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Sample records for allergen-specific ige antibodies

  1. [Radioimmunologic determination of total IgE and allergen-specific IgE-antibodies in diffuse neurodermitis].

    PubMed

    Pürschel, W; Zeidler, U; Kuse, M

    1975-10-01

    Total IgE levels in sera of 165 patients with atopic dermatitis and 79 patients with dermatoses as well as normal control patients were determined by radioimmunoassay (Phadebas, Pharmacia). Although the mean value for patients with atopic dermatitis was found far above the mean value for normal controls, 38% of patients showed total IgE serum levels within the normal range. Highest IgE serum levels were observed in patients with the generalized form of the disease and in patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis. No direct correlation however, to severity of disease could be found. In a series of 50 patients prick tests were compared to total IgE serum levels and to levels of allergen specific antibodies determined by radioallergosorbent-test (RAST). Extracts of grass pollens and of animal dandruff were used. There was complete agreement between results of skin testing and RAST in at least 80%. While cross reactions were common with grass pollen extracts in RAST, there was no cross-over with animal dandruff. No correlation was found between titer of allergen specific antibody and severity of skin lesions. IgE specific antibody could be detected in 48% of patients with normal total IgE serum levels and in 82% of patients with elevated values. PMID:1201945

  2. Factors affecting allergen-specific IgE serum levels in cats

    PubMed Central

    Belova, S.; Wilhelm, S.; Linek, M.; Beco, L.; Fontaine, J.; Bergvall, K.; Favrot, C.

    2012-01-01

    Pruritic skin diseases are common in cats and demand rigorous diagnostic workup for finding an underlying etiology. Measurement of a serum allergen-specific IgE in a pruritic cat is often used to make or confirm the diagnosis of a skin hypersensitivity disease, although current evidence suggests that elevated allergen-specific IgE do not always correlate with a clinical disease and vice versa. The aim of the study was to to assess the possible influence of age, deworming status, lifestyle, flea treatment, and gender on allergen-specific IgE levels and to evaluate the reliability of IgE testing in predicting the final diagnosis of a pruritic cat. For this purpose sera of 179 cats with pruritus of different causes and 20 healthy cats were evaluated for allergen-specific IgE against environmental, food and flea allergens using the Fc-epsilon receptor based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test. The results of the study showed positive correlation between age, outdoor life style, absence of deworming, absence of flea control measures and levels of allergen-specific IgE. Gender and living area (urban versus rural) did not seem to affect the formation of allergen-specific IgE. According to these findings, evaluating allergen-specific IgE levels, is not a reliable test to diagnose hypersensitivity to food or environmental allergens in cats. On the contrary, this test can be successfully used for diagnosing feline flea bite hypersensitivity. PMID:22754094

  3. Intra and inter-laboratory reproducibility of a monoclonal antibody cocktail based ELISA for detection of allergen specific IgE in dogs: proficiency monitoring of macELISA in six laboratories.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kenneth W; Blankenship, Karen D; McCurry, Zachary M; McKinney, Brennan; Ruffner, Rick; Esch, Robert E; Tambone, Cecilia; Faas, Rebecca; Hermes, Darren; Brazis, Pilar; Drouet, Laurent

    2012-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of results yielded using a monoclonal antibody based ELISA for detection of allergen specific IgE when run in six separate affiliated laboratories. On two separate occasions, duplicate samples of 15 different sera pools were independently evaluated by each laboratory in a single blinded fashion. The average intra-assay variance among reactive assay calibrators in all laboratories was 6.2% (range 2.6-18.2%), while the average intra-laboratory inter-assay variance was 12.1% (range 8.0-17.1%). The overall inter-assay inter-laboratory variance was consistent among laboratories and averaged 15.6% (range 15.1-16.6%). All laboratories yielded similar profiles and magnitudes of responses for replicate unknown samples; dose-response profiles observed in each of the laboratories were indistinguishable. Considering positive/negative results, inter-assay inter-laboratory concordance of results exceeded 95%. Correlation of OD values between and among all laboratories was strong (r>0.9, p<0.001). Correlation of OD values between the two separate evaluations was also high for all allergens except olive, which was attributed to lot-to-lot differences of allergen coated wells. Collectively, the results demonstrated that the monoclonal antibody based ELISA for measuring allergen specific canine IgE is reproducible, and documents that consistency of results can be achieved not only in an individual laboratory, but between laboratories using the same monoclonal-based ELISA.

  4. Allergen diagnosis microarray with high-density immobilization capacity using diamond-like carbon-coated chips for profiling allergen-specific IgE and other immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Koichi; Hiyoshi, Mineyoshi; Tada, Hitomi; Bando, Miwa; Ichioka, Takao; Kamemura, Norio; Kido, Hiroshi

    2011-11-14

    The diagnosis of antibody-mediated allergic disorders is based on clinical findings, skin prick tests and detection of allergen-specific IgE in serum. Here, we present a new microarray technique of high-density antigen immobilization using carboxylated arms on the surface of a diamond-like carbon (DLC)-coated chip. High immobilization capacity of antigen on DLC chip at (0.94-7.82)×10(9) molecules mm(-2) allowed the analysis of allergen-specific immunoglobulins against not only purified proteins but also natural allergen extracts with wide assay dynamic range. The higher sensitivity of the allergen-specific IgE detection on DLC chip was observed for comparison with the UniCAP system: the DLC chip allowed lowering the limit of dilution rate in UniCAP system to further dilution at 4-8-fold. High correlations (ρ>0.9-0.85) of allergen-specific IgE values determined by the DLC chip and UniCAP were found in most of 20 different allergens tested. The DLC chip was useful to determine allergen-induced antibodies of IgA, IgG, IgG1, and IgG4 in sera, apart from IgE, as well as secretory IgA in saliva against the same series of allergens on the chip in a minimal amount (1-2 μL) of sample.

  5. Sensitization rates of causative allergens for dogs with atopic dermatitis: detection of canine allergen-specific IgE.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Hee; Kim, Ha-Jung; Jang, Hye-Jin; Park, Hee-Myung

    2014-12-01

    Allergen-specific IgE serology tests became commercially available in the 1980s. Since then these tests have been widely used to diagnose and treat allergic skin diseases. However, the relationship between a positive reaction and disease occurrence has been controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate allergens using a serologic allergy test in dogs with atopic dermatitis (AD). Dogs clinically diagnosed with AD (n = 101) were tested using an allergen-specific IgE immunoassay. Among the total 92 environmental and food allergens, house dust and house dust mites were the most common. Several allergens including airborne pollens and molds produced positive reactions, and which was considered increasing allergens relating to the climate changes. The presence of antibodies against staphylococci and Malassezia in cases of canine AD was warranted in this study. Additionally, strong (chicken, turkey, brown rice, brewer's yeast, and soybean) and weakly (rabbit, vension, duck, and tuna) positive reactions to food allergens could be used for avoidance and limited-allergen trials. PMID:24962408

  6. Food allergen-specific serum IgG and IgE before and after elimination diets in allergic dogs.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Anja; Bexley, Jennifer; Halliwell, Richard E W; Mueller, Ralf S

    2011-12-15

    Serum food allergen-specific antibody testing is widely offered to identify suitable ingredients for diets to diagnose adverse food reaction (AFR) in dogs with allergic skin disease. Antibody concentrations in blood samples obtained during an unsuccessful diet to help in the choice of diet changes may be influenced by the previous diet. The objective of this paper was to measure food antigen-specific IgE and IgG for the most commonly used 16 food antigens before and after an elimination diet. Levels of food-specific serum IgE and IgG antibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Dogs had detectable IgE antibodies to beef, pork, lamb and cows' milk; and detectable IgG antibodies to beef, pork, lamb, cows' milk, chicken and turkey. Of 19 dogs with complete data sets, 14 dogs showed clear improvement during diet and in 7 dogs AFR could be diagnosed by deterioration on rechallenge and subsequent improvement on refeeding the diet. Serum was obtained before and 6-8 weeks after beginning such a diet. There was no significant difference in pre- and post-diet levels for any of the individual allergens nor for the total IgE and IgG concentrations of all antigens (P=0.55 and P=0.53 respectively). In these 19 dogs in which an elimination diet was used for the diagnosis of food allergy and in which 14 were probably food allergic and 7 were proven food allergic there were no significant differences in food-specific antibodies before and after an elimination diet of 6-8 weeks. PMID:21955446

  7. [The clinical picture is the most important reason to screen for the presence of allergen-specific IgE in children].

    PubMed

    Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C A F M

    2007-10-13

    The presence of allergen-specific IgE in serum is associated with sensitization, but the clinical relevance depends on the patient's history. It supports the diagnosis of an acute allergic response to inhalation or food allergens. The presence of allergen-specific IgE in the serum is not necessary for the diagnosis of asthma, perennial rhinitis or eczema; since allergen avoidance has no beneficial effect in these chronic allergic diseases, one should be critical about the relevance of testing for allergen-specific serum IgE. Screening tests for the presence of allergen-specific serum IgE are frequently used in children; a screening test consists of either 5 inhalant or 5 food allergens and if the test is positive, the laboratory will determine the specific IgE for each of the 5 allergens present in the test. This carries the risk of over-diagnosis if the clinical indication is not clear-cut. Furthermore, in children sensitized to grass pollen, the panel of inhalation and food allergens present in screening tests may lead to serological cross-reactivity with wheat; this increases the number of positive screening tests for food allergens without having clinical relevance. In conclusion, the use of screening tests for the presence of allergen-specific serum IgE should be looked at critically since it may unnecessarily increase the number of allergen-specific IgE tests.

  8. IgE ELISA using antisera derived from epsilon chain antigenic peptides detects allergen-specific IgE in allergic horses.

    PubMed

    Kalina, Warren V; Pettigrew, Howard D; Gershwin, Laurel J

    2003-05-12

    Equine disease with an allergic etiology is common. Environmental antigens most often implicated as allergens in horses include molds, dusty hay, grass pollen, hay dust mites, and insect saliva. Although intradermal testing with allergen is a useful diagnostic tool for some species, skin testing frequently produces false positive results in horses. Allergen deprivation as a diagnostic tool is often impossible and at best it is ineffective at diagnosing the specific allergic reactivity. Synthesis of IgE after exposure to allergen is the instigator of the allergic process. While IgE exerts its effect after binding strongly to mast cell Fc receptors, the presence of free IgE in the serum can be used to quantify and determine the allergen specificity of the allergic disease. A lack of widely available reagents for detection of equine IgE has limited this approach in horses. We have used the nucleotide sequence of equine IgE to prepare a peptide-based immunogen to elicit equine epsilon chain-specific antisera. Selection of peptides was based on antigenic attributes of the deduced amino acid sequence of the equine epsilon chain. Six peptides were selected for conjugation to carrier molecules and rabbit immunization. Of these, one peptide elicited antisera that was successfully used in enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) to screen horse serum from 64 allergic horses for allergen-specific IgE. Twenty-four of the 64 horses showed positive reactivity to one or more of the following allergens: grass, grain mill dust, mosquito, and horsefly. This study demonstrates the usefulness of peptide-based immunogens for development of antisera to rare or difficult to purify antigens such as IgE. Resultant antisera has great usefulness in diagnostic assays for equine allergy and as a research tool. PMID:12730014

  9. [Investigation of mold fungi in air samples of elementary schools and evaluation of allergen-specific IgE levels in students' sera].

    PubMed

    Ovet, Habibe; Ergin, Cağrı; Kaleli, Ilknur

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric fungal spores play important role in allergic reactions in atopic individuals. Monitorization of those spores found in the environment of atopic cases is crucial for the choice of the antigens that will be included in allergen screening procedures and precautions to be taken against mold-originated health problems. Since most of the people spend plenty of time indoors in recent years, the effects of exposure to indoor air fungi on human health have gained importance. This study was aimed to investigate the indoor air mold distribution of elementary schools in Denizli province (located in west Anatolia, Turkey) and to compare the allergen-specific IgE levels of children against the most frequently detected mold genus. A questionnaire (MM080) was distributed to the 4967 students (6-8 year-old) attending first and second degrees of 16 different elementary schools with scattered locations in city center. This questionnaire form included the questions related to the general information about the child, school environment, allergic complaints since last year, home environment and nutrition. Response rate to the questionnaire was 51.6% (2565/4967). Air samples were collected from 18 classrooms in March 2009, during which high rates of allergic symptoms were observed according to the questionnaire results. Mold fungi belonging to 10 different genera (Penicillium spp. 46%; Aspergillus spp. 18%; Cladosporium spp. 17%; Alternaria spp. 15%; Drechslera spp. 1%; Chrysosporium, Fusarium, Conidiobolus and Cladothecium species 0.5%; unidentified 1%) were isolated from indoor air of classrooms. Since the most frequently detected mold was Penicillium spp. (46%), the 48 children with atopic symptoms were called to the hospital for the determination of total IgE and Penicillium specific IgE in their sera. Twenty two students accepted the invitation and serum total IgE (Immulite 2000; Diagnostic Product Corporation, USA) and allergen-specific IgE (Penicillium brevicompactum

  10. Allergen-specific IgE in Icelandic horses with insect bite hypersensitivity and healthy controls, assessed by FcepsilonR1alpha-based serology.

    PubMed

    Frey, Rebecka; Bergvall, Kerstin; Egenvall, Agneta

    2008-11-15

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) and atopy can both be causes of pruritus in horses and are associated with allergen-specific IgE to biting insects and environmental allergens respectively. Information with respect to differences in IgE levels in diseased and healthy animals is crucial in enabling an understanding of the clinical relevance of results of allergen-specific IgE tests. The aim of this study was (i) to evaluate and compare levels of allergen-specific IgE, using an ELISA method, in Icelandic horses, with and without IBH, from Iceland and Sweden respectively; (ii) to investigate patterns of allergen-specific IgE to insects, pollens, moulds and mites in those groups of horses; and (iii) to investigate the clinical significance of employing two different cut-off levels for the ELISA. The study compromised a total number of 99 horses from Iceland and Sweden, with and without IBH, divided in 5 groups. Sera from the horses were analysed blindly with the use of Allercept , a non-competitive, solid-phase ELISA-test, designed to detect the presence of allergen-specific IgE in sera using the recombinant alpha chain of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcepsilonR1alpha). The distribution of the ELISA values was shown for each insect, mould, mite and pollen allergen, in the different groups using 10th, 50th and 90th percentiles. The use of two cut-off levels, 150 EA and 300 EA, did not eliminate the false positives. Horses with IBH had a higher number of positive reactions, counting all the 29 allergens, than healthy controls and this was borderline significant (P=0.053). In this study it was shown that serological testing with an ELISA that uses the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcepsilonR1alpha) is presently not suitable as a tool for establishing a diagnosis of IBH or equine atopy. The importance of establishing a correct cut-off level for the ELISA for the different allergens is emphasised.

  11. Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination with carrier-bound Bet v 1 peptides lacking allergen-specific T cell epitopes reduces Bet v 1-specific T cell responses via blocking antibodies in a murine model for birch pollen allergy

    PubMed Central

    Linhart, B; Narayanan, M; Focke-Tejkl, M; Wrba, F; Vrtala, S; Valenta, R

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaccines consisting of allergen-derived peptides lacking IgE reactivity and allergen-specific T cell epitopes bound to allergen-unrelated carrier molecules have been suggested as candidates for allergen-specific immunotherapy. Objective To study whether prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination with carrier-bound peptides from the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 lacking allergen-specific T cell epitopes has influence on Bet v 1-specific T cell responses. Methods Three Bet v 1-derived peptides, devoid of Bet v 1-specific T cell epitopes, were coupled to KLH and adsorbed to aluminium hydroxide to obtain a Bet v 1-specific allergy vaccine. Groups of BALB/c mice were immunized with the peptide vaccine before or after sensitization to Bet v 1. Bet v 1- and peptide-specific antibody responses were analysed by ELISA. T cell and cytokine responses to Bet v 1, KLH, and the peptides were studied in proliferation assays. The effects of peptide-specific and allergen-specific antibodies on T cell responses and allergic lung inflammation were studied using specific antibodies. Results Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination with carrier-bound Bet v 1 peptides induced a Bet v 1-specific IgG antibody response without priming/boosting of Bet v 1-specific T cells. Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination of mice with the peptide vaccine induced Bet v 1-specific antibodies which suppressed Bet v 1-specific T cell responses and allergic lung inflammation. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance Vaccination with carrier-bound allergen-derived peptides lacking allergen-specific T cell epitopes induces allergen-specific IgG antibodies which suppress allergen-specific T cell responses and allergic lung inflammation. PMID:24447086

  12. Update in the Mechanisms of Allergen-Specific Immunotheraphy

    PubMed Central

    Akkoc, Tunc; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2011-01-01

    Allergic diseases represent a complex innate and adoptive immune response to natural environmental allergens with Th2-type T cells and allergen-specific IgE predominance. Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the most effective therapeutic approach for disregulated immune response towards allergens by enhancing immune tolerance mechanisms. The main aim of immunotherapy is the generation of allergen nonresponsive or tolerant T cells in sensitized patients and downregulation of predominant T cell- and IgE-mediated immune responses. During allergen-specific immunotherapy, T regulatory cells are generated, which secrete IL-10 and induce allergen-specific B cells for the production of IgG4 antibodies. These mechanisms induce tolerance to antigens that reduces allergic symptoms. Although current knowledge highlights the role of T regulatory cell-mediated immunetolerance, definite mechanisms that lead to a successful clinical outcomes of allergen-specific immunotherapy still remains an open area of research. PMID:21217920

  13. Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells Derived from Donors with Natural Rubber Latex Allergy Modulate Allergen-Specific T-Cell Responses and IgE Production

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Alejandro; Aguirre, Adam; Guzmán, María Antonieta; González, Rodrigo; Catalán, Diego; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Larrondo, Milton; López, Mercedes; Pesce, Barbara; Rolland, Jennifer; O’Hehir, Robyn; Aguillón, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Natural rubber latex (NRL; Hevea brasiliensis) allergy is an IgE-mediated reaction to latex proteins. When latex glove exposure is the main sensitizing agent, Hev b 5 is one of the major allergens. Dendritic cells (DC), the main antigen presenting cells, modulated with pharmacological agents can restore tolerance in several experimental models, including allergy. In the current study, we aimed to generate DC with tolerogenic properties from NRL-allergic patients and evaluate their ability to modulate allergen-specific T and B cell responses. Here we show that dexamethasone-treated DC (dxDC) differentiated into a subset of DC, characterized by low expression of MHC class II, CD40, CD80, CD86 and CD83 molecules. Compared with LPS-matured DC, dxDC secreted lower IL-12 and higher IL-10 after CD40L activation, and induced lower alloantigenic T cell proliferation. We also show that dxDC pulsed with the dominant Hev b 5 T-cell epitope peptide, Hev b 546–65, inhibited both proliferation of Hev b 5-specific T-cell lines and the production of Hev b 5-specific IgE. Additionally, dxDC induced a subpopulation of IL-10-producing regulatory T cells that suppressed proliferation of Hev b 5-primed T cells. In conclusion, dxDC generated from NRL-allergic patients can modulate allergen-specific T-cell responses and IgE production, supporting their potential use in allergen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:24465795

  14. Effects of geohelminth infection and age on the associations between allergen-specific IgE, skin test reactivity and wheeze: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Moncayo, A-L; Vaca, M; Oviedo, G; Workman, L J; Chico, M E; Platts-Mills, T A E; Rodrigues, L C; Barreto, M L; Cooper, P J

    2013-01-01

    Background Most childhood asthma in poor populations in Latin America is not associated with aeroallergen sensitization, an observation that could be explained by the attenuation of atopy by chronic helminth infections or effects of age. Objective To explore the effects of geohelminth infections and age on atopy, wheeze, and the association between atopy and wheeze. Methods A case-control study was done in 376 subjects (149 cases and 227 controls) aged 7–19 years living in rural communities in Ecuador. Wheeze cases, identified from a large cross-sectional survey, had recent wheeze and controls were a random sample of those without wheeze. Atopy was measured by the presence of allergen-specific IgE (asIgE) and skin prick test (SPT) responses to house dust mite and cockroach. Geohelminth infections were measured in stools and anti-Ascaris IgE in plasma. Results The fraction of recent wheeze attributable to anti-Ascaris IgE was 45.9%, while those for SPT and asIgE were 10.0% and 10.5% respectively. The association between atopy and wheeze was greater in adolescents than children. Although Anti-Ascaris IgE was strongly associated with wheeze (adj. OR 2.24 (95% CI 1.33–3.78, P = 0.003) and with asIgE (adj. OR 5.34, 95% CI 2.49–11.45, P < 0.001), the association with wheeze was independent of asIgE. There was some evidence that the association between atopy and wheeze was greater in uninfected subjects compared with those with active geohelminth infections. Conclusions and clinical relevance Atopy to house dust mite and cockroach explained few wheeze cases in our study population, while the presence of anti-Ascaris IgE was an important risk factor. Our data provided only limited evidence that active geohelminth infections attenuated the association between atopy and wheeze in endemic areas or that age modified this association. The role of allergic sensitization to Ascaris in the development of wheeze, independent of atopy, requires further investigation. PMID

  15. Airway inflammation and IgE production induced by dust mite allergen-specific memory/effector Th2 cell line can be effectively attenuated by IL-35.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Hui; Loo, Evelyn Xiu-Ling; Kuo, I-Chun; Soh, Gim Hooi; Goh, Denise Li-Meng; Lee, Bee Wah; Chua, Kaw Yan

    2011-07-01

    CD4(+) memory/effector T cells play a central role in orchestrating the rapid and robust immune responses upon re-encounter with specific Ags. However, the immunologic mechanism(s) underlying these responses are still not fully understood. To investigate this, we generated an allergen (major house dust mite allergen, Blo t 5)-specific murine Th2 cell line that secreted IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13, but not IL-9 or TNF-α, upon activation by the cognate Ag. These cells also exhibited CD44(high)CD62L(-) and CD127(+) (IL-7Rα(+)) phenotypes, which are characteristics of memory/effector T cells. Experiments involving adoptive transfer of this Th2 cell line in mice, followed by three intranasal challenges with Blo t 5, induced a dexamethasone-sensitive eosinophilic airway inflammation. This was accompanied by elevation of Th2 cytokines and CC- and CXC-motif chemokines, as well as recruitment of lymphocytes and polymorphic mononuclear cells into the lungs. Moreover, Blo t 5-specific IgE was detected 4 d after the last intranasal challenge, whereas elevation of Blo t 5-specific IgG1 was found at week two. Finally, pulmonary delivery of the pVAX-IL-35 DNA construct effectively downregulated Blo t 5-specific allergic airway inflammation, and i.m. injection of pVAX-IL-35 led to long-lasting suppression of circulating Blo t 5-specific and total IgE. This model provides a robust research tool to elucidate the immunopathogenic role of memory/effector Th2 cells in allergic airway inflammation. Our results suggested that IL-35 could be a potential therapeutic target for allergic asthma through its attenuating effects on allergen-specific CD4(+) memory/effector Th2 cell-mediated airway inflammation.

  16. Oral sensitization with shrimp tropomyosin induces in mice allergen-specific IgE, T cell response and systemic anaphylactic reactions.

    PubMed

    Capobianco, Francescamaria; Butteroni, Cinzia; Barletta, Bianca; Corinti, Silvia; Afferni, Claudia; Tinghino, Raffaella; Boirivant, Monica; Di Felice, Gabriella

    2008-08-01

    Appropriate murine models of shrimp tropomyosin (ST) allergy would be useful in investigating the mechanisms underlying food allergy in human subjects, as well as for the pre-clinical evaluation of efficacy and safety of novel therapeutic approaches. These models should mimic immune and clinical features of human disease, including anaphylactic response. We sensitized C3H/HeJ mice by the oral route with purified ST using cholera toxin (CT) as adjuvant. ST-specific IgE, IgG1, IgG2a and IgA responses were evaluated by ELISA. Spleen cell proliferation and cytokine production by allergen-specific activation were assessed. Jejunum and colon fragments were collected to evaluate the local expression of cytokine genes by PCR. Local and systemic anaphylactic reactions induced by oral ST challenge were scored according to symptoms observed. Faecal samples were collected to assess local IgA production and histamine levels. Oral sensitization with ST plus CT induced in mice significant levels of serum IgE and IgG1 and faecal IgA. ST-specific cell proliferation and IL-4, IL-13 and IFN-gamma cytokine production were induced in the spleen. After oral challenge, 100% of mice had anaphylactic symptoms while no symptoms were observed in challenged naive mice. Faecal histamine content after ST challenge appeared significantly increased in sensitized mice when compared with that observed in pre-immune mice. Jejunum mRNA expression of T(h)2 cytokines was up-regulated by ST sensitization. These results support the importance of the oral way of sensitization and of the in-depth characterization of the anaphylactic response for the development of a suitable in vivo model of food allergy.

  17. Intratracheal exposure to Fab fragments of an allergen-specific monoclonal antibody regulates asthmatic responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Shin; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Matsuoka, Daiko; Sae-Wong, Chutha

    2014-01-01

    Fab fragments (Fabs) maintain the ability to bind to specific antigens but lack effector functions due to the absence of the Fc portion. In the present study, we tested whether Fabs of an allergen-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) were able to regulate asthmatic responses in mice. Asthmatic responses were induced in BALB/c mice by passive sensitization with anti-ovalbumin (OVA) polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) (day 0) and by active sensitization with OVA (days 0 and 14), followed by intratracheal (i.t.) challenge with OVA on day 1 and days 28, 29, 30 and 35. Fabs prepared by the digestion of an anti-OVA IgG1 (O1-10) mAb with papain were i.t. administered only once 30 min before antigenic challenge on day 1 or day 35. The results showed that i.t. administration of O1-10 Fabs with OVA markedly suppressed the early and/or late phases of asthmatic responses caused by passive and active sensitization. Similar results were obtained when Fabs of anti-OVA IgG2b mAb (O2B-3) were i.t. administered. In contrast, neither i.t. injection of intact 01-10/O2B-3 nor systemic injection of O1-10 Fabs suppressed the asthmatic responses. In vitro studies revealed that the capture of OVA by O1-10 Fabs prevented the subsequent binding of intact anti-OVA pAbs to the captured OVA. These results suggest that asthmatic responses may be down-regulated by the i.t. exposure to Fabs of an allergen-specific mAb via a mechanism involving the capture of allergen by Fabs in the respiratory tract before the interaction of intact antibody and allergen essential for the induction of asthmatic responses. PMID:24303921

  18. Allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Harold S; Norman, Philip S

    2014-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy was introduced for the treatment of grass pollen-induced hay fever in 1911. The treatment was soon extended to other pollens as well as perennial allergens, and to the treatment of bronchial asthma. Definitive studies of its efficacy for both rhinitis and asthma came only many decades later. Understanding gradually emerged of the underlying immunologic mechanisms that include the generation of regulatory T lymphocytes, immune deviation from allergen-specific Th2 to Th1 responses, and a shift in allergen-specific antibody production from immunoglobulin (Ig) E to IgG4. Along with understanding of the immune basis came an appreciation that immunotherapy modifies allergic disease expression, producing protection against disease progression and symptomatic improvement that persists for years after the treatment is discontinued. Recent new directions for immunotherapy include sublingual administration of inhalant allergens and use of the oral route to treat food allergy.

  19. Allergen-specific regulation of allergic rhinitis in mice by intranasal exposure to IgG1 monoclonal antibody Fab fragments against pathogenic allergen.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Daiko; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Sae-Wong, Chutha; Yoshino, Shin

    2014-09-01

    Fab fragments (Fabs) have the ability to bind to specific antigens but lack the Fc portion for binding to receptors on immune and inflammatory cells that play a critical role in allergic diseases. In the present study, we investigated whether Fabs of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) inhibited allergic rhinitis in mice. BALB/c mice sensitized by intraperitoneal injections of ovalbumin (OVA) plus alum on days 0 and 14 were intranasally challenged with OVA on days 28-30, and 35. Fabs prepared by the digestion of an anti-OVA IgG1 mAb (O1-10) with papain were also intranasally administered 15min before each OVA challenge. The results showed that treatment with O1-10 Fabs significantly suppressed the sneezing frequency, associated with decrease of OVA-specific IgE in the serum and infiltration by mast cells in the nasal mucosa seen following the fourth antigenic challenge; additionally, the level of mouse mast cell protease-1, a marker of mast cell activation, in serum was decreased. Furthermore, infiltration of eosinophils and goblet cell hyperplasia in the nasal mucosa at the fourth challenge were inhibited by treatment with O1-10 Fabs. In conclusion, these results suggest that intranasal exposure to Fabs of a pathogenic antigen-specific IgG1 mAb may be effective in regulating allergic rhinitis through allergen capture by Fabs in the nasal mucosa before the interaction of the intact antibody and allergen.

  20. IgE antibodies in toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Matowicka-Karna, Joanna; Kemona, Halina

    2014-05-15

    Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide infection caused by the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. At least a third of the world human population is infected with the parasite, making it one of the most successful parasitic infections. Primary maternal infection may cause health-threatening sequelae for the fetus, or even cause death of the uterus. Reactivation of a latent infection in immune deficiency conditions such as AIDS and organ transplantation can cause fatal toxoplasmic encephalitis. Toxoplasmosis is a major cause of chorioretinitis, especially in individuals with impaired immune systems. In the acute phase, directly after invading the body, T. gondii begins to multiply rapidly. In the majority of cases acquired toxoplasmosis is asymptomatic. In the second week of infection, specific IgM antibodies are present in the blood. IgE antibodies appear at the same time, slightly preceding specific IgA antibodies. The concentration of IgE can be one of the parameters used for diagnosing an infection with T. gondii. Laboratory diagnosis, i.e. IgE and serologic assays, plays the main role in the diagnosis of congenital infection and assists in the confirmatory diagnosis of toxoplasmic encephalitis and ocular toxoplasmosis. This article is a review of IgE in toxoplasmosis.

  1. Topical skin treatment with Fab fragments of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody suppresses allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Sae-Wong, Chutha; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Kangsanant, Sureeporn; Yoshino, Shin

    2016-05-15

    Fab fragments (Fabs), which lack effector functions due to the absence of the Fc portion, maintain the ability to bind to specific allergens. In the present study, we examined whether Fabs of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) were able to regulate allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice. BALB/c mice passively sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE mAb were repeatedly challenged with OVA applied to the skin after sodium dodecyl sulfate treatment. Fabs prepared by the digestion of anti-OVA IgG1 mAb (O1-10) with papain were applied to the skin 30min before the OVA challenges followed by measurement of clinical symptoms including erythema/hemorrhage, edema, scarring/dryness, and excoriation/erosion of the skin. Treatment with O1-10 Fabs, but not intact O1-10, showed inhibition of clinical symptoms (P<0.01) induced by the repeated OVA challenges in the sensitized mice; O1-10 Fabs suppressed histological changes such as epidermal hyperplasia (P<0.01) and the accumulation of mast cells (P<0.01) and neutrophils (P<0.01). Furthermore, treatment with O1-10 Fabs inhibited the increase in levels of IL-13 (P<0.01) and IL-17A production (P<0.05) in the lymph nodes of the sensitized mice. Additionally, the increased level of OVA in serum following the repeated OVA challenges in the sensitized mice was reduced by the treatment (P<0.05). These results suggest that topical application of pathogenic allergen-specific IgG1 mAb Fabs to the skin of mice is effective in suppressing allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions, suggesting that allergen-specific mAb Fabs could be used as a tool to regulate allergen-induced atopic dermatitis. PMID:26970183

  2. Use of humanized rat basophilic leukemia reporter cell lines as a diagnostic tool for detection of allergen-specific IgE in allergic patients: time for a reappraisal?

    PubMed

    Falcone, Franco H; Alcocer, Marcos J C; Okamoto-Uchida, Yoshimi; Nakamura, Ryosuke

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between allergens and specific IgE is at the heart of the allergic response and as such lies at the center of techniques used for diagnosis of allergic sensitization. Although serological tests are available, in vivo tests such as double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFC) and skin prick test (SPT) associated to the patients' clinical history are still the main guides to clinicians in many practices around the world. More recently, complex protein arrays and basophil activation tests, requiring only small amounts of whole blood, have been developed and refined, but are yet to enter clinical practice. Similarly, the use of rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cell lines for detection of allergen-specific IgE has been made possible by stable transfection of the human FcεRI α chain into this cell line more than 20 years ago, but has not found widespread acceptance among clinicians. Here, we review the perceived limitations of diagnostic applications of humanized RBL systems. Furthermore, we illustrate how the introduction of reporter genes into humanized RBL cells is able to overcome most of these limitations, and has the potential to become a new powerful tool to complement the armamentarium of allergists. A demonstration of the usefulness of humanized RBL reporter systems for elucidation of complex IgE sensitization patterns against wheat proteins and a section on the use of fluorescence-based reporter systems in combination with allergen arrays close the review. PMID:26452547

  3. Comparison of VIDAS Stallertest and Pharmacia CAP assays for detection of specific IgE antibodies in allergic children.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Myung Hyun; Lee, Soo-Young; Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Kyu-Earn

    2005-01-01

    In vitro determination of specific IgE antibodies in serum is the most frequently used method, besides the skin test, for diagnosing allergies. Standardized and reproducible assays of specific IgE antibodies contribute to the quality of diagnosis and treatment of allergic disease. This study compared the results and performance characteristics of the Pharmacia CAP system and a new specific IgE method using the VIDAS Stallertest (manufactured by bioMériux). To evaluate their clinical efficiency, the results of the CAP and VIDAS Stallertest assays were compared with skin prick test (SPT) results. After allergic patients completed SPTs, serum samples were collected and CAP and VIDAS Stallertest assays were performed to determine specific IgEs for Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus, cockroach, and alternaria. For egg and milk, we measured only the correlation between the 2 in vitro assays. When SPT was used as a reference standard, the sensitivity and specificity of the CAP assay was a little higher in respect to all inhalant allergens. There were significant correlations between the results of VIDAS Stallertest and CAP assays for IgE antibodies to inhalant and food allergens. This study indicates that the VIDAS Stallertest and Pharmacia CAP assays are feasible and replicable for measuring allergen-specific IgE. PMID:16081590

  4. IgE antibodies against snake venoms.

    PubMed

    Alonso, A; Scavini, L M; Marino, G A; Rodríguez, S M

    1995-01-01

    A similar event was detected in the clinical records of a small group of atopic patients living in the northern provinces of Argentina, i.e., they were bitten by a snake of the Bothrops species (or yarará) during their rural activities (woodcutters, cattle-drivers and farmers). Those who were bitten twice suffered an acute episode of hives and angioedema within 15 minutes after the snake bite. The presence of specific antibodies against Bothrops alternata (Ba) extract was detected by means of RAST for IgE and Ouchterlony and Boyden for IgG. The Ouchterlony also demonstrated crossreactivity among the venoms of the Bothrops species and the positivity of the six fractions obtained by DEAE-cellulose column fractionation against the horse anti-Ba serum. The Ba antigen induced a definite inhibition of the RAST. We presume that hives and angioedema in atopic patients immediately after a second snake bite could be attributed to the presence of a specific IgE antibody against the venom, and must not be misinterpreted with the toxic effects that appear later. PMID:7551202

  5. Allergy Work-Up Including Component-Resolved Diagnosis: How to Make Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy More Specific.

    PubMed

    Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Matricardi, Paolo M; Hamilton, Robert G

    2016-02-01

    Symptoms are recorded by obtaining a clinical history. Allergen sensitization is demonstrated by skin prick test or allergen-specific IgE serology. IgE sensitizations to allergen sources can be identified knowing the relationship between major aeroallergens and homologous allergen families. Some develop allergic sensitization to pan-allergens. Allergen extracts do not allow definitive separation of the sources. IgE antibody analysis of the major allergenic molecules facilitates differentiation of sensitizing allergen sources. IgE sensitizations to inhalant allergens are only relevant in the case of corresponding symptoms. In questionable cases, conjunctival or nasal provocation tests help induce confirmatory symptoms and identify relevant allergens for immunotherapy.

  6. Quantitative IgE antibody assays in allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Yunginger, J W; Ahlstedt, S; Eggleston, P A; Homburger, H A; Nelson, H S; Ownby, D R; Platts-Mills, T A; Sampson, H A; Sicherer, S H; Weinstein, A M; Williams, P B; Wood, R A; Zeiger, R S

    2000-06-01

    During the past several years, immunoassays for specific IgE antibodies have been refined to permit reporting results in mass units. Thus quantitative immunoassays for IgE antibodies may be an adjunct to skin tests. In cases of food allergy among children with atopic dermatitis, cutoff values for IgE antibody concentrations to egg, milk, peanut, and fish have been derived to provide 95% positive and 90% negative predictive values. Food-specific IgE antibody determinations can also be used to predict which food allergies are resolving spontaneously. Elevated egg-specific IgE antibody levels in infancy are associated with significantly increased risk for development of inhalant allergies later in childhood. In cases of inhalant allergy, specific IgE antibody levels correlate closely with results of inhalation challenge studies in cat-sensitive persons. Also, mite-specific IgE antibody levels correlate significantly with the mite allergen contents of reservoir dust in the homes of mite-sensitive persons. Immunoassays for quantitation of specific IgE antibodies may be used to document allergen sensitization over time and to evaluate the risk of reaction on allergen exposure. However, immunoassays and skin tests are not entirely interchangeable, and neither will replace the other in appropriate circumstances.

  7. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy: multiple suppressor factors at work in immune tolerance to allergens.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2014-03-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been used for more than 100 years as a desensitizing therapy for IgE-mediated allergic diseases and represents a potentially curative way of treatment. The mechanisms of action of AIT include the induction of very early desensitization of mast cells and basophils; generation of regulatory T and regulatory B (Breg) cell responses; regulation of IgE and IgG4; decreases in numbers and activity of eosinophils and mast cells in mucosal allergic tissues; and decreases in the activity of basophils in circulation. Skewing of allergen-specific effector T and effector B cells to a regulatory phenotype appears as a key event in the course of AIT and normal immune response to allergens. Recently, inducible IL-10-secreting Breg cells were also demonstrated to contribute to allergen tolerance through suppression of effector T cells and selective induction of IgG4 isotype antibodies. Allergen-specific regulatory T and Breg cells orchestrate a general immunoregulatory activity, which can be summarized as suppression of cytokines from inflammatory dendritic cells; suppression of effector TH1, TH2, and TH17 cells; suppression of allergen-specific IgE and induction of IgG4; and suppression of migration of mast cells, basophils, eosinophils, and effector T cells to tissues. A detailed knowledge of the mechanisms of AIT is not only important in designing the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases but might also find applications in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, organ transplantation, chronic infection, and cancer.

  8. [Clinical research of specific IgE and IgG4 antibody in allergic children. Correlation specific IgE antibody to specific IgG4 antibody to food allergen].

    PubMed

    Koya, N; Suzuki, S; Hara, M; Nagata, K; Tateno, A; Moroi, T; Iikura, Y

    1989-06-01

    We analysed the correlation specific IgE antibodies to specific IgG4 antibodies to food allergens in 150 asthmatic children by Multiple Factor Analysis-Type II and examined the role of both antibodies. The following results were obtained. 1) Of soybean, there was the stronger influence power between specific IgE and IgG4 antibody than the other 2 food allergens. 2) IgE antibody to soybean had the strong influence power to IgG4 antibodies to egg white and cow's milk and IgG4 antibody to soybean had same influence power to IgE antibodies to egg white and cow's milk. So, the specific IgE and IgG4 antibodies to soybean may be play the role of "the bride" between specific IgE antibody group and specific IgG4 antibody group of food allergens.

  9. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy and immune tolerance to allergens.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2015-01-01

    Substantial progress in understanding mechanisms of immune regulation in allergy, asthma, autoimmune diseases, tumors, organ transplantation and chronic infections has led to a variety of targeted therapeutic approaches. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been used for 100 years as a desensitizing therapy for allergic diseases and represents the potentially curative and specific way of treatment. The mechanisms by which allergen-AIT has its mechanisms of action include the very early desensitization effects, modulation of T- and B-cell responses and related antibody isotypes as well as inhibition of migration of eosinophils, basophils and mast cells to tissues and release of their mediators. Regulatory T cells (Treg) have been identified as key regulators of immunological processes in peripheral tolerance to allergens. Skewing of allergen-specific effector T cells to a regulatory phenotype appears as a key event in the development of healthy immune response to allergens and successful outcome in AIT. Naturally occurring FoxP3(+) CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells and inducible type 1 Treg (Tr1) cells contribute to the control of allergen-specific immune responses in several major ways, which can be summarized as suppression of dendritic cells that support the generation of effector T cells; suppression of effector Th1, Th2 and Th17 cells; suppression of allergen-specific IgE, and induction of IgG4; suppression of mast cells, basophils and eosinophils and suppression of effector T cell migration to tissues. New strategies for immune intervention will likely include targeting of the molecular mechanisms of allergen tolerance and reciprocal regulation of effector and regulatory T cell subsets.

  10. A comparison of intradermal testing and detection of allergen-specific immunoglobulin E in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in horses affected with skin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Erin E; Miller, William H; Wagner, Bettina

    2007-12-15

    Skin hypersensitivities (allergies) in horses are often diagnosed using clinical signs only. Intradermal testing or serological assays are diagnostic options to confirm the allergic nature of the disease and to identify the allergen(s). Our objective was to develop an allergen-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a monoclonal antibody specific for horse IgE and to examine its potential for allergen detection in serum in comparison to intradermal testing. Intradermal testing with 61 allergen extracts was performed on 10 horses affected with skin hypersensitivity. Their sera were analyzed by ELISA for IgE antibodies to the same allergens. The kappa test of concordance was used for comparison of the results of both tests. Out of 61 allergen extracts, only two (Timothy and Quack) had kappa values greater than 0.60, suggesting a substantial agreement between skin testing and IgE ELISA. The statistical comparison of the remaining 59 allergens showed little or no concordance between the tests beyond chance. To identify parameters that may influence the sensitivity of the ELISA, the assay was modified to detect allergen-specific IgGb and IgG(T) in serum, and the protein content in all allergen extracts was determined by SDS-PAGE. The commercial allergen extracts revealed a high variation in detectable protein. High concentrations of allergen-specific IgG in horse serum were found to compete with IgE for binding to the plates. In conclusion, an ELISA using whole serum and crude allergen preparations provides limited diagnostic information in horses. The reliable diagnosis of allergens in equine skin hypersensitivity is essential to improve allergen-specific treatments, such as hyposensitization, or the development of allergy vaccines.

  11. Grass immunotherapy induces inhibition of allergen-specific human peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Baskar, S; Hamilton, R G; Norman, P S; Ansari, A A

    1997-02-01

    The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from humans allergic to grass pollens (GR+ subjects) show strong in vitro proliferative responses to purified allergens from Lolium perenne pollen Lol p 1, and to a lesser extent to Lol p 2 and Lol p 3. By contrast, PBMC from grass allergic patients undergoing immunotherapy (GR + IT subjects) exhibit a very poor Lol p-specific proliferative response, similar to that observed in nongrass allergic subjects (GR-subjects). Unlike GR-subjects, both GR+ and GR + IT subjects have high levels of antigen-specific serum IgG and IgE antibodies to Lol p 1, Lol p 2 and Lol p 3. While GR+ subjects exhibit a significant correlation between antigen-specific serum antibody and PBMC responses, GR + IT subjects do not show a correlation between the two responses. The possible mechanisms by which immunotherapy may modulate allergen-specific T cell proliferative response are discussed.

  12. IgE Antibody Detection and Component Analysis in Patients with Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Erwin, Elizabeth A.; Tripathi, Anubha; Ogbogu, Princess U.; Commins, Scott P.; Slack, Maria A.; Cho, Christine B.; Hamilton, Robert G.; Workman, Lisa J.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although IgE antibodies to cow's milk and wheat are common in patients with EoE, titers are low and responses to diet are not dependent on having IgE antibodies. Objective To better define specific IgE antibody responses to foods, focusing on those foods that appear to play a role in EoE. Methods Adult (n=46) and pediatric (n=51) EoE patients were recruited for skin prick testing and serum measurement (whole and diluted) of IgE specific for aeroallergens, food extracts and component allergens by ImmunoCAP. Immuno Solid-phase Allergen Chip (ISAC) analysis was also used to measure IgE to 112 allergen molecules. Results In adults and children, there was a higher prevalence of sensitization to food extracts by ImmunoCAP compared with skin prick testing. Using ISAC to assess the specificity of IgE antibodies to 112 allergen molecules, results for food allergens were mostly negative. In contrast, ImmunoCAP assays for specific milk allergens gave positive IgE antibody results in 31/34 sera. The correlations between specific IgE antibody to Bosidi4 or Bos d 5 and milk extract were strong (R=0.89 and R=0.76 respectively; p<0.001). The evidence that IgE to foods was directed at minor components of the extracts was further supported by measurements on diluted sera. Conclusion The IgE responses in cow's milk sensitized EoE patients are frequently to whey proteins Bos d 4 and Bos d 5, minor components of the extract. These IgE assays may be able to identify the proteins that are relevant to EoE even though IgE is not the primary mechanism. PMID:26099818

  13. Sequential class switching is required for the generation of high affinity IgE antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Huizhong; Dolpady, Jayashree; Wabl, Matthias; Curotto de Lafaille, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    IgE antibodies with high affinity for their antigens can be stably cross-linked at low concentrations by trace amounts of antigen, whereas IgE antibodies with low affinity bind their antigens weakly. In this study, we find that there are two distinct pathways to generate high and low affinity IgE. High affinity IgE is generated through sequential class switching (μ→γ→ε) in which an intermediary IgG phase is necessary for the affinity maturation of the IgE response, where the IgE inherits somatic hypermutations and high affinity from the IgG1 phase. In contrast, low affinity IgE is generated through direct class switching (μ→ε) and is much less mutated. Mice deficient in IgG1 production cannot produce high affinity IgE, even after repeated immunizations. We demonstrate that a small amount of high affinity IgE can cause anaphylaxis and is pathogenic. Low affinity IgE competes with high affinity IgE for binding to Fcε receptors and prevents anaphylaxis and is thus beneficial. PMID:22249450

  14. Seed-based oral vaccines as allergen-specific immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Takaiwa, Fumio

    2011-03-01

    Plant-based vaccines have advantages over conventional vaccines in terms of scalability, lack of requirement for cold chain logistics, stability, safety, cost-effectiveness and needle-free administration. In particular, when antigen is expressed in seeds, high production is possible and immunogenicity is not lost even if stocked at ambient temperature for several years. Induction of immune tolerance (desensitization) to allergen is a principle strategy for controlling allergic diseases, and is generally carried out by subcutaneous injection. Seed-based oral administration offers a straightforward and inexpensive alternative approach to deliver vaccines effectively to the GALT without loss of activity. Consumption of transgenic seeds containing modified hypo-allergenic tolerogen or T-cell epitope peptides derived from allergens has no or very few severe side effects and can induce immune tolerance leading to reduction of allergen-specific IgE production, T-cell proliferation and release of histamine. Suppression of allergen-specific clinical symptoms results. Thus, seed-based allergy vaccines offer an innovative and convenient allergen-specific immunotherapeutic approach as an alternative to conventional allergen-specific immunotherapy.

  15. IgE antibody responses in young children with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Wahn, U; Warner, J; Simons, F E R; de Benedictis, F M; Diepgen, T L; Naspitz, C K; de Longueville, M; Bauchau, V

    2008-06-01

    In 2184 young children aged 13-24 months with atopic dermatitis (SCORAD 5-59) serum IgE antibodies to a standard panel of food and inhalant allergens were assayed. The frequency of positive IgE responses (>0.35 kU/l) increased with greater severity of skin disease. A significant minority of infants had levels of IgE antibody to foods to suggest they were at risk of acute reaction to those foods (7% to hen's egg, 3% to cow's milk, 4% to peanut). Our findings indicate that the frequency of positive IgE responses is related to disease severity and suggest that differences in the time course of the development of IgE responses to food, which are at maximum prevalence within the first year of life, while inhalant allergies, are still developing between 1 and 2 yr and beyond.

  16. Increased IgE antibody responses in rats exposed to tobacco smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Zetterstroem, O.N.; Nordvall, S.L.; Bjoerksten, B.A.; Ahlstedt, S.; Stelander, M.

    1985-05-01

    Raised serum IgE levels were found in a high proportion of rats that had been exposed to tobacco smoke twice daily 5 days a week for 8 wk in a Dontenville-type smoking machine. Levels above 1 ng/ml of IgE were found in nine of 20 animals exposed to cigarette smoke and in five of 20 rats exposed to smoke from cigarettes with 1.45% phenylmethyloxidiazole added for possible protection against the effects of the smoke. None of the 20 control rats exhibited similarly increased serum IgE. Exposure to tobacco smoke did not significantly affect the serum concentrations of IgM and IgG. The development of specific IgE and IgG antibodies was also influenced by tobacco smoke exposure. Rats exposed to ovalbumin aerosol developed increased levels of IgG and IgE antibodies, whereas no effect on the development of antibody titers was found in rats immunized by the subcutaneous route. This study demonstrates that exposure to tobacco smoke increases serum IgE levels and enhances sensitization via the airways by a local effect, thus supporting the mucosal theory of atopy.

  17. Diisocyanates, occupational asthma and IgE antibody: implications for hazard characterization.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Ian; Dearman, Rebecca J; Basketter, David A

    2014-10-01

    Sensitization of the respiratory tract by chemicals resulting in rhinitis and asthma is an important occupational health issue. Occupational asthma is associated with significant morbidity and can be fatal. Tests for the identification and characterization of chemicals with the potential to cause sensitization of the respiratory tract are lacking. In spite of sustained interest there are no validated or widely accepted methods available, and this presents toxicologists with a considerable challenge. One important constraint on the development of appropriate testing strategies has been uncertainty and controversy about the immunological mechanisms through which chemicals may induce sensitization of the respiratory tract. By analogy with protein respiratory allergy it is legitimate to consider that IgE antibody-dependent mechanisms may play a pivotal role. However, although many aspects of chemical respiratory allergy are consistent with reactions caused by IgE antibody, uncertainty remains because among patients with occupational asthma caused by chemical respiratory allergens there are commonly a proportion, and sometimes a significant proportion, of subjects that lack detectable IgE antibody. Here we consider the relevance of IgE antibody responses for the development of a chemical respiratory allergy to diisocyanates. A case is made that IgE antibody responses are, either directly or indirectly, closely associated with occupational asthma to the diisocyanates (and to other chemical respiratory allergens). As such the argument is advanced here that IgE antibody represents an appropriate readout for the characterization of chemical respiratory allergens, and that uncertainty about mode of action should no longer represent a hurdle in the development of suitable test methods.

  18. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (allergen-SIT) is a potentially curative treatment approach in allergic diseases. It has been used for almost 100 years as a desensitizing therapy. The induction of peripheral T cell tolerance and promotion of the formation of regulatory T-cells are key mechanisms in allergen-SIT. Both FOXP3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and inducible IL-10- and TGF-β-producing type 1 Treg (Tr1) cells may prevent the development of allergic diseases and play a role in successful allergen-SIT and healthy immune response via several mechanisms. The mechanisms of suppression of different pro-inflammatory cells, such as eosinophils, mast cells and basophils and the development of allergen tolerance also directly or indirectly involves Treg cells. Furthermore, the formation of non-inflammatory antibodies particularly IgG4 is induced by IL-10. Knowledge of these molecular basis is crucial in the understanding the regulation of immune responses and their possible therapeutic targets in allergic diseases. PMID:22409879

  19. Allergen-specific immunotherapy in atopic eczema.

    PubMed

    Darsow, Ulf; Forer, Ingeborg; Ring, Johannes

    2011-08-01

    Aeroallergens are relevant eliciting factors of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma but also of atopic eczema. The use of allergen-specific immunotherapy as in respiratory atopic diseases is controversial in patients with atopic eczema, but refined diagnostic methods to characterize subgroups of patients with relevant allergies and the results of smaller controlled studies give rise to new approaches in this field. This article reviews the theoretical problems and practical results associated with allergen-specific immunotherapy in atopic eczema. PMID:21461718

  20. Clonal differences in IgE antibodies affect cutaneous anaphylaxis-associated thermal sensitivity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Madison; Tonc, Elena; Ashbaugh, Alyssa; Wetzel, Abigail; Sykes, Akilah; Engblom, Camilla; Shabani, Estela; Mora-Solano, Carolina; Trier, Anna; Swanson, Linnea; Ewan, Emily; Martinov, Tijana; Chatterjea, Devavani

    2014-01-01

    Cellular and molecular mediators of immune responses are increasingly implicated in acute and chronic pain pathophysiologies. Here we demonstrate that passive cutaneous IgE/Ag anaphylaxis provokes increased thermal sensitivity in the hind paw tissue of mice. The murine anti-DNP IgE antibodies SPE-7 and ε26 are known to induce differential cytokine production in bone marrow cultured mast cells in vitro without antigen challenge. We found a novel, antigen-dependent heterogeneity in the thermal pain responses elicited in the hind paws between SPE-7 and ε26 sensitized DNP-challenged mice. Mice experienced pronounced hind paw thermal sensitivity lasting 6 hours after DNP challenge when sensitized with SPE-7 but not ε26 IgE. The two IgE clones induced equivalent hind paw edema, neutrophil influx, cytokine production, and reduction in tissue histamine content in vivo, and bound to the same or overlapping epitopes on the DNP antigen in vitro. Therefore IgE antibodies against the same antigen can induce comparable inflammation, yet contribute to markedly different anaphylaxis-associated pain within an allergic response, suggesting that non-canonical IgE binding partners such as sensory neurons may play a role in allergy-related pain responses. PMID:25149207

  1. Allergen-Specific Cytokine Polarization Protects Shetland Ponies against Culicoides obsoletus-Induced Insect Bite Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbroeks, Chantal; van der Lugt, Jaco J.; van der Meide, Nathalie M. A.; Willemse, Ton; Rutten, Victor P. M. G.; Zaiss, Dietmar M. W.

    2015-01-01

    The immunological mechanisms explaining development of an allergy in some individuals and not in others remain incompletely understood. Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a common, seasonal, IgE-mediated, pruritic skin disorder that affects considerable proportions of horses of different breeds, which is caused by bites of the insect Culicoides obsoletus (C. obsoletus). We investigated the allergen-specific immune status of individual horses that had either been diagnosed to be healthy or to suffer of IBH. Following intradermal allergen injection, skin biopsies were taken of IBH-affected and healthy ponies and cytokine expression was determined by RT-PCR. In addition, allergen-specific antibody titers were measured and cytokine expression of in vitro stimulated, allergen-specific CD4 T-cells was determined. 24 hrs after allergen injection, a significant increase in mRNA expression of the type-2 cytokine IL-4 was observed in the skin of IBH-affected Shetland ponies. In the skin of healthy ponies, however, an increase in IFNγ mRNA expression was found. Analysis of allergen-specific antibody titers revealed that all animals produced allergen-specific antibodies, and allergen-specific stimulation of CD4 T-cells revealed a significant higher percentage of IFNγ-expressing CD4 T-cells in healthy ponies compared to IBH-affected ponies. These data indicate that horses not affected by IBH, in contrast to the so far established dogma, are not immunologically ignorant but have a Th1-skewed allergen-specific immune response that appears to protect against IBH-associated symptoms. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of a natural situation, in which an allergen-specific immune skewing is protective in an allergic disorder. PMID:25901733

  2. Identification of rice proteins recognized by the IgE antibodies of patients with food allergies.

    PubMed

    Goliáš, Jaroslav; Humlová, Zuzana; Halada, Petr; Hábová, Věra; Janatková, Ivana; Tučková, Ludmila

    2013-09-18

    Similarity among food allergens is a great problem affecting the specificity of diagnosis and treatment of allergic patients. We have observed that 80% of patients with food (including wheat) and pollen allergies have increased IgE antibodies against rice proteins. By immunoblotting, we documented that boiling decreased solubility and IgE reactivity of PBS-extracted rice and wheat proteins, yet in SDS extracts this reactivity was only slightly changed. The sera of patients highly positive on the IgE immunoblot and positive in basophil activation and skin prick test with boiled rice components were used for characterizing the IgE-binding proteins separated by 1D or 2D electrophoresis. Using mass spectrometry, we identified 22 rice SDS soluble proteins. Six of them were new thermostable potential rice allergens: glutelin C precursor, granule-bound starch synthase 1 protein, disulfide isomerase-like 1-1 protein, hypothetical protein OsI_13867, putative acid phosphatase precursor 1, and a protein encoded by locus Os02g0453600. All of the identified rice proteins differed from known wheat allergens, except proteins belonging to the α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor family. Furthermore, we would suggest that in patients with high IgE reactivity to wheat and rice components, the IgE immunoblot and skin prick test with boiled rice proteins could be beneficial before diet recommendation.

  3. IgE antibody levels to ingested soya protein determined in a normal adult population.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, B F

    1982-01-01

    Levels of soy protein-specific IgE were measured in a normal adult population (seventy-four males, and fifteen females) who ingested soya-containing and control diets during two 4-week periods. Increases in soya-specific IgE were observed for some individuals following ingestion of the soya-containing diet, and for the female group the increase in soya-specific IgE was statistically significant (P = 0.02). The increase of soya-specific IgE was small and led to lower levels than that associated with adverse effects. The increase in soya-specific IgE in the female group was accompanied by a significant increase (P = 0.02) in total immunoglobulin A. Changes in the level of soy-specific haemagglutinating antibody, soya-specific IgG, IgA and IgM as measured by ELISA and the immunoconglutinin titre could not be related to ingestion of the soya-containing diet.

  4. Developments in allergen-specific immunotherapy: from allergen extracts to allergy vaccines bypassing allergen-specific immunoglobulin E and T cell reactivity.

    PubMed

    Focke, M; Swoboda, I; Marth, K; Valenta, R

    2010-03-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only specific and disease-modifying approach for the treatment of allergy but several disadvantages have limited its broad applicability. We argue that the majority of the possible disadvantages of SIT such as unwanted effects, poor efficacy and specificity as well as inconvenient application are related to the poor quality of natural allergen extracts, which are the active ingredients of all currently available allergy vaccines. Because of the progress made in the field of molecular allergen characterization, new allergy vaccines based on recombinant allergens, recombinant hypoallergenic allergen derivatives and allergen-derived T cell peptides have entered clinical testing and hold promise to reduce the side-effects and to increase the specificity as well as the efficacy of SIT. Here, we present a refined immunotherapy concept, which is based on the use of peptides derived from allergen surfaces that exhibit reduced, allergen-specific IgE as well as T cell reactivity. These peptides when fused to non-allergenic carriers give rise to allergen-specific protective IgG responses with T cell help from a non-allergenic carrier molecule. We summarize the experimental data demonstrating that such peptide vaccines can bypass allergen-specific IgE as well as T cell activation and may be administered at high doses without IgE- and T cell-mediated side-effects. Should these peptide vaccines prove efficacious and safe in clinical trials, it may become possible to develop convenient, safe and broadly applicable forms of SIT as true alternatives to symptomatic, drug-based allergy treatment.

  5. Prevalence of IgE antibodies to grain and grain dust in grain elevator workers

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.M.; Romeo, P.A.; Olenchock, S.A.

    1986-04-01

    IgE-mediated allergic reactions have been postulated to contribute to respiratory reactions seen in workers exposed to grain dusts. In an attempt better to define the prevalence of IgE antibodies in workers exposed to grain dusts, we performed the radioallergosorbent test (RAST) on worker sera using both commercial allergens prepared from grain and worksite allergens prepared from grain dust samples collected at the worksite. We found that the two types of reagents identified different populations with respect to the specificity of IgE antibodies present. The RAST assay performed using worksite allergens correlated well with skin test procedures. These results may allow us to gain better understanding of allergy associated with grain dust exposure, and document the utility of the RAST assay in assessment of occupational allergies.

  6. Systemic and mucosal IgE antibody responses of horses to infection with Anoplocephala perfoliata.

    PubMed

    Pittaway, Charles E; Lawson, April L; Coles, Gerald C; Wilson, A Douglas

    2014-01-17

    Infection of horses with Anoplocephala perfoliata induces a severe inflammatory reaction of the caecal mucosa around the site of parasite attachment adjacent to the ileocecal valve. Lesions show epithelial erosion or ulceration of the mucosa with infiltration by eosinophils, lymphocytes and mast cells leading to oedema, gross thickening and fibrosis of the caecal wall. Despite this evidence of an inflammatory reaction to A. perfoliata within the mucosa of the caecum there is little information about the nature of the local immune response to A. perfoliata. An ELISA which assays serum IgG(T) antibodies to A. perfoliata excretory/secretory antigens has been developed as a diagnostic test. However, the specificity of the ELISA remains sub-optimal and the role of other isotypes in the immune response to A. perfoliata has not been reported. This study measured IgA, IgE and IgG(T) antibody responses to A. perfoliata excretory/secretory antigens in sera of 75 horses presented for slaughter. The prevalence of A. perfoliata infection, as confirmed by the presence of parasites in the terminal ileum, caecum or proximal colon, was 55%. A. perfoliata-specific IgG(T) and IgE antibodies were significantly elevated in infected horses compared to controls; IgA antibodies were also detected but did not differ between infected and control horses. Diagnosis by serum IgG(T) ELISA had a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 80%, by comparison the serum IgE ELISA had a sensitivity of just 44% with a specificity of 82% and therefore did not provide an improved diagnostic test. Western blots with sera from infected horses demonstrated IgE-binding to at least 10 separate components of excretory/secretory (E/S) antigens. A similar pattern was also found with IgG(T). Around 30% of horses had high levels of serum IgE which bound fucose-containing carbohydrate antigens on the parasite surface but this was unrelated to the presence of A. perfoliata infection. Immunoperoxidase staining detected

  7. Polysensitisation to pollen due to profilin and calcium-binding protein: distribution of IgE antibodies to marker allergens in grass and birch pollen allergic rhinitis patients in southern Germany.

    PubMed

    Muehlmeier, G; Maier, H

    2014-04-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy for grass pollen allergy has been reported to be effective in up to 85% of patients. Sensitisation to profilin and calcium-binding protein (CBP) can possibly influence treatment results and may thus be a reason for treatment failures. During a study period of 3 years, the distribution patterns of antibodies to marker allergens were continuously investigated in all blood serum samples with a level of immunoglobulin E antibodies to timothy and birch pollen higher than 0.7 kUA/l (n = 556). Sensitisation to timothy grass pollen alone was found in 33% of the cases, to birch pollen alone in 19%, and to both in 48%. The group of polysensitised patients showed an inhomogenous distribution of antibodies to marker allergens. IgE against minor allergens was detected in 40%. Sensitisation to major allergens, especially to the major birch allergen, was not present in 13% of the polysensitised patients. Of the patients who were sensitised to minor allergens, 82% were sensitised to profilin, 11% to CBP, and 8% to both profilin and CBP. Profilin and CBP frequently cause polysensitisations to pollen. The data obtained justify the measurement of serum levels of antibodies to marker allergens in patients who are sensitised to more than one group of allergens.

  8. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation on IgE antibody responses in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Terr, A.I.; Moss, R.B.; Strober, S.

    1987-12-01

    Thirteen patients with rheumatoid arthritis and four patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and nephritis were treated with total lymphoid irradiation because of severe disease refractory to other forms of treatment. Serum samples before and after irradiation were tested for changes in total serum IgE and for changes in specific IgE antibodies to ryegrass pollen, dust mite, cat dander, and Alternaria. There were no statistically significant changes in total or specific IgE from lymphoid irradiation in these patients. The therapy caused a significant decrease in circulating total lymphocyte and Leu-3 (helper/inducer) T-lymphocyte counts. Therefore, reduction in circulating levels of helper/inducer T cells does not appear to influence preexisting levels of IgE antibodies.

  9. Soluble CD23 Levels are Inversely Associated with Atopy and Parasite-Specific IgE Levels but Not with Polyclonal IgE Levels in People Exposed to Helminth Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rujeni, Nadine; Nausch, Norman; Midzi, Nicholas; Gwisai, Reginald; Mduluza, Takafira; Taylor, David W.; Mutapi, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    Background Protective acquired immunity against helminths and allergic sensitisation are both characterised by high IgE antibody levels. Levels of IgE antibodies are naturally tightly regulated by several mechanisms including binding of the CD23 receptor. Following observations that helminth infections and allergic sensitisation may co-present, the current study aims to investigate the relationship between the soluble CD23 (sCD23) receptor, parasite-specific IgE responses and allergic sensitisation in people exposed to the helminth parasite Schistosoma haematobium. Methods A cohort of 434 participants was recruited in two villages with different levels of S. haematobium infection in Zimbabwe. Serum levels of the 25-kDa fragment of sCD23 were related to levels of schistosome infection intensity, allergen (house dust mite, HDM) and schistosome-specific IgE, total IgE and skin sensitisation to HDM. Results sCD23 levels rose significantly with schistosome infection intensity but declined significantly with schistosome-specific IgE levels. Furthermore, sCD23 levels were negatively associated with skin sensitisation and IgE reactivity against HDM, but showed no relationship with total IgE. Conclusion The results are consistent with the suppression of parasite and allergen-specific IgE levels by sCD23. Further mechanistic studies will determine the relevance of this potential regulatory mechanism in the development of helminth-specific immune responses in atopic individuals. PMID:23689700

  10. The relevance of tick bites to the production of IgE antibodies to the mammalian oligosaccharide galactose-α-1,3-galactose

    PubMed Central

    Commins, Scott P.; James, Hayley R.; Kelly, Elizabeth A.; Pochan, Shawna L.; Workman, Lisa J.; Perzanowski, Matthew S.; Kocan, Katherine M.; Fahy, John V.; Nganga, Lucy W.; Ronmark, Eva; Cooper, Philip J.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A. E.

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2009, we reported a novel form of delayed anaphylaxis to red meat, which is related to serum IgE antibodies to the oligosaccharide galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal). Most of these patients had tolerated meat for many years previously. The implication is that some exposure in adult life had stimulated the production of these IgE antibodies. Objectives To investigate possible causes of this IgE antibody response, focusing on evidence related to tick bites, which are common in the region where these reactions occur. Methods Serum assays were carried out using biotinylated proteins and extracts bound to a streptavidin ImmunoCAP. Results Prospective studies on IgE antibodies in three subjects following tick bites showed an increase in IgE to alpha-gal of twenty-fold or greater. Other evidence included i) a strong correlation between histories of tick bites and IgE to alpha-gal (χ2=26.8, p<0.001), ii) evidence that these IgE antibodies are common in areas where the tick Amblyomma americanum is common, and iii) a significant correlation between IgE antibodies to alpha-gal and IgE antibodies to proteins derived from A. americanum (rs=0.75, p<0.001). Conclusion The results presented here provide evidence that tick bites are a cause, or possibly the only cause, of IgE specific for alpha-gal in this area of the United States. Both the number of subjects becoming sensitized and the titer of IgE antibodies to alpha-gal are striking. Here we report the first example of a response to an ectoparasite giving rise to an important form of food allergy. PMID:21453959

  11. Ultrasensitive carbohydrate-peptide SPR imaging microarray for diagnosing IgE mediated peanut allergy

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Amit A.; Peczuh, Mark W.; Kumar, Challa V.; Rusling, James F

    2014-01-01

    Severity of peanut allergies is linked to allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies in blood, but diagnostics from assays using glycoprotein allergen mixtures may be inaccurate. Measuring IgEs specific to individual peptide and carbohydrate epitopes of allergenic proteins is promising. We report here the first immunoarray for IgEs utilizing both peptide and carbohydrate epitopes. A surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) microarray was equipped with peptide and β-xylosyl glycoside (BXG) epitopes from major peanut allergen glycoprotein Arachis hypogaea h2 (Ara-h2). A monoclonal anti-IgE antibody was included as positive control. IgEs were precaptured onto magnetic beads loaded with polyclonal anti-IgE antibodies to enhance sensitivity and minimize non-specific binding. As little as 0.1 attomole (0.5 pg/mL) IgE was detected from dilute serum in 45 min. IgEs binding to Ara-h2 peptide and BXG were quantified in 10 μL of patient serum and correlated with standard ImmunoCAP values. PMID:25259443

  12. An extended study of seroprevalence of anti-Anisakis simplex IgE antibodies in Norwegian blood donors.

    PubMed

    Lin, A H; Nepstad, I; Florvaag, E; Egaas, E; Van Do, T

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, cases of the fish parasite Anisakis simplex infection and allergy in human have increased in countries with high fish consumption. Our aim was to perform an extended seroprevalence study of anti-IgE antibodies against this parasite in Norway, one of the high fish-consuming countries. At the Department of Immunology and Transfusion Medicine and the Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway, two main groups of anonymized serum samples were collected; the first (n = 993) from recently recruited blood donors (designated 'BDO') and the second (n = 414) from patient with total IgE levels ≥1000 kU/l (designated 'IGE+'). The sera were analysed by the ImmunoCAP(®) method for total IgE and IgE antibodies against A. simplex, house dust mite (HDM), shrimp, cod, crab, brine shrimp and shrimp tropomyosin. The A. simplex positive sera were further tested by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method, which uses 2 recombinant (r) major allergens, rAni s 1 and rAni s 7 as target antigens. SDS-PAGE and Western immunoblotting analyses were also performed. Whereas the prevalences by ImmunoCAP(®) were 0.4% and 16.2% in the BDO and IGE+ groups, respectively, analyses with recombinant allergens showed only 0.0% and 0.2%. Cross-reactivity and immunoblotting analyses suggested that most of the ImmunoCAP(®) positive sera were probably false-positive due to cross-sensitization to shrimp and HDM. However, positivity due to other A. simplex antigens should also be considered. Compared with other high fish-consuming countries, we observed a very low seroprevalence of anti-Anisakis IgE antibodies in a Norwegian population. PMID:24219706

  13. [Effects of Celosia argentea and Cucurbita moschata extracts on anti-DNP IgE antibody production in mice].

    PubMed

    Imaoka, K; Ushijima, H; Inouye, S; Takahashi, T; Kojima, Y

    1994-05-01

    We have already reported that the Perilla frutescens extract (PFE) suppressed anti-DNA IgE antibody production in mice. In this study, we prepared extracts of Celosia argentea L. (CAE) and Cucurbita moschata Duch (CME), which are Chinese herbal medicines like Perilla frutescens, and examined the effects on anti-DNP antibody responses in mice. To examine the effects of CAE & CME on primary antibody responses, CAE & CME were intraperitoneally injected the day before primary immunization of DNP-ovalbumin. Anti-DNP antibody production was markedly suppressed. Then, we examined the effects on secondary antibody responses. CEA & CME were injected only the day before secondary immunization. Anti-DNP IgE production was markedly suppressed, but IgG responses were not affected. It was also found that mitogenic activity occurred in CAE & CME dose dependently in vitro. These effects of CAE & CME were superior to that of PFE. These results suggest that CAE & CME may be more useful than PFE for the suppression of IgE antibody in certain allergic disorders.

  14. Control of IgE responses. III. IL-6 and IFN-alpha are isotype-specific regulators of peak BPO-specific IgE antibody-forming cell responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Auci, D L; Kleiner, G I; Chice, S M; Dukor, P; Durkin, H G

    1993-03-01

    The ability of cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, GmCSF) to regulate peak benzylpenicilloyl (BPO)-specific IgE antibody-forming cell (AFC) responses was investigated. These responses were induced in BALB/c mice by ip injection of BPO-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (BPO-KLH; 10 micrograms) in aluminum hydroxide gel on Days 0, 21, and 42. On Day 44, or on Days 43, 44, and 45, mice were injected sc with varying doses of cytokine or anti-cytokine antibody. On Day 46, the numbers of BPO-specific AFC (IgM, IgG1, IgE and IgA) in spleen were determined ex vivo in enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay. Among the cytokines tested, only IL-6 suppressed BPO-specific IgE AFC responses in an isotype-specific fashion (60-90%). However, treatment of mice with anti-IL-6 also suppressed these responses, suggesting that IL-6 can either suppress or increase peak antigen specific IgE responses, depending upon its concentration. Among the cytokines tested, only IFN-alpha increased BPO-specific IgE AFC responses in an isotype-specific fashion. Since treatment with anti-IFN-alpha suppressed these responses, it appears that IFN-alpha is required to maintain peak antigen-specific IgE AFC responses. IL-4 or IFN-gamma nonspecifically suppressed responses of all isotypes. Treatment with anti-IL-4 also suppressed IgE responses, suggesting that this cytokine is required to maintain peak antigen specific IgE responses. Treatment with anti-IFN-gamma increased IgE responses, indicating that IFN-gamma suppresses peak antigen-specific IgE responses.

  15. Adjuvant activity of diesel-exhaust particulates for the production of IgE antibody in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Muranaka, M.; Suzuki, S.; Koizumi, K.; Takafuji, S.; Miyamoto, T.; Ikemori, R.; Tokiwa, H.

    1986-04-01

    The prevalence rate of allergic rhinitis caused by pollen has strikingly increased in Japan in the last three decades. The number of diesel cars in use has also rapidly increased in the country. This fact urged us to study the effects of particulates emitted from diesel cars on the production of IgE antibody. The primary IgE antibody responses in mice immunized with intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OA) mixed with diesel-exhaust particulates (DEP) were higher than those in the animals immunized with OA alone. This effect of DEP on the production of IgE antibody in mice was also demonstrated when mice were immunized with repeated injections of dinitrophenylated-OA. In addition, persistent IgE-antibody response to major allergen of Japanese cedar pollen (JCPA), a most common pollen causing allergic rhinitis in Japan, was observed in mice immunized with JCPA mixed with DEP but not in the animals immunized with JCPA alone. The results do indicate that the adjuvant activity of DEP can not be excluded as a possible cause of the associated change in the number of diesel cars and allergic rhinitis caused by pollen in Japan.

  16. Immunoassay of specific IgE: use of a single point calibration curve in the modified radioallergosorbent test.

    PubMed

    Williams, P B; Dolen, W K; Koepke, J W; Selner, J C

    1992-07-01

    Interest in immunoassay standardization has prompted development of specific IgE assays reporting results related to the international IgE reference. To examine the single point calibration curve employed in the modified RAST assay (MRT) to convert MRT counts to IgE units, independent dilutions of a 25 kU/L total IgE reference and nine allergic sera (three each for short ragweed, cat, and timothy) were made in horse serum and assayed. In a log-log plot, the single point curve was, by definition, linear over its entire range; the dilution curve was curvilinear because of reagent system saturation, which was at 7 kU/L. Curves were not parallel (P less than .001). Allergen-specific dilution curves showed saturation points at values similar to or less than the total IgE system. The linear portions of these curves paralleled the total IgE dilution curve but not the single point curve. This lack of parallelism would have resulted in varying magnitudes of error in estimation of IgE antibody levels in the upper and lower assay ranges, and would imply a lower detection limit for IgE than that which the assay actually has. Modified RAST assay is not appropriate in research or a clinical situation in which accurate quantitative results are needed. Modified RAST assay would furthermore be an inappropriate means of assigning units to proposed reference preparations for standardization.

  17. Reactivity of IgE antibodies with crustacea and oyster allergens: evidence for common antigenic structures.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, S B; McCants, M L

    1987-08-01

    IgE-antibody reactivity to oysters and crustacea of sera from six oyster-sensitive, seven oyster- and crustacea-sensitive, and 12 crustacea-sensitive subjects was investigated. All six subjects with a history of only oyster sensitivity had minimal RAST reactivity (ratios 2 to 5) to extracts of raw or boiled oysters. Three of the seven oyster- and crustacea-sensitive subjects and six of the 12 crustacea-sensitive, oyster-tolerant or unexposed subjects had elevated RAST ratios to oyster (14 to 41). Generally, elevated oyster RAST correlated with skin prick test reactivity to oyster but not with total serum IgE levels. The oyster RAST values of the 19 crustacea-sensitive subjects (with or without oyster sensitivity) correlated with crustacea RAST reactivity (crab RAST, most significant; shrimp RAST, least significant). Rabbit antisera to crustacea extracts detected precipitating antigens present in extracts of raw or boiled oysters. Significant inhibition of the oyster RAST was obtained with oyster or crustacea extracts. These studies suggest that in the diagnosis of oyster sensitivity the RAST may not be useful and that oyster and crustacea contain common antigenic structures.

