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Sample records for allergen-specific immunotherapy sit

  1. Allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Harold S; Norman, Philip S

    2014-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy was introduced for the treatment of grass pollen-induced hay fever in 1911. The treatment was soon extended to other pollens as well as perennial allergens, and to the treatment of bronchial asthma. Definitive studies of its efficacy for both rhinitis and asthma came only many decades later. Understanding gradually emerged of the underlying immunologic mechanisms that include the generation of regulatory T lymphocytes, immune deviation from allergen-specific Th2 to Th1 responses, and a shift in allergen-specific antibody production from immunoglobulin (Ig) E to IgG4. Along with understanding of the immune basis came an appreciation that immunotherapy modifies allergic disease expression, producing protection against disease progression and symptomatic improvement that persists for years after the treatment is discontinued. Recent new directions for immunotherapy include sublingual administration of inhalant allergens and use of the oral route to treat food allergy.

  2. Allergen-specific immunotherapy in atopic eczema.

    PubMed

    Darsow, Ulf; Forer, Ingeborg; Ring, Johannes

    2011-08-01

    Aeroallergens are relevant eliciting factors of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma but also of atopic eczema. The use of allergen-specific immunotherapy as in respiratory atopic diseases is controversial in patients with atopic eczema, but refined diagnostic methods to characterize subgroups of patients with relevant allergies and the results of smaller controlled studies give rise to new approaches in this field. This article reviews the theoretical problems and practical results associated with allergen-specific immunotherapy in atopic eczema. PMID:21461718

  3. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (allergen-SIT) is a potentially curative treatment approach in allergic diseases. It has been used for almost 100 years as a desensitizing therapy. The induction of peripheral T cell tolerance and promotion of the formation of regulatory T-cells are key mechanisms in allergen-SIT. Both FOXP3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and inducible IL-10- and TGF-β-producing type 1 Treg (Tr1) cells may prevent the development of allergic diseases and play a role in successful allergen-SIT and healthy immune response via several mechanisms. The mechanisms of suppression of different pro-inflammatory cells, such as eosinophils, mast cells and basophils and the development of allergen tolerance also directly or indirectly involves Treg cells. Furthermore, the formation of non-inflammatory antibodies particularly IgG4 is induced by IL-10. Knowledge of these molecular basis is crucial in the understanding the regulation of immune responses and their possible therapeutic targets in allergic diseases. PMID:22409879

  4. Allergen-specific immunotherapy: from therapeutic vaccines to prophylactic approaches.

    PubMed

    Valenta, R; Campana, R; Marth, K; van Hage, M

    2012-08-01

    Immunoglobulin E-mediated allergies affect more than 25% of the population. Allergen exposure induces a variety of symptoms in allergic patients, which include rhinitis, conjunctivitis, asthma, dermatitis, food allergy and life-threatening systemic anaphylaxis. At present, allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), which is based on the administration of the disease-causing allergens, is the only disease-modifying treatment for allergy. Current therapeutic allergy vaccines are still prepared from relatively poorly defined allergen extracts. However, with the availability of the structures of the most common allergen molecules, it has become possible to produce well-defined recombinant and synthetic allergy vaccines that allow specific targeting of the mechanisms of allergic disease. Here we provide a summary of the development and mechanisms of SIT, and then review new forms of therapeutic vaccines that are based on recombinant and synthetic molecules. Finally, we discuss possible allergen-specific strategies for prevention of allergic disease.

  5. Does allergen-specific immunotherapy induce contact allergy to aluminium?

    PubMed

    Netterlid, Eva; Hindsén, Monica; Siemund, Ingrid; Björk, Jonas; Werner, Sonja; Jacobsson, Helene; Güner, Nuray; Bruze, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Persistent, itching nodules have been reported to appear at the injection site after allergen-specific immuno-therapy with aluminium-precipitated antigen extract, occasionally in conjunction with contact allergy to aluminium. This study aimed to quantify the development of contact allergy to aluminium during allergen-specific immunotherapy. A randomized, controlled, single-blind multicentre study of children and adults entering allergen-specific immunotherapy was performed using questionnaires and patch-testing. A total of 205 individuals completed the study. In the 3 study groups all subjects tested negative to aluminium before allergen-specific immunotherapy and 4 tested positive after therapy. In the control group 4 participants tested positive to aluminium. Six out of 8 who tested positive also had atopic dermatitis. Positive test results were found in 5/78 children and 3/127 adults. Allergen-specific immunotherapy was not shown to be a risk factor for contact allergy to aluminium. Among those who did develop aluminium allergy, children and those with atopic dermatitis were more highly represented.

  6. Seed-based oral vaccines as allergen-specific immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Takaiwa, Fumio

    2011-03-01

    Plant-based vaccines have advantages over conventional vaccines in terms of scalability, lack of requirement for cold chain logistics, stability, safety, cost-effectiveness and needle-free administration. In particular, when antigen is expressed in seeds, high production is possible and immunogenicity is not lost even if stocked at ambient temperature for several years. Induction of immune tolerance (desensitization) to allergen is a principle strategy for controlling allergic diseases, and is generally carried out by subcutaneous injection. Seed-based oral administration offers a straightforward and inexpensive alternative approach to deliver vaccines effectively to the GALT without loss of activity. Consumption of transgenic seeds containing modified hypo-allergenic tolerogen or T-cell epitope peptides derived from allergens has no or very few severe side effects and can induce immune tolerance leading to reduction of allergen-specific IgE production, T-cell proliferation and release of histamine. Suppression of allergen-specific clinical symptoms results. Thus, seed-based allergy vaccines offer an innovative and convenient allergen-specific immunotherapeutic approach as an alternative to conventional allergen-specific immunotherapy.

  7. Developments in allergen-specific immunotherapy: from allergen extracts to allergy vaccines bypassing allergen-specific immunoglobulin E and T cell reactivity.

    PubMed

    Focke, M; Swoboda, I; Marth, K; Valenta, R

    2010-03-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only specific and disease-modifying approach for the treatment of allergy but several disadvantages have limited its broad applicability. We argue that the majority of the possible disadvantages of SIT such as unwanted effects, poor efficacy and specificity as well as inconvenient application are related to the poor quality of natural allergen extracts, which are the active ingredients of all currently available allergy vaccines. Because of the progress made in the field of molecular allergen characterization, new allergy vaccines based on recombinant allergens, recombinant hypoallergenic allergen derivatives and allergen-derived T cell peptides have entered clinical testing and hold promise to reduce the side-effects and to increase the specificity as well as the efficacy of SIT. Here, we present a refined immunotherapy concept, which is based on the use of peptides derived from allergen surfaces that exhibit reduced, allergen-specific IgE as well as T cell reactivity. These peptides when fused to non-allergenic carriers give rise to allergen-specific protective IgG responses with T cell help from a non-allergenic carrier molecule. We summarize the experimental data demonstrating that such peptide vaccines can bypass allergen-specific IgE as well as T cell activation and may be administered at high doses without IgE- and T cell-mediated side-effects. Should these peptide vaccines prove efficacious and safe in clinical trials, it may become possible to develop convenient, safe and broadly applicable forms of SIT as true alternatives to symptomatic, drug-based allergy treatment.

  8. EAACI: A European Declaration on Immunotherapy. Designing the future of allergen specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Allergy today is a public health concern of pandemic proportions, affecting more than 150 million people in Europe alone. In view of epidemiological trends, the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) predicts that within the next few decades, more than half of the European population may at some point in their lives experience some type of allergy. Not only do allergic patients suffer from a debilitating disease, with the potential for major impact on their quality of life, career progression, personal development and lifestyle choices, but they also constitute a significant burden on health economics and macroeconomics due to the days of lost productivity and underperformance. Given that allergy triggers, including urbanization, industrialization, pollution and climate change, are not expected to change in the foreseeable future, it is imperative that steps are taken to develop, strengthen and optimize preventive and treatment strategies. Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only currently available medical intervention that has the potential to affect the natural course of the disease. Years of basic science research, clinical trials, and systematic reviews and meta-analyses have convincingly shown that allergen specific immunotherapy can achieve substantial results for patients, improving the allergic individuals’ quality of life, reducing the long-term costs and burden of allergies, and changing the course of the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy not only effectively alleviates allergy symptoms, but it has a long-term effect after conclusion of the treatment and can prevent the progression of allergic diseases. Unfortunately, allergen specific immunotherapy has not yet received adequate attention from European institutions, including research funding bodies, even though this could be a most rewarding field in terms of return on investments, translational value and European integration and, a field in which Europe is recognized as

  9. EAACI: A European Declaration on Immunotherapy. Designing the future of allergen specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Moises A; Demoly, Pascal; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Bousquet, Jean; Sheikh, Aziz; Frew, Anthony; Scadding, Glenis; Bachert, Claus; Malling, Hans J; Valenta, Rudolph; Bilo, Beatrice; Nieto, Antonio; Akdis, Cezmi; Just, Jocelyne; Vidal, Carmen; Varga, Eva M; Alvarez-Cuesta, Emilio; Bohle, Barbara; Bufe, Albrecht; Canonica, Walter G; Cardona, Victoria; Dahl, Ronald; Didier, Alain; Durham, Stephen R; Eng, Peter; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Jacobsen, Lars; Jutel, Marek; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Klimek, Ludger; Lötvall, Jan; Moreno, Carmen; Mosges, Ralph; Muraro, Antonella; Niggemann, Bodo; Pajno, Giovanni; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Pfaar, Oliver; Rak, Sabina; Senna, Gianenrico; Senti, Gabriela; Valovirta, Erkka; van Hage, Marianne; Virchow, Johannes C; Wahn, Ulrich; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Allergy today is a public health concern of pandemic proportions, affecting more than 150 million people in Europe alone. In view of epidemiological trends, the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) predicts that within the next few decades, more than half of the European population may at some point in their lives experience some type of allergy.Not only do allergic patients suffer from a debilitating disease, with the potential for major impact on their quality of life, career progression, personal development and lifestyle choices, but they also constitute a significant burden on health economics and macroeconomics due to the days of lost productivity and underperformance. Given that allergy triggers, including urbanization, industrialization, pollution and climate change, are not expected to change in the foreseeable future, it is imperative that steps are taken to develop, strengthen and optimize preventive and treatment strategies.Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only currently available medical intervention that has the potential to affect the natural course of the disease. Years of basic science research, clinical trials, and systematic reviews and meta-analyses have convincingly shown that allergen specific immunotherapy can achieve substantial results for patients, improving the allergic individuals' quality of life, reducing the long-term costs and burden of allergies, and changing the course of the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy not only effectively alleviates allergy symptoms, but it has a long-term effect after conclusion of the treatment and can prevent the progression of allergic diseases.Unfortunately, allergen specific immunotherapy has not yet received adequate attention from European institutions, including research funding bodies, even though this could be a most rewarding field in terms of return on investments, translational value and European integration and, a field in which Europe is recognized as a

  10. Allergen-specific immunotherapy in pediatric allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) is the only curative way that can change the immunologic response to allergens and thus can modify the natural progression of allergic diseases. There are some important criteria which contributes significantly on efficacy of AIT, such as the allergen extract used for treatment, the dose and protocol, patient selection in addition to the severity and control of asthma. The initiation of AIT in allergic asthma should be considered in intermittent, mild and moderate cases which coexisting with other allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, and in case of unacceptable adverse effects of medications. Two important impact of AIT; steroid sparing effect and preventing from progression to asthma should be taken into account in pediatric asthma when making a decision on starting of AIT. Uncontrolled asthma remains a significant risk factor for adverse events and asthma should be controlled both before and during administration of AIT. The evidence concerning the efficacy of subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for treatment of pediatric asthma suggested that SCIT decreases asthma symptoms and medication scores, whereas SLIT can ameliorate asthma symptoms. Although the effectiveness of SCIT has been shown for both seasonal and perennial allergens, the data for SLIT is less convincing for perennial allergies in pediatric asthma. PMID:27489785

  11. Allergen-specific immunotherapy in pediatric allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Yukselen, Ayfer

    2016-07-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) is the only curative way that can change the immunologic response to allergens and thus can modify the natural progression of allergic diseases. There are some important criteria which contributes significantly on efficacy of AIT, such as the allergen extract used for treatment, the dose and protocol, patient selection in addition to the severity and control of asthma. The initiation of AIT in allergic asthma should be considered in intermittent, mild and moderate cases which coexisting with other allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, and in case of unacceptable adverse effects of medications. Two important impact of AIT; steroid sparing effect and preventing from progression to asthma should be taken into account in pediatric asthma when making a decision on starting of AIT. Uncontrolled asthma remains a significant risk factor for adverse events and asthma should be controlled both before and during administration of AIT. The evidence concerning the efficacy of subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for treatment of pediatric asthma suggested that SCIT decreases asthma symptoms and medication scores, whereas SLIT can ameliorate asthma symptoms. Although the effectiveness of SCIT has been shown for both seasonal and perennial allergens, the data for SLIT is less convincing for perennial allergies in pediatric asthma. PMID:27489785

  12. Recombinant allergens for allergen-specific immunotherapy: 10 years anniversary of immunotherapy with recombinant allergens.

    PubMed

    Valenta, Rudolf; Linhart, B; Swoboda, I; Niederberger, V

    2011-06-01

    The broad applicability of allergen-specific immunotherapy for the treatment and eventually prevention of IgE-mediated allergy is limited by the poor quality and allergenic activity of natural allergen extracts that are used for the production of current allergy vaccines. Today, the genetic code of the most important allergens has been deciphered; recombinant allergens equalling their natural counterparts have been produced for diagnosis and immunotherapy, and a large panel of genetically modified allergens with reduced allergenic activity has been characterized to improve safety of immunotherapy and explore allergen-specific prevention strategies. Successful immunotherapy studies have been performed with recombinant allergens and hypoallergenic allergen derivatives and will lead to the registration of the first recombinant allergen-based vaccines in the near future. There is no doubt that recombinant allergen-based vaccination strategies will be generally applicable to most allergen sources, including respiratory, food and venom allergens and allow to produce safe allergy vaccines for the treatment of the most common forms of IgE-mediated allergies.

  13. Allergen-specific immunotherapy: towards combination vaccines for allergic and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Edlmayr, Johanna; Niespodziana, Katarzyna; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Linhart, Birgit; Valenta, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    IgE-mediated allergies affect more than 25% of the population. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is an antigen-specific and disease-modifying form of treatment. It is based on the therapeutic administration of the disease-causing allergens to allergic patients. However, the fact that only allergen extracts of insufficient quality are currently available and the possible occurrence of side effects during treatment limit the broad use of SIT and prophylactic vaccination is has not yet been performed. In the last 20 years the DNA sequences of the most common allergens have been isolated and the corresponding allergens have been produced as recombinant allergens. Based on the progress made in the field of allergen characterization it is possible to improve the quality and safety of allergy vaccines and to develop new, more effective strategies for a broad application of SIT and even for prophylactic treatment. Here we discuss the development of combination vaccines for allergy and infectious diseases. This approach is based on the selection of allergen-derived peptides with reduced IgE- and T cell reactivity in order to minimize IgE- and T cell-mediated side effects as well as the potential of the vaccine to induce allergic sensitization. These peptides are fused by recombinant technology onto a viral carrier protein to obtain a combination vaccine which induces protective immunity against allergy and viral infections. The application of such combination vaccines for therapy and prophylaxis of allergy and infectious diseases is discussed.

  14. Allergen-specific immunotherapy provides immediate, long-term and preventive clinical effects in children and adults: the effects of immunotherapy can be categorised by level of benefit -the centenary of allergen specific subcutaneous immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Allergen Specific Immunotherapy (SIT) for respiratory allergic diseases is able to significantly improve symptoms as well as reduce the need for symptomatic medication, but SIT also has the capacity for long-term clinical effects and plays a protective role against the development of further allergies and symptoms. The treatment acts on basic immunological mechanisms, and has the potential to change the pathological allergic immune response. In this paper we discuss some of the most important achievements in the documentation of the benefits of immunotherapy, over the last 2 decades, which have marked a period of extensive research on the clinical effects and immunological background of the mechanisms involved. The outcome of immunotherapy is described as different levels of benefit from early reduction in symptoms over progressive clinical effects during treatment to long-term effects after discontinuation of the treatment and prevention of asthma. The efficacy of SIT increases the longer it is continued and immunological changes lead to potential long-term benefits. SIT alone and not the symptomatic treatment nor other avoidance measures has so far been documented as the therapy with long-term or preventive potential. The allergic condition is driven by a subset of T-helper lymphocytes (Th2), which are characterised by the production of cytokines like IL-4, and IL-5. Immunological changes following SIT lead to potential curative effects. One mechanism whereby immunotherapy suppresses the allergic response is through increased production of IgG4 antibodies. Induction of specific IgG4 is able to influence the allergic response in different ways and is related to immunological effector mechanisms, also responsible for the reduced late phase hyperreactivity and ongoing allergic inflammation. SIT is the only treatment which interferes with the basic pathophysiological mechanisms of the allergic disease, thereby creating the potential for changes in the long

  15. Allergen-specific immunotherapy induces Th1 shift in dogs with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Shida, Masayuki; Kadoya, Michiyo; Park, Seong-Jun; Nishifuji, Koji; Momoi, Yasuyuki; Iwasaki, Toshiroh

    2004-11-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy has been applied to canine atopic dermatitis. Despite the accumulated clinical evidence of its effect for atopic dogs, the basic immunologic mechanisms were not fully understood. In this study, the cytokine profile ex vivo in canine atopic dermatitis before and after allergen-specific immunotherapy was characterized using competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Blood samples were collected from 10 dogs with atopic dermatitis and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with house dust mite antigen. The levels of IFN-gamma and IL-4 mRNA were lower in atopic dogs compared with non-atopic controls. The ratio of IFN-gamma/IL-4 was low in atopic dogs indicating a cytokine profile polarized to Th2. The level of IFN-gamma after immunotherapy was significantly higher than that before (P < 0.05) whereas that of IL-4 mRNA was not changed. Consequently, the ratio of IFN-gamma/IL-4 after immunotherapy was significantly higher than that before immunotherapy (P < 0.05). These results indicate a Th2 cytokine bias is the dominant state in atopic dogs and allergen-specific immunotherapy causes a shift to wards a Th1 bias by enhancing IFN-gamma expression.

  16. Successful immunotherapy induces previously unidentified allergen-specific CD4+ T-cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, John F.; Hovde, Rachel; Glanville, Jacob; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Ji, Xuhuai; Gupta, Sheena; Tibshirani, Robert J.; Jay, David C.; Boyd, Scott D.; Chinthrajah, R. Sharon; Davis, Mark M.; Galli, Stephen J.; Maecker, Holden T.; Nadeau, Kari C.