  18. Evaluation of IgE Antibodies to Omalizumab (Xolair®) and Their Potential Correlation to Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Baker, Dana L; Nakamura, Gerald R; Lowman, Henry B; Fischer, Saloumeh Kadkhodayan

    2016-01-01

    Omalizumab (Xolair®) is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that selectively binds to human immunoglobulin E (IgE). Omalizumab is used to treat IgE-mediated diseases such as chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and moderate to severe allergic asthma. In pre-marketing clinical trials in patients with asthma, anaphylaxis was reported in 3 of 3,507 (0.1%) patients. In post-marketing spontaneous reports, the frequency of anaphylaxis attributed to omalizumab use was estimated to be at least 0.2% of patients based on an estimated exposure of about 57,300 patients from June 2003 through December 2006. To better understand the risk of anaphylaxis in patients with allergic asthma receiving omalizumab, a post-marketing pharmacosurveillance study was initiated in 2009. As part of this study, an assay was developed to detect antibodies of IgE isotype to omalizumab. Serum samples from patients in the study were evaluated using this assay. Our results indicated that there was no observable correlation between either anaphylaxis or skin test reactivity and the presence of antibodies of IgE isotype to omalizumab. Here, we discuss the development of this assay as well as the results of the immunogenicity assessment.

  19. Profound specific suppression by antigen of persistent IgM, IgG, and IgE antibody production.

    PubMed Central

    Dintzis, H M; Dintzis, R Z

    1992-01-01

    Ongoing, high-titer T-cell-dependent immune responses in adult mice, consisting of IgM, IgG, and IgE anti-fluorescein antibodies, can be specifically and substantially reduced (90-99%) when the mice are injected with appropriate doses of fluoresceinated dextran of defined molecular weight and hapten valence. This suppressive form of the antigen is nontoxic and specific, as responses to other antigens are unaffected. The suppression is long lasting and reduces high-affinity antibodies most markedly. Moreover, plasma cell secretion of specific antibody is virtually eliminated. This demonstrates that the reduction in antibody titer is not simply due to masking of serum antibody by the suppressive polymer. The results are discussed with reference to proposed models of B-cell and T-cell tolerance. Extension of these findings to disease-related immunogens may yield effective antigen-specific treatments of human allergy and autoimmune diseases. PMID:1736295

  20. Delayed anaphylaxis, angioedema, or urticaria after consumption of red meat in patients with IgE antibodies specific for galactose-α-1,3-galactose

    PubMed Central

    Commins, Scott P.; Satinover, Shama M.; Hosen, Jacob; Mozena, Jonathan; Borish, Larry; Lewis, Barrett D.; Woodfolk, Judith A.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Carbohydrate moieties are frequently encountered in food and can elicit IgE responses, the clinical significance of which has been unclear. Recent work, however, has shown that IgE antibodies to galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-gal), a carbohydrate commonly expressed on nonprimate mammalian proteins, are capable of eliciting serious, even fatal, reactions. Objective We sought to determine whether IgE antibodies to α-gal are present in sera from patients who report anaphylaxis or urticaria after eating beef, pork, or lamb. Methods Detailed histories were taken from patients presenting to the University of Virginia Allergy Clinic. Skin prick tests (SPTs), intradermal skin tests, and serum IgE antibody analysis were performed for common indoor, outdoor, and food allergens. Results Twenty-four patients with IgE antibodies to α-gal were identified. These patients described a similar history of anaphylaxis or urticaria 3 to 6 hours after the ingestion of meat and reported fewer or no episodes when following an avoidance diet. SPTs to mammalian meat produced wheals of usually less than 4 mm, whereas intradermal or fresh-food SPTs provided larger and more consistent wheal responses. CAP-RAST testing revealed specific IgE antibodies to beef, pork, lamb, cow’s milk, cat, and dog but not turkey, chicken, or fish. Absorption experiments indicated that this pattern of sensitivity was explained by an IgE antibody specific for α-gal. Conclusion We report a novel and severe food allergy related to IgE antibodies to the carbohydrate epitope α-gal. These patients experience delayed symptoms of anaphylaxis, angioedema, or urticaria associated with eating beef, pork, or lamb. PMID:19070355

  1. Control of IgE responses. II. Isotype specific suppression of peak hapten specific IgE antibody forming cell responses in BPO-KLH sensitized mice after oral administration of muramyldipeptide or murabutide.

    PubMed

    Auci, D L; Chice, S M; Dukor, P; Durkin, H G

    1993-01-01

    Muramyldipeptide (MDP) and murabutide (MB), a pyrogen free derivative of MDP, suppressed BPO specific IgE antibody forming cell (AFC) responses in vivo. To induce IgE responses, BALB/c mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with BPO-KLH (10 micrograms) in alum on days 0 and 21, or on days 0, 21 and 42. On day 44, mice were fed (gavage) or injected subcutaneously (s.c.) with MDP or MB (0.1-500 mg/kg). Mice were killed on days 45-70, and the numbers of BPO specific IgM, IgG1, IgE, and IgA antibody forming cells (AFC) in lymphoid organs determined in ELISPOT assay. With either immunization schedule, oral treatment with MDP or MB on day 44 suppressed BPO specific IgE AFC responses within 48 h (65-100%). With both molecules, the suppression was IgE isotype specific, dose dependent and transient. The suppression was also route specific since it was obtained only when MDP or MB was given by gavage, and not when injected s.c. These results show that peak antigen specific IgE responses can be suppressed in vivo, in isotype specific fashion, by a clearly defined class of molecules, one of which, MB, is a candidate for clinical studies in man. Pharmacologic agents of this type may be suitable for use in the therapeutic or prophylactic suppression of IgE and, hence, in the therapy of IgE mediated diseases such as allergic rhinitis, asthma, and other atopic diseases.

  2. Does allergen-specific immunotherapy induce contact allergy to aluminium?

    PubMed

    Netterlid, Eva; Hindsén, Monica; Siemund, Ingrid; Björk, Jonas; Werner, Sonja; Jacobsson, Helene; Güner, Nuray; Bruze, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Persistent, itching nodules have been reported to appear at the injection site after allergen-specific immuno-therapy with aluminium-precipitated antigen extract, occasionally in conjunction with contact allergy to aluminium. This study aimed to quantify the development of contact allergy to aluminium during allergen-specific immunotherapy. A randomized, controlled, single-blind multicentre study of children and adults entering allergen-specific immunotherapy was performed using questionnaires and patch-testing. A total of 205 individuals completed the study. In the 3 study groups all subjects tested negative to aluminium before allergen-specific immunotherapy and 4 tested positive after therapy. In the control group 4 participants tested positive to aluminium. Six out of 8 who tested positive also had atopic dermatitis. Positive test results were found in 5/78 children and 3/127 adults. Allergen-specific immunotherapy was not shown to be a risk factor for contact allergy to aluminium. Among those who did develop aluminium allergy, children and those with atopic dermatitis were more highly represented.

  3. Suppression of the benzylpenicilloyl- (BPO) specific IgE formation with isologous anti-idiotypic antibodies in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Blaser, K; Nakagawa, T; de Weck, A L

    1980-07-01

    In vivo effects of actively produced or passively administered isologous anti-idiotypic antisera (aId) on the benzylpenicilloyl- (BPO) specific IgE and IgG formation in BALB/c mice have been studied. Isologous anti-BPO aId were raised in BALB/c mice by immunization with purified anti-BPO antibodies isolated from ascites induced with BPO-bovine gamma-globulin in the same mouse strain. Mice producing isologous anti-BPO aId exhibited long-term suppression of BPO-specific IgE and IgG antibody responses induced by BPO-ovalbumin (BPO-OVA) in aluminum hydroxide. Simultaneously, they produced increased amounts of anti-BPO aId after each challenge with the BPO-OVA antigens. Passive administration of isologous anti-BPO aId into syngeneic mice previously sensitized with BPO-OVA caused depression of BPO-specific IgE antibody levels for 2 to 3 weeks. When anti-BPO IgE had again reached its previous level, passively administered aId had decreased to the level of untreated mice. Passive administration of anti-BPO aId also depressed the primary anti-BPO IgE formation for 2 to 3 weeks. In all these experiments the IgE antibody formation against the carrier proteins used for BPO-antigens was not affected. These results show that IgE and IgG antibodies share major idiotypic determinants and that IgE production is accessible to regulation by aId.

  4. Evaluation of an in vitro method for the measurement of specific IgE antibody responses: the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cell assay.

    PubMed

    Dearman, R J; Skinner, R A; Deakin, N; Shaw, D; Kimber, I

    2005-01-15

    The evaluation of allergenic potential is a key parameter in the safety assessment of novel proteins, including those expressed in genetically modified crops and foodstuffs. The majority of allergic reactions to food proteins are immediate type hypersensitivity reactions in which the principal biological effector is IgE antibody; the accurate measurement of specific IgE antibody is therefore a critical factor in experimental systems designed to characterize protein allergenic potential. Due to the presence of much higher concentrations of other immunoglobulin isotypes, the assessment of specific serum IgE antibody poses substantial technical challenges. We have examined the utility of the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cell line for the measurement of murine IgE responses. RBL cells were sensitized with mouse monoclonal anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE antibody and challenged with DNP-albumin conjugates with various hapten substitution ratios (SR). Polyclonal anti-OVA IgE antisera were also assessed for activity in the RBL assay. Results were compared with titers measured in homologous passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) assay. Marked degranulation of RBL cells was induced by conjugates with SRs of between 16 and 32, whereas conjugates with lower SRs (of 10 or 3) failed to elicit significant serotonin release. All conjugates were able to induce mast cell degranulation in vivo in a PCA assay. Anti-OVA antisera with PCA titers of 1/32 to 1/64 failed to stimulate RBL cell degranulation, whereas high titer antibody (1/2048 to 1/4096 by PCA) induced a positive RBL cell response. Successful stimulation of RBL cell degranulation requires not only appropriate epitope densities but also high affinity antibody. These data indicate that this assay is inappropriate for the routine analysis of specific polyclonal IgE antibody responses such as those that are induced by exposure to complex protein allergens.

  5. Neuropeptide-mediated regulation of hapten-specific IgE responses in mice. II. Mechanisms of substance P-mediated isotype-specific suppression of BPO-specific IgE antibody-forming cell responses induced in vitro.

    PubMed

    Carucci, J A; Herrick, C A; Durkin, H G

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that substance P (SP), injected into benzylpenicilloyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (BPO-KLH) sensitized mice at the peak of the benzylpenicilloyl (BPO)-specific IgE response, suppressed these responses in isotype-specific fashion within 48 h. These studies also showed that SP, but not neurotensin (NT), serotonin (5-HT), somatostatin (SOM) or gastrin, suppressed BPO-specific memory IgE antibody-forming cell (AFC) responses induced in vitro, also in isotype-specific fashion. To investigate the mechanisms by which SP suppressed BPO-specific IgE AFC responses were induced in vitro, these responses were induced by culturing spleen cells from BPO-KLH sensitized mice for 5 days with BPO-KLH with or without whole SP, amino terminal SP (SP 1-4: Arg-Lys-Pro-Lys), or carboxy terminal SP (SP 8-11: Phe-Gly-Leu-Met). In some experiments, the SP receptor antagonist (D-Pro2, D-Phe7, D-Trp9)-SP (D-SP) was included in culture. In other experiments anti-interferon monoclonal antibody (anti-IFN gamma mAb) was in culture. Whole SP and SP 8-11, but not SP 1-4, suppressed BPO-specific IgE AFC responses induced in vitro. The suppression obtained was IgE isotype-specific and dose-dependent. Inclusion of SP receptor antagonist (D-Pro2, D-Phe7, D-Trp9)-SP inhibited suppression of BPO-specific memory IgE AFC responses by SP or SP 8-11. The SP-mediated suppression of BPO-specific memory IgE responses appeared to involve interferon gamma (IFN gamma).

  6. Seasonal variation of IgE and IgG antibody of some atopic patients against the pollen grains of selected plant species.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, J; Shaw, S; Banerjee, S

    1990-01-01

    Several steps were taken to determine the seasonal variation of IgE and IgG antibody against Short Ragweed, Timothy Grass, Tag Alder and White Ash. Extracts of the above pollen grains were separated into their allergen components using SDS-gel electrophoresis and transblotted to nitrocellulose membrane (Western blotting) and probed with sera from atopic patients in every month (August 1987-July 1988). The IgE and IgG antibody against the specific-allergens were detected by double antibody immunoenzyme assay. The percentage of binding was determined by using a 620 video-densitometer. Results indicate that there was no reasonable IgE antibody before the pollination season, but IgEAb appeared after the season and was detectable for several months. Negligible amounts of IgGAb were observed. PMID:2292188

  7. A sensitive assay for the detection of IgE bound to the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1, in the form of immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Pree, Ines; Reisinger, Jürgen; Bohle, Barbara; Frantal, Sophie; Valenta, Rudolf; Niederberger, Verena

    2009-06-30

    Allergen-IgE immune complexes, in which the IgE paratopes are occupied by allergen, remain undetected in standard IgE-detection assays which are based on capturing specific IgE by allergens.We describe an assay for the detection of immune complexes consisting of IgE bound to one of the most frequent environmental allergens, the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1. This assay is based on a Bet v 1-specific monoclonal antibody, Bip 1, which binds to an epitope on Bet v 1 that is distinct from the epitopes recognized by allergic patients' IgE. IgE-immune complexes formed with sera from birch pollen-allergic patients (n = 46) were undetectable with solid phase-bound allergen but could be captured by Bip 1 immobilized to nitrocellulose membranes or ELISA plates and traced with radioactively or enzymatically labelled anti-human IgE antibodies. The levels of IgE complexed with Bet v 1 measured in our assays were highly correlated with the amounts of non-complexed allergen-specific IgE as determined by the ImmunoCAP assay which is based on solid phase-bound IgE (r = 0.95; p < 0.01). Bet v 1-specific IgE could even be detected at serum dilutions below the cut off of the ImmunoCAP system (i.e., 0.35 kUA/L). We have thus developed a robust and sensitive assay for the detection and quantification of Bet v 1-IgE immune complexes which should be useful to measure allergen-bound IgE in human body fluids and in in vitro experiments.

  8. Proteomic analysis of wheat proteins recognized by IgE antibodies of allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Sotkovský, Petr; Hubálek, Martin; Hernychová, Lenka; Novák, Petr; Havranová, Marie; Setinová, Iva; Kitanovicová, Andrea; Fuchs, Martin; Stulík, Jirí; Tucková, Ludmila

    2008-04-01

    Wheat belongs to six major food allergens inducing IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reaction manifesting as cutaneous, gastrointestinal, and respiratory symptoms. Although cereals are a staple food item in most diets, only a few wheat proteins causing hypersensitivity have been identified. To characterize wheat allergens, salt-soluble wheat extracts were separated by 1-DE and 2-DE and IgE-binding proteins were detected by immunoblotting using sera of patients with allergy to ingested wheat. Proteins, frequently recognized by IgE on 2-DE were analyzed by MALDI-TOF and QTOF and their spectrum was completed by 1-DE and LCQ(DECA) nLC-MS/MS IT technique. Using all three techniques we identified 19 potential wheat allergens such as alpha-amylase inhibitors, beta-amylase, profilin, serpin, beta-D-glucan exohydrolase, and 27K protein. Employing newly developed ELISA, levels of IgE Abs against Sulamit wheat extract and alpha-amylase inhibitors type 1 and 3 were quantified and shown to be significantly elevated in sera of allergic patients compared to those of healthy controls. The level of IgE Abs against alpha-amylase inhibitor type 3 was lower, slightly above the cut-off value in the majority of patients' sera. Our findings contribute to the identification of wheat allergens aimed to increase the specificity of serum IgE and cell activation diagnostic assays.

  9. Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes are the sites of first appearance of IgE bearing B lymphocytes and hapten specific IgE antibody forming cells in BPO-KLH sensitized mice.

    PubMed

    Auci, D L; Chice, S M; Heusser, C; Athanassiades, T J; Durkin, H G

    1992-01-01

    Antigen specific IgE responses originate in gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) of mice sensitized with benzylpenicilloyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (BPO-KLH) in alum, regardless of the route (intraperitoneal [i.p.], oral [gavage], subcutaneous [s.c.], intramuscular [i.m.] or intravenous [i.v.]) used for immunization. When BALB/c mice were injected i.p. with BPO-KLH (10 micrograms) in alum, B lymphocytes bearing membrane bound IgE (sIgE+B cells) first appeared simultaneously in Peyer's patches (PP) and mesenteric lymph node (MLN) on day 8. BPO specific IgE antibody forming cells (AFC) also appeared in PP on day 8, but were not found in MLN until day 10. On day 8, no sIgE+B cells or IgE AFC were found in bone marrow (BM) or other lymphoid organs. The appearance of sIgE+B cells and IgE AFC in PP and MLN was transient; these cells were no longer detected in PP on days 14 and 24, respectively, or in MLN on days 14 and 36, respectively. sIgE+B cells and IgE AFC did not appear in spleen until day 12, where they were detected through day 70. Although sIgE+B cells were never found in BM, IgE AFC appeared in BM on day 18, where they were detected through day 70. No sIgE+B cells or IgE AFC were found in other lymph nodes (OLN) on days 0-70. Boosting did not induce the reappearance of sIgE+B cells or IgE AFC in PP, the reappearance of sIgE+B cells in MLN, the appearance of sIgE+B cells in BM, or the appearance of sIgE+B cells or IgE AFC in OLN.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Inhibition of CD23-mediated IgE transcytosis suppresses the initiation and development of airway allergic inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The epithelium lining the airway tract and allergen-specific IgE are considered essential controllers of inflammatory responses to allergens. The human IgE receptor, CD23 (Fc'RII), is capable of transporting IgE or IgE-allergen complexes across the polarized human airway epithelial cell (AEC) monola...

  11. [Comparison of food specific IgE antibody test (RAST) and skin tests in children with atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Tang, R B; Chen, B S; Wu, K G; Hwang, B

    1993-09-01

    Thirty children with atopic dermatitis were enrolled in our study to evaluate the food specific IgE antibody assay (RAST) and skin tests as a screening test for food hypersensitivity. Our results showed that eight food antigens (fish, shrimp, crab, soybean, milk, egg-white, peanut, wheat) frequently elicited positive hypersensitivity reactions. Twenty-four patients had at least a positive skin reaction to one of the foods tested. Of the 240 skin tests, 30% (72/240) yield positive reactions. Eighteen patients had at least a positive RAST reaction to one of the foods tested, 20.9% (50/240) yield positive reaction. The agreement between skin test and RAST was 79.6%. Crab and shrimp accounted for most frequent positive reaction in both tests. The skin tests produced more positive results in skin testing than RAST, but gave a higher frequency of false positive results. The diagnosis of food allergy may be suspected from the medical history or by food specific IgE antibodies together with skin test as a screening test. Furthermore, the double blind placebo controlled food challenge should be considered as standard for clinical investigations.

  12. Evaluation of a spontaneous canine model of immunoglobulin E-mediated food hypersensitivity: dynamic changes in serum and fecal allergen-specific immunoglobulin E values relative to dietary change.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Hilary A; Hammerberg, Bruce

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of the pilot study reported here was to evaluate serum and fecal total and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) responses to dietary change in five Maltese x beagle dogs with suspected food hypersensitivity, compared with those of five clinically normal dogs. Clinical parameters (pruritus, otitis, and diarrhea) improved in the Maltese x beagle dogs during feeding of a novel diet, and signs were exacerbated by oral allergen provocation. Relative concentrations of serum and fecal wheat-, corn-, and milk-specific IgE were determined by use of an ELISA. The onset of clinical signs of disease was accompanied by an increase in serum allergen-specific IgE concentrations. In contrast, changes in clinical signs of disease or allergen-specific IgE values were not seen in the control group undergoing the same regimen. Total serum IgE concentration was measured by use of the ELISA, and comparison with known quantities of a monoclonal IgE allowed absolute values to be reported. Values were high in the Maltese x beagle colony (7 to 34 microg/ml), compared with those in the control dogs (0.7 to 6 microg/ml). Total serum and total fecal IgE concentrations did not change in either group during the study. Although allergen-specific IgE was detected in the feces of both groups, significant interassay variability made interpretation of the results difficult. The authors concluded that these Maltese x beagle dogs satisfied the currently recognized clinical criteria for the diagnosis of canine food hypersensitivity. Furthermore, the clinical and serologic responses seen in these dogs in response to oral allergen provocation suggest that this may be a useful model for the study of spontaneous food hypersensitivity.

  13. Allergen-specific immunotherapy: towards combination vaccines for allergic and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Edlmayr, Johanna; Niespodziana, Katarzyna; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Linhart, Birgit; Valenta, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    IgE-mediated allergies affect more than 25% of the population. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is an antigen-specific and disease-modifying form of treatment. It is based on the therapeutic administration of the disease-causing allergens to allergic patients. However, the fact that only allergen extracts of insufficient quality are currently available and the possible occurrence of side effects during treatment limit the broad use of SIT and prophylactic vaccination is has not yet been performed. In the last 20 years the DNA sequences of the most common allergens have been isolated and the corresponding allergens have been produced as recombinant allergens. Based on the progress made in the field of allergen characterization it is possible to improve the quality and safety of allergy vaccines and to develop new, more effective strategies for a broad application of SIT and even for prophylactic treatment. Here we discuss the development of combination vaccines for allergy and infectious diseases. This approach is based on the selection of allergen-derived peptides with reduced IgE- and T cell reactivity in order to minimize IgE- and T cell-mediated side effects as well as the potential of the vaccine to induce allergic sensitization. These peptides are fused by recombinant technology onto a viral carrier protein to obtain a combination vaccine which induces protective immunity against allergy and viral infections. The application of such combination vaccines for therapy and prophylaxis of allergy and infectious diseases is discussed.

  14. Allergen-specific immunotherapy: from therapeutic vaccines to prophylactic approaches.

    PubMed

    Valenta, R; Campana, R; Marth, K; van Hage, M

    2012-08-01

    Immunoglobulin E-mediated allergies affect more than 25% of the population. Allergen exposure induces a variety of symptoms in allergic patients, which include rhinitis, conjunctivitis, asthma, dermatitis, food allergy and life-threatening systemic anaphylaxis. At present, allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), which is based on the administration of the disease-causing allergens, is the only disease-modifying treatment for allergy. Current therapeutic allergy vaccines are still prepared from relatively poorly defined allergen extracts. However, with the availability of the structures of the most common allergen molecules, it has become possible to produce well-defined recombinant and synthetic allergy vaccines that allow specific targeting of the mechanisms of allergic disease. Here we provide a summary of the development and mechanisms of SIT, and then review new forms of therapeutic vaccines that are based on recombinant and synthetic molecules. Finally, we discuss possible allergen-specific strategies for prevention of allergic disease.

  15. Detection of IgE, IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies against raw and processed food antigens

    PubMed Central

    Vojdani, Aristo

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the first documented case of food allergy to cooked food in 1921 by Prausnitz and Kustner, all commercial food antigens are prepared from raw food. Furthermore, all IgE and IgG antibodies against dietary proteins offered by many clinical laboratories are measured against raw food antigens. Methods We developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the measurement of IgE, IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies against raw and processed food antigens. Sera with low or high reactivity to modified food antigens were subjected to myelin basic protein, oxidized low density lipoprotein, and advanced glycation end products (AGE) such as AGE-human serum albumin and AGE-hemoglobin. Results Compared to raw food antigens, IgE antibodies showed a 3–8-fold increase against processed food antigens in 31% of the patients. Similarly, IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies against modified food antigens overall were found at much higher levels than antibody reactions against raw food antigens. Almost every tested serum with high levels of antibodies against modified food antigens showed very high levels of antibodies against myelin basic protein, oxidized low density lipoprotein, AGE-human serum albumin and AGE-hemoglobin. Conclusion We conclude that the determination of food allergy, intolerance and sensitivity would be improved by testing IgE, IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies against both raw and processed food antigens. Antibodies against modified food antigens, by reacting with AGEs and tissue proteins, may cause perturbation in degenerative and autoimmune diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, inflammation, autoimmunity, neurodegeneration and neuroautoimmunity. PMID:19435515

  16. Detection of auto-anti-idiotypic antibodies to Lol p I (rye I) IgE antibodies in human sera by the use of murine idiotypes: levels in atopic and non-atopic subjects and effects of immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hébert, J; Bernier, D; Mourad, W

    1990-06-01

    Anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-Id Abs) are involved in the regulation of a number of immune responses including the IgE antibody production. In atopic patients, the increased synthesis of IgE antibodies could be related to a defective production of regulatory anti-Id Abs. In the present study, we first developed a sensitive assay for measuring the levels of anti-Id Abs directed against antibodies specific for Lol p I, the major allergenic determinant of Lolium perenne (rye grass). In this assay, we used previously described murine monoclonal anti-Lol p I antibodies that were shown to share epitopic specificities with human anti-Lol p I IgE and IgG antibodies, thus short-cutting the need for purification of F(ab')2 fragments of human IgG Abs and insuring optimal specificity and sensitivity. Levels of anti-Id Abs against two anti-Lol p I monoclonal antibodies (290A-167, 348A-6) were higher in normal volunteers than in untreated atopic patients. Specific immunotherapy increased the levels of anti-Id Abs to those of normal volunteers. These observations suggest a role for the Id-anti-Id network in the regulation of IgE antibody production.

  17. A human monoclonal IgE antibody that binds to MGL_1304, a major allergen in human sweat, without activation of mast cells and basophils.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kaori; Hiragun, Makiko; Hiragun, Takaaki; Kan, Takanobu; Kawaguchi, Tomoko; Yanase, Yuhki; Tanaka, Akio; Takahagi, Shunsuke; Hide, Michihiro

    MGL_1304, a major allergen in human sweat for patients with atopic dermatitis and/or cholinergic urticaria, is secreted from Malassezia globosa on human skin. The amounts of MGL_1304 and IgE against MGL_1304 are evaluated by the histamine release test using basophils or mast cells sensitized with serum containing IgE against MGL_1304, and enzyme linked sorbent assay (ELISA) using MGL_1304 and anti-MGL_1304 antibodies. Here, we identified a human monoclonal IgE (ABS-IgE) that binds to the high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) and MGL_1304 with high affinity (KD = 1.99 nM) but does not release histamine from basophils and mast cells. An ELISA using ABS-IgE as a standard IgE revealed that the amount of IgE against MGL_1304 (1000 U/ml) in the standard sera of patients with AD, employed in our previous report, is 32 ng/ml. A sandwich ELISA using ABS-IgE as a detection antibody showed approximately 10 times lower detection limit for MGL_1304 than ELISA in which MGL_1304 is directly bound to an ELISA plate. Moreover, ABS-IgE prevented histamine release from mast cells and basophils by neutralizing MGL_1304 not only in a free form in solution, but also on FcεRI expressed on the cell surface without cell activation. ABS-IgE may be used both to quantify the amount of MGL_1304 and anti-MGL_1304 IgE, and possibly for the treatment of diseases caused/aggravated by type I allergy to MGL_1304. PMID:26541454

  18. A human monoclonal IgE antibody that binds to MGL_1304, a major allergen in human sweat, without activation of mast cells and basophils.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kaori; Hiragun, Makiko; Hiragun, Takaaki; Kan, Takanobu; Kawaguchi, Tomoko; Yanase, Yuhki; Tanaka, Akio; Takahagi, Shunsuke; Hide, Michihiro

    MGL_1304, a major allergen in human sweat for patients with atopic dermatitis and/or cholinergic urticaria, is secreted from Malassezia globosa on human skin. The amounts of MGL_1304 and IgE against MGL_1304 are evaluated by the histamine release test using basophils or mast cells sensitized with serum containing IgE against MGL_1304, and enzyme linked sorbent assay (ELISA) using MGL_1304 and anti-MGL_1304 antibodies. Here, we identified a human monoclonal IgE (ABS-IgE) that binds to the high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) and MGL_1304 with high affinity (KD = 1.99 nM) but does not release histamine from basophils and mast cells. An ELISA using ABS-IgE as a standard IgE revealed that the amount of IgE against MGL_1304 (1000 U/ml) in the standard sera of patients with AD, employed in our previous report, is 32 ng/ml. A sandwich ELISA using ABS-IgE as a detection antibody showed approximately 10 times lower detection limit for MGL_1304 than ELISA in which MGL_1304 is directly bound to an ELISA plate. Moreover, ABS-IgE prevented histamine release from mast cells and basophils by neutralizing MGL_1304 not only in a free form in solution, but also on FcεRI expressed on the cell surface without cell activation. ABS-IgE may be used both to quantify the amount of MGL_1304 and anti-MGL_1304 IgE, and possibly for the treatment of diseases caused/aggravated by type I allergy to MGL_1304.

  19. Engraftment of retrovirally transduced Bet v 1-GFP expressing bone marrow cells leads to allergen-specific tolerance.

    PubMed

    Gattringer, Martina; Baranyi, Ulrike; Pilat, Nina; Hock, Karin; Klaus, Christoph; Buchberger, Elisabeth; Ramsey, Haley; Iacomini, John; Valenta, Rudolf; Wekerle, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chimerism is a promising strategy to induce tolerance to disease-causing antigens expressed on genetically modified haematopoietic stem cells. The approach was employed successfully in models of autoimmunity and organ transplantation. Recently, we demonstrated that molecular chimerism induces robust and lasting tolerance towards the major grass pollen allergen Phl p 5. Since allergens are a group of antigens differing widely in their function, origin and structure we further examined the effectiveness of molecular chimerism using the Phl p 5-unrelated major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1, co-expressed with the reporter GFP. Besides, inhibition of CD26 was used to promote engraftment of modified stem cells. Retrovirus VSV-Betv1-GFP was generated to transduce 5-FU-mobilized BALB/c hematopoietic cells to express membrane-bound Bet v 1 (VSV-GFP virus was used as control). Myeloablated BALB/c mice received Betv1-GFP or GFP expressing bone marrow cells, pre-treated with a CD26 inhibitor. Chimerism was followed by flow cytometry. Tolerance was assessed by measuring allergen-specific isotype levels in sera, RBL assays and T-cell proliferation assays. Mice transplanted with transduced BMC developed multi-lineage molecular chimerism which remained stable long-term (>8 months). After repeated immunizations with Bet v 1 and Phl p 5 serum levels of Bet v 1-specific antibodies (IgE, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG3 and IgA) remained undetectable in Betv1-GFP chimeras while high levels of Phl p 5-specific antibodies developed. Likewise, basophil degranulation was induced in response to Phl p 5 but not to Bet v 1 and specific non-responsiveness to Bet v 1 was observed in proliferation assays. These data demonstrate successful tolerization towards Bet v 1 by molecular chimerism. Stable long-term chimerism was achieved under inhibition of CD26. These results provide evidence for the broad applicability of molecular chimerism as tolerance strategy in allergy.

  20. Meat-specific IgG and IgA antibodies coexist with IgE antibodies in sera from allergic patients: clinical association and modulation by exclusion diet.

    PubMed

    Calderon, T E; Ferrero, M; Marino, G M; Cordoba, A; Beltramo, D; Muino, J C; Rabinovich, G A; Romero, M D

    2010-01-01

    IgE-mediated responses play a pivotal role in allergic patients with food intolerance. However, the association of food-specific IgG and IgA antibodies with the clinical outcome of allergic patients is still a matter of controversy. In this study we investigate whether beef-specific IgG and IgA antibodies may coexist with beef-specific IgE antibodies in food-allergic patients and examined their clinical relevance in different allergic settings. Beef-specific IgE, IgG and IgA antibodies were determined by solid-phase enzymoimmunoassay (ELISA) in a population of allergic patients (N=125) classified into patients with asthma, skin disease or gastrointestinal disorders, as well as in control subjects (N=80). IgE antibodies specific for citric fruits, tomato, cows milk, chickens egg and wheat were also determined. Beef was the predominant allergenic food in the whole population, not only for IgE (57.6 percent; P less than 0.001), but also for IgG and IgA isotypes (53.6 percent and 34.0 percent, respectively, P less than 0.001). Beef-specific IgE, IgG and IgA antibodies increased significantly in sera from patients with asthma, gastrointestinal disorders and skin allergy compared to sera from control subjects (P less than 0.001). Remarkably, IgG and IgA isotypes were significantly detected, even in the absence of IgE, in the three allergic conditions. All allergic patients, including those showing only IgG and IgA antibodies, significantly ameliorated their symptoms, and their levels of beef-specific antibodies were considerably reduced in response to a cow meat exclusion diet. While patients with gastrointestinal or skin allergic diseases were capable of tolerating beef following an established period of diet exclusion, asthmatic patients experienced a relapse of symptoms and showed a considerable increase in IgE, IgG and IgA-specific antibodies when re-challenged with a beef-enriched diet. Thus, beef-specific IgG and IgA antibodies coexist with IgE antibodies in sera

  1. Immunization with Hypoallergens of Shrimp Allergen Tropomyosin Inhibits Shrimp Tropomyosin Specific IgE Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Wai, Christine Y. Y.; Leung, Nicki Y. H.; Ho, Marco H. K.; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Shu, Shang An; Leung, Patrick S. C.; Chu, Ka Hou

    2014-01-01

    Designer proteins deprived of its IgE-binding reactivity are being sought as a regimen for allergen-specific immunotherapy. Although shrimp tropomyosin (Met e 1) has long been identified as the major shellfish allergen, no immunotherapy is currently available. In this study, we aim at identifying the Met e 1 IgE epitopes for construction of hypoallergens and to determine the IgE inhibitory capacity of the hypoallergens. IgE-binding epitopes were defined by three online computational models, ELISA and dot-blot using sera from shrimp allergy patients. Based on the epitope data, two hypoallergenic derivatives were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis (MEM49) and epitope deletion (MED171). Nine regions on Met e 1 were defined as the major IgE-binding epitopes. Both hypoallergens MEM49 and MED171 showed marked reduction in their in vitro reactivity towards IgE from shrimp allergy patients and Met e 1-sensitized mice, as well as considerable decrease in induction of mast cell degranulation as demonstrated in passive cutaneous anaphylaxis assay. Both hypoallergens were able to induce Met e 1-recognizing IgG antibodies in mice, specifically IgG2a antibodies, that strongly inhibited IgE from shrimp allergy subjects and Met e 1-sensitized mice from binding to Met e 1. These results indicate that the two designer hypoallergenic molecules MEM49 and MED171 exhibit desirable preclinical characteristics, including marked reduction in IgE reactivity and allergenicity, as well as ability to induce blocking IgG antibodies. This approach therefore offers promises for development of immunotherapeutic regimen for shrimp tropomyosin allergy. PMID:25365343

  2. Immunization with Hypoallergens of shrimp allergen tropomyosin inhibits shrimp tropomyosin specific IgE reactivity.

    PubMed

    Wai, Christine Y Y; Leung, Nicki Y H; Ho, Marco H K; Gershwin, Laurel J; Shu, Shang An; Leung, Patrick S C; Chu, Ka Hou

    2014-01-01

    Designer proteins deprived of its IgE-binding reactivity are being sought as a regimen for allergen-specific immunotherapy. Although shrimp tropomyosin (Met e 1) has long been identified as the major shellfish allergen, no immunotherapy is currently available. In this study, we aim at identifying the Met e 1 IgE epitopes for construction of hypoallergens and to determine the IgE inhibitory capacity of the hypoallergens. IgE-binding epitopes were defined by three online computational models, ELISA and dot-blot using sera from shrimp allergy patients. Based on the epitope data, two hypoallergenic derivatives were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis (MEM49) and epitope deletion (MED171). Nine regions on Met e 1 were defined as the major IgE-binding epitopes. Both hypoallergens MEM49 and MED171 showed marked reduction in their in vitro reactivity towards IgE from shrimp allergy patients and Met e 1-sensitized mice, as well as considerable decrease in induction of mast cell degranulation as demonstrated in passive cutaneous anaphylaxis assay. Both hypoallergens were able to induce Met e 1-recognizing IgG antibodies in mice, specifically IgG2a antibodies, that strongly inhibited IgE from shrimp allergy subjects and Met e 1-sensitized mice from binding to Met e 1. These results indicate that the two designer hypoallergenic molecules MEM49 and MED171 exhibit desirable preclinical characteristics, including marked reduction in IgE reactivity and allergenicity, as well as ability to induce blocking IgG antibodies. This approach therefore offers promises for development of immunotherapeutic regimen for shrimp tropomyosin allergy.

  3. Early recovery from cow's milk allergy is associated with decreasing IgE and increasing IgG4 binding to cow's milk epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Savilahti, Emma M.; Rantanen, Ville; Lin, Jing S.; Karinen, Sirkku; Saarinen, Kristiina M.; Goldis, Marina; Mäkelä, Mika J.; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Savilahti, Erkki; Sampson, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    Background Dynamics and balance of allergen specific IgE, IgG4 and IgA binding may contribute to the development of tolerance in cow's milk allergy. Profiling of antibody binding to cow's milk protein epitopes may help in predicting natural history of allergy. Objective To investigate differences in IgE, IgG4 and IgA binding to cow's milk epitopes over time between patients with early recovery or with persisting cow's milk allergy. Methods We studied serum samples at the time of diagnosis (mean age 7 months), one year later and at follow-up (mean age 8.6 years) from 11 patients with persisting IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy at age 8-9 years, and 12 patients who recovered by age 3 years. We measured the binding of IgE, IgG4 and IgA antibodies to sequential epitopes derived from five major cow's milk proteins with a peptide microarray-based immunoassay. We analyzed the data with a novel image processing method together with machine learning prediction. Results IgE epitope binding patterns were stable over time in patients with persisting cow's milk allergy, whereas binding decreased in patients who recovered early. Binding patterns of IgE and IgG4 overlapped. Among patients who recovered early, the signal of IgG4 binding increased while that of IgE decreased over time. IgE and IgG4 binding to a panel of αs1-, αs2-, β-and κ-casein regions predicted outcome with significant accuracy. Conclusions Attaining tolerance to cow's milk is associated with decreased epitope binding by IgE and a concurrent increase in corresponding epitope binding by IgG4. PMID:20462631

  4. Control of IgE responses. 4. Isotype-specific suppression of peak BPO-specific IgE antibody-forming cell responses and of BPO-specific IgE in serum by muramyldipeptide or murabutide after administration to mice by gavage.

    PubMed

    Auci, D L; Carucci, J A; Chice, S M; Smith, M C; Dukor, P; Durkin, H G

    1993-01-01

    Muramyldipeptide (MDP) and murabutide (MB) suppressed hapten-specific IgE antibody-forming cell (AFC) responses in vivo. IgE responses were induced in BALB/c mice by intraperitoneal injection with benzylpenicilloyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (BPO-KLH) (10 micrograms) in aluminum hydroxide gel (Alum) on days 0, 21 and 42. On day 44, mice were fed (gavage) or injected subcutaneously with varying concentrations of MDP or MB (0.1-500 mg/kg). The mice were killed on days 45-70, and the numbers of BPO-specific IgM, IgG1, IgE, and IgA AFC in various lymphoid organs were determined in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay. In addition, levels of BPO-specific IgE in serum were determined by ELISA. Data are expressed as AFC/10(7) cells or as micrograms/ml. Feeding with MDP or MB on day 44 suppressed BPO-specific IgE AFC responses and serum levels of BPO-specific IgE within 48 h (day 46) (65-100% and approximately 50% decrease, respectively). With both molecules, the suppression was IgE isotype-specific, dose-dependent and transient. The suppression was also route-specific since it was obtained only when MDP or MB were given by gavage, and not when injected subcutaneously. These results show that peak antigen-specific IgE responses can be downregulated in vivo, in isotype-specific fashion, by a clearly defined class of molecules, MDP and MB, one of which, MB, is a candidate for clinical studies in man. The mechanism of suppression probably involves the modulation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue and mucosal immunity. The clinical implications are that pharmacologic agents of this type may be suitable for use in the therapeutic or prophylactic downregulation of IgE and, hence, in the therapy of IgE-mediated diseases in man such as allergic rhinitis, asthma, and other atopic diseases.

  5. Allergy to Red Meat: A Diagnosis Made by the Patient and Confirmed by an Assay for IgE Antibodies Specific for Alpha-1,3-Galactose.

    PubMed

    Kaloga, Mamadou; Kourouma, Sarah; Kouassi, Yao Isidore; Ecra, Elidje Joseph; Gbery, Ildevert Patrice; Allou, Ange S; Diabate, Almamy; Djeha, Djokouehi; Sangaré, Abdoulaye; Yoboue, Yao Pauline

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of allergy to red meat observed in Ivory Coast. A 49-year-old male presented with pruritus. The diagnosis of allergy to red meat was confirmed by an assay for IgE antibodies specific for alpha-1,3 galactose. Interestingly, the disease was considered a spell to the patient who was suspected of being a sorcerer by the community. PMID:26933408

  6. IgE anti-respiratory syncytial virus antibodies detected in serum of pediatric patients with asthma.

    PubMed

    Smith-Norowitz, Tamar A; Mandal, Mira; Joks, Rauno; Norowitz, Levana T; Weaver, Diana; Durkin, Helen G; Bluth, Martin H; Kohlhoff, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes lower respiratory tract disease in infants and young children, and is a public health concern, as is the increase in pediatric asthma. Respiratory viral infections may trigger asthma exacerbations. However, it remains unknown whether RSV infection may have a specific association with asthma. Total serum IgE, and IgE- and IgG-anti-RSV Ab responses were studied in older asthmatic compared with non-asthmatic children (M/F, mean age: 14) (N=30, N=43, respectively). We found: (1) total serum IgE was higher in asthmatic compared with non-asthmatics (P<0.001); (2) total serum IgE did correlate with IgE anti-RSV Abs (P<0.001), and with IgG anti-RSV Abs (P=0.008) in all subjects; (3) total serum IgE levels did correlate with IgE anti-RSV in asthmatics (P=0.047), but not in non-asthmatics (P=0.13); (4) IgE anti-RSV Abs did correlate with IgG anti-RSV Abs in all subjects (P=0.001); (5) IgE- and IgG-anti RSV Abs were higher in asthma compared with no asthma (P=0.003; <0.001, respectively); (6) there was a significant association between age and IgE anti-RSV in non-asthma (P=0.008), but not in asthma (P=0.64). Our findings indicate that IgE-anti-RSV Ab responses may play important roles in RSV infection and asthma.

  7. Serum allergen-specific immunoglobulin E in atopic and healthy cats: comparison of a rapid screening immunoassay and complete-panel analysis.

    PubMed

    Diesel, Alison; DeBoer, Douglas J

    2011-02-01

    Feline and canine atopic dermatitis are thought to have a similar immunopathogenesis. As with dogs, detection of allergen-specific IgE in cat serum merely supports a diagnosis of feline atopy based on compatible history, clinical signs and elimination of other pruritic dermatoses. In this study, a rapid screening immunoassay (Allercept(®) E-Screen 2nd Generation; Heska AG, Fribourg, Switzerland; ES2G) was compared with a complete-panel serum allergen-specific IgE assay (Allercept(®); Heska AG; CP) in healthy cats with no history of skin disease and in atopic cats. The latter had no diagnosis of external parasitism, infection, food hypersensitivity or other skin disease explaining their pruritus, and expressed cutaneous reaction patterns typically associated with feline allergic skin disease (head, neck or pinnal pruritus, miliary dermatitis, self-induced alopecia, eosinophilic granuloma complex). The proportion of cats positive on either the ES2G or the CP assays was not significantly different between the atopic and healthy cat groups. There was, however, strong agreement between the results of the ES2G and CP assay; overall, the two tests were in agreement for 43 of 49 (88%) serum samples. There was also strong agreement when individual allergen groups were evaluated (agreement noted: indoor, 41 of 49 samples; grasses/weeds, 37 of 49 samples; and trees, 41 of 49 samples). These results indicate that although neither test is diagnostic for feline atopic dermatitis, the screening assay is beneficial for predicting the results of a complete-panel serum allergen-specific IgE assay in cats.

  8. IgE and IgG1 antibody production by a soluble product of Ascaris suum in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Stromberg, B E

    1979-01-01

    Third-stage larvae of Ascaris suum cultured to the fourth stage in a chemically defined culture medium produced a substance, the 'ACF antigen', which was allergenic in the guinea-pig. When three different concentrations (3.1, 31 and 62 micrograms) of the ACF antigen were given intraperitoneally, only the highest concentration induced a primary IgE specific antibody response (1:100 titre) as determined with the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction. Upon secondary exposure all concentrations demonstrated a strong IgE response (1:50,000 peak titre) with very little IgG1 activity (1:100). The secondary IgE responses began to rise on the fourth day, peaked on the sixth day and returned to relatively low levels by the fourteenth day (1:100). The intramuscular administration of the ACF antigen did not induce the extremely high titres of IgE as found with the intraperitoneal injection, but rather a low level response (1:500 peak) which did not differ greatly from the IgG1 response. PMID:521052

  9. Allergen-specific immunotherapy in pediatric allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) is the only curative way that can change the immunologic response to allergens and thus can modify the natural progression of allergic diseases. There are some important criteria which contributes significantly on efficacy of AIT, such as the allergen extract used for treatment, the dose and protocol, patient selection in addition to the severity and control of asthma. The initiation of AIT in allergic asthma should be considered in intermittent, mild and moderate cases which coexisting with other allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, and in case of unacceptable adverse effects of medications. Two important impact of AIT; steroid sparing effect and preventing from progression to asthma should be taken into account in pediatric asthma when making a decision on starting of AIT. Uncontrolled asthma remains a significant risk factor for adverse events and asthma should be controlled both before and during administration of AIT. The evidence concerning the efficacy of subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for treatment of pediatric asthma suggested that SCIT decreases asthma symptoms and medication scores, whereas SLIT can ameliorate asthma symptoms. Although the effectiveness of SCIT has been shown for both seasonal and perennial allergens, the data for SLIT is less convincing for perennial allergies in pediatric asthma. PMID:27489785

  10. Allergen-specific immunotherapy in pediatric allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Yukselen, Ayfer

    2016-07-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) is the only curative way that can change the immunologic response to allergens and thus can modify the natural progression of allergic diseases. There are some important criteria which contributes significantly on efficacy of AIT, such as the allergen extract used for treatment, the dose and protocol, patient selection in addition to the severity and control of asthma. The initiation of AIT in allergic asthma should be considered in intermittent, mild and moderate cases which coexisting with other allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, and in case of unacceptable adverse effects of medications. Two important impact of AIT; steroid sparing effect and preventing from progression to asthma should be taken into account in pediatric asthma when making a decision on starting of AIT. Uncontrolled asthma remains a significant risk factor for adverse events and asthma should be controlled both before and during administration of AIT. The evidence concerning the efficacy of subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for treatment of pediatric asthma suggested that SCIT decreases asthma symptoms and medication scores, whereas SLIT can ameliorate asthma symptoms. Although the effectiveness of SCIT has been shown for both seasonal and perennial allergens, the data for SLIT is less convincing for perennial allergies in pediatric asthma. PMID:27489785

  11. Combined effect of smoking habits and occupational exposure to hard metal on total IgE antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Shirakawa, T.; Kusaka, Y.; Morimoto, K. )

    1992-06-01

    A survey was made within a population of workers (n = 706) exposed to hard metal dust (an alloy including cobalt), an agent known to cause occupational allergy. Twenty-seven (4 percent) of 733 workers were eliminated from consideration in this study because of atopic status identified prior to starting work in the plant. Using a Phadebas PRIST, the subjects' total IgE levels were determined and related to their smoking and exposure status. Nonexposed male smokers (n = 135) had a higher geometric mean IgE level (39.7 IU/ml) than did nonexposed subjects who had never smoked (33.1 IU/ml; n = 99); those with a higher Brinkman index (greater than 300), a smoking index obtained by multiplying the number of cigarettes per day by the duration of smoking in years, had significantly (p less than 0.05) decreased IgE levels. Although ex-smokers (n = 72) had a higher geometric mean IgE level (73.3 IU/ml) than did those who had never smoked, their serum IgE level declined with age since the time they quit smoking, regardless of their hard metal exposure status. Hard metal (cobalt) exposure may play a significant role as an adjuvant in the production of total IgE. A multivariate analysis demonstrated that hard metal exposure and a smoking habit together arithmetically (p less than 0.05) increased total IgE levels. These two factors may be preventable risk factors for occupational allergy in hard metal workers.

  12. Comparison of specific IgE antibodies to wheat component allergens in two phenotypes of wheat allergy.

    PubMed

    Nam, Young-Hee; Hwang, Eui-Kyung; Jin, Hyun Jung; Lee, Jeong Min; Shin, Yoo-Seob; Ye, Young-Min; Palacin, Arantxa; Salcedo, Gabriel; Lee, Soo-Young; Park, Hae-Sim

    2013-11-01

    Specific IgE to gliadin was proposed as a marker for wheat dependent exercise induced anaphylaxis, while Tri a 14 was found to induce IgE response in baker's asthma. We evaluated whether these components could be used for discriminating phenotypes of wheat allergy. Twenty-nine patients who were wheat-induced anaphylaxis and/or urticaria (n=21, group I) and baker's asthma (n=8, group II) were enrolled. The prevalence of serum specific IgE to Tri a 14 was higher in group II (25%) than in group I (4.8%), while the serum specific IgE to gliadin was significantly higher in group I (70%) than in group II (12.5%). The cutoff value for predicting the baker's asthma using the ratio of serum specific IgE to Tri a 14 to gliadin was 742.8 optical density×1,000/(kU/L) with high sensitivity and specificity. These findings suggest that Tri a 14/gliadin may be a potential marker for predicting baker's asthma.

  13. Cloning of cockroach allergen, Bla g 4, identifies ligand binding proteins (or calycins) as a cause of IgE antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Arruda, L K; Vailes, L D; Hayden, M L; Benjamin, D C; Chapman, M D

    1995-12-29

    An allergen cloned from a Blattella germanica (German cockroach) cDNA library, encoded a 182-amino acid protein of 20,904 Da. This protein, designated B. germanica allergen 4 (Bla g 4), was expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The prevalence of serum IgE antibody to recombinant Bla g 4 in 73 cockroach allergic patients with asthma ranged from 40% (antigen binding radioimmunoassay) to 60% (plaque immunoassay). Cockroach allergic patients gave positive intradermal skin tests to recombinant Bla g 4 at concentrations of 10(-3)-10(-5) micrograms/ml, whereas non-allergic controls, or cockroach allergic patients with no detectable serum IgE antibody to Bla g 4, gave negative skin tests to 1 microgram/ml. Polymerase chain reaction and Southern analysis identified a 523-base pair DNA encoding Bla g 4 in both B. germanica and Periplaneta americana (American cockroach). However, Northern analysis showed that mRNA encoding Bla g 4 was transcribed in B. germanica but not in P. americana, suggesting that allergen expression was species specific. Sequence similarity searches showed that Bla g 4 was a ligand binding protein or calycin and unexpectedly revealed that this family contained several important allergens: beta-lactoglobulin, from cow milk, and rat and mouse urinary proteins. Although the overall sequence homology between these proteins was low (approximately 20%), macromolecular modeling techniques were used to generate two models of the tertiary structure of Bla g 4, based on comparisons with the x-ray crystal coordinates of bilin binding protein and rodent urinary proteins. The results show that members of the calycin protein family can cause IgE antibody responses by inhalation or ingestion and are associated with asthma and food hypersensitivity. PMID:8537384

  14. The intensity of T cell receptor engagement determines the cytokine pattern of human allergen-specific T helper cells.

    PubMed

    Carballido, J M; Faith, A; Carballido-Perrig, N; Blaser, K

    1997-02-01

    Enhanced production of T helper (Th)2 cytokines by allergen-specific Th cells plays a major role in the induction and maintenance of IgE-mediated allergic disorders. The mechanism that triggers this type of response in atopic individuals is not fully understood. Allergen-specific human Th cell clones produce interleukin (IL)-4 and low or undetectable levels of interferon (IFN)-gamma after stimulation with low concentrations of antigen. However, these Th cell clones are capable of generating significant amounts of IFN-gamma after optimal activation through their T cell receptor (TcR). Allergen-specific Th cell clones isolated from allergic individuals required higher doses of antigen to reach the plateau of proliferation and to generate Th0 cytokine responses than their counterparts isolated from nonallergic subjects. On the other hand, if allergen was replaced by anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb), both allergic and nonallergic Th cell clones attained the highest level of proliferation and significant IFN-gamma production in response to equivalent concentrations of anti-CD3 mAb. These results indicate that the strength of T cell ligation, which can be modulated by the availability of the TcR ligand, controls the balance of Thl/Th2 cytokines produced by memory Th cells in vitro. In the particular case of bee venom phospholipase A2, it is shown that the expression of allergen-specific surface Ig on antigen-presenting B cells has little influence on antigen uptake and therefore in determining the levels of T cell activation and cytokine production. Alternatively, the affinity of particular major histocompatibility complex class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells for allergen-derived peptides might determine the amount of specific ligand presented to the Th cells and play a decisive role skewing the Th cell cytokine production towards Th1 or Th2 phenotypes. These findings, which are consistent with the changes in cytokine patterns observed following clinical

  15. IgE adjuvant effect caused by particles - immediate and delayed effects.

    PubMed

    Granum, B; Gaarder, P I; Løvik, M

    2001-01-01

    Diesel exhaust particles are reported to increase the specific IgE response to ovalbumin (OVA) and pollen. Evidence has been provided that the particle core contributes to this adjuvant activity. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect of well-defined simple particles, polystyrene particles (PSP), on the production of allergen-specific IgE in a mouse model. The IgE adjuvant effect of PSP was investigated in experiments using intranasal (i.n.) instillation, intratracheal (i.t.) instillation or intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. Delayed and cumulative adjuvant effects were investigated by giving mice i.p. injections with PSP 1-3 days, or on 4 consecutive days before OVA, respectively. The levels of allergen-specific and total IgE were measured. Irrespectively of immunisation route and protocol, OVA in combination with PSP elicited increased levels of both allergen-specific and total IgE when compared with OVA alone. Therefore, in the experimental model, particles were found to augment the specific IgE response to an allergen even when the allergen was introduced several days after the particles. These findings imply that individuals exposed to particulate air pollution at one point of time may develop an increased reaction towards allergens inhaled later that day or even several days after the particle exposure. PMID:11164617

  16. Downstream class switching leads to IgE antibody production by B lymphocytes lacking IgM switch regions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingting; Franklin, Andrew; Boboila, Cristian; McQuay, Amy; Gallagher, Michael P; Manis, John P; Khamlichi, Ahmed Amine; Alt, Frederick W

    2010-02-16

    Ig heavy chain (IgH) class-switch recombination (CSR) replaces the IgH C mu constant region exons with one of several sets of downstream IgH constant region exons (e.g., C gamma, C epsilon, or C alpha), which affects switching from IgM to another IgH class (e.g., IgG, IgE, or IgA). Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates CSR by promoting DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) within switch (S) regions flanking the donor C mu (S mu) and a downstream acceptor C(H) (e.g., S gamma, S epsilon, S alpha) that are then joined to complete CSR. DSBs generated in S mu frequently are joined within S mu to form internal switch region deletions (ISD). AID-induced ISD and mutations have been considered rare in downstream S regions, suggesting that AID targeting to these S regions requires its prior recruitment to S mu. We have now assayed for CSR and ISD in B cells lacking S mu (S mu(-/-) B cells). In S mu(-/-) B cells activated for CSR to IgG1 and IgE, CSR to IgG1 was greatly reduced; but, surprisingly, CSR to IgE occurred at nearly normal levels. Moreover, normal B cells had substantial S gamma1 ISD and increased mutations in and near S gamma1, and levels of both were greatly increased in S mu(-/-) B cells. Finally, S mu(-/-) B cells underwent downstream CSR between S gamma1 and S epsilon on alleles that lacked S mu CSR to these sequences. Our findings show that AID targets downstream S regions independently of CSR with Smu and implicate an alternative pathway for IgE class switching that involves generation and joining of DSBs within two different downstream S regions before S mu joining.

  17. Neuropeptide-mediated regulation of hapten-specific IgE responses in mice. I. Substance P-mediated isotype-specific suppression of BPO-specific IgE antibody-forming cell responses induced in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Carucci, J A; Auci, D L; Herrick, C A; Durkin, H G

    1995-01-01

    The ability of substance P (SP) to regulate peak benzyl-penicilloyl (BPO)-specific IgE antibody-forming cell (AFC) responses in vivo and the ability of SP and other neuropeptides to regulate BPO-specific memory IgE AFC responses induced in vitro was determined. SP injected subcutaneously into BPO-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (BPO-KLH)-sensitized mice at the time of peak IgE responses suppressed these responses within 48 h (> 90%). The suppression obtained was IgE isotype-specific, dose-dependent, and transient. When spleen cells from immunized mice were cultured for 5 days with BPO-KLH, peak memory IgE AFC responses were induced in vitro. Inclusion of either SP or vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), but not neurotensin, serotonin, somatostatin, or gastrin, in cultures suppressed these responses in isotype-specific, dose-dependent fashion (approximately 70%). SP-, but not VIP-mediated suppression of IgE responses was abrogated by inclusion of anti-IFN gamma culture.

  18. IgE antibodies and urinary trimethylarsine oxide accounted for 1-7% population attributable risks for eczema in adults: USA NHANES 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy

    2015-12-01

    Population attributable risks from serum IgE and dust miteallergen concentrations and environmental chemicals for eczema are unclear. Therefore, it was aimed to examine serum IgE and allergen concentrations and environmental chemicals for eczema in adults and to calculate population attributable risks in a national and population-based setting. Data retrieved from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005-2006, was analyzed. Information on demographics and self-reported ever eczema was obtained by household interview. Bloods and urines (sub-sample) were also collected during the interview. Adults aged 20-85 were included. Statistical analyses were using chi-square test, t test, survey-weighted logistic regression modeling, and population attributable risk (PAR) estimation. Of all the included American adults (n = 4979), 310 (6.2%) reported ever eczema. Moreover, more eczema cases were observed in female adults but fewer cases in people born in Mexico. There were no significant associations observed between commonly known biomarkers (including vitamin D) and eczema or between dust mite allergens and eczema. Serum D. Farinae (PAR 1.0%), D. Pteronyssinus (PAR 1.1%), cat (PAR 1.8%), dog (PAR 1.6%), and muse (PAR 3.2%) IgE antibodies were associated with eczema. Adults with ever eczema were found to have higher levels of urinary trimethylarsine oxide concentrations (PAR 7.0%) but not other speciated arsenic concentrations. There were no clear associations between other environmental chemicals including heavy metals, phthalates, phenols, parabens, pesticides, nitrate, perchlorate, polycyclic hydrocarbons and eczema as well. Elimination of environmental risks might help delay or stop eczema up to 7% in the adult population.

  19. IgE antibodies and urinary trimethylarsine oxide accounted for 1-7% population attributable risks for eczema in adults: USA NHANES 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy

    2015-12-01

    Population attributable risks from serum IgE and dust miteallergen concentrations and environmental chemicals for eczema are unclear. Therefore, it was aimed to examine serum IgE and allergen concentrations and environmental chemicals for eczema in adults and to calculate population attributable risks in a national and population-based setting. Data retrieved from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005-2006, was analyzed. Information on demographics and self-reported ever eczema was obtained by household interview. Bloods and urines (sub-sample) were also collected during the interview. Adults aged 20-85 were included. Statistical analyses were using chi-square test, t test, survey-weighted logistic regression modeling, and population attributable risk (PAR) estimation. Of all the included American adults (n = 4979), 310 (6.2%) reported ever eczema. Moreover, more eczema cases were observed in female adults but fewer cases in people born in Mexico. There were no significant associations observed between commonly known biomarkers (including vitamin D) and eczema or between dust mite allergens and eczema. Serum D. Farinae (PAR 1.0%), D. Pteronyssinus (PAR 1.1%), cat (PAR 1.8%), dog (PAR 1.6%), and muse (PAR 3.2%) IgE antibodies were associated with eczema. Adults with ever eczema were found to have higher levels of urinary trimethylarsine oxide concentrations (PAR 7.0%) but not other speciated arsenic concentrations. There were no clear associations between other environmental chemicals including heavy metals, phthalates, phenols, parabens, pesticides, nitrate, perchlorate, polycyclic hydrocarbons and eczema as well. Elimination of environmental risks might help delay or stop eczema up to 7% in the adult population. PMID:26233738

  20. Dermatophagoides farinae-specific IgG responses in atopic dogs undergoing allergen-specific immunotherapy with aqueous vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chia-Chun; Griffin, Craig E; Hill, Peter B

    2008-08-01

    The molecular and immunologic mechanisms associated with successful allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT) have not been completely elucidated. The aim of this study was to characterize the changes in Dermatophagoides farinae-specific IgG in atopic dogs undergoing ASIT using aqueous vaccines. Fifteen atopic dogs with a positive skin test reaction to D. farinae were treated with aqueous vaccines for a minimum of 2 months following a standard protocol. Serum samples were collected before and during therapy and used to probe Western blots containing separated proteins of D. farinae. IgG responses were detected using a polyclonal goat anticanine IgG antibody and a chromogenic substrate 3,3'-diaminobenzidine. The blots were analysed using a semiquantitative digital image analysis system that evaluated the number and molecular weight of bands, as well as their intensity, which was related to IgG concentration. Prior to ASIT, all dogs showed allergen-specific IgG responses to various antigens of D. farinae. During ASIT, there was a significant increase in the total quantity of D. farinae-specific IgG antibodies to various antigens from the mite (P = 0.015). Significant increases were observed for a 98-kDa band (P = 0.015), likely to be Der f 15; bands with molecular weights between 50 and 70kDa (P=0.012); and bands between 30 and 45 kDa (P = 0.035). These findings provide support for the hypothesis that ASIT induces IgG blocking antibodies to allergens known to be relevant in canine atopic dermatitis.

  1. Neutrophil-mediated killing of Dipetalonema viteae microfilariae: simultaneous presence of IgE, IgG antibodies and complement is required.

    PubMed Central

    Aime, N; Haque, A; Bonnel, B; Torpier, G; Capron, A

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophils from the peripheral washings of normal rats in the presence of sera obtained from rats immune to circulating microfilariae adhered to and killed the microfilariae of Dipetalonema viteae in vitro within 16-24 hr. No significant adherence or cytotoxicity was mediated by sera collected from animals with a high microfilaraemia or from normal rats. Ultrastructural studies show that neutrophils, which are bigger than microfilariae, can easily internalize the small larvae resulting in the disintegration of the parasite. Immunoadsorption and inhibition experiments showed that the adherence-promoting activity resides both in IgG and IgE classes of antibody. However, the mere participation of these two antibodies is not sufficient to effect neutrophil adherence towards microfilariae, the presence of complement is also required. Samples of fresh immune rat serum (fIRS) depleted in alternative pathway components of complement by treatment with zymosan A failed to mediate cell adherence to the parasite. fIRS inactivated for the classical pathway of complement by the chelating agent EGTA partially retains its activity in mediating cytotoxicity to microfilariae. The striking antigenic specificity of D. viteae antibodies was shown by their ability to mediate cytotoxicity only to D. viteae but not towards Brugia malayi microfilariae. Images Figure 2 PMID:6538183

  2. Two Allergen Model Reveals Complex Relationship Between IgE Cross-Linking and Degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Handlogten, Michael W.; Deak, Peter E.; Bilgicer, Basar

    2014-01-01

    Summary Allergy is an immune response to complex mixtures of multiple allergens yet current models use a single synthetic allergen. Multiple allergens were modeled using two well-defined tetravalent allergens each specific for a distinct IgE thus enabling a systematic approach to evaluate the effect of each allergen and percent of allergen specific IgE on mast cell degranulation. We found the overall degranulation response caused by two allergens is additive for low allergen concentrations or low percent specific IgE, does not change for moderate allergen concentrations with moderate to high percent specific IgE, and is reduced for high allergen concentrations with moderate to high percent specific IgE. These results provide further evidence that supra-optimal IgE cross-linking decreases the degranulation response and establishes the two allergen model as a relevant experimental system to elucidate mast cell degranulation mechanisms. PMID:25308278

  3. EAACI: A European Declaration on Immunotherapy. Designing the future of allergen specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Allergy today is a public health concern of pandemic proportions, affecting more than 150 million people in Europe alone. In view of epidemiological trends, the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) predicts that within the next few decades, more than half of the European population may at some point in their lives experience some type of allergy. Not only do allergic patients suffer from a debilitating disease, with the potential for major impact on their quality of life, career progression, personal development and lifestyle choices, but they also constitute a significant burden on health economics and macroeconomics due to the days of lost productivity and underperformance. Given that allergy triggers, including urbanization, industrialization, pollution and climate change, are not expected to change in the foreseeable future, it is imperative that steps are taken to develop, strengthen and optimize preventive and treatment strategies. Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only currently available medical intervention that has the potential to affect the natural course of the disease. Years of basic science research, clinical trials, and systematic reviews and meta-analyses have convincingly shown that allergen specific immunotherapy can achieve substantial results for patients, improving the allergic individuals’ quality of life, reducing the long-term costs and burden of allergies, and changing the course of the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy not only effectively alleviates allergy symptoms, but it has a long-term effect after conclusion of the treatment and can prevent the progression of allergic diseases. Unfortunately, allergen specific immunotherapy has not yet received adequate attention from European institutions, including research funding bodies, even though this could be a most rewarding field in terms of return on investments, translational value and European integration and, a field in which Europe is recognized as

  4. EAACI: A European Declaration on Immunotherapy. Designing the future of allergen specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Moises A; Demoly, Pascal; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Bousquet, Jean; Sheikh, Aziz; Frew, Anthony; Scadding, Glenis; Bachert, Claus; Malling, Hans J; Valenta, Rudolph; Bilo, Beatrice; Nieto, Antonio; Akdis, Cezmi; Just, Jocelyne; Vidal, Carmen; Varga, Eva M; Alvarez-Cuesta, Emilio; Bohle, Barbara; Bufe, Albrecht; Canonica, Walter G; Cardona, Victoria; Dahl, Ronald; Didier, Alain; Durham, Stephen R; Eng, Peter; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Jacobsen, Lars; Jutel, Marek; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Klimek, Ludger; Lötvall, Jan; Moreno, Carmen; Mosges, Ralph; Muraro, Antonella; Niggemann, Bodo; Pajno, Giovanni; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Pfaar, Oliver; Rak, Sabina; Senna, Gianenrico; Senti, Gabriela; Valovirta, Erkka; van Hage, Marianne; Virchow, Johannes C; Wahn, Ulrich; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Allergy today is a public health concern of pandemic proportions, affecting more than 150 million people in Europe alone. In view of epidemiological trends, the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) predicts that within the next few decades, more than half of the European population may at some point in their lives experience some type of allergy.Not only do allergic patients suffer from a debilitating disease, with the potential for major impact on their quality of life, career progression, personal development and lifestyle choices, but they also constitute a significant burden on health economics and macroeconomics due to the days of lost productivity and underperformance. Given that allergy triggers, including urbanization, industrialization, pollution and climate change, are not expected to change in the foreseeable future, it is imperative that steps are taken to develop, strengthen and optimize preventive and treatment strategies.Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only currently available medical intervention that has the potential to affect the natural course of the disease. Years of basic science research, clinical trials, and systematic reviews and meta-analyses have convincingly shown that allergen specific immunotherapy can achieve substantial results for patients, improving the allergic individuals' quality of life, reducing the long-term costs and burden of allergies, and changing the course of the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy not only effectively alleviates allergy symptoms, but it has a long-term effect after conclusion of the treatment and can prevent the progression of allergic diseases.Unfortunately, allergen specific immunotherapy has not yet received adequate attention from European institutions, including research funding bodies, even though this could be a most rewarding field in terms of return on investments, translational value and European integration and, a field in which Europe is recognized as a

  5. Evaluation of cysticercus-specific IgG (total and subclasses) and IgE antibody responses in cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with neurocysticercosis showing intrathecal production of specific IgG antibodies.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Lisandra Akemi; Rossi, Cláudio Lúcio

    2013-02-01

    In the present study, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) standardized with vesicular fluid of Taenia solium cysticerci was used to screen for IgG (total and subclasses) and IgE antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with neurocysticercosis showing intrathecal production of specific IgG antibodies and patients with other neurological disorders. The following results were obtained: IgG-ELISA: 100% sensitivity (median of the ELISA absorbances (MEA)=1.17) and 100% specificity; IgG1-ELISA: 72.7% sensitivity (MEA=0.49) and 100% specificity; IgG2-ELISA: 81.8% sensitivity (MEA=0.46) and 100% specificity; IgG3-ELISA: 63.6% sensitivity (MEA=0.12) and 100% specificity; IgG4-ELISA: 90.9% sensitivity (MEA=0.85) and 100% specificity; IgE-ELISA 93.8% sensitivity (MEA=0.60) and 100% specificity. There were no significant differences between the sensitivities and specificities in the detection of IgG-ELISA and IgE-ELISA, although in CSF samples from patients with neurocysticercosis the MEA of the IgG-ELISA was significantly higher than that of the IgE-ELISA. The sensitivity and MEA values of the IgG4-ELISA were higher than the corresponding values for the other IgG subclasses. Future studies should address the contribution of IgG4 and IgE antibodies to the physiopathology of neurocysticercosis.

  6. Characterization of anti-idiotypic antibodies and their use as probes for determination of shared idiotopes expressed on murine and human IgE anti-rye I antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Mourad, W; Pelletier, G; Hébert, J

    1988-01-01

    This study describes the production and characterization of rabbit anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-ID Abs) against three idiotypes of three mAbs with different specificities. The anti-ID Abs were rendered idiotype specific by appropriate adsorption. Binding of labelled mAb to homologous anti-ID Ab bound to a polystyrene matrix was completely inhibited when the same mAb was added. In contrast, addition of other mAbs sharing the same isotype and the same light chain but with different specificity did not affect the binding reaction. Each anti-ID Ab inhibited completely and selectively the reaction between the allergen and the homologous mAb idiotype. Labelled rye I binding to a given polystyrene-bound mAb idiotype was completely blocked if the relevant anti-ID Ab was used as an inhibitor. Murine polyclonal anti-rye I antisera inhibited the reaction between all three mAbs and the antigens, as well as the reaction between all three mAb idiotypes and their homologous anti-ID Abs. On another hand, goat polyclonal anti-rye I antisera only inhibited the reaction between the mAbs and the antigens. These results suggest that the anti-ID Abs produced are directed against idiotopes located within the paratopes and such idiotopes are shared by murine monoclonal and polyclonal Abs. Human rye I-specific IgE and murine anti-rye I mAbs could share common idiotopes, since human IgE binding to the antigen was inhibited by the anti-ID Abs. These observations imply structural similarity in the V gene coding for the variable region of the antibody of two different species. PMID:3258278

  7. Allergen-specific immunotherapy induces Th1 shift in dogs with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Shida, Masayuki; Kadoya, Michiyo; Park, Seong-Jun; Nishifuji, Koji; Momoi, Yasuyuki; Iwasaki, Toshiroh

    2004-11-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy has been applied to canine atopic dermatitis. Despite the accumulated clinical evidence of its effect for atopic dogs, the basic immunologic mechanisms were not fully understood. In this study, the cytokine profile ex vivo in canine atopic dermatitis before and after allergen-specific immunotherapy was characterized using competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Blood samples were collected from 10 dogs with atopic dermatitis and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with house dust mite antigen. The levels of IFN-gamma and IL-4 mRNA were lower in atopic dogs compared with non-atopic controls. The ratio of IFN-gamma/IL-4 was low in atopic dogs indicating a cytokine profile polarized to Th2. The level of IFN-gamma after immunotherapy was significantly higher than that before (P < 0.05) whereas that of IL-4 mRNA was not changed. Consequently, the ratio of IFN-gamma/IL-4 after immunotherapy was significantly higher than that before immunotherapy (P < 0.05). These results indicate a Th2 cytokine bias is the dominant state in atopic dogs and allergen-specific immunotherapy causes a shift to wards a Th1 bias by enhancing IFN-gamma expression.

  8. Co-stimulation-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-8 by allergen-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Piattoni, S; Bistoni, O; Grignani, F; Bertotto, A

    1996-07-01

    Chemokines, which include interleukin (IL)-8, are a family of pro-inflammatory molecules with potent chemoattractant activity on neutrophils, as well as other cell types. IL-8 can be recovered from many inflammatory sites. To test the hypothesis that Th2-type allergen-specific T cells, known to be the main cell type governing the allergic inflammation, are a source of IL-8 and to investigate whether IL-8 release is influenced by the nature of the in vitro mitogenic or co-mitogenic stimulation, cypress-specific T-cell clones (TCC) were generated from five allergic subjects during in vitro seasonal exposure to the allergen. Purified cypress extract was produced directly from freshly collected pollen and used for in vitro stimulation of PBMC bulk cultures. After 5 days priming and a further 7 day period of IL-2-driven cell expansion, monoclonal antibodies to CD3, CD2 and CD28 were adopted for in vitro restimulation of allergen-specific cell lines or, subsequently, secondary established TCC. The induction of apoptosis was detected by propidium iodide (PI) cytofluorimetric assay. Basal and co-stimulation-induced IL-8 production was measured by an ELISA method. Both cypress-specific T-cell lines and TCC secreted appreciable amounts of IL-8. By cross-linking T-cell lines or Th2 CD4+ TCC with CD3, CD2 or CD28 MoAbs, the authors observed a great stimulation-induced IL-8 secretion, preferentially after CD2 or combined CD2/CD28 stimulation. In addition, CD4+ clones released large amounts of IL-8 into culture supernatants after CD2 stimulation while undergoing programmed cell death (30-40% hypodiploid DNA profile of PI-stained cells). In contrast, CD3 crosslinking was unable to determine the release of IL-8 or the induction of apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that incomplete TcR engagement by allergen may lead to the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines with a contemporary induction of apoptosis in a significant number of target cells. This phenomenon may

  9. A study of the human immune response to Lolium perenne (rye) pollen and its components, Lol p I and Lol p II (rye I and rye II). I. Prevalence of reactivity to the allergens and correlations among skin test, IgE antibody, and IgG antibody data.

    PubMed

    Freidhoff, L R; Ehrlich-Kautzky, E; Grant, J H; Meyers, D A; Marsh, D G

    1986-12-01

    In a stratified random sample of 320 white adults, the prevalence of puncture skin test positivity (ST +) to Lolium perenne (rye grass)-pollen extract (LPE) was 16%. Fifteen percent of all subjects (or 84% of subjects classified LPE IgE antibody positive [Ab +]) was classified IgE Ab + to highly purified Lol p I (Rye I), and 4% of all subjects (or 26% of subjects classified LPE IgE Ab +) was classified IgE Ab + to highly purified Lol p II (Rye II). These data and similar results obtained in an allergy-enriched group of 361 subjects are consistent with previous studies that Lol I is a major allergen and Lol II is a minor allergen of LPE. Whether we studied LPE, Lol I, or Lol II, responder subjects were younger than nonresponder subjects and more male than female subjects were responders. We then investigated the quantitative interrelationships among ST, IgE, and IgG Ab responsiveness to LPE, Lol I, and Lol II in the allergy-enriched group. For each allergen, log-log correlations were strong and significant for ST versus IgE Ab and for IgE Ab versus IgG Ab. All subjects IgE Ab + to Lol I or Lol II were IgG Ab + to that allergen, supporting other evidence for a commonality in the genetic control influencing the production of IgE and IgG Abs to a given allergen. Log-log correlations among ST end points, IgE Ab levels, or IgG Ab levels were strong for LPE versus either Lol I or Lol II but weak between Lol I and Lol II, consistent with the reported lack of cross-reactivity between Lol I and Lol II. Despite these findings, almost all Lol II + subjects were Lol I + by ST (98%), IgE Ab (91%), and IgG Ab (83%), suggesting that the Ia-restricted immune recognition of both these molecules is at least in part under a common genetic control.

  10. Adoptive cell transfer of contact sensitivity-initiation mediated by nonimmune cells sensitized with monoclonal IgE antibodies. Dependence on host skin mast cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, H; Ushio, H; Paliwal, V; Ptak, W; Askenase, P W

    1995-05-15

    A role for mast cell release of serotonin (5-HT), via Ag-specific factors derived from Thy-1+ B220+ lymphoid cells in the initiation of murine contact sensitivity (CS) has been suggested. However, because CS in mast cell-deficient mice was intact, a role for mast cells in CS initiation was unclear. Therefore, we examined whether CS could be initiated by i.v. injection of nonimmune mixed lymphoid cells that were sensitized in vitro with IgE. When naive mice received IgE-sensitized nonimmune spleen or lymph node cells, or IgE-sensitized purified mast cells, together with immune CS-effector B220- T cells, which therefore were depleted of CS-initiating, Thy-1+, B220+ cells, which could not transfer CS, then reconstitution of CS occurred. Mast cell-deficient W/Wv mice could not elicit this IgE-dependent CS ear swelling, but when mast cell deficiency was reversed by ear injection of normal bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells, then CS was restored. In vitro pretreatment with irrelevant monoclonal anti-OVA IgE prevented CS initiation mediated by Ag-specific, IgE mAb-sensitized cells, presumably by blocking sensitization with IgE. Thus Fc epsilon R on the normal lymphoid cells were involved. When ketanserin, a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, was injected i.v. before cell transfer, CS initiation via IgE-sensitized cells and CS were no longer elicited. Thus, in this system, IgE Abs bound to circulating IgE Fc epsilon R bearing lymphoid cells sensitized in vitro (most likely basophils), probably mediated early activation of these circulating basophils to release mediators, causing 5-HT release from cutaneous mast cells, to mediate CS initiation. PMID:7730614

  11. Correlation of IgE/IgG4 milk epitopes and affinity of milk-specific IgE antibodies with different phenotypes of clinical milk allergy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Julie; Lin, Jing; Bardina, Ludmilla; Goldis, Marina; Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna; Shreffler, Wayne G.; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Results from large-scale epitope mapping using peptide microarray have been shown to correlate with clinical features of milk allergy. Objectives We sought to assess IgE and IgG4 epitope diversity and IgE affinity in different clinical phenotypes of milk allergy and identify informative epitopes that may be predictive of clinical outcomes of milk allergy. Methods Forty-one subjects were recruited from a larger study on the effects of ingesting heat-denatured milk proteins in milk-allergic individuals. Using food challenges, subjects were characterized as clinically reactive to all forms of milk (n = 17), tolerant to heated milk (HM) products (n = 16), or outgrown their milk allergy (n = 8). Eleven non-milk allergic, healthy volunteers served as controls. Peptide microarray was performed using the previously published protocol. Results Milk allergic subjects had increased epitope diversity as compared to those who outgrew their allergy. HM tolerant subjects had IgE binding patterns similar to those who had outgrown their allergy, but IgG4 binding patterns that were more similar to the allergic group. Binding to higher numbers of IgE peptides was associated with more severe allergic reactions during challenge. There was no association between IgG4 peptides and clinical features of milk allergy. Using a competitive peptide microarray assay, allergic patients demonstrated a combination of high and low affinity IgE binding whereas HM tolerant subjects and those who had outgrown their milk allergy had primarily low affinity binding. Conclusions Greater IgE epitope diversity and higher affinity as determined by peptide microarray were associated with clinical phenotypes and severity of milk allergy. PMID:20226304

  12. The presence of serum anti-Ascaris lumbricoides IgE antibodies and of Trichuris trichiura infection are risk factors for wheezing and/or atopy in preschool-aged Brazilian children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The elucidation of factors that trigger the development of transient wheezing in early childhood may be an important step toward understanding the pathogenesis of asthma and other allergic diseases later in life. Transient wheezing has been mainly attributed to viral infections, although sensitisation to aeroallergens and food allergens may occur at an early age. In developing countries, intestinal helminthic infections have also been associated with allergy or atopy-related disorders. Objective The aim of this study was to explore the association of Trichuris trichiura and Ascaris lumbricoides infections with wheezing and atopy in early childhood. Study design A cross-sectional study using a Portuguese-language ISAAC phase I questionnaire, adapted for preschool-aged children, nested in a cohort study of childhood diarrhoea, was conducted on 682 children. Two faecal samples per child were examined for the presence of intestinal helminthic infection. IgE antibodies against three allergenic preparations (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Blomia tropicalis and common child food), as well as against A. lumbricoides antigens, were measured in a sub-sample of these children, whose parents allowed the procedure. Atopy was defined by the presence of levels of serum IgE antibodies ≥0.35 kU/L against at least one of the three tested allergenic preparations. Results Active T. trichiura infection but not A. lumbricoides infection was positively associated with wheezing in the total studied children population [adjusted OR = 2.60; CI = 1.54;4.38] and in the atopic children sub-population [adjusted OR = 3.07; CI = 1.00;9.43]. The association with atopy was also positive and statistically significant only in the brute analysis [OR = 2.13; CI = 1.03;4.40]. Anti-A. lumbricoides IgE antibodies, but not current A. lumbricoides infection, were positively associated with wheezing in atopic children [adjusted OR = 2.01; CI = 1.00;4.50] and in non-atopic children [adjusted OR

  13. Successful immunotherapy induces previously unidentified allergen-specific CD4+ T-cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, John F.; Hovde, Rachel; Glanville, Jacob; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Ji, Xuhuai; Gupta, Sheena; Tibshirani, Robert J.; Jay, David C.; Boyd, Scott D.; Chinthrajah, R. Sharon; Davis, Mark M.; Galli, Stephen J.; Maecker, Holden T.; Nadeau, Kari C.

    2016-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy can desensitize even subjects with potentially lethal allergies, but the changes induced in T cells that underpin successful immunotherapy remain poorly understood. In a cohort of peanut-allergic participants, we used allergen-specific T-cell sorting and single-cell gene expression to trace the transcriptional “roadmap” of individual CD4+ T cells throughout immunotherapy. We found that successful immunotherapy induces allergen-specific CD4+ T cells to expand and shift toward an “anergic” Th2 T-cell phenotype largely absent in both pretreatment participants and healthy controls. These findings show that sustained success, even after immunotherapy is withdrawn, is associated with the induction, expansion, and maintenance of immunotherapy-specific memory and naive T-cell phenotypes as early as 3 mo into immunotherapy. These results suggest an approach for immune monitoring participants undergoing immunotherapy to predict the success of future treatment and could have implications for immunotherapy targets in other diseases like cancer, autoimmune disease, and transplantation. PMID:26811452

  14. Recombinant allergens for allergen-specific immunotherapy: 10 years anniversary of immunotherapy with recombinant allergens.

    PubMed

    Valenta, Rudolf; Linhart, B; Swoboda, I; Niederberger, V

    2011-06-01

    The broad applicability of allergen-specific immunotherapy for the treatment and eventually prevention of IgE-mediated allergy is limited by the poor quality and allergenic activity of natural allergen extracts that are used for the production of current allergy vaccines. Today, the genetic code of the most important allergens has been deciphered; recombinant allergens equalling their natural counterparts have been produced for diagnosis and immunotherapy, and a large panel of genetically modified allergens with reduced allergenic activity has been characterized to improve safety of immunotherapy and explore allergen-specific prevention strategies. Successful immunotherapy studies have been performed with recombinant allergens and hypoallergenic allergen derivatives and will lead to the registration of the first recombinant allergen-based vaccines in the near future. There is no doubt that recombinant allergen-based vaccination strategies will be generally applicable to most allergen sources, including respiratory, food and venom allergens and allow to produce safe allergy vaccines for the treatment of the most common forms of IgE-mediated allergies.

  15. Successful immunotherapy induces previously unidentified allergen-specific CD4+ T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Ryan, John F; Hovde, Rachel; Glanville, Jacob; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Ji, Xuhuai; Gupta, Sheena; Tibshirani, Robert J; Jay, David C; Boyd, Scott D; Chinthrajah, R Sharon; Davis, Mark M; Galli, Stephen J; Maecker, Holden T; Nadeau, Kari C

    2016-03-01

    Allergen immunotherapy can desensitize even subjects with potentially lethal allergies, but the changes induced in T cells that underpin successful immunotherapy remain poorly understood. In a cohort of peanut-allergic participants, we used allergen-specific T-cell sorting and single-cell gene expression to trace the transcriptional "roadmap" of individual CD4+ T cells throughout immunotherapy. We found that successful immunotherapy induces allergen-specific CD4+ T cells to expand and shift toward an "anergic" Th2 T-cell phenotype largely absent in both pretreatment participants and healthy controls. These findings show that sustained success, even after immunotherapy is withdrawn, is associated with the induction, expansion, and maintenance of immunotherapy-specific memory and naive T-cell phenotypes as early as 3 mo into immunotherapy. These results suggest an approach for immune monitoring participants undergoing immunotherapy to predict the success of future treatment and could have implications for immunotherapy targets in other diseases like cancer, autoimmune disease, and transplantation. PMID:26811452

  16. Successful immunotherapy induces previously unidentified allergen-specific CD4+ T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Ryan, John F; Hovde, Rachel; Glanville, Jacob; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Ji, Xuhuai; Gupta, Sheena; Tibshirani, Robert J; Jay, David C; Boyd, Scott D; Chinthrajah, R Sharon; Davis, Mark M; Galli, Stephen J; Maecker, Holden T; Nadeau, Kari C

    2016-03-01

    Allergen immunotherapy can desensitize even subjects with potentially lethal allergies, but the changes induced in T cells that underpin successful immunotherapy remain poorly understood. In a cohort of peanut-allergic participants, we used allergen-specific T-cell sorting and single-cell gene expression to trace the transcriptional "roadmap" of individual CD4+ T cells throughout immunotherapy. We found that successful immunotherapy induces allergen-specific CD4+ T cells to expand and shift toward an "anergic" Th2 T-cell phenotype largely absent in both pretreatment participants and healthy controls. These findings show that sustained success, even after immunotherapy is withdrawn, is associated with the induction, expansion, and maintenance of immunotherapy-specific memory and naive T-cell phenotypes as early as 3 mo into immunotherapy. These results suggest an approach for immune monitoring participants undergoing immunotherapy to predict the success of future treatment and could have implications for immunotherapy targets in other diseases like cancer, autoimmune disease, and transplantation.

  17. Different Responses in Induction of Allergen Specific Immunoglobulin G4 and IgE-Blocking Factors for Three Mite Subcutaneous Immunotherapy Products

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Sang Chul; Son, Young Woong; Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Shin, Yoo Seob; Shin, Jung U; Sim, Da Woon; Park, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Kwang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Specific immunoglobulin G4 (sIgG4) and immunoglobulin E (IgE)-blocking factors produced by subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) play a critical role in the induction of allergen tolerance. However, comparative studies of available SCIT reagents on the induction of sIgG4 are limited. We compared increases in sIgG4 for three different house dust mite (HDM) SCIT reagents. Materials and Methods Seventy-two HDM sensitized allergic patients were enrolled and classified into four groups: 1) control (n=27), 2) SCIT with Hollister-Stier® (n=19), 3) Tyrosine S® (n=16), and 4) Novo-Helisen® (n=10). Levels of specific IgE (sIgE), sIgG4, and IgE blocking factor to Dermatophagoides farinae (D. farinae) were measured using ImmunoCAP (sIgE, sIgG4) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (IgE-blocking factors). Levels were measured before and 13.9±6.6 months after the SCIT. The allergen specificity and the induction levels of sIgE and sIgG4 were confirmed by immunoblot analysis. Results After SCIT, sIgG4 levels to D. farinae increased significantly; however, the increases differed significantly among the SCIT groups (p<0.001). Specific IgG4 levels to D. farinae were highest in Hollister-Stier® (3.7±4.1 mg/L), followed by Novo-Helisen® (2.2±2.3 mg/L) and Tyrosine S® (0.7±0.5 mg/L). In addition, patients who were administered using Hollister-Stier® showed the most significant decrease in IgE/IgG4 ratio (p<0.001) and increase in blocking factor (p=0.009). Finally, according to IgE immunoblot results, the Hollister-Stier® group showed the most significant attenuation of IgE binding patterns among others. Conclusion Currently available SCIT reagents induce different levels of specific IgG4, IgE/IgG4 ratio, and IgE-blocking factor. PMID:27593871

  18. Inhibition of IgE binding to cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants enhances diagnostic selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Holzweber, F; Svehla, E; Fellner, W; Dalik, T; Stubler, S; Hemmer, W; Altmann, F

    2013-01-01

    Background Allergy diagnosis by determination of allergen-specific IgE is complicated by clinically irrelevant IgE, of which the most prominent example is IgE against cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCDs) that occur on allergens from plants and insects. Therefore, CCDs cause numerous false-positive results. Inhibition of CCDs has been proposed as a remedy, but has not yet found its way into the routine diagnostic laboratory. We sought to provide a simple and affordable procedure to overcome the CCD problem. Methods Serum samples from allergic patients were analysed for allergen-specific IgEs by different commercial tests (from Mediwiss, Phadia and Siemens) with and without a semisynthetic CCD blocker with minimized potential for nonspecific interactions that was prepared from purified bromelain glycopeptides and human serum albumin. Results Twenty two per cent of about 6000 serum samples reacted with CCD reporter proteins. The incidence of anti-CCD IgE reached 35% in the teenage group. In patients with anti-CCD IgE, application of the CCD blocker led to a clear reduction in read-out values, often below the threshold level. A much better correlation between laboratory results and anamnesis and skin tests was achieved in many cases. The CCD blocker did not affect test results where CCDs were not involved. Conclusion Eliminating the effect of IgEs directed against CCDs by inhibition leads to a significant reduction in false-positive in vitro test results without lowering sensitivity towards relevant sensitizations. Application of the CCD blocker may be worthwhile wherever natural allergen extracts or components are used. PMID:24107260

  19. The CONSORT statement checklist in allergen-specific immunotherapy: a GA2LEN paper.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, P J; Brozek, J; Bachert, C; Bieber, T; Bonini, S; Burney, P; Calderon, M; Canonica, G W; Compalati, E; Daures, J P; Delgado, L; Demoly, P; Dahl, R; Durham, S R; Kowalski, M L; Malling, H J; Merk, H; Papadopoulos, N; Passalacqua, G; Simon, H U; Worms, M; Wahn, U; Zuberbier, T; Schünemann, H J; Bousquet, J

    2009-12-01

    The methodology of randomized clinical trials is essential for the critical assessment and registration of therapeutic interventions. The CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) statement was developed to alleviate the problems arising from the inadequate reporting of randomized controlled trials. The present article reflects on the items that we believe should be included in the CONSORT checklist in the context of conducting and reporting trials in allergen-specific immunotherapy. Only randomized, blinded (in particular blinding of patients, health care providers, and outcome assessors), placebo-controlled Phase III studies in this article. Our analysis focuses on the definition of patients' inclusion and exclusion criteria, allergen standardization, primary, secondary and exploratory outcomes, reporting of adverse events and analysis.

  20. The Developmental History of IgE and IgG4 Antibodies in Relation to Atopy, Eosinophilic Esophagitis, and the Modified TH2 Response.

    PubMed

    Aalberse, Rob C; Platts-Mills, Thomas A; Rispens, Theo

    2016-06-01

    A common reaction from anyone confronted with allergy is the question: what prevents universal allergy? We will discuss recent findings in the mouse system that have provided us with clues on why allergy is not more common. We will also address one crucial aspect of atopic allergy in humans, which is absent in most mouse model systems, an IgG/IgE ratio <10. We consider the typical mouse IgE response to be more closely related to the "modified TH2" response in humans. We will discuss the similarities and differences between the IgE and IgG4 response to allergens and an update on the IgG4 B cell, partly derived from studies on eosinophilic esophagitis and IgG4-related diseases. PMID:27221343

  1. Specific immunotherapy modifies allergen-specific CD4+ T cell responses in an epitope-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Wambre, Erik; DeLong, Jonathan H.; James, Eddie A.; Torres-Chinn, Nadia; Pfützner, Wolfgang; Möbs, Christian; Durham, Stephen R.; Till, Stephen J.; Robinson, David; Kwok, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the mechanisms by which the immune system induces and controls allergic inflammation at the T cell epitope level is critical for the design of new allergy vaccine strategies. Objective To characterize allergen-specific T cell responses linked with allergy or peripheral tolerance and to determine how CD4+ T cell responses to individual allergen-derived epitopes change over allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT). Methods Timothy grass pollen (TGP) allergy was used as a model for studying grass pollen allergies. The breadth, magnitude, epitope hierarchy and phenotype of the DR04:01-restricted TGP-specific T cell responses in ten grass pollen allergic, five non-atopic and six allergy vaccine-treated individuals was determined using an ex vivo pMHCII-tetramer approach. Results CD4+ T cells in allergic individuals are directed to a broad range of TGP epitopes characterized by defined immunodominance hierarchy patterns and with distinct functional profiles that depend on the epitope recognized. Epitopes that are restricted specifically to either TH2 or TH1/TR1 responses were identified. ASIT was associated with preferential deletion of allergen-specific TH2 cells and without significant change in frequency of TH1/TR1 cells. Conclusions Preferential allergen-specific TH2-cells deletion after repeated high doses antigen stimulation can be another independent mechanism to restore tolerance to allergen during immunotherapy. PMID:24373351

  2. Tracing antigen signatures in the human IgE repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Marth, Katharina; Novatchkova, Maria; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Jenisch, Stefan; Jäger, Siegfried; Kabelitz, Dieter; Valenta, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Allergen recognition by IgE antibodies is a key event in allergic inflammation. In this study, the IgE IGHV repertoires of individuals with allergy to the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1, were analyzed over a four years period of allergen exposure by RT-PCR and sequencing of cDNA. Approximately half of the IgE transcripts represented non-redundant sequences, which belonged to seventeen different IGHV genes. Most variable regions contained somatic mutations but also non-mutated sequences were identified. There was no evidence for relevant increases of somatic mutations over time of allergen exposure. Highly similar IgE variable regions were found after four years of allergen exposure in the same and in genetically non-related individuals. Our results indicate that allergens select and shape a limited number of similar IgE variable regions in the human IgE repertoire. PMID:20573403

  3. Peptide specificity and HLA restriction do not dictate lymphokine production by allergen-specific T-lymphocyte clones.

    PubMed Central

    van Neerven, R J; van de Pol, M M; Wierenga, E A; Aalberse, R C; Jansen, H M; Kapsenberg, M L

    1994-01-01

    Human and murine CD4+ T lymphocytes can be subdivided into distinct subsets [T-helper type 0 (Th0), Th1 or Th2], based on their lymphokine production profiles. Not much is known about the factors that determine these restricted lymphokine secretion profiles. Peptide specificity and human leucocyte antigen (HLA) restriction may be such factors. As it is well established that allergen-specific T lymphocytes from atopic individuals and non-atopic controls differ in their lymphokine secretion profile, we studied two allergen-specific T-lymphocyte clones (TLC) with identical peptide specificity and HLA restriction that were generated from the peripheral blood of an atopic donor and a non-atopic control donor. The two CD4+ TLC recognize the same epitope (20-33) of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus major allergen Der p II. Both TLC recognize the epitope in an HLA-DQB1*0602-restricted manner. However, the lymphokine production profiles of these TLC show clear differences after allergen-specific or polyclonal activation. As expected, TLC JBD4 from the atopic donor produced high levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4) without detectable interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), whereas TLC PBA1 from the non-atopic donor produced both IFN-gamma and IL-4 upon allergen-specific or polyclonal activation. Inasmuch as both TLC recognized the same epitope of Der p II in association with the same HLA-DQ molecule, these data suggest that peptide specificity and HLA restriction of human allergen-specific TLC do not dictate their lymphokine secretion profile. PMID:7525459

  4. Skin prick testing predicts peanut challenge outcome in previously allergic or sensitized children with low serum peanut-specific IgE antibody concentration.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Richard C; Richmond, Peter; Prescott, Susan L; Mallon, Dominic F; Gong, Grace; Franzmann, Annkathrin M; Naidoo, Rama; Loh, Richard K S

    2007-05-01

    Peanut allergy is transient in some children but it is not clear whether quantitating peanut-specific IgE by Skin Prick Test (SPT) adds additional information to fluorescent-enzyme immunoassay (FEIA) in discriminating between allergic and tolerant children. To investigate whether SPT with a commercial extract or fresh foods adds additional predictive information for peanut challenge in children with a low FEIA (<10 k UA/L) who were previously sensitized, or allergic to peanuts. Children from a hospital-based allergy service who were previously sensitized or allergic to peanuts were invited to undergo a peanut challenge unless they had a serum peanut-specific IgE>10 k UA/L, a previous severe reaction, or a recent reaction to peanuts (within two years). SPT with a commercial extract, raw and roasted saline soaked peanuts was performed immediately prior to open challenge in hospital with increasing quantity of peanuts until total of 26.7 g of peanut was consumed. A positive challenge consisted of an objective IgE mediated reaction occurring during the observation period. 54 children (median age of 6.3 years) were admitted for a challenge. Nineteen challenges were positive, 27 negative, five were indeterminate and three did not proceed after SPT. Commercial and fresh food extracts provided similar diagnostic information. A wheal diameter of >or=7 mm of the commercial extract predicted an allergic outcome with specificity 97%, positive predictive value 93% and sensitivity 83%. There was a tendency for an increase in SPT wheal since initial diagnosis in children who remained allergic to peanuts while it decreased in those with a negative challenge. The outcome of a peanut challenge in peanut sensitized or previously allergic children with a low FEIA can be predicted by SPT. In this cohort, not challenging children with a SPT wheal of >or=7 mm would have avoided 15 of 18 positive challenges and denied a challenge to one out of 27 tolerant children.

  5. Analysis of Ig V{sub H} region genes encoding IgE antibodies in splenic B lymphocytes of a patient with asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, R.E.; Chapman, C.J.; Stevenson, F.K.

    1995-05-15

    An atopic patient with hypersensitivity against house dust mite died as a result of an asthmatic attack. A portion of the spleen was obtained and was used to analyze the spectrum of Ig heavy chain V regions involved in encoding IgE Abs. A nested PCR technique generated 14 cloned V{sub H} sequences that had distinct CDR3 regions; 5 of 14 were derived from the minor V{sub H}5 family, and the remainder derived from the larger families, V{sub H}3 (6 of 14) and V{sub H}4 (3 of 14). One of the V{sub H}3-derived sequences was present as a repeated sequence in three clones. A control PCR with the same V{sub H} primers in combination with J{sub H} primers yielded only 1 of 13 sequences from V{sub H}5, indicating preferential V{sub H}5 usage only for IgE. Analysis of V{sub H}5-C{epsilon} sequences revealed usage of a single gene, DP73, with extensive mutations and several {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} containing common replacement amino acids. However, there was no concentration of replacement mutations in the CDRs, which conventionally would indicate a role for Ag selection. The V{sub H}3 and V{sub H}4 genes in combination with C{epsilon} also harbored extensive somatic mutations. From these findings in splenic B lymphocytes, and those of a previous study of blood lymphocytes, it seems that preferential usage of V{sub H}5 genes and extensive somatic hypermutation are characteristic of B cells synthesizing IgE in patients with allergic disease. 27 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Allergen-specific immunotherapy provides immediate, long-term and preventive clinical effects in children and adults: the effects of immunotherapy can be categorised by level of benefit -the centenary of allergen specific subcutaneous immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Allergen Specific Immunotherapy (SIT) for respiratory allergic diseases is able to significantly improve symptoms as well as reduce the need for symptomatic medication, but SIT also has the capacity for long-term clinical effects and plays a protective role against the development of further allergies and symptoms. The treatment acts on basic immunological mechanisms, and has the potential to change the pathological allergic immune response. In this paper we discuss some of the most important achievements in the documentation of the benefits of immunotherapy, over the last 2 decades, which have marked a period of extensive research on the clinical effects and immunological background of the mechanisms involved. The outcome of immunotherapy is described as different levels of benefit from early reduction in symptoms over progressive clinical effects during treatment to long-term effects after discontinuation of the treatment and prevention of asthma. The efficacy of SIT increases the longer it is continued and immunological changes lead to potential long-term benefits. SIT alone and not the symptomatic treatment nor other avoidance measures has so far been documented as the therapy with long-term or preventive potential. The allergic condition is driven by a subset of T-helper lymphocytes (Th2), which are characterised by the production of cytokines like IL-4, and IL-5. Immunological changes following SIT lead to potential curative effects. One mechanism whereby immunotherapy suppresses the allergic response is through increased production of IgG4 antibodies. Induction of specific IgG4 is able to influence the allergic response in different ways and is related to immunological effector mechanisms, also responsible for the reduced late phase hyperreactivity and ongoing allergic inflammation. SIT is the only treatment which interferes with the basic pathophysiological mechanisms of the allergic disease, thereby creating the potential for changes in the long

  7. Requirement for additional treatment for dogs with atopic dermatitis undergoing allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Colombo, S; Hill, P B; Shaw, D J; Thoday, K L

    2007-06-23

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT) is one of the main treatments for atopic dermatitis in dogs, but it often requires additional treatments such as antibacterial and antifungal therapy for secondary bacterial and yeast infections, or antipruritic drugs to control the clinical signs or treat the adverse effects of the immunotherapy. Twenty-seven dogs enrolled in a study of ASIT were clinically assessed four times over a period of nine months; their requirement for treatment for secondary bacterial and yeast infections, for the administration of glucocorticoids as additional antipruritic therapy, and for the treatment of any adverse effects of the ASIT were evaluated. Twenty (74 per cent) of the dogs were treated for superficial bacterial pyoderma, 18 (66.6 per cent) required treatment for Malassezia species dermatitis on one or more occasions, eight (29.6 per cent) required treatment for otitis externa due to Malassezia species or bacteria, and eight required glucocorticoids to control their clinical signs. Five (18.5 per cent) of the dogs experienced adverse effects due to the ASIT and two required treatment with antihistamines (H1 receptor antagonists) in order to continue with the ASIT. PMID:17586789

  8. Interleukin-2-Dependent Allergen-Specific Tissue-Resident Memory Cells Drive Asthma.

    PubMed

    Hondowicz, Brian D; An, Dowon; Schenkel, Jason M; Kim, Karen S; Steach, Holly R; Krishnamurty, Akshay T; Keitany, Gladys J; Garza, Esteban N; Fraser, Kathryn A; Moon, James J; Altemeier, William A; Masopust, David; Pepper, Marion

    2016-01-19

    Exposure to inhaled allergens generates T helper 2 (Th2) CD4(+) T cells that contribute to episodes of inflammation associated with asthma. Little is known about allergen-specific Th2 memory cells and their contribution to airway inflammation. We generated reagents to understand how endogenous CD4(+) T cells specific for a house dust mite (HDM) allergen form and function. After allergen exposure, HDM-specific memory cells persisted as central memory cells in the lymphoid organs and tissue-resident memory cells in the lung. Experimental blockade of lymphocyte migration demonstrated that lung-resident cells were sufficient to induce airway hyper-responsiveness, which depended upon CD4(+) T cells. Investigation into the differentiation of pathogenic Trm cells revealed that interleukin-2 (IL-2) signaling was required for residency and directed a program of tissue homing migrational cues. These studies thus identify IL-2-dependent resident Th2 memory cells as drivers of lung allergic responses.

  9. Sex steroid hormones and circulating IgE levels.

    PubMed

    Mathur, S; Mathur, R S; Goust, J M; Williamson, H O; Fudenberg, H H

    1977-12-01

    The possible influence of sex steroid hormones on circulating IgE levels in general and IgE anti-Candida antibodies in particular was studied by quantification of plasma levels of progesterone, estradiol and IgE (total and anti-Candida-specific) in females during the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle, and during pregnancy. IgE levels during the follicular and luteal phases were not significantly different, although the mean values for the luteal phase were slightly lower. This trend was apparent in daily samples from two normal females during one menstrual cycle. During pregnancy, when the levels of circulating sex steroids were high, IgE levels were only slightly higher than in the follicular and luteal phases. In men and in gonadal dysgenetics, circulating progesterone levels were similar to those of women during the follicular phase (i.e., lower than in the luteal phase or in pregnancy), but the IgE levels were not different. The apparently low levels of IgE during the luteal phase may therefore be due to physiological factors other than fluctuations in the sex steroid hormones. From the present studies, it is apparent that sex steroid hormones have little or no effect on humoral IgE levels, in marked contrast to previously described correlations for other immunoglobulins, especially anti-Candida antibodies. PMID:606452

  10. Minimizing fucosylation in insect cell-derived glycoproteins reduces binding to IgE antibodies from the sera of patients with allergy

    PubMed Central

    Palmberger, Dieter; Ashjaei, Kazem; Strell, Stephanie; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; Grabherr, Reingard

    2016-01-01

    The baculovirus/insect cell system has proven to be a very powerful tool for the expression of several therapeutics. Nevertheless, these products sometimes suffer from reduced biological activity and unwanted side effects. Several studies have demonstrated that glycosylation can greatly influence the structure, function, half-life, antigenicity and immunogenicity of various glycoproteins. Yet, the glycosylation pattern of insect cell-derived products is not favourable for many applications. Especially the presence of core α1,3-linked fucose bears the risk of causing immediate hypersensitivity reactions in patients with allergy. In this study we evaluated the impact of fucose residues on the allergenic potential of an insect cell-expressed vaccine candidate. In order to block the GDP-L-fucose de novo synthesis pathway, we integrated the Pseudomonas aeruginosa GDP-6-deoxy-D-lyxo-4-hexulose reductase (RMD) gene into a baculovirus backbone. This virus was then used for the expression of soluble influenza A virus hemagglutinin. Expression studies showed that the co-expression of RMD did not influence the overall level of recombinant protein secretion. We confirmed the result of our strategy by analysing PNGase A-released N-glycans using MALDI-TOF-MS. In order to evaluate the biological impact of defucosylation of influenza HA we tested the binding activity of IgE derived from the sera of patients with allergy to the purified antigen. The nonfucosylated hemagglutinin showed a 10-fold decrease in IgE binding levels as compared to wildtype variants. PMID:24753388

  11. Aluminium in allergen-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy--a German perspective.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Matthias F; Heath, Matthew D

    2014-07-16

    We are living in an "aluminium age" with increasing bioavailability of the metal for approximately 125 years, contributing significantly to the aluminium body burden of humans. Over the course of life, aluminium accumulates and is stored predominantly in the lungs, bones, liver, kidneys and brain. The toxicity of aluminium in humans is briefly summarised, highlighting links and possible causal relationships between a high aluminium body burden and a number of neurological disorders and disease states. Aluminium salts have been used as depot-adjuvants successfully in essential prophylactic vaccinations for almost 100 years, with a convincing positive benefit-risk assessment which remains unchanged. However, allergen-specific immunotherapy commonly consists of administering a long-course programme of subcutaneous injections using preparations of relevant allergens. Regulatory authorities currently set aluminium limits for vaccines per dose, rather than per treatment course. Unlike prophylactic vaccinations, numerous injections with higher proportions of aluminium-adjuvant per injection are applied in subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and will significantly contribute to a higher cumulative life dose of aluminium. While the human body may cope robustly with a daily aluminium overload from the environment, regulatory cumulative threshold values in immunotherapy need further addressing. Based on the current literature, predisposing an individual to an unusually high level of aluminium, such as through subcutaneous immunotherapy, has the potential to form focal accumulations in the body with the propensity to exert forms of toxicity. Particularly in relation to longer-term health effects, the safety of aluminium adjuvants in immunotherapy remains unchallenged by health authorities - evoking the need for more consideration, guidance, and transparency on what is known and not known about its safety in long-course therapy and what measures can be taken to prevent or

  12. Aluminium in allergen-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy--a German perspective.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Matthias F; Heath, Matthew D

    2014-07-16

    We are living in an "aluminium age" with increasing bioavailability of the metal for approximately 125 years, contributing significantly to the aluminium body burden of humans. Over the course of life, aluminium accumulates and is stored predominantly in the lungs, bones, liver, kidneys and brain. The toxicity of aluminium in humans is briefly summarised, highlighting links and possible causal relationships between a high aluminium body burden and a number of neurological disorders and disease states. Aluminium salts have been used as depot-adjuvants successfully in essential prophylactic vaccinations for almost 100 years, with a convincing positive benefit-risk assessment which remains unchanged. However, allergen-specific immunotherapy commonly consists of administering a long-course programme of subcutaneous injections using preparations of relevant allergens. Regulatory authorities currently set aluminium limits for vaccines per dose, rather than per treatment course. Unlike prophylactic vaccinations, numerous injections with higher proportions of aluminium-adjuvant per injection are applied in subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and will significantly contribute to a higher cumulative life dose of aluminium. While the human body may cope robustly with a daily aluminium overload from the environment, regulatory cumulative threshold values in immunotherapy need further addressing. Based on the current literature, predisposing an individual to an unusually high level of aluminium, such as through subcutaneous immunotherapy, has the potential to form focal accumulations in the body with the propensity to exert forms of toxicity. Particularly in relation to longer-term health effects, the safety of aluminium adjuvants in immunotherapy remains unchallenged by health authorities - evoking the need for more consideration, guidance, and transparency on what is known and not known about its safety in long-course therapy and what measures can be taken to prevent or

  13. C-type Lectin Receptor Expression on Human Basophils and Effects of Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, K; Rydnert, F; Broos, S; Andersson, M; Greiff, L; Lindstedt, M

    2016-09-01

    Basophils are emerging as immunoregulatory cells capable of interacting with their environment not only via their characteristic IgE-mediated activation, but also in an IgE-independent manner. Basophils are known to express and respond to stimulation via TLR2, TLR4, DC-SIGN and DCIR, but whether basophils also express other C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) is largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the CLR expression profile of human basophils using multicolour flow cytometry. As FcRs as well as some CLRs are associated with allergen recognition and shown to be involved in subsequent immune responses, the expression of CLRs and FcRs on peripheral blood basophils, as well as their frequency, was monitored for 1 year in subjects undergoing subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT). Here, we show that human basophils express CLECSF14, DEC205, Dectin-1, Dectin-2 and MRC2. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the frequencies of basophils expressing the allergy-associated CLRs Dectin-1 and Dectin-2 were significantly reduced after 1 year and 8 weeks of AIT, respectively. In contrast, the frequency of basophils positive for FcγRII, as well as the fraction of total basophils, significantly increased after 1 year of AIT. The herein demonstrated expression of various CLRs on basophils, and their altered CLR and FcR expression profile upon AIT, suggest yet unexplored ways by which basophils can interact with antigens and may point to novel immunoregulatory functions targeted through AIT. PMID:27354239

  14. Allergen-specific MHC class II tetramer+ cells are detectable in allergic, but not in nonallergic, individuals.

    PubMed

    Macaubas, Claudia; Wahlstrom, Jan; Galvão da Silva, Ana Paula; Forsthuber, Thomas G; Sønderstrup, Grete; Kwok, William W; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H; Umetsu, Dale T

    2006-04-15

    Allergen-specific cells are present in very low frequency in peripheral blood of humans, and differ in function in allergic and nonallergic individuals. We report in this study that soluble class II MHC tetramers can be used to directly identify and study such allergen epitope-specific CD4+ T cells in humans. We identified the major antigenic epitope of rye grass allergen Lol p 1 in HLA-DRB1*0401 individuals using HLA-DR*0401 transgenic mice and peripheral blood cells from HLA-DR*0401 individuals. Using DRB1*0401 tetramers loaded with this major epitope of Lol p 1, we detected allergen-specific CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood of DRB1*0401 rye grass allergic individuals after ex vivo expansion with allergen. These tetramer-positive cells produced IL-4, but little IFN-gamma. In contrast, we were unable to detect rye grass tetramer-positive cells in cultures from HLA-DR*0401 nonallergic individuals, even after expansion with IL-2. Thus, our results suggest that rye grass allergen-specific T cells in DR*0401 nonallergic subjects are present at very low levels (e.g., because of deletion or suppression), differ in a fundamental way in their requirement for ex vivo expansion (e.g., they may be anergic), or use TCRs distinct from those of allergic individuals. Thus, analysis using DRB1*0401 tetramers loaded with a major epitope of Lol p 1 indicates that allergen-specific CD4+ T cells in nonallergic individuals are distinct from those in allergic subjects.

  15. Serum Malassezia-specific IgE in dogs with recurrent Malassezia otitis externa without concurrent skin disease.

    PubMed

    Layne, Elizabeth A; DeBoer, Douglas J

    2016-08-01

    Immediate-type hypersensitivity (ITH), mediated by IgE, to Malassezia pachydermatis is recognized in atopic dogs with recurrent yeast dermatitis and otitis externa (OE). Malassezia-associated OE commonly occurs in dogs without other signs of atopic dermatitis (AD). The aim of this study was to detect Malassezia-specific IgE in the sera of dogs with recurrent Malassezia OE without concurrent skin disease. Sera from healthy dogs were used for comparison. An FcεRIα-based ELISA was used to measure Malassezia-specific IgE. There was no significant difference between number of positive affected dogs (6/21, 29%) and number of positive unaffected dogs (15/86, 17%) (P=0.36). There was also no significant difference in the concentrations of Malassezia-specific IgE between the two groups (P=0.97). Malassezia-specific IgE did not distinguish between patient groups so, as with other canine allergens, serum IgE reactivity for Malassezia could not be used to differentiate between diseased and healthy patients. The presence of Malassezia-specific IgE in some of the affected dogs might indicate ITH to Malassezia in those dogs. Evaluation of ITH via intradermal test reactivity and response to allergen-specific immunotherapy might clarify the role of Malassezia-associated ITH in similarly affected dogs. PMID:27288851

  16. IgE Immunotherapy Against Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leoh, Lai Sum

    2015-01-01

    The success of antibody therapy in cancer is consistent with the ability of these molecules to activate immune responses against tumors. Experience in clinical applications, antibody design, and advancement in technology have enabled antibodies to be engineered with enhanced efficacy against cancer cells. This allows re-evaluation of current antibody approaches dominated by antibodies of the IgG class with a new light. Antibodies of the IgE class play a central role in allergic reactions and have many properties that may be advantageous for cancer therapy. IgE-based active and passive immunotherapeutic approaches have been shown to be effective in both in vitro and in vivo models of cancer, suggesting the potential use of these approaches in humans. Further studies on the anticancer efficacy and safety profile of these IgE-based approaches are warranted in preparation for translation toward clinical application. PMID:25553797

  17. Tetracycline-mediated IgE isotype-specific suppression of ongoing human and murine IgE responses in vivo and murine memory IgE responses induced in vitro.

    PubMed

    Joks, Rauno; Smith-Norowitz, Tamar; Nowakowski, Maja; Bluth, Martin H; Durkin, Helen G

    2010-04-01

    We previously reported that minocycline treatment of allergic asthmatic patients had oral steroid sparing effects and improved their clinical status and that minocycline suppressed in vitro induction of IgE responses by their PBMC. The effect of minocycline on human or animal IgE responses in vivo has not been studied. Allergic asthmatics (serum IgE: 505 +/- 535 IU ml(-1)) were given minocycline (150 mg po to 250 mg po BID) as add-on therapy to standard care for up to 10 months; control subjects (IgE: 405 +/- 472 IU ml(-1)) received standard care (n = 6 per group). Serum immunoglobulin (IgM, IgG, IgE and IgA) levels were determined monthly (Nephelometry, Unicap Total IgE Fluoroenzyme immunoassay). BALB/c mice (n = 6 per group) were injected intraperitoneally with benzylpenicilloyl(14)-Keyhole limpet hemocyanin (BPO(14)-KLH) in alum on days 0, 21 and 42, fed with minocycline or doxycycline (10-100 mg kg(-1)) on day 44 and numbers of BPO-specific IgG(1), IgE and IgA antibody-forming cell (AFC) in mesenteric LN and spleen and serum immunoglobulin levels were determined on days 46-70 (enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay, ELISA). The ability of minocycline or doxycycline to suppress in vitro induction of murine memory IgE responses also was investigated. Minocycline strongly suppressed serum IgE levels of allergic asthmatics (9% per month) (P = 0.012). Minocycline (and doxycycline) also strongly suppressed peak murine IgE AFC and serum IgE responses (>95, approximately 75%, respectively) and in vitro induction of memory IgE responses by murine mesenteric LN and spleen cells (>95%). Tetracycline suppression of all human and murine IgE responses was IgE isotype specific. Suppression of murine IgE responses in vivo was dose dependent and lasted 5-7 days.

  18. Characterization of indoor home vacuum dust allergens and serum based allergen specific IgE levels in asthmatic and non-asthmatic children

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) study was conducted in the Detroit, Michigan area during fall to early winter 2006-2007. Children from 9-13 years of age were recruited into a cross-sectional study to examine biological markers of exposure, effects, and susce...

  19. Traffic-related air pollution and circulating levels of total and allergen-specific IgE among children in Detroit, Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: There is a growing body of literature suggesting a relationship between traffic-related air pollution and allergic health outcomes. Animal studies have demonstrated that air pollution, particularly diesel exhaust particles, may stimulate or enhance atopic responses...

  20. IgE, IgG4 and IgA specific to Bet v 1-related food allergens do not predict oral allergy syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guhsl, E E; Hofstetter, G; Lengger, N; Hemmer, W; Ebner, C; Fröschl, R; Bublin, M; Lupinek, C; Breiteneder, H; Radauer, C

    2015-01-01

    Background Birch pollen-associated plant food allergy is caused by Bet v 1-specific IgE, but presence of cross-reactive IgE to related allergens does not predict food allergy. The role of other immunoglobulin isotypes in the birch pollen-plant food syndrome has not been investigated in detail. Methods Bet v 1-sensitized birch pollen-allergic patients (n = 35) were diagnosed for food allergy by standardized interviews, skin prick tests, prick-to-prick tests and ImmunoCAP. Concentrations of allergen-specific IgE, IgG1, IgG4 and IgA to seven Bet v 1-related food allergens were determined by ELISA. Results Bet v 1, Cor a 1, Mal d 1 and Pru p 1 bound IgE from all and IgG4 and IgA from the majority of sera. Immunoglobulins to Gly m 4, Vig r 1 and Api g 1.01 were detected in <65% of the sera. No significant correlation was observed between plant food allergy and increased or reduced levels of IgE, IgG1, IgG4 or IgA specific to most Bet v 1-related allergens. Api g 1-specific IgE was significantly (P = 0.01) elevated in celeriac-allergic compared with celeriac-tolerant patients. Likewise, frequencies of IgE (71% vs 15%; P = 0.01) and IgA (86% vs 38%; P = 0.04) binding to Api g 1.01 were increased. Conclusion Measurements of allergen-specific immunoglobulins are not suitable for diagnosing Bet v 1-mediated plant food allergy to hazelnut and Rosaceae fruits. In contrast, IgE and IgA to the distantly related allergen Api g 1 correlate with allergy to celeriac. PMID:25327982

  1. Characterization of mutants of a highly cross-reactive calcium-binding protein from Brassica pollen for allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Garmatiuk, Tetiana; Swoboda, Ines; Twardosz-Kropfmüller, Anna; Dall'antonia, Fabio; Keller, Walter; Singh, Mohan B; Bhalla, Prem L; Okada, Takashi; Toriyama, Kinya; Weber, Milena; Ghannadan, Minoo; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Blatt, Katharina; Valent, Peter; Klein, Brigitte; Niederberger, Verena; Curin, Mirela; Balic, Nadja; Spitzauer, Susanne; Valenta, Rudolf

    2013-09-01

    The major turnip (Brassica rapa) pollen allergen, belongs to a family of calcium-binding proteins (i.e., two EF-hand proteins), which occur as highly cross-reactive allergens in pollen of weeds, grasses and trees. In this study, the IgE binding capacity and allergenic activity of three recombinant allergen variants containing mutations in their calcium-binding sites were analyzed in sensitized patients with the aim to identify the most suitable hypoallergenic molecule for specific immunotherapy. Analysis of the wildtype allergen and the mutants regarding IgE reactivity and activation of basophils in allergic patients indicated that the allergen derivative mutated in both calcium-binding domains had the lowest allergenic activity. Gel filtration and circular dichroism experiments showed that both, the wildtype and the double mutant, occurred as dimers in solution and assumed alpha-helical fold, respectively. However, both fold and thermal stability were considerably reduced in the double mutant. The use of bioinformatic tools for evaluation of the solvent accessibility and charge distribution suggested that the reduced IgE reactivity and different structural properties of the double mutant may be due to a loss of negatively charged amino acids on the surface. Interestingly, immunization of rabbits showed that only the double mutant but not the wildtype allergen induced IgG antibodies which recognized the allergen and blocked binding of allergic patients IgE. Due to the extensive structural similarity and cross-reactivity between calcium-binding pollen allergens the hypoallergenic double mutant may be useful not only for immunotherapy of turnip pollen allergy, but also for the treatment of allergies to other two EF-hand pollen allergens. PMID:23790497

  2. Characterization of mutants of a highly cross-reactive calcium-binding protein from Brassica pollen for allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Garmatiuk, Tetiana; Swoboda, Ines; Twardosz-Kropfmüller, Anna; Dall'antonia, Fabio; Keller, Walter; Singh, Mohan B; Bhalla, Prem L; Okada, Takashi; Toriyama, Kinya; Weber, Milena; Ghannadan, Minoo; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Blatt, Katharina; Valent, Peter; Klein, Brigitte; Niederberger, Verena; Curin, Mirela; Balic, Nadja; Spitzauer, Susanne; Valenta, Rudolf

    2013-09-01

    The major turnip (Brassica rapa) pollen allergen, belongs to a family of calcium-binding proteins (i.e., two EF-hand proteins), which occur as highly cross-reactive allergens in pollen of weeds, grasses and trees. In this study, the IgE binding capacity and allergenic activity of three recombinant allergen variants containing mutations in their calcium-binding sites were analyzed in sensitized patients with the aim to identify the most suitable hypoallergenic molecule for specific immunotherapy. Analysis of the wildtype allergen and the mutants regarding IgE reactivity and activation of basophils in allergic patients indicated that the allergen derivative mutated in both calcium-binding domains had the lowest allergenic activity. Gel filtration and circular dichroism experiments showed that both, the wildtype and the double mutant, occurred as dimers in solution and assumed alpha-helical fold, respectively. However, both fold and thermal stability were considerably reduced in the double mutant. The use of bioinformatic tools for evaluation of the solvent accessibility and charge distribution suggested that the reduced IgE reactivity and different structural properties of the double mutant may be due to a loss of negatively charged amino acids on the surface. Interestingly, immunization of rabbits showed that only the double mutant but not the wildtype allergen induced IgG antibodies which recognized the allergen and blocked binding of allergic patients IgE. Due to the extensive structural similarity and cross-reactivity between calcium-binding pollen allergens the hypoallergenic double mutant may be useful not only for immunotherapy of turnip pollen allergy, but also for the treatment of allergies to other two EF-hand pollen allergens.

  3. Induction of colitis in mice with food allergen-specific immune response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin-Jing; Zeng, Lu; Li, Xiao-Xi; Mo, Li-Hua; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Feng, Bai-Sui; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intestinal chronic inflammation is unclear. Food allergy plays an important role in the induction of intestinal inflammation. This study aims to test a hypothesis that food allergy initiates colitis. In this study, BALB/c mice were sensitized to a common food allergen, ovalbumin (OVA) with cholera toxin (CT) as an adjuvant. The colon epithelial barrier function was assessed with Ussing chamber technique. Expression of T cell immunoglobulin mucin domain molecule-4 (TIM4) in dendritic cells was evaluated by flow cytometry, RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed that allergen-related colitis was induced in mice as shown by heavy infiltration of inflammatory cells in the colon mucosa, loss of body weight of mice, increases in myeloperoxidase, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-4, OVA-specific IgE in the colon tissue. The colon epithelial barrier function was markedly compromised in colitis group mice, which was mimicked by exposure the colon mucosa to CT in Ussing chamber. High frequency of TIM4+ dendritic cells was detected in the colon mucosa of colitis mice. Exposure of dendritic cells to CT markedly increased the expression of TIM4. We conclude that IBD-like inflammation can be induced in the mouse colon by the food allergen-related immune response. PMID:27604348

  4. Induction of colitis in mice with food allergen-specific immune response.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin-Jing; Zeng, Lu; Li, Xiao-Xi; Mo, Li-Hua; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Feng, Bai-Sui; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intestinal chronic inflammation is unclear. Food allergy plays an important role in the induction of intestinal inflammation. This study aims to test a hypothesis that food allergy initiates colitis. In this study, BALB/c mice were sensitized to a common food allergen, ovalbumin (OVA) with cholera toxin (CT) as an adjuvant. The colon epithelial barrier function was assessed with Ussing chamber technique. Expression of T cell immunoglobulin mucin domain molecule-4 (TIM4) in dendritic cells was evaluated by flow cytometry, RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed that allergen-related colitis was induced in mice as shown by heavy infiltration of inflammatory cells in the colon mucosa, loss of body weight of mice, increases in myeloperoxidase, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-4, OVA-specific IgE in the colon tissue. The colon epithelial barrier function was markedly compromised in colitis group mice, which was mimicked by exposure the colon mucosa to CT in Ussing chamber. High frequency of TIM4(+) dendritic cells was detected in the colon mucosa of colitis mice. Exposure of dendritic cells to CT markedly increased the expression of TIM4. We conclude that IBD-like inflammation can be induced in the mouse colon by the food allergen-related immune response. PMID:27604348

  5. Induction of colitis in mice with food allergen-specific immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin-Jing; Zeng, Lu; Li, Xiao-Xi; Mo, Li-Hua; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Feng, Bai-Sui; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-09-01

    The pathogenesis of intestinal chronic inflammation is unclear. Food allergy plays an important role in the induction of intestinal inflammation. This study aims to test a hypothesis that food allergy initiates colitis. In this study, BALB/c mice were sensitized to a common food allergen, ovalbumin (OVA) with cholera toxin (CT) as an adjuvant. The colon epithelial barrier function was assessed with Ussing chamber technique. Expression of T cell immunoglobulin mucin domain molecule-4 (TIM4) in dendritic cells was evaluated by flow cytometry, RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed that allergen-related colitis was induced in mice as shown by heavy infiltration of inflammatory cells in the colon mucosa, loss of body weight of mice, increases in myeloperoxidase, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-4, OVA-specific IgE in the colon tissue. The colon epithelial barrier function was markedly compromised in colitis group mice, which was mimicked by exposure the colon mucosa to CT in Ussing chamber. High frequency of TIM4+ dendritic cells was detected in the colon mucosa of colitis mice. Exposure of dendritic cells to CT markedly increased the expression of TIM4. We conclude that IBD-like inflammation can be induced in the mouse colon by the food allergen-related immune response.

  6. Origin and fate of IgE-bearing lymphocytes. II. Gut-associated lymphoid tissue as sites of first appearance of IgE-bearing B lymphocytes and hapten-specific IgE antibody-forming cells in mice immunized with benzylpenicilloyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin by various routes: relation to asialo GM1 ganglioside+ cells and IgE/CD23 immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Auci, D L; Chice, S M; Heusser, C; Athanassiades, T J; Durkin, H G

    1992-10-01

    The organs in which B cells bearing membrane-bound IgE (sIgE+) and benzylpenicilloyl (BPO)-specific IgE antibody-forming cells (AFC) first appeared were determined in BALB/c mice given BPO-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (10 micrograms) in aluminum hydroxide by various routes (i.p, gavage, s.c., i.v., or i.m.). In mice immunized by the i.p. route, the numbers and location of sIgE+ B cells and asialo GM1 ganglioside (AsGm1+) cells, the location of IgE/CD23 immune complexes, and the numbers of BPO-specific IgE AFC in lymphoid organs were determined. With all routes of immunization, no sIgE+ B cells or BPO-specific IgE AFC were ever detected in any organ before day 8. On day 8, with the s.c., i.v., or i.m. routes, sIgE+ B cells and IgE AFC appeared exclusively in Peyer's patches (PP); with the i.p. or gavage routes, sIgE+ B cells simultaneously appeared in both PP and mesenteric lymph nodes, whereas IgE AFC appeared only in PP. In mice immunized by the i.p. route, IgE/CD23 immune complexes and strikingly increased numbers of AsGm1+ cells transiently appeared only in PP after the appearance and preceding the "disappearance" of the sIgE+ B cells and IgE AFC. The data suggest that specific IgE responses originate in gut-associated lymphoid tissue and appear later in spleen. The data also associate the appearance of IgE/CD23 immune complexes and AsGm1+ cells with the "disappearance" of sIgE+ B cells and IgE AFC from PP.

  7. A Protein Allergen Microarray Detects Specific IgE to Pollen Surface, Cytoplasmic, and Commercial Allergen Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Vigh-Conrad, Katinka A.; Conrad, Donald F.; Preuss, Daphne

    2010-01-01

    Background Current diagnostics for allergies, such as skin prick and radioallergosorbent tests, do not allow for inexpensive, high-throughput screening of patients. Additionally, extracts used in these methods are made from washed pollen that lacks pollen surface materials that may contain allergens. Methodology/Principal Findings We sought to develop a high-throughput assay to rapidly measure allergen-specific IgE in sera and to explore the relative allergenicity of different pollen fractions (i.e. surface, cytoplasmic, commercial extracts). To do this, we generated a protein microarray containing surface, cytoplasmic, and commercial extracts from 22 pollen species, commercial extracts from nine non-pollen allergens, and five recombinant allergenic proteins. Pollen surface and cytoplasmic fractions were prepared by extraction into organic solvents and aqueous buffers, respectively. Arrays were incubated with <25 uL of serum from 176 individuals and bound IgE was detected by indirect immunofluorescence, providing a high-throughput measurement of IgE. We demonstrated that the allergen microarray is a reproducible method to measure allergen-specific IgE in small amounts of sera. Using this tool, we demonstrated that specific IgE clusters according to the phylogeny of the allergen source. We also showed that the pollen surface, which has been largely overlooked in the past, contained potent allergens. Although, as a class, cytoplasmic fractions obtained by our pulverization/precipitation method were comparable to commercial extracts, many individual allergens showed significant differences. Conclusions/Significance These results support the hypothesis that protein microarray technology is a useful tool for both research and in the clinic. It could provide a more efficient and less painful alternative to traditionally used skin prick tests, making it economically feasible to compare allergen sensitivity of different populations, monitor individual responses over time

  8. Costimulation of CD3/TcR complex with either integrin or nonintegrin ligands protects CD4+ allergen-specific T-cell clones from programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Agea, E; Bistoni, O; Bini, P; Migliorati, G; Nicoletti, I; Bassotti, G; Riccardi, C; Bertotto, A; Spinozzi, F

    1995-08-01

    An optimal stimulation of CD4+ cells in an immune response requires not only signals transduced via the TcR/CD3 complex, but also costimulatory signals delivered as a consequence of interactions between T-cell surface-associated costimulatory receptors and their counterparts on antigen-presenting cells (APC). The intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, CD54) efficiently costimulates proliferation of resting, but not antigen-specific, T cells. In contrast, CD28 and CD2 support interleukin (IL)-2 synthesis and proliferation of antigen-specific T cells more efficiently than those of resting T cells. The molecular basis for this differential costimulation of T cells is poorly understood. Cypress-specific T-cell clones (TCC) were generated from four allergic subjects during in vivo seasonal exposure to the allergen. Purified cypress extract was produced directly from fresh collected pollen and incubated with the patients' mononuclear cells. Repeated allergen stimulation was performed in T-cell cultures supplemented with purified extract and autologous APC. The limiting-dilution technique was then adopted to generate allergen-specific TCC, which were also characterized by their cytokine secretion pattern as Th0 (IL-4 plus interferon-gamma) or Th2 (IL-4). Costimulation-induced proliferation or apoptosis was measured by propidium iodide cytofluorometric assay. By cross-linking cypress-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell clones with either anti-CD3 or anti-CD2, anti-CD28, and anti-CD54 monoclonal antibodies, we demonstrated that CD4+ clones (with Th0- or Th2-type cytokine production pattern) undergo programmed cell death only after anti-CD3 stimulation, whereas costimulation with either anti-CD54 or anti-CD28 protects target cells from apoptosis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7503404

  9. Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy Alters the Frequency, as well as the FcR and CLR Expression Profiles of Human Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Kristina; Rydnert, Frida; Broos, Sissela; Andersson, Morgan; Greiff, Lennart; Lindstedt, Malin

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) induces tolerance and shifts the Th2 response towards a regulatory T-cell profile. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood, but dendritic cells (DC) play a vital role as key regulators of T-cell responses. DCs interact with allergens via Fc receptors (FcRs) and via certain C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), including CD209/DC-SIGN, CD206/MR and Dectin-2/CLEC6A. In this study, the effect of AIT on the frequencies as well as the FcR and CLR expression profiles of human DC subsets was assessed. PBMC was isolated from peripheral blood from seven allergic donors before and after 8 weeks and 1 year of subcutaneous AIT, as well as from six non-allergic individuals. Cells were stained with antibodies against DC subset-specific markers and a panel of FcRs and CLRs and analyzed by flow cytometry. After 1 year of AIT, the frequency of CD123+ DCs was increased and a larger proportion expressed FcεRI. Furthermore, the expression of CD206 and Dectin-2 was reduced on CD141+ DCs after 1 year of treatment and CD206 as well as Dectin-1 was additionally down regulated in CD1c+ DCs. Interestingly, levels of DNGR1/CLEC9A on CD141+ DCs were increased by AIT, reaching levels similar to cells isolated from non-allergic controls. The modifications in phenotype and occurrence of specific DC subsets observed during AIT suggest an altered capacity of DC subsets to interact with allergens, which can be part of the mechanisms by which AIT induces allergen tolerance. PMID:26863539

  10. Identification of IgE binding to Api g 1-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Ruppel, Elvira; Aÿ, Bernhard; Boisguerin, Prisca; Dölle, Sabine; Worm, Margitta; Volkmer, Rudolf

    2010-11-01

    Celery is a frequent cause of food allergy in pollen-sensitized patients and can induce severe allergic reactions. Clinical symptoms cannot be predicted by skin prick tests (SPTs) or by determining allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE). Our aim was to identify specific IgE binding peptides by using an array technique. For our study, the sera of 21 patients with positive double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) to celery, as well as the sera of 17 healthy patients were used. Additionally, all patients underwent skin tests along with determinations of specific IgE binding. The major allergen of celery Api g 1.0101 (Apium graveolens) was synthesized as an array of overlapping peptides and probed with the patients' sera. We developed an improved immunoassay protocol by investigating peptide lengths, peptide densities, incubation parameters, and readout systems, which could influence IgE binding. Sera of celery-allergic patients showed binding to three distinct regions of Api g 1.0101. The region including amino acids 100 to 126 of Api g 1.0101 is the most important region for IgE binding. This region caused a fivefold higher binding of IgE from the sera of celery-allergic patients compared to those of healthy individuals. In particular, one peptide (VLVPTADGGSIC) was recognized by all sera of celery-allergic patients. In contrast, no binding to this peptide was detected in sera of the healthy controls. Our improved assay strategy allows us to distinguish between celery-allergic and healthy individuals, but needs to be explored in a larger cohort of well-defined patients.

  11. Variability of total and free IgE levels and IgE receptor expression in allergic subjects in and out of pollen season.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, M; Thorell, L; Sjölander, A; Larsson-Faria, S

    2015-04-01

    The inter- and intra-individual variability and seasonal variation of IgE, and high (FcεRI)- and low-affinity (CD23) IgE receptor expression in blood of seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) subjects, is not well studied. Thirty-two otherwise healthy subjects with a history of SAR to birch pollen and a positive skin prick test to birch pollen were sampled three times out of the pollen season and three times during the pollen season. FcεRI and CD23 expressions were analysed using flow cytometry. Total IgE was analysed using ImmunoCAP(®) and free IgE was analysed with a novel customised research assay using an IgG-FcεRI-chimera protein coupled to ImmunoCAP as capture reagent, ImmunoCAP-specific IgE conjugate and ImmunoCAP IgE calibrators. The performance of the free IgE assay was compared well with the reference ImmunoCAP total IgE assay. The working range of the assay was 0.35-200 kU/l IgE. FcεRI expression on basophils and CD23 expression on B cells showed low intrasubject variability both in and out of the pollen season (<10% CV). There was a small seasonal difference with lower total IgE levels (120 versus 128 kU/l; P = 0.004) and FcεRI expression (283 versus 325 mean fluorescence intensity (MFI); P < 0.001) during the pollen season. IgE, FcεRI expression and CD23 expression fulfilled biomarker and assay requirements of variability, and allergen exposure affected the biomarkers only to a minor degree. The free IgE assay may be used for measurement of free IgE levels in patients after anti-IgE antibody treatment. PMID:25620574

  12. Unique maturation program of the IgE response in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A key event in the pathogenesis of asthma and allergies is the production of IgE antibodies. We show here that IgE+ cells are exceptional because they are largely found outside germinal centers and express, from very early on, a genetic program of plasma cells. In spite of their extra-germinal cente...

  13. IgE to penicillins with different specificities can be identified by a multiepitope macromolecule: Bihaptenic penicillin structures and IgE specificities.

    PubMed

    Ariza, A; Barrionuevo, E; Mayorga, C; Montañez, M I; Perez-Inestrosa, E; Ruiz-Sánchez, A; Rodríguez-Guéant, R M; Fernández, T D; Guéant, J L; Torres, M J; Blanca, M

    2014-04-01

    Quantitation of specific IgE by immunoassay is a recommended in vitro test for the diagnosis of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to betalactams (BLs), particularly when skin test results are negative. IgE antibodies that recognize the common nuclear structure of all BLs or the specific side chain structure can be mainly distinguished by immunoassays. The aim of this study was to develop an immunoassay system to detect IgE antibodies with different specificities. Cellulose discs conjugated with benzylpenicillin (BP), amoxicillin (AX) or both drugs, with poly-l-lysine (PLL) as carrier molecule, were used as solid phases in the radioallergosorbent test (RAST). Direct and inhibition radioimmunoassay studies were made to verify the structures recognized by serum IgE antibodies from penicillin-allergic patients. Our results indicated that the addition of both haptens did not decrease the capacity to capture IgE when serum specific to either BP or AX was used, at least in terms of sensitivity. In addition, the inclusion of two haptens improved significantly the levels of IgE detection in patients who recognized both BP and AX. Therefore, the use of a solid phase with a carrier molecule conjugated with two determinants (AX and BP) is helpful to recognize IgE antibodies against either of these determinants and is useful for screening sera with different specificities.

  14. Differential T-Helper Cell Polarization after Allergen-Specific Stimulation of Autologous Dendritic Cells in Polysensitized Allergic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ashjaei, Kazem; Bublin, Merima; Smole, Ursula; Lengger, Nina; Hafner, Christine; Breiteneder, Heimo; Wagner, Stefan; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in the induction and regulation of adaptive immune responses by polarizing T-helper (Th) cells. In allergic disease this response is dominated by Th2 cells. It is still unclear whether the activation of Th cells by DCs in atopic individuals is allergen specific. Methods Monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) obtained from polysensitized patients were stimulated with purified Bet v 1, Phl p 5 and Act d 10, and the surface marker expression was analysed. Proliferation and cytokine profiles of autologous naïve CD4+ T cells co-cultured with allergen-pulsed MoDCs were assessed. Results The addition of either Bet v 1 or Phl p 5 did not further increase the expression of surface markers from matured MoDCs in all study groups. In co-cultures, autologous naïve CD4+ T cells proliferated when DCs obtained from individuals allergic to birch and grass pollen were stimulated with Bet v 1 and Phl p 5, respectively. In the co-culture supernatants, significantly increased levels of IL-5 and IL-13 were detected. This effect correlated with the sensitization background and was absent when applying an unspecific allergen, Act d 10. The levels of IL-10 in supernatants of MoDCs and the levels of IL-10 and IFN-γ in supernatants of T cells remained unchanged upon stimulation with allergens. Conclusions In this study we observed that allergen-specific stimulation of MoDCs induces T-cell proliferation and upregulation of Th2-type cytokines. Interestingly, this Th2 polarization was only observed in cells stimulated with the allergen to which the patients were sensitized. PMID:25792188

  15. Exposure to allergen and diesel exhaust particles potentiates secondary allergen-specific memory responses promoting asthma susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Eric B.; Biagini Myers, Jocelyn M.; Acciani, Thomas H.; Ryan, Patrick H.; Sivaprasad, Umasundari; Ruff, Brandy; LeMasters, Grace K.; Bernstein, David I.; Lockey, James; LeCras, Timothy D.; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to traffic pollution particulate matter, predominantly diesel exhaust particles (DEP), increases risk for asthma and asthma exacerbation, however the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Objective To examine the impact of DEP exposure on the generation and persistence of allergen-specific memory T-cells in asthma and translate these findings by determining the impact of early DEP exposure on the prevalence of allergic asthma in children. Methods The impact of DEP on HDM-specific memory responses was determined using an asthma model. Data from children enrolled in the Cincinnati Childhood Allergy and Air Pollution Study (CCAAPS) birth cohort were analyzed to determine the impact of the DEP exposure on asthma outcomes. Results DEP co-exposure with HDM resulted in persistent Th2/Th17 CD127+ effector/memory cells in the lungs, spleen and lymph nodes of adult and neonatal mice. After 7 weeks of rest, a single exposure to HDM resulted in airway hyperresponsiveness and increased levels of Th2 cytokines in only mice that had been previously exposed to both HDM and DEP versus HDM alone. Based on these data, we examined whether DEP exposure was similarly associated increased asthma prevalence in children in the presence or absence of allergen exposure/sensitization in the CCAAPS birth cohort. Early life exposure to high DEP was associated with significantly increased asthma prevalence among allergic children, but not among non-allergic children. Conclusion These findings suggest that DEP exposure results in accumulation of allergen specific Th2/Th17 cells in the lungs, potentiating secondary allergen recall responses and promoting the development of allergic asthma. PMID:25748065

  16. A Naturally Occurring Hypoallergenic Variant of Vespid Antigen 5 from Polybia scutellaris Venom as a Candidate for Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vinzón, Sabrina E.; Marino-Buslje, Cristina; Rivera, Elena; Biscoglio de Jiménez Bonino, Mirtha

    2012-01-01

    Stings by insects from the Hymenoptera order are known to cause life-threatening allergic reactions and impair life quality. Despite the effectiveness of conventional vespid venom immunotherapy, more standardized and safer allergy vaccines are required and recombinant hypoallergenic variants are important clinical tools. Antigen 5 is a major allergen of vespid venoms and it was previously reported that Antigen 5 from Polybia scutellaris (Poly s 5) could be a hypoallergenic variant. In this work we assess the immunological behavior and allergenic activity of Poly s 5 in order to explore its suitability for specific immunotherapy. With this aim, recombinant Poly s 5 was expressed in Pichia pastoris and the presence of cross-reactive epitopes with Pol a 5, a known allergenic Antigen 5, was investigated both at the IgG and IgE levels, by ELISA assays and a basophil-mediator release assay respectively. A molecular model was also built to better understand the relationship between immunological and structural aspects. In mice, Poly s 5 induced IgG antibodies which cross-reacted with Pol a 5. However, Poly s 5 induced only minimal amounts of IgE and was a poor inducer of basophil-mediator release, even when the cells were sensitized with Pol a 5-specific IgE. Moreover, Poly s 5-specific serum showed a specific protective activity and was able to inhibit the Pol a 5-induced basophil degranulation. Structural analysis from the molecular model revealed that a few amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal region of Poly s 5 should lead to an alteration of the surface topography and electrostatic potential of the epitopes which could be responsible for its hypoallergenic behavior. These findings, taken as a whole, show that Poly s 5 is likely a naturally occurring hypoallergenic Antigen 5 variant. PMID:22844463

  17. A naturally occurring hypoallergenic variant of vespid Antigen 5 from Polybia scutellaris venom as a candidate for allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vinzón, Sabrina E; Marino-Buslje, Cristina; Rivera, Elena; Biscoglio de Jiménez Bonino, Mirtha

    2012-01-01

    Stings by insects from the Hymenoptera order are known to cause life-threatening allergic reactions and impair life quality. Despite the effectiveness of conventional vespid venom immunotherapy, more standardized and safer allergy vaccines are required and recombinant hypoallergenic variants are important clinical tools. Antigen 5 is a major allergen of vespid venoms and it was previously reported that Antigen 5 from Polybia scutellaris (Poly s 5) could be a hypoallergenic variant. In this work we assess the immunological behavior and allergenic activity of Poly s 5 in order to explore its suitability for specific immunotherapy. With this aim, recombinant Poly s 5 was expressed in Pichia pastoris and the presence of cross-reactive epitopes with Pol a 5, a known allergenic Antigen 5, was investigated both at the IgG and IgE levels, by ELISA assays and a basophil-mediator release assay respectively. A molecular model was also built to better understand the relationship between immunological and structural aspects. In mice, Poly s 5 induced IgG antibodies which cross-reacted with Pol a 5. However, Poly s 5 induced only minimal amounts of IgE and was a poor inducer of basophil-mediator release, even when the cells were sensitized with Pol a 5-specific IgE. Moreover, Poly s 5-specific serum showed a specific protective activity and was able to inhibit the Pol a 5-induced basophil degranulation. Structural analysis from the molecular model revealed that a few amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal region of Poly s 5 should lead to an alteration of the surface topography and electrostatic potential of the epitopes which could be responsible for its hypoallergenic behavior. These findings, taken as a whole, show that Poly s 5 is likely a naturally occurring hypoallergenic Antigen 5 variant. PMID:22844463

  18. A naturally occurring hypoallergenic variant of vespid Antigen 5 from Polybia scutellaris venom as a candidate for allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vinzón, Sabrina E; Marino-Buslje, Cristina; Rivera, Elena; Biscoglio de Jiménez Bonino, Mirtha

    2012-01-01

    Stings by insects from the Hymenoptera order are known to cause life-threatening allergic reactions and impair life quality. Despite the effectiveness of conventional vespid venom immunotherapy, more standardized and safer allergy vaccines are required and recombinant hypoallergenic variants are important clinical tools. Antigen 5 is a major allergen of vespid venoms and it was previously reported that Antigen 5 from Polybia scutellaris (Poly s 5) could be a hypoallergenic variant. In this work we assess the immunological behavior and allergenic activity of Poly s 5 in order to explore its suitability for specific immunotherapy. With this aim, recombinant Poly s 5 was expressed in Pichia pastoris and the presence of cross-reactive epitopes with Pol a 5, a known allergenic Antigen 5, was investigated both at the IgG and IgE levels, by ELISA assays and a basophil-mediator release assay respectively. A molecular model was also built to better understand the relationship between immunological and structural aspects. In mice, Poly s 5 induced IgG antibodies which cross-reacted with Pol a 5. However, Poly s 5 induced only minimal amounts of IgE and was a poor inducer of basophil-mediator release, even when the cells were sensitized with Pol a 5-specific IgE. Moreover, Poly s 5-specific serum showed a specific protective activity and was able to inhibit the Pol a 5-induced basophil degranulation. Structural analysis from the molecular model revealed that a few amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal region of Poly s 5 should lead to an alteration of the surface topography and electrostatic potential of the epitopes which could be responsible for its hypoallergenic behavior. These findings, taken as a whole, show that Poly s 5 is likely a naturally occurring hypoallergenic Antigen 5 variant.

  19. Specific IgE response in patients with brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Araj, G. F.; Lulu, A. R.; Khateeb, M. I.; Haj, M.

    1990-01-01

    In the search to find discriminative serological markers to differentiate between patients with acute brucellosis and those with chronic brucellosis, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine and compare the brucella-specific IgE response in 80 sera from patients with acute brucellosis, 37 sera from patients with chronic brucellosis, 26 sera from patients with positive blood cultures for bacteria other than brucella and 51 sera from healthy controls. The IgE findings were compared to brucella-specific IgG, IgM, IgA and IgG1-4 demonstrated by ELISA, and to microagglutination test (MAT) results. Elevated (positive) antibrucella IgE titres were detected in 89 and 81% of sera from patients with acute and chronic brucellosis respectively. The predominant antibodies found in patients with acute brucellosis were of the IgG, IgM, IgA, IgE, IgG1 and IgG3 types while in chronic brucellosis IgG, IgA, IgE and IgG4 were found. Although IgE can be detected in patients with brucellosis, it does not discriminate between the acute and chronic stages of the disease. PMID:2249721

  20. Measurement of serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) specific for house dust mite antigens in normal cats and cats with allergic skin disease.

    PubMed

    Taglinger, K; Helps, C R; Day, M J; Foster, A P

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether cats with allergic skin disease have significant concentrations of serum Immunoglobulin E (IgE) specific for antigens derived from the house dust mites (HDM) Dermatophagoides farinae (DF) and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were developed for this purpose. Binding of serum allergen-specific IgE was detected via the use of biotinylated Fc-epsilon receptor alpha chain protein (FcvarepsilonRIalpha). Following optimisation of the assay, serum samples from 59 cats with allergic skin disease and 54 clinically normal cats were screened. Results were expressed as ELISA units per ml (EU/ml) compared to a standard curve. Serological findings were correlated with the clinical presentation of affected cats. Cats with symptoms of feline allergic skin disease were grouped as follows: self-induced alopecia without lesions (group 1), papulocrusting dermatitis (group 2), eosinophilic granuloma complex (group 3), papular/ulcerative dermatitis of head and neck/facial dermatitis (group 4), and a combination of symptoms (group 5). Control normal cats comprised the final group (group 6). The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis. There was no significant difference between groups for DF- and DP-specific IgE concentrations with a p-value of 0.875 and 0.705, respectively. Although the FcvarepsilonRIalpha-based ELISA was able to detect house dust mite-specific feline IgE, the presence of this allergen-specific IgE correlates poorly with the presence of clinical manifestations of allergic skin disease. The results of this study question the clinical relevance of house dust mite-specific IgE in feline allergic skin disease.

  1. Serum IgE Concentration in Trisomy 21

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Vicente

    1974-01-01

    Levels of serum IgE (an immunoglobulin carrying reaginic antibody activity) were investigated in 16 Down's syndrome adolescents (12-to 18-years old) and in an equal number of retardates matched for age and sex residing in the same institution. (CL)

  2. Identification of Aspergillus (A. flavus and A. niger) Allergens and Heterogeneity of Allergic Patients' IgE Response.

    PubMed

    Vermani, Maansi; Vijayan, Vannan Kandi; Agarwal, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Aspergillus species (A. flavus and A. niger) are important sources of inhalant allergens. Current diagnostic modalities employ crude Aspergillus extracts which only indicate the source to which the patient has been sensitized, without identifying the number and type of allergens in crude extracts. We report a study on the identification of major and minor allergens of the two common airborne Aspergillus species and heterogeneity of patients' IgE response to them. Skin prick tests were performed on 300 patients of bronchial asthma and/or allergic rhinitis and 20 healthy volunteers. Allergen specific IgE in patients' sera was estimated by enzyme allergosorbent test (EAST). Immunoblots were performed to identify major/minor allergens of Aspergillus extracts and to study heterogeneity of patients'IgE response to them. Positive cutaneous responses were observed in 17% and 14.7% of patients with A. flavus and A. niger extracts, respectively. Corresponding EAST positivity was 69.2% and 68.7%. In immunoblots, 5 allergenic proteins were identified in A. niger extract, major allergens being 49, 55.4 and 81.5 kDa. Twelve proteins bound patients' IgE in A. flavus extract, three being major allergens (13.3, 34 and 37 kDa). The position and slopes of EAST binding and inhibition curves obtained with individual sera varied from patient to patient. The number and molecular weight of IgE-binding proteins in both the Aspergillus extracts varied among patients. These results gave evidence of heterogeneity of patients' IgE response to major/minor Aspergillus allergens. This approach will be helpful to identify disease eliciting molecules in the individual patients (component resolved diagnosis) and may improve allergen-specific immunotherapy.