    2016-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy can desensitize even subjects with potentially lethal allergies, but the changes induced in T cells that underpin successful immunotherapy remain poorly understood. In a cohort of peanut-allergic participants, we used allergen-specific T-cell sorting and single-cell gene expression to trace the transcriptional “roadmap” of individual CD4+ T cells throughout immunotherapy. We found that successful immunotherapy induces allergen-specific CD4+ T cells to expand and shift toward an “anergic” Th2 T-cell phenotype largely absent in both pretreatment participants and healthy controls. These findings show that sustained success, even after immunotherapy is withdrawn, is associated with the induction, expansion, and maintenance of immunotherapy-specific memory and naive T-cell phenotypes as early as 3 mo into immunotherapy. These results suggest an approach for immune monitoring participants undergoing immunotherapy to predict the success of future treatment and could have implications for immunotherapy targets in other diseases like cancer, autoimmune disease, and transplantation. PMID:26811452

  17. Successful immunotherapy induces previously unidentified allergen-specific CD4+ T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Ryan, John F; Hovde, Rachel; Glanville, Jacob; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Ji, Xuhuai; Gupta, Sheena; Tibshirani, Robert J; Jay, David C; Boyd, Scott D; Chinthrajah, R Sharon; Davis, Mark M; Galli, Stephen J; Maecker, Holden T; Nadeau, Kari C

    2016-03-01

    Allergen immunotherapy can desensitize even subjects with potentially lethal allergies, but the changes induced in T cells that underpin successful immunotherapy remain poorly understood. In a cohort of peanut-allergic participants, we used allergen-specific T-cell sorting and single-cell gene expression to trace the transcriptional "roadmap" of individual CD4+ T cells throughout immunotherapy. We found that successful immunotherapy induces allergen-specific CD4+ T cells to expand and shift toward an "anergic" Th2 T-cell phenotype largely absent in both pretreatment participants and healthy controls. These findings show that sustained success, even after immunotherapy is withdrawn, is associated with the induction, expansion, and maintenance of immunotherapy-specific memory and naive T-cell phenotypes as early as 3 mo into immunotherapy. These results suggest an approach for immune monitoring participants undergoing immunotherapy to predict the success of future treatment and could have implications for immunotherapy targets in other diseases like cancer, autoimmune disease, and transplantation. PMID:26811452

  18. Successful immunotherapy induces previously unidentified allergen-specific CD4+ T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Ryan, John F; Hovde, Rachel; Glanville, Jacob; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Ji, Xuhuai; Gupta, Sheena; Tibshirani, Robert J; Jay, David C; Boyd, Scott D; Chinthrajah, R Sharon; Davis, Mark M; Galli, Stephen J; Maecker, Holden T; Nadeau, Kari C

    2016-03-01

    Allergen immunotherapy can desensitize even subjects with potentially lethal allergies, but the changes induced in T cells that underpin successful immunotherapy remain poorly understood. In a cohort of peanut-allergic participants, we used allergen-specific T-cell sorting and single-cell gene expression to trace the transcriptional "roadmap" of individual CD4+ T cells throughout immunotherapy. We found that successful immunotherapy induces allergen-specific CD4+ T cells to expand and shift toward an "anergic" Th2 T-cell phenotype largely absent in both pretreatment participants and healthy controls. These findings show that sustained success, even after immunotherapy is withdrawn, is associated with the induction, expansion, and maintenance of immunotherapy-specific memory and naive T-cell phenotypes as early as 3 mo into immunotherapy. These results suggest an approach for immune monitoring participants undergoing immunotherapy to predict the success of future treatment and could have implications for immunotherapy targets in other diseases like cancer, autoimmune disease, and transplantation.

  19. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy: multiple suppressor factors at work in immune tolerance to allergens.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2014-03-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been used for more than 100 years as a desensitizing therapy for IgE-mediated allergic diseases and represents a potentially curative way of treatment. The mechanisms of action of AIT include the induction of very early desensitization of mast cells and basophils; generation of regulatory T and regulatory B (Breg) cell responses; regulation of IgE and IgG4; decreases in numbers and activity of eosinophils and mast cells in mucosal allergic tissues; and decreases in the activity of basophils in circulation. Skewing of allergen-specific effector T and effector B cells to a regulatory phenotype appears as a key event in the course of AIT and normal immune response to allergens. Recently, inducible IL-10-secreting Breg cells were also demonstrated to contribute to allergen tolerance through suppression of effector T cells and selective induction of IgG4 isotype antibodies. Allergen-specific regulatory T and Breg cells orchestrate a general immunoregulatory activity, which can be summarized as suppression of cytokines from inflammatory dendritic cells; suppression of effector TH1, TH2, and TH17 cells; suppression of allergen-specific IgE and induction of IgG4; and suppression of migration of mast cells, basophils, eosinophils, and effector T cells to tissues. A detailed knowledge of the mechanisms of AIT is not only important in designing the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases but might also find applications in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, organ transplantation, chronic infection, and cancer.

  20. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy and immune tolerance to allergens.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2015-01-01

    Substantial progress in understanding mechanisms of immune regulation in allergy, asthma, autoimmune diseases, tumors, organ transplantation and chronic infections has led to a variety of targeted therapeutic approaches. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been used for 100 years as a desensitizing therapy for allergic diseases and represents the potentially curative and specific way of treatment. The mechanisms by which allergen-AIT has its mechanisms of action include the very early desensitization effects, modulation of T- and B-cell responses and related antibody isotypes as well as inhibition of migration of eosinophils, basophils and mast cells to tissues and release of their mediators. Regulatory T cells (Treg) have been identified as key regulators of immunological processes in peripheral tolerance to allergens. Skewing of allergen-specific effector T cells to a regulatory phenotype appears as a key event in the development of healthy immune response to allergens and successful outcome in AIT. Naturally occurring FoxP3(+) CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells and inducible type 1 Treg (Tr1) cells contribute to the control of allergen-specific immune responses in several major ways, which can be summarized as suppression of dendritic cells that support the generation of effector T cells; suppression of effector Th1, Th2 and Th17 cells; suppression of allergen-specific IgE, and induction of IgG4; suppression of mast cells, basophils and eosinophils and suppression of effector T cell migration to tissues. New strategies for immune intervention will likely include targeting of the molecular mechanisms of allergen tolerance and reciprocal regulation of effector and regulatory T cell subsets.

  1. Grass immunotherapy induces inhibition of allergen-specific human peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Baskar, S; Hamilton, R G; Norman, P S; Ansari, A A

    1997-02-01

    The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from humans allergic to grass pollens (GR+ subjects) show strong in vitro proliferative responses to purified allergens from Lolium perenne pollen Lol p 1, and to a lesser extent to Lol p 2 and Lol p 3. By contrast, PBMC from grass allergic patients undergoing immunotherapy (GR + IT subjects) exhibit a very poor Lol p-specific proliferative response, similar to that observed in nongrass allergic subjects (GR-subjects). Unlike GR-subjects, both GR+ and GR + IT subjects have high levels of antigen-specific serum IgG and IgE antibodies to Lol p 1, Lol p 2 and Lol p 3. While GR+ subjects exhibit a significant correlation between antigen-specific serum antibody and PBMC responses, GR + IT subjects do not show a correlation between the two responses. The possible mechanisms by which immunotherapy may modulate allergen-specific T cell proliferative response are discussed.

  2. The CONSORT statement checklist in allergen-specific immunotherapy: a GA2LEN paper.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, P J; Brozek, J; Bachert, C; Bieber, T; Bonini, S; Burney, P; Calderon, M; Canonica, G W; Compalati, E; Daures, J P; Delgado, L; Demoly, P; Dahl, R; Durham, S R; Kowalski, M L; Malling, H J; Merk, H; Papadopoulos, N; Passalacqua, G; Simon, H U; Worms, M; Wahn, U; Zuberbier, T; Schünemann, H J; Bousquet, J

    2009-12-01

    The methodology of randomized clinical trials is essential for the critical assessment and registration of therapeutic interventions. The CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) statement was developed to alleviate the problems arising from the inadequate reporting of randomized controlled trials. The present article reflects on the items that we believe should be included in the CONSORT checklist in the context of conducting and reporting trials in allergen-specific immunotherapy. Only randomized, blinded (in particular blinding of patients, health care providers, and outcome assessors), placebo-controlled Phase III studies in this article. Our analysis focuses on the definition of patients' inclusion and exclusion criteria, allergen standardization, primary, secondary and exploratory outcomes, reporting of adverse events and analysis.

  3. Aluminium in allergen-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy--a German perspective.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Matthias F; Heath, Matthew D

    2014-07-16

    We are living in an "aluminium age" with increasing bioavailability of the metal for approximately 125 years, contributing significantly to the aluminium body burden of humans. Over the course of life, aluminium accumulates and is stored predominantly in the lungs, bones, liver, kidneys and brain. The toxicity of aluminium in humans is briefly summarised, highlighting links and possible causal relationships between a high aluminium body burden and a number of neurological disorders and disease states. Aluminium salts have been used as depot-adjuvants successfully in essential prophylactic vaccinations for almost 100 years, with a convincing positive benefit-risk assessment which remains unchanged. However, allergen-specific immunotherapy commonly consists of administering a long-course programme of subcutaneous injections using preparations of relevant allergens. Regulatory authorities currently set aluminium limits for vaccines per dose, rather than per treatment course. Unlike prophylactic vaccinations, numerous injections with higher proportions of aluminium-adjuvant per injection are applied in subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and will significantly contribute to a higher cumulative life dose of aluminium. While the human body may cope robustly with a daily aluminium overload from the environment, regulatory cumulative threshold values in immunotherapy need further addressing. Based on the current literature, predisposing an individual to an unusually high level of aluminium, such as through subcutaneous immunotherapy, has the potential to form focal accumulations in the body with the propensity to exert forms of toxicity. Particularly in relation to longer-term health effects, the safety of aluminium adjuvants in immunotherapy remains unchallenged by health authorities - evoking the need for more consideration, guidance, and transparency on what is known and not known about its safety in long-course therapy and what measures can be taken to prevent or

  4. Aluminium in allergen-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy--a German perspective.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Matthias F; Heath, Matthew D

    2014-07-16

    We are living in an "aluminium age" with increasing bioavailability of the metal for approximately 125 years, contributing significantly to the aluminium body burden of humans. Over the course of life, aluminium accumulates and is stored predominantly in the lungs, bones, liver, kidneys and brain. The toxicity of aluminium in humans is briefly summarised, highlighting links and possible causal relationships between a high aluminium body burden and a number of neurological disorders and disease states. Aluminium salts have been used as depot-adjuvants successfully in essential prophylactic vaccinations for almost 100 years, with a convincing positive benefit-risk assessment which remains unchanged. However, allergen-specific immunotherapy commonly consists of administering a long-course programme of subcutaneous injections using preparations of relevant allergens. Regulatory authorities currently set aluminium limits for vaccines per dose, rather than per treatment course. Unlike prophylactic vaccinations, numerous injections with higher proportions of aluminium-adjuvant per injection are applied in subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and will significantly contribute to a higher cumulative life dose of aluminium. While the human body may cope robustly with a daily aluminium overload from the environment, regulatory cumulative threshold values in immunotherapy need further addressing. Based on the current literature, predisposing an individual to an unusually high level of aluminium, such as through subcutaneous immunotherapy, has the potential to form focal accumulations in the body with the propensity to exert forms of toxicity. Particularly in relation to longer-term health effects, the safety of aluminium adjuvants in immunotherapy remains unchallenged by health authorities - evoking the need for more consideration, guidance, and transparency on what is known and not known about its safety in long-course therapy and what measures can be taken to prevent or

  5. Requirement for additional treatment for dogs with atopic dermatitis undergoing allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Colombo, S; Hill, P B; Shaw, D J; Thoday, K L

    2007-06-23

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT) is one of the main treatments for atopic dermatitis in dogs, but it often requires additional treatments such as antibacterial and antifungal therapy for secondary bacterial and yeast infections, or antipruritic drugs to control the clinical signs or treat the adverse effects of the immunotherapy. Twenty-seven dogs enrolled in a study of ASIT were clinically assessed four times over a period of nine months; their requirement for treatment for secondary bacterial and yeast infections, for the administration of glucocorticoids as additional antipruritic therapy, and for the treatment of any adverse effects of the ASIT were evaluated. Twenty (74 per cent) of the dogs were treated for superficial bacterial pyoderma, 18 (66.6 per cent) required treatment for Malassezia species dermatitis on one or more occasions, eight (29.6 per cent) required treatment for otitis externa due to Malassezia species or bacteria, and eight required glucocorticoids to control their clinical signs. Five (18.5 per cent) of the dogs experienced adverse effects due to the ASIT and two required treatment with antihistamines (H1 receptor antagonists) in order to continue with the ASIT. PMID:17586789

  6. Specific immunotherapy modifies allergen-specific CD4+ T cell responses in an epitope-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Wambre, Erik; DeLong, Jonathan H.; James, Eddie A.; Torres-Chinn, Nadia; Pfützner, Wolfgang; Möbs, Christian; Durham, Stephen R.; Till, Stephen J.; Robinson, David; Kwok, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the mechanisms by which the immune system induces and controls allergic inflammation at the T cell epitope level is critical for the design of new allergy vaccine strategies. Objective To characterize allergen-specific T cell responses linked with allergy or peripheral tolerance and to determine how CD4+ T cell responses to individual allergen-derived epitopes change over allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT). Methods Timothy grass pollen (TGP) allergy was used as a model for studying grass pollen allergies. The breadth, magnitude, epitope hierarchy and phenotype of the DR04:01-restricted TGP-specific T cell responses in ten grass pollen allergic, five non-atopic and six allergy vaccine-treated individuals was determined using an ex vivo pMHCII-tetramer approach. Results CD4+ T cells in allergic individuals are directed to a broad range of TGP epitopes characterized by defined immunodominance hierarchy patterns and with distinct functional profiles that depend on the epitope recognized. Epitopes that are restricted specifically to either TH2 or TH1/TR1 responses were identified. ASIT was associated with preferential deletion of allergen-specific TH2 cells and without significant change in frequency of TH1/TR1 cells. Conclusions Preferential allergen-specific TH2-cells deletion after repeated high doses antigen stimulation can be another independent mechanism to restore tolerance to allergen during immunotherapy. PMID:24373351

  7. C-type Lectin Receptor Expression on Human Basophils and Effects of Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, K; Rydnert, F; Broos, S; Andersson, M; Greiff, L; Lindstedt, M

    2016-09-01

    Basophils are emerging as immunoregulatory cells capable of interacting with their environment not only via their characteristic IgE-mediated activation, but also in an IgE-independent manner. Basophils are known to express and respond to stimulation via TLR2, TLR4, DC-SIGN and DCIR, but whether basophils also express other C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) is largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the CLR expression profile of human basophils using multicolour flow cytometry. As FcRs as well as some CLRs are associated with allergen recognition and shown to be involved in subsequent immune responses, the expression of CLRs and FcRs on peripheral blood basophils, as well as their frequency, was monitored for 1 year in subjects undergoing subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT). Here, we show that human basophils express CLECSF14, DEC205, Dectin-1, Dectin-2 and MRC2. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the frequencies of basophils expressing the allergy-associated CLRs Dectin-1 and Dectin-2 were significantly reduced after 1 year and 8 weeks of AIT, respectively. In contrast, the frequency of basophils positive for FcγRII, as well as the fraction of total basophils, significantly increased after 1 year of AIT. The herein demonstrated expression of various CLRs on basophils, and their altered CLR and FcR expression profile upon AIT, suggest yet unexplored ways by which basophils can interact with antigens and may point to novel immunoregulatory functions targeted through AIT. PMID:27354239

  8. Allergy Work-Up Including Component-Resolved Diagnosis: How to Make Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy More Specific.

    PubMed

    Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Matricardi, Paolo M; Hamilton, Robert G

    2016-02-01

    Symptoms are recorded by obtaining a clinical history. Allergen sensitization is demonstrated by skin prick test or allergen-specific IgE serology. IgE sensitizations to allergen sources can be identified knowing the relationship between major aeroallergens and homologous allergen families. Some develop allergic sensitization to pan-allergens. Allergen extracts do not allow definitive separation of the sources. IgE antibody analysis of the major allergenic molecules facilitates differentiation of sensitizing allergen sources. IgE sensitizations to inhalant allergens are only relevant in the case of corresponding symptoms. In questionable cases, conjunctival or nasal provocation tests help induce confirmatory symptoms and identify relevant allergens for immunotherapy.

  9. [Allergen-specific immunotherapy for food allergies in childhood. Current options and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Trendelenburg, Valérie; Blümchen, Katharina

    2016-07-01

    During recent years increasing research has been conducted on casual treatment options for food allergy, with focus on oral immunotherapy (OIT) for hen's egg, cow's milk and peanut allergy. Several studies could show that OIT leads to desensitization or an increase of threshold. However, severe adverse events during this treatment are not uncommon. Whether OIT leads to a sustained, 'robust' development of tolerance in patients has not yet been thoroughly investigated. Besides OIT, some studies on sublingual (SLIT) and epicutaneous immunotherapy (EPIT) were performed, aiming to improve the safety profile. Furthermore, there are some pilot studies investigating a combined treatment of SLIT and OIT or a combined use of anti-IgE treatment or probiotic supplementation with OIT. Further placebo-controlled trials with larger sample size are needed in order to develop standardized protocols before immunotherapy may be used as a therapeutic option for food allergy outside of clinical trials. PMID:27324376

  10. Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy in Patients 55 Years and Older: Results and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Baptistella, Eduardo; Maniglia, Sergio; Malucelli, Diego Augusto; Rispoli, Daniel; Pruner de Silva, Thanara; Tsuru, Fernanda Miyoko; Becker, Renata Vecentin; Bernardi, Gustavo; Dranka, Daniela; Ferraz, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Over the years the immune system suffers many morphologic and functional alterations, which result in a peak of function in puberty and a gradual decrease in the elderly. Aim Treat patients 55 years or older with allergic rhinitis with immunotherapy and then analyze the response to allergens. Materials and Methods From June 2009 to July 2010, 104 charts of patients 55 years or older with allergic complaints were evaluated. The patients were selected by anamnesis, physical examination, and otorhinolaryngologic exam. The patients had cutaneous test for mites before and after 1 year of sublingual specific immunotherapy. The cutaneous response was classified as negative (absent), light, moderate, or severe. Results Before vaccination, 42 (40.4%) patients were classified as having a severe form of allergy and 62 (59.6%) as having a moderate allergy. After the specific therapy, 40 (38.4%) patients were classified as negative (absent), 37 (35.6%) as light, 19 (18.3%) as moderate, and 8 (7.7%) as severe responses. Conclusion Immunotherapy, a desensitization technique, is indicated in cases which patients cannot avoid the exposure to allergens and in situations where pharmacologic therapy is not ideal. Specific immunotherapy to treat the allergic rhinitis in elderly patients was efficient and had no collateral effects, and in addition to the clinical benefit, improvement in the cutaneous test could also be observed. PMID:25992039

  11. Dermatophagoides farinae-specific IgG responses in atopic dogs undergoing allergen-specific immunotherapy with aqueous vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chia-Chun; Griffin, Craig E; Hill, Peter B

    2008-08-01

    The molecular and immunologic mechanisms associated with successful allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT) have not been completely elucidated. The aim of this study was to characterize the changes in Dermatophagoides farinae-specific IgG in atopic dogs undergoing ASIT using aqueous vaccines. Fifteen atopic dogs with a positive skin test reaction to D. farinae were treated with aqueous vaccines for a minimum of 2 months following a standard protocol. Serum samples were collected before and during therapy and used to probe Western blots containing separated proteins of D. farinae. IgG responses were detected using a polyclonal goat anticanine IgG antibody and a chromogenic substrate 3,3'-diaminobenzidine. The blots were analysed using a semiquantitative digital image analysis system that evaluated the number and molecular weight of bands, as well as their intensity, which was related to IgG concentration. Prior to ASIT, all dogs showed allergen-specific IgG responses to various antigens of D. farinae. During ASIT, there was a significant increase in the total quantity of D. farinae-specific IgG antibodies to various antigens from the mite (P = 0.015). Significant increases were observed for a 98-kDa band (P = 0.015), likely to be Der f 15; bands with molecular weights between 50 and 70kDa (P=0.012); and bands between 30 and 45 kDa (P = 0.035). These findings provide support for the hypothesis that ASIT induces IgG blocking antibodies to allergens known to be relevant in canine atopic dermatitis.