  3. Allergy-related outcomes in relation to serum IgE: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2006

    PubMed Central

    Salo, Päivi M.; Calatroni, Agustin; Gergen, Peter J.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Sever, Michelle L.; Jaramillo, Renee; Arbes, Samuel J.; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2011-01-01

    Background The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2005–2006 was the first population-based study to investigate levels of serum total and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) in the general US population. Objective We estimated prevalence of allergy-related outcomes and examined relationships between serum IgE levels and these outcomes in a representative sample of the US population. Methods Data for this cross-sectional analysis were obtained from the NHANES 2005–2006. Study subjects aged 6 years and older (N=8086) had blood taken for measurement of total IgE and 19 specific IgEs against common aeroallergens, including Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus fumigatus, Bermuda grass, birch, oak, ragweed, Russian thistle, rye grass, cat dander, cockroach, dog dander, dust mite (Dermatophagoides farinae and D. pteronyssinus), mouse and rat urine proteins; and selected foods (egg white, cow’s milk, peanut, and shrimp). Serum samples were analyzed for total and allergen-specific IgEs using the Pharmacia CAP System. Information on allergy-related outcomes and demographics was collected by questionnaire. Results In the NHANES 2005–2006, 6.6% reported current hay fever and 23.5% suffered from current allergies. Allergy-related outcomes increased with increasing total IgE (adjusted ORs for a 10-fold increase in total IgE =1.86, 95% CI:1.44–2.41 for hay fever and 1.64, 95% CI: 1.41–1.91 for allergies). Elevated levels of plant-, pet-, and mold-specific IgEs contributed independently to allergy-related symptoms. The greatest increase in odds was observed for hay fever and plant-specific IgEs (adjusted OR=4.75, 95% CI:3.83–5.88). Conclusion In the US population, self-reported allergy symptoms are most consistently associated with elevated levels of plant-, pet-, and mold-specific IgEs. PMID:21320720

  4. Prenatal exposure to household pets influences fetal IgE production

    PubMed Central

    Aichbhaumik, Niladri; Zoratti, Edward M.; Strickler, Ronald; Wegienka, Ganesa; Ownby, Dennis R.; Havstad, Suzanne; Johnson, Christine Cole

    2013-01-01

    Background Early life pet exposure may protect against allergic sensitization during childhood. Few studies have evaluated the effect of prenatal pet exposure on potential neonatal markers of allergic risk. Objective To investigate whether maternal exposure to pets affects cord blood IgE levels in a population-based, general risk, ethnically mixed birth cohort. Methods Pet keeping during pregnancy was ascertained from women residing in a defined area of Wayne County Michigan and recruited from five staff model obstetric clinics. Maternal venous blood was analyzed for total and allergen-specific IgE along with cord blood total IgE from 1049 infants. Results Compared to infants from households with no cats or dogs kept indoors during pregnancy, infants whose homes had either cats or dogs had significantly reduced mean cord IgE levels [0.34 IU/ml (95%CI 0.30–0.38) vs. 0.24 IU/ml (0.20–0.27) p = 0.025]. Similar effects were apparent in cat-only households [0.21 IU/ml (0.16–0.27), p = 0.020] and dog-only households [0.24 IU/ml (0.19–0.29), p = 0.045]. There was no effect on results when excluding mothers who reported avoiding pets due to allergy-related concerns. Conclusion Mothers with either cats or dogs in their home during pregnancy deliver children with lower cord blood IgE levels compared to mothers who do not live with these pets, supporting the hypothesis that pet exposure influences immune development in a manner that is protective for atopy and is operant even before birth. PMID:18702655

  5. Production and immunological analysis of IgE reactive recombinant egg white allergens expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dhanapala, Pathum; Doran, Tim; Tang, Mimi L K; Suphioglu, Cenk

    2015-05-01

    IgE-mediated allergy to chicken egg affects a large number of children and adults worldwide. The current management strategy for egg allergy is strict avoidance, however this is impractical due to the presence of eggs in a range of foods and pharmaceutical products including vaccines. Strict avoidance also poses nutritional disadvantages due to high nutritional value of eggs. Allergen specific immunotherapy is being pursued as a curative treatment, in which an allergic individual is gradually exposed to the allergen to induce tolerance. Use of recombinant proteins for immunotherapy has been beneficial due to the purity of the recombinant proteins compared to natural proteins. In this study, we produced IgE reactive recombinant egg white proteins that can be used for future immunotherapy. Using E. coli as an expression system, we successfully produced recombinant versions of Gal d 1, 2 and 3, that were IgE reactive when tested against a pool of egg allergic patients' sera. The IgE reactivity indicates that these recombinant proteins are capable of eliciting an immune response, thus being potential candidates for immunotherapy. We have, for the first time, attempted to produce recombinant versions of all 4 major egg white allergens in E. coli, and successfully produced 3, with only Gal d 4 showing loss of IgE reactivity in the recombinant version. The results suggest that egg allergy in Australian populations may mainly be due to IgE reactivity to Gal d 3 and 4, while Gal d 1 shows higher IgE reactivity. This is the first report of a collective and comparative immunological analysis of all 4 egg white allergens. The significance of this study is the potential use of the IgE reactive recombinant egg white proteins in immunotherapy to treat egg allergic patients. PMID:25656803

  6. Multiple independent IgE epitopes on the highly allergenic grass pollen allergen Phl p 5

    PubMed Central

    Levin, M; Rotthus, S; Wendel, S; Najafi, N; Källström, E; Focke-Tejkl, M; Valenta, R; Flicker, S; Ohlin, M

    2014-01-01

    Background Group 5 allergens are small proteins that consist of two domains. They belong to the most potent respiratory allergens. Objective To determine the binding sites and to study allergic patients' IgE recognition of the group 5 allergen (Phl p 5) from timothy grass pollen using human monoclonal IgE antibodies that have been isolated from grass pollen allergic patients. Methods Using recombinant isoallergens, fragments, mutants and synthetic peptides of Phl p 5, as well as peptide-specific antibodies, the interaction of recombinant human monoclonal IgE and Phl p 5 was studied using direct binding and blocking assays. Cross-reactivity of monoclonal IgE with group 5 allergens in several grasses was studied and inhibition experiments with patients' polyclonal IgE were performed. Results Monoclonal human IgE showed extensive cross-reactivity with group 5 allergens in several grasses. Despite its small size of 29 kDa, four independent epitope clusters on isoallergen Phl p 5.0101, two in each domain, were recognized by human IgE. Isoallergen Phl p 5.0201 carried two of these epitopes. Inhibition studies with allergic patients' polyclonal IgE suggest the presence of additional IgE epitopes on Phl p 5. Conclusions & Clinical Relevance Our results reveal the presence of a large number of independent IgE epitopes on the Phl p 5 allergen explaining the high allergenic activity of this protein and its ability to induce severe allergic symptoms. High-density IgE recognition may be a general feature of many potent allergens and form a basis for the development of improved diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in allergic disease. PMID:25262820

  7. Association of end-product adducts with increased IgE binding of roasted peanuts.

    PubMed

    Chung, S Y; Champagne, E T

    2001-08-01

    Recently, we have shown that roasted peanuts have a higher level of IgE binding (i.e., potentially more allergenic) than raw peanuts. We hypothesized that this increase in IgE binding of roasted peanuts is due to an increased levels of protein-bound end products or adducts such as advanced glycation end products (AGE), N-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), malondialdehyde (MDA), and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). To support our hypothesis, we produced polyclonal antibodies (IgG) to each of these adducts, determined their levels in raw and roasted peanuts, and examined their ability to bind to IgE from a pooled serum of patients with clinically important peanut allergy. Results showed that AGE, CML, MDA, and HNE adducts were all present in raw and roasted peanuts. Roasted peanuts exhibited a higher level of AGE and MDA adducts than raw peanuts. IgE was partially inhibited in a competitive ELISA by antibodies to AGE but not by antibodies to CML, MDA, or HNE. This indicates that IgE has an affinity for peanut AGE adducts. Roasted peanuts exhibited a higher level of IgE binding, which was correlated with a higher level of AGE adducts. We concluded that there is an association between AGE adducts and increased IgE binding (i.e., allergenicity) of roasted peanuts.

  8. Effects of Bordetella pertussis components on IgE and IgG1 responses.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, K

    1983-01-01

    The effect of dermonecrotic toxin (DNT), fimbrial hemagglutinin (FHA), K-agglutinogen, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and pertussigen from Bordetella pertussis on the production of IgE and IgG1 antibodies to hen egg albumin (Ea) was investigated in C57BL/6 mice. The IgE antibody contents were determined by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in the skin of Lewis rats, while the IgG1 antibody contents were determined by PCA reactions on the skin of mice using sera that had been heated for 3 hr at 56 C to destroy the IgE antibodies. Among the B. pertussis components tested, pertussigen was the most effective adjuvant for increasing the IgE and IgG1 antibodies to Ea. LPS also moderately increased both types of antibodies, and FHA slightly increased the IgG1 titers. When LPS was given 5 days before Ea, it suppressed both IgE and IgG1 titers while FHA had only slight adjuvant action on both type of antibodies. When each of the components was tested for its ability to modify the adjuvant action of pertussigen, it was found that only DNT interfered significantly with the adjuvanticity of pertussigen when given on the day of immunization with Ea. When the components were given 5 days before Ea, DNT produced significant suppression of only the IgG1 response. LPS, FHA, and K-agglutinogen did not significantly affect the adjuvant action of pertussigen. PMID:6321910

  9. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  10. Genetic basis of IgE responsiveness: relevance to the atopic diseases.

    PubMed

    Marsh, D G; Neely, J D; Breazeale, D R; Ghosh, B; Freidhoff, L R; Schou, C; Beaty, T H

    1995-01-01

    Genetic analysis of 170 subjects in 11 extended Amish families revealed evidence for linkage of five markers in chromosome 5q31.1 with a gene controlling total serum IgE levels. No linkage was found between these markers and specific IgE antibody levels. Analysis of total IgE within a subset of 128 IgE-antibody-negative sib pairs confirmed evidence for linkage to 5q31.1, especially IL4 (p = 4 x 10(-6)). These and other data suggest that IL4 or a nearby gene regulates IgE production in a non-antigen-specific (noncognate) fashion and provide evidence for a possible link between asthma and the IL4 gene. PMID:7613143

  11. Structural basis of omalizumab therapy and omalizumab-mediated IgE exchange

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, Luke F.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana; Brigger, Daniel; Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Graham, Michelle T.; Nadeau, Kari Christine; Eggel, Alexander; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    Omalizumab is a widely used therapeutic anti-IgE antibody. Here we report the crystal structure of the omalizumab–Fab in complex with an IgE-Fc fragment. This structure reveals the mechanism of omalizumab-mediated inhibition of IgE interactions with both high- and low-affinity IgE receptors, and explains why omalizumab selectively binds free IgE. The structure of the complex also provides mechanistic insight into a class of disruptive IgE inhibitors that accelerate the dissociation of the high-affinity IgE receptor from IgE. We use this structural data to generate a mutant IgE-Fc fragment that is resistant to omalizumab binding. Treatment with this omalizumab-resistant IgE-Fc fragment, in combination with omalizumab, promotes the exchange of cell-bound full-length IgE with omalizumab-resistant IgE-Fc fragments on human basophils. This combination treatment also blocks basophil activation more efficiently than either agent alone, providing a novel approach to probe regulatory mechanisms underlying IgE hypersensitivity with implications for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27194387

  12. Structural basis of omalizumab therapy and omalizumab-mediated IgE exchange

    DOE PAGES

    Pennington, Luke F.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana; Brigger, Daniel; Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Graham, Michelle T.; Nadeau, Kari Christine; Eggel, Alexander; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2016-05-19

    Omalizumab is a widely used therapeutic anti-IgE antibody. Here we report the crystal structure of the omalizumab–Fab in complex with an IgE-Fc fragment. This structure reveals the mechanism of omalizumab-mediated inhibition of IgE interactions with both high- and low-affinity IgE receptors, and explains why omalizumab selectively binds free IgE. The structure of the complex also provides mechanistic insight into a class of disruptive IgE inhibitors that accelerate the dissociation of the high-affinity IgE receptor from IgE. We use this structural data to generate a mutant IgE-Fc fragment that is resistant to omalizumab binding. Treatment with this omalizumab-resistant IgE-Fc fragment, inmore » combination with omalizumab, promotes the exchange of cell-bound full-length IgE with omalizumab-resistant IgE-Fc fragments on human basophils. Furthermore, this combination treatment also blocks basophil activation more efficiently than either agent alone, providing a novel approach to probe regulatory mechanisms underlying IgE hypersensitivity with implications for therapeutic interventions.« less

  13. The Extracellular Domains of IgG1 and T Cell-Derived IL-4/IL-13 Are Critical for the Polyclonal Memory IgE Response In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Turqueti-Neves, Adriana; Otte, Manuel; Schwartz, Christian; Schmitt, Michaela Erika Renate; Lindner, Cornelia; Pabst, Oliver; Yu, Philipp; Voehringer, David

    2015-01-01

    IgE-mediated activation of mast cells and basophils contributes to protective immunity against helminths but also causes allergic responses. The development and persistence of IgE responses are poorly understood, which is in part due to the low number of IgE-producing cells. Here, we used next generation sequencing to uncover a striking overlap between the IgE and IgG1 repertoires in helminth-infected or OVA/alum-immunized wild-type BALB/c mice. The memory IgE response after secondary infection induced a strong increase of IgE+ plasma cells in spleen and lymph nodes. In contrast, germinal center B cells did not increase during secondary infection. Unexpectedly, the memory IgE response was lost in mice where the extracellular part of IgG1 had been replaced with IgE sequences. Adoptive transfer studies revealed that IgG1+ B cells were required and sufficient to constitute the memory IgE response in recipient mice. T cell-derived IL-4/IL-13 was required for the memory IgE response but not for expansion of B cells from memory mice. Together, our results reveal a close relationship between the IgE and IgG1 repertoires in vivo and demonstrate that the memory IgE response is mainly conserved at the level of memory IgG1+ B cells. Therefore, targeting the generation and survival of allergen-specific IgG1+ B cells could lead to development of new therapeutic strategies to treat chronic allergic disorders. PMID:26523376

  14. Development and in-house validation of allergen-specific ELISA tests for the quantification of Dau c 1.01, Dau c 1.02 and Dau c 4 in carrot extracts (Daucus carota).

    PubMed

    Foetisch, Kay; Dahl, Lotte; Jansen, Baerbel; Becker, Wolf-Meinhard; Lidholm, Jonas; van Ree, Ronald; Broll, Hermann; Kaul, Susanne; Vieths, Stefan; Holzhauser, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Even though carrot allergy is common in Europe, the amount of different allergens in carrots is still unknown due to a lack of methods for quantitative allergen measurements. The current study aimed at the development of quantitative ELISA tests for the known carrot allergens, namely Dau c 1.01, Dau c 1.02, and Dau c 4 in pure carrot extracts. Monoclonal antibodies targeting the major carrot allergen isoforms Dau c 1.01 and Dau c 1.02 were generated and combined in sandwich ELISA with rabbit antisera against Api g 1, the celery homologue of Dau c 1. A competitive ELISA for the carrot profilin Dau c 4 was based on a polyclonal rabbit antiserum. The three ELISA tests were allergen-specific and displayed detection limits between 0.4 and 6 ng allergen/ml of carrot extract. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) as a means of intraassay variability of the Dau c 1.01, Dau c 1.02 and Dau c 4 ELISA tests was 8.1%, 6.9%, and 11.9%, and the mean interassay CV 13.3%, 37.1% and 15.6%, respectively. Target recovery ranged between 93 and 113%. In conclusion, the specific, accurate and reproducible quantification of three important carrot allergens may help to identify less allergenic carrot varieties, as well as to standardize the amount of allergens in extracts used for carrot allergy diagnosis.

  15. Local IgE in non-allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Campo, P; Rondón, C; Gould, H J; Barrionuevo, E; Gevaert, P; Blanca, M

    2015-05-01

    Local allergic rhinitis (LAR) is characterized by the presence of a nasal Th2 inflammatory response with local production of specific IgE antibodies and a positive response to a nasal allergen provocation test (NAPT) without evidence of systemic atopy. The prevalence has been shown to be up to 25% in subjects affected with rhinitis with persistence, comorbidity and evolution similar to allergic rhinitis. LAR is a consistent entity that does not evolve to allergic rhinitis with systemic atopy over time although patients have significant impairment in quality of life and increase in the severity of nasal symptoms over time. Lower airways can be also involved. The diagnosis of LAR is based mostly on demonstration of positive response to NAPT and/or local synthesis of specific IgE. Allergens involved include seasonal or perennial such as house dusts mites, pollens, animal epithelia, moulds (alternaria) and others. Basophils from peripheral blood may be activated by the involved allergens suggesting the spill over of locally synthesized specific IgE to the circulation. LAR patients will benefit from the same treatment as allergic patients using antihistamines, inhaled corticosteroids and IgE antagonists. Studies on immunotherapy are ongoing and will determine its efficacy in LAR in terms of symptoms improvement and evolution of the natural course of the disease.

  16. IgE epitope proximity determines immune complex shape and effector cell activation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Gieras, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Roux, Kenneth H.; Dutta, Moumita; Khodoun, Marat; Zafred, Domen; Cabauatan, Clarissa R.; Lupinek, Christian; Weber, Milena; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Keller, Walter; Finkelman, Fred D.; Valenta, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background IgE-allergen complexes induce mast cell and basophil activation and thus immediate allergic inflammation. They are also important for IgE-facilitated allergen presentation to T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Objective To investigate whether the proximity of IgE binding sites on an allergen affects immune complex shape and subsequent effector cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Methods We constructed artificial allergens by grafting IgE epitopes in different numbers and proximity onto a scaffold protein. The shape of immune complexes formed between artificial allergens and the corresponding IgE was studied by negative-stain electron microscopy. Allergenic activity was determined using basophil activation assays. Mice were primed with IgE, followed by injection of artificial allergens to evaluate their in vivo allergenic activity. Severity of systemic anaphylaxis was measured by changes in body temperature. Results We could demonstrate simultaneous binding of 4 IgE antibodies in close vicinity to each other. The proximity of IgE binding sites on allergens influenced the shape of the resulting immune complexes and the magnitude of effector cell activation and in vivo inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the proximity of IgE epitopes on an allergen affects its allergenic activity. We thus identified a novel mechanism by which IgE-allergen complexes regulate allergic inflammation. This mechanism should be important for allergy and other immune complex–mediated diseases. PMID:26684291

  17. IgE and mast cells in host defense against parasites and venoms.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kaori; Tsai, Mindy; Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas; Galli, Stephen J

    2016-09-01

    IgE-dependent mast cell activation is a major effector mechanism underlying the pathology associated with allergic disorders. The most dramatic of these IgE-associated disorders is the fatal anaphylaxis which can occur in some people who have developed IgE antibodies to otherwise innocuous antigens, such as those contained in certain foods and medicines. Why would such a highly "maladaptive" immune response develop in evolution and be retained to the present day? Host defense against parasites has long been considered the only beneficial function that might be conferred by IgE and mast cells. However, recent studies have provided evidence that, in addition to participating in host resistance to certain parasites, mast cells and IgE are critical components of innate (mast cells) and adaptive (mast cells and IgE) immune responses that can enhance host defense against the toxicity of certain arthropod and animal venoms, including enhancing the survival of mice injected with such venoms. Yet, in some people, developing IgE antibodies to insect or snake venoms puts them at risk for having a potentially fatal anaphylactic reaction upon subsequent exposure to such venoms. Delineating the mechanisms underlying beneficial versus detrimental innate and adaptive immune responses associated with mast cell activation and IgE is likely to enhance our ability to identify potential therapeutic targets in such settings, not only for reducing the pathology associated with allergic disorders but perhaps also for enhancing immune protection against pathogens and animal venoms. PMID:27225312

  18. Asthma phenotypes and IgE responses.

    PubMed

    Froidure, Antoine; Mouthuy, Jonathan; Durham, Stephen R; Chanez, Pascal; Sibille, Yves; Pilette, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of IgE represented a major breakthrough in allergy and asthma research, whereas the clinical interest given to IgE in asthma has been blurred until the arrival of anti-IgE biotherapy. Novel facets of the complex link between IgE and asthma have been highlighted by the effect of this treatment and by basic research. In parallel, asthma phenotyping recently evolved to the concept of endotypes, relying on identified/suspected pathobiological mechanisms to phenotype patients, but has not yet clearly positioned IgE among biomarkers of asthma.In this review, we first summarise recent knowledge about the regulation of IgE production and its main receptor, FcεRI. In addition to allergens acting as classical IgE inducers, viral infections as well as air pollution may trigger the IgE pathway, notably resetting the threshold of IgE sensitivity by regulating FcεRI expression. We then analyse the place of IgE in different asthma endo/phenotypes and discuss the potential interest of IgE among biomarkers in asthma.

  19. NASA-IGES Translator and Viewer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Jin J.; Logan, Michael A.

    1995-01-01

    NASA-IGES Translator (NIGEStranslator) is a batch program that translates a general IGES (Initial Graphics Exchange Specification) file to a NASA-IGES-Nurbs-Only (NINO) file. IGES is the most popular geometry exchange standard among Computer Aided Geometric Design (CAD) systems. NINO format is a subset of IGES, implementing the simple and yet the most popular NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines) representation. NIGEStranslator converts a complex IGES file to the simpler NINO file to simplify the tasks of CFD grid generation for models in CAD format. The NASA-IGES Viewer (NIGESview) is an Open-Inventor-based, highly interactive viewer/ editor for NINO files. Geometry in the IGES files can be viewed, copied, transformed, deleted, and inquired. Users can use NIGEStranslator to translate IGES files from CAD systems to NINO files. The geometry then can be examined with NIGESview. Extraneous geometries can be interactively removed, and the cleaned model can be written to an IGES file, ready to be used in grid generation.

  20. Generation of a chimeric dust mite hypoallergen using DNA shuffling for application in allergen-specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bei-Bei; Diao, Ji-Dong; Liu, Zhi-Ming; Li, Chao-Pin; Jiang, Yu-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only treatment that provides long lasting relief of allergy symptoms. Unfortunately, SIT-based traditional remedies carry the risk of producing local and/or systemic side effects. To improve the safety and efficacy of SIT, it has been proposed that SIT must utilize allergens that are hypoallergenic but hyperimmunogenic. Therefore, we used DNA shuffling to generate mutant genes encoding hypoallergens with potent immunogenicity and screened them for their capacity to modify the allergic response. We tentatively shuffled the major group 1 allergen genes from house dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, and discovered a novel chimeric gene, termed C 1. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) and the chimeric protein C 1 was purified. An animal model of asthma demonstrated that C 1 not only decreased the production of serum IgE and IgG1, and inhibited the production of IL-4 and IL-5 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). C 1 also boosted the levels of IgG2a and IFN-γ, which may demonstrate a rebalance of TH1 and TH2 allergic response. Additionally, flow cytometry showed that the immunogenicity of C 1 was higher than that of ProDer f 1, but was not significantly different from that of ProDer p 1. Our findings suggest that the C 1 is hypoallergenic and yet highly immunogenic, which makes it potentially safe and effective for use in SIT of allergic asthma. PMID:25120738

  1. Generation of a chimeric dust mite hypoallergen using DNA shuffling for application in allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bei-Bei; Diao, Ji-Dong; Liu, Zhi-Ming; Li, Chao-Pin; Jiang, Yu-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only treatment that provides long lasting relief of allergy symptoms. Unfortunately, SIT-based traditional remedies carry the risk of producing local and/or systemic side effects. To improve the safety and efficacy of SIT, it has been proposed that SIT must utilize allergens that are hypoallergenic but hyperimmunogenic. Therefore, we used DNA shuffling to generate mutant genes encoding hypoallergens with potent immunogenicity and screened them for their capacity to modify the allergic response. We tentatively shuffled the major group 1 allergen genes from house dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, and discovered a novel chimeric gene, termed C 1. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) and the chimeric protein C 1 was purified. An animal model of asthma demonstrated that C 1 not only decreased the production of serum IgE and IgG1, and inhibited the production of IL-4 and IL-5 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). C 1 also boosted the levels of IgG2a and IFN-γ, which may demonstrate a rebalance of TH1 and TH2 allergic response. Additionally, flow cytometry showed that the immunogenicity of C 1 was higher than that of ProDer f 1, but was not significantly different from that of ProDer p 1. Our findings suggest that the C 1 is hypoallergenic and yet highly immunogenic, which makes it potentially safe and effective for use in SIT of allergic asthma. PMID:25120738

  2. Are allergic multimorbidities and IgE polysensitization associated with the persistence or re-occurrence of foetal type 2 signalling? The MeDALL hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Anto, J M; Wickman, M; Keil, T; Valenta, R; Haahtela, T; Lodrup Carlsen, K; van Hage, M; Akdis, C; Bachert, C; Akdis, M; Auffray, C; Annesi-Maesano, I; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Cambon-Thomsen, A; Carlsen, K H; Chatzi, L; Forastiere, F; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gehrig, U; Guerra, S; Heinrich, J; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Lambrecht, B; Lupinek, C; Maier, D; Melén, E; Momas, I; Palkonen, S; Pinart, M; Postma, D; Siroux, V; Smit, H A; Sunyer, J; Wright, J; Zuberbier, T; Arshad, S H; Nadif, R; Thijs, C; Andersson, N; Asarnoj, A; Ballardini, N; Ballereau, S; Bedbrook, A; Benet, M; Bergstrom, A; Brunekreef, B; Burte, E; Calderon, M; De Carlo, G; Demoly, P; Eller, E; Fantini, M P; Hammad, H; Hohman, C; Just, J; Kerkhof, M; Kogevinas, M; Kull, I; Lau, S; Lemonnier, N; Mommers, M; Nawijn, M; Neubauer, A; Oddie, S; Pellet, J; Pin, I; Porta, D; Saes, Y; Skrindo, I; Tischer, C G; Torrent, M; von Hertzen, L

    2015-09-01

    Allergic diseases [asthma, rhinitis and atopic dermatitis (AD)] are complex. They are associated with allergen-specific IgE and nonallergic mechanisms that may coexist in the same patient. In addition, these diseases tend to cluster and patients present concomitant or consecutive diseases (multimorbidity). IgE sensitization should be considered as a quantitative trait. Important clinical and immunological differences exist between mono- and polysensitized subjects. Multimorbidities of allergic diseases share common causal mechanisms that are only partly IgE-mediated. Persistence of allergic diseases over time is associated with multimorbidity and/or IgE polysensitization. The importance of the family history of allergy may decrease with age. This review puts forward the hypothesis that allergic multimorbidities and IgE polysensitization are associated and related to the persistence or re-occurrence of foetal type 2 signalling. Asthma, rhinitis and AD are manifestations of a common systemic immune imbalance (mesodermal origin) with specific patterns of remodelling (ectodermal or endodermal origin). This study proposes a new classification of IgE-mediated allergic diseases that allows the definition of novel phenotypes to (i) better understand genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, (ii) better stratify allergic preschool children for prognosis and (iii) propose novel strategies of treatment and prevention.

  3. Are allergic multimorbidities and IgE polysensitization associated with the persistence or re-occurrence of foetal type 2 signalling? The MeDALL hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Anto, J M; Wickman, M; Keil, T; Valenta, R; Haahtela, T; Lodrup Carlsen, K; van Hage, M; Akdis, C; Bachert, C; Akdis, M; Auffray, C; Annesi-Maesano, I; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Cambon-Thomsen, A; Carlsen, K H; Chatzi, L; Forastiere, F; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gehrig, U; Guerra, S; Heinrich, J; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Lambrecht, B; Lupinek, C; Maier, D; Melén, E; Momas, I; Palkonen, S; Pinart, M; Postma, D; Siroux, V; Smit, H A; Sunyer, J; Wright, J; Zuberbier, T; Arshad, S H; Nadif, R; Thijs, C; Andersson, N; Asarnoj, A; Ballardini, N; Ballereau, S; Bedbrook, A; Benet, M; Bergstrom, A; Brunekreef, B; Burte, E; Calderon, M; De Carlo, G; Demoly, P; Eller, E; Fantini, M P; Hammad, H; Hohman, C; Just, J; Kerkhof, M; Kogevinas, M; Kull, I; Lau, S; Lemonnier, N; Mommers, M; Nawijn, M; Neubauer, A; Oddie, S; Pellet, J; Pin, I; Porta, D; Saes, Y; Skrindo, I; Tischer, C G; Torrent, M; von Hertzen, L

    2015-09-01

    Allergic diseases [asthma, rhinitis and atopic dermatitis (AD)] are complex. They are associated with allergen-specific IgE and nonallergic mechanisms that may coexist in the same patient. In addition, these diseases tend to cluster and patients present concomitant or consecutive diseases (multimorbidity). IgE sensitization should be considered as a quantitative trait. Important clinical and immunological differences exist between mono- and polysensitized subjects. Multimorbidities of allergic diseases share common causal mechanisms that are only partly IgE-mediated. Persistence of allergic diseases over time is associated with multimorbidity and/or IgE polysensitization. The importance of the family history of allergy may decrease with age. This review puts forward the hypothesis that allergic multimorbidities and IgE polysensitization are associated and related to the persistence or re-occurrence of foetal type 2 signalling. Asthma, rhinitis and AD are manifestations of a common systemic immune imbalance (mesodermal origin) with specific patterns of remodelling (ectodermal or endodermal origin). This study proposes a new classification of IgE-mediated allergic diseases that allows the definition of novel phenotypes to (i) better understand genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, (ii) better stratify allergic preschool children for prognosis and (iii) propose novel strategies of treatment and prevention. PMID:25913421

  4. Self-reactive IgE exacerbates interferon responses associated with autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Henault, Jill; Riggs, Jeffrey M.; Karnell, Jodi L.; Liarski, Vladimir M.; Li, Jianqing; Shirinian, Lena; Xu, Linda; Casey, Kerry A.; Smith, Michael A.; Khatry, Deepak B.; Izhak, Liat; Clarke, Lorraine; Herbst, Ronald; Ettinger, Rachel; Petri, Michelle; Clark, Marcus R.; Mustelin, Tomas; Kolbeck, Roland; Sanjuan, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Canonically, IgE mediates allergic immune responses by triggering mast cells and basophils to release histamine and Type 2 helper cytokines. Here, we report that in human systemic lupus erythematosus, IgE antibodies specific for double-stranded DNA activate plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), an immune cell type linked to viral defense, leading to the secretion of substantial amounts of interferon-α. The concentrations of dsDNA-specific IgE found in patient serum correlated with disease severity and greatly potentiated pDC functions by triggering phagocytosis via FcεRI followed by Toll-like receptor 9-mediated DNA sensing in phagosomes. These findings expand the known pathogenic mechanisms of IgE-mediated inflammation beyond those found in allergy and demonstrate that IgE can trigger interferon responses capable of exacerbating self-destructive autoimmune responses. PMID:26692173

  5. Human IgE is efficiently produced in glycosylated and biologically active form in lepidopteran cells.

    PubMed

    Bantleon, Frank; Wolf, Sara; Seismann, Henning; Dam, Svend; Lorentzen, Andrea; Miehe, Michaela; Jabs, Frederic; Jakob, Thilo; Plum, Melanie; Spillner, Edzard

    2016-04-01

    TH2-biased immunity to parasites and allergens is often associated with increased levels of antigen-specific and high affinity IgE. The role in reacting against minute amounts of target structures and to provoke severe anaphylactic reactions renders IgE a mechanistically outstanding isotype. IgE represents the least abundant serum antibody isotype and exhibits a variety of peculiarities including structure, extensive glycosylation and effector functions. Despite large progress in antibody technologies, however, the recombinant access to isotypes beyond IgG such as IgE still is scarce. The capacity of expression systems has to meet the complex structural conformations and the extensive posttranslational modifications that are indispensable for biological activity. In order to provide alternatives to mammalian expression systems with often low yield and a more complex glycosylation pattern we established the recombinant production of the highly complex IgE isotype in insect cells. Recombinant IgE (rIgE) was efficiently assembled and secreted into the supernatant in yields of >30 mg/L. Purification from serum free medium using different downstream processing methods provided large amounts of rIgE. This exhibited a highly specific interaction with its antigen, therapeutic anti-IgE and its high affinity receptor, the FcεRI. Lectins and glyco-proteomic analyses proved the presence of prototypic insect type N-glycans on the epsilon heavy chain. Mediator release assays demonstrated a biological activity of the rIgE comparable to IgE derived from mammalian cells. In summary the expression in insect cells provides rIgE with variant glycosylation pattern, but retained characteristics and biological activity. Therefore our data contribute to the understanding of functional and structural aspects and potential use of the IgE isotype. PMID:26943931

  6. Seasonal split influenza vaccine induced IgE sensitization against influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tetsuo; Kumagai, Takuji; Nishimura, Naoko; Ozaki, Takao; Okafuji, Teruo; Suzuki, Eitaro; Miyata, Akiko; Okada, Kenji; Ihara, Toshiaki

    2015-11-01

    Although anaphylaxis is an extremely rare vaccine-associated adverse event, it occurred in young children following administration of the 2011/12 seasonal split influenza vaccine, which contained 2-phenoxyethanol as the preservative. These children had high levels of IgE antibodies against influenza vaccine components. We herein investigated why these children were sensitized. One hundred and seventeen series of serum samples were obtained immediately before, and one month after the first and second immunizations with the HA split vaccine of 2011/12. Forty-two sequential serum samples were collected in the acute and convalescent phases (2 and 4 weeks) after natural infection with H1N1 Pdm in 2009. IgE antibodies developed following the vaccination of young children with seasonal split vaccines, whereas no significant IgE response was observed following natural infection with H1N1 Pdm 2009. The prevalence of IgE antibodies was not influenced by outbreaks of H1N1 Pdm. Repeated immunization with the HA split vaccine induced IgE sensitization against the influenza vaccine irrespective of the H1N1, H3N2, or B influenza subtypes. The reasons why anaphylaxis only occurred in recipients of the influenza vaccine containing 2-phenoxyethanol are still being investigated, and the size distribution of antigen particles may have shifted to a slightly larger size. Since the fundamental reason was IgE sensitization, current split formulation for the seasonal influenza vaccine needs to be reconsidered to prevent the induction of IgE sensitization.

  7. Generation of equine TSLP-specific antibodies and their use for detection of TSLP produced by equine keratinocytes and leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Janda, Jozef; Plattet, Philippe; Torsteinsdottir, Sigurbjörg; Jonsdottir, Sigridur; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Marti, Eliane

    2012-06-30

    Allergic horses react to innocuous environmental substances by activation of Th2 cells and production of allergen-specific IgE antibodies. The mechanisms leading to Th2 differentiation are not well understood. In humans and mice, epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) plays a central role in this process. Little is known about equine TSLP (eqTSLP) and its role in allergic diseases and our current knowledge is limited to the assessment of TSLP mRNA expression. In order to be able to study eqTSLP at the protein level, the aim of the present study was to produce recombinant eqTSLP protein and generate TSLP-specific antibodies. EqTSLP was cloned from a skin biopsy sample from a horse with chronic urticaria and eqTSLP protein was expressed in E.coli and in mammalian cells. Recombinant proteins were designed to include C-terminal Histag, which allowed subsequent purification and detection by Histag-specific Ab. Polyclonal and monoclonal eqTSLP-specific Ab were generated after immunization of mice with E.coli-expressed TSLP. Their specificity was tested by western blotting and ELISA. In addition, a commercially available polyclonal human TSLP-specific antibody was tested for cross-reactivity with eqTSLP. Expression of TSLP protein was confirmed by western blotting using Histag-specific Ab. E.coli-expressed TSLP appears as a band of ∼13 kDa, whereas mammalian cell-expressed TSLP showed several bands at 20-25 kDa, probably representing several glycosylation forms. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies generated in this study, as well as commercially available human TSLP-specific Ab reacted with both E.coli- and mammalian cell-expressed TSLP in western blotting and ELISA. A capture ELISA was established to quantitate TSLP in cell supernatants and validated using supernatants from primary equine keratinocytes and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). Increased TSLP concentrations were found after stimulation of keratinocytes with PMA+ionomycine and with

  8. Mutational epitope analysis of Pru av 1 and Api g 1, the major allergens of cherry (Prunus avium) and celery (Apium graveolens): correlating IgE reactivity with three-dimensional structure.

    PubMed

    Neudecker, Philipp; Lehmann, Katrin; Nerkamp, Jörg; Haase, Tanja; Wangorsch, Andrea; Fötisch, Kay; Hoffmann, Silke; Rösch, Paul; Vieths, Stefan; Scheurer, Stephan

    2003-11-15

    Birch pollinosis is often accompanied by adverse reactions to food due to pollen-allergen specific IgE cross-reacting with homologous food allergens. The tertiary structure of Pru av 1, the major cherry (Prunus avium) allergen, for example, is nearly identical with Bet v 1, the major birch (Betula verrucosa) pollen allergen. In order to define cross-reactive IgE epitopes, we generated and analysed mutants of Pru av 1 and Api g 1.0101, the major celery (Apium graveolens) allergen, by immunoblotting, EAST (enzyme allergosorbent test), CD and NMR spectroscopy. The mutation of Glu45 to Trp45 in the P-loop region, a known IgE epitope of Bet v 1, significantly reduced IgE binding to Pru av 1 in a subgroup of cherry-allergic patients. The backbone conformation of Pru av 1 wild-type is conserved in the three-dimensional structure of Pru av 1 Trp45, demonstrating that the side chain of Glu45 is involved in a cross-reactive IgE epitope. Accordingly, for a subgroup of celery-allergic patients, IgE binding to the homologous celery allergen Api g 1.0101 was enhanced by the mutation of Lys44 to Glu. The almost complete loss of IgE reactivity to the Pru av 1 Pro112 mutant is due to disruption of its tertiary structure. Neither the mutation Ala112 nor deletion of the C-terminal residues 155-159 influenced IgE binding to Pru av 1. In conclusion, the structure of the P-loop partially explains the cross-reactivity pattern, and modulation of IgE-binding by site-directed mutagenesis is a promising approach to develop hypo-allergenic variants for patient-tailored specific immunotherapy.

  9. Serum Specific IgE to Thyroid Peroxidase Activates Basophils in Aspirin Intolerant Urticaria.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yoo Seob; Suh, Dong-Hyeon; Yang, Eun-Mi; Ye, Young-Min; Park, Hae-Sim

    2015-06-01

    Thyroid antibodies are frequently observed in urticaria patients, but their roles in urticaria are not clearly elucidated. We investigated the role of serum specific IgE to thyroid peroxidase (TPO) in patients with aspirin intolerant acute urticaria (AIAU) and aspirin intolerant chronic urticaria (AICU). We recruited 59 AIAU and 96 AICU patients with 69 normal controls (NC). Serum specific IgE to TPO was measured by manual direct ELISA, and CD203c expressions on basophil with additions of TPO were measured to prove a direct role of TPO in effector cells. The prevalences of serum specific IgE to TPO were significantly higher in AIAU (15.2%) and AICU groups (7.5%) compared to NC (0%, P=0.018: P=0.013, respectively). Flow cytometry showed CD203c induction in a dose dependent manner with serial additions of TPO in some AIAU and AICU patients having high specific IgE to TPO. Our findings show that the prevalence of serum specific IgE to TPO was significantly higher in both AIAU and AICU patients than in NC. It is suggested that specific IgE to TPO play a pathogenic role in AIAU and AICU. PMID:26028921

  10. Abnormal humoral immune response to Staphylococcus aureus in patients with Staphylococcus aureus hyper IgE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matter, L; Wilhelm, J A; Roth, F; Schopfer, K

    1986-11-01

    Patients with the S. aureus hyper IgE syndrome (SAHIGES) have an abnormal IgE response to cell wall and surface antigens of S. aureus. In this paper we describe the detection of IgE antibodies to soluble antigens of staphylococci (S. aureus and S. epidermidis) and qualitative abnormalities of the IgG response to soluble S. aureus antigens in patients with SAHIGES. These findings may be of pathogenetic importance and help to delineate SAHIGES from other diseases. PMID:3815899

  11. IgE binding to peanut allergens is inhibited by combined D-aspartic and D-glutamic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    D-amino acids (D-aas) are reported to bind to IgE antibodies from people with allergy and asthma. The objectives of this study were to determine if D-aas bind or inhibit IgE binding to peanut allergens, and if they are more effective than L-amino acids (L-aas) in this respect. Several D-aa cocktails...

  12. Association of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Polymorphisms with Total Plasma IgE Levels in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung soo; Choi, Jinyoung; Hahn, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Young-Bok; Yu, Dong-Soo; Kim, Jin-Wou

    2016-01-01

    The macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) gene is located on human chromosome 22q11.2 and is linked to atopic phenotypes. Plasma MIF and log [total IgE] levels are significantly elevated in atopic dermatitis (AD) patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between two MIF polymorphisms, −173 G to C and −794 CATT5–8, and total plasma IgE levels in AD patients in Korea. We performed PCR-RFLP analysis in 178 AD patients and 80 control subjects to determine whether MIF SNPs are associated with susceptibility to AD. Plasma total IgE and MIF levels were determined, and then logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the associations between a SNP or haplotype and plasma total IgE or MIF levels. The −173 G/C polymorphism, located in the MIF promoter, was significantly associated with AD; the odds ratios (ORs) for the CC homozygotes and GC heterozygotes were 9.3 and 2.5, respectively. The MIF C/5-CATT and the MIF C/7-CATT haplotypes were significantly associated with AD; the ORs for the MIF C/5-CATT and MIF C/7-CATT haplotypes were 9.7 and 4.5, respectively. Log [total IgE] levels were highly associated with the MIF −794 7-CATT polymorphism. Notably, the MIF C/7-CATT haplotype was associated with a decrease in plasma log [total IgE] levels in a gene dose-dependent manner. Although log [MIF] levels were not associated with the MIF polymorphisms, the frequencies of the MIF C/5-CATT haplotype-containing genotypes decreased in order of MIF levels. Our results demonstrate that MIF promoter polymorphisms in the −173 C allele and the MIF C/5-CATT and C/7-CATT haplotypes were significantly associated with an increased risk for AD. In particular, the −794 7-CATT locus and the MIF C/7-CATT haplotype were significantly associated with decreased total IgE levels in the plasma, suggesting that these polymorphisms might be a marker for intrinsic AD rather than extrinsic AD that shows high total IgE levels and presence of allergen-specific

  13. Association of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Polymorphisms with Total Plasma IgE Levels in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Soo; Choi, Jinyoung; Hahn, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Young-Bok; Yu, Dong-Soo; Kim, Jin-Wou

    2016-01-01

    The macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) gene is located on human chromosome 22q11.2 and is linked to atopic phenotypes. Plasma MIF and log [total IgE] levels are significantly elevated in atopic dermatitis (AD) patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between two MIF polymorphisms, -173 G to C and -794 CATT5-8, and total plasma IgE levels in AD patients in Korea. We performed PCR-RFLP analysis in 178 AD patients and 80 control subjects to determine whether MIF SNPs are associated with susceptibility to AD. Plasma total IgE and MIF levels were determined, and then logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the associations between a SNP or haplotype and plasma total IgE or MIF levels. The -173 G/C polymorphism, located in the MIF promoter, was significantly associated with AD; the odds ratios (ORs) for the CC homozygotes and GC heterozygotes were 9.3 and 2.5, respectively. The MIF C/5-CATT and the MIF C/7-CATT haplotypes were significantly associated with AD; the ORs for the MIF C/5-CATT and MIF C/7-CATT haplotypes were 9.7 and 4.5, respectively. Log [total IgE] levels were highly associated with the MIF -794 7-CATT polymorphism. Notably, the MIF C/7-CATT haplotype was associated with a decrease in plasma log [total IgE] levels in a gene dose-dependent manner. Although log [MIF] levels were not associated with the MIF polymorphisms, the frequencies of the MIF C/5-CATT haplotype-containing genotypes decreased in order of MIF levels. Our results demonstrate that MIF promoter polymorphisms in the -173 C allele and the MIF C/5-CATT and C/7-CATT haplotypes were significantly associated with an increased risk for AD. In particular, the -794 7-CATT locus and the MIF C/7-CATT haplotype were significantly associated with decreased total IgE levels in the plasma, suggesting that these polymorphisms might be a marker for intrinsic AD rather than extrinsic AD that shows high total IgE levels and presence of allergen-specific IgE

  14. Mast cells and IgE in defense against venoms: Possible "good side" of allergy?

    PubMed

    Galli, Stephen J; Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas; Tsai, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    Physicians think of mast cells and IgE primarily in the context of allergic disorders, including fatal anaphylaxis. This 'bad side' of mast cells and IgE is so well accepted that it can be difficult to think of them in other contexts, particularly those in which they may have beneficial functions. However, there is evidence that mast cells and IgE, as well as basophils (circulating granulocytes whose functions partially overlap with those of mast cells), can contribute to host defense as components of adaptive type 2 immune responses to helminths, ticks and certain other parasites. Accordingly, allergies often are conceptualized as "misdirected" type 2 immune responses, in which IgE antibodies are produced against any of a diverse group of apparently harmless antigens, as well as against components of animal venoms. Indeed, certain unfortunate patients who have become sensitized to venoms develop severe IgE-associated allergic reactions, including fatal anaphylaxis, upon subsequent venom exposure. In this review, we will describe evidence that mast cells can enhance innate resistance to reptile or arthropod venoms during a first exposure to such venoms. We also will discuss findings indicating that, in mice which survive an initial encounter with venom, acquired type 2 immune responses, IgE antibodies, the high affinity IgE receptor (FcɛRI), and mast cells can contribute to acquired resistance to the lethal effects of both honeybee venom and Russell's viper venom. These findings support the hypothesis that mast cells and IgE can help protect the host against venoms and perhaps other noxious substances. PMID:26666482

  15. Determination of insulin specific IgE in serum of diabetic patients by solid-phase radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Falholt, K.

    1982-04-01

    A solid-phase assay system for quantitative measurement of insulin specific IgE has been developed. Insulin specific IgE and IgG are bound to insulin covalently coupled to Sepharose particles. After a washing procedure which removes unbound immunoglobulins, /sup 125/I-anti-human IgE-rabbit globulin is added to the Sepharose to determine the amount of bound IgE. The use of standardized /sup 125/I-anti-human-IgE-globulin permits quantitation against a calibration curve of IgE and expression as units/ml. No cross-reactivity of IgG was found. Insulin specific IgE was determined in the sera of diabetic patients. Patients treated with procine or mixed species purified insulin (monocomponent MC) did not differ significantly from a non-diabetic control group, whereas serum samples taken from patients treated with crystallized insulin preparations showed a significantly higher level of insulin specific IgE (p < 0.05). Twenty-four patients with generalized insulin allergy and eight patients with immunological insulin resistance also had considerably higher values of IgE antibodies than the control group (p < 0.001 and p < 0.005, respectively). No correlation was found between the concentration of insulin specific IgE and IgG in individual sera and the level of insulin specific IgE was independent of the total IgE. In all cases of allergy elicited by purified insulin (monocomponent MC), it was ascertained that the diabetic patients in question had received less pure insulin during earlier treatment.

  16. Antibodies as natural adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies in complex with specific antigen can dramatically change the antibody response to this antigen. Depending on antibody class and type of antigen, >99 % suppression or >100-fold enhancement of the response can take place. IgM and IgG3 are efficient enhancers and operate via the complement system. In contrast, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b enhance antibody and CD4(+) T cell responses to protein antigens via activating Fcγ-receptors. IgE also enhances antibody and CD4(+) T cell responses to small proteins but uses the low-affinity receptor for IgE, CD23. Most likely, IgM and IgG3 work by increasing the effective concentration of antigen on follicular dendritic cells in splenic follicles. IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgE probably enhance antibody responses by increasing antigen presentation by dendritic cells to T helper cells. IgG antibodies of all subclasses have a dual effect, and suppress antibody responses to particulate antigens such as erythrocytes. This capacity is used in the clinic to prevent immunization of Rhesus-negative women to Rhesus-positive fetal erythrocytes acquired via transplacental hemorrage. IgG-mediated suppression in mouse models can take place in the absence of Fcγ-receptors and complement and to date no knock-out mouse strain has been found where suppression is abrogated.

  17. Experiences of specific IgE in asthma due to diisocyanates.

    PubMed

    Keskinen, H; Tupasela, O; Tiikkainen, U; Nordman, H

    1988-11-01

    The specific IgE antibodies were studied with the Phadebas RAST technique in 35 patients with asthma due to diisocyanates. Two had been sensitized to toluene diisocyanate (TDI), 17 to methylene diisocyanate (MDI) and 16 to hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI). In each case the diagnosis was confirmed with a bronchial provocation test (BPT). The asthmatic reaction was immediate in 17 cases, of which three had also a late reaction (dual). Eighteen patients reacted only with a late reaction. Seven (20%) had specific IgE to diisocyanates. All RAST-positive patients had an immediate asthmatic reaction. None of the late reactors and referents had positive RASTs. RAST inhibition tests with 94-100% inhibition confirmed the specificity of the method. There was cross-reactivity between different diisocyanates, however. The patients with positive RAST to diisocyanates had a higher level of total IgE than the RAST negative group and the referents.

  18. Human IgE binding to the glycosidic moiety of bovine kappa-casein.

    PubMed

    Pizzano, Rosa; Nicolai, Maria A; Manzo, Carla; Giannattasio, Matteo; Addeo, Francesco

    2005-10-01

    IgE ability for recognizing milk proteins was assayed in the serum of an adult atopic patient who outgrew cow milk allergy in early childhood. A number of protein species included in casein from bovine milk were detected by human IgE in immunoblotting experiments. Comparing these results with those obtained from an analysis using antibody preparations specifically directed toward the different casein fractions, IgE-reactive bands were identified as isoforms of kappa-casein. IgE-reactive protein was not present in neither bovine cheese, regardless of cheese-making technology and time ripening, nor milk from any other dairy animal, such as ewe, goat, and water buffalo. Chemical deglycosylation of protein bands immobilized onto nitrocellulose proved that the glycosidic moiety of bovine kappa-casein was principally involved in IgE recognition.

  19. Prostaglandins E2 signal mediated by receptor subtype EP2 promotes IgE production in vivo and contributes to asthma development

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuhan; Zhao, Chunyan; Wang, Wei; Jin, Rong; Li, Qian; Ge, Qing; Guan, Youfei; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandins E2 (PGE2) has been shown to enhance IgE production by B cells in vitro. The physiological and pathological relevance of this phenomenon and the underlying molecular mechanism, however, remain to be elucidated. B cells from wild type and EP2-deficient mice were compared in culture for their responses to PGE2 in terms of IgE class switching and production. Ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma models were used to evaluate the impact of EP2-deficiency on IgE responses and the development of asthma. PGE2 promoted IgE class switching, generation of IgE+ cells and secretion of IgE by B cells stimulated with LPS+IL4. These effects were much attenuated as a consequence of EP2 deficiency. Consistent with the in vitro data, EP2-deficient mice showed a markedly suppressed IgE antibody response and developed less pronounced airway inflammation in the OVA-induced asthma model. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that PGE2, in an EP2-depedent manner, enhanced STAT6 activation induced by IL-4, thereby promoting the expression of IgE germline and post switch transcripts and the transcription of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). Collectively, these data support an important regulatory role of the PGE2-EP2-STAT6 signaling pathway in IgE response and allergic diseases. PMID:26852804

  20. Self-reactive IgE exacerbates interferon responses associated with autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Henault, Jill; Riggs, Jeffrey M; Karnell, Jodi L; Liarski, Vladimir M; Li, Jianqing; Shirinian, Lena; Xu, Linda; Casey, Kerry A; Smith, Michael A; Khatry, Deepak B; Izhak, Liat; Clarke, Lorraine; Herbst, Ronald; Ettinger, Rachel; Petri, Michelle; Clark, Marcus R; Mustelin, Tomas; Kolbeck, Roland; Sanjuan, Miguel A

    2016-02-01

    Canonically, immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediates allergic immune responses by triggering mast cells and basophils to release histamine and type 2 helper cytokines. Here we found that in human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), IgE antibodies specific for double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), a type of cell of the immune system linked to viral defense, which led to the secretion of substantial amounts of interferon-α (IFN-α). The concentration of dsDNA-specific IgE found in patient serum correlated with disease severity and greatly potentiated pDC function by triggering phagocytosis via the high-affinity FcɛRI receptor for IgE, followed by Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9)-mediated sensing of DNA in phagosomes. Our findings expand the known pathogenic mechanisms of IgE-mediated inflammation beyond those found in allergy and demonstrate that IgE can trigger interferon responses capable of exacerbating self-destructive autoimmune responses.

  1. Concentrated protein body product derived from rice endosperm as an oral tolerogen for allergen-specific immunotherapy--a new mucosal vaccine formulation against Japanese cedar pollen allergy.

    PubMed

    Wakasa, Yuhya; Takagi, Hidenori; Watanabe, Nobumasa; Kitamura, Noriko; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Ogo, Yuko; Hayashi, Shimpei; Yang, Lijun; Ohta, Masaru; Thet Tin, Wai Wai; Sekikawa, Kenji; Takano, Makoto; Ozawa, Kenjirou; Hiroi, Takachika; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum-derived type-I protein body (PB-I) from rice endosperm cells is an ideal candidate formulation for the oral delivery of bioencapsulated peptides as tolerogens for allergen-specific immunotherapy. In the present study, PBs containing the deconstructed Japanese cedar pollen allergens Cryptomeria japonica 1 (Cry j 1) and Cry j 2 were concentrated by treatment with thermostable α-amylase at 90°C to remove the starch from milled rice powder, which resulted in a 12.5-fold reduction of dry weight compared to the starting material. The modified Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 antigens in this concentrated PB product were more resistant to enzymatic digestion than those in the milled seed powder despite the absence of intact cell wall and starch, and remained stable for at least 10 months at room temperature without detectable loss or degradation. The high resistance of these allergens could be attributed to changes in protein physicochemical properties induced by the high temperature concentration process, as suggested by the decreased solubility of the antigens and seed proteins in PBs in step-wise-extraction experiments. Confocal microscopy showed that the morphology of antigen-containing PB-Is was preserved in the concentrated PB product. The concentrated PB product induced specific immune tolerance against Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 in mice when orally administered, supporting its potential use as a novel oral tolerogen formulation. PMID:25774686

  2. Concentrated protein body product derived from rice endosperm as an oral tolerogen for allergen-specific immunotherapy--a new mucosal vaccine formulation against Japanese cedar pollen allergy.

    PubMed

    Wakasa, Yuhya; Takagi, Hidenori; Watanabe, Nobumasa; Kitamura, Noriko; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Ogo, Yuko; Hayashi, Shimpei; Yang, Lijun; Ohta, Masaru; Thet Tin, Wai Wai; Sekikawa, Kenji; Takano, Makoto; Ozawa, Kenjirou; Hiroi, Takachika; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum-derived type-I protein body (PB-I) from rice endosperm cells is an ideal candidate formulation for the oral delivery of bioencapsulated peptides as tolerogens for allergen-specific immunotherapy. In the present study, PBs containing the deconstructed Japanese cedar pollen allergens Cryptomeria japonica 1 (Cry j 1) and Cry j 2 were concentrated by treatment with thermostable α-amylase at 90°C to remove the starch from milled rice powder, which resulted in a 12.5-fold reduction of dry weight compared to the starting material. The modified Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 antigens in this concentrated PB product were more resistant to enzymatic digestion than those in the milled seed powder despite the absence of intact cell wall and starch, and remained stable for at least 10 months at room temperature without detectable loss or degradation. The high resistance of these allergens could be attributed to changes in protein physicochemical properties induced by the high temperature concentration process, as suggested by the decreased solubility of the antigens and seed proteins in PBs in step-wise-extraction experiments. Confocal microscopy showed that the morphology of antigen-containing PB-Is was preserved in the concentrated PB product. The concentrated PB product induced specific immune tolerance against Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 in mice when orally administered, supporting its potential use as a novel oral tolerogen formulation.

  3. Vaccine development for allergen-specific immunotherapy based on recombinant allergens and synthetic allergen peptides: Lessons from the past and novel mechanisms of action for the future.

    PubMed

    Valenta, Rudolf; Campana, Raffaela; Focke-Tejkl, Margit; Niederberger, Verena

    2016-02-01

    In the past, the development of more effective, safe, convenient, broadly applicable, and easy to manufacture vaccines for allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been limited by the poor quality of natural allergen extracts. Progress made in the field of molecular allergen characterization has now made it possible to produce defined vaccines for AIT and eventually for preventive allergy vaccination based on recombinant DNA technology and synthetic peptide chemistry. Here we review the characteristics of recombinant and synthetic allergy vaccines that have reached clinical evaluation and discuss how molecular vaccine approaches can make AIT more safe and effective and thus more convenient. Furthermore, we discuss how new technologies can facilitate the reproducible manufacturing of vaccines of pharmaceutical grade for inhalant, food, and venom allergens. Allergy vaccines in clinical trials based on recombinant allergens, recombinant allergen derivatives, and synthetic peptides allow us to target selectively different immune mechanisms, and certain of those show features that might make them applicable not only for therapeutic but also for prophylactic vaccination.

  4. Concentrated Protein Body Product Derived from Rice Endosperm as an Oral Tolerogen for Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy—A New Mucosal Vaccine Formulation against Japanese Cedar Pollen Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Wakasa, Yuhya; Takagi, Hidenori; Watanabe, Nobumasa; Kitamura, Noriko; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Ogo, Yuko; Hayashi, Shimpei; Yang, Lijun; Ohta, Masaru; Thet Tin, Wai Wai; Sekikawa, Kenji; Takano, Makoto; Ozawa, Kenjirou; Hiroi, Takachika; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum-derived type-I protein body (PB-I) from rice endosperm cells is an ideal candidate formulation for the oral delivery of bioencapsulated peptides as tolerogens for allergen-specific immunotherapy. In the present study, PBs containing the deconstructed Japanese cedar pollen allergens Cryptomeria japonica 1 (Cry j 1) and Cry j 2 were concentrated by treatment with thermostable α-amylase at 90°C to remove the starch from milled rice powder, which resulted in a 12.5-fold reduction of dry weight compared to the starting material. The modified Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 antigens in this concentrated PB product were more resistant to enzymatic digestion than those in the milled seed powder despite the absence of intact cell wall and starch, and remained stable for at least 10 months at room temperature without detectable loss or degradation. The high resistance of these allergens could be attributed to changes in protein physicochemical properties induced by the high temperature concentration process, as suggested by the decreased solubility of the antigens and seed proteins in PBs in step-wise-extraction experiments. Confocal microscopy showed that the morphology of antigen-containing PB-Is was preserved in the concentrated PB product. The concentrated PB product induced specific immune tolerance against Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 in mice when orally administered, supporting its potential use as a novel oral tolerogen formulation. PMID:25774686

  5. Vaccine development for allergen-specific immunotherapy based on recombinant allergens and synthetic allergen peptides: Lessons from the past and novel mechanisms of action for the future

    PubMed Central

    Valenta, Rudolf; Campana, Raffaela; Focke-Tejkl, Margit; Niederberger, Verena

    2016-01-01

    In the past, the development of more effective, safe, convenient, broadly applicable, and easy to manufacture vaccines for allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been limited by the poor quality of natural allergen extracts. Progress made in the field of molecular allergen characterization has now made it possible to produce defined vaccines for AIT and eventually for preventive allergy vaccination based on recombinant DNA technology and synthetic peptide chemistry. Here we review the characteristics of recombinant and synthetic allergy vaccines that have reached clinical evaluation and discuss how molecular vaccine approaches can make AIT more safe and effective and thus more convenient. Furthermore, we discuss how new technologies can facilitate the reproducible manufacturing of vaccines of pharmaceutical grade for inhalant, food, and venom allergens. Allergy vaccines in clinical trials based on recombinant allergens, recombinant allergen derivatives, and synthetic peptides allow us to target selectively different immune mechanisms, and certain of those show features that might make them applicable not only for therapeutic but also for prophylactic vaccination. PMID:26853127

  6. Human eosinophils express the high affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, in bullous pemphigoid.

    PubMed

    Messingham, Kelly N; Holahan, Heather M; Frydman, Alexandra S; Fullenkamp, Colleen; Srikantha, Rupasree; Fairley, Janet A

    2014-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering disease mediated by autoantibodies targeting BP180 (type XVII collagen). Patient sera and tissues typically have IgG and IgE autoantibodies and elevated eosinophil numbers. Although the pathogenicity of the IgE autoantibodies is established in BP, their contribution to the disease process is not well understood. Our aims were two-fold: 1) To establish the clinical relationships between total and BP180-specific IgE, eosinophilia and other markers of disease activity; and 2) To determine if eosinophils from BP patients express the high affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, as a potential mechanism of action for IgE in BP. Our analysis of 48 untreated BP patients revealed a correlation between BP180 IgG and both BP180 IgE and peripheral eosinophil count. Additionally, we established a correlation between total IgE concentration and both BP180 IgE levels and eosinophil count. When only sera from patients (n = 16) with total IgE ≥ 400 IU/ml were analyzed, BP180 IgG levels correlated with disease severity, BP230 IgG, total circulating IgE and BP180 IgE. Finally, peripheral eosinophil count correlated more strongly with levels of BP180 IgE then with BP180 IgG. Next, eosinophil FcεRI expression was investigated in the blood and skin using several methods. Peripheral eosinophils from BP patients expressed mRNA for all three chains (α, β and γ) of the FcεRI. Surface expression of the FcεRIα was confirmed on both peripheral and tissue eosinophils from most BP patients by immunostaining. Furthermore, using a proximity ligation assay, interaction of the α- and β-chains of the FcεRI was observed in some biopsy specimens, suggesting tissue expression of the trimeric receptor form in some patients. These studies provide clinical support for the relevance of IgE in BP disease and provide one mechanism of action of these antibodies, via binding to the FcεRI on eosinophils. PMID:25255430

  7. Effects of multiple oral dosing on IgE synthesis in mice: oral sensitization by albumin extracts from seeds of Jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) containing lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Restum-Miguel, N; Prouvost-Danon, A

    1985-01-01

    The IgE antibody response was studied in DBA/2 mice; the mice were pretreated orally with albumin extracts from seeds of Jack fruit (Jackalbumin) and subsequently immunized subcutaneously with Jackalbumin mixed with ovalbumin (OA) and a synthetic adjuvant, muramyl dipeptide (MDP). The allergenicity of Jackalbumin was evaluated by its capacity to induce a specific IgE response which was measured by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) and by degranulation of washed peritoneal mast cells following antigen challenge (Jackalbumin or OA). Antibody against the crude extracts and anti-lectin (FIISP) IgE responses were also tested by PCA. After being fed eight doses of 1 mg Jackalbumin, DBA/2 mice became immunized: i.e. specific IgE antibody responses were observed and the peritoneal mast cells became sensitized. An increase in IgE response was verified in mice that were pre-fed and subsequently immunized. The results indicated that: the albumin extracts from Jack seeds, containing lectins, can be allergenic by the oral route; multiple oral doses with these extracts can induce an enhancement of the IgE response on subsequent subcutaneous immunization; antigenically, Jackalbumin does not seem to cross-react with OA; the lectins contained in the albumin fraction from Artocarpus seeds were also shown to be allergenic; the IgE titres showed an inverse correlation to the degree of purification of the lectin used for PCA challenge. PMID:3972438

  8. Effects of multiple oral dosing on IgE synthesis in mice: oral sensitization by albumin extracts from seeds of Jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) containing lectins.

    PubMed

    Restum-Miguel, N; Prouvost-Danon, A

    1985-03-01

    The IgE antibody response was studied in DBA/2 mice; the mice were pretreated orally with albumin extracts from seeds of Jack fruit (Jackalbumin) and subsequently immunized subcutaneously with Jackalbumin mixed with ovalbumin (OA) and a synthetic adjuvant, muramyl dipeptide (MDP). The allergenicity of Jackalbumin was evaluated by its capacity to induce a specific IgE response which was measured by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) and by degranulation of washed peritoneal mast cells following antigen challenge (Jackalbumin or OA). Antibody against the crude extracts and anti-lectin (FIISP) IgE responses were also tested by PCA. After being fed eight doses of 1 mg Jackalbumin, DBA/2 mice became immunized: i.e. specific IgE antibody responses were observed and the peritoneal mast cells became sensitized. An increase in IgE response was verified in mice that were pre-fed and subsequently immunized. The results indicated that: the albumin extracts from Jack seeds, containing lectins, can be allergenic by the oral route; multiple oral doses with these extracts can induce an enhancement of the IgE response on subsequent subcutaneous immunization; antigenically, Jackalbumin does not seem to cross-react with OA; the lectins contained in the albumin fraction from Artocarpus seeds were also shown to be allergenic; the IgE titres showed an inverse correlation to the degree of purification of the lectin used for PCA challenge.

  9. Soluble IgE receptors – elements of the IgE network

    PubMed Central

    Platzer, Barbara; Ruiter, Floortje; van der Mee, John; Fiebiger, Edda

    2011-01-01

    Soluble isoforms of three human IgE Fc receptors, namely FcεRI, FcεRII and galectin-3, can be found in serum. These soluble IgE receptors are a diverse family of proteins unified by the characteristic of interacting with IgE in the extracellular matrix. A truncated form of the alpha-chain of FcεRI, the high affinity IgE receptor, has recently been described as a soluble isoform (sFcεRI). Multiple soluble isoforms of CD23 (sCD23), the low affinity IgE receptor also known as FcεRII, are generated via different mechanisms of extracellular and intracellular proteolysis. The second low affinity IgE receptor, galectin-3, only exists as a secretory protein. We here discuss the physiological roles of these three soluble IgE receptors as elements of the human IgE network. Additionally, we review the potential and current use of sFcεRI, sCD23 and galectin-3 as biomarkers in human disease. PMID:21920387

  10. Role of IgE in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Sanjuan, Miguel A; Sagar, Divya; Kolbeck, Roland

    2016-06-01

    There is accumulating evidence to suggest that IgE plays a significant role in autoimmunity. The presence of circulating self-reactive IgE in patients with autoimmune disorders has been long known but, at the same time, largely understudied. However, studies have shown that the increased IgE concentration is not associated with higher prevalence for atopy and allergy in patients with autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus. IgE-mediated mechanisms are conventionally known to facilitate degranulation of mast cells and basophils and promote TH2 immunity, mechanisms that are not only central to mounting an appropriate defense against parasitic worms, noxious substances, toxins, venoms, and environmental irritants but that also trigger exuberant allergic reactions in patients with allergies. More recently, IgE autoantibodies have been recognized to participate in the self-inflicted damaging immune responses that characterize autoimmunity. Such autoimmune responses include direct damage on tissue-containing autoantigens, activation and migration of basophils to lymph nodes, and, as observed most recently, induction of type 1 interferon responses from plasmacytoid dendritic cells. The importance of IgE as a central pathogenic mechanism in autoimmunity has now been clinically validated by the approval of omalizumab, an anti-IgE mAb, for patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria and for the clinical benefit of patients with bullous pemphigoid. In this review we summarize recent reports describing the prevalence of self-reactive IgE and discuss novel findings that incriminate IgE as central in the pathogenesis of inflammatory autoimmune disorders. PMID:27264000

  11. Clinical and radiological signs of ABPA associated with airways infection with Aspergillus in the absence of specific IgE.

    PubMed

    Sunzini, F; Barbato, C; Canofari, C; Lugari, L; Perricone, R; Bergamini, A

    2016-09-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a hypersensitivity reaction to Aspergillus that mainly affects patients with asthma. For diagnosis, elevated serum IgE level are needed according to Greenberger and Patterson criteria. We report a case of 43 years-old woman who developed ABPA with productive cough, fever and radiological findings of multiple confluent areas of consolidation in both upper lobes. Laboratory tests showed elevated peripheral eosinophil counts (9.3 x 10(3)/ml). In bronchial washing A. galactomannans and A. Fumigatus were isolated, although we found normal levels of serum IgE, and the absence of serum IgG and IgE antibodies to Aspergillus and A. galactomannans. In conclusion, clinical and radiological signs of ABPA can be associated with Aspergillus infection also in the absence of a specific serum antibody reaction. PMID:27608478

  12. Allergen-specific immune response suppresses interleukin 10 expression in B cells via increasing micro-RNA-17-92 cluster.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiao-Rui; Qiu, Shu-Qi; Yang, Li-Tao; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Gui; Liu, Jiang-Qi; Zeng, Lu; Li, Xiao-Xi; Mo, Li-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10-expressing B cells play a critical role in the immune homeostasis in the body; its regulation has not been fully understood. Micro-RNA (miR)-17-92 cluster has strong regulation in the immunity. This study tests a hypothesis that miR-17-92 cluster suppresses IL-10 expression in B cells. In this study, peripheral B cells were collected from patients with allergic rhinitis (AR). The B cells were treated with specific allergens, dust mite extracts, in the culture. The expressions of miR-17-92 cluster and IL-10 in the culture were assessed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that the levels of miR-19a, but not the rest of the 5 members (miR-17, miR-18a, miR-19b, miR-20a, and miR-92a), were significantly higher in peripheral B cells from AR patients as than in B cells from healthy participants. Exposure of B cells from AR patients to specific allergen, dust mite extracts, significantly increased the levels if miR-19a and suppressed the expression of IL-10 in B cells. The levels of histone deacetylase 11 and acetylated H3K9 were higher, and the RNA polymerase II and c-Maf (the IL-10 transcription factor) were lower, at the IL-10 promoter locus. In conclusion, miR-19a mediates the allergen-specific immune response-decreased IL-10 expression in B cells. PMID:27491928

  13. IGES transformer and NURBS in grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Tzu-Yi; Soni, Bharat K.

    1993-01-01

    In the field of Grid Generation and the CAD/CAM, there are numerous geometry output formats which require the designer to spend a great deal of time manipulating geometrical entities in order to achieve a useful sculptured geometrical description for grid generation. Also in this process, there is a danger of losing fidelity of the geometry under consideration. This stresses the importance of a standard geometry definition for the communication link between varying CAD/CAM and grid system. The IGES (Initial Graphics Exchange Specification) file is a widely used communication between CAD/CAM and the analysis tools. The scientists at NASA Research Centers - including NASA Ames, NASA Langley, NASA Lewis, NASA Marshall - have recognized this importance and, therefore, in 1992 they formed the committee of the 'NASA-IGES' which is the subset of the standard IGES. This committee stresses the importance and encourages the CFD community to use the standard IGES file for the interface between the CAD/CAM and CFD analysis. Also, two of the IGES entities -- the NURBS Curve (Entity 126) and NURBS Surface (Entity 128) -- which have many useful geometric properties -- like the convex hull property, local control property and affine invariance, also widely utilized analytical geometries can be accurately represented using NURBS. This is important in today grid generation tools because of the emphasis of the interactive design. To satisfy the geometry transformation between the CAD/CAM system and Grid Generation field, the CAGI (Computer Aided Geometry Design) developed, which include the Geometry Transformation, Geometry Manipulation and Geometry Generation as well as the user interface. This paper will present the successful development IGES file transformer and application of NURBS definition in the grid generation.

  14. Human Eosinophils Express the High Affinity IgE Receptor, FcεRI, in Bullous Pemphigoid

    PubMed Central

    Messingham, Kelly N.; Holahan, Heather M.; Frydman, Alexandra S.; Fullenkamp, Colleen; Srikantha, Rupasree; Fairley, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering disease mediated by autoantibodies targeting BP180 (type XVII collagen). Patient sera and tissues typically have IgG and IgE autoantibodies and elevated eosinophil numbers. Although the pathogenicity of the IgE autoantibodies is established in BP, their contribution to the disease process is not well understood. Our aims were two-fold: 1) To establish the clinical relationships between total and BP180-specific IgE, eosinophilia and other markers of disease activity; and 2) To determine if eosinophils from BP patients express the high affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, as a potential mechanism of action for IgE in BP. Our analysis of 48 untreated BP patients revealed a correlation between BP180 IgG and both BP180 IgE and peripheral eosinophil count. Additionally, we established a correlation between total IgE concentration and both BP180 IgE levels and eosinophil count. When only sera from patients (n = 16) with total IgE≥400 IU/ml were analyzed, BP180 IgG levels correlated with disease severity, BP230 IgG, total circulating IgE and BP180 IgE. Finally, peripheral eosinophil count correlated more strongly with levels of BP180 IgE then with BP180 IgG. Next, eosinophil FcεRI expression was investigated in the blood and skin using several methods. Peripheral eosinophils from BP patients expressed mRNA for all three chains (α, β and γ) of the FcεRI. Surface expression of the FcεRIα was confirmed on both peripheral and tissue eosinophils from most BP patients by immunostaining. Furthermore, using a proximity ligation assay, interaction of the α- and β-chains of the FcεRI was observed in some biopsy specimens, suggesting tissue expression of the trimeric receptor form in some patients. These studies provide clinical support for the relevance of IgE in BP disease and provide one mechanism of action of these antibodies, via binding to the FcεRI on eosinophils. PMID:25255430

  15. Mapping of murine IgE epitopes involved in IgE-Fc epsilon receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Schwarzbaum, S; Nissim, A; Alkalay, I; Ghozi, M C; Schindler, D G; Bergman, Y; Eshhar, Z

    1989-06-01

    The generation of anti-IgE monoclonal antibodies has permitted the identification of various serological epitopes on the IgE molecule. The relationship of the sites on IgE recognized by such antibodies to the Fc epsilon receptor (Fc epsilon R) interaction site has been determined using cross-inhibition studies. However, interpretation of this type of experiment is limited by problems of steric hindrance. Thus, to accomplish precise mapping on the IgE molecule of the Fc epsilon R interaction site and the binding sites of various anti-IgE mAb, we employed site-directed mutagenesis of the IgE heavy chain gene. To this end we have constructed and expressed a recombinant murine constant epsilon heavy chain (C epsilon) gene bearing a (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetic acid (NP)-binding VH region. Several site-specific mutants in the C epsilon 3 and C epsilon 4 domains of this recombinant C epsilon gene were prepared and expressed by transfection into the light chain-producing J558L myeloma cell line. The resulting IgE antibodies were tested for binding to mast cells and to various anti-IgE mAb. The mutants produced include a proline to histidine point mutant at amino acid residue 404 in the C epsilon 3 domain, a mutant with a truncated C epsilon 4 domain, a mutant with a 45 amino acid deletion in the carboxy end of C epsilon 3, and a chimeric human C epsilon in which the human C epsilon 3 was replaced by the homologous mouse C epsilon 3 domain. These mutants have permitted the localization, to the C epsilon 3 domain, of the epitopes recognized by the 84.1C and 95.3 anti-IgE mAb. The 84.1C mAb recognizes a site on IgE which is identical or very close to the Fc epsilon R binding site, and 95.3 recognizes a site on IgE which is related, but not identical to the Fc epsilon R binding site. The antigenic determinant recognized by the 51.3 mAb, which is inefficient at blocking the IgE-Fc epsilon R interaction, has been mapped to the C epsilon 4 domain. When tested for binding to

  16. Hypersensitivity to P. officinalis pollen: correlation of IgE with skin testing methods.

    PubMed

    Cvitanović, S; Grbić, D; Zekan, L; Boban, M; Vrdoljak, E; Parpura, V; Petrović, S; Marusić, M

    1989-01-01

    Fifty pollinosis patients, who have reported contact with P. officinalis, were tested for skin sensitivity with P. officinalis pollen extract. Intracutaneous testing and the skin prick method were employed and their sensitivity verified with regard to serum concentrations of specific IgE antibodies determined with the RAST method. Two criteria of the skin prick method evaluation were employed. The intracutaneous method correlated best with RAST. In contrast to intracutaneous testing, the skin prick method did not produce any false-positive results; however, due to a few false-negative cases observed, it appeared that in borderline-negative cases the skin prick method would require determination of serum IgE antibodies to reach a clear-cut diagnosis.

  17. Targeting HER2/neu with a fully human IgE to harness the allergic reaction against cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Tracy R.; Leuchter, Richard K.; Quintero, Rafaela; Helguera, Gustavo; Rodíguez, José A.; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Schultes, Birgit C.; Nicodemus, Christopher F.

    2013-01-01

    Breast and ovarian cancer are two of the leading causes of cancer deaths among women in the United States. Overexpression of the HER2/neu oncoprotein has been reported in patients affected with breast and ovarian cancers, and is associated with poor prognosis. To develop a novel targeted therapy for HER2/neu expressing tumors, we have constructed a fully human IgE with the variable regions of the scFv C6MH3-B1 specific for HER2/neu. This antibody was expressed in murine myeloma cells and was properly assembled and secreted. The Fc region of this antibody triggers in vitro degranulation of rat basophilic cells expressing human FcεRI (RBL SX-38) in the presence of murine mammary carcinoma cells that express human HER2/neu (D2F2/E2), but not the shed (soluble) antigen (ECDHER2) alone. This IgE is also capable of inducing passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in a human FcεRIα transgenic mouse model, in the presence of a cross-linking antibody, but not in the presence of soluble ECDHER2. Additionally, IgE enhances antigen presentation in human dendritic cells and facilitates cross-priming, suggesting that the antibody is able to stimulate a secondary T-cell antitumor response. Furthermore, we show that this IgE significantly prolongs survival of human FcεRIα transgenic mice bearing D2F2/E2 tumors. We also report that the anti-HER2/neu IgE is well tolerated in a preliminary study conducted in Macaca fascicularis (cynomolgus) monkeys. In summary, our results suggest that this IgE should be further explored as a potential therapeutic against HER2/ neu overexpressing tumors, such as breast and ovarian cancers. PMID:22127364

  18. Nanocrystalline diamond impedimetric aptasensor for the label-free detection of human IgE.

    PubMed

    Tran, Dinh T; Vermeeren, Veronique; Grieten, Lars; Wenmackers, Sylvia; Wagner, Patrick; Pollet, Jeroen; Janssen, Kris P F; Michiels, Luc; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2011-02-15

    Like antibodies, aptamers are highly valuable as bioreceptor molecules for protein biomarkers because of their excellent selectivity, specificity and stability. The integration of aptamers with semiconducting materials offers great potential for the development of reliable aptasensors. In this paper we present an aptamer-based impedimetric biosensor using a nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) film as a working electrode for the direct and label-free detection of human immunoglobulin E (IgE). Amino (NH(2))-terminated IgE aptamers were covalently attached to carboxyl (COOH)-modified NCD surfaces using carbodiimide chemistry. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was applied to measure the changes in interfacial electrical properties that arise when the aptamer-functionalized diamond surface was exposed to IgE solutions. During incubation, the formation of aptamer-IgE complexes caused a significant change in the capacitance of the double-layer, in good correspondence with the IgE concentration. The linear dynamic range of IgE detection was from 0.03 μg/mL to 42.8 μg/mL. The detection limit of the aptasensor reached physiologically relevant concentrations (0.03 μg/mL). The NCD-based aptasensor was demonstrated to be highly selective even in the presence of a large excess of IgG. In addition, the aptasensor provided reproducible signals during six regeneration cycles. The impedimetric aptasensor was successfully tested on human serum samples, which opens up the potential of using EIS for direct and label-free detection of IgE levels in blood serum.