  12. Role of IL-10 in allergen-specific immunotherapy and normal response to allergens.

    PubMed

    Akdis, C A; Blaser, K

    2001-09-01

    Induction of specific unresponsiveness (tolerance/anergy) in peripheral T cells by interleukin-10 (IL-10) and recovery by cytokines from the tissue microenvironment represent two key steps in specific immunotherapy of allergy and in natural exposure to allergens in healthy individuals. IL-10 elicits anergy in T cells by selective inhibition of the CD28 costimulatory pathway and controls suppression and development of antigen-specific immunity.

  13. Generation of a chimeric dust mite hypoallergen using DNA shuffling for application in allergen-specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bei-Bei; Diao, Ji-Dong; Liu, Zhi-Ming; Li, Chao-Pin; Jiang, Yu-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only treatment that provides long lasting relief of allergy symptoms. Unfortunately, SIT-based traditional remedies carry the risk of producing local and/or systemic side effects. To improve the safety and efficacy of SIT, it has been proposed that SIT must utilize allergens that are hypoallergenic but hyperimmunogenic. Therefore, we used DNA shuffling to generate mutant genes encoding hypoallergens with potent immunogenicity and screened them for their capacity to modify the allergic response. We tentatively shuffled the major group 1 allergen genes from house dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, and discovered a novel chimeric gene, termed C 1. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) and the chimeric protein C 1 was purified. An animal model of asthma demonstrated that C 1 not only decreased the production of serum IgE and IgG1, and inhibited the production of IL-4 and IL-5 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). C 1 also boosted the levels of IgG2a and IFN-γ, which may demonstrate a rebalance of TH1 and TH2 allergic response. Additionally, flow cytometry showed that the immunogenicity of C 1 was higher than that of ProDer f 1, but was not significantly different from that of ProDer p 1. Our findings suggest that the C 1 is hypoallergenic and yet highly immunogenic, which makes it potentially safe and effective for use in SIT of allergic asthma. PMID:25120738

  14. Generation of a chimeric dust mite hypoallergen using DNA shuffling for application in allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bei-Bei; Diao, Ji-Dong; Liu, Zhi-Ming; Li, Chao-Pin; Jiang, Yu-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only treatment that provides long lasting relief of allergy symptoms. Unfortunately, SIT-based traditional remedies carry the risk of producing local and/or systemic side effects. To improve the safety and efficacy of SIT, it has been proposed that SIT must utilize allergens that are hypoallergenic but hyperimmunogenic. Therefore, we used DNA shuffling to generate mutant genes encoding hypoallergens with potent immunogenicity and screened them for their capacity to modify the allergic response. We tentatively shuffled the major group 1 allergen genes from house dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, and discovered a novel chimeric gene, termed C 1. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) and the chimeric protein C 1 was purified. An animal model of asthma demonstrated that C 1 not only decreased the production of serum IgE and IgG1, and inhibited the production of IL-4 and IL-5 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). C 1 also boosted the levels of IgG2a and IFN-γ, which may demonstrate a rebalance of TH1 and TH2 allergic response. Additionally, flow cytometry showed that the immunogenicity of C 1 was higher than that of ProDer f 1, but was not significantly different from that of ProDer p 1. Our findings suggest that the C 1 is hypoallergenic and yet highly immunogenic, which makes it potentially safe and effective for use in SIT of allergic asthma. PMID:25120738

  15. Concentrated protein body product derived from rice endosperm as an oral tolerogen for allergen-specific immunotherapy--a new mucosal vaccine formulation against Japanese cedar pollen allergy.

    PubMed

    Wakasa, Yuhya; Takagi, Hidenori; Watanabe, Nobumasa; Kitamura, Noriko; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Ogo, Yuko; Hayashi, Shimpei; Yang, Lijun; Ohta, Masaru; Thet Tin, Wai Wai; Sekikawa, Kenji; Takano, Makoto; Ozawa, Kenjirou; Hiroi, Takachika; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum-derived type-I protein body (PB-I) from rice endosperm cells is an ideal candidate formulation for the oral delivery of bioencapsulated peptides as tolerogens for allergen-specific immunotherapy. In the present study, PBs containing the deconstructed Japanese cedar pollen allergens Cryptomeria japonica 1 (Cry j 1) and Cry j 2 were concentrated by treatment with thermostable α-amylase at 90°C to remove the starch from milled rice powder, which resulted in a 12.5-fold reduction of dry weight compared to the starting material. The modified Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 antigens in this concentrated PB product were more resistant to enzymatic digestion than those in the milled seed powder despite the absence of intact cell wall and starch, and remained stable for at least 10 months at room temperature without detectable loss or degradation. The high resistance of these allergens could be attributed to changes in protein physicochemical properties induced by the high temperature concentration process, as suggested by the decreased solubility of the antigens and seed proteins in PBs in step-wise-extraction experiments. Confocal microscopy showed that the morphology of antigen-containing PB-Is was preserved in the concentrated PB product. The concentrated PB product induced specific immune tolerance against Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 in mice when orally administered, supporting its potential use as a novel oral tolerogen formulation. PMID:25774686

  16. Concentrated protein body product derived from rice endosperm as an oral tolerogen for allergen-specific immunotherapy--a new mucosal vaccine formulation against Japanese cedar pollen allergy.

    PubMed

    Wakasa, Yuhya; Takagi, Hidenori; Watanabe, Nobumasa; Kitamura, Noriko; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Ogo, Yuko; Hayashi, Shimpei; Yang, Lijun; Ohta, Masaru; Thet Tin, Wai Wai; Sekikawa, Kenji; Takano, Makoto; Ozawa, Kenjirou; Hiroi, Takachika; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum-derived type-I protein body (PB-I) from rice endosperm cells is an ideal candidate formulation for the oral delivery of bioencapsulated peptides as tolerogens for allergen-specific immunotherapy. In the present study, PBs containing the deconstructed Japanese cedar pollen allergens Cryptomeria japonica 1 (Cry j 1) and Cry j 2 were concentrated by treatment with thermostable α-amylase at 90°C to remove the starch from milled rice powder, which resulted in a 12.5-fold reduction of dry weight compared to the starting material. The modified Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 antigens in this concentrated PB product were more resistant to enzymatic digestion than those in the milled seed powder despite the absence of intact cell wall and starch, and remained stable for at least 10 months at room temperature without detectable loss or degradation. The high resistance of these allergens could be attributed to changes in protein physicochemical properties induced by the high temperature concentration process, as suggested by the decreased solubility of the antigens and seed proteins in PBs in step-wise-extraction experiments. Confocal microscopy showed that the morphology of antigen-containing PB-Is was preserved in the concentrated PB product. The concentrated PB product induced specific immune tolerance against Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 in mice when orally administered, supporting its potential use as a novel oral tolerogen formulation.

  17. Vaccine development for allergen-specific immunotherapy based on recombinant allergens and synthetic allergen peptides: Lessons from the past and novel mechanisms of action for the future.

    PubMed

    Valenta, Rudolf; Campana, Raffaela; Focke-Tejkl, Margit; Niederberger, Verena

    2016-02-01

    In the past, the development of more effective, safe, convenient, broadly applicable, and easy to manufacture vaccines for allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been limited by the poor quality of natural allergen extracts. Progress made in the field of molecular allergen characterization has now made it possible to produce defined vaccines for AIT and eventually for preventive allergy vaccination based on recombinant DNA technology and synthetic peptide chemistry. Here we review the characteristics of recombinant and synthetic allergy vaccines that have reached clinical evaluation and discuss how molecular vaccine approaches can make AIT more safe and effective and thus more convenient. Furthermore, we discuss how new technologies can facilitate the reproducible manufacturing of vaccines of pharmaceutical grade for inhalant, food, and venom allergens. Allergy vaccines in clinical trials based on recombinant allergens, recombinant allergen derivatives, and synthetic peptides allow us to target selectively different immune mechanisms, and certain of those show features that might make them applicable not only for therapeutic but also for prophylactic vaccination.

  18. Vaccine development for allergen-specific immunotherapy based on recombinant allergens and synthetic allergen peptides: Lessons from the past and novel mechanisms of action for the future

    PubMed Central

    Valenta, Rudolf; Campana, Raffaela; Focke-Tejkl, Margit; Niederberger, Verena

    2016-01-01

    In the past, the development of more effective, safe, convenient, broadly applicable, and easy to manufacture vaccines for allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been limited by the poor quality of natural allergen extracts. Progress made in the field of molecular allergen characterization has now made it possible to produce defined vaccines for AIT and eventually for preventive allergy vaccination based on recombinant DNA technology and synthetic peptide chemistry. Here we review the characteristics of recombinant and synthetic allergy vaccines that have reached clinical evaluation and discuss how molecular vaccine approaches can make AIT more safe and effective and thus more convenient. Furthermore, we discuss how new technologies can facilitate the reproducible manufacturing of vaccines of pharmaceutical grade for inhalant, food, and venom allergens. Allergy vaccines in clinical trials based on recombinant allergens, recombinant allergen derivatives, and synthetic peptides allow us to target selectively different immune mechanisms, and certain of those show features that might make them applicable not only for therapeutic but also for prophylactic vaccination. PMID:26853127

  19. Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy Alters the Frequency, as well as the FcR and CLR Expression Profiles of Human Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Kristina; Rydnert, Frida; Broos, Sissela; Andersson, Morgan; Greiff, Lennart; Lindstedt, Malin

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) induces tolerance and shifts the Th2 response towards a regulatory T-cell profile. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood, but dendritic cells (DC) play a vital role as key regulators of T-cell responses. DCs interact with allergens via Fc receptors (FcRs) and via certain C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), including CD209/DC-SIGN, CD206/MR and Dectin-2/CLEC6A. In this study, the effect of AIT on the frequencies as well as the FcR and CLR expression profiles of human DC subsets was assessed. PBMC was isolated from peripheral blood from seven allergic donors before and after 8 weeks and 1 year of subcutaneous AIT, as well as from six non-allergic individuals. Cells were stained with antibodies against DC subset-specific markers and a panel of FcRs and CLRs and analyzed by flow cytometry. After 1 year of AIT, the frequency of CD123+ DCs was increased and a larger proportion expressed FcεRI. Furthermore, the expression of CD206 and Dectin-2 was reduced on CD141+ DCs after 1 year of treatment and CD206 as well as Dectin-1 was additionally down regulated in CD1c+ DCs. Interestingly, levels of DNGR1/CLEC9A on CD141+ DCs were increased by AIT, reaching levels similar to cells isolated from non-allergic controls. The modifications in phenotype and occurrence of specific DC subsets observed during AIT suggest an altered capacity of DC subsets to interact with allergens, which can be part of the mechanisms by which AIT induces allergen tolerance. PMID:26863539

  20. Update in the Mechanisms of Allergen-Specific Immunotheraphy

    PubMed Central

    Akkoc, Tunc; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2011-01-01

    Allergic diseases represent a complex innate and adoptive immune response to natural environmental allergens with Th2-type T cells and allergen-specific IgE predominance. Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the most effective therapeutic approach for disregulated immune response towards allergens by enhancing immune tolerance mechanisms. The main aim of immunotherapy is the generation of allergen nonresponsive or tolerant T cells in sensitized patients and downregulation of predominant T cell- and IgE-mediated immune responses. During allergen-specific immunotherapy, T regulatory cells are generated, which secrete IL-10 and induce allergen-specific B cells for the production of IgG4 antibodies. These mechanisms induce tolerance to antigens that reduces allergic symptoms. Although current knowledge highlights the role of T regulatory cell-mediated immunetolerance, definite mechanisms that lead to a successful clinical outcomes of allergen-specific immunotherapy still remains an open area of research. PMID:21217920

  1. Different Responses in Induction of Allergen Specific Immunoglobulin G4 and IgE-Blocking Factors for Three Mite Subcutaneous Immunotherapy Products

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Sang Chul; Son, Young Woong; Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Shin, Yoo Seob; Shin, Jung U; Sim, Da Woon; Park, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Kwang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Specific immunoglobulin G4 (sIgG4) and immunoglobulin E (IgE)-blocking factors produced by subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) play a critical role in the induction of allergen tolerance. However, comparative studies of available SCIT reagents on the induction of sIgG4 are limited. We compared increases in sIgG4 for three different house dust mite (HDM) SCIT reagents. Materials and Methods Seventy-two HDM sensitized allergic patients were enrolled and classified into four groups: 1) control (n=27), 2) SCIT with Hollister-Stier® (n=19), 3) Tyrosine S® (n=16), and 4) Novo-Helisen® (n=10). Levels of specific IgE (sIgE), sIgG4, and IgE blocking factor to Dermatophagoides farinae (D. farinae) were measured using ImmunoCAP (sIgE, sIgG4) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (IgE-blocking factors). Levels were measured before and 13.9±6.6 months after the SCIT. The allergen specificity and the induction levels of sIgE and sIgG4 were confirmed by immunoblot analysis. Results After SCIT, sIgG4 levels to D. farinae increased significantly; however, the increases differed significantly among the SCIT groups (p<0.001). Specific IgG4 levels to D. farinae were highest in Hollister-Stier® (3.7±4.1 mg/L), followed by Novo-Helisen® (2.2±2.3 mg/L) and Tyrosine S® (0.7±0.5 mg/L). In addition, patients who were administered using Hollister-Stier® showed the most significant decrease in IgE/IgG4 ratio (p<0.001) and increase in blocking factor (p=0.009). Finally, according to IgE immunoblot results, the Hollister-Stier® group showed the most significant attenuation of IgE binding patterns among others. Conclusion Currently available SCIT reagents induce different levels of specific IgG4, IgE/IgG4 ratio, and IgE-blocking factor. PMID:27593871

  2. A Naturally Occurring Hypoallergenic Variant of Vespid Antigen 5 from Polybia scutellaris Venom as a Candidate for Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vinzón, Sabrina E.; Marino-Buslje, Cristina; Rivera, Elena; Biscoglio de Jiménez Bonino, Mirtha

    2012-01-01

    Stings by insects from the Hymenoptera order are known to cause life-threatening allergic reactions and impair life quality. Despite the effectiveness of conventional vespid venom immunotherapy, more standardized and safer allergy vaccines are required and recombinant hypoallergenic variants are important clinical tools. Antigen 5 is a major allergen of vespid venoms and it was previously reported that Antigen 5 from Polybia scutellaris (Poly s 5) could be a hypoallergenic variant. In this work we assess the immunological behavior and allergenic activity of Poly s 5 in order to explore its suitability for specific immunotherapy. With this aim, recombinant Poly s 5 was expressed in Pichia pastoris and the presence of cross-reactive epitopes with Pol a 5, a known allergenic Antigen 5, was investigated both at the IgG and IgE levels, by ELISA assays and a basophil-mediator release assay respectively. A molecular model was also built to better understand the relationship between immunological and structural aspects. In mice, Poly s 5 induced IgG antibodies which cross-reacted with Pol a 5. However, Poly s 5 induced only minimal amounts of IgE and was a poor inducer of basophil-mediator release, even when the cells were sensitized with Pol a 5-specific IgE. Moreover, Poly s 5-specific serum showed a specific protective activity and was able to inhibit the Pol a 5-induced basophil degranulation. Structural analysis from the molecular model revealed that a few amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal region of Poly s 5 should lead to an alteration of the surface topography and electrostatic potential of the epitopes which could be responsible for its hypoallergenic behavior. These findings, taken as a whole, show that Poly s 5 is likely a naturally occurring hypoallergenic Antigen 5 variant. PMID:22844463

  3. Characterization of mutants of a highly cross-reactive calcium-binding protein from Brassica pollen for allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Garmatiuk, Tetiana; Swoboda, Ines; Twardosz-Kropfmüller, Anna; Dall'antonia, Fabio; Keller, Walter; Singh, Mohan B; Bhalla, Prem L; Okada, Takashi; Toriyama, Kinya; Weber, Milena; Ghannadan, Minoo; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Blatt, Katharina; Valent, Peter; Klein, Brigitte; Niederberger, Verena; Curin, Mirela; Balic, Nadja; Spitzauer, Susanne; Valenta, Rudolf

    2013-09-01

    The major turnip (Brassica rapa) pollen allergen, belongs to a family of calcium-binding proteins (i.e., two EF-hand proteins), which occur as highly cross-reactive allergens in pollen of weeds, grasses and trees. In this study, the IgE binding capacity and allergenic activity of three recombinant allergen variants containing mutations in their calcium-binding sites were analyzed in sensitized patients with the aim to identify the most suitable hypoallergenic molecule for specific immunotherapy. Analysis of the wildtype allergen and the mutants regarding IgE reactivity and activation of basophils in allergic patients indicated that the allergen derivative mutated in both calcium-binding domains had the lowest allergenic activity. Gel filtration and circular dichroism experiments showed that both, the wildtype and the double mutant, occurred as dimers in solution and assumed alpha-helical fold, respectively. However, both fold and thermal stability were considerably reduced in the double mutant. The use of bioinformatic tools for evaluation of the solvent accessibility and charge distribution suggested that the reduced IgE reactivity and different structural properties of the double mutant may be due to a loss of negatively charged amino acids on the surface. Interestingly, immunization of rabbits showed that only the double mutant but not the wildtype allergen induced IgG antibodies which recognized the allergen and blocked binding of allergic patients IgE. Due to the extensive structural similarity and cross-reactivity between calcium-binding pollen allergens the hypoallergenic double mutant may be useful not only for immunotherapy of turnip pollen allergy, but also for the treatment of allergies to other two EF-hand pollen allergens. PMID:23790497

  4. Characterization of mutants of a highly cross-reactive calcium-binding protein from Brassica pollen for allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Garmatiuk, Tetiana; Swoboda, Ines; Twardosz-Kropfmüller, Anna; Dall'antonia, Fabio; Keller, Walter; Singh, Mohan B; Bhalla, Prem L; Okada, Takashi; Toriyama, Kinya; Weber, Milena; Ghannadan, Minoo; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Blatt, Katharina; Valent, Peter; Klein, Brigitte; Niederberger, Verena; Curin, Mirela; Balic, Nadja; Spitzauer, Susanne; Valenta, Rudolf

    2013-09-01

    The major turnip (Brassica rapa) pollen allergen, belongs to a family of calcium-binding proteins (i.e., two EF-hand proteins), which occur as highly cross-reactive allergens in pollen of weeds, grasses and trees. In this study, the IgE binding capacity and allergenic activity of three recombinant allergen variants containing mutations in their calcium-binding sites were analyzed in sensitized patients with the aim to identify the most suitable hypoallergenic molecule for specific immunotherapy. Analysis of the wildtype allergen and the mutants regarding IgE reactivity and activation of basophils in allergic patients indicated that the allergen derivative mutated in both calcium-binding domains had the lowest allergenic activity. Gel filtration and circular dichroism experiments showed that both, the wildtype and the double mutant, occurred as dimers in solution and assumed alpha-helical fold, respectively. However, both fold and thermal stability were considerably reduced in the double mutant. The use of bioinformatic tools for evaluation of the solvent accessibility and charge distribution suggested that the reduced IgE reactivity and different structural properties of the double mutant may be due to a loss of negatively charged amino acids on the surface. Interestingly, immunization of rabbits showed that only the double mutant but not the wildtype allergen induced IgG antibodies which recognized the allergen and blocked binding of allergic patients IgE. Due to the extensive structural similarity and cross-reactivity between calcium-binding pollen allergens the hypoallergenic double mutant may be useful not only for immunotherapy of turnip pollen allergy, but also for the treatment of allergies to other two EF-hand pollen allergens.

  5. A naturally occurring hypoallergenic variant of vespid Antigen 5 from Polybia scutellaris venom as a candidate for allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vinzón, Sabrina E; Marino-Buslje, Cristina; Rivera, Elena; Biscoglio de Jiménez Bonino, Mirtha

    2012-01-01

    Stings by insects from the Hymenoptera order are known to cause life-threatening allergic reactions and impair life quality. Despite the effectiveness of conventional vespid venom immunotherapy, more standardized and safer allergy vaccines are required and recombinant hypoallergenic variants are important clinical tools. Antigen 5 is a major allergen of vespid venoms and it was previously reported that Antigen 5 from Polybia scutellaris (Poly s 5) could be a hypoallergenic variant. In this work we assess the immunological behavior and allergenic activity of Poly s 5 in order to explore its suitability for specific immunotherapy. With this aim, recombinant Poly s 5 was expressed in Pichia pastoris and the presence of cross-reactive epitopes with Pol a 5, a known allergenic Antigen 5, was investigated both at the IgG and IgE levels, by ELISA assays and a basophil-mediator release assay respectively. A molecular model was also built to better understand the relationship between immunological and structural aspects. In mice, Poly s 5 induced IgG antibodies which cross-reacted with Pol a 5. However, Poly s 5 induced only minimal amounts of IgE and was a poor inducer of basophil-mediator release, even when the cells were sensitized with Pol a 5-specific IgE. Moreover, Poly s 5-specific serum showed a specific protective activity and was able to inhibit the Pol a 5-induced basophil degranulation. Structural analysis from the molecular model revealed that a few amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal region of Poly s 5 should lead to an alteration of the surface topography and electrostatic potential of the epitopes which could be responsible for its hypoallergenic behavior. These findings, taken as a whole, show that Poly s 5 is likely a naturally occurring hypoallergenic Antigen 5 variant. PMID:22844463

  6. A naturally occurring hypoallergenic variant of vespid Antigen 5 from Polybia scutellaris venom as a candidate for allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vinzón, Sabrina E; Marino-Buslje, Cristina; Rivera, Elena; Biscoglio de Jiménez Bonino, Mirtha

    2012-01-01

    Stings by insects from the Hymenoptera order are known to cause life-threatening allergic reactions and impair life quality. Despite the effectiveness of conventional vespid venom immunotherapy, more standardized and safer allergy vaccines are required and recombinant hypoallergenic variants are important clinical tools. Antigen 5 is a major allergen of vespid venoms and it was previously reported that Antigen 5 from Polybia scutellaris (Poly s 5) could be a hypoallergenic variant. In this work we assess the immunological behavior and allergenic activity of Poly s 5 in order to explore its suitability for specific immunotherapy. With this aim, recombinant Poly s 5 was expressed in Pichia pastoris and the presence of cross-reactive epitopes with Pol a 5, a known allergenic Antigen 5, was investigated both at the IgG and IgE levels, by ELISA assays and a basophil-mediator release assay respectively. A molecular model was also built to better understand the relationship between immunological and structural aspects. In mice, Poly s 5 induced IgG antibodies which cross-reacted with Pol a 5. However, Poly s 5 induced only minimal amounts of IgE and was a poor inducer of basophil-mediator release, even when the cells were sensitized with Pol a 5-specific IgE. Moreover, Poly s 5-specific serum showed a specific protective activity and was able to inhibit the Pol a 5-induced basophil degranulation. Structural analysis from the molecular model revealed that a few amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal region of Poly s 5 should lead to an alteration of the surface topography and electrostatic potential of the epitopes which could be responsible for its hypoallergenic behavior. These findings, taken as a whole, show that Poly s 5 is likely a naturally occurring hypoallergenic Antigen 5 variant.

  7. 100 years of immunotherapy: the Monaco charter. under the high patronage of His Serene Highness Prince Albert II of Monaco.

    PubMed

    Canonica, G Walter; Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E; Compalati, Enrico; Bohle, Barbara; Bonini, Sergio; Bousquet, Jean; Cox, Linda; Fink-Wagner, Antje H; González Díaz, Sandra; Jacobsen, Lars; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Pawankar, Ruby; Vieths, Stefan; Yusuf, Osman; Zuberbier, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    Aims of the Monaco Charter: (1) to present the current evidence on the efficacy and safety of allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) and to address the reasons for its underuse in clinical practice; (2) to develop strategies to increase the awareness about the benefits and the hazards of SIT in allergic patients, lay public and healthcare professionals not trained in allergy, and (3) to make SIT accessible and affordable to eligible patients.

  8. New treatments for allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Mübeccel

    2014-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) represents the only curative and specific way for the treatment of allergic diseases, which have reached a pandemic dimension in industrial countries affecting up to 20-30% of the population. Although applied for 100 years to cure allergy, SIT still faces several problems related to side effects and limited efficacy. Currently, allergen-SIT is performed with vaccines based on allergen extracts that can cause severe, often life threatening, anaphylactic reactions as well as new IgE sensitization to other allergens present in the extract. Low patient adherence and high costs due to long duration (3 to 5 years) of treatment have been commonly reported. Several strategies have been developed to tackle these issues and it became possible to produce recombinant allergen-SIT vaccines with reduced allergenic activity.

  9. New treatments for allergen immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) represents the only curative and specific way for the treatment of allergic diseases, which have reached a pandemic dimension in industrial countries affecting up to 20-30% of the population. Although applied for 100 years to cure allergy, SIT still faces several problems related to side effects and limited efficacy. Currently, allergen-SIT is performed with vaccines based on allergen extracts that can cause severe, often life threatening, anaphylactic reactions as well as new IgE sensitization to other allergens present in the extract. Low patient adherence and high costs due to long duration (3 to 5 years) of treatment have been commonly reported. Several strategies have been developed to tackle these issues and it became possible to produce recombinant allergen-SIT vaccines with reduced allergenic activity. PMID:25258656

  10. Role of interleukin 10 in specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Akdis, C A; Blesken, T; Akdis, M; Wüthrich, B; Blaser, K

    1998-01-01

    The induction of allergen-specific anergy in peripheral T cells represents a key step in specific immunotherapy (SIT). Here we demonstrate that the anergic state results from increased IL-10 production. In bee venom (BV)-SIT the specific proliferative and cytokine responses against the main allergen, the phospholipase A2 (PLA), and T cell epitope-containing PLA peptides were significantly suppressed after 7 d of treatment. Simultaneously, the production of IL-10 increased during BV-SIT. After 28 d of BV-SIT the anergic state was established. Intracytoplasmic cytokine staining of PBMC combined with surface marker detection revealed that IL-10 was produced initially by activated CD4(+)CD25(+), allergen-specific T cells, and followed by B cells and monocytes. Neutralization of IL-10 in PBMC fully reconstituted the specific proliferative and cytokine responses. A similar state of IL-10-associated T cell anergy, as induced in BV-SIT, was found in hyperimmune individuals who recently had received multiple bee stings. The addition of IL-10 to soluble CD40 ligand IL-4-stimulated PBMC or purified B cells inhibited the PLA-specific and total IgE and enhanced the IgG4 formation. Accordingly, increased IL-10 production by SIT causes specific anergy in peripheral T cells, and regulates specific IgE and IgG4 production toward normal IgG4-related immunity. PMID:9649562

  11. New routes for allergen immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Pål; von Moos, Seraina; Mohanan, Deepa; Kündig, Thomas M.; Senti, Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    IgE-mediated allergy is a highly prevalent disease in the industrialized world. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) should be the preferred treatment, as it has long lasting protective effects and can stop the progression of the disease. However, few allergic patients choose to undergo SIT, due to the long treatment time and potential allergic adverse events. Since the beneficial effects of SIT are mediated by antigen presenting cells inducing Th1, Treg and antibody responses, whereas the adverse events are caused by mast cells and basophils, the therapeutic window of SIT may be widened by targeting tissues rich in antigen presenting cells. Lymph nodes and the epidermis contain high density of dendritic cells and low numbers of mast cells and basophils. The epidermis has the added benefit of not being vascularised thereby reducing the chances of anaphylactic shock due to leakage of allergen. Hence, both these tissues represent highly promising routes for SIT and are the focus of discussion in this review. PMID:23095873

  12. Onset of oral allergic syndrome during birch sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ciprandi, G

    2012-08-01

    Pollen allergy may be frequently associated with oral allergy to fruits and/or vegetables (the so called oral allergic syndrome). Some studies reported a possible positive effect exerted by allergen-specific immunotherapy on OAS course, while others did not. A case of OAS case onset after starting sublingual immunotherapy is reported.

  13. Construction of the recombinant vaccine based on T-cell epitope encoding Der p1 and evaluation on its specific immunotherapy efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinhong; Li, Chaopin; Zhao, Beibei; Xu, Pengfei; Xu, Haifeng; He, Lianping

    2015-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) is currently recognized as the only etiological therapy to ameliorate asthmatic symptom. The current study was aimed at evaluating the immune effect of vaccine MAT3T designed on MHCII pathway, which includes T cell fusion peptide encoding Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus class 1 allergen (Der p1). We initially cloned the nucleotide sequences of TAT, IhC and 3 segments of T cell epitope coding for Der p1, and reassembled these sequences in linear manner to form fusion gene named MAT3T, which was applied to immunize the asthmatic models of mice induced by Der p1 allergen for tentative SIT. ELISA results showed that MAT3T was able to increase the level of IFN-γ in BALF and allergen specific antibody IgG2a in serum, while decrease the level of IL-13 in BALF and allergen specific antibody IgE and IgG1. Pathological confirmation further revealed that the inflammatory reactions and inflammatory cell infiltration were totally reduced in lung tissue of mice after MAT3T treatment. Our results show that the recombinant allergen MAT3T can effectively correct the imbalance of Th1/Th2, and MAT3T may be used as candidate vaccine against asthma on SIT basis. PMID:26131270

  14. Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination with carrier-bound Bet v 1 peptides lacking allergen-specific T cell epitopes reduces Bet v 1-specific T cell responses via blocking antibodies in a murine model for birch pollen allergy

    PubMed Central

    Linhart, B; Narayanan, M; Focke-Tejkl, M; Wrba, F; Vrtala, S; Valenta, R

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaccines consisting of allergen-derived peptides lacking IgE reactivity and allergen-specific T cell epitopes bound to allergen-unrelated carrier molecules have been suggested as candidates for allergen-specific immunotherapy. Objective To study whether prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination with carrier-bound peptides from the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 lacking allergen-specific T cell epitopes has influence on Bet v 1-specific T cell responses. Methods Three Bet v 1-derived peptides, devoid of Bet v 1-specific T cell epitopes, were coupled to KLH and adsorbed to aluminium hydroxide to obtain a Bet v 1-specific allergy vaccine. Groups of BALB/c mice were immunized with the peptide vaccine before or after sensitization to Bet v 1. Bet v 1- and peptide-specific antibody responses were analysed by ELISA. T cell and cytokine responses to Bet v 1, KLH, and the peptides were studied in proliferation assays. The effects of peptide-specific and allergen-specific antibodies on T cell responses and allergic lung inflammation were studied using specific antibodies. Results Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination with carrier-bound Bet v 1 peptides induced a Bet v 1-specific IgG antibody response without priming/boosting of Bet v 1-specific T cells. Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination of mice with the peptide vaccine induced Bet v 1-specific antibodies which suppressed Bet v 1-specific T cell responses and allergic lung inflammation. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance Vaccination with carrier-bound allergen-derived peptides lacking allergen-specific T cell epitopes induces allergen-specific IgG antibodies which suppress allergen-specific T cell responses and allergic lung inflammation. PMID:24447086

  15. Factors affecting allergen-specific IgE serum levels in cats

    PubMed Central

    Belova, S.; Wilhelm, S.; Linek, M.; Beco, L.; Fontaine, J.; Bergvall, K.; Favrot, C.

    2012-01-01

    Pruritic skin diseases are common in cats and demand rigorous diagnostic workup for finding an underlying etiology. Measurement of a serum allergen-specific IgE in a pruritic cat is often used to make or confirm the diagnosis of a skin hypersensitivity disease, although current evidence suggests that elevated allergen-specific IgE do not always correlate with a clinical disease and vice versa. The aim of the study was to to assess the possible influence of age, deworming status, lifestyle, flea treatment, and gender on allergen-specific IgE levels and to evaluate the reliability of IgE testing in predicting the final diagnosis of a pruritic cat. For this purpose sera of 179 cats with pruritus of different causes and 20 healthy cats were evaluated for allergen-specific IgE against environmental, food and flea allergens using the Fc-epsilon receptor based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test. The results of the study showed positive correlation between age, outdoor life style, absence of deworming, absence of flea control measures and levels of allergen-specific IgE. Gender and living area (urban versus rural) did not seem to affect the formation of allergen-specific IgE. According to these findings, evaluating allergen-specific IgE levels, is not a reliable test to diagnose hypersensitivity to food or environmental allergens in cats. On the contrary, this test can be successfully used for diagnosing feline flea bite hypersensitivity. PMID:22754094

  16. Hypoallergenic molecules for subcutaneous immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jongejan, Laurian; van Ree, Ronald; Poulsen, Lars K

    2016-01-01

    Although a large part of the population suffers from allergies, a cure is not yet available. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) offers promise for these patients. AIT has proven successful in insect and venom allergies; however, for food allergy this is still unclear. In this editorial we focus on the recent advances in a proof of concept study in food allergy, FAST (Food allergy specific immunotherapy), which may increase interest within the biomolecular and pharmaceutical industry to embark on similar projects of immunology driven precision medicine within the allergy field.

  17. Hypoallergenic molecules for subcutaneous immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jongejan, Laurian; van Ree, Ronald; Poulsen, Lars K

    2016-01-01

    Although a large part of the population suffers from allergies, a cure is not yet available. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) offers promise for these patients. AIT has proven successful in insect and venom allergies; however, for food allergy this is still unclear. In this editorial we focus on the recent advances in a proof of concept study in food allergy, FAST (Food allergy specific immunotherapy), which may increase interest within the biomolecular and pharmaceutical industry to embark on similar projects of immunology driven precision medicine within the allergy field. PMID:26558320

  18. FAST: towards safe and effective subcutaneous immunotherapy of persistent life-threatening food allergies.

    PubMed

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Poulsen, Lars K; Neubauer, Angela; Asturias, Juan; Blom, Lars; Boye, Joyce; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Clausen, Michael; Ferrara, Rosa; Garosi, Paula; Huber, Hans; Jensen, Bettina M; Koppelman, Stef; Kowalski, Marek L; Lewandowska-Polak, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Maillere, Bernard; Mari, Adriano; Martinez, Alberto; Mills, Clare En; Nicoletti, Claudio; Opstelten, Dirk-Jan; Papadopoulos, Nikos G; Portoles, Antonio; Rigby, Neil; Scala, Enrico; Schnoor, Heidi J; Sigurdardottir, Sigurveig T; Stavroulakis, George; Stolz, Frank; Swoboda, Ines; Valenta, Rudolf; van den Hout, Rob; Versteeg, Serge A; Witten, Marianne; van Ree, Ronald

    2012-03-09

    The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections with aqueous food extracts may be effective but has proven to be accompanied by too many anaphylactic side-effects. FAST aims to develop a safe alternative by replacing food extracts with hypoallergenic recombinant major allergens as the active ingredients of SIT. Both severe fish and peach allergy are caused by a single major allergen, parvalbumin (Cyp c 1) and lipid transfer protein (Pru p 3), respectively. Two approaches are being evaluated for achieving hypoallergenicity, i.e. site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification. The most promising hypoallergens will be produced under GMP conditions. After pre-clinical testing (toxicology testing and efficacy in mouse models), SCIT with alum-absorbed hypoallergens will be evaluated in phase I/IIa and IIb randomized double-blind placebo-controlled (DBPC) clinical trials, with the DBPC food challenge as primary read-out. To understand the underlying immune mechanisms in depth serological and cellular immune analyses will be performed, allowing identification of novel biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. FAST aims at improving the quality of life of food allergic patients by providing a safe and effective treatment that will significantly lower their threshold for fish or peach intake, thereby decreasing their anxiety and dependence on rescue medication.

  19. Allergen-Specific Cytokine Polarization Protects Shetland Ponies against Culicoides obsoletus-Induced Insect Bite Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbroeks, Chantal; van der Lugt, Jaco J.; van der Meide, Nathalie M. A.; Willemse, Ton; Rutten, Victor P. M. G.; Zaiss, Dietmar M. W.