  19. Red meat allergic patients have a selective IgE response to the α-Gal glycan.

    PubMed

    Apostolovic, D; Tran, T A T; Sánchez-Vidaurre, S; Cirkovic Velickovic, T; Starkhammar, M; Hamsten, C; van Hage, M

    2015-11-01

    Galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) is a mammalian carbohydrate with significance in a novel type of food allergy. Patients with IgE against α-Gal report severe allergic symptoms 3-6 h after consumption of red meat. We investigated whether IgE from red meat allergic patients recognizes other mammalian glycans than α-Gal or glycans from the plant kingdom and insects of importance in allergy. We found that none of the 24 red meat allergic patients investigated had an IgE antibody response against the other abundant mammalian glycan N-glycolylneuraminic acid or against cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants from plant or venom sources (nCup a 1, nArt v 1, and MUXF3). Deglycosylation of an α-Gal-containing protein, bovine thyroglobulin, significantly reduced the IgE response. In conclusion, we show that red meat allergic patients have a selective IgE response to the α-Gal glycan found in red meat. Other common glycans reactive in allergic disease are not targets of red meat allergic patients' IgE.

  20. IL-6 mediated isotype specific suppression of hapten specific IgE in serum of BPO-KLH sensitized mice: role of IFN alpha in maintainance of hapten specific IgE responses.

    PubMed

    Auci, D L; Miller, H; Chice, S M; Durkin, H G

    1994-04-01

    The ability of IL-6 or IFN alpha or antibodies to these cytokines to regulate serum levels of hapten specific immunoglobulins (IgM, IgG1, IgE, IgA) was studied in BPO-KLH (benzylpenicilloyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin) sensitized BALB/c mice at the peak of a hapten specific IgE antibody forming cell (AFC) response. To induce peak IgE responses, mice were injected intraperitonealy (i.p.) with BPO-KLH (10 micrograms) in aluminum hydroxide gel (alum) on days 0, 21, and 42. On day 44, mice were injected s.c. with IL-6 (100-1000 U), IFN alpha (1000-10,000 U), anti-IL-6 (100-1000 neutralizing units [NU]), or anti-IFN alpha (1000-10,000 NU). On day 46, levels of BPO specific IgM, IgG1, IgE and IgA in serum were determined (ELISA). Data are expressed as micrograms/ml. IL-6 suppressed BPO specific IgE in serum in isotype specific fashion (to > 90%), increasing IgA (approximately 3 fold), and leaving IgM and IgG1 unchanged. Since removal of endogenous IL-6 with anti-IL-6 increased serum IgE, and suppressed IgG1 (approximately 50%), with IgM and IgA unchanged, this suggests that IL-6 is an isotype specific suppressor of peak IgE responses and as such may be useful in the therapeutic management of atopic disease. IFN alpha treatment increased serum IgE levels (60%), and potentiated IgA responses (> 30 fold), with IgM and IgG1 unchanged. Since removal of endogenous IFN alpha with anti-IFN alpha decreased IgE levels (approximately 50%), increasing IgA, with IgM and IgG1 unchanged, this suggests a role for IFN alpha as an isotype specific helper of peak IgE responses and in maintenance of IgA responses.

  1. Immunogenetic analysis of the heavy chain variable regions of IgE from patients allergic to peanuts.

    PubMed

    Janezic, A; Chapman, C J; Snow, R E; Hourihane, J O; Warner, J O; Stevenson, F K

    1998-03-01

    Peanuts are one of the most allergenic of the foods, and hypersensitivity responses to peanut allergens can be fatal. Although the nature of the antigenic components of peanuts is being defined at the molecular level, there is little information on the induced IgE antibodies, which are central to the allergic reaction. Recognition sites of IgE antibody molecules arise from the variable regions of heavy and light chains (VH and VL). By using nested polymerase chain reactions with specific primers for the available repertoire of VH genes, together with primers in the constant epsilon region, we have amplified VH sequences of IgE from blood lymphocytes of two patients with peanut allergy. After cloning and sequencing the products, we found a predominance of VH1 family use in both patients, which was not found in control IgM-specific primers. The IgE VH sequences were highly somatically mutated, but in only six of 17 cases was there clear evidence for clustering of amino acids indicative of antigen selection. Previous results from patients with allergy to house dust mites have indicated predominance of VH5 use and little evidence for antigen selection. Although results from two patients allergic to peanuts must be regarded as preliminary, they do suggest that the IgE response to peanuts may have a different VH bias, with a similar mutational pattern.

  2. Multiple IgE recognition on the major allergen of the Parietaria pollen Par j 2.

    PubMed

    Longo, Valeria; Costa, Maria Assunta; Cibella, Fabio; Cuttitta, Giuseppina; La Grutta, Stefania; Colombo, Paolo

    2015-02-01

    The interaction between IgE antibodies and allergens is a key event in triggering an allergic reaction. The characterization of this region provides information of paramount importance for diagnosis and therapy. Par j 2 Lipid Transfer Protein is one of the most important allergens in southern Europe and a well-established marker of sensitization in Parietaria pollen allergy. The main aim of this study was to map the IgE binding regions of this allergen and to study the pattern of reactivity of individual Parietaria-allergic patients. By means of gene fragmentation, six overlapping peptides were expressed in Escherichia coli, and their IgE binding activity was evaluated by immunoblotting in a cohort of 79 Parietaria-allergic patients. Our results showed that Pj-allergic patients display a heterogeneous pattern of IgE binding to the different recombinant fragments, and that patients reacted simultaneously against several protein domains spread all the over the molecule, even in fragments which do not contain structural features resembling the native allergen. Our results reveal the presence of a large number of linear and conformational epitopes on the Par j 2 sequence, which probably explains the high allergenic activity of this allergen.

  3. Prevalence of IgE reactivities in mold-allergic subjects to commercially available fungal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Horner, W Elliott; Armstrong, Maricelis; El-Dahr, Jane; McCants, Marjorie; Reese, Gerald; Kobernick, Aaron K; Lehrer, Samuel B

    2008-01-01

    Fungi are important aeroallergens. However, fungal allergen sources of consistent quality for clinical testing are not readily available. Because some allergens have been identified as enzymes, we assessed the prevalence of IgE reactivity to commercially available fungal enzymes. The purpose of this study was to determine IgE antibody reactivity by radioallergosorbent assay (RAST) to commercially available fungal enzymes in mold-allergic individuals. Sera from 20 subjects with symptoms of respiratory allergies and skin test reactivity to 2 or more fungal allergens (4 conidial [imperfecti] fungi and/or 8 basidiomycetes) were selected. Controls were six atopic individuals with neither history of fungal allergy nor skin test reactivity to fungi. Seventeen commercial fungal enzymes were used as antigens to evaluate the subjects' IgE antibody reactivity by RAST. Sera from most fungus-allergic individuals showed substantial IgE antibody reactivity to enzymes; control sera showed little or no reactivity. The mean reactivity to all commercial enzymes of all subjects tested was RAST > or = 3% with only one exception. The most reactive fungal enzymes were invertase (bakers' yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae), cellulase (Trichoderma viride), and glucosidase (brewers yeast, S. cerevisiae) with mean binding of 14.6, 9.5, and 8.8%, respectively. Using RAST results with a combination of four enzymes from S. cerevisiae (brewers yeast glucosidase, bakers' yeast maltase, invertase, and invertase V), a sensitivity of 100% was shown for detecting mold-allergic patients. The studies suggest that fungal enzymes may be useful source materials for the identification of fungal allergens and may also provide readily available source materials to produce improved diagnostic and therapeutic reagents.

  4. Relationship between omalizumab pharmacokinetics, IgE pharmacodynamics and symptoms in patients with severe persistent allergic (IgE-mediated) asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Philip J; Tannenbaum, Stacey; Gautier, Aurelie; Jimenez, Pablo

    2009-01-01

    AIMS Omalizumab, a subcutaneously administered anti-IgE antibody, is effective for moderate-to-severe persistent allergic asthma. The aims were to (i) describe the population pharmacodynamics of free IgE with a mechanism-based, nonlinear, omalizumab–IgE binding model; (ii) deduce a target-free IgE suppression level by correlation with clinical outcomes; and (iii) check the adequacy of current approved dosing tables and explore potential doses and regimens beyond. METHODS Concentration data (omalizumab, free and total IgE) were obtained from 1781 patients aged 12–79 years, in four sparsely sampled randomized, placebo-controlled studies and 152 subjects in a richly sampled single-dose study. NONMEM predictive performance across the range of bodyweights (39–150 kg) and baseline IgE (19–1055 IU ml−1) was checked by simulation. Predicted free IgE levels were correlated with time-averaged patient diary clinical outcomes. RESULTS The model accurately predicted observed omalizumab, free and total IgE concentrations. Free IgE concentrations correlated well with clinical signs and symptoms, allowing a target concentration of 14 ng ml−1, at the midpoint of 4-week clinical observation periods, to be set for determining the dose and regimen for omalizumab. CONCLUSIONS The omalizumab–IgE binding model is predictive for free IgE and demonstrates a nonlinear time-dependent relationship between free IgE suppression and clinical outcomes in asthma. Although currently approved dosing tables are close to optimal, it should be possible to treat patients with higher levels of baseline IgE if higher doses can be administered. PMID:19660004

  5. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  6. Association Between PTPN22 Polymorphisms and IgE Responses to Staphylococcal Superantigens in Chronic Urticaria.

    PubMed

    Palikhe, Sailesh; Kim, Seung Hyun; Pham, Le Duy; Ye, Young Min; Park, Hae Sim

    2015-05-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase-22 (PTPN22) gene encodes lymphoid-specific tyrosine phosphatase (Lyp), an inhibitor of T cell activation. A polymorphism of the PTPN22 gene has been found to be associated with chronic urticaria (CU). We investigated the associations between PTPN22 gene polymorphisms and CU characteristics, including serum specific IgE antibodies response to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA). CU patients (n=409) and normal healthy controls (n=388) were enrolled in the present study. Serum specific IgE to TSST-1 and SEA were measured by ImmunoCAP®. Five PTPN22 single nucleotide polymorphisms, -1123G>C, 1858C>T, 13145A>G, 14943C>T, and 20628A>G, were genotyped. There were no significant differences in genotype or haplotype frequencies of these polymorphisms between the 2 groups. CU patients carrying the GG genotype at 20628A>G (P=0.035) or haplotype 3 [GGG] (P=0.047) had a significantly higher prevalence of serum specific IgE to TSST-1 compared to non-carriers. Similarly, CT/TT genotype at 14943C>T had a significantly higher prevalence of serum specific IgE to SEA (P=0.045). The findings suggest that the PTPN22 gene polymorphisms at 20628A>G and 14943C>T may enhance serum specific IgE responses to TSST-1 and SEA, which may contribute to CU pathogenesis. PMID:25749762

  7. Confirmation of a predicted lack of IgE binding to Cry3Bb1 from genetically modified (GM) crops.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Osamu; Koyano, Satoru; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Sawada, Jun-Ichi; Teshima, Reiko

    2010-04-01

    Some GM crops including MON863 corn and stack varieties contain Cry3Bb1 protein. Cry3Bb1 is very important from the standpoint of assessing the safety of GM crops. In this study Cry3Bb1 was assessed from the standpoint of possible binding to IgE from allergy patients. First, an ELISA that was improved in our laboratory was used to test serum samples from 13 corn allergy patients in the United States with recombinant Cry3Bb1 expressed in Escherichia coli, and serum samples from 55 patients in Japan with various food allergies were also assayed. Two samples from the Japanese allergy patients were suspected of being positive, but Western blotting analysis with purified Cry3Bb1 indicated that the binding between IgE and Cry3Bb1 was nonspecific. Ultimately, no specific binding between IgE and recombinant Cry3Bb1 was detected. Next, all proteins extracted from MON863 corn and non-GM corn were probed with IgE antibodies in serum samples from the corn allergy patients by Western blotting, but the staining patterns of MON863 and non-GM corn were similar, meaning that unintended allergic reactions to MON863 are unlikely to occur. Our study provides additional information that confirms the predicted lack of IgE binding to Cry3Bb1 in people with existing food allergies.

  8. Variable Region Identical IgA and IgE to Cryptococcus neoformans Capsular Polysaccharide Manifest Specificity Differences*

    PubMed Central

    Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Nakouzi, Antonio; Pohl, Mary Ann; Bowen, Anthony; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years several groups have shown that isotype switching from IgM to IgG to IgA can affect the affinity and specificity of antibodies sharing identical variable (V) regions. However, whether the same applies to IgE is unknown. In this study we compared the fine specificity of V region-identical IgE and IgA to Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharide and found that these differed in specificity from each other. The IgE and IgA paratopes were probed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with 15N-labeled peptide mimetics of cryptococcal polysaccharide antigen (Ag). IgE was found to cleave the peptide at a much faster rate than V region-identical IgG subclasses and IgA, consistent with an altered paratope. Both IgE and IgA were opsonic for C. neoformans and protected against infection in mice. In summary, V-region expression in the context of the ϵ constant (C) region results in specificity changes that are greater than observed for comparable IgG subclasses. These results raise the possibility that expression of certain V regions in the context of α and ϵ C regions affects their function and contributes to the special properties of those isotypes. PMID:25778397

  9. Planning and Managing the IGE/S School. Theoretical Paper No. 65.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struve, Patrick W.; Schultz, James V.

    This document is the initial description of the specifications of the philosophies, procedures, and processes for secondary schools to use in planning, implementing, and managing Individually Guided Education (IGE) learning programs. This is specified in a target format. Also delineated is the general and specific developmental strategy the…

  10. Guinea-pig reaginic antibody

    PubMed Central

    Margni, R. A.; Hajos, Silvia E.

    1973-01-01

    The methods for isolation and purification of a guinea-pig serum protein with homocytotropic antibody activity and characteristics of IgE are described. By precipitation in the equivalence zone or immunoadsorption and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, we isolated an homocytotropic antibody, that was not able to give a precipitin line when it was reacted directly with the antigen. It was capable of sensitizing guinea-pig skin for PCA after a latent period of 24–48 hours but not after 3 hours; it was sensitive to treatment with mercaptoethanol. It had antigenic determinants present in the other guinea-pig immunoglobulins and particular antigenic determinants. All these properties make us believe that this protein belongs to an immunoglobulin different from γ1 and similar to the reaginic antibody (IgE) described in other species. ImagesFIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4126261

  11. Antibody determination in the diagnosis of Wuchereria bancrofti infection in man

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayake, S.; Ismail, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    The levels of IgG and IgE antibodies reacting with somatic antigens of adult Setaria digitata and Wuchereria bancrofti microfilariae were determined in sera of 90 patients with Bancroftian filariasis and 379 non-filarial subjects. Antibodies reacting with adult antigens and with soluble microfilarial antigens were seen in both microfilaraemic and amicrofilaraemic patients. Antibodies reacting with surface antigens of W. bancrofti microfilariae were seen only in amicrofilaraemic subjects. IgE antibodies were detected with the adult antigen only in both microfilaraemic and amicrofilaraemic patients. The absolute levels of IgG antibodies were significantly higher than those of IgE antibodies. It is concluded that the determination of serum antibodies reacting with adult antigens is suitable for the diagnosis of both the microfilaraemic and amicrofilaraemic phases of infection, and the determination of antibody to microfilarial surface antigens is applicable in patients with clinically evident disease. PMID:7032737

  12. A comparison between IgE and IgG4 as markers of allergy in children: an experimental trial in a model of natural antigen avoidance.

    PubMed

    Piacentini, G L; Guerresi, S; Kantar, A; Lubrano, L; Olivieri, F; Boner, A L; Peroni, D G

    2011-01-01

    IgG4 have been hypothesized to act as blocking antibodies capable of preventing IgE-mediated effector cell triggering. This study aims to evaluate the changes in IgG4 in children during a period of natural antigen avoidance. Serum IgE and IgG4 were evaluated in a group of asthmatic children, aged between 7 and 17 years, admitted to the residential house Istituto Pio XII (Misurina, BL, Italy), located at 1,756 m, in a natural model of antigen avoidance. All the patients were skin prick test positive to at least two of the following allergens: Dermatophagoides pteronissynus, Dermatophagoides farinae, cat epithelium, timothy grass pollen and Parietaria pollen. During the 180 days of hospitalization, serum specific IgE and IgG4 were measured six times. A significant decrease (p≤0.05) in serum specific IgE to house dust mite and pollen allergens was observed; by contrast, no significant variations were shown by IgG4 and IgG4/IgE ratio. No significant relationship was found between serum specific IgE, IgG4 and IgG4/IgE ratio variations and the re-exposure to house dust mite allergens during the Christmas holidays. A positive correlation between specific IgE and specific IgG4 was observed at each considered time (T0: r=0.57, p=0.08; T1: r=0.85, p=0.001; T3: r=0.76, p=0.01). The positive correlation between specific IgE and specific IgG4, enduring throughout the entire time of study, suggests a relationship between these classes of immunoglobulins.

  13. Fucoidan prevents C{epsilon} germline transcription and NF{kappa}B p52 translocation for IgE production in B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Oomizu, Souichi; Yanase, Yuhki; Suzuki, Hidenori; Kameyoshi, Yoshikazu; Hide, Michihiro . E-mail: mhide@hiroshima-u.ac.jp

    2006-11-24

    Fucoidan, a dietary fiber contained in seaweed, reduces the increase of antigen-specific IgE in mice exposed to ovalbumin. In this study, we investigated the effect of fucoidan on IgE production and intracellular events in B cells in vitro. Fucoidan inhibited the production of IgE and C{epsilon} germline transcription in murine B cells induced by IL-4 (100 ng/ml) and anti-CD40 antibodies (10 {mu}g/ml), whereas it stimulated cell proliferation. A significant effect of fucoidan on IgE production was observed when B cells were stimulated with a higher dose (5 {mu}g/ml) of anti-CD40 antibodies, but not when stimulated with lower doses (1.25, 2.5 {mu}g/ml), regardless of the IL-4 concentrations. Moreover, nuclear translocation of NF{kappa}B p52, but neither that of NF{kappa}B p65, nor the phosphorylation of JAK1 and STAT6 was reduced by fucoidan. These results suggest that fucoidan inhibited IgE production by preventing the NF{kappa}B p52-mediated pathways activated by CD40.

  14. Impact of the IL-4 -590 C/T transition on the levels of Plasmodium falciparum specific IgE, IgG, IgG subclasses and total IgE in two sympatric ethnic groups living in Mali.

    PubMed

    Vafa, Manijeh; Maiga, Bakary; Israelsson, Elisabeth; Dolo, Amagana; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Troye-Blomberg, Marita

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of IL-4 -590 T/C polymorphism on the levels of malaria-specific IgE, IgG, IgG (1-4) subclasses as well as total IgE in the Fulani and their sympatric ethnic group, the Dogon, in Mali. Asymptomatic individuals, of the Fulani and the Dogon ethnic groups, were included in the study. IL-4 is involved in the regulation of IgE and IgG4 subclass. In line with this we found that within the Fulani, the T allele was associated with increased levels of total and anti-malarial IgE (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively). The Fulani T allele carriers had slightly higher levels of malarial specific IgG4 as compared to those with the CC genotype (P=0.08). No such differences were observed amongst the Dogon individuals. Taken together, these data indicate that the impact of IL-4 -590 variants on antibody levels may vary in different ethnic populations, and that this might affect the Ig-class and subclass distributions.

  15. IgE in the diagnosis and treatment of allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Platts-Mills, Thomas A E; Schuyler, Alexander J; Erwin, Elizabeth A; Commins, Scott P; Woodfolk, Judith A

    2016-06-01

    Traditionally, the concept of allergy implied an abnormal response to an otherwise benign agent (eg, pollen or food), with an easily identifiable relationship between exposure and disease. However, there are syndromes in which the relationship between exposure to the relevant allergen and the "allergic" disease is not clear. In these cases the presence of specific IgE antibodies can play an important role in identifying the relevant allergen and provide a guide to therapy. Good examples include chronic asthma and exposure to perennial indoor allergens and asthma related to fungal infection. Finally, we are increasingly aware of forms of food allergy in which the relationship between exposure and the disease is delayed by 3 to 6 hours or longer. Three forms of food allergy with distinct clinical features are now well recognized. These are (1) anaphylactic sensitivity to peanut, (2) eosinophilic esophagitis related to cow's milk, and (3) delayed anaphylaxis to red meat. In these syndromes the immunology of the response is dramatically different. Peanut and galactose α-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal) are characterized by high- or very high-titer IgE antibodies for Ara h 2 and alpha-gal, respectively. By contrast, eosinophilic esophagitis is characterized by low levels of IgE specific for milk proteins with high- or very high-titer IgG4 to the same proteins. The recent finding is that patients with alpha-gal syndrome do not have detectable IgG4 to the oligosaccharide. Thus the serum results not only identify relevant antigens but also provide a guide to the nature of the immune response. PMID:27264001

  16. Selective IgE deficiency, immune dysregulation, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Magen, Eli; Schlesinger, Menachem; David, Michael; Ben-Zion, Itzhak; Vardy, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Selective IgE deficiency (IgED) is currently defined as a significant decrease in serum levels of IgE (<2 kIU/L) in a patient whose other immunoglobulin levels are normal. There are no published large-scale epidemiological studies regarding the prevalence of and clinical features of IgED. In the population-based case-control study, we investigated clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with IgED. Case samples were drawn from all subjects (n = 18487), with serum total IgE measurement during 2012 at Leumit Health Care Services (Israel) and had serum total IgE of <2 kIU/L. The control group was randomly sampled from the remaining 18,261 subjects with a case-control ratio of four controls for each case (1:4). Comorbid diseases were identified by specific International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnostic codes given by the corresponding board-certificated physicians. Two hundred twenty-six subjects showed serum total IgE levels of <2 kIU/L; 68 (30.9%) were between the ages of 4 and 12 years (children) and 250 (69.1%) were ≥12 years old (adults). Matched control groups were selected for each age group. The children group was characterized by higher prevalence of asthma and hyperreactive airways disease; and both children and adult groups had significantly higher prevalence of chronic sinusitis, otitis media, autoimmune, and oncological diseases than their respective controls. Undetectable serum total IgE may serve as a marker of immune dysregulation and autoimmunity.

  17. Role of anti-IgE monoclonal antibody (omalizumab) in the treatment of bronchial asthma and allergic respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Gennaro

    2006-03-01

    IgE molecules play a crucial role in allergic respiratory diseases and may cause chronic airway inflammation in asthma through activation of effector cells via high-affinity (FcepsilonRI) or low-affinity (FcepsilonRII) IgE receptors. Since the discovery of IgE antibodies our understanding of the mechanisms of allergy has improved to such an extent that we can differentiate allergic/atopic from intrinsic respiratory diseases. Therapeutic anti-IgE antibodies, able to reduce free IgE levels and to block the binding of IgE to FcepsilonRI without crosslinking IgE and triggering degranulation of IgE-sensitized cells have been developed. This non-anaphylactogenic anti-IgE monoclonal antibody (omalizumab) binds IgE at the same site as these antibodies bind FcepsilonRI and FcepsilonRII. Consequently, omalizumab inhibits IgE effector functions by blocking IgE binding to high-affinity receptors on IgE effector cells and does not cause mast cell or basophil activation because it cannot bind to IgE on cell surfaces where the FcepsilonR1 receptor already masks the anti-IgE epitope. Studies in patients with atopic asthma showed that omalizumab decreases serum IgE levels and allergen-induced bronchoconstriction during both the early and late-phase responses to inhaled allergen. In several clinical controlled trials omalizumab resulted effective in reducing asthma-related symptoms, decreasing corticosteroid use and improving quality of life of asthmatic patients. Recent studies show the benefits of omalizumab as add-on therapy in patients with severe persistent asthma who are inadequately controlled by optimal pharmacological therapy. The anti-IgE approach to asthma treatment has several advantages, including concomitant treatment of other IgE-mediated diseases such as allergic rhinitis, a favorable safety profile and a convenient dosing frequency.

  18. Allergen-induced inflammation and the role of immunoglobulin E (IgE).

    PubMed

    Fendrick, A M; Baldwin, J L

    2001-01-01

    The prevalence of common allergic disorders such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis has increased significantly in the past 30 years. The impact of these atopic diseases on the patient and the health care system is considerable: Allergic disorders are associated with a high degree of morbidity, which can profoundly impact patient quality of life and health care resource use. Existing strategies to treat allergic disorders beyond simple allergen avoidance focus on diminishing or eliminating the recurrent and/or persistent signs and symptoms that characterize the allergic response. A new strategy has been developed that uses antibodies directed against immunoglobulin E (IgE) to prevent it from binding to cells bearing its receptors and thus neutralizing the allergic response before it begins. These new agents reduce allergic responses in atopic individuals and improve their symptoms while reducing rescue medication and corticosteroid use in patients with allergic asthma or seasonal allergic rhinitis. Thus, anti-IgE antibodies represent proof that IgE plays a central role in allergic reactions and that anti-IgE therapy is a potentially effective treatment for allergic disease.

  19. [Antibody response to Ascaris lumbricoides among the children population in the Ustí Region].

    PubMed

    Richter, J; Stiborová, I; Pohorská, J; Dobiásová, L; Král, V

    2005-11-01

    A group of 156 children aged between 10 and 12 years were screened for IgG and IgE antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides. The study subjects were 64 children of Romany origin and 92 children from the majority population. IgG antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides were detected in 112 (71.8%) children. No difference in the prevalence of IgG antibodies was found between Romany children and those from the majority population. As many as 34.1% of the study subjects had IgE antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides, again with no difference between the two ethnic groups. Children with IgG antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides had significantly higher total IgE levels compared to those who had tested IgG negative. To demonstrate induction of a non-specific IgE response was one of the study objectives. The high prevalence rates of IgG and IgE antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides are suggestive of a high frequency of cross- and non-specific reactions. Possible effect of cross-reactivity to other antigens on the specific IgG and IgE antibody response to Ascaris lumbricoides is discussed.

  20. Interpreting IgE sensitization tests in food allergy.

    PubMed

    Chokshi, Niti Y; Sicherer, Scott H

    2016-01-01

    Food allergies are increasing in prevalence, and with it, IgE testing to foods is becoming more commonplace. Food-specific IgE tests, including serum assays and prick skin tests, are sensitive for detecting the presence of food-specific IgE (sensitization), but specificity for predicting clinical allergy is limited. Therefore, positive tests are generally not, in isolation, diagnostic of clinical disease. However, rationale test selection and interpretation, based on clinical history and understanding of food allergy epidemiology and pathophysiology, makes these tests invaluable. Additionally, there exist highly predictive test cutoff values for common allergens in atopic children. Newer testing methodologies, such as component resolved diagnostics, are promising for increasing the utility of testing. This review highlights the use of IgE serum tests in the diagnosis of food allergy. PMID:26666347

  1. Mechanisms of Anaphylaxis Beyond IgE.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Cano, R; Picado, C; Valero, A; Bartra, J

    2016-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is an acute, life-threatening, multisystem syndrome resulting from the sudden release of mediators derived from mast cells and basophils. Food allergens are the main triggers of anaphylaxis, accounting for 33%-56% of all cases and up to 81% of cases of anaphylaxis in children. Human anaphylaxis is generally thought to be mediated by IgE, with mast cells and basophils as key players, although alternative mechanisms have been proposed. Neutrophils and macrophages have also been implicated in anaphylactic reactions, as have IgG-dependent, complement, and contact system activation. Not all allergic reactions are anaphylactic, and the presence of the so-called accompanying factors (cofactors or augmenting factors) may explain why some conditions lead to anaphylaxis, while in other cases the allergen elicits a milder reaction or is even tolerated. In the presence of these factors, allergic reactions may be induced at lower doses of allergen or become more severe. Cofactors are reported to be relevant in up to 30% of anaphylactic episodes. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and exercise are the best-documented cofactors, although estrogens, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, β-blockers, lipid-lowering drugs, and alcohol have also been involved. The mechanisms underlying anaphylaxis are complex and involve several interrelated pathways. Some of these pathways may be key to the development of anaphylaxis, while others may only modulate the severity of the reaction. An understanding of predisposing and augmenting factors could lead to the development of new prophylactic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27164622

  2. Selective IgE deficiency and cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mishal, Joseph; Vardy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Selective immunoglobulin E (IgE) deficiency (IgED) is defined as serum levels of IgE more than or equal to 2 kIU/L and is associated with immune dysregulation and autoimmunity. This study aimed to investigate a prevalence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) in population with IgED. Within the electronic patient record (EPR) database of Leumit Health Care Services (LHS) in Israel, data capture was performed using IBM Cognos 10.1.1 BI Report Studio software. The case samples were drawn from the full study population (n = 18,487), having any allergy-related symptoms and/or those requesting antiallergy medications and performed serum total IgE measurement during 2012 at LHS. All subjects aged more than or equal to 40 years old, with serum total IgE less than 2 kIU/L were included in case group. Control group was randomly sampled from the remained subjects, with a case-control ratio of 10 controls for each case (1:10). The comorbid cardiovascular diseases during less than or equal to 10 years before serum total IgE testing were identified and retrieved using specific International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnostic codes. There were 103 in case and 1030 subjects in control group. Compared with control group patients, the case group had significantly more arterial hypertension [34 (37.7%) versus 187 (18.2%), p < 0.001], ischemic heart disease (IHD) [26 (25.2%) versus 87 (8.4%), p < 0.001], carotid stenosis [5 (4.9%) versus 7 (0.7%), p = 0.003], cerebrovascular disease (CVD) [3 (2.9%) versus 5 (0.5%), p = 0.029], and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) [4 (3.9%) versus 9 (0.9%), p = 0.024]. IgED is associated with higher prevalence of arterial hypertension and ASCVD. PMID:25976439

  3. Selective IgE deficiency and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Magen, Eli; Mishal, Joseph; Vardy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Selective immunoglobulin E (IgE) deficiency (IgED) is defined as serum levels of IgE more than or equal to 2 kIU/L and is associated with immune dysregulation and autoimmunity. This study aimed to investigate a prevalence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) in population with IgED. Within the electronic patient record (EPR) database of Leumit Health Care Services (LHS) in Israel, data capture was performed using IBM Cognos 10.1.1 BI Report Studio software. The case samples were drawn from the full study population (n = 18,487), having any allergy-related symptoms and/or those requesting antiallergy medications and performed serum total IgE measurement during 2012 at LHS. All subjects aged more than or equal to 40 years old, with serum total IgE less than 2 kIU/L were included in case group. Control group was randomly sampled from the remained subjects, with a case-control ratio of 10 controls for each case (1:10). The comorbid cardiovascular diseases during less than or equal to 10 years before serum total IgE testing were identified and retrieved using specific International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnostic codes. There were 103 in case and 1030 subjects in control group. Compared with control group patients, the case group had significantly more arterial hypertension [34 (37.7%) versus 187 (18.2%), p < 0.001], ischemic heart disease (IHD) [26 (25.2%) versus 87 (8.4%), p < 0.001], carotid stenosis [5 (4.9%) versus 7 (0.7%), p = 0.003], cerebrovascular disease (CVD) [3 (2.9%) versus 5 (0.5%), p = 0.029], and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) [4 (3.9%) versus 9 (0.9%), p = 0.024]. IgED is associated with higher prevalence of arterial hypertension and ASCVD.

  4. Investigation of IGES for CAD/CAE data transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zobrist, George W.

    1989-01-01

    In a CAD/CAE facility there is always the possibility that one may want to transfer the design graphics database from the native system to a non-native system. This may occur because of dissimilar systems within an organization or a new CAD/CAE system is to be purchased. The Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES) was developed in an attempt to solve this scenario. IGES is a neutral database format into which the CAD/CAE native database format can be translated to and from. Translating the native design database format to IGES requires a pre-processor and transling from IGES to the native database format requires a post-processor. IGES is an artifice to represent CAD/CAE product data in a neutral environment to allow interfacing applications, archive the database, interchange of product data between dissimilar CAD/CAE systems, and other applications. The intent here is to present test data on translating design product data from a CAD/CAE system to itself and to translate data initially prepared in IGES format to various native design formats. This information can be utilized in planning potential procurement and developing a design discipline within the CAD/CAE community.

  5. Recreation of the 28-entity IGES test file using the ComputerVision CADDS 4X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuan, Anchyi; Shah, Saurin; Smith, Kevin

    1987-01-01

    An Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES) test file is called the 28 Entity IGES Test File. This file contains 28 geometric and annotation entities which are considered the basic entities that an IGES translator for any CAD system should support. The main purpose was to determine how the IGES preprocessor supports the 28 entities through recreation of the 28 Entity IGES Test File on the ComputerVision CADDS 4X. Test procedure is described and test results are presented.

  6. Extra-intestinal symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome: related to high total IgE levels and atopic sensitization?

    PubMed

    Vara, Ellen Johanne; Valeur, Jørgen; Hausken, Trygve; Lied, Gülen Arslan

    2016-08-01

    Objective We have previously found that high levels of total IgE, but not atopic sensitization, was a significant predictor for functional gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. In this study, we aimed to assess the prevalence of extra-intestinal symptoms in IBS patients, and explore their relation to total IgE levels and atopic sensitization. Materials and methods Seventy-one patients with functional GI complaints were included. Severity of GI symptoms, fatigue and musculoskeletal pain was evaluated using the following questionnaires: IBS-Severity Scoring System (IBS-SSS), Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS), FibroFatigue Scale (FFS), and Visual Analog Scales (VAS) for musculoskeletal pain. Levels of total IgE and specific IgE-antibodies were analyzed. Results Fatigue and musculoskeletal pain were demonstrated in 78.9 and 43.7% of the patients, respectively. IBS-SSS scores were significantly correlated with fatigue scores and musculoskeletal pain. Patients with fatigue and musculoskeletal pain had significantly higher IBS-SSS scores than patients without fatigue and musculoskeletal pain. Total IgE levels were significantly higher in IBS patients compared to a healthy control group from a previous study. However, neither total IgE nor atopic sensitization was significantly associated with extra-intestinal symptoms. Conclusions IBS, fatigue, and musculoskeletal pain were significantly associated. Total IgE levels were higher in IBS patients than healthy controls, but not related to intestinal or extra-intestinal symptom severity. Atopy was not associated with any of the co-morbidities. Thus, the clinical significance of high IgE levels in IBS remains unclear and further studies are warranted to explore a common underlying mechanism for the co-morbid triad of IBS, fatigue, and musculoskeletal pain.

  7. Ara h 2: crystal structure and IgE binding distinguish two sub-populations of peanut allergic patients by epitope diversity

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Geoffrey A.; Gosavi, Rajendrakumar A.; Pomés, Anna; Wünschmann, Sabina; Moon, Andrea F.; London, Robert E.; Pedersen, Lars C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Peanut allergy affects 1% of the population and causes the most fatal food-related anaphylactic reactions. The protein Ara h 2 is the most potent peanut allergen recognized by 80–90% of peanut allergic patients. Methods The crystal structure of the major peanut allergen Ara h 2 was determined for the first time at 2.7 Å resolution using a customized MBP-fusion system. IgE antibody binding to the MBP fusion construct versus the natural allergen was compared by ELISA using sera from peanut allergic patients. Results The structure of Ara h 2 is a five helix bundle held together by four disulfide bonds and related to the prolamin protein superfamily. The fold is most similar to other amylase and trypsin inhibitors. The MBP-Ara h 2 fusion construct was positively recognized by IgE from 76% of allergic patients (25/33). Two populations of patients could be identified. Sub-population 1 (n=14) showed an excellent correlation of IgE antibody binding to natural versus recombinant Ara h 2. Sub-population 2 (n=15) showed significantly reduced IgE binding to the MBP fusion protein. Interestingly, about 20% of the IgE binding in sub-population 2 could be recovered by increasing the distance between MBP and Ara h 2 in a second construct. Discussion The reduced IgE binding to the MBP-Ara h 2 of sub-population 2 indicates that the MBP molecule protects an immunodominant epitope region near the first helix of Ara h 2. Residues involved in the epitope(s) are suggested by the crystal structure. The MBP-Ara h 2 fusion constructs will be useful to further elucidate the relevance of certain epitopes to peanut allergy. PMID:21255036

  8. Coordinated action of IgE and a B-cell-stimulatory factor on the CD23 receptor molecule up-regulates B-lymphocyte growth.

    PubMed Central

    Guy, G R; Gordon, J

    1987-01-01

    The CD23 (BLAST-2) antigen, recently identified as the low-affinity IgE receptor of B lymphocytes, has also been implicated as the focus for growth-promoting signals delivered to activated B cells by a low molecular weight B-cell growth factor (BCGF). Here we show that IgE and BCGF can coordinate B-lymphocyte growth through their opposing effects on the CD23 molecule. While the activation of purified quiescent B cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate led to the induction of 45-kDa CD23 at the surface membrane, the inclusion of IgE increased CD23 expression by a factor of approximately equal to 5. The addition of BCGF resulted in the rapid release of a 35-kDa form of CD23 from the cell surface. This shed molecule is associated with autocrine growth factor activity. Substantially more of this material was generated by BCGF acting on cells that had been stimulated in the presence of IgE. The combined effects of IgE and BCGF on DNA synthesis in activated B cells were more than additive. IgE similarly augmented the stimulatory capacity of a CD23 antibody that mimics the biological actions of BCGF. Binding of the anti-receptor antibody to its 45-kDa target at the B-cell surface also prompted the release of the 35-kDa soluble species. These results demonstrate a pleiotropy in the CD23 molecule with regard to both ligand binding and the subsequent behavior of the receptor. The ability of this single receptor to orchestrate a B-lymphocyte response through a variety of ligands and its role in normal and transformed autocrine growth are discussed. Images PMID:2957693

  9. Exposure of brown Norway rats to diesel exhaust particles prior to ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization elicits IgE adjuvant activity but attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Caroline C; Yin, Xuejun J; Ma, Jane Y C; Millecchia, Lyndell; Barger, Mark W; Roberts, Jenny R; Zhang, Xing-Dong; Antonini, James M; Ma, Joseph K H

    2005-11-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) during the sensitization process has been shown to increase antigen-specific IgE production and aggravate allergic airway inflammation in human and animal models. In this study, we evaluated the effect of short-term DEP exposure on ovalbumin (OVA)-mediated responses using a post-sensitization model. Brown Norway rats were first exposed to filtered air or DEP (20.6 +/- 2.7 mg/m3) for 4 h/day for five consecutive days. One day after the final air or DEP exposure (day 1), rats were sensitized with aerosolized OVA (40.5 +/- 6.3 mg/m3), and then again on days 8 and 15, challenged with OVA on day 29, and sacrificed on days 9 or 30, 24 h after the second OVA exposure or the final OVA challenge, respectively. Control animals received aerosolized saline instead of OVA. DEP were shown to elicit an adjuvant effect on the production of antigen-specific IgE and IgG on day 30. At both time points, no significant airway inflammatory responses and lung injury were found for DEP exposure alone. However, the OVA-induced inflammatory cell infiltration, acellular lactate dehydrogenase activity and albumin content in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and numbers of T cells and their CD4+ and CD8+ subsets in lung-draining lymph nodes were markedly reduced by DEP on day 30 compared with the air-plus-OVA exposure group. The OVA-induced nitric oxide (NO) in the BAL fluid and production of NO, interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-12 by alveolar macrophages (AM) were also significantly lowered by DEP on day 30 as well as day 9. DEP or OVA alone decreased intracellular glutathione (GSH) in AM and lymphocytes on days 9 and 30. The combined DEP and OVA exposure resulted in further depletion of GSH in both cell types. These results show that short-term DEP exposure prior to sensitization had a delayed effect on enhancement of the sensitization in terms of allergen-specific IgE and IgG production, but caused an attenuation of the allergen-induced airway

  10. Reduction in IgE reactivity of Pacific mackerel parvalbumin by heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Ayako; Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Shiomi, Kazuo; Hamada-Sato, Naoko

    2016-09-01

    Parvalbumin, a major fish allergen, has been reported to be highly thermostable. However, little is known as to whether parvalbumin is stable at more than 100°C. Thermostability of the Pacific mackerel parvalbumin was examined by subjecting heated (20-140°C) muscle extracts to SDS-PAGE, western blotting and ELISA. As judged by SDS-PAGE and western blotting with the anti-parvalbumin antiserum recognizing the primary structure, the parvalbumin was not degraded even under severe heating conditions. However, western blotting analysis with the monoclonal antibody recognizing the stereoscopic structure revealed that the parvalbumin undergoes conformational changes in a heating load-dependent manner. Importantly, the IgE reactivity of the parvalbumin determined by ELISA using patient sera was also reduced in a heating load-dependent manner; complete loss of IgE reactivity was induced by heating at 140°C. This study showed that the allergenicity of the Pacific mackerel parvalbumin is considerably less thermostable than assumed for other fish parvalbumins. PMID:27041301

  11. Characterization and crystallization of a recombinant IgE Fab fragment in complex with the bovine β-lactoglobulin allergen

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, Merja Jänis, Janne; Jylhä, Sirpa; Kallio, Johanna M.; Hakulinen, Nina; Laukkanen, Marja-Leena; Takkinen, Kristiina; Rouvinen, Juha

    2008-01-01

    The high-resolution mass-spectrometric characterization, crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of a recombinant IgE Fab fragment in complex with bovine β-lactoglobulin are reported. A D1 Fab fragment containing the allergen-binding variable domains of the IgE antibody was characterized by ESI FT–ICR mass spectrometry and crystallized with bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG) using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 293 K. X-ray data suitable for structure determination were collected to 2.8 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 67.0, b = 100.6, c = 168.1 Å. The three-dimensional structure of the D1 Fab fragment–BLG complex will provide the first insight into IgE antibody–allergen interactions at the molecular level.

  12. Ara h 6 complements Ara h 2 as an important marker for IgE reactivity to peanut.

    PubMed

    Koid, Audrey E; Chapman, Martin D; Hamilton, Robert G; van Ree, Ronald; Versteeg, Serge A; Dreskin, Stephen C; Koppelman, Stef J; Wünschmann, Sabina

    2014-01-01

    The similarities of two major peanut allergens, Ara h 2 and Ara h 6, in molecular size, amino acid sequence, and structure have made it difficult to obtain natural Ara h 6 free of Ara h 2. The objectives of this study were to purify natural Ara h 6 that is essentially free of Ara h 2 and to compare its IgE reactivity and potency in histamine release assays to Ara h 2. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the highly purified allergen (<0.01% Ara h 2) revealed a single 14.5 kD band, and the identity of Ara h 6 was confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Ara h 6 showed a higher seroprevalence in chimeric IgE enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (n = 54) but a weaker biological activity in basophil histamine release assays than Ara h 2. Purified Ara h 6 will be useful for diagnostic IgE antibody assays as well as molecular and cellular studies to investigate the immunological mechanisms of peanut allergy. PMID:24328145

  13. Pertussis toxin enhanced IgG1 and IgE responses to primary tetanus immunization are mediated by interleukin-4 and persist during secondary responses to tetanus alone.

    PubMed

    Samore, M H; Siber, G R

    1996-03-01

    Pertussis toxin (Ptx), the major toxin product of Bordetella pertussis, has potent immunologic effect including adjuvant effects on antibody responses and sensitization for anaphylaxis. In order to further define the effect of Ptx on the class and subclass of murine antibody response, we measured total and antigen specific IgG subclasses and IgE in Balb/c mice after primary and secondary immunization with tetanus toxoid (TT). Low doses of Ptx (100 ng) given intravenously at the time of primary immunization increased primary IgG1 and IgE anti-TT antibodies as well as total IgG1 and IgE concentrations compared to controls. The increase in IgG1 subclass and IgE response when Ptx was present during primary immunization was even more pronounced after secondary immunization with TT alone 3 weeks or 3 months later. Similar effects were noted after diphtheria toxoid immunization in the presence of Ptx. Administration of the anti IL-4 monoclonal antibody (11B11) suppressed the enhanced total and TT-specific IgE responses but not the enhanced IgG1 responses. The presence of low concentrations of Ptx during primary immunization primes for induction of IL-4 producing T-cell help which enhances IgGI and IgE responses to the primary exposure as well as to subsequent exposures of the antigen in the absence of Ptx. This phenomenon may have significance for the adjuvant activity of vaccines containing Ptx as well as for the immune response to natural pertussis.

  14. Association between the MHC gene region and variation of serum IgE levels against specific mould allergens in the horse

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    To investigate whether the equine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene region influences the production of mould-specific immunoglobulin E antibodies (IgE), alleles of the equine leukocyte antigen (ELA-A) locus and three microsatellite markers (UM-011, HTG-05 and HMS-42) located on the same chromosome as the equine MHC were determined in 448 Lipizzan horses. Statistical analyses based on composite models, showed significant associations of the ELA-A and UM-011 loci with IgE titres against the recombinant Aspergillus fumigatus 7 antigen (rAsp f 7). UM-011 was also significantly associated with IgE titres against the recombinant Aspergillus fumigatus 8 antigen (rAsp f 8). In addition to the loci mentioned above, the MHC class II DQA and DRA loci were determined in 76 Lipizzans from one stud. For IgE levels against rAsp f 7, the composite model showed the strongest association for DQA (P < 0.01) while for rAsp f 8 specific IgE levels, similarly to the results found with all 448 horses, the strongest association was found with UM-011 (P = 0.01), which is closely linked with the MHC class II DRB locus. These results suggest that the equine MHC gene region and possibly MHC class II loci, influence the specific IgE response in the horse. However, although the strongest associations were found with DQA and UM-011, this study did not distinguish if the observed effects were due to the MHC itself or to other tightly linked genes. PMID:12927090

  15. A Fusion Protein Consisting of the Vaccine Adjuvant Monophosphoryl Lipid A and the Allergen Ovalbumin Boosts Allergen-Specific Th1, Th2, and Th17 Responses In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Lothar; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Vieths, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background. The detoxified TLR4-ligand Monophosphoryl Lipid A (MPLA) is the first approved TLR-agonist used as adjuvant in licensed vaccines but has not yet been explored as part of conjugated vaccines. Objective. To investigate the immune-modulating properties of a fusion protein consisting of MPLA and Ovalbumin (MPLA : Ova). Results. MPLA and Ova were chemically coupled by stable carbamate linkage. MPLA : Ova was highly pure without detectable product-related impurities by either noncoupled MPLA or Ova. Light scattering analysis revealed MPLA : Ova to be aggregated. Stimulation of mDC and mDC : DO11.10 CD4+ TC cocultures showed a stronger activation of both mDC and Ova-specific DO11.10 CD4+ TC by MPLA : Ova compared to the mixture of both components. MPLA : Ova induced both strong proinflammatory (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokine responses from mDCs while also boosting allergen-specific Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokine secretion. Conclusion. Conjugation of MPLA and antigen enhanced the immune response compared to the mixture of both components. Due to the nonbiased boost of Ova-specific Th2 and Th17 responses while also inducing Th1 responses, this fusion protein may not be a suitable vaccine candidate for allergy treatment but may hold potential for the treatment of other diseases that require a strong stimulation of the host's immune system (e.g., cancer). PMID:27340679

  16. Peanut oral immunotherapy modifies IgE and IgG4 responses to major peanut allergens

    PubMed Central

    Vickery, Brian P.; Lin, Jing; Kulis, Michael; Fu, Zhiyan; Steele, Pamela H.; Jones, Stacie M.; Scurlock, Amy M.; Gimenez, Gustavo; Bardina, Ludmilla; Sampson, Hugh A.; Burks, A. Wesley

    2012-01-01

    Background Peanut-allergic subjects have highly stable pathologic antibody repertoires to the immunodominant B cell epitopes of the major peanut allergens Ara h 1-3. Objective We used a peptide microarray technique to analyze the effect of treatment with peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) on such repertoires. Methods Measurements of total peanut-specific IgE (psIgE) and psIgG4 were made with CAP-FEIA. We analyzed sera from 22 OIT subjects and 6 controls and measured serum specific IgE and IgG4 binding to epitopes of Ara h 1-3 using a high-throughput peptide microarray technique. Antibody affinity was measured using a competitive peptide microarray as previously described. Results At baseline, psIgE and psIgG4 diversity were similar between subjects and controls, and there was broad variation in epitope recognition. After a median 41 months of OIT, polyclonal psIgG4 increased from a median 0.3 mcg/mL (IQR 0.1-0.43) at baseline to 10.5 mcg/mL (3.95-45.48) (p<0.0001) and included de novo specificities. PsIgE was reduced from a median baseline of 85.45 kUA/L (23.05-101.0) to 7.75 kUA/L (2.58-30.55) (p<0.0001). Affinity was unaffected. Although the psIgE repertoire contracted in most OIT-treated subjects, several subjects generated new IgE specificities even as the total psIgE decreased. Global epitope-specific shifts from IgE to IgG4 binding occurred, including at an informative epitope of Ara h 2. Conclusion OIT differentially alters Ara h 1-3 binding patterns. These changes are variable between subjects, not observed in controls, and include a progressive polyclonal increase in IgG4, with concurrent reduction in IgE amount and diversity. PMID:23199605

  17. Different natural killer (NK) receptor expression and immunoglobulin E (IgE) regulation by NK1 and NK2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, E; Akdis, M; Bilgic, S; Disch, R; Falk, C S; Blaser, K; Akdis, C; Deniz, G

    2005-01-01

    Many studies concerning the role of T cells and cytokines in allergy have been performed, but little is known about the role of natural killer (NK) cells. Accordingly, the expression of co-stimulatory, inhibitory and apoptosis receptors, cytokine profiles and their effect on immunoglobulin isotypes were investigated in polyallergic atopic dermatitis (AD) patients with hyper immunoglobulin E (IgE) and healthy individuals. AD patients showed significantly decreased peripheral blood NK cells compared to healthy individuals. Freshly isolated NK cells of polyallergic patients spontaneously released higher amounts of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13 and interferon (IFN)-γ compared to healthy individuals. NK cells were differentiated to NK1 cells by IL-12 and neutralizing anti-IL-4 monoclonal antibodies (mAb), and to NK2 cells by IL-4 and neutralizing anti-IL-12 mAb. Following IL-12 stimulation, NK cells produced increased levels of IFN-γ and decreased IL-4. In contrast, stimulation of NK cells with IL-4 inhibited IFN-γ, but increased IL-13, production. The effect of NK cell subsets on IgE regulation was examined in co-cultures of in vitro differentiated NK cells with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or B cells. NK1 cells significantly inhibited IL-4- and soluble CD40-ligand-stimulated IgE production; however, NK2 cells did not have any effect. The inhibitory effect of NK1 cells on IgE production was blocked by neutralization of IFN-γ. Except for CD40, NK cell subsets showed different expression of killer-inhibitory receptors and co-stimulatory molecules between the polyallergic and healthy subjects. These results indicate that human NK cells show differences in numbers, surface receptor and cytokine phenotypes and functional properties in AD. PMID:15807855

  18. Allergen structures and epitopes.

    PubMed

    Meno, K H

    2011-07-01

    Human type 1 hypersensitivity diseases such as allergic rhinoconjunctivitis are characterized by allergen-specific IgE antibodies produced in allergic individuals after allergen exposure. IgE antibodies bound to receptors on the surface of effector cells trigger an allergic response by interacting with three-dimensional (conformational) epitopes on the allergen surface. Crystal structures are available for complexes of antibody specifically bound to five allergens, from birch pollen, bee venom, cockroach, cow's milk and timothy grass pollen. The details of the antibody-allergen interaction extending all the way to atomic resolution are available from such complexes. In vitro investigations using recombinant monoclonal antibodies and human basophils show that binding affinity is a key to triggering the allergic response. Continued molecular characterization of antibody-allergen interactions is paving the way for the use of recombinant allergens in allergen-specific diagnosis and immunotherapy. PMID:21668845

  19. IGE IN ASTHMATIC HUMAN SERA IS REACTIVE AGAINST MOLD EXTRACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molds have been associated with various health effects including asthma, but their role in induction of asthma is unclear. However, the presence of mold-specific IgE indicates their capacity to induce allergic responses and possibly exacerbate asthma symptoms. This study was und...

  20. A Progress Report on the Development of the Minnesota State IGE Network 1973-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loritz, Daniel B.

    This is a progress report on the development of the Minnesota State Individually Guided Education (IGE) Network. The foreword states that the state IGE network came into being in July of 1973 in response to a need for the continuing awareness, implementation, and refinement of IGE on a statewide basis. Section 1 is an introduction which explains…

  1. Evidence that FcRn mediates the transplacental passage of maternal IgE in the form of IgG anti-IgE/IgE immune complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bundhoo, Arvin; Paveglio, Sara; Rafti, Ektor; Dhongade, Ashish; Blumberg, Richard S.; Matson, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    Background The mechanism(s) responsible for acquisition of maternal antibody isotypes other than IgG are not fully understood. This uncertainty is a major reason underlying the continued controversy regarding whether cord blood (CB) IgE originates in the mother or fetus. Objective To investigate the capacity of maternal IgE to be transported across the placenta in the form of IgG anti-IgE/IgE immune complexes (ICs) and to determine the role of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) in mediating this process. Methods Maternal and CB serum concentrations of IgE, IgG anti-IgE, and IgG anti-IgE/IgE ICs were determined in a cohort of allergic and non-allergic mother/infant dyads. Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells stably transfected with human FcRn were used to study the binding and transcytosis of IgE in the form of IgG anti-IgE/IgE ICs. Results Maternal and CB serum concentrations of IgG anti-IgE/IgE ICs were highly correlated, regardless of maternal allergic status. IgG anti-IgE/IgE ICs generated in vitro bound strongly to FcRn-expressing MDCK cells and were transcytosed in an FcRn-dependent manner. Conversely, monomeric IgE did not bind to FcRn and was not transcytosed. IgE was detected in solutions of transcytosed IgG anti-IgE/IgE ICs, even though essentially all the IgE remained in complex form. Similarly, the majority of IgE in CB sera was found to be complexed to IgG. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance These data indicate that human FcRn facilitates the transepithelial transport of IgE in the form of IgG anti-IgE/IgE ICs. They also strongly suggest that the majority of IgE in CB sera is the result of FcRn-mediated transcytosis of maternal-derived IgG anti-IgE/IgE ICs. These findings challenge the widespread perception that maternal IgE does not cross the placenta. Measuring maternal or CB levels of IgG anti-IgE/IgE ICs may be a more accurate predictor of allergic risk. PMID:25652137

  2. The influence of the carrier molecule on amoxicillin recognition by specific IgE in patients with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to betalactams

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Adriana; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Salas, María; Doña, Inmaculada; Martín-Serrano, Ángela; Pérez-Inestrosa, Ezequiel; Pérez-Sala, Dolores; Guzmán, Antonio E.; Montañez, María I.; Torres, María J.

    2016-01-01

    The optimal recognition of penicillin determinants, including amoxicillin (AX), by specific IgE antibodies is widely believed to require covalent binding to a carrier molecule. The nature of the carrier and its contribution to the antigenic determinant is not well known. Here we aimed to evaluate the specific-IgE recognition of different AX-derived structures. We studied patients with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to AX, classified as selective or cross-reactors to penicillins. Competitive immunoassays were performed using AX itself, amoxicilloic acid, AX bound to butylamine (AXO-BA) or to human serum albumin (AXO-HSA) in the fluid phase, as inhibitors, and amoxicilloyl-poli-L-lysine (AXO-PLL) in the solid-phase. Two distinct patterns of AX recognition by IgE were found: Group A showed a higher recognition of AX itself and AX-modified components of low molecular weights, whilst Group B showed similar recognition of both unconjugated and conjugated AX. Amoxicilloic acid was poorly recognized in both groups, which reinforces the need for AX conjugation to a carrier for optimal recognition. Remarkably, IgE recognition in Group A (selective responders to AX) is influenced by the mode of binding and/or the nature of the carrier; whereas IgE in Group B (cross-responders to penicillins) recognizes AX independently of the nature of the carrier. PMID:27731424

  3. Delayed Anaphylaxis to Red Meat in Patients with IgE Specific for Galactose alpha-1,3-Galactose (alpha-gal)

    PubMed Central

    Platts-Mills, Thomas A. E.

    2012-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that can be rapidly progressing and fatal. In instances where the triggering allergen is not known, establishing the etiology of anaphylaxis is pivotal to long-term risk management. Our recent work has identified a novel IgE antibody (Ab) response to a mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal), that has been associated with two distinct forms of anaphylaxis: (1) immediate onset anaphylaxis during first exposure to intravenous cetuximab, and (2) delayed onset anaphylaxis 3–6 h after ingestion of mammalian food products (e.g., beef and pork). The results of our studies strongly suggest that tick bites are a cause, if not the only significant cause, of IgE Ab responses to alpha-gal in the southern, eastern and central United States. Patients with IgE Ab to alpha-gal continue to emerge and, increasingly, these cases involve children. This IgE Ab response cross-reacts with cat and dog but does not appear to pose a risk for asthma; however, it may impair diagnostic testing in some situations. PMID:23054628

  4. Anti-IgE monoclonal antibody (omalizumab) in the treatment of atopic asthma and allergic respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Gennaro; Liccardi, Gennaro; Noschese, Paolo; Salzillo, Antonello; D'Amato, Maria; Cazzola, Mario

    2004-09-01

    Since the discovery of immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies thirty-six years ago, our understanding of the mechanisms of allergy has improved to such an extent that we can now better differentiate allergy from non-allergic hypersensitivity, and allergic/atopic from intrinsic/non-atopic bronchial asthma. IgE antibodies are crucial immune mediators of airway inflammation in allergic atopic asthma and IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions are the likely mechanisms of allergen-induced airway obstruction. In addition, IgE may cause chronic airway inflammation in asthma through effector cells activated via high-affinity (Fcepsilon RI) or low-affinity (Fcepsilon RII) IgE receptors. Therapeutic anti-IgE antibodies able to reduce free IgE levels and to block the binding of IgE to Fcepsilon RI without cross-linking IgE and triggering degranulation of IgE-sensitised cells have been developed. This non-anaphylactogenic anti-IgE monoclonal antibody (rhuMAb-E25; omalizumab) binds IgE at the same site as these antibodies bind Fcepsilon RI and Fcepsilon RII. As a consequence, omalizumab inhibits IgE effector functions by blocking IgE binding to high-affinity receptors on IgE effector cells and does not cause mast cell or basophil activation because it cannot bind to IgE on cell surfaces where the Fcepsilon R1 receptor already masks the anti-IgE epitope. Studies in patients with atopic asthma demonstrated that omalizumab decreases serum IgE levels and allergen-induced bronchoconstriction during both the early and late-phase responses to inhaled allergen. In several clinical controlled trials omalizumab resulted to be able to reduce asthma-related symptoms, to decrease corticosteroid use and to improve quality of life of asthmatic patients. The anti-IgE approach to asthma treatment has several advantages, including concomitant treatment of other IgE-mediated diseases (allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, atopic dermatitis and food allergies), a favourable side-effect profile

  5. Changes over Time in IgE Sensitization to Allergens of the Fish Parasite Anisakis spp.

    PubMed Central

    Carballeda-Sangiao, Noelia; Rodríguez-Mahillo, Ana I.; Careche, Mercedes; Navas, Alfonso; Moneo, Ignacio; González-Muñoz, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background Sensitization to Anisakis spp. can produce allergic reactions after eating raw or undercooked parasitized fish. Specific IgE is detected long after the onset of symptoms, but the changes in specific IgE levels over a long follow-up period are unknown; furthermore, the influence of Anisakis spp. allergen exposure through consumption of fishery products is also unknown. Objective To analyse the changes in IgE sensitization to Anisakis spp. allergens over several years of follow-up and the influence of the consumption of fishery products in IgE sensitization. Methods Total IgE, Anisakis spp.-specific IgE, anti-Ani s 1 and anti-Ani s 4 IgE were repeatedly measured over a median follow-up duration of 49 months in 17 sensitized patients. Results Anisakis spp.-specific IgE was detected in 16/17 patients throughout the follow-up period. The comparison between baseline and last visit measurements showed significant decreases in both total IgE and specific IgE. The specific IgE values had an exponential or polynomial decay trend in 13/17 patients. In 4/17 patients, an increase in specific IgE level with the introduction of fish to the diet was observed. Three patients reported symptoms after eating aquaculture or previously frozen fish, and in two of those patients, symptom presentation was coincident with an increase in specific IgE level. Conclusions IgE sensitization to Anisakis spp. allergens lasts for many years since specific IgE was detectable in some patients after more than 8 years from the allergic episode. Specific IgE monitoring showed that specific IgE titres increase in some allergic patients and that allergen contamination of fishery products can account for the observed increase in Anisakis spp.-specific IgE level. Clinical Relevance Following sensitization to Anisakis spp. allergens, the absence of additional exposure to those allergens does not result in the loss of IgE sensitization. Exposure to Anisakis spp. allergens in fishery products can

  6. IgE reactivity to hen egg white allergens in dogs with cutaneous adverse food reactions.

    PubMed

    Shimakura, Hidekatsu; Uchiyama, Jumpei; Saito, Taku; Miyaji, Kazuki; Fujimura, Masato; Masuda, Kenichi; Okamoto, Noriaki; DeBoer, Douglas J; Sakaguchi, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    Dogs with cutaneous adverse food reactions (CAFR) often have specific IgE to food allergens. Egg white, which is majorly composed of ovomucoid, ovalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme, is a food allergen in dogs. Information of the IgE reactivity to purified egg white allergens supports accurate diagnosis and efficiency treatment in humans. However, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no studies on the IgE reactivity to purified egg white allergens in dogs. Here, we investigated the IgE reactivity to crude and purified allergens of hen egg white in dogs with CAFR. First, when we examined serum samples from 82 dogs with CAFR for specific IgE to crude egg white by ELISA, 9.8% (8/82) of the dogs with CAFR showed the IgE reactivity to crude egg white. We then used sera from the eight dogs with positive IgE reactivity to crude egg white to examine the IgE reactivity to four purified allergens, ovomucoid, ovalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme, by ELISA. We found that 75% (6/8) of the dogs showed IgE reactivity to both ovomucoid and ovalbumin, and that 37.5% (3/8) of the dogs showed IgE reactivity to ovotransferrin. None (0/8) showed IgE reactivity to lysozyme. Moreover, validating these results, the immunoblot analyses were performed using the sera of the three dogs showing the highest IgE reactivity to crude egg white. Both anti-ovomucoid and anti-ovalbumin IgE were detected in the sera of these dogs, while anti-ovotransferrin IgE was not detected. Considering these, ovomucoid and ovalbumin appears to be the major egg white allergens in dogs with CAFR. PMID:27436445

  7. Allergen presentation by epidermal Langerhans' cells from patients with atopic dermatitis is mediated by IgE.

    PubMed Central

    Mudde, G C; Van Reijsen, F C; Boland, G J; de Gast, G C; Bruijnzeel, P L; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C A

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the role of IgE-bearing Langerhans' cells (LC) from atopic dermatitis (AD) patients in antigen presentation, IgE+LC and non-IgE bearing LC (IgE-LC) from AD patients were investigated for their antigen-presenting capacity and compared to antigen-presenting cells (APC) from peripheral blood. The T-cell response to Candida albicans, using IgE+LC from AD patients as APC, was in the same range as with IgE-LC. Also, the T-cell response to Candida with autologous APC from peripheral blood did not significantly differ between these groups. In contrast to this finding, the T-cell response to house dust allergen (HDA) was dependent on the type of APC used. If non-T cells from peripheral blood were used as APC, both AD patients and controls responded to HDA. However, when LC were used as APC, a T-cell response to HDA was only observed in the presence of IgE+LC. IgE-LC from AD patients or LC from normal controls were unable to present HDA. Preincubation of IgE+LC with anti-IgE or anti-kappa/lambda antibodies inhibited HDA-induced T-cell proliferation, whereas the response to Candida was not affected. These in vitro results, which demonstrate the necessity of cell-bound IgE on LC for the presentation of aero-allergens, strongly correlate with the in vivo presence of a positive delayed patch reaction to the same antigens. When the LC of a patient appeared to be IgE-, the in vitro proliferative response as well as, in most cases, the in vivo patch test reaction to the same antigens was negative. In conclusion, these experiments demonstrate that there are at least two different mechanisms by which LC capture antigens for antigen presentation. In one of them cell-bound IgE, as can be demonstrated on LC from AD patients, plays a crucial role. The binding and presentation of HDA by APC from peripheral blood can take place independently of cell-bound IgE. Candida can be presented by both types of APC in the absence of IgE. PMID:2179131

  8. Application Protocol, Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES), Layered Electrical Product

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connell, L.J.

    1994-12-01

    An application protocol is an information systems engineering view of a specific product The view represents an agreement on the generic activities needed to design and fabricate the product the agreement on the information needed to support those activities, and the specific constructs of a product data standard for use in transferring some or all of the information required. This application protocol describes the data for electrical and electronic products in terms of a product description standard called the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES). More specifically, the Layered Electrical Product IGES Application Protocol (AP) specifies the mechanisms for defining and exchanging computer-models and their associated data for those products which have been designed in two dimensional geometry so as to be produced as a series of layers in IGES format The AP defines the appropriateness of the data items for describing the geometry of the various parts of a product (shape and location), the connectivity, and the processing and material characteristics. Excluded is the behavioral requirements which the product was intended to satisfy, except as those requirements have been recorded as design rules or product testing requirements.

  9. IgE sensitization in snow crab-processing workers.

    PubMed

    Cartier, A; Malo, J L; Ghezzo, H; McCants, M; Lehrer, S B

    1986-08-01

    Occupational asthma is a highly prevalent disease among snow crab-processing workers, but its immunologic mechanism has not been identified. Prick skin tests with snow crab-meat extract, commercial extracts from other crab genera, and snow crab cooking water collected in 1984 were performed on 119 workers. Crab-specific IgE was assessed by RAST in sera from 115 workers with meat and water extracts. Both skin and RAST tests were performed in 58 individuals. Diagnosis of occupational asthma had previously been confirmed in 54 individuals. A highly significant relationship was demonstrated between the presence of immediate skin reactivity or increased serum levels of specific IgE to crab extracts and the occurrence of occupational asthma. There was good agreement between the results of skin and RAST tests with extracts of either meat or snow crab cooking water. Cooking water and snow crab-meat extracts were more sensitive than commercial preparations. Water extract was more potent and more sensitive than meat extract. We conclude that there is evidence that occupational asthma in snow crab-processing workers is mediated through an IgE mechanism.

  10. Silibinin attenuates antigen-specific IgE production through the modulation of Th1/Th2 balance in ovalbumin-sensitized BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Fu-Hua; Jan, Tong-Rong

    2009-03-01

    The effect of silibinin on antigen-specific antibody production and T-cell cytokine expression was investigated. BALB/c mice were either left untreated or administered daily with vehicle (VH; saline) and/or silibinin (200 or 400 mg/kg) by gavage for 3 consecutive days prior to sensitization with ovalbumin (OVA). The antibody production in the serum and T-cell-derived cytokine expression by splenocytes were determined 7 days post OVA sensitization. Our results demonstrated that the production of OVA-specific serum IgE and total IgE was significantly attenuated by silibinin treatment, whereas OVA-specific IgG(2a) was markedly enhanced. In parallel with the differential modulation of the production of IgG(2a) and IgE, treatment of OVA-sensitized mice with silibinin markedly increased and decreased the production of IFN-gamma and IL-4, respectively, by splenocytes cultured in the presence of OVA. Together, these results suggest that silibinin treatment polarizes the Th1/Th2 immune balance toward the Th1-dominant direction, which may be beneficial against IgE-mediated allergy.

  11. Tetanus toxoid IgE may be useful in predicting allergy during childhood.

    PubMed

    Ciprandi, G; De Amici, M; Quaglini, S; Labò, E; Castellazzi, A M; Miraglia Del Giudice, M; Marseglia, A; Bianchi, L; Moratti, R; Marseglia, G L

    2012-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions after immunization with tetanus toxoid are occasionally observed in atopic and non-atopic individuals. High IgE levels in infancy may predict subsequent allergy. The aims of this study were: i) to evaluate the role of specific IgE to tetanus toxoid in children in response to tetanus immunization and the possible factors associated with specific IgE levels, and ii) to investigate the correlation between specific IgE levels to tetanus toxoid and the late development of allergy (up to 12 years). Initially, 278 healthy infants (152 males and 126 females, aged 12 months) living in an urban city were screened for serum total IgE and specific IgE to tetanus toxoid, after having obtained informed consent from parents. After 12 years, 151 children could be evaluated. Total IgE summed with tetanus specific IgE were significantly associated with allergy at 12 years. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that serum total IgE and tetanus specific IgE may be predictive of subsequent allergy onset.

  12. IgE Reactivity of the Dog Lipocalin Allergen Can f 4 and the Development of a Sandwich ELISA for Its Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Saarelainen, Soili; Randell, Jukka; Häyrinen, Jukka; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Virtanen, Tuomas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Divergent results on the IgE reactivity of dog-allergic subjects to Can f 4 have been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of Can f 4 in dog allergy and to develop an immunochemical method for measuring Can f 4 content in environmental samples. Methods We purified the natural dog allergen Can f 4 from a dog dander extract by monoclonal antibody-based affinity chromatography and generated its variant in a recombinant form. Sixty-three dog-allergic patients and 12 nonallergic control subjects were recruited in the study. The IgE-binding capacity of natural Can f 4 and its recombinant variant was assessed by ELISA, immunoblotting, and skin prick tests (SPT). Results Eighty-one percent of the dog-allergic patients showed a positive result to the immunoaffinity-purified natural Can f 4 in IgE ELISA, but only 46% in IgE immunoblotting. Respective results with the recombinant Can f 4 variant were 54% and 49%. SPT results reflected those obtained in ELISA and immunoblotting. The overall IgE reactivity of the immunoaffinity-purified natural Can f 4 was found to depend strongly on the integrity of the allergen's conformation. A sandwich ELISA based on monoclonal antibodies was found to be functional for measuring Can f 4 in environmental samples. Conclusions Can f 4 is a major allergen of dog together with Can f 1 and Can f 5. In combination with other dog allergens, it improves the reliability of allergy tests in dog allergy. PMID:25749774

  13. The relevance of anti-food antibodies for the diagnosis of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Johansson, S G; Dannaeus, A; Lilja, G

    1984-12-01

    All individuals are exposed to large amounts of potentially immunogenic food proteins. Most people respond by producing IgG, IgA, or IgM antibodies. The presence of such antibodies in serum is a normal, but not necessarily physiologic phenomenon. In certain groups of individuals, such as young infants, persons with a selective IgA deficiency and patients with inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders, especially high levels of such antibodies are commonly found despite complete tolerance to intake of the food in question. Obviously the finding of IgG, IgA or IgM antibodies to food proteins in serum is of limited clinical relevance. The presence in serum of IgE antibodies to food antigens is not uncommon in some patients with atopic dermatitis, although the clinical relevance of the antibodies for the dermatitis is not always clear. Young, atopic children have low levels of such antibodies as a normal, transient phenomenon. High concentrations of IgE antibodies not only to classical food antigens such as egg, fish, cow's milk, nuts, shellfish, peanuts and cereals but also to less typical allergens such as celery, some spices and other vegetables often indicate a pronounced food allergy that can give rise to a serious reaction upon contact. In contrast to the case with non-IgE antibodies, the presence of IgE antibodies in serum is a non-physiologic state of clinical relevance.

  14. Psoriasis in hyper IgE syndrome – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Javad; Abedian- Kenari, Saeed; Ghasemi, Maryam; Gohardehi, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hyper IgE syndrome (HIES) is a rare primary immune deficiency, described as Job`s syndrome characterized by increased serum levels of IgE, eczema, recurrent cutaneous and pulmonary infections. In this paper, we presented a case of Hyper IgE syndrome. Case Presentation: A 16-year-old Iranian boy presented with a one year history of skin lesions in knees and elbows was diagnosed of psoriasis disease. He had a history of recurrent infections including otitis media, pneumonia, diarrea and skin infection. Laboratory results showed increased level of total IgE and normal in other immunoglobulin. Histologic finding showed hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis of acanthotic epidermis with regular elongation of rete ridges diagnose psoriasis disorder. Conclusion: In conclusion, this is the first case of hyper IgE patient with psoriasis disorder. We addressed the important laboratory findings and actual theories explaining possible association between hyper IgE immunoglobulinemia and psoriasis disorder. PMID:24009971

  15. Increased levels of IgE and autoreactive, polyreactive IgG in wild rodents: implications for the hygiene hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Devalapalli, A.P.; Lesher, A.; Shieh, K.; Solow, J.S.; Everett, M.L.; Edala, A.S.; Whitt, P.; Long, Renee R.; Newton, N.; Parker, W.

    2006-01-01

    To probe the potential role of Th1 versus Th2 reactivity underlying the hygiene hypothesis, intrinsic levels of Th1-associated and Th2-associated antibodies in the serum of wild rodents were compared with that in various strains of laboratory rodents. Studies using rat lung antigens as a target indicated that wild rats have substantially greater levels of autoreactive, polyreactive immunoglobulin G (IgG), but not autoreactive, polyreactive IgM than do laboratory rats, both on a quantitative and qualitative basis. Increased levels of serum IgG and IgE were observed in both wild rats and wild mice relative to their laboratory-raised counterparts, with the effect being most pronounced for IgE levels. Further, wild rats had greater intrinsic levels of both Th1- and Th2-associated IgG subclasses than did lab rats. The habitat (wild versus laboratory raised) had a more substantial impact on immunoglobulin concentration than did age, strain or gender in the animals studied. The presence in wild rodents of increased intrinsic, presumably protective, non-pathogenic responses similar to both autoimmune (autoreactive IgG, Th1-associated) and allergic (IgE, Th2-associated) reactions as well as increased levels of Th1-associated and Th2-associated IgG subclasses points toward a generally increased stimulation of the immune system in these animals rather than a shift in the nature of the immunoreactivity. It is concluded that, at least to the extent that feedback inhibition is a controlling element of immunoreactivity, an overly hygienic environment may affect the threshold of both types of immune responses more so than the balance between the different responses.