    2015-01-01

    The immunological mechanisms explaining development of an allergy in some individuals and not in others remain incompletely understood. Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a common, seasonal, IgE-mediated, pruritic skin disorder that affects considerable proportions of horses of different breeds, which is caused by bites of the insect Culicoides obsoletus (C. obsoletus). We investigated the allergen-specific immune status of individual horses that had either been diagnosed to be healthy or to suffer of IBH. Following intradermal allergen injection, skin biopsies were taken of IBH-affected and healthy ponies and cytokine expression was determined by RT-PCR. In addition, allergen-specific antibody titers were measured and cytokine expression of in vitro stimulated, allergen-specific CD4 T-cells was determined. 24 hrs after allergen injection, a significant increase in mRNA expression of the type-2 cytokine IL-4 was observed in the skin of IBH-affected Shetland ponies. In the skin of healthy ponies, however, an increase in IFNγ mRNA expression was found. Analysis of allergen-specific antibody titers revealed that all animals produced allergen-specific antibodies, and allergen-specific stimulation of CD4 T-cells revealed a significant higher percentage of IFNγ-expressing CD4 T-cells in healthy ponies compared to IBH-affected ponies. These data indicate that horses not affected by IBH, in contrast to the so far established dogma, are not immunologically ignorant but have a Th1-skewed allergen-specific immune response that appears to protect against IBH-associated symptoms. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of a natural situation, in which an allergen-specific immune skewing is protective in an allergic disorder. PMID:25901733

  20. Efficacies of immunotherapy with polypeptide vaccine from ProDer f 1 in asthmatic mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaopin; Li, Qiuyu; Jiang, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    Allergic asthma is associated with the major house dust mite group 1 allergens Der p 1 and Der f 1, which belongs to the papin-like protease family and is the most potent of indoor allergens and allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), is seen as effective intervention for the entity. The current study was designed to verify the SIT efficacies of the enzymatic hydrolysates (papain and trypsin) in mice with asthma. We initially developed the asthmatic mouse models with ProDer f 1, and respectively applied recombinant ProDer f 1 protein and the two kinds of enzymatic hydrolysates for SIT. The results were verified by measuring the contents of IL-4, IL-10, IL-17 and IFN-γ changed in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and supernatant of splenocyte culture as well as level changes of specific IgE and IgG2a in the serum. After SIT intervention, the symptoms of allergic inflammation was alleviated significantly in mice treated with ProDer f 1 protein and the two enzymatic hydrolysates via detection of the lung tissue sections, and infiltration of inflammatory cells was also notably depressed as compared with the models, though the epithelial structure in airways remained similar with the PBS group. In addition, we observed lower serum contents of the specific IgE antibody and lower levels of IL-4, IL-17 in BALF and splenic cells in mice undergone SIT, whereas specific IgG2a, IFN-γ and IL-10 in BALF and supernatant of splenocyte culture were higher as compared to the asthma group. The findings suggest the SIT using the above two kinds of hydrolysates may effectively inhibit the allergic inflammation in the airways of mouse models sensitized with ProDer f 1 protein. PMID:25932130

  1. Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells Derived from Donors with Natural Rubber Latex Allergy Modulate Allergen-Specific T-Cell Responses and IgE Production

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Alejandro; Aguirre, Adam; Guzmán, María Antonieta; González, Rodrigo; Catalán, Diego; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Larrondo, Milton; López, Mercedes; Pesce, Barbara; Rolland, Jennifer; O’Hehir, Robyn; Aguillón, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Natural rubber latex (NRL; Hevea brasiliensis) allergy is an IgE-mediated reaction to latex proteins. When latex glove exposure is the main sensitizing agent, Hev b 5 is one of the major allergens. Dendritic cells (DC), the main antigen presenting cells, modulated with pharmacological agents can restore tolerance in several experimental models, including allergy. In the current study, we aimed to generate DC with tolerogenic properties from NRL-allergic patients and evaluate their ability to modulate allergen-specific T and B cell responses. Here we show that dexamethasone-treated DC (dxDC) differentiated into a subset of DC, characterized by low expression of MHC class II, CD40, CD80, CD86 and CD83 molecules. Compared with LPS-matured DC, dxDC secreted lower IL-12 and higher IL-10 after CD40L activation, and induced lower alloantigenic T cell proliferation. We also show that dxDC pulsed with the dominant Hev b 5 T-cell epitope peptide, Hev b 546–65, inhibited both proliferation of Hev b 5-specific T-cell lines and the production of Hev b 5-specific IgE. Additionally, dxDC induced a subpopulation of IL-10-producing regulatory T cells that suppressed proliferation of Hev b 5-primed T cells. In conclusion, dxDC generated from NRL-allergic patients can modulate allergen-specific T-cell responses and IgE production, supporting their potential use in allergen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:24465795

  2. Specific immunotherapy in atopic dermatitis--Four-year treatment in different age and airborne allergy type subgroups.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka-Operacz, Magdalena; Silny, Wojciech

    2006-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory disease involving the skin and frequently other organs and systems such as respiratory system. The recently recognized atopic nature of the skin inflammation in AD has raised a growing interest in the treatment with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT). In this study, the efficacy of SIT was evaluated in a group of 37 AD patients aged 5-44 years: 14 allergic to house dust mites (HDM), 17 to grass pollen allergens, and 6 allergic to grass and mugwort pollen allergens. IgE-mediated airborne allergy was well documented in all cases. SIT was performed with Novo Helisen Depot allergy vaccines of appropriate composition. Control group included 29 patients with AD and confirmed IgE-mediated airborne allergy to analogous allergens: HDM, 14 patients; grass pollen allergens, 11 patients; and grass and mugwort pollen allergens, 4 patients. Conventional methods of AD treatment were used in the control group. Clinical evaluation of patients was performed with W-AZS index after 12, 24, 36 and 48 months of therapy. SIT was found to be an efficacious and safe method of treatment for selected patients with AD and IgE-mediated airborne allergy. The efficacy of this therapeutic method was significantly higher than that recorded by conventional methods used in the control group in all 3 age subgroups and all 3 types of airborne allergy (HDM, grass pollen, and grass and mugwort pollen). It is concluded that SIT may be highly promising method of controlling skin inflammation in AD with the potential to prevent the development of AD into respiratory allergy.

  3. Design of a ProDer f 1 vaccine delivered by the MHC class II pathway of antigen presentation and analysis of the effectiveness for specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiming; Jiang, Yuxin; Li, Chaopin

    2014-01-01

    Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f 1) is one of leading cause for allergic asthma, and allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is currently recognized as the only etiological therapy to ameliorate asthmatic symptom. The current study was designed on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II pathway, invariant chain (Ii)-segment hybrids as vaccine basis to explore the efficacy of Der f 1 hybrid vaccine by virtue of Ii as carrier in enhancing the protective immune response to asthma. Initially, we engineered a fused molecule, DCP-IhC-ProDer f 1, to deliver ProDer f 1 antigen via specific dendritic cell-targeting peptides to dendritic cells (DCs). Then the DCP-IhC-ProDer f 1 was immunized to the asthmatic models of murine induced by ProDer f 1 allergen. The findings showed that the cytokine repertoire in the murine model was shifted after SIT, including stronger secretion of IFN-γ and IL-10, and a decreased production of IL-4 and IL-17. ELISA determination revealed that the hybrid displayed weak IgE and IgG1 reactivities, and IgG2a levels were elevated. Furthermore, DCP-IhC-ProDer f 1 treatment inhibited inflammatory cell infiltration in the lung tissues. Our results suggest that the DCP-Ihc-ProDer f 1 may be used as a candidate SIT against asthma. PMID:25197336

  4. Targeting dendritic cells in allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Novak, Natalija

    2006-05-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is a well-established strategy for treating allergic diseases with the goal of inducing allergen-specific tolerance. Identified mechanisms contributing to the therapeutic effect of immunotherapy include a shift of T helper 2 (Th2)-type immune responses to a modified Th2 immune response, a change of the balance of IgE-producing B cells to the production of IgG subtypes, in addition to increased IL-10 and TGF-beta secretion and activation of the suppressive functions of regulatory T-cells. Dendritic cells (DCs), which as outposts of the immune system are capable of T-cell priming through efficient allergen uptake by IgE receptors expressed on their cell surface. Most of the hypotheses concerning the function of DCs as facilitators of allergen-specific tolerance in allergen immunotherapy remain speculative. Therefore, studies must focus on the functional changes of DCs under immunotherapy to close the gap of knowledge about their exact role. These experimental data should help confirm the hypothesis of DCs as efficient silencers and potential target cells and take advantage of the bivalent character and tolerogenic properties of DCs. PMID:16701146

  5. Pediatric investigation plans for specific immunotherapy: Questionable contributions to childhood health.

    PubMed

    Rose, Klaus; Kopp, Matthias Volkmar

    2015-12-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only disease-modifying treatment for children, adolescents, and adults with allergic diseases. The EU has a combined system of national and EU-wide marketing authorization for all medicines. Germany introduced a new therapy allergen ordinance in 2008. Allergen products manufacturers had to apply for marketing authorization application for the major allergen groups (grass group, birch group, mites group, bee/wasp venom). Due to the EU pediatric regulation, in force since 2007, manufacturers had also to submit a pediatric investigation plan (PIP) for each allergen product. We investigated the allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC) standard PIP, developed jointly by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the German Paul Ehrlich Institut (PEI). We analyzed the 118 EMA PIP decisions, looked for SIT trials in children in www.clinicaltrials.gov, and further analyzed EMA/EU justifications. The PIPs request a 1-year dose-finding study in adults, a 5-year placebo-controlled (PC) efficacy & safety (E&S) study in adults, and a 5-year PC E&S study in children. Fifty-eight PIP development programs will have to be performed until 2031. But children benefit even more from SIT for ARC than adults. There is no convincing medical/scientific justification for PC E&S studies in children in the relevant EMA documents. The PIP requirement to withhold effective treatment to thousands of children in the placebo group over a 5-year period raises profound concerns. The EMA justifications are formalistic and lack scientific foundation. A critical academic review of the ARC PIPs and the entire PIP system is urgently needed. PMID:26495999

  6. Pediatric investigation plans for specific immunotherapy: Questionable contributions to childhood health.

    PubMed

    Rose, Klaus; Kopp, Matthias Volkmar

    2015-12-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only disease-modifying treatment for children, adolescents, and adults with allergic diseases. The EU has a combined system of national and EU-wide marketing authorization for all medicines. Germany introduced a new therapy allergen ordinance in 2008. Allergen products manufacturers had to apply for marketing authorization application for the major allergen groups (grass group, birch group, mites group, bee/wasp venom). Due to the EU pediatric regulation, in force since 2007, manufacturers had also to submit a pediatric investigation plan (PIP) for each allergen product. We investigated the allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC) standard PIP, developed jointly by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the German Paul Ehrlich Institut (PEI). We analyzed the 118 EMA PIP decisions, looked for SIT trials in children in www.clinicaltrials.gov, and further analyzed EMA/EU justifications. The PIPs request a 1-year dose-finding study in adults, a 5-year placebo-controlled (PC) efficacy & safety (E&S) study in adults, and a 5-year PC E&S study in children. Fifty-eight PIP development programs will have to be performed until 2031. But children benefit even more from SIT for ARC than adults. There is no convincing medical/scientific justification for PC E&S studies in children in the relevant EMA documents. The PIP requirement to withhold effective treatment to thousands of children in the placebo group over a 5-year period raises profound concerns. The EMA justifications are formalistic and lack scientific foundation. A critical academic review of the ARC PIPs and the entire PIP system is urgently needed.

  7. Modulation of immune responses by immunotherapy in allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Cavkaytar, Ozlem; Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2014-08-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been used for 100 years and until now different immunoregulatory pathways have been shown to take place in its mechanisms of action. It is characterized by administration of the causative allergen and is shown to be clinically efficient even after discontinuation of therapy particularly in allergic respiratory diseases, bee venom allergy, and food allergy. Generation of antigen/allergen-specific peripheral tolerance is the key mechanism during immunotherapy. It is mediated by development of T and B regulatory cells, IgG4 isotype allergen-specific antibodies and the involvement of multiple suppressor factors, which lead to decreased tissue inflammation, early and late phase responses. Describing novel regulatory mechanisms in the process of immune tolerance induction will help to identify treatment modalities not only for allergic disorders, but also for autoimmune diseases, organ transplantation, chronic infections, and cancer.

  8. Concentrated Protein Body Product Derived from Rice Endosperm as an Oral Tolerogen for Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy—A New Mucosal Vaccine Formulation against Japanese Cedar Pollen Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Wakasa, Yuhya; Takagi, Hidenori; Watanabe, Nobumasa; Kitamura, Noriko; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Ogo, Yuko; Hayashi, Shimpei; Yang, Lijun; Ohta, Masaru; Thet Tin, Wai Wai; Sekikawa, Kenji; Takano, Makoto; Ozawa, Kenjirou; Hiroi, Takachika; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum-derived type-I protein body (PB-I) from rice endosperm cells is an ideal candidate formulation for the oral delivery of bioencapsulated peptides as tolerogens for allergen-specific immunotherapy. In the present study, PBs containing the deconstructed Japanese cedar pollen allergens Cryptomeria japonica 1 (Cry j 1) and Cry j 2 were concentrated by treatment with thermostable α-amylase at 90°C to remove the starch from milled rice powder, which resulted in a 12.5-fold reduction of dry weight compared to the starting material. The modified Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 antigens in this concentrated PB product were more resistant to enzymatic digestion than those in the milled seed powder despite the absence of intact cell wall and starch, and remained stable for at least 10 months at room temperature without detectable loss or degradation. The high resistance of these allergens could be attributed to changes in protein physicochemical properties induced by the high temperature concentration process, as suggested by the decreased solubility of the antigens and seed proteins in PBs in step-wise-extraction experiments. Confocal microscopy showed that the morphology of antigen-containing PB-Is was preserved in the concentrated PB product. The concentrated PB product induced specific immune tolerance against Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 in mice when orally administered, supporting its potential use as a novel oral tolerogen formulation. PMID:25774686

  9. Peptide specificity and HLA restriction do not dictate lymphokine production by allergen-specific T-lymphocyte clones.

    PubMed Central

    van Neerven, R J; van de Pol, M M; Wierenga, E A; Aalberse, R C; Jansen, H M; Kapsenberg, M L

    1994-01-01

    Human and murine CD4+ T lymphocytes can be subdivided into distinct subsets [T-helper type 0 (Th0), Th1 or Th2], based on their lymphokine production profiles. Not much is known about the factors that determine these restricted lymphokine secretion profiles. Peptide specificity and human leucocyte antigen (HLA) restriction may be such factors. As it is well established that allergen-specific T lymphocytes from atopic individuals and non-atopic controls differ in their lymphokine secretion profile, we studied two allergen-specific T-lymphocyte clones (TLC) with identical peptide specificity and HLA restriction that were generated from the peripheral blood of an atopic donor and a non-atopic control donor. The two CD4+ TLC recognize the same epitope (20-33) of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus major allergen Der p II. Both TLC recognize the epitope in an HLA-DQB1*0602-restricted manner. However, the lymphokine production profiles of these TLC show clear differences after allergen-specific or polyclonal activation. As expected, TLC JBD4 from the atopic donor produced high levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4) without detectable interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), whereas TLC PBA1 from the non-atopic donor produced both IFN-gamma and IL-4 upon allergen-specific or polyclonal activation. Inasmuch as both TLC recognized the same epitope of Der p II in association with the same HLA-DQ molecule, these data suggest that peptide specificity and HLA restriction of human allergen-specific TLC do not dictate their lymphokine secretion profile. PMID:7525459

  10. Interleukin-2-Dependent Allergen-Specific Tissue-Resident Memory Cells Drive Asthma.

    PubMed

    Hondowicz, Brian D; An, Dowon; Schenkel, Jason M; Kim, Karen S; Steach, Holly R; Krishnamurty, Akshay T; Keitany, Gladys J; Garza, Esteban N; Fraser, Kathryn A; Moon, James J; Altemeier, William A; Masopust, David; Pepper, Marion

    2016-01-19

    Exposure to inhaled allergens generates T helper 2 (Th2) CD4(+) T cells that contribute to episodes of inflammation associated with asthma. Little is known about allergen-specific Th2 memory cells and their contribution to airway inflammation. We generated reagents to understand how endogenous CD4(+) T cells specific for a house dust mite (HDM) allergen form and function. After allergen exposure, HDM-specific memory cells persisted as central memory cells in the lymphoid organs and tissue-resident memory cells in the lung. Experimental blockade of lymphocyte migration demonstrated that lung-resident cells were sufficient to induce airway hyper-responsiveness, which depended upon CD4(+) T cells. Investigation into the differentiation of pathogenic Trm cells revealed that interleukin-2 (IL-2) signaling was required for residency and directed a program of tissue homing migrational cues. These studies thus identify IL-2-dependent resident Th2 memory cells as drivers of lung allergic responses.

  11. New strategies for allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Carnés, Jerónimo; Robinson, Douglas S

    2008-06-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy, consisting in the administration of increasing amounts of offending allergens into sensitive patients was first used nearly one hundred years ago and remains in use worldwide for treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma. It has been recognised as the only effective treatment for type I allergic diseases when the appropriate quantities of allergens are used. The immunological mechanisms by which specific immunotherapy is effective include the modulation of T cells and the response of B-cells and is accompanied by significant decreases of specific IgE and increases in allergen specific IgG antibodies, mainly IgG4. While specific allergen injection immunotherapy is highly effective and the most common way of administration other routes such as oral or intranasal ways have been considered as and alternative to subcutaneous injections. During the last century, allergenic vaccines have been prepared using individual allergens adsorbed to different adjuvant substances. These vaccines have demonstrated efficacy and good results in different clinical trials. However, many novel approaches to allergen immunotherapy have been developed in the last years in order to increase the safety and efficacy of allergenic vaccines. In that way, different and modern vaccines have been prepared including more purified products such as depigmented allergen extracts; allergoids, consisting on big molecules of thousands of kDa, which contain all the individual allergens and show a significant decrease in severe adverse reactions; peptides or small aminoacid sequences; recombinant allergens; hypoallergenic vaccines where the IgE binding sites have been modified; or allergen-CpG fusion molecules. New presentations are under study and new treatments will be developed in the near future with the objective that the prevention of allergic disease may become a reality. The review article also discuss recent patent related to the field. PMID:19075996

  12. Allergen-specific MHC class II tetramer+ cells are detectable in allergic, but not in nonallergic, individuals.

    PubMed

    Macaubas, Claudia; Wahlstrom, Jan; Galvão da Silva, Ana Paula; Forsthuber, Thomas G; Sønderstrup, Grete; Kwok, William W; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H; Umetsu, Dale T

    2006-04-15

    Allergen-specific cells are present in very low frequency in peripheral blood of humans, and differ in function in allergic and nonallergic individuals. We report in this study that soluble class II MHC tetramers can be used to directly identify and study such allergen epitope-specific CD4+ T cells in humans. We identified the major antigenic epitope of rye grass allergen Lol p 1 in HLA-DRB1*0401 individuals using HLA-DR*0401 transgenic mice and peripheral blood cells from HLA-DR*0401 individuals. Using DRB1*0401 tetramers loaded with this major epitope of Lol p 1, we detected allergen-specific CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood of DRB1*0401 rye grass allergic individuals after ex vivo expansion with allergen. These tetramer-positive cells produced IL-4, but little IFN-gamma. In contrast, we were unable to detect rye grass tetramer-positive cells in cultures from HLA-DR*0401 nonallergic individuals, even after expansion with IL-2. Thus, our results suggest that rye grass allergen-specific T cells in DR*0401 nonallergic subjects are present at very low levels (e.g., because of deletion or suppression), differ in a fundamental way in their requirement for ex vivo expansion (e.g., they may be anergic), or use TCRs distinct from those of allergic individuals. Thus, analysis using DRB1*0401 tetramers loaded with a major epitope of Lol p 1 indicates that allergen-specific CD4+ T cells in nonallergic individuals are distinct from those in allergic subjects.

  13. Novel ways for immune intervention in immunotherapy: mucosal allergy vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mascarell, Laurent; Van Overtvelt, Laurence; Moingeon, Philippe

    2006-05-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is currently the only curative treatment for allergy. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been successfully used to treat patients who are allergic to insect venom, house dust mites, or tree or grass pollens. In the context of potentially severe, albeit infrequent, side effects associated with SCIT, mucosal routes of administration are being investigated to conduct allergenic desensitization. This article reviews recent developments in the field of nasal, oral, and sublingual immunotherapy as they relate to safety, clinical efficacy, and immune mechanisms of action. Implications for the design and development of improved allergy vaccines that could be used through such nonparenteral routes are discussed. Specifically, allergen presentation platforms and adjuvants facilitating the targeting of immune cells at mucosal surfaces to promote tolerance induction are reviewed.

  14. Antigen-based immunotherapy for autoimmune disease: current status

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Darren Lowell; Ponda, Punita

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are common chronic disorders that not only have a major impact on the quality of life but are also potentially life-threatening. Treatment modalities that are currently favored have conferred significant clinical benefits, but they may have considerable side effects. An optimal treatment strategy for autoimmune disease would specifically target disease-associated antigens and limit systemic side effects. Similar to allergen-specific immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis, antigen-specific immunotherapy for autoimmune disease aims to induce immune deviation and promote tolerance to specific antigens. In this review, we present the current status of studies and clinical trials in both human and animal hosts that use antigen-based immunotherapy for autoimmune disease. PMID:27471707

  15. [The clinical picture is the most important reason to screen for the presence of allergen-specific IgE in children].

    PubMed

    Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C A F M

    2007-10-13

    The presence of allergen-specific IgE in serum is associated with sensitization, but the clinical relevance depends on the patient's history. It supports the diagnosis of an acute allergic response to inhalation or food allergens. The presence of allergen-specific IgE in the serum is not necessary for the diagnosis of asthma, perennial rhinitis or eczema; since allergen avoidance has no beneficial effect in these chronic allergic diseases, one should be critical about the relevance of testing for allergen-specific serum IgE. Screening tests for the presence of allergen-specific serum IgE are frequently used in children; a screening test consists of either 5 inhalant or 5 food allergens and if the test is positive, the laboratory will determine the specific IgE for each of the 5 allergens present in the test. This carries the risk of over-diagnosis if the clinical indication is not clear-cut. Furthermore, in children sensitized to grass pollen, the panel of inhalation and food allergens present in screening tests may lead to serological cross-reactivity with wheat; this increases the number of positive screening tests for food allergens without having clinical relevance. In conclusion, the use of screening tests for the presence of allergen-specific serum IgE should be looked at critically since it may unnecessarily increase the number of allergen-specific IgE tests.

  16. Advances in allergen immunotherapy: aiming for complete tolerance to allergens.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2015-03-25

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been used for more than 100 years as a tolerance-inducing therapy for allergic diseases and represents a potentially curative method of treatment. AIT functions through multiple mechanisms, including regulating T and B cell responses, changing antibody isotypes, and decreasing mediator release and migration of eosinophils, basophils, and mast cells to affected tissues. Despite the relative success of AIT, attempts are being made to improve this therapy in order to overcome problems in standardization, efficacy, safety, long duration of treatment, and costs. These have led to the development of biotechnological products with successful clinical results.

  17. The intensity of T cell receptor engagement determines the cytokine pattern of human allergen-specific T helper cells.

    PubMed

    Carballido, J M; Faith, A; Carballido-Perrig, N; Blaser, K

    1997-02-01

    Enhanced production of T helper (Th)2 cytokines by allergen-specific Th cells plays a major role in the induction and maintenance of IgE-mediated allergic disorders. The mechanism that triggers this type of response in atopic individuals is not fully understood. Allergen-specific human Th cell clones produce interleukin (IL)-4 and low or undetectable levels of interferon (IFN)-gamma after stimulation with low concentrations of antigen. However, these Th cell clones are capable of generating significant amounts of IFN-gamma after optimal activation through their T cell receptor (TcR). Allergen-specific Th cell clones isolated from allergic individuals required higher doses of antigen to reach the plateau of proliferation and to generate Th0 cytokine responses than their counterparts isolated from nonallergic subjects. On the other hand, if allergen was replaced by anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb), both allergic and nonallergic Th cell clones attained the highest level of proliferation and significant IFN-gamma production in response to equivalent concentrations of anti-CD3 mAb. These results indicate that the strength of T cell ligation, which can be modulated by the availability of the TcR ligand, controls the balance of Thl/Th2 cytokines produced by memory Th cells in vitro. In the particular case of bee venom phospholipase A2, it is shown that the expression of allergen-specific surface Ig on antigen-presenting B cells has little influence on antigen uptake and therefore in determining the levels of T cell activation and cytokine production. Alternatively, the affinity of particular major histocompatibility complex class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells for allergen-derived peptides might determine the amount of specific ligand presented to the Th cells and play a decisive role skewing the Th cell cytokine production towards Th1 or Th2 phenotypes. These findings, which are consistent with the changes in cytokine patterns observed following clinical

  18. Sick of sitting.

    PubMed

    Levine, James A

    2015-08-01

    Sitting too much kills. Epidemiological, physiological and molecular data suggest that sedentary lifestyle can explain, in part, how modernity is associated with obesity, more than 30 chronic diseases and conditions and high healthcare costs. Excessive sitting--sitting disease--is not innate to the human condition. People were designed to be bipedal and, before the industrial revolution, people moved substantially more throughout the day than they do presently. It is encouraging that solutions exist to reverse sitting disease. Work environments, schools, communities and cities can be re-imagined and re-invented as walking spaces, and people thereby offered more active, happier, healthier and more productive lives.

  19. Nanoparticle based-immunotherapy against allergy.

    PubMed

    Gamazo, Carlos; Gastaminza, Gabriel; Ferrer, Marta; Sanz, María L; Irache, Juan M

    2014-01-01

    Allergic diseases are one of the most prevalent diseases, reaching epidemic proportions in developed countries. An allergic reaction occurs after contact with an environmental protein, such as inhalants allergens (pollen, animal dander, house dust mites), or food proteins. This response is known as part of the type 2 immunity that is counterbalanced by Type 1 immunity and Tregs. Widely used allergen-specific immunotherapy (IT) is a long term treatment to induce such switch from Th2 to Th1 response. However, conventional IT requires multiple allergen injections over a long period of time and is not free of risk of producing allergic reactions. As a consequence, new safer and faster immunotherapeutic methods are required. This review deals with allergen IT using nanoparticles as allergen delivery system that will allow a different way of administration, reduce dose and diminish allergen exposure to IgE bound to mast cells or basophils.

  20. Assessment of allergen-induced respiratory hyperresponsiveness before the prescription of a specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Argentão, Daiana Guedes Pinto; dos Santos Lima, Regiane Patussi; da Silva, Mariana Dias; dos Santos, Raquel Acácia Pereira Gonçalves; Fabbri, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Asymptomatic sensitization is a frequent condition that must be considered before the indication of allergic-specific immunotherapy. Objective: The aim of this study was to appreciate and correlate the local and spirometric changes elicited by the allergen-specific nasal provocation test (NPT) to define practical and feasible guidelines for the allergist/immunologist to demonstrate specific respiratory hyperresponsiveness before the indication of allergic-specific immunotherapy. Methods: A total of 172 subjects (children and adults) with a diagnosis of allergic rhinitis were submitted to flow-volume spirometry immediately before and after the NPT performed with Dermatophagoides antigens. The differences between the pre- and postspirometric estimated values of peak expiratory flow rate (PEFdif%), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1dif%), and forced vital capacity (FVCdif%) were correlated with the results of the nasal provocation test symptom score (NPT-SS). Results: There were 119 subjects (69%) with NPT-SS > 2. Among these patients who were reactive, the mean NPT-SS was 6.3. The Spearman's correlation between PEFdif% and NPT-SS was r = −0.44 (p = 0.01); the Spearman's correlation between FEV1dif% and NPT-SS was r = −0.22 (p = 0.01), and the Spearman's correlation between FVCdif% and NPT-SS was r = −0.21 (p = 0.04). Conclusion: The combined utilization of the allergen-specific NPT-SS with the spirometry (or PEF meter) is a safe methodology to evaluate allergen-specific nasal and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (which sometimes acts as a bronchial provocation test) in patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma due to hypersensitivity who are candidates for allergen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:26302728

  1. Sitting and Television Viewing

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Christopher E.; Youngstedt, Shawn D.; Phillips, Barbara; Tulio de Mello, Marco; Hirshkowitz, Max

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Excess sitting is emerging as a novel risk factor for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, mental illness, and all-cause mortality. Physical activity, distinct from sitting, is associated with better sleep and lower risk for OSA, yet relationships among sitting behaviors and sleep/OSA remain unknown. We examined whether total sitting time and sitting while viewing television were associated with sleep duration and quality, OSA risk, and sleepiness. METHODS: The 2013 National Sleep Foundation Sleep in America Poll was a cross-sectional study of 1,000 adults aged 23 to 60 years. Total sitting time, time watching television while sitting, sleep duration and quality, OSA risk, and daytime sleepiness were assessed. RESULTS: After adjusting for confounding factors (including BMI and physical activity), each additional hour per day of total sitting was associated with greater odds of poor sleep quality (OR [95% CI] = 1.06 [1.01, 1.11]) but not with other sleep metrics (including sleep duration), OSA risk, or daytime sleepiness. For television viewing while sitting, each additional hour per day was associated with greater odds of long sleep onset latency (≥ 30 min) (OR = 1.15 [1.04, 1.27]), waking up too early in the morning (OR = 1.12 [1.03, 1.23]), poor sleep quality (OR = 1.12 [1.02, 1.24]), and “high risk” for OSA (OR = 1.15 [1.04, 1.28]). Based upon an interaction analysis, regular physical activity was protective against OSA risk associated with television viewing (P = .04). CONCLUSIONS: Excess sitting was associated with relatively poor sleep quality. Sitting while watching television was associated with relatively poor sleep quality and OSA risk and may be an important risk factor for sleep disturbance and apnea risk. PMID:25633255

  2. Sensitization rates of causative allergens for dogs with atopic dermatitis: detection of canine allergen-specific IgE.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Hee; Kim, Ha-Jung; Jang, Hye-Jin; Park, Hee-Myung

    2014-12-01

    Allergen-specific IgE serology tests became commercially available in the 1980s. Since then these tests have been widely used to diagnose and treat allergic skin diseases. However, the relationship between a positive reaction and disease occurrence has been controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate allergens using a serologic allergy test in dogs with atopic dermatitis (AD). Dogs clinically diagnosed with AD (n = 101) were tested using an allergen-specific IgE immunoassay. Among the total 92 environmental and food allergens, house dust and house dust mites were the most common. Several allergens including airborne pollens and molds produced positive reactions, and which was considered increasing allergens relating to the climate changes. The presence of antibodies against staphylococci and Malassezia in cases of canine AD was warranted in this study. Additionally, strong (chicken, turkey, brown rice, brewer's yeast, and soybean) and weakly (rabbit, vension, duck, and tuna) positive reactions to food allergens could be used for avoidance and limited-allergen trials. PMID:24962408

  3. [Radioimmunologic determination of total IgE and allergen-specific IgE-antibodies in diffuse neurodermitis].

    PubMed

    Pürschel, W; Zeidler, U; Kuse, M

    1975-10-01

    Total IgE levels in sera of 165 patients with atopic dermatitis and 79 patients with dermatoses as well as normal control patients were determined by radioimmunoassay (Phadebas, Pharmacia). Although the mean value for patients with atopic dermatitis was found far above the mean value for normal controls, 38% of patients showed total IgE serum levels within the normal range. Highest IgE serum levels were observed in patients with the generalized form of the disease and in patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis. No direct correlation however, to severity of disease could be found. In a series of 50 patients prick tests were compared to total IgE serum levels and to levels of allergen specific antibodies determined by radioallergosorbent-test (RAST). Extracts of grass pollens and of animal dandruff were used. There was complete agreement between results of skin testing and RAST in at least 80%. While cross reactions were common with grass pollen extracts in RAST, there was no cross-over with animal dandruff. No correlation was found between titer of allergen specific antibody and severity of skin lesions. IgE specific antibody could be detected in 48% of patients with normal total IgE serum levels and in 82% of patients with elevated values. PMID:1201945

  4. International consensus on allergy immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jutel, Marek; Agache, Ioana; Bonini, Sergio; Burks, A Wesley; Calderon, Moises; Canonica, Walter; Cox, Linda; Demoly, Pascal; Frew, Antony J; O'Hehir, Robin; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Muraro, Antonella; Lack, Gideon; Larenas, Désirée; Levin, Michael; Nelson, Harald; Pawankar, Ruby; Pfaar, Oliver; van Ree, Ronald; Sampson, Hugh; Santos, Alexandra F; Du Toit, George; Werfel, Thomas; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Zhang, Luo; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2015-09-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been used to treat allergic disease since the early 1900s. Despite numerous clinical trials and meta-analyses proving AIT efficacious, it remains underused and is estimated to be used in less than 10% of patients with allergic rhinitis or asthma worldwide. In addition, there are large differences between regions, which are not only due to socioeconomic status. There is practically no controversy about the use of AIT in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma, but for atopic dermatitis or food allergy, the indications for AIT are not well defined. The elaboration of a wider consensus is of utmost importance because AIT is the only treatment that can change the course of allergic disease by preventing the development of asthma and new allergen sensitizations and by inducing allergen-specific immune tolerance. Safer and more effective AIT strategies are being continuously developed both through elaboration of new allergen preparations and adjuvants and alternate routes of administration. A number of guidelines, consensus documents, or both are available on both the international and national levels. The international community of allergy specialists recognizes the need to develop a comprehensive consensus report to harmonize, disseminate, and implement the best AIT practice. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology, formed by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology; the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; and the World Allergy Organization, has decided to issue an international consensus on AIT.

  5. Sick of sitting

    PubMed Central

    Levine, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Sitting too much kills. Epidemiological, physiological and molecular data suggest that sedentary lifestyle can explain, in part, how modernity is associated with obesity, more than 30 chronic diseases and conditions and high healthcare costs. Excessive sitting—sitting disease—is not innate to the human condition. People were designed to be bipedal and, before the industrial revolution, people moved substantially more throughout the day than they do presently. It is encouraging that solutions exist to reverse sitting disease. Work environments, schools, communities and cities can be re-imagined and reinvented as walking spaces, and people thereby offered more active, happier, healthier and more productive lives. PMID:26003325

  6. Allergen Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rael, Efren

    2016-09-01

    Allergies affect a large proportion of the population. Allergies can adversely affect productivity, sleep, and quality of life and can lead to life-threatening reactions. Allergies can spread to affect multiple organ systems. Allergen immunotherapy is the only therapy that can change the natural history of allergic disease. PMID:27545737

  7. rBet v 1 immunotherapy of sensitized mice with Streptococcus thermophilus as vehicle and adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Petrarca, Claudia; Clemente, Emanuela; Toto, Valentina; Iezzi, Manuela; Rossi, Cosmo; Zanotta, Stefania; Mistrello, Gianni; Zanoni, Ivan; Granucci, Francesca; Arioli, Stefania; Mora, Diego; Guglielmetti, Simone; Paganelli, Roberto; Di Gioacchino, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacilli are able to induce upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs with Th1 cytokines production and increase in Treg activity. This could explain the observed effectiveness of the prolonged administration of lactobacilli in the prevention of allergic disorders in infants and envisage the possible use of bacteria expressing the allergen for the specific immunotherapy of allergic diseases. Hence, we evaluated Streptococcus thermophilus (ST) expressing rBet v 1 as allergen delivery tool and adjuvant factor for immunotherapy in Betv1-sensitized mice. rBet v 1 gene was introduced and expressed in ST (ST[rBet v 1]). BALB/c mice were sensitized with rBet v 1 and then treated with either ST alone, ST[rBet v 1], or the combination of ST and rBet v 1, for 20 days. After 2 aerosol challenges, Treg frequency, in vitro allergen-induced cytokines, rBet v 1-specific IgE and IgG2a, and bronchial histology were made in harvested spleen, sera, and lung. Results were compared with those obtained from not-treated/sensitized mice. ST[rBet v 1] induced immunological and histological changes typical of successful SIT: increased frequency of Tregs and expression of Foxp3; decreased allergen-specific IgE/IgG2a ratio; decrease of in vitro rBet v 1-induced IL-4 from spleen cells; increased allergen-induced IL-10 and IFN-γ; drop of bronchial eosinophilia. ST and ST+rBet v 1 combination, even though induced a slight increase in the frequency of Tregs and moderate allergen-induced IL-10, were ineffective in reducing bronchial eosinophilia, allergen induced IL-4 and rBet v 1-specific IgE/IgG2a ratio. ST[rBet v 1] has tolerogenic and Th-1 skewing properties and efficiently delivers the allergen to the gut immune-system restraining and readdressing the established specific Th2 response toward the allergen in mice. PMID:24603094

  8. rBet v 1 immunotherapy of sensitized mice with Streptococcus thermophilus as vehicle and adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Petrarca, Claudia; Clemente, Emanuela; Toto, Valentina; Iezzi, Manuela; Rossi, Cosmo; Zanotta, Stefania; Mistrello, Gianni; Zanoni, Ivan; Granucci, Francesca; Arioli, Stefania; Mora, Diego; Guglielmetti, Simone; Paganelli, Roberto; Di Gioacchino, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacilli are able to induce upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs with Th1 cytokines production and increase in Treg activity. This could explain the observed effectiveness of the prolonged administration of lactobacilli in the prevention of allergic disorders in infants and envisage the possible use of bacteria expressing the allergen for the specific immunotherapy of allergic diseases. Hence, we evaluated Streptococcus thermophilus (ST) expressing rBet v 1 as allergen delivery tool and adjuvant factor for immunotherapy in Betv1-sensitized mice. rBet v 1 gene was introduced and expressed in ST (ST[rBet v 1]). BALB/c mice were sensitized with rBet v 1 and then treated with either ST alone, ST[rBet v 1], or the combination of ST and rBet v 1, for 20 days. After 2 aerosol challenges, Treg frequency, in vitro allergen-induced cytokines, rBet v 1-specific IgE and IgG2a, and bronchial histology were made in harvested spleen, sera, and lung. Results were compared with those obtained from not-treated/sensitized mice. ST[rBet v 1] induced immunological and histological changes typical of successful SIT: increased frequency of Tregs and expression of Foxp3; decreased allergen-specific IgE/IgG2a ratio; decrease of in vitro rBet v 1-induced IL-4 from spleen cells; increased allergen-induced IL-10 and IFN-γ; drop of bronchial eosinophilia. ST and ST+rBet v 1 combination, even though induced a slight increase in the frequency of Tregs and moderate allergen-induced IL-10, were ineffective in reducing bronchial eosinophilia, allergen induced IL-4 and rBet v 1-specific IgE/IgG2a ratio. ST[rBet v 1] has tolerogenic and Th-1 skewing properties and efficiently delivers the allergen to the gut immune-system restraining and readdressing the established specific Th2 response toward the allergen in mice. PMID:24603094

  9. Intratracheal exposure to Fab fragments of an allergen-specific monoclonal antibody regulates asthmatic responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Shin; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Matsuoka, Daiko; Sae-Wong, Chutha

    2014-01-01

    Fab fragments (Fabs) maintain the ability to bind to specific antigens but lack effector functions due to the absence of the Fc portion. In the present study, we tested whether Fabs of an allergen-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) were able to regulate asthmatic responses in mice. Asthmatic responses were induced in BALB/c mice by passive sensitization with anti-ovalbumin (OVA) polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) (day 0) and by active sensitization with OVA (days 0 and 14), followed by intratracheal (i.t.) challenge with OVA on day 1 and days 28, 29, 30 and 35. Fabs prepared by the digestion of an anti-OVA IgG1 (O1-10) mAb with papain were i.t. administered only once 30 min before antigenic challenge on day 1 or day 35. The results showed that i.t. administration of O1-10 Fabs with OVA markedly suppressed the early and/or late phases of asthmatic responses caused by passive and active sensitization. Similar results were obtained when Fabs of anti-OVA IgG2b mAb (O2B-3) were i.t. administered. In contrast, neither i.t. injection of intact 01-10/O2B-3 nor systemic injection of O1-10 Fabs suppressed the asthmatic responses. In vitro studies revealed that the capture of OVA by O1-10 Fabs prevented the subsequent binding of intact anti-OVA pAbs to the captured OVA. These results suggest that asthmatic responses may be down-regulated by the i.t. exposure to Fabs of an allergen-specific mAb via a mechanism involving the capture of allergen by Fabs in the respiratory tract before the interaction of intact antibody and allergen essential for the induction of asthmatic responses. PMID:24303921