  16. Intestinal Microbial Diversity during Early-Life Colonization Shapes Long-Term IgE Levels

    PubMed Central

    Cahenzli, Julia; Köller, Yasmin; Wyss, Madeleine; Geuking, Markus B.; McCoy, Kathy D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Microbial exposure following birth profoundly impacts mammalian immune system development. Microbiota alterations are associated with increased incidence of allergic and autoimmune disorders with elevated serum IgE as a hallmark. The previously reported abnormally high serum IgE levels in germ-free mice suggests that immunoregulatory signals from microbiota are required to control basal IgE levels. We report that germ-free mice and those with low-diversity microbiota develop elevated serum IgE levels in early life. B cells in neonatal germ-free mice undergo isotype switching to IgE at mucosal sites in a CD4 T-cell- and IL-4-dependent manner. A critical level of microbial diversity following birth is required in order to inhibit IgE induction. Elevated IgE levels in germ-free mice lead to increased mast-cell-surface-bound IgE and exaggerated oral-induced systemic anaphylaxis. Thus, appropriate intestinal microbial stimuli during early life are critical for inducing an immunoregulatory network that protects from induction of IgE at mucosal sites. PMID:24237701

  17. Cross-linking of Thy-1 glycoproteins or high-affinity IgE receptors induces mast cell activation via different mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Dráberová, L; Dráber, P

    1993-01-01

    Rat peritoneal and pleural mast cells and rat basophilic leukemia cells, RBL-2H3, have been previously shown to be activated by Thy-1-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb). In the present study we investigated the mechanism of Thy-1-mediated activation and compared it with activation induced by cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor. Binding of an IgG Thy-1 x 1-specific mAb, MRCOX7 (OX7), to RBL-2H3 cells and mast cells, and activation of RBL-2H3 by the OX7 were abrogated by pretreatment of the cells with phosphatidyl inositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). The F(ab')2 fragment of OX7, in contrast to the Fab' fragment, induced cell activation as well as intact OX7 mAb. Cells sensitized with IgE exhibited an increased responsiveness to anti-Thy-1 antibodies suggesting formation of functional complexes of IgE receptor/IgE/Thy-1/anti-Thy-1. Pretreatment of RBL-2H3 cells with cholera toxin potentiated activation induced by IgE+antigen (Ag) and IgE+OX7, but had no effect on activation induced by OX7 antibody alone. Similarly, dexamethasone had no effect on OX7-induced activation but inhibited IgE+Ag- and IgE+OX7-induced activation. Analysis of phosphotyrosine-containing proteins in RBL-2H3 cell lysates revealed that IgE+Ag and IgE+OX7 induced a marked increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins that were not tyrosine phosphorylated in cells exposed to OX7 mAb alone. Similar results were obtained when RBL-2H3-derived cells, expressing transfected mouse Thy-1.2, were activated with Thy-1.2-specific IgM antibody. The combined data suggest that Thy-1-specific antibodies activate cells by a mechanism that is different from activation induced by cross-linking of high-affinity IgE receptor. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7902332

  18. Migration of antibody secreting cells towards CXCL12 depends on the isotype that forms the BCR

    PubMed Central

    Achatz-Straussberger, Gertrude; Zaborsky, Nadja; Königsberger, Sebastian; Luger, Elke O.; Lamers, Marinus; Crameri, Reto; Achatz, Gernot

    2010-01-01

    Truncation of the cytoplasmic tail of membrane-bound IgE in vivo results in lower serum IgE levels, decreased numbers of IgE-secreting plasma cells and the abrogation of specific secondary immune responses. Here we present mouse strain KN1 that expresses a chimeric ε-γ1 BCR, consisting of the extracellular domains of the ε gene and the trans-membrane and cytoplasmic domains of the γ1 gene. Thus, differences in the IgE immune response of KN1 mice reflect the influence of the “γ1-mediated signalling” of mIgE bearing B cells. KN1 mice show an increased serum IgE level, resulting from an elevated number of IgE-secreting cells. Although the primary IgE immune response in KN1 mice is inconspicuous, the secondary response is far more robust. Most strikingly, IgE-antibody secreting cells with “γ1-signalling history” migrate more efficiently towards the chemokine CXCL12, which guides plasmablasts to plasma cell niches, than IgE-antibody secreting cells with WT “ε-signalling history”. We conclude that IgE plasmablasts have an intrinsic, lower chance to contribute to the long-lived plasma cell pool than IgG1 plasmablasts. PMID:18925577

  19. Higher Plasma Concentration of Food-Specific Antibodies in Persons with Autistic Disorder in Comparison to Their Siblings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trajkovski, Vladimir; Petlichkovski, Aleksandar; Efinska-Mladenovska, Olivija; Trajkov, Dejan; Arsov, Todor; Strezova, Ana; Ajdinski, Ljubomir; Spiroski, Mirko

    2008-01-01

    Specific IgA, IgG, and IgE antibodies to food antigens in 35 participants with autistic disorder and 21 of their siblings in the Republic of Macedonia were examined. Statistically significant higher plasma concentration of IgA antibodies against alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, casein, and gliadin were found in the children with autistic…

  20. Long-term falls in antibodies to dust mite and pollen allergens in patients with asthma or hay fever.

    PubMed

    Rawle, F C; Burr, M L; Platts-Mills, T A

    1983-09-01

    'Spontaneous' improvement in, or alteration of, allergic symptoms is a common occurrence, and the immunological basis is of interest in attempts to develop effective specific therapy. In the present study we measured levels of serum antibodies to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus in patients diagnosed as having house-dust-allergic asthma up to 40 years previously. The results show a progressive fall in both IgG and IgE antibodies to antigen P1 and RAST binding to crude D. pteronyssinus extract. By contrast changes in total serum IgE were not marked. Within each of the groups of patients diagnosed 20, 30 and 40 years previously, 70% no longer suffered severe symptoms. However, the absence of detectable IgE antibody in serum was neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for loss of symptoms. A group of patients who had spontaneously recovered from hay fever had significantly lower IgG and IgE antibody for the major grass pollen allergen Rye I and also lower total IgE than current hay fever sufferers. In neither hay fever nor asthma was there evidence to link spontaneous improvement in symptoms with an increase in IgG antibodies.

  1. IgE Mediates Killing of Intracellular Toxoplasma gondii by Human Macrophages through CD23-Dependent, Interleukin-10 Sensitive Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Vouldoukis, Ioannis; Mazier, Dominique; Moynet, Daniel; Thiolat, Denis; Malvy, Denis; Mossalayi, M. Djavad

    2011-01-01

    Background In addition to helminthic infections, elevated serum IgE levels were observed in many protozoal infections, while their contribution during immune response to these pathogens remained unclear. As IgE/antigen immune complexes (IgE-IC) bind to human cells through FcεRI or FcεRII/CD23 surface molecules, the present study aimed to identify which functional receptor may be involved in IgE-IC interaction with human macrophages, the major effector cell during parasite infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Human monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with Toxoplasma gondii before being incubated with IgE-IC. IgE receptors were then identified using appropriate blocking antibodies. The activation of cells and parasiticidal activity were evaluated by mediator quantification and direct counting of infected macrophages. RNAs were extracted and cell supernatants were also collected for their content in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin-10 (IL-10) and nitrites. Sera from symptomatic infected patients were also tested for their content of IgE, IL-10 and nitrites, and compared to values found in healthy donors. Results showed that IgE-IC induced intracellular elimination of parasites by human macrophages. IgE-mediated effect was FcεRI-independent, but required cross-linking of surface FcεRII/CD23, cell activation and the generation of nitric oxide (NO). Although TNF-α was shown to be produced during cell activation, this cytokine had minor contribution in this phenomenon while endogenous and exogenous IL-10 down-regulated parasite killing. Inverse relationship was found between IL-10 and NO expression by infected human macrophages at both mRNA and mediator levels. The relationship between these in vitro data and in vivo levels of various factors in T. gondii infected patients supports the involvement of CD23 antigen and IL-10 expression in disease control. Conclusion Thus, IgE may be considered as immune mediator during antiprotozoal activity of

  2. Indirect genetic effects and kin recognition: estimating IGEs when interactions differ between kin and strangers.

    PubMed

    Alemu, S W; Berg, P; Janss, L; Bijma, P

    2014-02-01

    Social interactions among individuals are widespread, both in natural and domestic populations. As a result, trait values of individuals may be affected by genes in other individuals, a phenomenon known as indirect genetic effects (IGEs). IGEs can be estimated using linear mixed models. The traditional IGE model assumes that an individual interacts equally with all its partners, whether kin or strangers. There is abundant evidence, however, that individuals behave differently towards kin as compared with strangers, which agrees with predictions from kin-selection theory. With a mix of kin and strangers, therefore, IGEs estimated from a traditional model may be incorrect, and selection based on those estimates will be suboptimal. Here we investigate whether genetic parameters for IGEs are statistically identifiable in group-structured populations when IGEs differ between kin and strangers, and develop models to estimate such parameters. First, we extend the definition of total breeding value and total heritable variance to cases where IGEs depend on relatedness. Next, we show that the full set of genetic parameters is not identifiable when IGEs differ between kin and strangers. Subsequently, we present a reduced model that yields estimates of the total heritable effects on kin, on non-kin and on all social partners of an individual, as well as the total heritable variance for response to selection. Finally we discuss the consequences of analysing data in which IGEs depend on relatedness using a traditional IGE model, and investigate group structures that may allow estimation of the full set of genetic parameters when IGEs depend on kin. PMID:24169647

  3. Structural insights into the IgE mediated responses induced by the allergens Hev b 8 and Zea m 12 in their dimeric forms

    PubMed Central

    Mares-Mejía, Israel; Martínez-Caballero, Siseth; Garay-Canales, Claudia; Cano-Sánchez, Patricia; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Lara-González, Samuel; Ortega, Enrique; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela

    2016-01-01

    Oligomerization of allergens plays an important role in IgE-mediated reactions, as effective crosslinking of IgE- FcεRI complexes on the cell membrane is dependent on the number of exposed B-cell epitopes in a single allergen molecule or on the occurrence of identical epitopes in a symmetrical arrangement. Few studies have attempted to experimentally demonstrate the connection between allergen dimerization and the ability to trigger allergic reactions. Here we studied plant allergenic profilins rHev b 8 (rubber tree) and rZea m 12 (maize) because they represent an important example of cross-reactivity in the latex-pollen-food syndrome. Both allergens in their monomeric and dimeric states were isolated and characterized by exclusion chromatography and mass spectrometry and were used in immunological in vitro experiments. Their crystal structures were solved, and for Hev b 8 a disulfide-linked homodimer was found. Comparing the structures we established that the longest loop is relevant for recognition by IgE antibodies, whereas the conserved regions are important for cross-reactivity. We produced a novel monoclonal murine IgE (mAb 2F5), specific for rHev b 8, which was useful to provide evidence that profilin dimerization considerably increases the IgE-mediated degranulation in rat basophilic leukemia cells. PMID:27586352

  4. Structural insights into the IgE mediated responses induced by the allergens Hev b 8 and Zea m 12 in their dimeric forms.

    PubMed

    Mares-Mejía, Israel; Martínez-Caballero, Siseth; Garay-Canales, Claudia; Cano-Sánchez, Patricia; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Lara-González, Samuel; Ortega, Enrique; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela

    2016-01-01

    Oligomerization of allergens plays an important role in IgE-mediated reactions, as effective crosslinking of IgE- FcεRI complexes on the cell membrane is dependent on the number of exposed B-cell epitopes in a single allergen molecule or on the occurrence of identical epitopes in a symmetrical arrangement. Few studies have attempted to experimentally demonstrate the connection between allergen dimerization and the ability to trigger allergic reactions. Here we studied plant allergenic profilins rHev b 8 (rubber tree) and rZea m 12 (maize) because they represent an important example of cross-reactivity in the latex-pollen-food syndrome. Both allergens in their monomeric and dimeric states were isolated and characterized by exclusion chromatography and mass spectrometry and were used in immunological in vitro experiments. Their crystal structures were solved, and for Hev b 8 a disulfide-linked homodimer was found. Comparing the structures we established that the longest loop is relevant for recognition by IgE antibodies, whereas the conserved regions are important for cross-reactivity. We produced a novel monoclonal murine IgE (mAb 2F5), specific for rHev b 8, which was useful to provide evidence that profilin dimerization considerably increases the IgE-mediated degranulation in rat basophilic leukemia cells. PMID:27586352

  5. Structural insights into the IgE mediated responses induced by the allergens Hev b 8 and Zea m 12 in their dimeric forms.

    PubMed

    Mares-Mejía, Israel; Martínez-Caballero, Siseth; Garay-Canales, Claudia; Cano-Sánchez, Patricia; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Lara-González, Samuel; Ortega, Enrique; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela

    2016-09-02

    Oligomerization of allergens plays an important role in IgE-mediated reactions, as effective crosslinking of IgE- FcεRI complexes on the cell membrane is dependent on the number of exposed B-cell epitopes in a single allergen molecule or on the occurrence of identical epitopes in a symmetrical arrangement. Few studies have attempted to experimentally demonstrate the connection between allergen dimerization and the ability to trigger allergic reactions. Here we studied plant allergenic profilins rHev b 8 (rubber tree) and rZea m 12 (maize) because they represent an important example of cross-reactivity in the latex-pollen-food syndrome. Both allergens in their monomeric and dimeric states were isolated and characterized by exclusion chromatography and mass spectrometry and were used in immunological in vitro experiments. Their crystal structures were solved, and for Hev b 8 a disulfide-linked homodimer was found. Comparing the structures we established that the longest loop is relevant for recognition by IgE antibodies, whereas the conserved regions are important for cross-reactivity. We produced a novel monoclonal murine IgE (mAb 2F5), specific for rHev b 8, which was useful to provide evidence that profilin dimerization considerably increases the IgE-mediated degranulation in rat basophilic leukemia cells.

  6. Testing the "toxin hypothesis of allergy": Mast cells, IgE, and innate and acquired immune responses to venoms*

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Mindy; Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas; Galli, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Work in mice indicates that innate functions of mast cells, particularly degradation of venom toxins by mast cell-derived proteases, can enhance resistance to certain arthropod or reptile venoms. Recent reports indicate that acquired Th2 immune responses associated with the production of IgE antibodies, induced by Russell’s viper venom or honeybee venom, or by a component of honeybee venom, bee venom phospholipase 2 (bvPLA2), can increase the resistance of mice to challenge with potentially lethal doses of either of the venoms or bvPLA2. These findings support the conclusion that, in contrast to the detrimental effects associated with allergic Th2 immune responses, mast cells and IgE-dependent immune responses to venoms can contribute to innate and adaptive resistance to venom-induced pathology and mortality. PMID:26210895

  7. Maize IgE binding proteins: each plant a different profile?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Allergies are nearly always triggered by protein molecules and the majority of individuals with documented immunologic reactions to foods exhibit IgE hypersensitivity reactions. In this study we aimed to understand if natural differences, at proteomic level, between maize populations, may induce different IgE binding proteins profiles among maize-allergic individuals. We also intended to deepen our knowledge on maize IgE binding proteins. Results In order to accomplish this goal we have used proteomic tools (SDS-PAGE and 2-D gel electrophoresis followed by western blot) and tested plasma IgE reactivity from four maize-allergic individuals against four different protein fractions (albumins, globulins, glutelins and prolamins) of three different maize cultivars. We have observed that maize cultivars have different proteomes that result in different IgE binding proteins profiles when tested against plasma from maize-allergic individuals. We could identify 19 different maize IgE binding proteins, 11 of which were unknown to date. Moreover, we found that most (89.5%) of the 19 identified potential maize allergens could be related to plant stress. Conclusions These results lead us to conclude that, within each species, plant allergenic potential varies with genotype. Moreover, considering the stress-related IgE binding proteins identified, we hypothesise that the environment, particularly stress conditions, may alter IgE binding protein profiles of plant components. PMID:24650160

  8. The Cloning and Expression of Human Monoclonal Antibodies: Implications for Allergen Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    James, Louisa K

    2016-02-01

    Allergic responses are dependent on the highly specific effector functions of IgE antibodies. Conversely, antibodies that block the activity of IgE can mediate tolerance to allergen. Technologies that harness the unparalleled specificity of antibody responses have revolutionized the way that we diagnose and treat human disease. This area of research continues to advance at a rapid pace and has had a significant impact on our understanding of allergic disease. This review will present an overview of humoral responses and provide an up-to-date summary of technologies used in the generation of human monoclonal antibodies. The impact that monoclonal antibodies have on allergic disease will be discussed, with a particular focus on allergen immunotherapy, which remains the only form of treatment that can modulate the underlying immune mechanisms and induce long-term clinical tolerance. PMID:26780523

  9. Evidence of infectious asthma phenotype: Chlamydia-induced allergy and pathogen-specific IgE in a neonatal mouse model.

    PubMed

    Patel, Katir K; Webley, Wilmore C

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease whose etiology is poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that early-life respiratory infections with atypical bacteria may play an important role in the induction or exacerbation of chronic respiratory disease. The current study utilized a neonatal mouse ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization model of asthma to determine the course of early-life respiratory tract infection by Chlamydia. Neonatal (day 1) and adult (6 wks) BALB/c mice were infected intranasally with Chlamydia (MoPn) and 7 weeks later were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Allergic airway disease was characterized by examination of serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) cellularity, cytokine production and antibody response. The presence of Chlamydia was determined by PCR and culture. Ova-specific IgE was quantified by ELISA and Chlamydia-specific IgE was determined via Western blot analysis. Chlamydial infection in neonatal mice induced increased production of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, 5, 10, and 13) in both BAL and serum, while infected adult mice produced increased Th1 cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ). The BAL from infected neonates contained significantly elevated levels of eosinophils compared to infected adult mice. Although adult mice cleared the infection ∼30 days post infection (pi), neonates were still infected 66 days after initial infection. Chlamydia-specific IgE was detected in both the BAL and serum of neonatal mice beginning 28 days post infection, however, infected adult mice did not produce Chlamydia-specific IgE antibodies over the course of the study. When allergic airway was induced using Ova, infected neonatal mice increased their production of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 by >2 fold compared to uninfected controls and infected adult groups. Our findings demonstrate that early-life Chlamydia infection induces a Th2-dominant cytokine response in the airways of neonatal mice, leading to chronic infection. More significantly, early life respiratory

  10. Evidence for a locus regulating total serum IgE levels mapping to chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, D.A.; Xu, J.; Levitt, R.C.

    1994-09-15

    Genetic studies of total serum IgE levels were preformed since high IgE levels correlate with clinical expression of allergy and asthma. Families ascertained through a parent with asthma were genotyped for markers on 5q where there are multiple candidate genes that may influence the control of IgE and inflammation. Evidence for linkage of the IgE phenotype to 5q was obtained by both sib-pair and lod score analysis with evidence for recessive inheritance of high IgE levels from segregation analysis. These findings represent a major step in mapping genes important in the regulation of allergic responses and the pathogenesis of asthma. 52 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Cutting Edge: IgE Plays an Active Role in Tumor Immunosurveillance in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Elisa A; Brini, Anna T; Yenagi, Vijay A; Ferreira, Lorena M; Achatz-Straussberger, Gertrude; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Sanvito, Francesca; Soprana, Elisa; van Anken, Eelco; Achatz, Gernot; Siccardi, Antonio G; Vangelista, Luca

    2016-10-01

    Exogenous IgE acts as an adjuvant in tumor vaccination in mice, and therefore a direct role of endogenous IgE in tumor immunosurveillance was investigated. By using genetically engineered mice, we found that IgE ablation rendered mice more susceptible to the growth of transplantable tumors. Conversely, a strengthened IgE response provided mice with partial or complete resistance to tumor growth, depending on the tumor type. By genetic crosses, we showed that IgE-mediated tumor protection was mostly lost in mice lacking FcεRI. Tumor protection was also lost after depletion of CD8(+) T cells, highlighting a cross-talk between IgE and T cell-mediated tumor immunosurveillance. Our findings provide the rationale for clinical observations that relate atopy with a lower risk for developing cancer and open new avenues for the design of immunotherapeutics relevant for clinical oncology. PMID:27566822

  12. The 28-entity IGES test file results using ComputerVision CADDS 4X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuan, Anchyi; Shah, Saurin; Smith, Kevin

    1987-01-01

    The investigation was based on the following steps: (1) Read the 28 Entity IGES (Initial Graphics Exchange Specification) Test File into the CAD data base with the IGES post-processor; (2) Make the modifications to the displayed geometries, which should produce the normalized front view and the drawing entity defined display; (3) Produce the drawing entity defined display of the file as it appears in the CAD system after modification to the geometry; (4) Translate the file back to IGES format using IGES pre-processor; (5) Read the IGES file produced by the pre-processor back into the CAD data base; (6) Produce another drawing entity defined display of the CAD display; and (7) Compare the plots resulting from steps 3 and 6 - they should be identical to each other.

  13. Mutagenesis within human FcepsilonRIalpha differentially affects human and murine IgE binding.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Graham A; Hulett, Mark D; Cook, Justin P D; Trist, Halina M; Henry, Alistair J; McDonnell, James M; Beavil, Andrew J; Beavil, Rebecca L; Sutton, Brian J; Hogarth, P Mark; Gould, Hannah J

    2002-02-15

    Soluble fragments of the alpha-chain of FcepsilonRI, the high-affinity receptor for IgE, compete with membrane-bound receptors for IgE and may thus provide a means to combat allergic responses. Mutagenesis within FcepsilonRIalpha is used in this study, in conjunction with the crystal structure of the FcepsilonRIalpha/IgE complex, to define the relative importance of specific residues within human FcepsilonRIalpha for IgE binding. We have also compared the effects of these mutants on binding to both human and mouse IgE, with a view to evaluating the mouse as an appropriate model for the analysis of future agents designed to mimic the human FcepsilonRIalpha and attenuate allergic disease. Three residues within the C-C' region of the FcepsilonRIalpha2 domain and two residues within the alpha2 proximal loops of the alpha1 domain were selected for mutagenesis and tested in binding assays with human and mouse IgE. All three alpha2 mutations (K117D, W130A, and Y131A) reduced the affinity of human IgE binding to different extents, but K117D had a far more pronounced effect on mouse IgE binding, and although Y131A had little effect, W130A modestly enhanced binding to mouse IgE. The mutations in alpha1 (R15A and F17A) diminished binding to both human and mouse IgE, with these effects most likely caused by disruption of the alpha1/alpha2 interface. Our results demonstrate that the effects of mutations in human FcepsilonRIalpha on mouse IgE binding, and hence the inhibitory properties of human receptor-based peptides assayed in rodent models of allergy, may not necessarily reflect their activity in a human IgE-based system.

  14. Nanoparticles rapidly assess specific IgE in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, Sarmadia; Qadri, Shahnaz; al-Ramadi, Basel; Haik, Yousef

    2012-08-01

    Allergy is the sixth leading cause of chronic disease in the world. This study demonstrates the feasibility of detecting allergy indicators in human plasma, noninvasively, at the point of care and with a comparable efficiency and reduced turnaround time compared with the gold standard. Peanut allergy was utilized as a model due to its widespread occurrence among the US population and fatality if not treated. The detection procedure utilized magnetic nanoparticles that were coated with an allergen layer (peanut protein extract). Peanut immunoglobulin E (IgE) was detected in concentrations close to the minimum detection range of CAP assay. The results were obtained in minutes compared with the CAP assay which requires more than 3 h.

  15. The distinctive germinal center phase of IgE+ B lymphocytes limits their contribution to the classical memory response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms involved in the maintenance of memory IgE responses are poorly understood, and the role played by germinal center (GC) IgE+ cells in memory responses is particularly unclear. IgE B cell differentiation is characterized by a transient GC phase, a bias towards the plasma cell (PC) fate,...

  16. Molecular Determinants for Antibody Binding on Group 1 House Dust Mite Allergens

    SciTech Connect

    Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Pomés, Anna; Glesner, Jill; Vailes, Lisa D.; Osinski, Tomasz; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Majorek, Karolina A.; Heymann, Peter W.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A.E.; Minor, Wladek; Chapman, Martin D.

    2012-07-11

    House dust mites produce potent allergens, Der p 1 and Der f 1, that cause allergic sensitization and asthma. Der p 1 and Der f 1 are cysteine proteases that elicit IgE responses in 80% of mite-allergic subjects and have proinflammatory properties. Their antigenic structure is unknown. Here, we present crystal structures of natural Der p 1 and Der f 1 in complex with a monoclonal antibody, 4C1, which binds to a unique cross-reactive epitope on both allergens associated with IgE recognition. The 4C1 epitope is formed by almost identical amino acid sequences and contact residues. Mutations of the contact residues abrogate mAb 4C1 binding and reduce IgE antibody binding. These surface-exposed residues are molecular targets that can be exploited for development of recombinant allergen vaccines.

  17. Total serum IgE levels in systemic lupus erythematosus and associations with childhood onset allergies.

    PubMed

    Parks, C G; Biagini, R E; Cooper, G S; Gilkeson, G S; Dooley, M A

    2010-12-01

    Elevated serum IgE has been described in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but associations with disease risk and characteristics remain unresolved. We assessed total serum IgE levels and atopy (IgE > 100 IU/ml) in recently diagnosed SLE patients (n = 228) compared with population controls (n = 293) and in relation to disease activity, autoantibodies, clinical features, total immunoglobulins, C-reactive protein, and allergy history. Multivariate models estimated determinants of IgE and atopy in patients and controls, and associations of SLE with allergy and atopy. Total IgE levels were higher in patients than controls (median = 42 vs. 29 IU/ml); 32% of patients and 25% of controls were atopic (p = 0.06). IgE levels were significantly higher in non-Whites and patients reporting childhood onset (<18 years) asthma and hives, and in controls reporting childhood asthma, hay fever, eczema, and adult onset hives. After accounting for racial differences, atopy was not associated with SLE, nephritis, or other clinical and laboratory parameters. In sum, our findings provide limited evidence of a direct association between total serum IgE and SLE overall or with other disease characteristics after adjusting for demographic characteristics and allergy history. Future studies may want to explore potentially shared risk factors for development of allergy, atopy, and SLE.

  18. IgE reactivity to carbohydrate moieties of glycoproteins in wheat allergy.

    PubMed

    Song, Tae Won; Hong, Jung Yeon; Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Mi Na; Kim, Yoon Hee; Lee, Soo-Young; Kim, Kyung Won; Sohn, Myung Hyun; Kim, Kyu-Earn

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate moieties of different glycoproteins, such as cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCDs) and galactose α-1,3-galactose, can induce IgE reactivity with varied clinical significance. In this study, the possible participation of glycan from wheat gliadin, with respect to its IgE-binding capacity, was investigated in children with food allergies to wheat. Total IgE and wheat-specific IgE quantification, documentation of history, and/or oral food challenge (OFC) were performed for 52 children. Subjects with positive wheat-specific IgE were characterized as the symptomatic group, never-exposed group, or asymptomatic group. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and glycan detection in gliadin were performed. IgE binding to gliadin and deglycosylated gliadin was measured by immunoblotting and ELISA. Gliadin-specific IgE was detected and correlated with wheat-specific IgE in the symptomatic, never-exposed, and asymptomatic groups. The glycan range overlapped significantly with the gliadin range. Deglycosylation of gliadin reduced the allergenicity of gliadin. In gliadin, the allergenicity of the glycan portion was greater in the symptomatic group than in the never-exposed and asymptomatic groups. We conclude that N-glycan in gliadin might exhibit allergenicity as a possible carbohydrate epitope in wheat allergy in children.

  19. Correlation of serum IgE levels and clinical manifestations in patients with actinic prurigo*

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas-Gonzalez, Juan Carlos; Lievanos-Estrada, Zahide; Vega-Memije, Maria Elisa; Hojyo-Tomoka, Maria Teresa; Dominguez-Soto, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Actinic prurigo is an idiopathic photodermatosis, the pathophysiology of which has been hypothesized to involve subtype IV type b (Th2) hypersensitive response, whereby IL4, IL5, and IL13 are secreted and mediate the production of B cells, IgE, and IgG4. OBJECTIVES: To examine the association of serum IgE levels and the clinical severity of injuries. METHODS: This case-control study comprised patients with a clinical and histopathological diagnosis of actinic prurigo, as well as clinically healthy subjects, from whom 3cc of peripheral blood was taken for immunoassay. Cases were classified by lesion severity as mild, moderate, and severe. Descriptive statistics were analyzed, and chi-square test was performed. RESULTS: We included 21 actinic prurigo patients and 21 subjects without disease; 11 patients with actinic prurigo had elevated serum IgE levels, and 10 had low serum levels. Six actinic prurigo (AP) patients with elevated serum levels of IgE had moderate injuries, 4 had severe injuries, and 1 had minor injuries. Eight out of 10 patients with normal IgE levels presented with minor injuries in the clinical evaluation. The 21 controls did not have increased serum IgE levels. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated IgE levels are associated with moderate to severe clinical lesions, suggesting that actinic prurigo entails a type IV subtype b hypersensitivity response in which Th2 cells predominate. PMID:26982774

  20. IgE reactivity to carbohydrate moieties of glycoproteins in wheat allergy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tae Won; Hong, Jung Yeon; Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Mi Na; Kim, Yoon Hee; Lee, Soo-Young; Kim, Kyung Won

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate moieties of different glycoproteins, such as cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCDs) and galactose α-1,3-galactose, can induce IgE reactivity with varied clinical significance. In this study, the possible participation of glycan from wheat gliadin, with respect to its IgE-binding capacity, was investigated in children with food allergies to wheat. Total IgE and wheat-specific IgE quantification, documentation of history, and/or oral food challenge (OFC) were performed for 52 children. Subjects with positive wheat-specific IgE were characterized as the symptomatic group, never-exposed group, or asymptomatic group. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and glycan detection in gliadin were performed. IgE binding to gliadin and deglycosylated gliadin was measured by immunoblotting and ELISA. Gliadin-specific IgE was detected and correlated with wheat-specific IgE in the symptomatic, never-exposed, and asymptomatic groups. The glycan range overlapped significantly with the gliadin range. Deglycosylation of gliadin reduced the allergenicity of gliadin. In gliadin, the allergenicity of the glycan portion was greater in the symptomatic group than in the never-exposed and asymptomatic groups. We conclude that N-glycan in gliadin might exhibit allergenicity as a possible carbohydrate epitope in wheat allergy in children. PMID:25976436

  1. Human immune response to allergens of house dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. IV. Occurrence of natural autologous anti-idiotypic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Saint-Remy, J M; Lebecque, S J; Lebrun, P M; Jacquemin, M G

    1988-01-01

    IgG isolated from the plasma of seven individuals hypersensitive to the common house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DPT) was exhaustively adsorbed onto insolubilized DPT. The unbound fraction was found by radioimmunoassay to contain antibodies recognizing the variable region of both anti-DPT IgG and IgE antibodies. This recognition was idiotype (Id)-specific as it persisted after passage over insolubilized polyclonal IgG of unrelated specificity. Most of these anti-Id IgG carried the internal image of the initial antigen in that they competitively inhibited the binding of anti-DPT antibodies to DPT. Immunoadsorption of anti-Id IgG onto insolubilized anti-DPT IgG antibodies from the same individual completely eliminated their reaction with anti-DPT IgG but not with anti-DPT IgE, suggesting that idiotopes included in the antigen-binding site of specific IgG and IgE antibodies were not identical. Anti-Id IgG recognizing idiotopes located outside the antigen-binding site (bystander idiotopes) were also completely removed by passage over insolubilized anti-DPT IgG; in this case the reaction of the anti-Id IgG with both anti-DPT IgG and anti-DPT IgE was inhibited, indicating that, for a given individual, bystander idiotopes were shared between anti-DPT antibodies pertaining to these two isotypes.

  2. Helminths and malaria co-infections are associated with elevated serum IgE

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Both helminth and malaria infections result in a highly polarized immune response characterized by IgE production. This study aimed to investigate the total serum IgE profile in vivo as a measure of Th2 immune response in malaria patients with and without helminth co-infection. Methods A cross sectional observational study composed of microscopically confirmed malaria positive (N = 197) and malaria negative (N = 216) apparently healthy controls with and without helminth infection was conducted at Wondo Genet Health Center, Southern Ethiopia. A pre-designed structured format was utilized to collect socio-demographic and clinical data of the subjects. Detection and quantification of helminths, malaria parasites and determination of serum IgE levels were carried out following standard procedures. Results Irrespective of helminth infection, individuals infected by malaria showed significantly high levels of serum IgE compared with malaria free apparently healthy controls (with and without helminth infections). Moreover, malaria patients co-infected with intestinal helminths showed high level of serum IgE compared with those malaria patients without intestinal helminths (2198 IU/ml versus 1668 IU/ml). A strong statistically significant association was observed between malaria parasite density and elevated serum IgE levels (2047 IU/ml versus 1778 IU/ml; P = 0.001) with high and low parasitaemia (parasite density >50,000 parasite/μl of blood), respectively. Likewise, helminth egg loads were significantly associated with elevated serum IgE levels (P = 0.003). Conclusions The elevated serum IgE response in malaria patients irrespective of helminth infection and its correlation with malaria parasite density and helminth egg intensity support that malaria infection is also a strong driver of IgE production as compared to helminths. PMID:24886689

  3. The relationship of the possible allergic response to jellyfish envenomation and serum antibody titers.

    PubMed

    Russo, A J; Calton, G J; Burnett, J W

    1983-01-01

    The sera of patients envenomated by the sea nettle (Chrysaora quinquecirrha) or the Portuguese man-o'war (Physalia physalis) were investigated for immune specific and cross-reacting antibodies. Crude or partially purified (SP-Sephadex column chromatography) nematocyst venom was used as antigen in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) designed to detect IgG and IgE antibodies. The sera of 66 patients who exhibited strictly cutaneous, extracutaneous or anaphylactoid reactions to envenomation were studied. Most of the subjects developed an IgG antibody and many developed an IgE antibody to the venom of the offending animal. The titer of both immunoglobulins correlated directly with the severity of symptoms. Cross-reacting antibodies to these two jellyfish were apparent in a significant number of patients, but detectable cross-reacting IgE antibodies were rare in patients severely stung by the sea nettle. The titer of specific IgG antibody was higher against the partially purified lethal sea nettle venom than fractions lacking lethal activity. These results may support the hypothesis that some of the visible response to jellyfish envenomation may be allergic in nature and that cross-reactivity to these venoms may be clinically important. PMID:6137884

  4. Treating atopic asthma with the anti-IgE monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G

    2002-04-01

    Omalizumab is a nonanaphylactogenic humanized murine monoclonal antibody which binds to circulating immunoglobulin (Ig)E but does not bind to IgE bound to inflammatory cells because in this case the epitope on IgE against which omalizumab is directed is already attached to cell receptors and is masked. By binding to free circulating IgE omalizumab prevents the allergic and asthmatic responses that are mediated by the interaction of IgE with high affinity and low affinity receptors on a variety of cell types. To support entry into therapy of human allergic diseases a series of safety and efficacy studies have been conducted with omalizumab in subjects affected by atopic asthma and these trials revealed that omalizumab is well tolerated, resulting in a dose-dependent decrease in serum free IgE levels. Omalizumab exhibited a prolonged pharmacological effect without inducing anaphylaxis, blunted the early- and late-phase responses to inhaled allergen, reduced the symptoms of asthma improving lung function and quality of life and reduced corticosteroid use.

  5. Recombinant pollen allergens from Dactylis glomerata: preliminary evidence that human IgE cross-reactivity between Dac g II and Lol p I/II is increased following grass pollen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, A M; Van Ree, R; Cardy, S M; Bevan, L J; Walker, M R

    1992-07-01

    We previously described the isolation of three identical complementary DNA (cDNA) clones, constructed from Orchard/Cocksfoot grass (Dactylis glomerata) anther messenger RNA (mRNA), expressing a 140,000 MW beta-galactosidase fusion protein recognized by IgE antibodies in atopic sera. Partial nucleotide sequencing and inferred amino acid sequence showed greater than 90% homology with the group II allergen from Lolium perenne (Lol II) indicating they encode the group II equivalent, Dac g II. Western blot immunoprobing of recombinant lysates with rabbit polyclonal, mouse monoclonal and human polyclonal antisera demonstrates immunological identity between recombinant Dac g II, Lol p I and Lol p II. Similar cross-identity is observed with pollen extracts from three other grass species: Festuca rubra, Phleum pratense and Anthoxanthum odoratum. Recombinant Dac g II was recognized by species- and group-cross-reactive human IgE antibodies in 33% (4/12) of sera randomly selected from grass-sensitive individuals and in 67% (14/21) of sera from patients receiving grass pollen immunotherapy, whilst 0/4 sera from patients receiving venom immunotherapy alone contained Dac g II cross-reactive IgE. Cross-reactive IgG4 antibodies were detectable in 95% of sera from grass pollen immunotherapy patients. These preliminary data suggest that conventional grass pollen allergoid desensitization immunotherapy may induce IgE responses to a cross-reactive epitope(s) co-expressed by grass pollen groups I and II (and possibly group III) allergens.

  6. Development of a label free IGE sensitive aptasensor based on electrochemical impedance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kara, Pinar; Meric, Buket; Ozsoz, Mehmet

    2010-08-01

    A sensitive aptamer based electrochemical biosensor to detect human immunoglobulin E (IgE) is presented in this study. 5' Biotin labeled 45 mer DNA aptamer sequence was immobilized onto streptavidin coated graphite surfaces. Interaction between human IgE and DNA aptamer was monitored by Electrochemical Impedance Spectrometry (EIS) in a 0.48nM detection limit of IgE. EIS analysis are based on electron transfer resistance (Rct) in the presence of 5mM [Fe(CN)6]3-/4-.

  7. Immunoglobulin E antibodies against a reactive dye--a case report.

    PubMed

    Hagmar, L; Welinder, H; Dahlquist, I

    1986-06-01

    The presence of specific IgE (immunoglobulin E) antibodies against a conjugate between human serum albumin and a reactive azo dye (Levafix Goldgelb E-3GA, Reactive Orange 67) was demonstrated by the radioallergosorbent test (RAST), RAST inhibition, and skin prick tests in an occupationally exposed subject with symptoms of mainly rhinoconjunctivitis.

  8. [Monoclonal antibody therapy for allergic asthma].

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Masanori; Matsuse, Takeshi

    2002-03-01

    Allergic responses at the level of the respiratory system are mostly mediated by IgE-dependent mechanisms. The first selective anti-IgE therapy, a recombinant humanized monoclonal anti-IgE antibody(rhuMAb-E25), binds with high affinity to the Fc epsilon RI receptor binding site on IgE, thereby reducing the amount of free IgE available to bind to Fc epsilon RI receptors on mast cells and basophils. In addition, administration of rhuMAb-E25 indirectly reduces Fc epsilon RI receptor density on cells involved in allergic responses. rhuMAb-E25 has been shown to reduce allergic responses in atopic individuals and to improve symptoms and reduce rescue medication and corticosteroid use in patient with allergic asthma. The clinical effectiveness of rhuMAb-E25 supports the central role of IgE in allergic reaction and the viability of anti-IgE therapy as an effective immunological intervention for allergic asthma.

  9. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked with an increased risk ...

  10. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  11. Antimitochondrial antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. The mitochondria are an important part of cells. They are ... often, in people with other kinds of liver disease and some autoimmune diseases. Risks Risks for having ...

  12. Monitoring of peanut-allergic patients with peanut-specific IgE.

    PubMed

    Borici-Mazi, Rozita; Mazza, Jorge A; Moote, David W; Payton, Keith B

    2008-01-01

    Peanut allergy affects approximately 1% of the population. Double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges are gold standard for diagnosis. Serum peanut-specific IgE (PN-IgE) is used in clinical practice as an additional diagnostic and monitoring tool. The purpose of this study was to characterize the clinical features of a peanut-allergic patient's cohort and determine the optimum frequency of measuring PN-IgE to predict the outcome of future peanut challenges. Retrospective chart review was performed of peanut-allergic patients followed up and serially tested for PN-IgE with a qualitative antibody fluorescent-enzyme immunoassay performed at the Immunology Laboratory, London Health Sciences Center, from 1997 to 2004. One hundred eighteen patients (median age at first reaction to peanut, 1.5 years; median baseline PN-IgE, 18.75) were reviewed. Younger age at first reaction and first PN-IgE measurement predicted slower decline of PN-IgE values (p < 0.001 and p = 0.044). At 2 and 5 years post-initial measurement, 12.9 and 66%, respectively, of all patients had a significant decrease of PN-IgE values. Twenty percent of the patients experienced elevation of PN-IgE levels during follow-up. For most patients with significant history of reaction to peanuts and positive skin-prick test, it is probably adequate to measure serum PN-IgE levels every 3-5 years to screen for development of tolerance and predict the outcome of future peanut challenges. More frequent measurements might be considered in older patients with lower initial PN-IgE levels.

  13. NASA geometry data exchange specification for computational fluid dynamics (NASA IGES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Matthew W.; Kerr, Patricia A.; Thorp, Scott A.; Jou, Jin J.

    1994-01-01

    This document specifies a subset of an existing product data exchange specification that is widely used in industry and government. The existing document is called the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification. This document, a subset of IGES, is intended for engineers analyzing product performance using tools such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This document specifies how to define mathematically and exchange the geometric model of an object. The geometry is represented utilizing nonuniform rational B-splines (NURBS) curves and surfaces. Only surface models are represented; no solid model representation is included. This specification does not include most of the other types of product information available in IGES (e.g., no material properties or surface finish properties) and does not provide all the specific file format details of IGES. The data exchange protocol specified in this document is fully conforming to the American National Standard (ANSI) IGES 5.2.

  14. Postsplenectomy type-1 hypersensitivity response: a correlation between IL-4 and IgE serum levels.

    PubMed

    Miniello, Stefano; Cristallo, Graziana; Testini, Mario; Balzanelli, Mario Giosuè; Marzaioli, Rinaldo; Venezia, Pietro; Lissidini, Germana; Petrozza, Dino; Nacchiero, Michele

    2008-01-01

    Authors demonstrated the presence of allergic manifestations in splenectomized patients following traumatic rupture of this organ. In particular, allergic diathesis, as supported by serum IgE increase, was exclusively found in patients with preserved T helper (h)-2 lymphocyte function. Th-2 function was monitored by measuring serum levels of interleukin (IL)-4, a cytokine involved in IgE synthesis. On the opposite, in splenectomized individuals with a reduced Th-2 function as supported by lower IL-4 serum levels, no IgE increase and allergic manifestations were detectable. On these grounds, authors hypothesize that allergic manifestations may be correlated to splenectomy since its exeresis may favor the persistence of antigens in the blood. Consequentially, in patients with a preserved Th-2 function, antigenic overload may lead to IgE increase and allergy onset.

  15. IGES, a key interface specification for CAD/CAM systems integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. M.; Wellington, J.

    1984-01-01

    The Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES) program has focused the efforts of 52 companies on the development and documentation of a means of graphics data base exchange among present day CAD/CAM systems. The project's brief history has seen the evolution of the Specification into preliminary industrial usage marked by public demonstrations of vendor capability, mandatory requests in procurement actions, and a formalization into an American National Standard in September 1981. Recent events have demonstrated intersystem data exchange among seven vendor systems with a total of 30 vendors committing to offer IGES capability. A full range of documentation supports the IGES project and the recently approved IGES Version 2.0 of the Specification.

  16. Diagnostic Utility of Total IgE in Foods, Inhalant, and Multiple Allergies in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Mughales, Jamil A

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess the diagnostic significance of total IgE in foods, inhalant, and multiple allergies. Methods. Retrospective review of the laboratory records of patients who presented with clinical suspicion of food or inhalant allergy between January 2013 and December 2014. Total IgE level was defined as positive for a value >195 kU/L; and diagnosis was confirmed by the detection of specific IgE (golden standard) for at least one food or inhalant allergen and at least two allergens in multiple allergies. Results. A total of 1893 (male ratio = 0.68, mean age = 39.0 ± 19.2 years) patients were included. Total IgE had comparable sensitivity (55.8% versus 59.6%) and specificity (83.9% versus 84.4%) in food versus inhalant allergy, respectively, but a superior PPV in inhalant allergy (79.1% versus 54.4%). ROC curve analysis showed a better diagnostic value in inhalant allergies (AUC = 0.817 (95% CI = 0.796-0.837) versus 0.770 (95% CI = 0.707-0.833)). In multiple allergies, total IgE had a relatively good sensitivity (78.6%), while negative IgE testing (<195 kU/L) predicted the absence of multiple allergies with 91.5% certitude. Conclusion. Total IgE assay is not efficient as a diagnostic test for foods, inhalant, or multiple allergies. The best strategy should refer to specific IgE testing guided by a comprehensive atopic history. PMID:27314052

  17. IgE response to two new allergen proteins of Solanum melongena L. (eggplant).

    PubMed

    Hoseini-Alfatemi, Seyedeh Mahsan; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Sharifi-Rad, Javad

    2015-12-01

    A number of allergens from eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) have been previously identified. In this study, we could detect IgE reactivity of two allergic subjects' sera towards two protein bands of molecular mass of about 35 and 15 kDa. As IgE were reactive to both raw and cooked eggplant extracts, a heat-stable nature of these novel allergens is apparent. PMID:26455782

  18. IgE response to two new allergen proteins of Solanum melongena L. (eggplant).

    PubMed

    Hoseini-Alfatemi, Seyedeh Mahsan; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Sharifi-Rad, Javad

    2015-12-01

    A number of allergens from eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) have been previously identified. In this study, we could detect IgE reactivity of two allergic subjects' sera towards two protein bands of molecular mass of about 35 and 15 kDa. As IgE were reactive to both raw and cooked eggplant extracts, a heat-stable nature of these novel allergens is apparent.

  19. Total serum IgE concentration in patients with psoriasis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lajevardi, Vahideh; Ghiasi, Maryam; Goodarzi, Azadeh; Mohtasham, Sima; Ansari, Mahsa; Hedayat, Kosar; Nassiri, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic relapsing disorder that involves the skin, nails and joints. With regard to the role of the immune system in psoriasis, the current study compared serum IgE concentration in patients with psoriasis with control group. Current case-control study was conducted in Dermatology clinic of Razi hospital, Tehran University of medical sciences, Tehran, Iran in 2012. Fifty-eight patients with psoriasis e referred to the clinic were assigned as patient group and 58 healthy subjects with matched age and sex as a control group. Patient's history, family history and demographic characteristics such as age and sex, duration and severity of disease using PASI, were collected and entered into a form. Consent form was obtained from participants. Serum IgE concentrations of both study groups were measured by electrochemiluminescence assay in the laboratory A total number of 58 patients with psoriasis, mean age of 44.15 (19-76 years) and 58 controls with matched age and sex were studied. Mean average of serum IgE concentration in the control group was 115.13 versus 200/06 concentration in patients group (P=0.16). Serum IgE concentration in 22.4% of patients versus 17.2% in controls was greater than normal concentration (P=0.48). No significant correlation was between serum IgE concentration and disease severity using PASI (P=0.11, r=0.21), neither a significant correlation with disease duration, age and gender. According to the present study, serum IgE concentrations are not greater in patients with psoriasis. IgE concentration is also not associated with the severity of psoriasis based on the PASI score, therefore, the role of IgE in psoriasis can be considered insignificant as some previous studies indicate.

  20. RARE ASSOCIATION OF HYPER IgE SYNDROME WITH CERVICAL RIB AND NATAL TEETH

    PubMed Central

    Roshan, Anupama S; Janaki, C; Parveen, B; Gomathy, N

    2009-01-01

    Hyper IgE syndrome (HIES) is a rare immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by a triad of cutaneous abscesses, mostly caused by Staphylococus aureus; pneumonia; and raised IgE levels. Nonimmunological associations include course facial features, multiple bone fractures, joint hyperextensibility, and retained primary dentition. Patients require long-term antibiotic therapy. We report here a classical case of HIES with rare associations of natal teeth, bilateral cervical ribs, and conductive deafness. The patient was being treated with monteleukast and dapsone. PMID:20101342

  1. Antibody validation

    PubMed Central

    Bordeaux, Jennifer; Welsh, Allison W.; Agarwal, Seema; Killiam, Elizabeth; Baquero, Maria T.; Hanna, Jason A.; Anagnostou, Valsamo K.; Rimm, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are among the most frequently used tools in basic science research and in clinical assays, but there are no universally accepted guidelines or standardized methods for determining the validity of these reagents. Furthermore, for commercially available antibodies, it is clear that what is on the label does not necessarily correspond to what is in the tube. To validate an antibody, it must be shown to be specific, selective, and reproducible in the context for which it is to be used. In this review, we highlight the common pitfalls when working with antibodies, common practices for validating antibodies, and levels of commercial antibody validation for seven vendors. Finally, we share our algorithm for antibody validation for immunohistochemistry and quantitative immunofluorescence. PMID:20359301

  2. Introduction to Antigen and Antibody Assays.

    PubMed

    Day, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Serological tests are used widely in veterinary practice; most often in the diagnosis of infectious disease. Such tests may be used to detect antigen from an infectious agent within a biological sample or to detect the presence of serum antibody specific for the pathogen as evidence of immunological exposure. These tests are all based on the fundamental principles of interaction between antigenic epitopes and antibodies of either the immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgM, IgA, or IgE classes. The relative concentration of specific antibody within a sample is traditionally determined by calculation of the titer of antibody. With few exceptions, the primary interaction between an antigen and antibody in vitro cannot be visualized and so serological tests generally employ a secondary indicator system based on the use of a polyclonal antiserum or monoclonal antibody. A range of such tests has been developed, but many in veterinary medicine are based on the principle of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, which is described in detail in this article. The interpretation of serological tests must be made carefully, taking into consideration the sensitivity and specificity of the test and the possible reasons for false-positive and false-negative outcomes. PMID:27154595

  3. Translation of CODEV Lens Model To IGES Input File

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, T. D.; Carlin, B. B.

    1986-10-01

    The design of modern optical systems is not a trivial task; even more difficult is the requirement for an opticker to accurately describe the physical constraints implicit in his design so that a mechanical designer can correctly mount the optical elements. Typical concerns include setback of baffles, obstruction of clear apertures by mounting hardware, location of the image plane with respect to fiducial marks, and the correct interpretation of systems having odd geometry. The presence of multiple coordinate systems (optical, mechan-ical, system test, and spacecraft) only exacerbates an already difficult situation. A number of successful optical design programs, such as CODEV (1), have come into existence over the years while the development of Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) has allowed a number of firms to install "paperless" design systems. In such a system, a part which is entered by keyboard, or pallet, is made into a real physical piece on a milling machine which has received its instructions from the design system. However, a persistent problem is the lack of a link between the optical design programs and the mechanical CAD programs. This paper will describe a first step which has been taken to bridge this gap. Starting with the neutral plot file generated by the CODEV optical design program, we have been able to produce a file suitable for input to the ANVIL (2) and GEOMOD (3) software packages, using the International Graphics Exchange Standard (IGES) interface. This is accomplished by software of our design, which runs on a VAX (4) system. A description of the steps to be taken in transferring a design will be provided. We shall also provide some examples of designs on which this technique has been used successfully. Finally, we shall discuss limitations of the existing software and suggest some improvements which might be undertaken.

  4. A study of the human immune response to Lolium perenne (rye) pollen and its components, Lol p I and Lol p II (Rye I and Rye II). II. Longitudinal variation of antibody levels in relation to symptomatology and pollen exposure and correction of seasonally elevated antibody levels to basal values.

    PubMed

    Freidhoff, L R; Ehrlich-Kautzky, E; Meyers, D A; Marsh, D G

    1987-11-01

    This study used a standardized, dialyzed, Lolium perenne (ryegrass) pollen extract and two of its well-characterized components, Lol p I (Rye I) and Lol p II (Rye II), to characterize the longitudinal variation of both IgE and IgG antibody (Ab) levels, as well as total serum IgE levels, in 20 grass-allergic subjects followed for 13 months. Ab levels declined toward a basal level just before, and increased just after, the grass-pollination season, returning to the same basal level just before the next grass-pollination season. The least complex allergen, Lol II, demonstrated the most uniform pattern of variation in both IgE and IgG Ab levels. Total serum IgE levels demonstrated the least regular pattern of variation. Grass-pollen counts were strongly correlated with symptom-medication scores for these subjects (rs = 0.87). Initial values were correlated with the rise in total IgE and IgE Ab to Lol II across the grass-pollen season. Skin test results were correlated with initial IgE Ab levels for L. perenne pollen extract and Lol II. Finally, a procedure for correcting IgE Ab levels to basal values was proposed and tested. The correction procedure, for each IgE Ab, was based on the average rise during the grass-pollination season (or average decline after the grass-pollination season) observed for all subjects with that IgE Ab.

  5. Helminth infection alters IgE responses to allergens structurally related to parasite proteins.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Helton da Costa; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flávia L; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Nutman, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    Immunological cross-reactivity between environmental allergens and helminth proteins has been demonstrated, although the clinically related implications of this cross-reactivity have not been addressed. To investigate the impact of molecular similarity among allergens and cross-reactive homologous helminth proteins in IgE-based serologic assessment of allergic disorders in a helminth-infected population, we performed ImmunoCAP tests in filarial-infected and noninfected individuals for IgE measurements to allergen extracts that contained proteins with high levels of homology with helminth proteins as well as IgE against representative recombinant allergens with and without helminth homologs. The impact of helminth infection on the levels and function of the IgE to these specific homologous and nonhomologous allergens was corroborated in an animal model. We found that having a tissue-invasive filarial infection increased the serological prevalence of ImmunoCAP-identified IgE directed against house dust mite and cockroach, but not against timothy grass, the latter with few allergens with homologs in helminth infection. IgE ELISA confirmed that filaria-infected individuals had higher IgE prevalences to those recombinant allergens that had homologs in helminths. Mice infected with the helminth Heligmosomoides polygyrus displayed increased levels of IgE and positive skin tests to allergens with homologs in the parasite. These results show that cross-reactivity among allergens and helminth proteins can have practical implications, altering serologic approaches to allergen testing and bringing a new perspective to the "hygiene hypothesis." PMID:25404363

  6. Helminth infection alters IgE responses to allergens structurally related to parasite proteins

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Helton da Costa; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flávia L.; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Immunological cross-reactivity between environmental allergens and helminth proteins has been demonstrated, though the clinically-related implications of this cross-reactivity have not been addressed. To investigate the impact of molecular similarity among allergens and cross-reactive homologous helminth proteins in IgE-based serologic assessment of allergic disorders in helminth-infected population, we performed Immunocap™ tests in filarial-infected and non-infected individuals for IgE measurements to allergen extracts that contained proteins with high levels of homology with helminth proteins and IgE against representative recombinant allergens with and without helminth homologues were performed. The impact of helminth infection on the levels and function of the IgE to these specific homologous and non-homologous allergens was corroborated in an animal model. We found that having a tissue-invasive filarial infection increased the serological prevalence of Immunocap™ identified IgE directed against house dust mite and cockroach, but not against timothy grass, the latter with few allergens with homologues in helminth infection. IgE ELISA confirmed that filaria-infected individuals had higher IgE prevalences to those recombinant allergens that had homologues in helminths. Mice infected with helminth Heligmosomoides polygyrus displayed increased levels of IgE and positive skin tests to allergens with homologues in the parasite. These results show that cross-reactivity among allergens and helminth proteins can have practical implications altering serologic approaches to allergen testing and brings a new perspective to the Hygiene Hypothesis. PMID:25404363

  7. Flagellin modulates IgE expression in B cells to initiate food allergy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin-Jing; Ma, Na; Zeng, Lu; Mo, Li-Hua; Li, Xiao-Xi; Xu, Ling-Zhi; Yang, Bo; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Feng, Bai-Sui; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Zhang, Huan-Ping; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-01-01

    The initiation mechanism of IgE expression has not been fully understood. Flagellin (FGN) is an important microbial factor in the regulation of immune responses in the intestine. This study tests a hypothesis that FGN plays a crucial role in the isotype switching of IgE in B cells and the initiation of food allergy. In this study, the expression of IgE in B cells was analyzed by real time RT-PCR, Western blotting and chromatin immunoprecipitation. A mouse model was developed to assess the role of Toll like receptor-5 in the development of IgE-mediated allergic reaction in the intestinal mucosa. The results showed that exposure to FGN suppressed the expression of Bcl6 in B cells via increasing the levels of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 7; the latter up regulated the levels of methylated H3K9 and H3K27, down regulated RNA polymerase II and STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) at the Bcl6 promoter locus. Exposure to FGN and IL-4 markedly increased the expression of IgE in B cells via activating p300, H3K4, Pol II and STAT6 at the IgE promoter locus. As compared with the sensitized wild mice, the sensitized TLR5-deficient mice showed no detectable OVA-specific IgE in the serum; mast cells in the intestinal mucosa were not activated, no apparent allergic symptoms were evoked after the specific antigen challenge. In conclusion, FGN facilitates the initiation of food allergy in mice by triggering IgE transcription in B cells in a Th2 polarization environment via activating HDAC7 and suppressing Bcl6 expression. PMID:27398157

  8. IgE Immunoadsorption Knocks Down the Risk of Food-Related Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Dahdah, Lamia; Ceccarelli, Stefano; Amendola, Silvia; Campagnano, Pietro; Cancrini, Caterina; Mazzina, Oscar; Fiocchi, Alessandro

    2015-12-01

    The effects of an immunoadsorption procedure, specifically designed to remove immunoglobulin E (IgE), on food-induced anaphylaxis have never been evaluated. We evaluate the effects of IgE removal on the allergic thresholds to foods. A 6-year-old boy with anaphylaxis to multiple foods and steroid-resistant unstable allergic asthma displayed serum IgE levels of 2800 to 3500 kU/L. To lower IgE serum concentrations, which could be overridden by a high dose of omalizumab, 1.5 plasma volumes were exchanged in 8 apheresis sessions. During the procedure, serum IgE levels fell to 309 kU/L. After the procedure, the threshold of reactivity to baked milk increased from 0.125 to 5 g of milk protein (full tolerance) after the first session, and the threshold of reactivity to hazelnut increased from 0.037 to 0.142 g of protein after the first session, 0.377 g after the eighth, and 1.067 g (full tolerance) after the first administration of omalizumab. Immediately after the sixth IgE immunoadsorption, we started omalizumab therapy. In the next 40 days, the threshold of reactivity to hazelnut increased to 7.730 (full tolerance). Asthma control was obtained, treatment with montelukast was stopped, and fluticasone was tapered from 500 to 175 μg/day. The boy became partially or fully tolerant to all the tested foods, and quality of life was improved. IgE immunoadsorption, used to establish the starting basis for omalizumab administration, is able to increase the tolerance threshold to foods. PMID:26620068

  9. Identification of IgE sequential epitopes of lentil (Len c 1) by peptide microarray immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Vereda, Andrea; Andreae, Doerthe A.; Lin, Jing; Shreffler, Wayne G.; Ibañez, Maria Dolores; Cuesta-Herranz, Javier; Bardina, Luda; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Lentils are oftentimes responsible for allergic reactions to legumes in Mediterranean children. Though the primary sequence of the major allergen, Len c 1 is known, the location of the IgE binding epitopes remains undefined. Objective We sought to identify IgE-binding epitopes of Len c 1 and relate epitope binding to clinical characteristics. Methods 135 peptides corresponding to the primary sequence of Len c 1 were probed with sera from 33 lentil-allergic individuals and 15 non-atopic controls by means of microarray immunoassay. Lentil-specific IgE, Skin Prick Tests and clinical reactions to lentil were determined. Epitopes were defined as overlapping signal above inter- and intra-slide cut-offs and confirmed by inhibition assays using a peptide from the respective region. Hierarchical clustering of microarray data was used to correlate binding patterns with clinical findings. Results The lentil-allergic patients specifically recognized IgE-binding epitopes located in the C-terminal region, between peptide 107 and 135. Inhibition experiments confirmed the specificity of IgE binding in this region, identifying different epitopes. Linkage of cluster results with clinical data and lentil specific IgE levels displayed a positive correlation between lentil-specific IgE levels, epitope recognition and respiratory symptoms. Modeling based on the three-dimensional structure of a homologous soy vicilin suggests that the Len c 1 epitopes identified are exposed on the surface of the molecule. Conclusion Several IgE-binding sequential epitopes of Len c 1 have been identified. Epitopes are located in the C-terminal region, and are predicted to be exposed on the surface of the protein. Epitope diversity is positively correlated with IgE levels, pointing to a more polyclonal IgE response. PMID:20816193

  10. Effects of treatment on IgE responses against parasite allergen-like proteins and immunity to reinfection in childhood schistosome and hookworm coinfections.

    PubMed

    Pinot de Moira, Angela; Jones, Frances M; Wilson, Shona; Tukahebwa, Edridah; Fitzsimmons, Colin M; Mwatha, Joseph K; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Kabatereine, Narcis B; Dunne, David W

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring human immunity to both schistosomiasis and hookworm infection has been associated with IgE responses against parasite allergen-like proteins. Since the two helminths frequently coinfect the same individuals, there is growing advocacy for their concurrent treatment. However, both helminths are known to exert strong immunomodulatory effects; therefore, coinfected individuals could have immune responses different from those characteristically seen in monoinfected individuals. In this study, we measured changes in IgE, IgG1, and IgG4 responses to schistosome and hookworm antigens, including the allergen-like proteins Schistosoma mansoni tegumental-allergen-like 1 protein (SmTAL1), SmTAL2, and Necator americanus Ancylostoma-secreted protein-2 (Na-ASP-2), following concurrent treatment of schoolchildren coinfected with Schistosoma mansoni and hookworm. Antibody responses to schistosome egg (soluble egg antigen and SmTAL2) or somatic adult hookworm (AHW) antigens either decreased after treatment or were unchanged, whereas those to schistosome worm antigens (soluble worm antigen and SmTAL1) increased. The observed different effects of treatment likely reflect the different modes of drug action and sites of infection for these two helminths. Importantly, there was no evidence that the simultaneous treatment of coinfected children with praziquantel and albendazole affected schistosome- and hookworm-specific humoral responses differently from those characteristic of populations in which only one organism is endemic; schistosome- and hookworm-specific responses were not associated, and there was no evidence for cross-regulation. Posttreatment increases in the levels of IgE to schistosome worm antigens were associated with lower Schistosoma mansoni reinfection intensity, while no associations between humoral responses to AHW antigen and protection from hookworm reinfection were observed in this sample of school-aged children.

  11. Profiling antibodies to class II HLA in transplant patient sera.

    PubMed

    McMurtrey, Curtis; Lowe, Dave; Buchli, Rico; Daga, Sunil; Royer, Derek; Humphrey, Alisha; Cate, Steven; Osborn, Sean; Mojsilovic, Aleksandar; VanGundy, Rodney; Bardet, Wilfried; Duty, Andrew; Mojsilovic, Danijela; Jackson, Kenneth; Stastny, Peter; Briggs, David; Zehnder, Daniel; Higgins, Rob; Hildebrand, William

    2014-03-01

    Immunizing events including pregnancy, transfusions, and transplantation promote strong alloantibody responses to HLA. Such alloantibodies to HLA preclude organ transplantation, foster hyperacute rejection, and contribute to chronic transplant failure. Diagnostic antibody-screening assays detect alloreactive antibodies, yet key attributes including antibody concentration and isotype remain largely unexplored. The goal here was to provide a detailed profile of allogeneic antibodies to class II HLA. Methodologically, alloantibodies were purified from sensitized patient sera using an HLA-DR11 immunoaffinity column and subsequently categorized. Antibodies to DR11 were found to fix complement, exist at a median serum concentration of 2.3μg/mL, consist of all isotypes, and isotypes IgG2, IgM, and IgE were elevated. Because multimeric isotypes can confound diagnostic determinations of antibody concentration, IgM and IgA isotypes were removed and DR11-IgG tested alone. Despite removal of multimeric isotypes, patient-to-patient antibody concentrations did not correlate with MFI values. In conclusion, allogeneic antibody responses to DR11 are comprised of all antibody isotypes at differing proportions, these combined isotypes fix complement at nominal serum concentrations, and enhancements other than the removal of IgM and IgA multimeric isotypes may be required if MFI is to be used as a means of determining anti-HLA serum antibody concentrations in diagnostic clinical assays.

  12. Evaluation of the relationship between IgE level and skin superinfection in children with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Alyson B; Yousef, Ejaz; Hossain, Jobayer

    2010-01-01

    Increased Th2 polarity weakens the innate immune response and predisposes children with atopic dermatitis (AD) to skin superinfection. This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between IgE level and bacterial superinfection in children with AD. A medical chart review was performed on 103 children with AD to assess the association between IgE level and skin superinfection. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to assess the relationship between categorized IgE level and the presence of bacterial superinfection after adjusting for cofounding variables including allergic rhinitis, asthma, and food allergy. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare pre- and postskin superinfection median IgE levels in a subset of patients. Compared with children with an IgE level of <300 IU/mL, children with an IgE level of >1001 IU/mL were 66.00 times more likely to have a skin superinfection (p = 0.003) and children with an IgE level between 301 and 1000 IU/mL were 12.38 times more likely to have a skin superinfection (p < 0.001). After controlling for cofounding variables including asthma, allergic rhinitis, and food allergy, children with an IgE level of >1001 IU/mL were 71.89 times more likely to have a skin superinfection (p = 0.018) and children with an IgE level between 301 and 1000 IU/mL were 8.79 times more likely to have a skin superinfection (p < 0.001) when compared with children with an IgE level of <300 IU/mL. There was a significant increase in IgE levels from baseline in 13 children treated for a skin superinfection (p = 0.001). IgE level is associated with Staphylococcus aureus superinfection in children with AD.

  13. The distinctive germinal center phase of IgE+ B lymphocytes limits their contribution to the classical memory response

    PubMed Central

    He, Jin-Shu; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Xiangying, Deng; Zuan, Lim Yok; Jones, Leigh Ann; Ramakrishna, Lakshmi; de Vries, Victor C.; Dolpady, Jayashree; Aina, Hoi; Joseph, Sabrina; Narayanan, Sriram; Subramaniam, Sharrada; Puthia, Manoj; Wong, Glenn; Xiong, Huizhong; Poidinger, Michael; Urban, Joseph F.; Lafaille, Juan J.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the maintenance of memory IgE responses are poorly understood, and the role played by germinal center (GC) IgE+ cells in memory responses is particularly unclear. IgE+ B cell differentiation is characterized by a transient GC phase, a bias toward the plasma cell (PC) fate, and dependence on sequential switching for the production of high-affinity IgE. We show here that IgE+ GC B cells are unfit to undergo the conventional GC differentiation program due to impaired B cell receptor function and increased apoptosis. IgE+ GC cells fail to populate the GC light zone and are unable to contribute to the memory and long-lived PC compartments. Furthermore, we demonstrate that direct and sequential switching are linked to distinct B cell differentiation fates: direct switching generates IgE+ GC cells, whereas sequential switching gives rise to IgE+ PCs. We propose a comprehensive model for the generation and memory of IgE responses. PMID:24218137

  14. Liver X receptors control IgE expression in B cells.

    PubMed

    Heine, Guido; Dahten, Anja; Hilt, Kerstin; Ernst, Dennis; Milovanovic, Milena; Hartmann, Björn; Worm, Margitta

    2009-05-01

    B lymphocytes play a fundamental role in the development of IgE-dependent allergic immune reactions. Upon appropriate activation, IgE class switch recombination is initiated in B cells, followed by terminal differentiation to IgE-secreting plasmablasts. This process is controlled by different nuclear receptors, including receptors for vitamin D, retinoids, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma ligands. In this study, we show constitutive expression of the nuclear liver X receptor (LXR)alpha and LXRbeta in peripheral human B cells. Activation of LXRs reduced secreted IgE (-68% +/- 11) in CD40 and IL-4 activated B cells. The production of other isotypes, including IgG, IgM, IgA and B cell homeostatic parameters were not significantly altered by LXR activation. We identified inhibitory action of LXR activation on IgE production involving reduced phosphorylation of JNK and increased membrane CD23 expression (38% +/- 11). The biological significance of our findings was validated by showing that systemic treatment of type I-sensitized BALB/c mice with LXR ligands reduced the serum concentrations of Ag-specific IgE in a dose-dependent manner (maximum, -52% +/- 14). Thus, our data indicates that LXRs are involved in the control of IgE secretion by differentiating B cells. PMID:19380774

  15. Autoimmune Hepatitis in Brazilian Children: IgE and Genetic Polymorphisms in Associated Genes

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Léa Campos; Goldberg, Anna Carla; Marin, Maria Lucia Carnevale; Schneidwind, Karina Rosa; Frade, Amanda Farage; Kalil, Jorge; Miura, Irene Kasue; Pugliese, Renata Pereira Sustovich; Danesi, Vera Lucia Baggio; Porta, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) patients present hypergammaglobulinemia, periportal CD8+ cytotoxic T cell infiltration, and cirrhosis. Autoantibody profile defines AIH types 1 and 2 in addition to strong association with HLA-DRB1. We previously detected increased IgE serum levels and sought to compare clinical and histological features according to IgE levels in AIH (n = 74, ages 1–14 years) patients. Additionally, we typed 117 patients and 227 controls for functional polymorphisms of IL4, IL13, IL5, and IL4RA genes involved in IgE switching and eosinophil maturation that might contribute to overall genetic susceptibility to AIH. Serum IgE levels were high in 55% of AIH-1, but only in 12% of AIH-2 (P = 0.003) patients. Liver IgE was present in 91.3% of AIH-1 patients. The A alleles at both IL13 rs20541 and IL4RA rs1805011 were associated with AIH-1 (P = 0.024, OR = 1.55 and P < 0.0001, OR = 2.15, resp.). Furthermore, individuals presenting homozygosis for the A allele at IL4RA rs1805011 and HLA-DRB1∗03 and/or ∗13 allele had sixfold greater risk to develop the disease (OR = 14.00, P < 0.001). The novel association suggests an additional role for IgE-linked immune response genes in the pathogenesis of AIH. PMID:26693492

  16. Immature B cells preferentially switch to IgE with increased direct Sμ to Sε recombination.

    PubMed

    Wesemann, Duane R; Magee, Jennifer M; Boboila, Cristian; Calado, Dinis Pedro; Gallagher, Michael P; Portuguese, Andrew J; Manis, John P; Zhou, Xiaolong; Recher, Mike; Rajewsky, Klaus; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Alt, Frederick W

    2011-12-19

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) class-switch recombination (CSR) replaces initially expressed Cμ (IgM) constant regions (C(H)) exons with downstream C(H) exons. Stimulation of B cells with anti-CD40 plus interleukin-4 induces CSR from Cμ to Cγ1 (IgG1) and Cε (IgE), the latter of which contributes to the pathogenesis of atopic diseases. Although Cε CSR can occur directly from Cμ, most mature peripheral B cells undergo CSR to Cε indirectly, namely from Cμ to Cγ1, and subsequently to Cε. Physiological mechanisms that influence CSR to Cγ1 versus Cε are incompletely understood. In this study, we report a role for B cell developmental maturity in IgE CSR. Based in part on a novel flow cytometric IgE CSR assay, we show that immature B cells preferentially switch to IgE versus IgG1 through a mechanism involving increased direct CSR from Cμ to Cε. Our findings suggest that IgE dysregulation in certain immunodeficiencies may be related to impaired B cell maturation.

  17. Human immune response to allergens of house dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. V. Auto-anti-idiotypic antibody characterization and cross-reactivity.

    PubMed

    Saint-Remy, J M; Lebecque, S J; Lebrun, P M; Jacquemin, M G

    1988-07-01

    From the serum of 10 allergic subjects we have prepared IgG antibodies recognizing idiotopes carried by specific antibodies to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt) allergens, and studied cross-reactivity of anti-Dpt IgG bystander and antigen-binding site-associated idiotopes by latex agglutination assays. Idiotopes of specific anti-Dpt IgE were evaluated by radioimmunoassays. Depending on the assay, a binding or inhibition of more than 50%, as compared to the reactivity of specific antibodies with the corresponding anti-idiotypic (anti-Id) IgG, was considered significant. Cross-reactivity of antigen-binding site-associated idiotopes attained a mean proportion of 6/10 for IgG and 9.6/10 for IgE. By contrast, bystander idiotopes cross-reacted only occasionally with a mean proportion of 2/10 for both IgG and IgE antibodies. Anti-Id antibodies from two subjects have been isolated by adsorption on insolubilized anti-Dpt antibodies of the corresponding patient. Using this purified material we have confirmed that (a) the majority of anti-Id antibodies carry an "internal image" of the initial antigen and compete in a dose-dependent manner with Dpt allergens for the binding to the anti-Dpt antibodies and (b) paratope-associated idiotopes of anti-Dpt antibodies are shared by unrelated individuals.

  18. Impact of heat processing on the detection of the major shellfish allergen tropomyosin in crustaceans and molluscs using specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Sandip D; Abdel Rahman, Anas M; Komoda, Toshikazu; Lopata, Andreas L

    2013-12-15

    The major heat-stable shellfish allergen, tropomyosin, demonstrates immunological cross-reactivity, making specific differentiation of crustaceans and molluscs for food labelling very difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of allergen-specific monoclonal antibodies in differential detection of shellfish-derived tropomyosin in 11 crustacean and 7 mollusc species, and to study the impact of heating on its detection. Cross-reactive tropomyosin was detected in all crustacean species, with partial detection in molluscs: mussels, scallops and snails but none in oyster, octopus and squid. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that heating of shellfish has a profound effect on tropomyosin detection. This was evident by the enhanced recognition of multiple tropomyosin variants in the analysed shellfish species. Specific monoclonal antibodies, targetting the N-terminal region of tropomyosin, must therefore be developed to differentiate tropomyosins in crustaceans and molluscs. This can help in correct food labelling practices and thus protection of consumers.

  19. Factors associated with Culicoides Obsoletus complex spp.-specific IgE reactivity in Icelandic horses and Shetland ponies.

    PubMed

    Schurink, Anouk; van der Meide, Nathalie M A; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Ducro, Bart J; Tijhaar, Edwin

    2014-09-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a common allergic skin disease in horses, caused by biting insects of the Culicoides spp. In The Netherlands, Culicoides spp. of the Obsoletus complex are the most important midges involved in IBH. The aim of the present study was to identify and quantify associations between several endogenous (host) and exogenous (environmental) factors and immunoglobulin E (IgE) reactivity against Obsoletus complex-derived whole body extract or seven recombinant allergens, measured by ELISA. Data from 143 Icelandic horses and 177 Shetland ponies were analysed using multivariable models. In addition, the relationship between IgE reactivity and severity of clinical signs in IBH-affected horses was examined. Positive correlations were found between Obsoletus complex-specific IgE and severity of clinical signs. Disease status (IBH affected or control), breed and the interaction between IBH status and breed were significantly associated with IgE reactivity against several Obsoletus complex allergens. Significantly greater IgE reactivity was seen in IBH-affected horses compared to controls. The differences in IgE values between cases and controls were most pronounced in Icelandic horses. Shetland pony controls had significantly greater IgE reactivity compared to Icelandic horse controls, while differences in IgE values comparing Shetland pony cases and Icelandic horse cases were not significant. Severity of clinical signs and IgE reactivity in IBH-affected horses against several Obsoletus complex allergens appeared to be related. Consideration of the factors associated with Obsoletus complex-specific IgE in horses might further improve interpretation and accuracy of IgE ELISA test results within these breeds, although further research is required.

  20. Use of Specific IgE and Skin Prick Test to Determine Clinical Reaction Severity.

    PubMed

    Ta, Von; Weldon, Brittany; Yu, Grace; Humblet, Olivier; Neale-May, Susan; Nadeau, Kari

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: To determine whether specific IgE and skin prick test correlate better in predicting reaction severity during a double-blinded placebo controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) for egg, milk, and multiple tree nut allergens. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study. PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY: Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, August 2009 and ongoing. METHODOLOGY: We examined the reaction severity of twenty-four subjects to nine possible food allergens: milk, egg, almond, cashew, hazelnut, peanut, sesame, pecan and walnut. Specific IgE and SPT were performed before each DBPCFC. DBPCFC results were classified into mild (1), moderate (2), or severe (3) reactions using a modified Bock's criteria. RESULTS: Twenty four subjects underwent a total of 80 DBPCFC. Eighty percent of all DBPCFCs resulted in a positive reaction. A majority, 71%, were classified as mild. No reactions occurred with a SPT of zero mm while three reactions occurred with a negative specific IgE. All reactions were reversible with medication. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that SPT and specific IgE levels are not associated with reaction severity (p<0.64 and 0.27, respectively). We also found that combining specific IgE and SPT improved specificity but did not help to achieve clinically useful sensitivity. For instance, an SPT > 5mm had a sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 50%. Combining SPT > 5mm and IgE > 7 resulted in a reduced sensitivity of 64%. Unexpectedly, a history of anaphylaxis 70% (n=17) was not predictive of anaphylaxis on challenge 4% (n=2). PMID:22993721

  1. Assessing the allergenicity of proteins introduced into genetically modified crops using specific human IgE assays.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Richard E; Leach, John N

    2004-01-01

    Global commercial production of genetically modified (GM) crops has grown to over 67 million hectares annually, primarily of herbicide-tolerant and insect protection crop varieties. GM crops are produced by the insertion of specific genes that either encode a protein, or a regulatory RNA sequence. A comprehensive safety evaluation is conducted for each new commercial GM crop, including an assessment of the potential allergenicity of any newly introduced protein. If the gene was derived from an allergenic organism, or the protein sequence is highly similar to a known allergen, immunoassays, e.g., Western blot assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay tests, are performed to identify protein-specific IgE binding by sera of individuals allergic to the gene source, or the source of the sequence-matched allergen. Although such assays are commonly used to identify previously unknown allergens, criteria have not been established to demonstrate that a protein is unlikely to cause allergic reactions. This review discusses factors that affect the predictive value of these tests, including clinical selection criteria for serum donors, selection of blocking reagents to reduce nonspecific antibody binding, inhibition assays to verify specificity of binding, and scientifically justified limits of detection (sensitivity) in the absence of information regarding biological thresholds.