  10. Differential T-Helper Cell Polarization after Allergen-Specific Stimulation of Autologous Dendritic Cells in Polysensitized Allergic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ashjaei, Kazem; Bublin, Merima; Smole, Ursula; Lengger, Nina; Hafner, Christine; Breiteneder, Heimo; Wagner, Stefan; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in the induction and regulation of adaptive immune responses by polarizing T-helper (Th) cells. In allergic disease this response is dominated by Th2 cells. It is still unclear whether the activation of Th cells by DCs in atopic individuals is allergen specific. Methods Monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) obtained from polysensitized patients were stimulated with purified Bet v 1, Phl p 5 and Act d 10, and the surface marker expression was analysed. Proliferation and cytokine profiles of autologous naïve CD4+ T cells co-cultured with allergen-pulsed MoDCs were assessed. Results The addition of either Bet v 1 or Phl p 5 did not further increase the expression of surface markers from matured MoDCs in all study groups. In co-cultures, autologous naïve CD4+ T cells proliferated when DCs obtained from individuals allergic to birch and grass pollen were stimulated with Bet v 1 and Phl p 5, respectively. In the co-culture supernatants, significantly increased levels of IL-5 and IL-13 were detected. This effect correlated with the sensitization background and was absent when applying an unspecific allergen, Act d 10. The levels of IL-10 in supernatants of MoDCs and the levels of IL-10 and IFN-γ in supernatants of T cells remained unchanged upon stimulation with allergens. Conclusions In this study we observed that allergen-specific stimulation of MoDCs induces T-cell proliferation and upregulation of Th2-type cytokines. Interestingly, this Th2 polarization was only observed in cells stimulated with the allergen to which the patients were sensitized. PMID:25792188

  11. Exposure to allergen and diesel exhaust particles potentiates secondary allergen-specific memory responses promoting asthma susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Eric B.; Biagini Myers, Jocelyn M.; Acciani, Thomas H.; Ryan, Patrick H.; Sivaprasad, Umasundari; Ruff, Brandy; LeMasters, Grace K.; Bernstein, David I.; Lockey, James; LeCras, Timothy D.; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to traffic pollution particulate matter, predominantly diesel exhaust particles (DEP), increases risk for asthma and asthma exacerbation, however the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Objective To examine the impact of DEP exposure on the generation and persistence of allergen-specific memory T-cells in asthma and translate these findings by determining the impact of early DEP exposure on the prevalence of allergic asthma in children. Methods The impact of DEP on HDM-specific memory responses was determined using an asthma model. Data from children enrolled in the Cincinnati Childhood Allergy and Air Pollution Study (CCAAPS) birth cohort were analyzed to determine the impact of the DEP exposure on asthma outcomes. Results DEP co-exposure with HDM resulted in persistent Th2/Th17 CD127+ effector/memory cells in the lungs, spleen and lymph nodes of adult and neonatal mice. After 7 weeks of rest, a single exposure to HDM resulted in airway hyperresponsiveness and increased levels of Th2 cytokines in only mice that had been previously exposed to both HDM and DEP versus HDM alone. Based on these data, we examined whether DEP exposure was similarly associated increased asthma prevalence in children in the presence or absence of allergen exposure/sensitization in the CCAAPS birth cohort. Early life exposure to high DEP was associated with significantly increased asthma prevalence among allergic children, but not among non-allergic children. Conclusion These findings suggest that DEP exposure results in accumulation of allergen specific Th2/Th17 cells in the lungs, potentiating secondary allergen recall responses and promoting the development of allergic asthma. PMID:25748065

  12. Specific allergen immunotherapy attenuates allergic airway inflammation in a rat model of Alstonia scholaris pollen induced airway allergy.

    PubMed

    Datta, Ankur; Moitra, Saibal; Hazra, Iman; Mondal, Somnath; Das, Prasanta Kumar; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Chaudhuri, Suhnrita; Bhattacharya, Debanjan; Tripathi, Santanu Kumar; Chaudhuri, Swapna

    2016-01-01

    Pollen grains are well established to be an important cause of respiratory allergy. Current pharmacologic therapies for allergic asthma do not cure the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only treatment method which re-directs the immune system away from allergic response leading to a long lasting effect. The mechanism by which immunotherapy achieves this goal is an area of active research world-wide. The present experimental study was designed to develop an experimental model of allergic lung inflammation based on a relevant human allergen, Alstonia scholaris pollen, and to establish the immunological and cellular features of specific allergen immunotherapy using this same pollen extract. Our results revealed that Alstonia scholaris pollen sensitization and challenge causes eosinophilic airway inflammation with mucin hypersecretion. This is associated with increased total IgE, increased expression of FcɛRI on lung mast cells and increased levels of IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 as confirmed by ELISA, in-situ immunofluorescence and FACS assay. Allergen specific immunotherapy reduced airway inflammation and also decreased total IgE level, FcɛRI expression, IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 levels. It was further noted that the reduction of these levels was more by intra-nasal route than by intra-peritoneal route. Thus we present a novel animal model of Alstonia scholaris pollen allergic disease and specific allergen immunotherapy which will pave the way towards the development of better treatment modalities.

  13. Specific allergen immunotherapy attenuates allergic airway inflammation in a rat model of Alstonia scholaris pollen induced airway allergy.

    PubMed

    Datta, Ankur; Moitra, Saibal; Hazra, Iman; Mondal, Somnath; Das, Prasanta Kumar; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Chaudhuri, Suhnrita; Bhattacharya, Debanjan; Tripathi, Santanu Kumar; Chaudhuri, Swapna

    2016-01-01

    Pollen grains are well established to be an important cause of respiratory allergy. Current pharmacologic therapies for allergic asthma do not cure the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only treatment method which re-directs the immune system away from allergic response leading to a long lasting effect. The mechanism by which immunotherapy achieves this goal is an area of active research world-wide. The present experimental study was designed to develop an experimental model of allergic lung inflammation based on a relevant human allergen, Alstonia scholaris pollen, and to establish the immunological and cellular features of specific allergen immunotherapy using this same pollen extract. Our results revealed that Alstonia scholaris pollen sensitization and challenge causes eosinophilic airway inflammation with mucin hypersecretion. This is associated with increased total IgE, increased expression of FcɛRI on lung mast cells and increased levels of IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 as confirmed by ELISA, in-situ immunofluorescence and FACS assay. Allergen specific immunotherapy reduced airway inflammation and also decreased total IgE level, FcɛRI expression, IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 levels. It was further noted that the reduction of these levels was more by intra-nasal route than by intra-peritoneal route. Thus we present a novel animal model of Alstonia scholaris pollen allergic disease and specific allergen immunotherapy which will pave the way towards the development of better treatment modalities. PMID:26667977

  14. Aluminium in Allergies and Allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium is a hot topic in the current debate. Exposure occurs due to environmental, dietary and intentional exposure to aluminium, such as in vaccines where it was introduced in 1926. In spite of the fact that it is a typical Th2 adjuvant, aluminium redirects the immune response in systemic allergen immunotherapy (SIT) upon prolonged immunization. SIT in the US, and SLIT in general, are at present non-adjuvanted therapies, but in Europe aluminium is used as adjuvant in most SIT preparations. It enhances the safety of SIT by local deposition of the allergen. Undesired properties of aluminium adjuvants comprise acute and chronic inflammation at the injection site, its Th2 immune stimulatory capacity, its accumulation besides biodistribution in the body. The adjuvant and safety profile of aluminium adjuvants in allergy vaccines are discussed, as well as the need for putting modern delivery systems and adjuvants on the fast track.

  15. Peanut immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Peanut allergy is common and can be a cause of severe, life-threatening reactions. It is rarely outgrown like other food allergies, such as egg and milk. Peanut allergy has a significant effect on the quality of life of sufferers and their families, due to dietary and social restrictions, but mainly stemming from fear of accidental peanut ingestion. The current management consists of strict avoidance, education and provision of emergency medication, but a disease- modifying therapy is needed for peanut allergy. Recent developments involve the use of immunotherapy, which has shown promise as an active form of treatment. Various routes of administration are being investigated, including subcutaneous, oral, sublingual and epicutaneous routes. Other forms of treatment, such as the use of vaccines and anti-IgE molecules, are also under investigation. So far, results from immunotherapy studies have shown good efficacy in achieving desensitisation to peanut with a good safety profile. However, the issue of long-term tolerance has not been fully addressed yet and larger, phase III studies are required to further investigate safety and efficacy. An assessment of cost/benefit ratio is also required prior to implementing this form of treatment. The use of immunotherapy for peanut allergy is not currently recommended for routine clinical use and should not be attempted outside specialist allergy units. PMID:25276342

  16. Melanoma immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sivendran, Shanthi; Glodny, Bradley; Pan, Michael; Merad, Miriam; Saenger, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    Melanoma immunotherapy has been an area of intense research for decades, and this work is now yielding more tangible results for patients. Work has focused on 4 main areas: cytokine therapy, administration of immune-modulating antibodies, adoptive T-cell therapy, and vaccines. Cytokine therapy is an established treatment for advanced melanoma, and immune-modulating antibodies have recently emerged as an exciting new area of drug development with efficacy now established in a phase III trial. Adoptive T-cell therapy provides the proof of principle that T cells can attack and eliminate tumors. It has been challenging, however, to adapt this treatment for widespread use. Vaccines have generally yielded poor results, but intratumor pathogen-based strategies have shown encouraging results in recent trials, perhaps due to stronger immune stimulation. A review of the field of melanoma immunotherapy is provided here, with emphasis on those agents that have reached clinical testing. Novel strategies to induce the immune system to attack melanomas are reviewed. In the future, it is envisioned that immunotherapy will have further application in combination with cytotoxic and targeted therapies.

  17. Allergen diagnosis microarray with high-density immobilization capacity using diamond-like carbon-coated chips for profiling allergen-specific IgE and other immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Koichi; Hiyoshi, Mineyoshi; Tada, Hitomi; Bando, Miwa; Ichioka, Takao; Kamemura, Norio; Kido, Hiroshi

    2011-11-14

    The diagnosis of antibody-mediated allergic disorders is based on clinical findings, skin prick tests and detection of allergen-specific IgE in serum. Here, we present a new microarray technique of high-density antigen immobilization using carboxylated arms on the surface of a diamond-like carbon (DLC)-coated chip. High immobilization capacity of antigen on DLC chip at (0.94-7.82)×10(9) molecules mm(-2) allowed the analysis of allergen-specific immunoglobulins against not only purified proteins but also natural allergen extracts with wide assay dynamic range. The higher sensitivity of the allergen-specific IgE detection on DLC chip was observed for comparison with the UniCAP system: the DLC chip allowed lowering the limit of dilution rate in UniCAP system to further dilution at 4-8-fold. High correlations (ρ>0.9-0.85) of allergen-specific IgE values determined by the DLC chip and UniCAP were found in most of 20 different allergens tested. The DLC chip was useful to determine allergen-induced antibodies of IgA, IgG, IgG1, and IgG4 in sera, apart from IgE, as well as secretory IgA in saliva against the same series of allergens on the chip in a minimal amount (1-2 μL) of sample.

  18. An update on immunotherapy for food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Scurlock, Amy M.; Jones, Stacie M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the review Recent investigation has resulted in significant advances toward definitive therapeutic options for food allergy. In this review, we will explore novel immunotherapeutic interventions for the active treatment of food allergy. Recent findings Because the injection route for allergen immunotherapy to foods has been associated with an unacceptable risk of severe anaphylactic reactions, use of mucosally targeted therapeutic strategies is of significant interest for food allergy. Allergen-specific immunotherapeutic approaches such as oral, sublingual, epicutaneous, and peptide immunotherapy have demonstrated efficacy in increasing threshold dose and inducing immunologic changes associated with both desensitization and oral tolerance in animal and human trials. More global immunomodulatory strategies, such as Traditional Chinese Medicine and anti-IgE therapy have been shown to effectively target the allergic response, and clinical trials are ongoing to determine the efficacy and safety in human food allergy. Summary The advent of therapies that target the mucosal immune response to promote oral tolerance have shown great promise in the treatment of food hypersensitivity. However, there is still significant risk of adverse reactions associated with these therapeutic strategies and further study is needed to carefully advance these therapeutic modalities toward general clinical implementation. PMID:20856110

  19. Co-stimulation-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-8 by allergen-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Piattoni, S; Bistoni, O; Grignani, F; Bertotto, A

    1996-07-01

    Chemokines, which include interleukin (IL)-8, are a family of pro-inflammatory molecules with potent chemoattractant activity on neutrophils, as well as other cell types. IL-8 can be recovered from many inflammatory sites. To test the hypothesis that Th2-type allergen-specific T cells, known to be the main cell type governing the allergic inflammation, are a source of IL-8 and to investigate whether IL-8 release is influenced by the nature of the in vitro mitogenic or co-mitogenic stimulation, cypress-specific T-cell clones (TCC) were generated from five allergic subjects during in vitro seasonal exposure to the allergen. Purified cypress extract was produced directly from freshly collected pollen and used for in vitro stimulation of PBMC bulk cultures. After 5 days priming and a further 7 day period of IL-2-driven cell expansion, monoclonal antibodies to CD3, CD2 and CD28 were adopted for in vitro restimulation of allergen-specific cell lines or, subsequently, secondary established TCC. The induction of apoptosis was detected by propidium iodide (PI) cytofluorimetric assay. Basal and co-stimulation-induced IL-8 production was measured by an ELISA method. Both cypress-specific T-cell lines and TCC secreted appreciable amounts of IL-8. By cross-linking T-cell lines or Th2 CD4+ TCC with CD3, CD2 or CD28 MoAbs, the authors observed a great stimulation-induced IL-8 secretion, preferentially after CD2 or combined CD2/CD28 stimulation. In addition, CD4+ clones released large amounts of IL-8 into culture supernatants after CD2 stimulation while undergoing programmed cell death (30-40% hypodiploid DNA profile of PI-stained cells). In contrast, CD3 crosslinking was unable to determine the release of IL-8 or the induction of apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that incomplete TcR engagement by allergen may lead to the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines with a contemporary induction of apoptosis in a significant number of target cells. This phenomenon may

  20. Laser-facilitated epicutaneous immunotherapy to IgE-mediated allergy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mudnakudu Nagaraju Kiran; Zhou, Chang; Wu, Mei X

    2016-08-10

    Allergen specific immunotherapy has been shown to be the only effective treatment for long-lasting clinical benefit to IgE-mediated allergic diseases, but a fewer than 5% of patients choose the treatment because of inconvenience and a high risk of anaphylaxis. Recently, epicutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (EPIT) has proven effective, yet with limitations owing to strong skin reactions. We demonstrate here safer and faster EPIT, named μEPIT, by delivering powdered allergen and adjuvants into many micropores in the epidermis. We fabricated a microarray patch fractionally coated with a powder mixture of ovalbumin (OVA) model allergen, CpG, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD3). Topical application of the patch onto laser-microperforated skin resulted in a high level of epidermal delivery while greatly minimizing allergen leakage into circulation system as compared to current subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). Moreover, only three times of μEPIT over two weeks could sufficiently inhibit allergen-specific IgE responses in mice suffering OVA-induced airway hyperresponsivness (AHR), which was unattainable by eight times of SCIT over three weeks. Mechanistically, μEPIT preferably enhanced IgG2a production suggesting TH1-biased immune responses and induced a high level of T-regulatory (Treg) cells against repeated allergen sensitization. The immune tolerance was confirmed by marked reduction in airway wall thickness as well as eosinophil and neutrophil infiltration into the respiratory airway. The μEPIT represents a novel and painless technology to treat IgE-mediated allergic diseases with little local skin reaction and a minimal risk of anaphylaxis. PMID:27235977

  1. The future of sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, F; Duse, M; Frati, F; Incorvaia, C; Marseglia, G L; La Rosa, M

    2009-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is currently the most prescribed form of allergen immunotherapy in many European countries. Its use has been accepted in the international consensus publications, and recently also the scepticism of USA scientists is attenuated. Still, this treatment may be improved, and the possible developments consist of modification of the materials, use of adjuvants and use of recombinant allergens. Moreover, new applications of SLIT, such as food allergy, seem promising. Concerning materials, the future form of SLIT is likely to be represented by tablets, which were already tested for efficacy and safety with grass pollen extracts, and are likely to increase the convenience for the patient by the use of no-updosing schedule. Adjuvants fitting with the characteristics of SLIT seem to be CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG), able to interact with the Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) whose activation induces a Th1-like pattern of cytokine release, combination of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 plus dexamethasone (VitD3-Dex), and Lactobacillus plantarum. The approach with recombinant allergens, named component-resolved diagnosis, offers the possibility to tailor immunotherapy, which was found to be effective in two randomized trials of subcutaneous SIT (16-17), while studies with SLIT are not yet available. Regarding food allergy, an important controlled study demonstrated that SLIT with hazelnut is able to increase patients tolerance over possible reactions from inadvertent assumption of the culprit food, and warrants for further trials with other foods. PMID:19944008

  2. Sitting on 'Voltaire'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated image of PIA04191 Sitting on 'Voltaire'

    This false-color mosaic was taken with Spirit's panoramic camera on martian day, or sol, 554 (July 25, 2005), while Spirit was sitting on the 'Voltaire' layered rock outcrop.

    A rock within the Voltaire outcrop, called 'Haussmann,' exhibited many interesting patterns, including rounded pebbles that are approximately 2 to 3 centimeters (.8 to 1.2 inches) across. The pebbles are embedded in a finer-grained matrix of material. The striations in Haussmann are noted. The rounded pebbles must have been exposed to erosion in the past, before they were embedded into the rock.

    The layered rocks in this area are thought to have formed from an impact event, as ejected deposits. They illustrate the complexity of the rocks found by Spirit as the rover made its way to the summit of Husband Hill.

  3. Sitting on a fastball.

    PubMed

    Cañal-Bruland, R; Filius, M A; Oudejans, R R D

    2015-01-01

    This is the first study to show that when baseball batters fail to hit change-ups it is because they sit on a fastball. Sitting on a fastball refers to a strategy of baseball batters to always expect a fastball (a fast type of pitch), because expecting slower balls would result in too late movement initiation for unexpected fastballs. Here the authors analyzed movement patterns of highly talented baseball batters facing randomly presented fastballs and change-ups (a slower type of pitch). Results revealed that when batters failed to a hit change-up, this was due to too fast movement initiation patterns that were highly similar to those typically associated with fastballs. More specifically, the movement initiation pattern was not adjusted to the slower speeds of change-ups, resulting in a miss. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first behavioral experiment showing that the strategy of sitting on a fastball exists, and how it affects batting performance on change-ups.