  2. Fournier gangrene associated with hyper IgE syndrome (Job syndrome).

    PubMed

    Hori, Junichi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Watanabe, Masaki; Osanai, Hiroaki; Hori, Masako

    2008-04-01

    We report a case of a 32-year-old man with hyper IgE syndrome (Job syndrome) who developed Fournier gangrene due to infectious multiple atheromas of the scrotal skin that progressed to the right groin and thigh. The patient required surgical debridement and subsequent skin grafting. This is a rare case of Fournier gangrene associated with hyper IgE syndrome (Job syndrome). When a patient without diabetes mellitus has repeated infections and atopic-like dermatitis, Job syndrome should be considered. PMID:18380833

  3. Syntaxin-4 is essential for IgE secretion by plasma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Arman; DeCourcey, Joseph; Larbi, Nadia Ben; Loughran, Sinéad T.; Walls, Dermot; Loscher, Christine E.

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Knock-down of syntaxin-4 in U266 plasma cells resulted in reduction of IgE secretion. •Knock-down of syntaxin-4 also leads to the accumulation of IgE in the cell. •Immuno-fluorescence staining shows co-localisation of IgE and syntaxin-4 in U266 cells. •Findings suggest a critical requirement for syntaxin-4 in IgE secretion from plasma cells. -- Abstract: The humoral immune system provides a crucial first defense against the invasion of microbial pathogens via the secretion of antigen specific immunoglobulins (Ig). The secretion of Ig is carried out by terminally differentiated B-lymphocytes called plasma cells. Despite the key role of plasma cells in the immune response, the mechanisms by which they constitutively traffic large volumes of Ig out of the cell is poorly understood. The involvement of Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins in the regulation of protein trafficking from cells has been well documented. Syntaxin-4, a member of the Qa SNARE syntaxin family has been implicated in fusion events at the plasma membrane in a number of cells in the immune system. In this work we show that knock-down of syntaxin-4 in the multiple myeloma U266 human plasma cell line results in a loss of IgE secretion and accumulation of IgE within the cells. Furthermore, we show that IgE co-localises with syntaxin-4 in U266 plasma cells suggesting direct involvement in secretion at the plasma membrane. This study demonstrates that syntaxin-4 plays a critical role in the secretion of IgE from plasma cells and sheds some light on the mechanisms by which these cells constitutively traffic vesicles to the surface for secretion. An understanding of this machinery may be beneficial in identifying potential therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma and autoimmune disease where over-production of Ig leads to severe pathology in patients.

  4. The relevance of specific serum IgG, IgG4 and IgE in the determination of shrimp and crab allergies in Malaysian allergic rhinitis patients.

    PubMed

    Sheah-Min, Y; Choon-Kook, S

    2001-03-01

    The significance of food specific serum IgG4 antibody in food allergy is unclear and this led us to investigate the relevance of specific IgG4, along with IgG and IgE antibodies to two common food allergens in Malaysia. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure the serum antibodies in 143 allergic rhinitis patients' sera, of which 47 were from patients with clinical indication of shrimp allergy, 46 with clinical indication of crab allergy and 50 without indication to either allergy. Clinical indication of allergy was based on answers to a questionnaire or results of the skin prick test. We found that the elevation of specific IgE or IgG4 is associated with shrimp and crab allergies but elevation of specific IgG is not associated with either allergy. However, the clinical utility of elevated specific IgG and IgG4 levels is pending further investigation.

  5. Development of allergic antibody to an enzyme in a body lotion: results of an 18-month clinical study.

    PubMed

    Sarlo, Katherine; Adamson, Gregory M; Hollis, Victoria L; Innis, J David; Babcock, Laura S; Kirchner, D Bruce

    2004-04-01

    Use of enzymes in cosmetic products is novel and the safety of these products is not well understood. The safety of a prototype enzyme-containing body moisturizer lotion was tested via measures of skin compatibility and potential to induce protease-specific IgE antibody in a clinical study. Female, atopic subjects (n = 1,100) used body lotion containing 100 ppm protease (Y217L BPN') for 5 consecutive days per month, for 18 months. Regular lotion was used the remaining days of each month. Skin evaluation and skin prick tests (SPT) were conducted every 3 months. Measures of skin hydration were made in a subset of subjects at 3-month intervals: skin biopsies occurred at baseline and at the first 3-month timepoint. Serum from SPT positive subjects was tested for specific IgE in an immunoCAP assay. Clinical evaluation and histopathology showed no skin irritation and increased hydration of the skin over time. Three of 864 subjects completing the study developed IgE antibody to the enzyme: 1 subject after 6 months product use and 2 subjects after 15 months product use. A fourth subject was found with IgE antibody 3 months after study termination. None had allergic symptoms associated with product use. Intermittent exposure to a low level of protease enzyme in a body lotion led to the development of specific IgE antibody in 0.46% of subjects. While this study showed favorable skin compatibility of the protease containing lotion, the occurrence of allergic antibody to the enzyme was unacceptable for product commercialization.

  6. IgE is expressed on, but not produced by, fetal cells in the human placenta irrespective of maternal atopy

    PubMed Central

    EKSTRÖM, E SVERREMARK; NILSSON, C; HOLMLUND, U; PLOEG, I VAN DER; SANDSTEDT, B; LILJA, G; SCHEYNIUS, A

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of atopic diseases in children has increased during the last decades. Atopic symptoms usually appear early in life. This implies an early priming for atopic disease, possibly even at the fetal level. We therefore compared the presence and production of IgE in the local in utero environment during pregnancy in atopic and non-atopic women. Eighty-six women were included in the study. Fifty women were demonstrated to be atopics, based on clinical symptoms of atopic disease together with a positive Phadiatop and/or skin prick test. Placentas from these term pregnancies were obtained. Slices covering the full thickness of the placenta were cut clockwise around the umbilical cord and were analysed with immunohistochemistry. Surprisingly, numerous IgE+ cells, located primarily in the fetal villous stroma, were detected in a majority of the investigated placentas irrespective of the atopy of the mother or maternal or fetal total serum IgE levels. The placental IgE could not be demonstrated to be bound to IgE receptors, but was shown to be bound to fetal macrophages, possibly via FcγRI. No evidence was found for local fetal IgE production, although cells producing epsilon transcripts were occasionally detected in the decidua. We describe here the novel finding of numerous IgE+ cells in the human placenta, suggesting an hitherto unknown role for IgE in a successful pregnancy outcome, irrespective of whether or not the mother is atopic. PMID:11876750

  7. Intrathecal synthesis of IgE in children with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Docal, Barbara; Dorta-Contreras, Alberto J; Bu-Coifiu-Fanego, Raisa; Hernández, Hermes Fundora; Barroso, Jesús Callol; Sanchez-Martinez, Consuelo

    2008-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by the helminth Angiostrongylus cantonensis, is an emerging infectious disease in America. The objective of this paper was to determine if the intrathecal synthesis of immunoglobulin E is produced during the acute phase of the disease. Methods Thirteen patients, mean age 4.5 years were studied; a diagnostic lumbar puncture was performed and serum samples taken. Immunoglobulin E (IgE) in serum and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was quantified by nephelometry. Control patients had other infections or other neurological diseases. Results The mean cell count in the CSF was 500 × 10-6 cells/L and of these 23% were eosinophils. In blood the eosinophils were 13%. The chief symptoms of the patients were migraine, vomiting and fever and 50% presented some meningeal signs. IgE intrathecal synthesis analyzed by the corresponding quotient diagram (Reibergram) was observed in all patients. No intrathecal IgE synthesis was seen in control patients. Conclusion Intrathecal synthesis of IgE demonstrates the participation of this immunoglobulin in the destruction of the third stage larvae of the parasite in the CSF. The test should be considered in our environment as a tool to aid diagnosis. PMID:19032790

  8. Teacher Perceptions of School Climate and the Implementation of Individually Guided Education (IGE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Edgar A.; And Others

    This study investigated teacher perceptions of the climate in 545 individually Guided Education (IGE) elementary schools, using the Organizational Climate Index as a research tool. The schools were categorized according to degree and length of implementation and according to location (rural, suburban, urban, and inner city). The following…

  9. A locus regulating total serum IgE maps to chromosome 5q

    SciTech Connect

    Amelung, P.J.; Panhuysen, C.I.M.; Postma, D.S. |

    1994-09-01

    Familial aggregation of allergy has been demonstrated in numerous past studies. However, allergy is a complex disorder which is not inherited as a simple Mendelian trait. Total serum IgE levels correlate with the clinical expression of allergy and asthma and can be utilized as a quantitative measure of the allergic phenotype. We studied 92 families from Northern Holland ascertained through a parent with asthma who were originally studied between 1962-1970. Since there is a large number of candidate genes on chromosome 5q, families were genotyped for markers in this region. These genes either directly or indirectly regulate IgE production and the activation and proliferation of cellular elements that are involved in inflammation associated with allergy and asthma. They include IL-4, IL-3, IL-5, IL-9, IL-12, IL-13 and GM-CSF. Segregation analyses revealed recessive inheritance of `high` levels with a mean for the `low` phenotype of 1.51 (32 IU) and 2.52 (331 IU) for the `high` phenotype. Linkage of log IgE with markers on 5q was tested using the sib-pair and the LOD score methods with the genetic model obtained from the segregation analyses. These results provide evidence for a locus controlling IgE levels near the cytokine gene cluster on 5q. This region appears critical in susceptibility to allergy and asthma.

  10. Elevated serum IgE, eosinophilia, and lung function in rubber workers

    SciTech Connect

    Bascom, R.; Baser, M.E.; Thomas, R.J.; Fisher, J.F.; Yang, W.N.; Baker, J.H. )

    1990-01-01

    We previously reported an outbreak of acute respiratory illness associated with eosinophilia in a group of rubber workers who performed a thermoinjection process in which synthetic rubber was heated and then injected onto metal molds. This study was conducted to determine if persistent respiratory health effects were associated with this work area and to explore the possible allergic etiology of this syndrome. A survey was performed 1 mo after a major improvement in area ventilation and consisted of baseline, cross-shift, and cross-week spirometry; diffusing capacity; serum immunoglobulin E (IgE), total eosinophil count; and skin patch testing. Baseline lung function, cross-shift, and cross-week spirometry were not significantly worse in the exposed group as compared to the control group. However, either eosinophilia (greater than 450/mm3) or elevated serum IgE (greater than 470 ng/ml) were present in 44% of exposed workers vs. 11% of the control group (p = .003). Nine months later, neither eosinophilia nor elevated IgE were associated with employment in this work area. We conclude that employment in the thermoinjection process was associated with eosinophilia and elevated IgE, which suggests sensitization to one of the components of the rubber, although no effect on pulmonary function could be demonstrated.

  11. Decreased immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding to cashew allergens following sodium sulfite treatment and heating.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Christopher P; Desormeaux, Wendy A; Wasserman, Richard L; Yoshioka-Tarver, Megumi; Condon, Brian; Grimm, Casey C

    2014-07-16

    Cashew nut and other nut allergies can result in serious and sometimes life-threatening reactions. Linear and conformational epitopes within food allergens are important for immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding. Methods that disrupt allergen structure can lower IgE binding and lessen the likelihood of food allergy reactions. Previous structural and biochemical data have indicated that 2S albumins from tree nuts and peanuts are potent allergens, and that their structures are sensitive to strong reducing agents such as dithiothreitol. This study demonstrates that the generally regarded as safe (GRAS) compound sodium sulfite effectively disrupted the structure of the cashew 2S albumin, Ana o 3, in a temperature-dependent manner. This study also showed that sulfite is effective at disrupting the disulfide bond within the cashew legumin, Ana o 2. Immunoblotting and ELISA demonstrated that the binding of cashew proteins by rabbit IgG or IgE from cashew-allergic patients was markedly lowered following treatment with sodium sulfite and heating. The results indicate that incorporation of sodium sulfite, or other food grade reagents with similar redox potential, may be useful processing methods to lower or eliminate IgE binding to food allergens. PMID:24926808

  12. Conduct of the Study: Phase I of the IGE Evaluation Project. Working Paper No. 258. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopp, Pamela M.; And Others

    This paper is one of a group that describes the research methodology for an evaluation of individually guided education (IGE) in American elementary schools. The paper covers the first phase activities from solicitation of participants (April 1977) through preparation of final data tapes for the structural equations analysis (September 1978).…

  13. 1971-72 Directory of IGE/Multiunit Elementary Schools in the United States of America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Research and Development Center for Cognitive Learning.

    This directory is intended to help persons identify the locations of innovative educational centers implementing IGE/multiunit school concepts in the U.S.A. Over 500 centers in 18 States are identified. Schools are listed alphabetically by district in each State with school addresses and telephone numbers, the names and addresses of school…

  14. Decreased immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding to cashew allergens following sodium sulfite treatment and heating.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Christopher P; Desormeaux, Wendy A; Wasserman, Richard L; Yoshioka-Tarver, Megumi; Condon, Brian; Grimm, Casey C

    2014-07-16

    Cashew nut and other nut allergies can result in serious and sometimes life-threatening reactions. Linear and conformational epitopes within food allergens are important for immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding. Methods that disrupt allergen structure can lower IgE binding and lessen the likelihood of food allergy reactions. Previous structural and biochemical data have indicated that 2S albumins from tree nuts and peanuts are potent allergens, and that their structures are sensitive to strong reducing agents such as dithiothreitol. This study demonstrates that the generally regarded as safe (GRAS) compound sodium sulfite effectively disrupted the structure of the cashew 2S albumin, Ana o 3, in a temperature-dependent manner. This study also showed that sulfite is effective at disrupting the disulfide bond within the cashew legumin, Ana o 2. Immunoblotting and ELISA demonstrated that the binding of cashew proteins by rabbit IgG or IgE from cashew-allergic patients was markedly lowered following treatment with sodium sulfite and heating. The results indicate that incorporation of sodium sulfite, or other food grade reagents with similar redox potential, may be useful processing methods to lower or eliminate IgE binding to food allergens.

  15. IgE and non-IgE mediated allergic disorders in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Morton, S; Palmer, B; Muir, K; Powell, R

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To ascertain the prevalence of IgE and non-IgE mediated allergic disorders in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
METHODS—49 SLE cases (all satisfying at least four "Revised ARA Criteria") and 98 healthy, age, and sex matched controls (randomly selected through two urban general practices and one rural general practice) were interviewed by telephone to screen for a history of allergy. Subjects with a history of allergic rhinitis, asthma or atopic eczema then underwent skin prick testing to confirm underlying IgE mediated disease.
RESULTS—Analysis of the data by conditional logistic regression revealed no significant difference in frequency of allergic disorders in SLE cases and controls (odds ratio (OR) 0.92, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.45, 1.86). In addition a subgroup analysis of subjects with IgE mediated/associated atopic disorders, showed that cases and controls were at a similar risk of having these conditions (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.41, 1.96).
CONCLUSIONS—This study suggests that people with SLE are not at an increased risk of IgE mediated/associated allergic disorders, in contrast with previous reports.

 Keywords: systemic lupus erythematosus; allergy PMID:9924207

  16. Treatment of cashew extracts with Aspergillopepsin reduces IgE binding to cashew allergens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cashew nuts can cause serious and sometimes life threatening reactions in people that suffer from food allergies. These reactions are mediated by immunoglobulin E binding (IgE) to allergenic cashew proteins. Enzymes from Aspergillus fungal species are used in many industrial and pharmaceutical appli...

  17. Heat-induced alterations in cashew allergen solubility and IgE binding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cashew nuts are included in a group of 8 foods that commonly cause food allergies. IgE binding to allergens within the nuts can cause allergic reactions that can be severe. Foods containing cashew nuts must be labeled to prevent accidental exposure to people who suffer from allergy to cashew nuts....

  18. Effect of d-amino acids on IgE binding to peanut allergens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    D-amino acids are formed when L-amino acids are exposed to heat. The objective was to determine the existence of D-amino acids in roasted peanut and their effect on IgE binding. Raw and roasted peanut protein extracts were hydrolyzed in 6 N HCL under vacuum. The hydrolysates were then analyzed for D...

  19. Helminth Allergens, Parasite-Specific IgE, and Its Protective Role in Human Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Fitzsimmons, Colin Matthew; Falcone, Franco Harald; Dunne, David William

    2014-01-01

    The Th2 immune response, culminating in eosinophilia and IgE production, is not only characteristic of allergy but also of infection by parasitic worms (helminths). Anti-parasite IgE has been associated with immunity against a range of helminth infections and many believe that IgE and its receptors evolved to help counter metazoan parasites. Allergens (IgE-antigens) are present in only a small minority of protein families and known IgE targets in helminths belong to these same families (e.g., EF-hand proteins, tropomyosin, and PR-1 proteins). During some helminth infection, especially with the well adapted hookworm, the Th2 response is moderated by parasite-expressed molecules. This has been associated with reduced allergy in helminth endemic areas and worm infection or products have been proposed as treatments for allergic conditions. However, some infections (especially Ascaris) are associated with increased allergy and this has been linked to cross-reactivity between worm proteins (e.g., tropomyosins) and highly similar molecules in dust-mites and insects. The overlap between allergy and helminth infection is best illustrated in Anisakis simplex, a nematode that when consumed in under-cooked fish can be both an infective helminth and a food allergen. Nearly 20 molecular allergens have been isolated from this species, including tropomyosin (Ani s 3) and the EF-hand protein, Ani s troponin. In this review, we highlight aspects of the biology and biochemistry of helminths that may have influenced the evolution of the IgE response. We compare dominant IgE-antigens in worms with clinically important environmental allergens and suggest that arrays of such molecules will provide important information on anti-worm immunity as well as allergy. PMID:24592267

  20. IgE Sensitization Profiles Differ between Adult Patients with Severe and Moderate Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Catharina; Lupinek, Christian; Lundeberg, Lena; Crameri, Reto; Valenta, Rudolf; Scheynius, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex chronic inflammatory disease where allergens can act as specific triggering factors. Aim To characterize the specificities of IgE-reactivity in patients with AD to a broad panel of exogenous allergens including microbial and human antigens. Methodology Adult patients with AD were grouped according to the SCORAD index, into severe (n = 53) and moderate AD (n = 126). As controls 43 patients were included with seborrhoeic eczema and 97 individuals without history of allergy or skin diseases. Specific IgE reactivity was assessed in plasma using Phadiatop®, ImmunoCap™, micro-arrayed allergens, dot-blotted recombinant Malassezia sympodialis allergens, and immune-blotted microbial and human proteins. Results IgE reactivity was detected in 92% of patients with severe and 83% of patients with moderate AD. Sensitization to cat allergens occurred most frequently, followed by sensitization to birch pollen, grass pollen, and to the skin commensal yeast M. sympodialis. Patients with severe AD showed a significantly higher frequency of IgE reactivity to allergens like cat (rFel d 1) and house dust mite (rDer p 4 and 10), to Staphylococcus aureus, M. sympodialis, and to human antigens. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the frequencies of IgE reactivity to the grass pollen allergens rPhl p 1, 2, 5b, and 6 between the two AD groups. Furthermore the IgE reactivity profile of patients with severe AD was more spread towards several different allergen molecules as compared to patients with moderate AD. Conclusion We have revealed a hitherto unknown difference regarding the molecular sensitization profile in patients with severe and moderate AD. Molecular profiling towards allergen components may provide a basis for future investigations aiming to explore the environmental, genetic and epigenetic factors which could be responsible for the different appearance and severity of disease phenotypes in AD. PMID:27228091

  1. Structural characterization and IgE epitope analysis of arginine kinase from Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Mao, Hai-Yan; Cao, Min-Jie; Maleki, Soheila J; Cai, Qiu-Feng; Su, Wen-Jin; Yang, Yang; Liu, Guang-Ming

    2013-12-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) is reported to be the pan-allergen of shellfish. However, there is limited information on its IgE epitopes and structural characteristics. In this study, AK from Scylla paramamosain was purified and characterized. The purified AK is a glycoprotein with the molecular weight of 40 kDa and it demonstrates cross-reactivity with the related allergens present in other shellfish. The cDNA of S. paramamosain AK was cloned, which encodes 357 amino acid residues. Nine linear epitopes and seven conformational epitopes were predicted following bioinformatics analysis. In addition, the entire recombinant AK (rAK) and three partial recombinant AKs (rAK1, rAK2, and rAK3) were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The proteins of rAK1, rAK2 and rAK have strong IgE reactivity with the pooled sera from crab allergic patients, while rAK3 has significantly weaker IgE reactivity, which indicates that the IgE epitopes of AK are mainly distributed in the regions of rAK1 and rAK2. Furthermore, three experimental linear epitopes (epitope 1: AA 127-141, epitope 2: AA 141-155, and epitope 3: AA 211-225) were discovered in the region of rAK1 and rAK2 using synthetized overlapping peptides. The experimental linear epitopes were mapped onto the protein homology model of AK. Meanwhile, in the IgE-binding assays of the sera from nine crab allergic patients, only three sera reacted with the denatured, linear AK as shown by Western-blotting, eight sera reacted with the native, folded AK by both dot-blotting and ELISA, which indicates that the conformational IgE epitopes of S. paramamosain AK may be more predominant.

  2. IgE binding to peanut allergens is inhibited by combined D-aspartic and D-glutamic acids.

    PubMed

    Chung, Si-Yin; Reed, Shawndrika

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if D-amino acids (D-aas) bind and inhibit immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding to peanut allergens. D-aas such as D-Asp (aspartic acid), D-Glu (glutamic acid), combined D-[Asp/Glu] and others were each prepared in a cocktail of 9 other D-aas, along with L-amino acids (L-aas) and controls. Each sample was mixed with a pooled plasma from peanut-allergic donors, and tested by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and Western blots for IgE binding to peanut allergens. Results showed that D-[Asp/Glu] (4 mg/ml) inhibited IgE binding (75%) while D-Glu, D-Asp and other D-aas had no inhibitory effect. A higher inhibition was seen with D-[Asp/Glu] than with L-[Asp/Glu]. We concluded that IgE was specific for D-[Asp/Glu], not D-Asp or D-Glu, and that D-[Asp/Glu] was more reactive than was L-[Asp/Glu] in IgE inhibition. The finding indicates that D-[Asp/Glu] may have the potential for removing IgE or reducing IgE binding to peanut allergens in vitro. PMID:25053052

  3. IgG antibodies in food allergy influence allergen-antibody complex formation and binding to B cells: a role for complement receptors.

    PubMed

    Meulenbroek, Laura A P M; de Jong, Renske J; den Hartog Jager, Constance F; Monsuur, Hanneke N; Wouters, Diana; Nauta, Alma J; Knippels, Léon M J; van Neerven, R J Joost; Ruiter, Bert; Leusen, Jeanette H W; Hack, C Erik; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A F M; Knulst, André C; Garssen, Johan; van Hoffen, Els

    2013-10-01

    Allergen-IgE complexes are more efficiently internalized and presented by B cells than allergens alone. It has been suggested that IgG Abs induced by immunotherapy inhibit these processes. Food-allergic patients have high allergen-specific IgG levels. However, the role of these Abs in complex formation and binding to B cells is unknown. To investigate this, we incubated sera of peanut- or cow's milk-allergic patients with their major allergens to form complexes and added them to EBV-transformed or peripheral blood B cells (PBBCs). Samples of birch pollen-allergic patients were used as control. Complex binding to B cells in presence or absence of blocking Abs to CD23, CD32, complement receptor 1 (CR1, CD35), and/or CR2 (CD21) was determined by flow cytometry. Furthermore, intact and IgG-depleted sera were compared. These experiments showed that allergen-Ab complexes formed in birch pollen, as well as food allergy, contained IgE, IgG1, and IgG4 Abs and bound to B cells. Binding of these complexes to EBV-transformed B cells was completely mediated by CD23, whereas binding to PBBCs was dependent on both CD23 and CR2. This reflected differential receptor expression. Upon IgG depletion, allergen-Ab complexes bound to PBBCs exclusively via CD23. These data indicated that IgG Abs are involved in complex formation. The presence of IgG in allergen-IgE complexes results in binding to B cells via CR2 in addition to CD23. The binding to both CR2 and CD23 may affect Ag processing and presentation, and (may) thereby influence the allergic response.

  4. Sensitive label-free electrochemical analysis of human IgE using an aptasensor with cDNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Yu; Wu, Kuan-Ying; Su, Hsiu-Li; Hung, Huan-Yi; Hsieh, You-Zung

    2013-01-15

    In this study, we developed an ultrasensitive label-free aptamer-based electrochemical biosensor, featuring a highly specific anti-human immunoglobulin E (IgE) aptamer as a capture probe, for human IgE detection. Construction of the aptasensor began with the electrodeposition of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) onto a graphite-based screen-printed electrode (SPE). After immobilizing the thiol-capped anti-human IgE aptamer onto the AuNPs through self-assembly, we treated the electrode with mercaptohexanol (MCH) to ensure that the remaining unoccupied surfaces of the AuNPs would not undergo nonspecific binding. We employed a designed complementary DNA featuring a guanine-rich section in its sequence (cDNA G1) as a detection probe to bind with the unbound anti-human IgE aptamer. We measured the redox current of methylene blue (MB) to determine the concentration of human IgE in the sample. When the aptamer captured human IgE, the binding of cDNA G1 to the aptamer was inhibited. Using cDNA G1 in the assay greatly amplified the redox signal of MB bound to the detection probe. Accordingly, this approach allowed the linear range (coefficient of determination: 0.996) for the analysis of human IgE to extend from 1 to 100,000pM; the limit of detection was 0.16pM. The fabricated aptasensor exhibited good selectivity toward human IgE even when human IgG, thrombin, and human serum albumin were present at 100-fold concentrations. This method should be readily applicable to the detection of other analytes, merely by replacing the anti-human IgE aptamer/cDNA G1 pair with a suitable anti-target molecule aptamer and cDNA.

  5. Experiences with monoclonal antibody therapy for allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Boushey, H A

    2001-08-01

    Identification of the central role IgE plays in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases made it a key target for therapy. The first selective anti-IgE therapy, a unique humanized monoclonal anti-IgE antibody (omalizumab), binds with high affinity to the Fc(epsilon)RI receptor binding site on IgE, thereby reducing the amount of free IgE available to bind to Fc(epsilon)RI receptors on mast calls, basophils, and other cells. In addition, administration of omalizumab indirectly reduces Fc(epsilon)RI receptor density on cells involved in allergic responses. In two bronchoprovocation trials involving patients with mild allergic asthma, omalizumab attenuated both early- and late-phase allergic responses. Omalizumab was subsequently evaluated as a treatment for asthma in large, multicenter, randomized, double-blind phase II and III trials involving patients with moderate to severe asthma who required corticosteroid therapy. When added to treatment with oral or inhaled corticosteroids, omalizumab reduced symptoms and exacerbations, improved lung function and quality of life, and reduced the need for rescue medications. These benefits persisted even in the "corticosteroid reduction" phase of these trials, when omalizumab treatment was shown to allow patients to reduce or discontinue their inhaled and/or oral corticosteroids. These effects of omalizu-mab in improving asthma control, as well as its excellent safety profile, may ultimately make this agent a useful addition to the physician's armamentarium of treatments for asthma.

  6. Increased serum IgE concentrations during infection and graft versus host disease after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, S A; Rogers, T R; Perry, D; Hobbs, J R; Riches, P G

    1984-01-01

    Serum IgE concentrations estimated in 25 bone marrow transplant recipients during episodes of infection or graft versus host disease, or both, were raised not only in some patients with acute graft versus host disease but also in many patients with infection. Raised values were not seen in chronic graft versus host disease. The routine estimation of serum IgE in bone marrow transplant recipients had minimal value because of the lack of specificity of the IgE response. PMID:6368605

  7. Bortezomib plus melphalan and prednisone (VMP regimen) as the initial treatment for IgE multiple myeloma: a case study.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Komiya, Yusuke; Hoshino, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    Patients with IgE multiple myeloma have poor prognosis. Due to the rarity of this condition, no standard treatment has been developed. As the VMP regimen (bortezomib plus melphalan and prednisone) has been reported to be highly effective in the treatment of other types of myeloma, we treated a patient with newly diagnosed IgE myeloma using the VMP regimen. Her myeloma responded well to VMP regimen. The results of this case report thus suggest that physicians may consider VMP regimen for use as the initial treatment for IgE myeloma.

  8. Common food allergens and their IgE-binding epitopes.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Hiroaki; Yokooji, Tomoharu; Taogoshi, Takanori

    2015-10-01

    Food allergy is an adverse immune response to certain kinds of food. Although any food can cause allergic reactions, chicken egg, cow's milk, wheat, shellfish, fruit, and buckwheat account for 75% of food allergies in Japan. Allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies play a pivotal role in the development of food allergy. Recent advances in molecular biological techniques have enabled the efficient analysis of food allergens. As a result, many food allergens have been identified, and their molecular structure and IgE-binding epitopes have also been identified. Studies of allergens have demonstrated that IgE antibodies specific to allergen components and/or the peptide epitopes are good indicators for the identification of patients with food allergy, prediction of clinical severity and development of tolerance. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding the allergens and IgE epitopes in the well-researched allergies to chicken egg, cow's milk, wheat, shrimp, and peanut.

  9. Ige-mediated food allergy - current problems and future perspectives (review).

    PubMed

    Lomidze, N; Gotua, T; Gotua, M

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of FA have changed over time, and many studies have indeed suggested a true rise in prevalence over the past 10-20 years. Recent studies showed that prevalence of self-reported food allergy is 17, 3%, versus challenged confirmed - 0.9%. The majority of allergic reactions to foods, particularly in children, are suggested to be caused primarily by eight foods, namely cow's milk, egg, wheat, soy, peanut, tree nuts, fish, and shellfish. Clinical symptoms of FA include skin, gastrointestinal and systemic reaction anaphylaxis that might be life-threatening and cause fatal reaction. Diagnosis of food allergy is based on SPT, sIgE measurements, component resolved diagnostics (CRD) and double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) tests. The primary therapy for food allergy is strict avoidance of the causal foods. Patients should be provided an emergency action plan, including how to administer an epinephrine autoinjector. It is recommended that all infants be exclusively breast-fed, without maternal diet restriction of allergens, until 4 to 6 months of age. Recent studies have shown that oral immunotherapy (OIT) can induce desensitization and modulate allergen-specific immune responses. Further work to evaluate the long-term effectiveness and safety of this therapy is ongoing and needed before they are used in the main-stream care of children or adults with food allergy. PMID:25693219

  10. Ige-mediated food allergy - current problems and future perspectives (review).

    PubMed

    Lomidze, N; Gotua, T; Gotua, M

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of FA have changed over time, and many studies have indeed suggested a true rise in prevalence over the past 10-20 years. Recent studies showed that prevalence of self-reported food allergy is 17, 3%, versus challenged confirmed - 0.9%. The majority of allergic reactions to foods, particularly in children, are suggested to be caused primarily by eight foods, namely cow's milk, egg, wheat, soy, peanut, tree nuts, fish, and shellfish. Clinical symptoms of FA include skin, gastrointestinal and systemic reaction anaphylaxis that might be life-threatening and cause fatal reaction. Diagnosis of food allergy is based on SPT, sIgE measurements, component resolved diagnostics (CRD) and double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) tests. The primary therapy for food allergy is strict avoidance of the causal foods. Patients should be provided an emergency action plan, including how to administer an epinephrine autoinjector. It is recommended that all infants be exclusively breast-fed, without maternal diet restriction of allergens, until 4 to 6 months of age. Recent studies have shown that oral immunotherapy (OIT) can induce desensitization and modulate allergen-specific immune responses. Further work to evaluate the long-term effectiveness and safety of this therapy is ongoing and needed before they are used in the main-stream care of children or adults with food allergy.

  11. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti- ...

  12. A hypoallergenic hybrid molecule with increased immunogenicity consisting of derivatives of the major grass pollen allergens, Phl p 2 and Phl p 6.

    PubMed

    Linhart, Birgit; Mothes-Luksch, Nadine; Vrtala, Susanne; Kneidinger, Michael; Valent, Peter; Valenta, Rudolf

    2008-07-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is currently based on the administration of allergen extracts containing natural allergens. However, its broad application is limited by the poor quality of these extracts. Based on recombinant allergens, well-defined allergy vaccines for allergen-specific immunotherapy can be produced. Furthermore, they can be modified to reduce their allergenic activity and to avoid IgE-mediated side effects. Here, we demonstrate that the immunogenicity of two grass pollen-derived hypoallergenic allergen derivatives could be increased by engineering them as a single hybrid molecule. We used a hypoallergenic Phl p 2 mosaic, generated by fragmentation of the Phl p 2 sequence and reassembly of the resulting peptides in an altered order, and a truncated Phl p 6 allergen, to produce a hybrid protein. The hybrid retained the reduction of IgE reactivity and allergenic activity of its components as shown by ELISA and basophil activation assays. Immunization with the hybrid molecule demonstrated the increased immunogenicity of this molecule, leading to higher levels of allergen-specific IgG antibodies compared to the single components. These antibodies could inhibit patients' IgE binding to the wild-type allergens. Thus, the described strategy allows the development of safer and more efficacious vaccines for the treatment of grass pollen allergy.

  13. Molecular and immunological characterization and IgE epitope mapping of Pen n 18, a major allergen of Penicillium notatum.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chia-Jung; Chen, Yen-Ming; Su, Song-Nan; Forouhar, Farhad; Lee, Shu-Hua; Chow, Lu-Ping

    2002-01-01

    The mould genus, Penicillium, is a significant source of environmental aero-allergens. A major allergen from Penicillium notatum, Pen n 18, was identified by two-dimensional immunoblotting using monoclonal antibody G11A10, raised against the vacuolar serine protease of Penicillium citrinum, followed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight MS analysis of the peptide digest. Pen n 18 was then cloned and the amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA sequence. The cDNA encoded a 494 amino acid protein, considerably larger than mature Pen n 18, the differences being due to the N- and C-terminal prosequences. The deduced amino acid sequence showed extensive similarity with those of vacuolar serine proteases from various fungi. The Pen n 18 coding sequence was expressed in Escherichia coli as a His-tagged fusion protein and purified by Ni(2+)-chelate affinity chromatography. On immunoblots, the purified recombinant protein specifically bound IgE from mould-allergic patients, and cross-inhibition assays demonstrated the presence of common IgE-binding epitopes on Pen n 18 and a major allergen of P. citrinum, Pen c 18. When mapping of the allergenic epitopes was performed, at least nine different linear IgE-binding epitopes, located throughout the Pen n 18 protein, were identified. Of these, peptide C12, located in the N-terminal region of the molecule, was recognized by serum from 75% of the patients tested and therefore appears to be an immunodominant IgE-binding epitope. PMID:11964171

  14. Diagnostic Value of Specific IgE to Peanut and Ara h 2 in Korean Children with Peanut Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Young; Han, Youngshin; Kim, Kwanghoon; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Min-Ji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to establish the diagnostic decision point (DDP) of peanut specific IgE (sIgE) for predicting the outcome of oral food challenge (OFC). We also evaluated the usefulness of sIgE to peanut components (Ara h 1, 2, 3, 8, and 9) in diagnosing peanut allergy. Methods Korean children aged over 12 months with a suspected peanut allergy were enrolled. Diagnosis of peanut allergy was confirmed by an open OFC or through the convincing history of anaphylaxis. Cutoff levels of sIgE to peanut and peanut components were determined by analyzing receiver operating characteristic curves. Results Forty-eight children (22 boys and 26 girls) with a suspected peanut allergy were enrolled. The previously established DDP for peanut-sIgE antibodies (14 kU/L) showed a sensitivity of 22.7%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 100%, and negative predictive value of 60.4% in our study population. The median levels of peanut-sIgE (5.4 kU/L vs 1.1 kU/L, P<0.001) and Ara h 2-sIgE (0.8 kU/L vs 0 kU/L, P<0.001) were significantly higher in the peanut allergy group than in the peanut tolerance group. The peanut-sIgE concentration indicating a PPV of 100% was 10.3 kU/L. The Ara h 2-sIgE level of 4.0 kU/L had a PPV of 100%. Conclusions Our results showed that the cutoff levels for peanut (10.3 kU/L) and Ara h 2 (4.0 kU/L) established in this study is useful for the diagnosis of peanut allergy in Korean children. PMID:26739409

  15. Exercise-induced bronchocontriction, skin sensitivity, and serum IgE in children with eczema.

    PubMed Central

    Price, J F; Cogswell, J J; Joseph, M C; Cochrane, G M

    1976-01-01

    Forty-two children with eczema were studied for exercise-induced astham (EIA), skin sensitivity to prick testing, blood eosinophil count, and immunoglobulins. 29 had a fall in peak expiratory flow rate after exercise greater than 20% and of these, 23 had symptoms of wheezing. 13 of the eczematous children showed a fall of less than 20%. The children with EIA showed greater cutaneous sensitivity (p less than 0.001) and a higher total serum IgE (p less than 0.025). 3 of the group with a fall of less than 20% had allergic rhinitis with skin sensitivity to grass pollen. The remaining 10 had no clinical evidence of allergic disease, other than eczema and skin sensitivity, and total IgE fell within the normal range. It is suggested that in a proportion of chilren with eczema there is little evidence of reaginic allergy. PMID:1015843

  16. Anti-timothy IgE formation: suppression with antigen D-dGl conjugates.

    PubMed

    Malley, A; Deppe, L

    1980-01-01

    Antigen D fragments (AgD1 and AgD2) and chemically synthesized quercetin-glutathione were conjugated to the synthetic polypeptide copolymer of D-glutamic acid and D-lysine (dGL). These conjugates were tested at varying epitope densities to determine their ability to suppress a secondary anti-antigen B IgE response. The data showed that all of the conjugates used with epitope densities of 5-20 groups per dGL produced significant dose-dependent suppression of a secondary IgE response. The duration of the observed suppression was short (about 30 days), but could be extended by additional treatment with the conjugate prior to the loss of unresponsiveness.

  17. High IgE in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients is complexed with anti-IgE autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Millauer, N; Zuercher, A W; Miescher, S M; Gerber, H A; Seitz, M; Stadler, B M

    1999-01-01

    This study presents data on more than 300 RA and allergic patients analysed for their serum levels of anti-immunoglobulin isotype autoantibodies and IgE. We observed high levels of IgE in sera of RA and allergic patients. Interestingly, we measured significantly higher specific IgE levels against Alternaria but not against nine other allergens in the RA compared with the allergic group. As expected, anti-IgG autoantibodies (rheumatoid factors (RF)) of different isotypes were detected in sera from RA patients only. However, we found increased titres of complexed anti-IgE autoantibodies in all RF+ groups and in the allergic group. These findings may explain why despite elevated IgE levels a decreased prevalence of allergic diseases in RA patients has been observed. PMID:9933440

  18. Platelet antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pulkrabek, S M

    1996-12-01

    The proper diagnosis of patients with immune-mediated thrombocytopenias can be accomplished by using the advances made in the field of platelet serology. These techniques range from solid phase red cell adherence to sequencing platelet antigen amino acids by polymerase chain reaction. This article describes platelet antigens, the clinical tests available to detect platelet antigens and antibodies, and the value of these tests in supporting clinical diagnoses.

  19. Rapamycin attenuates airway hyperreactivity, goblet cells, and IgE in experimental allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Kramer, Elizabeth L; Brandt, Eric B; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Le Cras, Timothy D

    2011-12-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway integrates environmental cues, promotes cell growth/differentiation, and regulates immune responses. Although inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin has potent immunosuppressive activity, mixed effects have been reported in OVA-induced models of allergic asthma. We investigated the impact of two rapamycin treatment protocols on the major characteristics of allergic asthma induced by the clinically relevant allergen, house dust mite (HDM). In protocol 1, BALB/c mice were exposed to 10 intranasal HDM doses over a period of 24 d and treated with rapamycin simultaneously during the sensitization/exposure period. In protocol 2, rapamycin was administered after the mice had been sensitized to HDM (i.p. injection) and prior to initiation of two intranasal HDM challenges over 4 d. Airway hyperreactivity (AHR), IgE, inflammatory cells, cytokines, leukotrienes, goblet cells, and activated T cells were assessed. In protocol 1, rapamycin blocked HDM-induced increases in AHR, inflammatory cell counts, and IgE, as well as attenuated goblet cell metaplasia. In protocol 2, rapamycin blocked increases in AHR, IgE, and T cell activation and reduced goblet cell metaplasia, but it had no effect on inflammatory cell counts. Increases in IL-13 and leukotrienes were also blocked by rapamycin, although increases in IL-4 were unaffected. These data demonstrated that rapamycin can inhibit cardinal features of allergic asthma, including increases in AHR, IgE, and goblet cells, most likely as a result of its ability to reduce the production of two key mediators of asthma: IL-13 and leukotrienes. These findings highlight the importance of the mTOR pathway in allergic airway disease. PMID:22021618

  20. Rapamycin attenuates airway hyperreactivity, goblet cells, and IgE in experimental allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Kramer, Elizabeth L; Brandt, Eric B; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Le Cras, Timothy D

    2011-12-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway integrates environmental cues, promotes cell growth/differentiation, and regulates immune responses. Although inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin has potent immunosuppressive activity, mixed effects have been reported in OVA-induced models of allergic asthma. We investigated the impact of two rapamycin treatment protocols on the major characteristics of allergic asthma induced by the clinically relevant allergen, house dust mite (HDM). In protocol 1, BALB/c mice were exposed to 10 intranasal HDM doses over a period of 24 d and treated with rapamycin simultaneously during the sensitization/exposure period. In protocol 2, rapamycin was administered after the mice had been sensitized to HDM (i.p. injection) and prior to initiation of two intranasal HDM challenges over 4 d. Airway hyperreactivity (AHR), IgE, inflammatory cells, cytokines, leukotrienes, goblet cells, and activated T cells were assessed. In protocol 1, rapamycin blocked HDM-induced increases in AHR, inflammatory cell counts, and IgE, as well as attenuated goblet cell metaplasia. In protocol 2, rapamycin blocked increases in AHR, IgE, and T cell activation and reduced goblet cell metaplasia, but it had no effect on inflammatory cell counts. Increases in IL-13 and leukotrienes were also blocked by rapamycin, although increases in IL-4 were unaffected. These data demonstrated that rapamycin can inhibit cardinal features of allergic asthma, including increases in AHR, IgE, and goblet cells, most likely as a result of its ability to reduce the production of two key mediators of asthma: IL-13 and leukotrienes. These findings highlight the importance of the mTOR pathway in allergic airway disease.

  1. Evaluation of reduced allergenicity of deamidated gliadin in a mouse model of wheat-gliadin allergy using an antibody prepared by a peptide containing three epitopes.

    PubMed

    Abe, Ryosuke; Shimizu, Shiori; Yasuda, Karin; Sugai, Masae; Okada, Yohei; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Akao, Makoto; Kumagai, Hitoshi; Kumagai, Hitomi

    2014-04-01

    Gliadin is the principal allergen of wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). The primary structure of IgE-binding epitopes in wheat gliadin includes tandem sequencing sites of glutamine residues. Therefore, deamidation would be an effective approach to reduce the allergenicity of wheat proteins. In our previous study, we deamidated wheat gliadin without causing peptide-bond hydrolysis or polymerization by use of carboxylated cation-exchange resins, and we found that the deamidated gliadin scarcely reacted with the sera of patients radioallergosorbent test (RAST)-positive to wheat. In this study, we examined the allergenicity of deamidated gliadin in a mouse model of wheat-gliadin allergy. Oral administration of deamidated gliadin to gliadin-sensitized mice suppressed enhancement in intestinal permeability, serum allergen level, serum allergen-specific IgE level, mast-cell-surface expression of FcεRI, and serum and intestinal histamine levels. Our results indicate that gliadin deamidated with no peptide-bond hydrolysis by cation-exchange resins has low allergenicity even under in vivo conditions. PMID:24617642

  2. Evaluation of reduced allergenicity of deamidated gliadin in a mouse model of wheat-gliadin allergy using an antibody prepared by a peptide containing three epitopes.

    PubMed

    Abe, Ryosuke; Shimizu, Shiori; Yasuda, Karin; Sugai, Masae; Okada, Yohei; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Akao, Makoto; Kumagai, Hitoshi; Kumagai, Hitomi

    2014-04-01

    Gliadin is the principal allergen of wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). The primary structure of IgE-binding epitopes in wheat gliadin includes tandem sequencing sites of glutamine residues. Therefore, deamidation would be an effective approach to reduce the allergenicity of wheat proteins. In our previous study, we deamidated wheat gliadin without causing peptide-bond hydrolysis or polymerization by use of carboxylated cation-exchange resins, and we found that the deamidated gliadin scarcely reacted with the sera of patients radioallergosorbent test (RAST)-positive to wheat. In this study, we examined the allergenicity of deamidated gliadin in a mouse model of wheat-gliadin allergy. Oral administration of deamidated gliadin to gliadin-sensitized mice suppressed enhancement in intestinal permeability, serum allergen level, serum allergen-specific IgE level, mast-cell-surface expression of FcεRI, and serum and intestinal histamine levels. Our results indicate that gliadin deamidated with no peptide-bond hydrolysis by cation-exchange resins has low allergenicity even under in vivo conditions.

  3. Layered Electrical Product Application Protocol (AP). Draft: Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    An application protocol is an information systems engineering view of a specific product. The view represents an agreement on the generic activities needed to design and fabricate the product, the agreement on the information needed to support those activities, and the specific constructs of a product data standard for use in transfering some or all of the information required. This applications protocol describes the data for electrical and electronic products in terms of a product description standard called the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES). More specifically, the Layered Electrical Product IGES Application Protocol (AP) specifies the mechanisms for defining and exchanging computer-models and their associated data for those products which have been designed in two dimensional geometry so as to be produced as a series of layers in IGES format. The AP defines the appropriateness of the data items for describing the geometry of the various parts of a product (shape and location), the connectivity, and the processing and material characteristics. Excluded is the behavioral requirements which the product was intended to satisfy, except as those requirements have been recorded as design rules or product testing requirements.

  4. Acute Eosinophilic Myocarditis and Hyper IgE in HIV Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Thawabi, Mohammad; Habib, Mirette; Shaaban, Hamid; Shamoon, Fayez

    2014-01-01

    Context: Eosinophilic myocarditis is a rare cause of myocarditis. It is manifested histopathologically by diffuse or focal myocardial inflammation with eosinophilic infiltration, often in association with peripheral blood eosinophilia. Patients infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), especially those with lower CD4 counts, can occasionally have hyperimmunoglobulinemia E (Hyper IgE) and eosinophilia. Case Report: We report a case of a 29-year-old patient with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) who had a persistent elevation of eosinophil counts and elevated IgE levels for a year prior to admission. He was presented to our emergency department with chest pain and laboratory tests revealed peripheral blood eosinophilia and elevated troponins. Coronary angiogram showed nonobstructive coronary artery disease. He then underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging which was consistent with an infiltrative myocarditis. After being put on steroid therapy, his peripheral eosinophilia resolved and his cardiac symptoms improved. Conclusion: Our case highlights that eosinophilia and Hyper IgE in HIV patients has the potential to contribute to end-organ damage. PMID:25077083

  5. The amyloid fold of Gad m 1 epitopes governs IgE binding

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Rosa; Martínez, Javier; Castro, Ana; Pedrosa, María; Quirce, Santiago; Rodríguez-Pérez, Rosa; Gasset, María

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are polymeric structural states formed from locally or totally unfolded protein chains that permit surface reorganizations, stability enhancements and interaction properties that are absent in the precursor monomers. β-Parvalbumin, the major allergen in fish allergy, forms amyloids that are recognized by IgE in the patient sera, suggesting a yet unknown pathological role for these assemblies. We used Gad m 1 as the fish β-parvalbumin model and a combination of approaches, including peptide arrays, recombinant wt and mutant chains, biophysical characterizations, protease digestions, mass spectrometry, dot-blot and ELISA assays to gain insights into the role of amyloids in the IgE interaction. We found that Gad m 1 immunoreactive regions behave as sequence-dependent conformational epitopes that provide a 1000-fold increase in affinity and the structural repetitiveness required for optimal IgE binding and cross-linking upon folding into amyloids. These findings support the amyloid state as a key entity in type I food allergy. PMID:27597317

  6. Evidence for two unlinked loci regulating total serum IgE levels.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, J; Levitt, R C; Panhuysen, C I; Postma, D S; Taylor, E W; Amelung, P J; Holroyd, K J; Bleecker, E R; Meyers, D A

    1995-01-01

    Studies investigating the genetic control of total serum IgE levels are of major importance in understanding basic pathophysiologic mechanisms in atopy and asthma, since IgE levels predict onset and correlate with the clinical expression of these disorders. Previous analysis of data from 92 families, ascertained through a parent with asthma, showed evidence for recessive inheritance of high IgE levels with linkage to chromosome 5q. Since there was significant residual familial correlation in the one-locus segregation analysis, two-locus segregation and linkage analyses were performed. Segregation analyses provided evidence for a second major locus unlinked to the locus on 5q. Utilization of this two-locus model corroborates the previous evidence for linkage between this trait and markers on 5q31-q33. The LODs for the most informative marker D5S436 increased from 3.00 at 10% recombination to 4.67 at 9% recombination, when the two-locus model was used. Additional linkage studies are needed to map this second locus. These results demonstrate the importance of performing multilocus segregation and linkage analyses for quantitative traits that are related to the phenotype of a complex disorder. This approach has given further insight into the genetics of allergy and asthma by providing evidence for a two-locus model. PMID:7668269

  7. Evidence for two unlinked loci regulating total serum IgE levels

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Levitt, R.C.; Taylor, E.W.

    1995-08-01

    Studies investigating the genetic control of total serum IgE levels are of major importance in understanding basic pathophysiologic mechanisms in atopy and asthma, since IgE levels predict onset and correlate with the clinical expression of these disorders. Previous analysis of data from 92 families, ascertained through a parent with asthma, showed evidence for recessive inheritance of high IgE levels with linkage to chromosome 5q. Since there was significant residual familial correlation in the one-locus segregation analysis, two-locu segregation and linkage analyses were performed. Segregation analyses provided evidence for a second major locus unlinked to the locus on 5q. Utilization of this two-locus model corroborates the previous evidence for linkage between this trait and markers on 5q{sub 31}-q{sub 33}. The LODs for the most informative marker D5S436 increased from 3.00 at 10% recombination to 4.67 at 9% recombination when the two-locus model was used. Additional linkage studies are needed to map this second locus. These results demonstrate the importance of performing multilocus segregation and linkage analyses for quantitative traits that are related to the phenotype of a complex disorder. This approach has given further insight into the genetics of allergy and asthma by providing evidence for a two-locus model. 34 refs., 3 figs.

  8. The amyloid fold of Gad m 1 epitopes governs IgE binding.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Rosa; Martínez, Javier; Castro, Ana; Pedrosa, María; Quirce, Santiago; Rodríguez-Pérez, Rosa; Gasset, María

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are polymeric structural states formed from locally or totally unfolded protein chains that permit surface reorganizations, stability enhancements and interaction properties that are absent in the precursor monomers. β-Parvalbumin, the major allergen in fish allergy, forms amyloids that are recognized by IgE in the patient sera, suggesting a yet unknown pathological role for these assemblies. We used Gad m 1 as the fish β-parvalbumin model and a combination of approaches, including peptide arrays, recombinant wt and mutant chains, biophysical characterizations, protease digestions, mass spectrometry, dot-blot and ELISA assays to gain insights into the role of amyloids in the IgE interaction. We found that Gad m 1 immunoreactive regions behave as sequence-dependent conformational epitopes that provide a 1000-fold increase in affinity and the structural repetitiveness required for optimal IgE binding and cross-linking upon folding into amyloids. These findings support the amyloid state as a key entity in type I food allergy. PMID:27597317

  9. Chinese herbal extracts of Rubia cordifolia and Dianthus superbus suppress IgE production and prevent peanut-induced anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Peanut allergy is characterized by increased levels of peanut-specific IgE in the serum of most patients. Thus, the most logical therapy would be to inhibit the IgE production by committed B-cells. This study aims to investigate the unreported anti-IgE effects of Chinese herbal extracts of Rubia cordifolia (Qiancao) and Dianthus superbus (Qumai). Methods Seventy herbal extracts were tested for their ability to reduce IgE secretion by a human B-cell line. Those with the lowest inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) values were tested in a mouse model of peanut-anaphylaxis. Anaphylactic scores, body temperature, plasma histamine and peanut-specific-immunoglobulins were determined. Results Rubia cordifolia and Dianthus superbus inhibited the in vitro IgE production by a human B-cell line in a dose-dependent manner and the in vivo IgE production in a murine model of peanut allergy without affecting peanut-specific-IgG1 levels. After challenge, all mice in the sham groups developed anaphylactic reactions and increased plasma histamine levels. The extract-treated mice demonstrated significantly reduced peanut-triggered anaphylactic reactions and plasma histamine levels. Conclusion The extracts of Rubia cordifolia and Dianthus superbus inhibited the IgE production in vivo and in vitro as well as reduced anaphylactic reactions in peanut-allergic mice, suggesting potentials for allergy treatments. PMID:21961957

  10. Total serum IgE level influences oral food challenge tests for IgE-mediated food allergies.

    PubMed

    Horimukai, K; Hayashi, K; Tsumura, Y; Nomura, I; Narita, M; Ohya, Y; Saito, H; Matsumoto, K

    2015-03-01

    Probability curves predicting oral food challenge test (OFC) results based on specific IgE levels are widely used to prevent serious allergic reactions. Although several confounding factors are known to affect probability curves, the main factors that affect OFC outcomes are currently unclear. We hypothesized that an increased total IgE level would reduce allergic reactivity. Medical records of 337 and 266 patients who underwent OFCs for 3.5 g boiled hen's egg white and 3.1 ml raw cow's milk, respectively, were examined retrospectively. We subdivided the patients into three groups based on total IgE levels and age by percentile (<25th, 25-75th, and >75th percentiles), and logistic regression analyses were performed on each group. Patients with higher total IgE levels were significantly less responsive. In addition, age did not significantly affect the OFC results. Therefore, total IgE levels should be taken into account when predicting OFC results based on food-specific IgE levels.

  11. Polyclonal IgE increase after HgCl2 injections in BN and LEW rats: a genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Sapin, C; Hirsch, F; Delaporte, J P; Bazin, H; Druet, P

    1984-01-01

    An autoimmune disease and a dramatic increase in total serum IgE concentration are observed in BN rats that are chronically injected with HgCl2. In contrast, LEW rats do not develop the characteristic glomerulonephritis and are very "low IgE responders". In this study, we examined the genetic control of total serum IgE increase after HgCl2 injection in F1 and F2 hybrids, in both backcrosses between LEW and BN rats, and in LEW.1N congenic rats. Genetic analysis was performed using peak IgE concentrations expressed as log microgram/ml. A high IgE phenotype was found to be dominant. Eighty-five percent of F2 variance was due to genetic factors (VG) while only 15% of this variance was caused by environmental factors (VE). From observations in F2 hybrids and backcrosses, estimations of additive variance (VA) and dominance variance (VD) were made following three different methods. Genetic control by about four loci is demonstrated. One of these genes is RT1-linked. This gene contributes to 25% of the phenotypic difference observed between BN and LEW rats. No correlation was found between the peak total IgE level and autoimmune disease based on IgG deposition in spleen and/or kidney.

  12. Cysteine protease of the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis preferentially evokes an IgE/IgG1 antibody response in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, I; Yamada, M; Uchikawa, R; Matsuda, S; Arizono, N

    1995-01-01

    Some cysteine proteases such as papain and those of mites and schistosomes have potent allergenic properties. To clarify the allergenicity of nematode cysteine proteases, the enzyme was purified from the intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis using cation exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. The purified protease, of 16 kD and pI 8.5, showed maximum enzyme activity at pH 5.5 and substrate preference for Z-Phe-Arg-MCA. The specific inhibitors of cysteine protease leupeptin, iodoacetic acid, and E-64, completely suppressed the activity, indicating that the purified enzyme belongs to the cysteine protease family. Cysteine protease activity was found not only in somatic extract, but also in the excretory-secretory (ES) product of the nematode. When anti-cysteine protease immunoglobulin isotypes were examined in sera from rats infected with N. brasiliensis, a high level of IgG1 and a lower level of IgE antibody were detected. Depletion of IgG antibodies from the sera using protein G affinity columns resulted in a marked increase in reactivity of anti-cysteine protease IgE with the antigen, possibly due to the removal of competing IgG antibodies. In contrast to IgE and IgG1, production of anti-cysteine protease IgG2a was negligible. These results indicate that the nematode cysteine protease preferentially evokes an IgE/IgG1 antibody response. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7554403

  13. Serum antibody to Sarcoptes scabiei and house dust mite prior to and during infestation with S. scabiei.

    PubMed

    Arlian, L G; Morgan, M S

    2000-07-01

    In this study, serum antibodies to Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis (SS), Dermatophagoides farinae (DF), and D. pteronyssinus (DP) were determined in 19 healthy, random-source dogs prior to infestation with scabies then again during a primary infestation, cure and challenge infestation with scabies. Prior to scabies infestation, serum of 11 dogs contained faintly detectable amounts of IgE and/or IgG to proteins in SS extract, probably resulting from sensitization to dust mites that share cross-reactive antigenic epitopes with SS. After becoming infested with scabies, the response to SS antigens became stronger with antibodies appearing to more antigens as the scabies infestation progressed. Three of the newly recognized proteins were 170, 155 and 142/133kD and could be used in a diagnostic test since antibodies to them appeared during the primary infestation. In addition, during the primary infestation, 14 of 15 dogs developed IgE to 1-11 new SS proteins in addition to an increase in IgE binding to those proteins recognized prior to infestation. Overall, the strongest antibody responses (IgE and IgG) were exhibited during cure of the first infestation, when dead mites were still present in the stratum corneum. As expected, the antibody response was strong and rapid during challenge when the infestation self-cured. The immunogenic SS proteins identified by serum antibody binding during challenge, when the hosts self-cured, are candidates for inclusion in a vaccine. These candidate proteins are 200, 185, 170, 155, 142/133, 112, 97, 74, 57, 45/42, 32 and 22kD. Some of the proteins in SS that exhibited new or increased antibody binding during the experiment also had IgE and IgG binding to proteins with similar molecular weights in DF and DP extracts. These results illustrate the difficulties involved in understanding and interpreting serum antibody for developing a serological test for the diagnosis of scabies, isolating relevant SS antigens that could be included in a

  14. The germinal center antibody response in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    DeFranco, Anthony L.

    2016-01-01

    The germinal center response is the delayed but sustained phase of the antibody response that is responsible for producing high-affinity antibodies of the IgG, IgA and/or IgE isotypes. B cells in the germinal center undergo re-iterative cycles of somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin gene variable regions, clonal expansion, and Darwinian selection for cells expressing higher-affinity antibody variants. Alternatively, selected B cells can terminally differentiate into long-lived plasma cells or into a broad diversity of mutated memory B cells; the former secrete the improved antibodies to fight an infection and to provide continuing protection from re-infection, whereas the latter may jumpstart immune responses to subsequent infections with related but distinct infecting agents. Our understanding of the molecules involved in the germinal center reaction has been informed by studies of human immunodeficiency patients with selective defects in the production of antibodies. Recent studies have begun to reveal how innate immune recognition via Toll-like receptors can enhance the magnitude and selective properties of the germinal center, leading to more effective control of infection by a subset of viruses. Just as early insights into the nature of the germinal center found application in the development of the highly successful conjugate vaccines, more recent insights may find application in the current efforts to develop new generations of vaccines, including vaccines that can induce broadly protective neutralizing antibodies against influenza virus or HIV-1. PMID:27303636

  15. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  16. Genome-Wide Scan on Total Serum IgE Levels Identifies FCER1A as Novel Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Elke; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Mempel, Martin; Klopp, Norman; Gohlke, Henning; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Ollert, Markus; Ring, Johannes; Behrendt, Heidrun; Heinrich, Joachim; Novak, Natalija; Bieber, Thomas; Krämer, Ursula; Berdel, Dietrich; von Berg, Andrea; Bauer, Carl Peter; Herbarth, Olf; Koletzko, Sibylle; Prokisch, Holger; Mehta, Divya; Meitinger, Thomas; Depner, Martin; von Mutius, Erika; Liang, Liming; Moffatt, Miriam; Cookson, William; Kabesch, Michael; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Illig, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    High levels of serum IgE are considered markers of parasite and helminth exposure. In addition, they are associated with allergic disorders, play a key role in anti-tumoral defence, and are crucial mediators of autoimmune diseases. Total IgE is a strongly heritable trait. In a genome-wide association study (GWAS), we tested 353,569 SNPs for association with serum IgE levels in 1,530 individuals from the population-based KORA S3/F3 study. Replication was performed in four independent population-based study samples (total n = 9,769 individuals). Functional variants in the gene encoding the alpha chain of the high affinity receptor for IgE (FCER1A) on chromosome 1q23 (rs2251746 and rs2427837) were strongly associated with total IgE levels in all cohorts with P values of 1.85×10−20 and 7.08×10−19 in a combined analysis, and in a post-hoc analysis showed additional associations with allergic sensitization (P = 7.78×10−4 and P = 1.95×10−3). The “top” SNP significantly influenced the cell surface expression of FCER1A on basophils, and genome-wide expression profiles indicated an interesting novel regulatory mechanism of FCER1A expression via GATA-2. Polymorphisms within the RAD50 gene on chromosome 5q31 were consistently associated with IgE levels (P values 6.28×10−7−4.46×10−8) and increased the risk for atopic eczema and asthma. Furthermore, STAT6 was confirmed as susceptibility locus modulating IgE levels. In this first GWAS on total IgE FCER1A was identified and replicated as new susceptibility locus at which common genetic variation influences serum IgE levels. In addition, variants within the RAD50 gene might represent additional factors within cytokine gene cluster on chromosome 5q31, emphasizing the need for further investigations in this intriguing region. Our data furthermore confirm association of STAT6 variation with serum IgE levels. PMID:18846228

  17. [Influence of serum levels of vitamin D on IgE response in schoolchildren with asthma in poor communities].

    PubMed

    Egea, Eduardo; Garavito, Gloria; Fang, Luis; Mendoza, Dary Luz; Escamilla, José Miguel; De Los Ríos, Elsie; Dennis, Rodolfo; Sánchez-Borges, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Antecedentes: El asma es una enfermedad frecuente en el mundo y la vitamina D (Vit-D) se ha asociado con la presencia y severidad de esta enfermedad. Objetivo: Establecer la asociación entre los niveles de Vit-D y la respuesta IgE en escolares con asma residentes de cuatro ciudades colombiananas. Métodos: Estudio de casos y controles en 1340 escolares (687 asmáticos y 653 controles) de comunidades en extrema pobreza de Barranquilla, Cartagena, Santa Marta y Montería. Se midieron las concentraciones séricas de Vit-D, IgE total e IgE específica anti Dermatofagoides farinae, Periplaneta americana y Ascaris lumbricoides (AL). Resultados: Los controles reportaron concentraciones mayores de Vit-D [61.9 ± 28.4 ng/mL] que los casos [53 ± 23.3 ng/mL] (p<0.05). La IgE total fue mayor en los casos (p<0.05). Solo IgE anti-AL mostró una diferencia clara: controles, densidad óptica 0.27 ± 0.25; casos 0.22 ± 0.24 (p<0.05). La Vit-D presentó diferencias entre casos y controles en cada población. Conclusiones: No se pudo demostrar la asociación entre deficiencia de Vit-D y asma, dado que la IgE total estuvo elevada en los pacientes y en los controles. Los resultados sugieren que la Vit-D influye en la respuesta IgE específica en niños asmáticos pobres en zonas endémicas para helmintiasis.

  18. Human tonsillar IgE biosynthesis in vitro. I. Enhancement of IgE and IgG synthesis in the presence of pokeweed mitogen by T-cell irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, K.; Manzara, T.; Harbeck, R.J.; Kirkpatrick, C.H.

    1982-02-01

    A study of the events regulating human IgE biosynthesis in vitro was undertaken with tonsillar lymphocytes. IgG synthesis was also studied to evaluate the specificity of our observations. T-cell irradiation significantly enhanced synthesis of IgE by pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-stimulated B cells from 12 of 18 donors and IgG in all 18 donors. This enhancement was the result of de novo immunoglobulin synthesis, since the amount of IgE and IgG spontaneously released from lysed and lysed-and-cultured mononuclear cells was significantly less than that detected in the cell cultures, and the augmentation was completely ablated by the treatment of the cells with cycloheximide or mitomycin C. Enhancement was also dependent on the presence of PWM; T-cell irradiation did not enhance IgE synthesis in unstimulated cultures. Moreover, this enhancement was also observed in the co-cultures of B cells and allogeneic irradiated T cells. These observations suggest that radiosensitive T cells exert a suppressive activity that contributes to regulation of human IgE and IgG synthesis and that the suppressor function as well as the helper function can overcome allogeneic disparities.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  20. Chapter 31: Common in vitro tests for allergy and immunology.

    PubMed

    Makhija, Melanie; O'Gorman, Maurice R G

    2012-01-01

    Allergen-specific IgE antibody is the most commonly ordered in vitro test in the practice of allergy and is used to diagnose type I hypersensitivity reactions to foods or reactivity to aeroallergens in patients with relative contraindications to skin-prick testing such as dermatographism. The Phadebas radioallergosorbent test (RAST; Pharmacia, Uppsala, Sweden) was the first assay reported for the detection of the allergen-specific IgE antibody. In a RAST, antigen (allergen) is bound to a solid phase, such as a paper disk, and then incubated with human serum. A buffer wash removes unbound serum proteins, and radiolabeled anti-human IgE is added to detect bound IgE, if present. The results are reported in arbitrary units of IgE per milliliter of serum. The term RAST was originally a brand name but it is now often used colloquially (and incorrectly) to describe any in vitro assay for allergen-specific IgE. Total serum IgE can be measured and is helpful in determining atopic presentations such as in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis or in patients with persistent asthma who are candidates for monoclonal anti-IgE antibody therapy with, omalizumab. In patients with recurrent bacterial infections of the sinopulmonary tract, the basic humoral immune system testing includes measuring quantitative immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, and IgM) and comparing them to age-matched normal ranges. Most clinical laboratories use nephelometry to measure immunoglobulin levels quantitatively. Nephelometry detects either the rate or the end point of soluble immune complex formation (the IgG in sera complexes with an anti-IgG antibody forming a classic immunoprecipitation reaction) by monitoring the scatter of transmitted light. The most common method for the screening of cellular immunodeficiency involved the measurement of the absolute and relative representation of the major lymphocyte subsets, T-cells, T-helper cells, T-cytotoxic cells, B-cells and NK-cells.

  1. Population differences in cutaneous methacholine reactivity and circulating IgE concentrations.

    PubMed

    Buckley, C E; Larrick, J W; Kaplan, J E

    1985-12-01

    We evaluated the incidence of allergic and vasomotor symptoms, serum IgE concentrations, and the cutaneous responses to allergens and/or methacholine in 229 Waorani Indians residing at 300 m altitude near the headwaters of the Amazon River, 39 Tibetans residing at 4000 m in the Himalayas, and 84 healthy subjects residing at 150 m in the piedmont region of North Carolina. The Waorani Indians had a high level of intestinal parasitism, an intermediate level of parasitism occurs in Tibetans, and parasitism is rare in the control population. One Waorani Indian (less than 1%), six Tibetans (15%), and 59 North Carolina subjects (88%) had a past history of allergic or vasomotor symptoms. The prevalence of positive epicutaneous allergen skin tests among the Waorani was 40 in 2910 tests and was significantly less (chi-squared = 184.5; p less than or equal to 0.0001) than the 151 in 1344 incidence in the North Carolina subjects. Large highly significant differences (p less than or equal to 0.0001) were detected between the geometric mean IgE concentrations (international unit per milliliter) and methacholine-induced cutaneous flare responsiveness (millimeter) elicited, respectively, in comparisons between the Waorani Indians (9806 IU/ml; less than 1.0 mm), Tibetans (2930 IU/ml; 2.06 mm), and North Carolina subjects (108 IU/ml; 4.49 mm). Differences in methacholine sensitivity were small and not significant. A highly significant inverse relationship (r = -0.50, p less than or equal to 0.0001) was detected between the circulating IgE concentrations and the methacholine-induced cutaneous flare responsiveness in this cross-cultural, cross-environmental comparison of three populations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4067133

  2. High IgE sensitization to maize and rice pollen in the highlands of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Ramavovololona; Sénéchal, Hélène; Andrianarisoa, Ange; Rakotoarimanana, Vololona; Godfrin, Dominique; Peltre, Gabriel; Poncet, Pascal; Sutra, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Maize and rice are two crops constituting the main food supply in many under-developed and developing countries. Despite the large area devoted to the culture, the sensitization to the pollen from these plants is reported to be low and often considered as an occupational allergy. Methods Sixty five Malagasy pollen allergic patients were clinically and immunochemically investigated with regard to maize and rice pollen allergens. Pollen extracts were electrophoretically separated in 1 and 2 dimensions and IgE and IgG reactivities detected upon immunoblotting. Results When exploring the sensitization profile of Malagasy allergic patients to maize and rice pollen, it appears that a high proportion of these patients consulting during grass pollinating season were sensitized to both pollen as revealed by skin prick testing (62 vs. 59%) and IgE immunoblotting (85 vs. 40%). Several clinically relevant allergens were recognized by patients’ serum IgE in maize and rice pollen extracts. Conclusion The high levels of maize and rice pollen sensitization should be related, in this tropical region, to a specific environmental exposure including i) a proximity of the population to the allergenic sources and ii) a putative exacerbating effect of a highly polluted urban atmosphere on pollen allergenicity. Cross-reactivities between wild and cultivated grasses and also between rice and maize pollen are involved as well as some specific maize sensitizations. The presence of dense urban and peri-urban agriculture, in various African regions and worldwide, could be a high environmental risk factor for people sensitive to maize pollen. PMID:25870739

  3. PKU-related dysgammaglobulinaemia: the effect of diet therapy on IgE and allergic sensitization.

    PubMed

    Riva, E; Fiocchi, A; Agostoni, C; Biasucci, G; Sala, M; Banderali, G; Luotti, D; Giovannini, M

    1994-01-01

    The effect of diet on the development of immunoallergic signs and symptoms in children with phenylketonuria (PKU) was evaluated. Immunological indices of 58 children with PKU treated with diets were compared to the immunological indices of 58 healthy (non-PKU) children. In the PKU group, 39 children had been placed on diet therapy within the first month of life; 19 children had been placed on diet therapy after 6 months of age. Total circulating lymphocytes; CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ circulating lymphocytes; and serum IgA, IgM, IgG and total IgE levels were measured for each child. Skin prick tests were performed for common inhalant and food allergens. Every 3 months over the 2-year period of this study, the signs and symptoms of eczema, allergic rhinitis and asthma were recorded. The PKU group had lower IgG levels (p = 0.004) and higher total IgE levels (p = 0.0001) than the control group. Significantly lower IgE levels were found in children started on diet therapy within the first month of life compared with those started on diet therapy after 6 months of age (p = 0.0001). Allergic sensitization was significantly more frequent in the PKU group (24/58 vs 13/58, z = 2.00, p < 0.05), but no significant difference in the incidence of eczema and allergic rhinitis was found. Asthma was less frequent in the PKU group than in the control group (5/58 vs 14/58, z = 2.09, p < 0.05). Thus, diet appeared to prevent the development of immunoallergic signs and symptoms.

  4. IgE expression on the surface of B1 and B2 lymphocytes in experimental murine schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, F L; Aguiar, A M; Borojevic, R; El-Cheikh, M C

    2005-07-01

    In a previous study we monitored the distribution and phenotype expression of B1 cells during the evolution of experimental murine schistosomiasis mansoni and we proposed that the B1 cells were heterogeneous: a fraction which originated in the spleen and followed the migratory pathway to mesenteric ganglia, while the other was the resident peritoneal B1-cell pool. In the present study, we have addressed the question of whether these two B1-lymphocyte populations are involved in the production of the late Ig isotype IgE, which is present in high levels in schistosomal infection. Lymphocyte expression of surface markers and immunoglobulins were monitored by immunofluorescence flow cytometry. Both in the spleen and mesenteric ganglia, the B1 and B2 cells were induced to switch from IgM to IgE in the early Th2-dominated phase of the disease, with an increase of IgE in its later phases. Conversely, peritoneal B1-IgM+ switched to the remaining IgE+ present in high numbers in the peritoneal cavity throughout the disease. We correlated the efficient induction of the expression of late Ig isotypes by B1 cells with high levels of inflammatory cytokines due to the intense host response to the presence of worms and their eggs in the abdominal cavity. In conclusion, B1 cells have a different switch behavior from IgM to IgE indicating that these cell sub-populations depend on the microenvironment.

  5. Influence of Mansonella perstans microfilaraemia on total IgE levels in Gabonese patients co-infected with Loa loa.

    PubMed

    Bouyou-Akotet, M K; Moussavou Boussougou, M N; Ovono-Abessolo, F; Owono-Medang, M; Kombila, M

    2014-03-01

    Mansonella (M.) perstans filariasis is widely found in Africa, including Gabon where Loa loa is also endemic. This study reports the total IgE titres according to different bioclinical forms of single or co-infection with L. loa and M. perstans in 138 patients and 20 healthy controls. The median parasite density was significantly higher in cases of loiasis. IgE titres were higher in patients with microscopic dual-infection and in the group of patients with occult loiasis plus M. perstans microfilaraemia (8425 [5292-20,679]KUI/L and 6304 [1045-10,326]KUI/L, respectively), compared to individuals with either microfilaraemic Loa loa (3368 [1414-7074]KUI/L) or Mansonella (4370 [1478-7334]KUI/L) single infections (p<0.01). IgE levels were positively correlated with M. perstans microfilaraemia (rho=0.27; p<0.01). Compared to single infections, dual M. perstans-L. loa infection induces very high total IgE titres. Studies correlating IgE titres and clinical symptoms are needed to confirm the involvement of this immunoglobulin in the pathological processes during filariasis. PMID:24280145

  6. Polyclonal hyper-IgE mouse model reveals mechanistic insights into antibody class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Misaghi, Shahram; Senger, Kate; Sai, Tao; Qu, Yan; Sun, Yonglian; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Nguyen, Allen; Jin, Zhaoyu; Zhou, Meijuan; Yan, Donghong; Lin, Wei Yu; Lin, Zhonghua; Lorenzo, Maria N.; Sebrell, Andrew; Ding, Jiabing; Xu, Min; Caplazi, Patrick; Austin, Cary D.; Balazs, Mercedesz; Roose-Girma, Merone; DeForge, Laura; Warming, Søren; Lee, Wyne P.; Dixit, Vishva M.; Zarrin, Ali A.

    2013-01-01

    Preceding antibody constant regions are switch (S) regions varying in length and repeat density that are targets of activation-induced cytidine deaminase. We asked how participating S regions influence each other to orchestrate rearrangements at the IgH locus by engineering mice in which the weakest S region, Sε, is replaced with prominent recombination hotspot Sμ. These mice produce copious polyclonal IgE upon challenge, providing a platform to study IgE biology and therapeutic interventions. The insertion enhances ε germ-line transcript levels, shows a preference for direct vs. sequential switching, and reduces intraswitch recombination events at native Sμ. These results suggest that the sufficiency of Sμ to mediate IgH rearrangements may be influenced by context-dependent cues. PMID:24019479

  7. Polyclonal hyper-IgE mouse model reveals mechanistic insights into antibody class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Misaghi, Shahram; Senger, Kate; Sai, Tao; Qu, Yan; Sun, Yonglian; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Nguyen, Allen; Jin, Zhaoyu; Zhou, Meijuan; Yan, Donghong; Lin, Wei Yu; Lin, Zhonghua; Lorenzo, Maria N; Sebrell, Andrew; Ding, Jiabing; Xu, Min; Caplazi, Patrick; Austin, Cary D; Balazs, Mercedesz; Roose-Girma, Merone; DeForge, Laura; Warming, Søren; Lee, Wyne P; Dixit, Vishva M; Zarrin, Ali A

    2013-09-24

    Preceding antibody constant regions are switch (S) regions varying in length and repeat density that are targets of activation-induced cytidine deaminase. We asked how participating S regions influence each other to orchestrate rearrangements at the IgH locus by engineering mice in which the weakest S region, Sε, is replaced with prominent recombination hotspot Sμ. These mice produce copious polyclonal IgE upon challenge, providing a platform to study IgE biology and therapeutic interventions. The insertion enhances ε germ-line transcript levels, shows a preference for direct vs. sequential switching, and reduces intraswitch recombination events at native Sμ. These results suggest that the sufficiency of Sμ to mediate IgH rearrangements may be influenced by context-dependent cues. PMID:24019479

  8. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    PubMed

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA.

  9. IL-1, IL-4 production and IgE levels in acute and chronic fasciolosis before and after triclabendazole treatment.

    PubMed

    Allam, A F; Osman, M M; el-Sayed, M H; Demian, S R

    2000-12-01

    IL-1 generation by mononuclear phagocytes, IL-4 production by Th2 lymphocytes and IgE levels in serum were measured in eight patients with acute fasciolosis and seven patients in the chronic stage of the disease before and after triclabendazole treatment. Results were compared with those of a control group of ten individuals. The monocytes and lymphocytes from patients with acute and chronic fasciolosis produced significantly lower levels of IL-1 and IL-4 respectively, particularly in the chronic phase of the disease, as compared to the control. A significant increase in IgE level in both acute and chronic fasciolosis was observed. The level was significantly higher in acute as compared to chronic cases. After treatment with triclabendazole IL-1, IL-4 and IgE levels moved towards the control indicating obvious improvement in the immunological responses of the patients.

  10. IL-1, IL-4 production and IgE levels in acute and chronic fasciolosis before and after triclabendazole treatment.

    PubMed

    Allam, A F; Osman, M M; el-Sayed, M H; Demian, S R

    2000-12-01

    IL-1 generation by mononuclear phagocytes, IL-4 production by Th2 lymphocytes and IgE levels in serum were measured in eight patients with acute fasciolosis and seven patients in the chronic stage of the disease before and after triclabendazole treatment. Results were compared with those of a control group of ten individuals. The monocytes and lymphocytes from patients with acute and chronic fasciolosis produced significantly lower levels of IL-1 and IL-4 respectively, particularly in the chronic phase of the disease, as compared to the control. A significant increase in IgE level in both acute and chronic fasciolosis was observed. The level was significantly higher in acute as compared to chronic cases. After treatment with triclabendazole IL-1, IL-4 and IgE levels moved towards the control indicating obvious improvement in the immunological responses of the patients. PMID:11198376

  11. Effect of in vitro irradiation and cell cycle-inhibitory drugs on the spontaneous human IgE synthesis in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Del Prete, G.F.; Vercelli, D.; Tiri, A.; Maggi, E.; Rossi, O.; Romagnani, S.; Ricci, M.

    1987-01-01

    The in vitro effects of radiation, diterpine forskolin (FK), and hydrocortisone (HC) on the in vitro spontaneous IgE synthesis by peripheral blood B-lymphocytes from atopic patients were investigated. Without affecting cell viability, in vitro irradiation inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion de novo IgE synthesis in vitro by B cells from all patients examined with a mean 40% reduction of in vitro IgE product after treatment with 100 rads. In contrast, the in vitro IgE production by the U266 myeloma cell line was unaffected, even by irradiation with 1600 rads. The addition to B cell cultures from atopic patients of FK consistently resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of the spontaneous IgE production in vitro. The addition to cultures of 10(-5) and 10(-6) molar concentrations of HC was also usually inhibitory, whereas lower HC concentrations were uneffective or even enhanced the spontaneous in vitro IgE synthesis. When 10(-6) molar concentrations of both HC and FK were combined in culture, a summation inhibitory effect on the spontaneous IgE synthesis was observed. In contrast, neither FK nor HC had inhibitory effect on the in vitro spontaneous IgE synthesis by the U266 myeloma cell line. The spontaneous in vitro IgE synthesis by B cells from patients with Hodgkin's disease, demonstrating high levels of serum IgE, was strongly reduced or virtually abolished after patients underwent total nodal irradiation to prevent the spread of the disease. In addition, the in vitro spontaneous IgE synthesis by B cells from atopic patients was markedly decreased or abolished by in vivo administration of betamethasone.

  12. Netherton's syndrome: a syndrome of elevated IgE and characteristic skin and hair findings.

    PubMed

    Smith, D L; Smith, J G; Wong, S W; deShazo, R D

    1995-01-01

    Netherton's syndrome is a rare symptom complex characterized by greatly elevated IgE levels with atopic manifestations, an ichthyotic skin disorder (ichthyosis linearis circumflexa and/or congenital lamellar ichthyosis), and the characteristic hair abnormality trichorrhexis invaginata. It may be confused with atopic dermatitis but does not respond to topical corticosteroid treatment. Netherton's syndrome is therefore of considerable importance to allergists. In this article we report the results of the clinical and immunologic evaluation of a previously unreported patient who responded to treatment with 12% ammonium lactate lotion and management of his allergic disease. Furthermore, we have reviewed the English literature and compared the findings in our patient with those of 43 other reported patients. Our patient shared the features of other previously reported patients with this disorder. We conclude that this disease should be included among the other disorders with elevated IgE. Patients may benefit from evaluation and treatment of their allergic symptoms and topical skin treatment with ammonium lactate.

  13. The Low Affinity IgE Receptor (CD23) Is Cleaved by the Metalloproteinase ADAM10*

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, George A.; Blumenkron, Fernando; Yeung, Nolan; Zhou, Pei; Williams, Jason; Grammer, Amrie C.; Petrovich, Robert; Lipsky, Peter E.; Moss, Marcia L.; Werb, Zena

    2008-01-01

    The low affinity IgE receptor, Fc∊RII (CD23), is both a positive and negative regulator of IgE synthesis. The proteinase activity that converts the membrane-bound form of CD23 into a soluble species (sCD23) is an important regulator of the function of CD23 and may be an important therapeutic target for the control of allergy and inflammation. We have characterized the catalytic activity of ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) 10 toward human CD23. We found that ADAM10 efficiently catalyzes the cleavage of peptides derived from two distinct cleavage sites in the CD23 backbone. Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases and a specific prodomain-based inhibitor of ADAM10 perturb the release of endogenously produced CD23 from human leukemia cell lines as well as primary cultures of human B-cells. Expression of a mutant metalloproteinase-deficient construct of ADAM10 partially inhibited the production of sCD23. Similarly, small inhibitory RNA knockdown of ADAM10 partially inhibited CD23 release and resulted in the accumulation of the membrane-bound form of CD23 on the cells. ADAM10 contributes to CD23 shedding and thus could be considered a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of allergic disease. PMID:17389606

  14. The low affinity IgE receptor (CD23) is cleaved by the metalloproteinase ADAM10.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, George A; Blumenkron, Fernando; Yeung, Nolan; Zhou, Pei; Williams, Jason; Grammer, Amrie C; Petrovich, Robert; Lipsky, Peter E; Moss, Marcia L; Werb, Zena

    2007-05-18

    The low affinity IgE receptor, FcepsilonRII (CD23), is both a positive and negative regulator of IgE synthesis. The proteinase activity that converts the membrane-bound form of CD23 into a soluble species (sCD23) is an important regulator of the function of CD23 and may be an important therapeutic target for the control of allergy and inflammation. We have characterized the catalytic activity of ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) 10 toward human CD23. We found that ADAM10 efficiently catalyzes the cleavage of peptides derived from two distinct cleavage sites in the CD23 backbone. Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases and a specific prodomain-based inhibitor of ADAM10 perturb the release of endogenously produced CD23 from human leukemia cell lines as well as primary cultures of human B-cells. Expression of a mutant metalloproteinase-deficient construct of ADAM10 partially inhibited the production of sCD23. Similarly, small inhibitory RNA knockdown of ADAM10 partially inhibited CD23 release and resulted in the accumulation of the membrane-bound form of CD23 on the cells. ADAM10 contributes to CD23 shedding and thus could be considered a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of allergic disease.

  15. Comparative proteomic analysis and IgE binding properties of peanut seed and testa (skin).

    PubMed

    White, Brittany L; Gökce, Emine; Nepomuceno, Angelito I; Muddiman, David C; Sanders, Timothy H; Davis, Jack P

    2013-04-24

    To investigate the protein composition and potential allergenicity of peanut testae or skins, proteome analysis was conducted using nanoLC-MS/MS sequencing. Initial amino acid analysis suggested differences in protein compositions between the blanched seed (skins removed) and skin. Phenolic compounds hindered analysis of proteins in skins when the conventional extraction method was used; therefore, phenol extraction of proteins was necessary. A total of 123 proteins were identified in blanched seed and skins, and 83 of the proteins were common between the two structures. The skins contained all of the known peanut allergens in addition to 38 proteins not identified in the seed. Multiple defense proteins with antifungal activity were identified in the skins. Western blotting using sera from peanut-allergic patients revealed that proteins extracted from both the blanched seed and skin bound significant levels of IgE. However, when phenolic compounds were present in the skin protein extract, no IgE binding was observed. These findings indicate that peanut skins contain potentially allergenic proteins; however, the presence of phenolic compounds may attenuate this effect. PMID:23534881

  16. Total IgE detection in paired cerebrospinal fluid and serum samples from patients with neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Bueno, E C; Vaz, A J; Machado, L d; Livramento, J A

    2000-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NC), the presence of Taenia solium metacestodes in tissues, is the most frequent and severe parasitic infection of the central nervous system. We investigated the presence of total IgE by an automated chemiluminescence assay in 53 paired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum samples from patients with NC (P) and in 40 CSF samples from individuals with other neurological disorders as the control group (C). Total IgE concentration ranged from 1.2 to 6.6 IU/ml (mean = 1.4 IU/ml, standard deviation-sd = 1.1 IU/ml) in 28.3% of CSF samples from the P group, a value significantly higher than for the C group ( pound1.0 IU/ml). The serum samples from the P group showed concentrations ranging from 1. 0 to 2330.0 IU/ml (mean = 224.1 IU/ml, sd = 452.1 IU/ml), which were higher than the normal value cited by the manufacturer (<100.0 IU/ml) in 32.1% of the samples. A significant difference was observed in CSF samples from the P and C groups (p = 0.005) and in serum samples from the P group compared to the normal value (p = 0. 005), with sera showing more frequent abnormal results.

  17. The correlation between anti phospholipase A2 specific IgE and clinical symptoms after a bee sting in beekeepers

    PubMed Central

    Matysiak, Joanna; Bręborowicz, Anna; Dereziński, Paweł; Kokot, Zenon J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Beekeepers are a group of people with high exposure to honeybee stings and with a very high risk of allergy to bee venom. Therefore, they are a proper population to study the correlations between clinical symptoms and results of diagnostic tests. Aim The primary aim of our study was to assess the correlations between total IgE, venom- and phospholipase A2-specific IgE and clinical symptoms after a bee sting in beekeepers. The secondary aim was to compare the results of diagnostic tests in beekeepers and in individuals with standard exposure to bees. Material and methods Fifty-four individuals were divided into two groups: beekeepers and control group. The levels of total IgE (tIgE), venom-specific IgE (venom sIgE), and phospholipase A2-specific IgE (phospholipase A2 sIgE) were analyzed. Results Our study showed no statistically significant correlation between the clinical symptoms after a sting and tIgE in the entire analyzed group. There was also no correlation between venom sIgE level and clinical symptoms either in beekeepers or in the group with standard exposure to bees. We observed a statistically significant correlation between phospholipase A2 sIgE level and clinical signs after a sting in the group of beekeepers, whereas no such correlation was detected in the control group. Significantly higher venom-specific IgE levels in the beekeepers, as compared to control individuals were shown. Conclusions In beekeepers, the severity of clinical symptoms after a bee sting correlated better with phospholipase A2 sIgE than with venom sIgE levels. PMID:27512356

  18. Selection of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Harel Inbar, Noa; Benhar, Itai

    2012-10-15

    More than 2 dozen years had passed since the field of antibody engineering was established, with the first reports of bacterial [1-3] and mammalian cells [4] expression of recombinant antibody fragments, and in that time a lot of effort was dedicated to the development of efficient technological means, intended to assist in the creation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Research focus was given to two intertwined technological aspects: the selection platform and the recombinant antibody repertoires. In accordance with these areas of interest, it is the goal of this chapter to describe the various selection tools and antibody libraries existing, with emphasis on the later, and their applications. This chapter gives a far from exhaustive, subjective "historic account" of the field, describing the selection platforms, the different formats of antibody repertoires and the applications of both for selecting recombinant antibodies. Several excellent books provide detailed protocols for constructing antibody libraries and selecting antibodies from those libraries [5-13]. Such books may guide a newcomer to the field in the fine details of antibody engineering. We would like to offer advice to the novice: although seemingly simple, effective library construction and antibody isolation provide best benefits in the hands of professionals. It is an art as much as it is science.

  19. Salivary, nasal, genital, and systemic antibody responses in monkeys immunized intranasally with a bacterial protein antigen and the Cholera toxin B subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, M W; Moldoveanu, Z; White, P L; Sibert, G J; Mestecky, J; Michalek S, M

    1996-01-01

    Previous attempts to induce mucosal antibodies in rhesus monkeys by enteric immunization have resulted in only modest and short-lived responses, dominated by immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in the plasma. In this study, two groups of rhesus monkeys were immunized intranasally three times at 2-week intervals with a bacterial protein antigen (AgI/II) either chemically coupled to or mixed with the B subunit of cholera toxin (CT), a known potent mucosal immunogen and carrier for other immunogens. Cells secreting antibodies, predominantly of the IgA isotype, to AgI/II and to CT were detected in the peripheral blood 1 week after each immunization, indicating the dissemination of IgA-secreting precursor cells through the mucosal immune system. IgG and, to a lesser extent, IgA antibodies to both proteins were induced in the plasma commencing after the second immunization. Plasma IgE concentrations and IgE antibody levels were not consistently raised during the immunization period. IgA antibodies were found in nasal and vaginal washes. Nasal IgG but not IgA antibodies showed a significant positive correlation with plasma IgG antibody levels, suggesting that they were largely derived by transudation from the circulation. Analysis of the molecular form of vaginal IgA indicated that both secretory and monomeric forms of IgA were present in various proportions. Furthermore, neither IgG nor IgA antibodies in vaginal washes were correlated with plasma antibody responses, suggesting the contribution of locally synthesized antibodies of both isotypes. Comparison of the responses between the two groups of animals showed only sporadic significant differences, indicating that intranasal immunization with AgI/II either coupled to or mixed with the B subunit of CT was equally effective at inducing generalized IgA antibody responses in the mucosal immune system and predominantly IgG antibodies in the plasma. PMID:8606090

  20. The strength of the antibody response to the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides inversely correlates with levels of B-Cell Activating Factor (BAFF)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background B-Cell Activating Factor (BAFF) is a cytokine regulating antibody production. Polymorphisms in the gene encoding BAFF were associated with the antibody response to Ascaris but not to mite allergens. In the present study we evaluated the relationship between BAFF and specific antibodies against Ascaris and mites in 448 controls and 448 asthmatics. Soluble BAFF was measured by ELISA and BAFF mRNA by qPCR. Surface expression of BAFF and its receptor (BAFF-R) was analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Individuals with specific IgE levels to Ascaris >75th percentile had lower levels of soluble BAFF; those with specific IgG levels to Ascaris >75th percentile had reduced BAFF mRNA. Total IgE and specific IgE to mites were not related to BAFF levels. There were no differences in soluble BAFF or mRNA levels between asthmatics and controls. There was an inverse relationship between the cell-surface expression of BAFF-R on CD19+ B cells and BAFF levels at the transcriptional and protein level. Conclusions These findings suggest that differences in BAFF levels are related to the strength of the antibody response to Ascaris. PMID:24906685

  1. Influence of the route of sensitization on local and systemic immune responses in a murine model of type I allergy.

    PubMed

    Repa, A; Wild, C; Hufnagl, K; Winkler, B; Bohle, B; Pollak, A; Wiedermann, U

    2004-07-01

    The pathophysiological and immunological characteristics of allergic immune responses are controlled by a variety of factors. We have studied the extent to which the route of sensitization influences allergen-specific IgE synthesis and local airway inflammation using a mouse model of allergic sensitization to the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1. Sensitization of BALB/c mice with recombinant (r)Bet v 1 was performed using intraperitoneal (i.p.), subcutaneous (s.c.) or aerosol (a.s.) sensitization protocols. Mice were analysed for allergen-specific serum antibodies by ELISA and IgE-dependent basophil degranulation. Proliferative responses and cytokine production of splenocytes were measured upon Bet v 1 stimulation in vitro. Bronchoalveolar lavages were performed after airway challenge with aerosolized birch pollen extract for assessment of eosinophilic airway inflammation and local cytokine production in vivo. Highest allergen specific IgE levels and IgE-dependent basophil degranulation were achieved using the SC route. High IL-5 production by spleen and lung cells was associated with pronounced eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavages. After i.p. sensitization, despite giving the highest IgG levels, only low IgE levels, basophil degranulation and IL-5 production were seen. On the other hand, a.s. sensitization, resulting in the lowest systemic IgE and IL-5 levels, led to a comparably strong airway inflammation as the s.c. route. Our finding that the route of sensitization can result in a dissociation of local and systemic immune responses may contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of allergic diseases and help to develop new treatment strategies.

  2. Antigen Transfer from Exosomes to Dendritic Cells as an Explanation for the Immune Enhancement Seen by IgE Immune Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Henningsson, Frida; Heyman, Birgitta; Conrad, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    IgE antigen complexes induce increased specific T cell proliferation and increased specific IgG production. Immediately after immunization, CD23+ B cells capture IgE antigen complexes, transport them to the spleen where, via unknown mechanisms, dendritic cells capture the antigen and present it to T cells. CD23, the low affinity IgE receptor, binds IgE antigen complexes and internalizes them. In this study, we show that these complexes are processed onto B-cell derived exosomes (bexosomes) in a CD23 dependent manner. The bexosomes carry CD23, IgE and MHC II and stimulate antigen specific T-cell proliferation in vitro. When IgE antigen complex stimulated bexosomes are incubated with dendritic cells, dendritic cells induce specific T-cell proliferation in vivo, similar to IgE antigen complexes. This suggests that bexosomes can provide the essential transfer mechanism for IgE antigen complexes from B cells to dendritic cells. PMID:25330118

  3. Different antibody- and cytokine-mediated responses to Plasmodium falciparum parasite in two sympatric ethnic tribes living in Mali.

    PubMed

    Farouk, Salah E; Dolo, Amagana; Bereczky, Sàndor; Kouriba, Bourema; Maiga, Boubacar; Färnert, Anna; Perlmann, Hedvig; Hayano, Masashi; Montgomery, Scott M; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Troye-Blomberg, Marita

    2005-01-01

    The Fulani are known to be less susceptible to Plasmodium falciparum malaria infections and to have lower parasitaemia despite living under similar malaria transmission intensity compared with other ethnic tribes. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the Fulani were more polarised towards Th2 as reflected by higher numbers of malaria-specific IL-4- and IL-10-producing cells and lower numbers of IFN-gamma- and IL-12-producing cells as compared to their neighbour ethnic tribe, the Dogon of Mali. Total IgE and both anti-malaria IgE and IgG antibodies were measured by ELISA and the numbers of IL-4-, IFN-gamma-, IL-10- and IL-12-producing cells were enumerated using enzyme-linked ImmunoSpot assay (ELISPOT). Numbers of parasite clones were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The study was performed outside the transmission period and all individuals included were asymptomatic. The results revealed that the Fulani were less parasitised, had fewer circulating parasite clones in their blood, had significantly higher anti-malaria IgG and IgE antibodies and higher proportions of malaria-specific IL-4- and IFN-gamma-producing cells compared to the Dogon. The higher antigen-specific production of IL-4 among the Fulani was statistically significant both before and after adjustment for level of spontaneous cytokine production, while greater IFN-gamma production only attained statistical significance after adjustment for spontaneous levels. Taken together, the association of higher anti-malarial IgE and IgG antibodies and increased numbers of specific IL-4- and IFN-gamma-producing cells compared to the ethnic sympatric tribe, the Dogon, may assist in explaining the lower susceptibility to malaria observed in the Fulani.

  4. IgE, allergies and helminth parasites: a new perspective on an old conundrum.

    PubMed

    Bell, R G

    1996-08-01

    This paper analyses the association between infection with helminth parasites, the elevated production of IgE and the expression of allergies. Interpretations of this interaction have taken place in a scientific environment whose most secure element is the immunochemistry of allergic reactions resulting in a substantial body of literature that has sought a biological role for allergic reactivity in protective immunity directed against helminth parasites. While the association between helminth infections and elevated levels of IgE, mast cells and eosinophils is well established, a functional role for allergic reactions in protection against helminths has eluded experimental proof. Instead of this hypothesis, it is proposed that allergic reactivity is rarely present in helminth-infected individuals because allergic reactions do not function to regulate helminth infections. Data from many sources are used to establish that the 'normal' state of all mammals is to be infected with helminth parasites from shortly after birth until well into adulthood. Only in the last 100 years or so have people living in areas of high development with sophisticated water and sewage systems been able to escape helminth infection. Allergies are as conspicuously present in these human populations as they are absent in populations that are still regularly exposed to helminths. Furthermore, in populations with endemic helminthoses there is little overt expression of allergic pathology that could be connected to the acquisition or elimination of helminth parasites. Based on these observations, it is suggested that endemic helminthoses activate the Th2 system, particularly at mucosal surfaces, to provide a different level of immunological homeostasis than currently occurs in developed societies. Under these conditions, mast cells, eosinophils and IgE rarely participate in reactions that we would recognize as 'allergic', although their participation in the control of helminth infections is

  5. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and skin disease

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, D.A.; Lee, L.A.

    1985-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a recently described mechanism of immunologic lysis in which cellular targets sensitized by specific antibodies are efficiently and selectively lysed by Fc receptor (FcR) bearing nonspecific effectors. Immunoglobulins of various classes (IgG, IgM, IgA, IgE) and various cellular effectors (large granular lymphocytes, monocyte/macrophages, T lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils) can induce ADCC in vitro, and the importance of ADCC in vivo is being tested experimentally in resistance to viral, bacterial, and parasitic infection, in tumor surveillance, in allograft rejection, and in inflammatory diseases. There is much indirect evidence that ADCC may be the mechanism of damage of different cellular targets in skin diseases, but the best direct evidence concerns immunologic keratinocyte damage, especially in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE). The authors have shown that keratinocytes of several species are highly susceptible to lymphocyte and monocyte-mediated ADCC, but not to neutrophil or eosinophil ADCC in vitro using two different cytotoxicity assays. In contrast, complement was a relatively ineffective mediator of lysis of metabolically intact keratinocyte targets. Patients with certain cutaneous lupus syndromes have serum antibodies capable of inducing monocyte and lymphocyte ADCC of targets coated with extractable nuclear antigens. The authors have shown that these antigens apparently move to the cell membrane of keratinocytes in vitro following ultraviolet irradiation. In an animal model, they have shown that antibodies to SSA/Ro bind to human keratinocytes in vivo, especially after ultraviolet irradiation.

  6. Assessment of IgE and IgG4 Binding Capacities of Cow's Milk Proteins Selectively Altered by Proteases.

    PubMed

    Charcosset, Alexandre; Adel-Patient, Karine; Dupont, Christophe; Bernard, Hervé

    2016-05-01

    Specific IgE and IgG4 have been reported to play key roles in the context of IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy (CMA), but the persistence of their epitopes in milk hydrolysates has not been evaluated. Using sera from 32 CMA patients, 6 CMA patients treated by epicutaneous therapy (CM-treated), and 4 CM-tolerant peanut allergic patients, we analyzed the IgE and IgG4 binding capacities related to major milk allergens in processed milk. Different proteases (plasmin, chymosin, α-chymotrypsin, or pepsin) were used progressively and selectively to hydrolyze β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) and casein (CN) in milk. We then showed that proteases differentially affect IgE or IgG4 immunoreactivities of CN and β-LG and also that we could not relate IgE and/or IgG4 levels or specificities to milk hydrolysates to the clinical status of the patients. PMID:27015440

  7. Participative Decision Making in IGE/MUS-E Schools. Technical Report No. 356 (Parts 1 and 2).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerlinger, Constance M.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships of the Instructional Improvement Committee's (IIC) involvement in decision making, the representation of teachers on the IIC, and the effectiveness of the Instruction and Research (I&R) Unit in Individually Guided Education/Multiunit Elementary (IGE/MUS-E) schools. The theoretical base for…

  8. Allergens in the pathogenesis of asthma: potential role of anti-immunoglobulin E therapy.

    PubMed

    Storms, William

    2002-01-01

    Evidence suggests that allergy is a significant triggering factor in asthma in children and adults alike. In immunoglobulin (Ig) E-mediated allergic reactions, sensitization occurs when allergen-specific B cells are stimulated and switched to IgE antibody production by interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 provided by helper T cells type 2 (Th2). The IgE antibodies act by arming cells bearing either the high-affinity (FcepsilonRI) or low-affinity (FcepsilonRII or CD23) receptor. The subsequent interaction of allergen with IgE-FcepsilonRI complexes on mast cells and basophils causes cross-linking of receptors that triggers the release of a variety of inflammatory mediators, cytokines and chemokines. Therefore, the ability to lower circulating free IgE levels is desirable because most individuals are exposed to multiple allergens to which they are sensitive at any given time. Omalizumab (formerly known as rhuMAb-E25) is a recently developed humanized monoclonal anti-IgE antibody directed at the FcepsilonRI binding domain of human IgE. It inhibits binding of IgE to mast cells without provoking mast cell activation. Preliminary clinical data from randomized controlled trials have shown that the addition of omalizumab to standard asthma therapy reduces asthma exacerbations and decreases inhaled corticosteroid and rescue medication use. The compound is also well tolerated. Omalizumab represents a novel therapeutic approach in the management of asthma.

  9. Influence of thermal processing on IgE reactivity to lentil and chickpea proteins.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Carmen; Cabanillas, Beatriz; Pedrosa, Mercedes M; Varela, Alejandro; Guillamón, Eva; Muzquiz, Mercedes; Crespo, Jesús F; Rodriguez, Julia; Burbano, Carmen

    2009-11-01

    In the last years, legume proteins are gaining importance as food ingredients because of their nutraceutical properties. However, legumes are also considered relevant in the development of food allergies through ingestion. Peanuts and soybeans are important food allergens in Western countries, while lentil and chickpea allergy are more relevant in the Mediterranean area. Information about the effects of thermal-processing procedures at various temperatures and conditions is scarce; therefore, the effect of these procedures on legume allergenic properties is not defined so far. The SDS-PAGE and IgE-immunoblotting patterns of chickpeas and lentils were analyzed before and after boiling (up to 60 min) and autoclaving (1.2 and 2.6 atm, up to 30 min). The results indicated that some of these treatments reduce IgE binding to lentil and chickpea, the most important being harsh autoclaving. However, several extremely resistant immunoreactive proteins still remained in these legumes even after this extreme treatment.

  10. Molecular editing of cellular responses by the high-affinity receptor for IgE.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryo; Leach, Sarah; Liu, Wenhua; Ralston, Evelyn; Scheffel, Jörg; Zhang, Weiguo; Lowell, Clifford A; Rivera, Juan

    2014-02-28

    Cellular responses elicited by cell surface receptors differ according to stimulus strength. We investigated how the high-affinity receptor for immunoglobulin E (IgE) modulates the response of mast cells to a high- or low-affinity stimulus. Both high- and low-affinity stimuli elicited similar receptor phosphorylation; however, differences were observed in receptor cluster size, mobility, distribution, and the cells' effector responses. Low-affinity stimulation increased receptor association with the Src family kinase Fgr and shifted signals from the adapter LAT1 to the related adapter LAT2. LAT1-dependent calcium signals required for mast cell degranulation were dampened, but the role of LAT2 in chemokine production was enhanced, altering immune cell recruitment at the site of inflammation. These findings uncover how receptor discrimination of stimulus strength can be interpreted as distinct in vivo outcomes.

  11. Association of house dust mite-specific IgE with asthma control, medications and household pets

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, John Donnie A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence is conflicting regarding the effectiveness of creating a low-allergen environment or reducing allergen exposure to control asthma exacerbations. Objective This study determined the association of house dust mite (HDM)-specific IgE levels with asthma symptom control, selected medications, family history of allergic disease, and exposure to second-hand smoke and household pets. Methods Serum samples from 102 doctor-diagnosed allergic asthma patients and 100 non-atopic controls were subjected to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using the HDM species Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp), Dermatophagoides farinae (Df), and Blomia tropicalis (Bt) allergens. Point-biserial correlation coefficient, Pearson R correlation, and logistic regression analyses were used to determine association of HDM-specific IgE levels with the abovementioned variables. Results Of the 102 cases, 38.24%, 47.06%, and 33.33% were sensitized to Bt, Df, and Dp, respectively. Sensitized patients showed greater probability [Bt (OR = 1.21), Df (OR = 1.14), and Dp (OR = 1.35)] to manifest symptoms than those who were not. Obtained p-values [Bt (p = 0.73), Df (p = 0.83), and Dp (p = 0.59)], however, proved that HDM-specific IgE levels had no significant contribution in predicting or explaining occurrence of asthma symptoms. Bt- and Df-specific IgEs showed moderately weak but significant relationship with bambuterol HCl and expectorant, respectively. Patients currently on said medications registered higher HDM-specific IgE levels than those who were not. No significant correlation between IgE levels and family history of allergic disease or with exposure to second-hand smoke was seen. Dp-specific IgE levels of patients exposed to household pets were significantly lower compared to those without exposure. Conclusion This study proves that sensitization to Bt, Df, and Dp allergens is not significantly associated with asthma symptoms and control. Although cases were shown to be sensitized

  12. Genome-wide Association Study and Admixture Mapping Reveal New Loci Associated with Total IgE Levels in Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Pino-Yanes, Maria; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Galanter, Joshua M.; Levin, Albert M.; Campbell, Catarina D.; Eng, Celeste; Huntsman, Scott; Nishimura, Katherine K.; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Mohajeri, Kiana; O'Roak, Brian J.; Hu, Donglei; Mathias, Rasika A.; Nguyen, Elizabeth A.; Roth, Lindsey A.; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Sandoval, Karla; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Lurmann, Fred; Davis, Adam; Farber, Harold J.; Meade, Kelley; Avila, Pedro C.; Serebrisky, Denise; Chapela, Rocio; Ford, Jean G.; Lenoir, Michael A.; Thyne, Shannon M.; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Borrell, Luisa N.; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Sen, Saunak; Kumar, Rajesh; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Martinez, Fernando D.; Raby, Benjamin A.; Weiss, Scott T.; Nicolae, Dan L.; Ober, Carole; Meyers, Deborah A.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Mack, Steven J.; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Eichler, Evan E.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Williams, L. Keoki; Torgerson, Dara G.; Burchard, Esteban G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is a key mediator of allergic inflammation and is frequently elevated in allergic disorders. Objective To identify genetic variants associated with IgE levels in Latinos. Methods We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and admixture mapping of total IgE levels in 3,334 Latinos from the Genes-environments & Admixture in Latino Americans (GALA II) study. Replication was evaluated in 454 Latinos, 1,564 European Americans, and 3,187 African Americans from independent studies. Results We confirmed associations of six genes identified by previous GWAS and identified a novel genome-wide significant association of a polymorphism in ZNF365 with total IgE (rs200076616, p=2.3x10−8). We next identified four admixture mapping peaks (6p21.32-p22.1, 13p22-31, 14q23.2, and 22q13.1) where local African, European, and/or Native American ancestry was significantly associated with IgE levels. The most significant peak was 6p21.32-p22.1, where Native American ancestry was associated with lower levels of IgE (p=4.95x10−8). All but 22q13.1 were replicated in an independent sample of Latinos, and two of the peaks were replicated in African Americans (6p21.32-p22.1 and 14q23.2). Fine mapping of 6p21.32-p22.1 identified six genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms in Latinos, two of which replicated in European Americans. Another SNP was peak-wide significant within 14q23.2 in African Americans (rs1741099, p=3.7x10−6), and replicated in non-African American samples (p=0.011). Conclusion We confirmed genetic associations at six genes, and identified novel associations within ZNF365, HLA-DQA1, and 14q23.2. Our results highlight the importance of studying diverse, multi-ethnic populations to uncover novel loci associated with total IgE levels. PMID:25488688

  13. The role of IgE recognition in allergic reactions to amoxicillin and clavulanic acid.

    PubMed

    Torres, M J; Montañez, M I; Ariza, A; Salas, M; Fernandez, T D; Barbero, N; Mayorga, C; Blanca, M

    2016-02-01

    Betalactam (BL) antibiotics are the drugs most frequently involved in IgE-mediated reactions. The culprit BL varies according to consumption patterns, with amoxicillin (AX) more prevalent in Southern Europe and penicillin V in Scandinavian countries. Nowadays, the combination of AX and clavulanic acid (CLV) is the most highly consumed BL containing medicine worldwide. Both BLs, AX and CLV, can independently be involved in reactions, which poses a diagnostic challenge. In patients with immediate allergic reactions to AX, two patterns of responses have been described, those responding to benzylpenicillin (cross-reactors) and those selective to AX. In addition, selective reactions to CLV account for around 30% of allergic reactions to the combination AX-CLV. These patterns of IgE recognition could be related to differences in the haptenation process, in the immunological response, or in the BL involved in the first sensitization. In this regard, patients with selective responses to CLV are generally younger than those allergic to AX or benzylpenicillin. So far, no evidence of cross-reactivity between CLV and other BLs has been reported. This shows the importance of an accurate diagnosis of CLV allergy, as patients with selective reactions to CLV could take other BLs including AX. Diagnosis can be performed in vivo and in vitro, although no immunoassay currently exists. Research regarding the CLV antigenic determinants and protein conjugates is essential to improve diagnosis. BLs need to covalently bind to a carrier protein to be immunogenic. The antigenic determinant of AX is the amoxicilloyl amide, but CLV leads to unstable structures, many of which are unknown. Moreover, the nature of the BL-protein conjugates plays an important role in IgE recognition. This review aims to summarize current knowledge on the immunochemistry, diagnostic approaches as well as chemical and proteomic studies for both AX and CLV.

  14. Anaphylaxis to IGIV in immunoglobulin-naïve common variable immunodeficiency patient in the absence of IgG anti-IgA antibodies: successful administration of low IgA-containing immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Asal; Caperton, Caroline; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    Although severe reactions to immunoglobulin preparations have been frequently reported, IgE antibodies against IgA are usually not investigated; and occur predominantly in previously sensitized patients. The purpose is to report anaphylaxis to IGIV during initial infusion in a patient with common variable immunodeficiency with absent IgA without prior sensitization and in the absence of detectable IgG anti-IgA antibodies, and positive skin tests for immediate hypersensitivity to four different preparations of IGIV, one subcutaneous immunoglobulin preparation, and to purified IgA. Patient was treated without side effects with IGIV preparation depleted of IgA to which immediate hypersensitivity skin test was negative. This case demonstrates that patients with CVID with no IgA and without prior exposure to immunoglobulin or plasma may develop anaphylaxis following initial infusion of IGIV, which appears to be due to IgE anti-IgA, and independent of IgG anti-IgA antibodies. Since there is no good correlation between anaphylaxis/anaphylactic reactions and IgG anti-IgA antibodies, and IgE anti-IgA antibody test is commercially unavailable, we suggest that the patients with CVID with absence of IgA might be skin tested for immediate hypersensitivity prior to initiation of immunoglobulin administration. However, such recommendation may require studies on a large number of patients with CVID with no detectable IgA.

  15. Mapping of Lol p I allergenic epitopes by using murine monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mourad, W; Bernier, D; Jobin, M; Hébert, J

    1989-11-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against three non-overlapping epitopes of Lol p I allergen were previously produced and subsequently used for purification of the allergen. In the present study, these MAbs were further characterized, and the biological activity of the purified allergen assessed. The three MAbs were of the IgG isotype and carried a kappa light chain. Their affinity constants were in the range of 7.4-15.1 x 10(-9) mol/l. Purified Lol p I kept its biological activity, as shown by its ability to induce histamine release by basophils of Lol p I-sensitive patients. The profiles of histamine release induced by either Lol p I or crude Lolium perenne extracts were comparable. This observation suggests that human IgE bound to basophils are polyspecific which has been confirmed by immunoblot and inhibition assay. Our data indicated also that Lol p I possesses a major allergenic epitope recognized by all human serum IgE tested. This epitope seems to be partially shared by those recognized by the three MAbs. Finally, preincubation of Lol p I with either one of the Mabs did not affect significantly the basophil-histamine release induced by the purified allergen. This suggests that Lol p I possesses allergenic sites other than the one shared by MAbs and IgE Abs.

  16. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  17. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah; O'Kennedy, Richard J

    2016-06-30

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  18. Association between total immunoglobulin E and antibody responses to naturally acquired Ascaris lumbricoides infection and polymorphisms of immune system-related LIG4, TNFSF13B and IRS2 genes.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, N; Mercado, D; Vergara, C; Sánchez, J; Kennedy, M W; Jiménez, S; Fernández, A M; Gutiérrez, M; Puerta, L; Caraballo, L

    2009-08-01

    The 13q33-34 region harbours a susceptibility locus to Ascaris lumbricoides, although the underlying genes are unknown. Immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG confer protective immunity and here we sought to investigate in an endemic population whether LIG4, TNFSF13B and IRS2 genes influence IgE and IgG levels against Ascaris and the ABA-1 allergen as a putative resistance marker. Mite-allergic asthmatic patients were analysed for potential relationships between Ascaris predisposition and allergy. One thousand and sixty-four subjects from Cartagena, Colombia, were included. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped using TaqMan assays. Antibody levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Linear and logistic regressions were used to model effects of genotypes on antibody levels. The GG genotype of LIG4 (rs1805388) was associated with higher IgE levels to Ascaris compared with other genotypes. TNFSF13B (rs10508198) was associated positively with IgG levels against Ascaris extract and IgE levels against ABA-1. In asthmatics, IRS2 (rs2289046) was associated with high total IgE levels. Associations held up after correction by population stratification using a set of 52 ancestry markers, age, sex and disease status. There was no association with asthma or mite sensitization. In a tropical population, LIG4 and TNFSF13B polymorphisms are associated with specific IgE and IgG to Ascaris, supporting previous linkage studies implicating the 13q33 region. Our results suggest that genes protecting against parasite infections can be different to those predisposing to asthma and atopy.

  19. Association between total immunoglobulin E and antibody responses to naturally acquired Ascaris lumbricoides infection and polymorphisms of immune system-related LIG4, TNFSF13B and IRS2 genes

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, N; Mercado, D; Vergara, C; Sánchez, J; Kennedy, M W; Jiménez, S; Fernández, A M; Gutiérrez, M; Puerta, L; Caraballo, L

    2009-01-01

    The 13q33–34 region harbours a susceptibility locus to Ascaris lumbricoides, although the underlying genes are unknown. Immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG confer protective immunity and here we sought to investigate in an endemic population whether LIG4, TNFSF13B and IRS2 genes influence IgE and IgG levels against Ascaris and the ABA-1 allergen as a putative resistance marker. Mite-allergic asthmatic patients were analysed for potential relationships between Ascaris predisposition and allergy. One thousand and sixty-four subjects from Cartagena, Colombia, were included. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped using TaqMan assays. Antibody levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Linear and logistic regressions were used to model effects of genotypes on antibody levels. The GG genotype of LIG4 (rs1805388) was associated with higher IgE levels to Ascaris compared with other genotypes. TNFSF13B (rs10508198) was associated positively with IgG levels against Ascaris extract and IgE levels against ABA-1. In asthmatics, IRS2 (rs2289046) was associated with high total IgE levels. Associations held up after correction by population stratification using a set of 52 ancestry markers, age, sex and disease status. There was no association with asthma or mite sensitization. In a tropical population, LIG4 and TNFSF13B polymorphisms are associated with specific IgE and IgG to Ascaris, supporting previous linkage studies implicating the 13q33 region. Our results suggest that genes protecting against parasite infections can be different to those predisposing to asthma and atopy. PMID:19604268

  20. Biochemical and structural analysis of the IgE binding sites on ara h1, an abundant and highly allergenic peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Shin, D S; Compadre, C M; Maleki, S J; Kopper, R A; Sampson, H; Huang, S K; Burks, A W; Bannon, G A

    1998-05-29

    Allergy to peanut is a significant IgE-mediated health problem because of the high prevalence, potential severity, and chronicity of the reaction. Ara h1, an abundant peanut protein, is recognized by serum IgE from >90% of peanut-sensitive individuals. It has been shown to belong to the vicilin family of seed storage proteins and to contain 23 linear IgE binding epitopes. In this communication, we have determined the critical amino acids within each of the IgE binding epitopes of Ara h1 that are important for immunoglobulin binding. Surprisingly, substitution of a single amino acid within each of the epitopes led to loss of IgE binding. In addition, hydrophobic residues appeared to be most critical for IgE binding. The position of each of the IgE binding epitopes on a homology-based molecular model of Ara h1 showed that they were clustered into two main regions, despite their more even distribution in the primary sequence. Finally, we have shown that Ara h1 forms a stable trimer by the use of a reproducible fluorescence assay. This information will be important in studies designed to reduce the risk of peanut-induced anaphylaxis by lowering the IgE binding capacity of the allergen.

  1. Complementarity between microarray and immunoblot for the comparative evaluation of IgE repertoire of French and Italian cypress pollen allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Shahali, Y; Nicaise, P; Brázdová, A; Charpin, D; Scala, E; Mari, A; Sutra, J P; Chollet-Martin, S; Sénéchal, H; Poncet, P

    2014-01-01

    Cypress pollen represents the primary cause of respiratory allergies in Mediterranean areas. Patients allergic to Cupressus sempervirens pollen (Cups) (CPA) can be discriminated on the basis of the immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding to a basic 14 kDa protein (BP14) or to high-molecular-weight (HMW) glycoproteins only. Specific IgE repertoires of two differentially exposed CPA cohorts, French and Italian, were investigated using an IgE microarray system (some known major allergens from several allergenic sources) and individual IgE immunoblotting (IB) of whole Cups pollen extract separated by SDS-PAGE (all allergens from one allergenic source: cypress pollen). The prevalence of sensitization to BP14 was higher in French (37 %) than in Italian patients (17 %) and major differences were observed in IgE reactivities to lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). Thirty percent of the Italian CPA (4 % in the French group) had specific IgE against the Parietaria pollen LTP, independently of IB subgroups. Regarding peach LTP sensitization, all Pru p 3+ Italian CPA (10 %) were in the HMW+ subgroup, while Pru p 3+ French CPA (20 %) were all included in the BP14+ subgroup. BP14 sensitization is likely a marker of Cups exposure and is, in French CPA, significantly correlated to Pru p 3 sensitization. The IgE immunoblot and microarray are complementary tools that highlight differences in the subtle sensitization profile between groups of patients in comparative studies.

  2. Genome-Wide Association Study for Levels of Total Serum IgE Identifies HLA-C in a Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Yatagai, Yohei; Sakamoto, Tohru; Masuko, Hironori; Kaneko, Yoshiko; Yamada, Hideyasu; Iijima, Hiroaki; Naito, Takashi; Noguchi, Emiko; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Tamari, Mayumi; Imoto, Yoshimasa; Tokunaga, Takahiro; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Konno, Satoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Hizawa, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Most of the previously reported loci for total immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels are related to Th2 cell-dependent pathways. We undertook a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify genetic loci responsible for IgE regulation. A total of 479,940 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for association with total serum IgE levels in 1180 Japanese adults. Fine-mapping with SNP imputation demonstrated 6 candidate regions: the PYHIN1/IFI16, MHC classes I and II, LEMD2, GRAMD1B, and chr13∶60576338 regions. Replication of these candidate loci in each region was assessed in 2 independent Japanese cohorts (n = 1110 and 1364, respectively). SNP rs3130941 in the HLA-C region was consistently associated with total IgE levels in 3 independent populations, and the meta-analysis yielded genome-wide significance (P = 1.07×10−10). Using our GWAS results, we also assessed the reproducibility of previously reported gene associations with total IgE levels. Nine of 32 candidate genes identified by a literature search were associated with total IgE levels after correction for multiple testing. Our findings demonstrate that SNPs in the HLA-C region are strongly associated with total serum IgE levels in the Japanese population and that some of the previously reported genetic associations are replicated across ethnic groups. PMID:24324648

  3. Antibody Blood Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... discovered that people with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of certain antibodies ... rye and barley that are generically known as “gluten.” Antibody Testing: Only A First Step To help ...

  4. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Screen Share this page: Was this page ... Screen Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; Blood Typing ; RBC Antibody Identification ; Type and Screen; Crossmatch All content ...

  5. Human cysticercosis: antigens, antibodies and non-responders.

    PubMed Central

    Flisser, A; Woodhouse, E; Larralde, C

    1980-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis of sera from patients with brain cysticercosis against a crude antigenic extract from Cysticercus cellulosae indicates that nearly 50% of the patients do not make sufficient antibodies to ostensively precipitate. The other 50% of the patients who do make precipitating antibodies show a very heterogeneous response in the number of antigens they recognize as well as in the type of antigen--as classified by their electrophoretic mobilities. The most favoured, called antigen B, is recognized by 84% of positive sera and corresponds to one or a limited number of antigens isoelectric at pH 8.6. Indirect immunofluorescence with monospecific anti-human immunoglobulins, performed upon the immunoelectrophoretic preparations, reveal that all cysticercus antigens induced the synthesis of antibodies in the immunoglobulin classes in the order G greater than M greater than E greater than A greater than D. Finally, antigen H (an anodic component) seems to favour IgE relative to its ability to induce IgG. Thus, although in natural infection a good proportion of cysticercotic patients do not seem to mount an energetic antibody response against the parasite, giving rise to some speculations about immunosuppression, the fact that 50% do synthesize antibodies allows for some optimistic expectations from vaccination of humans--in view of the good results of vaccination in experimental animals mediated by IgG antibodies. A likely prospect for a human vaccine would be antigen B because it is the most frequently detected by humans, although its immunizing and toxic properties remain to be properly studied. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 6 PMID:7389197

  6. Human cysticercosis: antigens, antibodies and non-responders.

    PubMed

    Flisser, A; Woodhouse, E; Larralde, C

    1980-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis of sera from patients with brain cysticercosis against a crude antigenic extract from Cysticercus cellulosae indicates that nearly 50% of the patients do not make sufficient antibodies to ostensively precipitate. The other 50% of the patients who do make precipitating antibodies show a very heterogeneous response in the number of antigens they recognize as well as in the type of antigen--as classified by their electrophoretic mobilities. The most favoured, called antigen B, is recognized by 84% of positive sera and corresponds to one or a limited number of antigens isoelectric at pH 8.6. Indirect immunofluorescence with monospecific anti-human immunoglobulins, performed upon the immunoelectrophoretic preparations, reveal that all cysticercus antigens induced the synthesis of antibodies in the immunoglobulin classes in the order G greater than M greater than E greater than A greater than D. Finally, antigen H (an anodic component) seems to favour IgE relative to its ability to induce IgG. Thus, although in natural infection a good proportion of cysticercotic patients do not seem to mount an energetic antibody response against the parasite, giving rise to some speculations about immunosuppression, the fact that 50% do synthesize antibodies allows for some optimistic expectations from vaccination of humans--in view of the good results of vaccination in experimental animals mediated by IgG antibodies. A likely prospect for a human vaccine would be antigen B because it is the most frequently detected by humans, although its immunizing and toxic properties remain to be properly studied.

  7. Pathogenesis of rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Eifan, A O; Durham, S R

    2016-09-01

    Rhinitis is a heterogeneous condition that has been associated with inflammatory responses as in allergic rhinitis but can also occur in the absence of inflammation such as in so-called idiopathic (previously 'vasomotor') rhinitis. Allergic rhinitis affects approximately one in four of the population of westernized countries and is characterized by typical symptoms of nasal itching, sneezing, watery discharge and congestion. The intention of this review is to illustrate key concepts of the pathogenesis of rhinitis. Imbalance in innate and adaptive immunity together with environmental factors is likely to play major roles. In allergic rhinitis, initial allergen exposure and sensitization involves antigen-presenting cells, T and B lymphocytes and results in the generation of allergen-specific T cells and allergen-specific IgE antibodies. On re-exposure to relevant allergens, cross-linking of IgE on mast cells results in the release of mediators of hypersensitivity such as histamine and immediate nasal symptoms. Within hours, there is an infiltration by inflammatory cells, particularly Th2 T lymphocytes, eosinophils and basophils into nasal mucosal tissue that results in the late-phase allergic response. Evidence for nasal priming and whether or not remodelling may be a feature of allergic rhinitis will be reviewed. The occurrence of so-called local allergic rhinitis in the absence of systemic IgE will be discussed. Non-allergic (non-IgE-mediated) rhinitis will be considered in the context of inflammatory and non-inflammatory disorders. PMID:27434218

  8. Allergy to Parietaria officinalis pollen.

    PubMed

    Cvitanović, S

    1999-03-01

    Parietaria pollen allergens (officinalis, judaica, lusitanica, creatica) are one of the most common causes of pollinosis in the Mediterranean (Spain, France, Italy, and Croatia). Parietaria has very long period of pollination, often reaching peaks of more than 500 grains/m3 of air at the beginning of June, and very strong allergenic properties. There is a significantly positive correlation for the newcomers between the intensity of the skin test reaction and concentration of specific serum IgE with the length of residence in the area, whereas autochthonous patients show a negative correlation between the age and intensity of hypersensitivity. This suggests that the environment encountered at birth may have a decisive role in the development of allergic respiratory diseases. Due to structurally similar pollen antigens in different Parietaria species, they are all equally useful in diagnosis and treatment of allergy, regardless of the pollen species to which the patient is sensitive or the prevalent species in the area. In our hands, specific immunotherapy with subcutaneous injections of partially purified, characterized, and standardized pollen extract of Parietaria allergen proved effective. It was possible to define an optimal maintenance dose of antigen per injection. During (years of) therapy, we observed an initial increase in total serum IgE concentration and increase in allergen-specific serum IgG blocking antibodies, decrease in allergen-specific serum IgE concentration and amount of histamine released from peripheral blood leukocytes challenged in vitro with the allergen, as well as in symptom and additional medication scores.

  9. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  10. Positive dermal hypersensitivity and specific antibodies in workers exposed to bio-engineered enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, R.E.; Henningsen, G.M.; Driscoll, R.; MacKenzie, B.A.; Wilcox, T.; Scinto, J.D.; Bernstein, D.M.; Swanson, M. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN )

    1991-03-15

    Thirty-six employees who produced industrial enzymes from bio-engineered strains of bacteria and fungi were evaluated by skin prick testing and enzyme linked immunosorbent assays for specific IgE and IgG antibodies. The workers complained of asthma- and flu-like' symptoms which generally lessened away from work. The enzymes evaluated were {alpha}-amylase from A. niger (ind-AAN), B. licheniformis (ind-AAL) and B. subtilis (ind-AAS); purified {alpha}-amylase from B. subtilis (AAS) and A. niger (AAN); alkaline protease from B. licheniformis (ind-APL) and purified alkaline protease (APL); amylase glucosidase from A. niger (ind-AGN) and purified amylase glucosidase (AGN). Significantly positive skin tests were found for APL, AGN and ind-AAN. Significantly elevated specific IgE results were observed for AAN, AGN, and ind-AAN; elevated specific IgGs were observed for AAN, ind-AAN, ind-AAS, ind-AAL and ind-AGN. Radioimmunoassays of air filter samples (using sera with high Ab titers) for 4 of the ind-enzymes showed only ind-AAN at extremely high environmental levels. These results indicate that occupational exposure to some ind-enzymes causes immediate onset dermal hypersensitivity reactions. The results are equivocal as to whether these reactions are IgE mediated, as IgE titers were low. Contrary to this, IgG titers were extremely high and suggest that these biomarkers can be used as indicators of both individual exposure and environmental analyses.

  11. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. ... different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  12. 22 Protein-Protein Interactions Determine IgE Reactivity to Polygalacturonase From Cupressus sempervirens Pollen

    PubMed Central

    Shahali, Youcef; Sutra, Jean-Pierre; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie; Haddad, Iman; Vinh, Joëlle; Mari, Adriano; Charpin, Denis; Sénéchal, Hélène; Poncet, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Background In a recent proteomic study, we identified in Italian cypress (Cupressus sempervirens, Cups) pollen grains, 2 proteins at 43 and 60 kDa, homologous to already known Cupressaceae polygalacturonase (PG) proteins. The 60-kDa PG is suspected to be a multi-protein complex including the 43-kDa PG and one or more proteins with lectin-like properties Objective In the present study, cypress pollen PGs were further characterized and the molecular basis of their allergenicity including the presence of specific IgE directed against cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCDs) were investigated. Methods Cups pollen PBS extracts were characterized using 2- and double one-dimensional electrophoresis followed by IgE immunoblotting. The IgE reactivity to carbohydrate- versus peptide-specific determinants was investigated using both bromelain inhibition and Con A-binding assays. Pollen proteins were also prefractionated in their native forms using size exclusion chromatography. The presence of multi-protein complexes were investigated by using 2-D blue native (BN)-PAGE/SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. Results Upon bromelain inhibition assay, we revealed that 70% of tested patients displayed CCD-specific IgE to the 43-kDa PG while its isoenzyme of 60 kDa appeared to be exclusively recognized for its peptide-specific determinants. The specific binding of the Con A lectin to the 43-kDa PG, and not to the 60-kDa isoenzyme, demonstrated the presence of exposed mannose-containing oligosaccharides only on the 43-kDa protein. This fact reflects fundamental differences between specific IgE-binding epitopes involved in the recognition of the 43-kDa and 60-kDa proteins making these 2 cypress pollen PGs immunologically distinguishable. The present results suggest that in the 60-kDa protein complex, the CCDs of the 43-kDa PG are not exposed due to the binding of a lectin-like protein exhibiting peptidic IgE reactive epitopes recognized by 25% of tested patients. Conclusion The current

  13. Comparative binding of soluble fragments (derCD23, sCD23, and exCD23) of recombinant human CD23 to CD21 (SCR 1-2) and native IgE, and their effect on IgE regulation.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Sandra Lyn; Jaeger, Christiane; Ferrara, Claudia; Fingeroth, Joyce; Van De Venter, Maryna; Oosthuizen, Vaughan

    2011-01-01

    IgE, responsible for type I hypersensitivities, is regulated by interactions between its receptor, CD23, and co-receptor CD21. To examine comparative binding of recombinant human CD21 SCR 1-2 and native human IgE to CD23 plus the effect of CD23 on IgE production, we engineered recombinant soluble human CD23 fragments; (1) derCD23, (2) sCD23 and (3) exCD23, formed in vivo by proteolysis. SPR analysis revealed a progressive increment in affinity of soluble fragments for IgE, upon increasing length of CD23 "stalk" domain, exCD23>sCD23>derCD23. Soluble CD23 fragments and their oligomeric state are shown to fine-tune the immune response. Oligomers appear more important in enhancing IgE synthesis and monomers lacking the tail residues fail to bind CD21 yet bind membrane IgE and down-regulate IgE synthesis. Co-ligation of membrane IgE and CD21 through soluble CD23 monomers is disturbed. This study supports anti-allergic therapies involving stabilizing membrane CD23, or preventing shedding of soluble CD23. PMID:21889131

  14. Antibody and blood leukocyte response in Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) tick-infested dogs and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Matias P J; Aoki, Vanessa L; Sanches, Françoise P S; Aquino, Lúcia P T C T; Garcia, Marcos V; Machado, Rosângela Z; Bechara, Gervásio H

    2003-07-10

    The dog is considered to be the natural host of Rhipicephalus sanguineus and is unable to develop appreciable resistance even after repeated feedings. The guinea pig develops strong resistance after one infestation with adult ticks. Antibody (IgG) titres against tick salivary gland antigens (SGAs) and blood leukocyte numbers in dogs and guinea pigs undergoing experimental R. sanguineus tick infestations were measured to detect a possible correlation with susceptibility or resistance of hosts. Since infested dogs develop an immediate hypersensitivity reaction to R. sanguineus antigens, total and anti-R. sanguineus SGA IgE levels were also measured in this host species. IgG and IgE antibody levels were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) along three consecutive infestations of both hosts. Most dogs and guinea pigs displayed low IgG levels against R. sanguineus SGAs, though marked differences in individual response were observed. Although dog's total serum IgE levels increased significantly after infestations, no change in the amount of anti-salivary gland IgE was detected. Total and differential blood cell counts were determined in dogs and guinea pigs during primary and secondary infestation. In dogs, a tertiary infestation and a subsequent higher infestation level were also evaluated. Infested dogs did not display any alteration in blood leukocyte counts throughout the experiment. Guinea pigs, on the other hand, developed a significant basophilia during primary infestation which increased further during secondary infestation. These data reveal similarities and differences in the reactions of resistant and non-resistant hosts to ticks. They contribute for the understanding of such host-parasite relationships and will hopefully aid in the development of immune control of ticks. PMID:12860067

  15. [VGKC-complex antibodies].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    Various antibodies are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). Representative antibodies to VGKCs were first identified by radioimmunoassays using radioisotope-labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were detected only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in patients with Morvan's syndrome and in those with a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1 and CASPR-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now commonly known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most commonly detected in patients with limbic encephalitis with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Furthermore, VGKC-complex antibodies are tightly associated with chronic idiopathic pain. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways has also been implicated. These antibodies may be detected in sera of some patients with neurodegenerative diseases (for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease).

  16. Advances in Antibody Design.

    PubMed

    Tiller, Kathryn E; Tessier, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics requires optimizing several of their key attributes. These include binding affinity and specificity, folding stability, solubility, pharmacokinetics, effector functions, and compatibility with the attachment of additional antibody domains (bispecific antibodies) and cytotoxic drugs (antibody-drug conjugates). Addressing these and other challenges requires the use of systematic design methods that complement powerful immunization and in vitro screening methods. We review advances in designing the binding loops, scaffolds, domain interfaces, constant regions, post-translational and chemical modifications, and bispecific architectures of antibodies and fragments thereof to improve their bioactivity. We also highlight unmet challenges in antibody design that must be overcome to generate potent antibody therapeutics. PMID:26274600

  17. Regulation of levels of serum antibodies to ryegrass pollen allergen Lol pIV by an internal image anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhou, E M; Kisil, F T

    1995-03-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody (anti-Id), designated B1/1, was produced against an idiotope of a murine antibody (mAb91), which recognizes the epitope, site A, of allergen Lol pIV, one of the major groups of allergens in ryegrass (Lolium perenne) pollen. The ability of B1/1 to modulate the antibody responses to Lol pIV was investigated in murine model systems. In the first system, B1/1-keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) conjugate was administered to treat three different strains of mice (C57BL/6, BALB/c and C3H). In the second and third model systems, a solution of B1/1 in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was used to treat syngeneic BALB/c mice at various doses and time intervals, respectively. The treatment with either form of B1/1, administered at doses ranging from 100 ng to 100 micrograms mouse, resulted in a reduction of the levels of the antibodies to Lol pIV. In particular, the level of IgE antibodies to Lol pIV was greatly reduced. The administration of a single intravenous (i.v.) injection of a solution of B1/1 8 weeks prior to the challenge with Lol pIV was still effective in reducing the level of antibodies to the allergen. Moreover, the level of antibodies to Lol pIV that expressed the idiotope mAb91 was also markedly decreased. By contrast, it was observed that the level of antibodies to Lol pIV in mice pretreated with B1/1 in PBS at a dose of 10 ng/mouse increased (albeit slightly) compared to that in mice treated with control mAb. These experimental models lend themselves for investigating the mechanism(s) by which an anti-Id modulates antibody responses to a grass pollen allergen.

  18. Nephritogenic-antinephritogenic antibody network in lupus glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Doria, A; Gatto, M

    2012-12-01

    Lupus glomerulonephritis (LGN) is one of the most threatening manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and a major predictor of poor prognosis. The mechanisms leading to kidney inflammation are not completely clear; however, autoantibodies seem to play a pivotal role. Apoptosis dysregulation in SLE is likely to trigger generation of autoantibodies, the released nucleosomes being the driving autoantigen for further epitope amplification and selection of DNA or nucleosome-specific B cells. Growing evidence supports a multistep path to LGN involving initial autoantibody binding to chromatin fragments in the mesangial matrix, where they can induce mesangial inflammation leading to a shut-down of the renal DNase gene, generation and deposition of secondary necrotic chromatin on the glomerular basement membrane favouring antibody binding, complement activation and development of membrano-proliferative glomerular lesions. Anti-DNA IgG antibodies display the major pathogenetic potential in LGN initiation; however, other isotypes (IgA or IgE) as well as autoantibodies targeting other molecules (e.g. anti-C1q, anti-C reactive protein) can perpetuate renal injury. Conversely, protective autoantibodies are also likely in SLE which can contain renal damage targeting either DNA (i.e. IgM anti-DNA) or other molecules (e.g. pentraxin 3). Thus, lupus nephritogenic-antinephritogenic antibodies orchestrate the balance between harm and defence of renal tissue.

  19. Enhanced in vivo IgE production and T cell polarization toward the type 2 phenotype in association with indoor exposure to VOC: results of the LARS study.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, I; Rehwagen, M; Diez, U; Seiffart, A; Rolle-Kampczyk, U; Richter, M; Wetzig, H; Borte, M; Herbarth, O

    2001-12-01

    The association between indoor exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOC), prevalence of allergic sensitization and cytokine secretion profile of peripheral T cells was studied in 3 year old children of the LARS study (Leipzig Allergy Risk Children Study) to investigate the role of VOC exposure as a risk factor for the development of atopic disease. Indoor VOC exposure was measured over a period of 4 weeks in infants' bedrooms using a passive sampling system. Specific IgE antibodies to food, indoor and outdoor allergens were measured by the Pharmacia CAP system and correlated to VOC exposure (n = 120). In addition, cytokine producing peripheral T cells (interleukin(IL)-4, interferon(IFN)-gamma) were measured in a subgroup of 28 children by means of intracellular cytokine staining. For the first time we were able to show that exposure to alkanes (C6, C9, C10) and aromatic compounds (toluene, o-xylene, m + p-xylene, 2-, 3- and 4-ethyl-toluene, chlorobenzene) may contribute to the risk of allergic sensitization to the food allergens milk and egg white (Odds ratios between 5.7 and 11.2). Moreover, significantly reduced numbers of CD3+/CD8+ peripheral T cells were found in children exposed to alkanes (C9-C13), naphthalene and chlorobenzene. Exposure to benzene, ethylbenzene and chlorobenzene was associated with higher percentages of IL-4 producing CD3+ T cells. Both an increase in IL-4 producing type 2 T cells and a reduction of IFN-gamma producing type 1 T cells may contribute to a type 2 skewed memory in response to allergens. Therefore, we suggest exposure to VOCs in association with allergic sensitization to be mediated by a T cell polarization toward the type 2 phenotype.

  20. Analytical criteria for performance characteristics of IgE binding methods for evaluating safety of biotech food products.

    PubMed

    Holzhauser, Thomas; Ree, Ronald van; Poulsen, Lars K; Bannon, Gary A

    2008-10-01

    There is detailed guidance on how to perform bioinformatic analyses and enzymatic degradation studies for genetically modified crops under consideration for approval by regulatory agencies; however, there is no consensus in the scientific community on the details of how to perform IgE serum studies. IgE serum studies are an important safety component to acceptance of genetically modified crops when the introduced protein is novel, the introduced protein is similar to known allergens, or the crop is allergenic. In this manuscript, we describe the characteristics of the reagents, validation of assay performance, and data analysis necessary to optimize the information obtained from serum testing of novel proteins and genetically modified (GM) crops and to make results more accurate and comparable between different investigations. PMID:18727951

  1. An immunostimulatory DNA sequence from a probiotic strain of Bifidobacterium longum inhibits IgE production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Noritoshi; Kitazawa, Haruki; Shimosato, Takeshi; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Kokubo, Sadayuki; Saito, Tadao

    2006-04-01

    The immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) BL07 (5'-GCGTCGGTTTCGGTGCTCAC-3') was identified from the genomic DNA of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium longum BB536. ODN BL07 stimulated B-lymphocyte proliferation and induced interleukin-12 (IL-12) production in macrophage-like J774.1 cells. ODNs BL07 and BL07S (modified with phosphorothioate backbone) significantly inhibited immunoglobulin E (IgE) production and stimulated interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and IL-12 production, but did not affect IL-4 secretion in murine splenic cells of ovalbumin-primed BALB/c mice. These ODNs also significantly inhibited production of IgE in purified murine B cells in the presence of IL-4 and anti-CD40. The results suggest the potential of ODNs BL07 and BL07S in preventing IgE-related immune responses and the possible involvement of ODN BL07 in the antiallergic efficacy of B. longum BB536.

  2. Analytical criteria for performance characteristics of IgE binding methods for evaluating safety of biotech food products.

    PubMed

    Holzhauser, Thomas; Ree, Ronald van; Poulsen, Lars K; Bannon, Gary A

    2008-10-01

    There is detailed guidance on how to perform bioinformatic analyses and enzymatic degradation studies for genetically modified crops under consideration for approval by regulatory agencies; however, there is no consensus in the scientific community on the details of how to perform IgE serum studies. IgE serum studies are an important safety component to acceptance of genetically modified crops when the introduced protein is novel, the introduced protein is similar to known allergens, or the crop is allergenic. In this manuscript, we describe the characteristics of the reagents, validation of assay performance, and data analysis necessary to optimize the information obtained from serum testing of novel proteins and genetically modified (GM) crops and to make results more accurate and comparable between different investigations.

  3. Levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) in paired examinations of serum and synovial fluid in rheumatoid arthritis and reactive synovitis of local origin.

    PubMed

    Hrncír, Z; Tichý, M; Sims, J; Salavec, M; Vavrina, J

    1977-12-15

    Levels of IgE were examined in pairs of serum and synovial fluid of the knee joint in a series of 78 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), reactive synovitis during osteoarthrosis, and after injury. The IgE levels in synovial fluid were significantly lower (p less than 0.05) in all groups; in RA, they were in significant correlation (r=0.6208, p less than 0.0001) and in direct linear regression to the levels in serum. In 5 patients of the whole series, however, the IgE levels in serum were lower by one order of magnitude as compared with synovial fluid. Serum levels of IgE in RA were in significant correlation and in direct linear regression to the titres of rheumatoid factors according to the latex-fixation test (r=0.3688, p=0.0249) and the haemagglutination test with sheep red cells (r=0.3721, p=0.0235).

  4. Serum IgE concentration and other immune manifestations of treatment with gold salts are linked to the MHC and IL4 regions in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Kermarrec, N.; Blanpied, C.; Druet, P.

    1996-01-01

    A subset of patients with rheumatoid arthritis occasionally develops skin reactions and glomerulonephritis and exhibits an increase in serum IgE concentration when treated with gold salts. Brown-Norway (BN) rats injected with aurothiopropanolsulfonate (ATPS) also manifest an autoimmune glomerulonephritis and increased serum IgE concentration, whereas Lewis (LEW) rats are resistant to complications. Here, we show linkage between responses to ATPS in a (BN x LEW) F2 cohort and the major histocompatibility complex (RT1) on rat chromosome 20 and between markers in the region of IL4 and other candidate genes on rat chromosome 10. Recently, human serum IgE concentration has been reported to be linked to the IL-4 region. Taken together, these findings raise the possibility that homologous genes could be implicated in ATPS manifestations in the rat and in the regulation of IgE levels in the human. 10 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. Low-dose intragastric administration of Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA) does not induce immunoglobulin E (IgE) production in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Haas, H; Herzig, K H; André, S; Galle, J; Gronow, A; Gabius, H J

    2001-04-01

    Native Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA) poses a potential health threat, when ingested with improperly cooked red kidney beans. Since PHA triggers human basophilic granulocytes in culture to rapidly release considerable amounts of interleukin-(IL-)4 and IL-13, key cytokines for inducing immunoglobulin E (IgE) production, the question was addressed whether this lectin can evoke in vivo IgE production. IgE-low-responder (Sprague-Dawley) rats received PHA (6 mg/rat/day) intragastrically by gavage over a period of 10 days. Up to day 35, there was no IgE induction regardless of whether the animals were boostered subcutaneously with PHA or not, indicating that PHA cannot be regarded as a general IgE inducer in rats. PMID:11788794

  6. Chimeras of Bet v 1 and Api g 1 reveal heterogeneous IgE responses in patients with birch pollen allergy

    PubMed Central

    Gepp, Barbara; Lengger, Nina; Bublin, Merima; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Breiteneder, Heimo; Radauer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Background Characterization of IgE-binding epitopes of allergens and determination of their patient-specific relevance is crucial for the diagnosis and treatment of allergy. Objective We sought to assess the contribution of specific surface areas of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.0101 to binding IgE of individual patients. Methods Four distinct areas of Bet v 1 representing in total 81% of its surface were grafted onto the scaffold of its homolog, Api g 1.0101, to yield the chimeras Api-Bet-1 to Api-Bet-4. The chimeras were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. IgE binding of 64 sera from Bet v 1–sensitized subjects with birch pollen allergy was determined by using direct ELISA. Specificity was assessed by means of inhibition ELISA. Results rApi g 1.0101, Api-Bet-1, Api-Bet-2, Api-Bet-3, and Api-Bet-4 bound IgE from 44%, 89%, 80%, 78%, and 48% of the patients, respectively. By comparing the amount of IgE binding to the chimeras and to rApi g 1.0101, 81%, 70%, 75%, and 45% of the patients showed significantly enhanced IgE binding to Api-Bet-1, Api-Bet-2, Api-Bet-3, and Api-Bet-4, respectively. The minority (8%) of the sera revealed enhanced IgE binding exclusively to a single chimera, whereas 31% showed increased IgE binding to all 4 chimeras compared with rApi g 1.0101. The chimeras inhibited up to 70% of IgE binding to rBet v 1.0101, confirming the specific IgE recognition of the grafted regions. Conclusion The Bet v 1–specific IgE response is polyclonal, and epitopes are spread across the entire Bet v 1 surface. Furthermore, the IgE recognition profile of Bet v 1 is highly patient specific. PMID:24529686

  7. New Regulatory Roles of Galectin-3 in High-Affinity IgE Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bambouskova, Monika; Polakovicova, Iva; Halova, Ivana; Goel, Gautam; Draberova, Lubica; Bugajev, Viktor; Doan, Aivi; Utekal, Pavol; Gardet, Agnes; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of the high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI) in mast cells initiates activation events that lead to degranulation and release of inflammatory mediators. To better understand the signaling pathways and genes involved in mast cell activation, we developed a high-throughput mast cell degranulation assay suitable for RNA interference experiments using lentivirus-based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) delivery. We tested 432 shRNAs specific for 144 selected genes for effects on FcεRI-mediated mast cell degranulation and identified 15 potential regulators. In further studies, we focused on galectin-3 (Gal3), identified in this study as a negative regulator of mast cell degranulation. FcεRI-activated cells with Gal3 knockdown exhibited upregulated tyrosine phosphorylation of spleen tyrosine kinase and several other signal transduction molecules and enhanced calcium response. We show that Gal3 promotes internalization of IgE-FcεRI complexes; this may be related to our finding that Gal3 is a positive regulator of FcεRI ubiquitination. Furthermore, we found that Gal3 facilitates mast cell adhesion and motility on fibronectin but negatively regulates antigen-induced chemotaxis. The combined data indicate that Gal3 is involved in both positive and negative regulation of FcεRI-mediated signaling events in mast cells. PMID:26929198

  8. Case Report About Fatal or Near-Fatal Hypersensitivity Reactions to Cetuximab: Anticetuximab IgE as a Valuable Screening Test.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Benoît; Mariotte, Delphine; Moldovan, Cristian; Grellard, Jean-Michel; Vergnaud, Marie-Claude; Laroche, Dominique; Gervais, Radj

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions are a classic side effect of cetuximab. We report the cases of three patients who developed life-threatening hypersensitivity to cetuximab, which could have been predicted by assessing the concentration of serum anticetuximab immunoglobulin (Ig)E. The anticetuximab IgE concentration could be an interesting test to predict which patients are at risk of experiencing severe hypersensitivity reactions to cetuximab.

  9. Case Report About Fatal or Near-Fatal Hypersensitivity Reactions to Cetuximab: Anticetuximab IgE as a Valuable Screening Test

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Benoît; Mariotte, Delphine; Moldovan, Cristian; Grellard, Jean-Michel; Vergnaud, Marie-Claude; Laroche, Dominique; Gervais, Radj

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions are a classic side effect of cetuximab. We report the cases of three patients who developed life-threatening hypersensitivity to cetuximab, which could have been predicted by assessing the concentration of serum anticetuximab immunoglobulin (Ig)E. The anticetuximab IgE concentration could be an interesting test to predict which patients are at risk of experiencing severe hypersensitivity reactions to cetuximab. PMID:25089092

  10. Aspergillus oryzae lectin induces anaphylactoid oedema and mast cell activation through its interaction with fucose of mast cell-bound non-specific IgE.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, K; Yoshino, S

    2011-11-01

    We investigated whether Aspergillus oryzae lectin (AOL), a fucose-specific lectin, induces anaphylactoid reactions and mast cell activation. The injection of AOL into footpads of mice produced a dose-related acute paw oedema. The AOL-induced oedema was attenuated by predose of histamine H1 receptor blocker or pretreatment of the lectin with fucose before injection and was not observed in SCID and mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv mice. These results suggested that the AOL-induced anaphylactoid reaction was mediated by histamine released from mast cells. In addition, the activation of mast cells was seemed to be induced by the crosslinking of IgE on the cell surface following the binding of AOL to fucose residues in IgE. Consistent with the in vivo results, AOL induced the degranulation of the rat mast cell line RBL2H3 sensitized with monoclonal IgE. As AOL induced the increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration of IgE-sensitized RBL2H3 cells as well as antigen stimulation, AOL could input signals from FcεRI. The degranulation of IgE-sensitized RBL2H3 cells by AOL was diminished by pretreatment of AOL with fucose. Defucosylated IgE did not induce degranulation of RBL2H3 cells in response to AOL stimulation, in spite of its ability to induce degranulation by antigen stimulation as intact IgE. These results indicated that AOL bound to fucose residue of IgE causing antigen-independent IgE-mediated mast cell activation and anaphylactoid reactions in vitro and in vivo, respectively. AOL bound to human IgE as well as to mouse IgE, suggesting the possible implication of AOL in the allergic response to Aspergillus oryzae in humans.

  11. IgE sensitization to the nonspecific lipid-transfer protein Ara h 9 and peanut-associated bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Arkwright, Peter D; Summers, Colin W; Riley, Beverley J; Alsediq, Najla; Pumphrey, Richard S H

    2013-01-01

    Allergen component analysis is now available in many laboratories. The aim of this study was to examine the possible association between peanut allergen IgE components and severity of clinical reactions in patients with a history of peanut allergy. Data and sera collected from 192 patients within the Manchester Allergy Research Database and Serum Bank were used in this retrospective study. Sensitization to peanut specific IgE and Ara h 1, 2, 3, and 8 peanut IgE components, as measured by fluoroenzyme immunoassay, was not associated with anaphylaxis. In contrast, sensitization to the lipid-transfer protein Ara h 9 was significantly more prevalent in patients with peanut-associated bronchospasm (26% versus 9% of patients), even after adjusting for potential confounding effects of age, gender, and severity of concomitant chronic atopic diseases. Patients who were sensitized to Ara h 9 were more likely to have ingested rather than just have had skin contact with peanut and have a more rapid onset of symptoms. These results are consistent with observations that sensitization to heat and protease resistant lipid-transfer protein components of hazelnut, grains, and fruit is predictive of anaphylaxis.