  4. Food allergen-specific serum IgG and IgE before and after elimination diets in allergic dogs.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Anja; Bexley, Jennifer; Halliwell, Richard E W; Mueller, Ralf S

    2011-12-15

    Serum food allergen-specific antibody testing is widely offered to identify suitable ingredients for diets to diagnose adverse food reaction (AFR) in dogs with allergic skin disease. Antibody concentrations in blood samples obtained during an unsuccessful diet to help in the choice of diet changes may be influenced by the previous diet. The objective of this paper was to measure food antigen-specific IgE and IgG for the most commonly used 16 food antigens before and after an elimination diet. Levels of food-specific serum IgE and IgG antibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Dogs had detectable IgE antibodies to beef, pork, lamb and cows' milk; and detectable IgG antibodies to beef, pork, lamb, cows' milk, chicken and turkey. Of 19 dogs with complete data sets, 14 dogs showed clear improvement during diet and in 7 dogs AFR could be diagnosed by deterioration on rechallenge and subsequent improvement on refeeding the diet. Serum was obtained before and 6-8 weeks after beginning such a diet. There was no significant difference in pre- and post-diet levels for any of the individual allergens nor for the total IgE and IgG concentrations of all antigens (P=0.55 and P=0.53 respectively). In these 19 dogs in which an elimination diet was used for the diagnosis of food allergy and in which 14 were probably food allergic and 7 were proven food allergic there were no significant differences in food-specific antibodies before and after an elimination diet of 6-8 weeks. PMID:21955446

  5. A comparison of intradermal testing and detection of allergen-specific immunoglobulin E in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in horses affected with skin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Erin E; Miller, William H; Wagner, Bettina

    2007-12-15

    Skin hypersensitivities (allergies) in horses are often diagnosed using clinical signs only. Intradermal testing or serological assays are diagnostic options to confirm the allergic nature of the disease and to identify the allergen(s). Our objective was to develop an allergen-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a monoclonal antibody specific for horse IgE and to examine its potential for allergen detection in serum in comparison to intradermal testing. Intradermal testing with 61 allergen extracts was performed on 10 horses affected with skin hypersensitivity. Their sera were analyzed by ELISA for IgE antibodies to the same allergens. The kappa test of concordance was used for comparison of the results of both tests. Out of 61 allergen extracts, only two (Timothy and Quack) had kappa values greater than 0.60, suggesting a substantial agreement between skin testing and IgE ELISA. The statistical comparison of the remaining 59 allergens showed little or no concordance between the tests beyond chance. To identify parameters that may influence the sensitivity of the ELISA, the assay was modified to detect allergen-specific IgGb and IgG(T) in serum, and the protein content in all allergen extracts was determined by SDS-PAGE. The commercial allergen extracts revealed a high variation in detectable protein. High concentrations of allergen-specific IgG in horse serum were found to compete with IgE for binding to the plates. In conclusion, an ELISA using whole serum and crude allergen preparations provides limited diagnostic information in horses. The reliable diagnosis of allergens in equine skin hypersensitivity is essential to improve allergen-specific treatments, such as hyposensitization, or the development of allergy vaccines.

  6. Allergen-specific IgE in Icelandic horses with insect bite hypersensitivity and healthy controls, assessed by FcepsilonR1alpha-based serology.

    PubMed

    Frey, Rebecka; Bergvall, Kerstin; Egenvall, Agneta

    2008-11-15

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) and atopy can both be causes of pruritus in horses and are associated with allergen-specific IgE to biting insects and environmental allergens respectively. Information with respect to differences in IgE levels in diseased and healthy animals is crucial in enabling an understanding of the clinical relevance of results of allergen-specific IgE tests. The aim of this study was (i) to evaluate and compare levels of allergen-specific IgE, using an ELISA method, in Icelandic horses, with and without IBH, from Iceland and Sweden respectively; (ii) to investigate patterns of allergen-specific IgE to insects, pollens, moulds and mites in those groups of horses; and (iii) to investigate the clinical significance of employing two different cut-off levels for the ELISA. The study compromised a total number of 99 horses from Iceland and Sweden, with and without IBH, divided in 5 groups. Sera from the horses were analysed blindly with the use of Allercept , a non-competitive, solid-phase ELISA-test, designed to detect the presence of allergen-specific IgE in sera using the recombinant alpha chain of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcepsilonR1alpha). The distribution of the ELISA values was shown for each insect, mould, mite and pollen allergen, in the different groups using 10th, 50th and 90th percentiles. The use of two cut-off levels, 150 EA and 300 EA, did not eliminate the false positives. Horses with IBH had a higher number of positive reactions, counting all the 29 allergens, than healthy controls and this was borderline significant (P=0.053). In this study it was shown that serological testing with an ELISA that uses the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcepsilonR1alpha) is presently not suitable as a tool for establishing a diagnosis of IBH or equine atopy. The importance of establishing a correct cut-off level for the ELISA for the different allergens is emphasised.

  7. Engraftment of retrovirally transduced Bet v 1-GFP expressing bone marrow cells leads to allergen-specific tolerance.

    PubMed

    Gattringer, Martina; Baranyi, Ulrike; Pilat, Nina; Hock, Karin; Klaus, Christoph; Buchberger, Elisabeth; Ramsey, Haley; Iacomini, John; Valenta, Rudolf; Wekerle, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chimerism is a promising strategy to induce tolerance to disease-causing antigens expressed on genetically modified haematopoietic stem cells. The approach was employed successfully in models of autoimmunity and organ transplantation. Recently, we demonstrated that molecular chimerism induces robust and lasting tolerance towards the major grass pollen allergen Phl p 5. Since allergens are a group of antigens differing widely in their function, origin and structure we further examined the effectiveness of molecular chimerism using the Phl p 5-unrelated major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1, co-expressed with the reporter GFP. Besides, inhibition of CD26 was used to promote engraftment of modified stem cells. Retrovirus VSV-Betv1-GFP was generated to transduce 5-FU-mobilized BALB/c hematopoietic cells to express membrane-bound Bet v 1 (VSV-GFP virus was used as control). Myeloablated BALB/c mice received Betv1-GFP or GFP expressing bone marrow cells, pre-treated with a CD26 inhibitor. Chimerism was followed by flow cytometry. Tolerance was assessed by measuring allergen-specific isotype levels in sera, RBL assays and T-cell proliferation assays. Mice transplanted with transduced BMC developed multi-lineage molecular chimerism which remained stable long-term (>8 months). After repeated immunizations with Bet v 1 and Phl p 5 serum levels of Bet v 1-specific antibodies (IgE, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG3 and IgA) remained undetectable in Betv1-GFP chimeras while high levels of Phl p 5-specific antibodies developed. Likewise, basophil degranulation was induced in response to Phl p 5 but not to Bet v 1 and specific non-responsiveness to Bet v 1 was observed in proliferation assays. These data demonstrate successful tolerization towards Bet v 1 by molecular chimerism. Stable long-term chimerism was achieved under inhibition of CD26. These results provide evidence for the broad applicability of molecular chimerism as tolerance strategy in allergy.

  8. [Reduced sitting time improves health].

    PubMed

    Helajärvi, Harri; Pahkala, Katja; Raitakari, Olli; Tammelin, Tuija; Viikari, Jorma; Heinonen, Olli

    2013-01-01

    The health-promoting effects of physical exercise are scientifically proven, but the health risks of sitting still remain rather poorly known. Technological development of the society will by no means cut down sitting. Should too much sitting be considered as one of the independent factors increasing the risk of metabolic diseases and its reduction as a health-promoting measure? Innovative solutions made possible by the new technology to cut down on sitting and to increase physical activity may prove to be important future tools for promoting health.

  9. Generation of hypoallergenic neoglycoconjugates for dendritic cell targeted vaccination: A novel tool for specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Esther E.; Himly, Martin; Myschik, Julia; Hauser, Michael; Altmann, Friedrich; Isakovic, Almedina; Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Thalhamer, Josef; Weiss, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of allergic disorders and asthma continuously increased over the past decades, consuming a considerable proportion of the health care budget. Allergen-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy represents the only intervention treating the underlying causes of type I allergies, but still suffers from unwanted side effects and low compliance. There is an urgent need for novel approaches improving safety and efficacy of this therapy. In the present study we investigated carbohydrate-mediated targeting of allergens to dermal antigen-presenting cells and its influence on immunogenicity and allergenicity. Mannan, high (40 kDa) and low (6 kDa) molecular weight dextran, and maltodextrin were covalently attached to ovalbumin and papain via mild carbohydrate oxidation resulting in neoglycocomplexes of various sizes. In particular, mannan-conjugates were efficiently taken up by dendritic cells in vivo leading to elevated humoral immune responses against the protein moiety and a shift from IgE to IgG. Beyond providing an adjuvant effect, papain glycocomplexes also proved to mask B-cell epitopes, thus rendering the allergen derivative hypoallergenic. The present data demonstrate that carbohydrate-modified allergens combine targeting of antigen presenting cells with hypoallergenicity, offering the potential for low dose allergen-specific immunotherapy while concomitantly reducing the risk of side effects. PMID:23147517

  10. Immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain suppresses peanut allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James A; Shepley-McTaggart, Ariel; Umpierrez, Michelle; Hurlburt, Barry K; Maleki, Soheila J; Sampson, Hugh A; Mayfield, Stephen P; Berin, M Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    Peanut allergy is an IgE-mediated adverse reaction to a subset of proteins found in peanuts. Immunotherapy aims to desensitize allergic patients through repeated and escalating exposures for several months to years using extracts or flours. The complex mix of proteins and variability between preparations complicates immunotherapy studies. Moreover, peanut immunotherapy is associated with frequent negative side effects and patients are often at risk of allergic reactions once immunotherapy is discontinued. Allergen-specific approaches using recombinant proteins are an attractive alternative because they allow more precise dosing and the opportunity to engineer proteins with improved safety profiles. We tested whether Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, two major peanut allergens, could be produced using chloroplast of the unicellular eukaryotic alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. C. reinhardtii is novel host for producing allergens that is genetically tractable, inexpensive and easy to grow, and is able to produce more complex proteins than bacterial hosts. Compared to the native proteins, algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain and Ara h 2 have a reduced affinity for IgE from peanut-allergic patients. We further found that immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain confers protection from peanut-induced anaphylaxis in a murine model of peanut allergy.

  11. Immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain suppresses peanut allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James A; Shepley-McTaggart, Ariel; Umpierrez, Michelle; Hurlburt, Barry K; Maleki, Soheila J; Sampson, Hugh A; Mayfield, Stephen P; Berin, M Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    Peanut allergy is an IgE-mediated adverse reaction to a subset of proteins found in peanuts. Immunotherapy aims to desensitize allergic patients through repeated and escalating exposures for several months to years using extracts or flours. The complex mix of proteins and variability between preparations complicates immunotherapy studies. Moreover, peanut immunotherapy is associated with frequent negative side effects and patients are often at risk of allergic reactions once immunotherapy is discontinued. Allergen-specific approaches using recombinant proteins are an attractive alternative because they allow more precise dosing and the opportunity to engineer proteins with improved safety profiles. We tested whether Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, two major peanut allergens, could be produced using chloroplast of the unicellular eukaryotic alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. C. reinhardtii is novel host for producing allergens that is genetically tractable, inexpensive and easy to grow, and is able to produce more complex proteins than bacterial hosts. Compared to the native proteins, algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain and Ara h 2 have a reduced affinity for IgE from peanut-allergic patients. We further found that immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain confers protection from peanut-induced anaphylaxis in a murine model of peanut allergy. PMID:26801740

  12. Specific immunotherapy with mugwort pollen allergoid reduce bradykinin release into the nasal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Grzanka, Alicja; Jawor, Barbara; Czecior, Eugeniusz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A pathomechanism of allergic rhinitis is complex. A neurogenic mechanism seems to play a significant role in this phenomenon. Aim The evaluation of influence of specific immunotherapy of mugwort pollen allergic patients on the bradykinin concentration in the nasal lavage fluid. Material and methods The study included 22 seasonal allergic rhinitis patients. Thirty persons with monovalent allergy to mugwort pollen, confirmed with skin prick tests and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E, underwent a 3-year-long allergen immunotherapy with the mugwort extract (Allergovit, Allergopharma, Germany). The control group was composed of 9 persons with polyvalent sensitivity to pollen, who were treated with pharmacotherapy. Before the allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) and in subsequent years before the pollen seasons, a provocation allergen test with the mugwort extract was performed, together with collection of nasal fluids, where bradykinin concentration was determined according to Proud method. Results There were similar levels of bradykinin in both groups at baseline prior to therapy (AIT group: 584.0 ±87.2 vs. controls 606.3 ±106.5 pg/ml) and changes after allergen challenge 1112.4 ±334.8 vs. 1013.3 ±305.9 pg/ml as well. The bradykinin concentration in nasal lavage fluid after mugwort challenge in 1 year was lower in the AIT group (824.1 ±184.2 pg/ml vs. 1000.4 ±411.5 pg/l; p < 005) with a further significant decrease after the 2nd and 3rd year of specific immunotherapy. Significant reduction of symptoms and medications use was observed in hyposensitized patients. Conclusions A decreased level of bradykinin as a result of AIT suggests that some of the symptomatic benefits of AIT may be related to the reduced release of bradykinin into nasal secretions. These values correlate with clinical improvement within the course of treatment.

  13. Specific immunotherapy with mugwort pollen allergoid reduce bradykinin release into the nasal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Grzanka, Alicja; Jawor, Barbara; Czecior, Eugeniusz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A pathomechanism of allergic rhinitis is complex. A neurogenic mechanism seems to play a significant role in this phenomenon. Aim The evaluation of influence of specific immunotherapy of mugwort pollen allergic patients on the bradykinin concentration in the nasal lavage fluid. Material and methods The study included 22 seasonal allergic rhinitis patients. Thirty persons with monovalent allergy to mugwort pollen, confirmed with skin prick tests and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E, underwent a 3-year-long allergen immunotherapy with the mugwort extract (Allergovit, Allergopharma, Germany). The control group was composed of 9 persons with polyvalent sensitivity to pollen, who were treated with pharmacotherapy. Before the allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) and in subsequent years before the pollen seasons, a provocation allergen test with the mugwort extract was performed, together with collection of nasal fluids, where bradykinin concentration was determined according to Proud method. Results There were similar levels of bradykinin in both groups at baseline prior to therapy (AIT group: 584.0 ±87.2 vs. controls 606.3 ±106.5 pg/ml) and changes after allergen challenge 1112.4 ±334.8 vs. 1013.3 ±305.9 pg/ml as well. The bradykinin concentration in nasal lavage fluid after mugwort challenge in 1 year was lower in the AIT group (824.1 ±184.2 pg/ml vs. 1000.4 ±411.5 pg/l; p < 005) with a further significant decrease after the 2nd and 3rd year of specific immunotherapy. Significant reduction of symptoms and medications use was observed in hyposensitized patients. Conclusions A decreased level of bradykinin as a result of AIT suggests that some of the symptomatic benefits of AIT may be related to the reduced release of bradykinin into nasal secretions. These values correlate with clinical improvement within the course of treatment. PMID:27605897

  14. Serum allergen-specific immunoglobulin E in atopic and healthy cats: comparison of a rapid screening immunoassay and complete-panel analysis.

    PubMed

    Diesel, Alison; DeBoer, Douglas J

    2011-02-01

    Feline and canine atopic dermatitis are thought to have a similar immunopathogenesis. As with dogs, detection of allergen-specific IgE in cat serum merely supports a diagnosis of feline atopy based on compatible history, clinical signs and elimination of other pruritic dermatoses. In this study, a rapid screening immunoassay (Allercept(®) E-Screen 2nd Generation; Heska AG, Fribourg, Switzerland; ES2G) was compared with a complete-panel serum allergen-specific IgE assay (Allercept(®); Heska AG; CP) in healthy cats with no history of skin disease and in atopic cats. The latter had no diagnosis of external parasitism, infection, food hypersensitivity or other skin disease explaining their pruritus, and expressed cutaneous reaction patterns typically associated with feline allergic skin disease (head, neck or pinnal pruritus, miliary dermatitis, self-induced alopecia, eosinophilic granuloma complex). The proportion of cats positive on either the ES2G or the CP assays was not significantly different between the atopic and healthy cat groups. There was, however, strong agreement between the results of the ES2G and CP assay; overall, the two tests were in agreement for 43 of 49 (88%) serum samples. There was also strong agreement when individual allergen groups were evaluated (agreement noted: indoor, 41 of 49 samples; grasses/weeds, 37 of 49 samples; and trees, 41 of 49 samples). These results indicate that although neither test is diagnostic for feline atopic dermatitis, the screening assay is beneficial for predicting the results of a complete-panel serum allergen-specific IgE assay in cats.

  15. Immunotherapy and tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haidong; Qiao, Jian; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Recent exciting progress in cancer immunotherapy has ushered in a new era of cancer treatment. Immunotherapy can elicit unprecedented durable responses in advanced cancer patients that are much greater than conventional chemotherapy. However, such responses only occur in a relatively small fraction of patients. A positive response to immunotherapy usually relies on dynamic interactions between tumor cells and immunomodulators inside the tumor microenvironment (TME). Depending on the context of these interactions, the TME may play important roles to either dampen or enhance immune responses. Understanding the interactions between immunotherapy and the TME is not only critical to dissect the mechanisms of action but also important to provide new approaches in improving the efficiency of current immunotherapies. In this review, we will highlight recent work on how the TME can influence the efficacy of immunotherapy as well as how manipulating the TME can improve current immunotherapy regimens in some cases.

  16. Immunotherapy for mold allergy.

    PubMed

    Coop, Christopher A

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this article is to review the available studies regarding mold immunotherapy. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE to identify peer-reviewed articles related to mold immunotherapy using the following keywords: mold, allergy, asthma, and immunotherapy. In addition, references cited within these articles were also reviewed. Articles were selected based on their relevance to the topic. Allergic responses to inhaled mold antigens are a recognized factor in allergic rhinitis and asthma. There are significant problems with respect to the production of relevant allergen material for the diagnosis and treatment of mold allergy with immunotherapy. Mold allergens contain proteases and should not be mixed with other allergens for immunotherapy. Most of the immunotherapy studies focus on two molds, Alternaria and Cladosporium. There is a lack of randomized placebo-controlled trials when evaluating the efficacy of mold immunotherapy with trials only focusing on immunotherapy to Alternaria and Cladosporium. Additional studies are needed regarding mold allergy and immunotherapy focusing on which molds are important for causing allergic disease.

  17. Immunotherapy for mold allergy.

    PubMed

    Coop, Christopher A

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this article is to review the available studies regarding mold immunotherapy. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE to identify peer-reviewed articles related to mold immunotherapy using the following keywords: mold, allergy, asthma, and immunotherapy. In addition, references cited within these articles were also reviewed. Articles were selected based on their relevance to the topic. Allergic responses to inhaled mold antigens are a recognized factor in allergic rhinitis and asthma. There are significant problems with respect to the production of relevant allergen material for the diagnosis and treatment of mold allergy with immunotherapy. Mold allergens contain proteases and should not be mixed with other allergens for immunotherapy. Most of the immunotherapy studies focus on two molds, Alternaria and Cladosporium. There is a lack of randomized placebo-controlled trials when evaluating the efficacy of mold immunotherapy with trials only focusing on immunotherapy to Alternaria and Cladosporium. Additional studies are needed regarding mold allergy and immunotherapy focusing on which molds are important for causing allergic disease. PMID:24057512

  18. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT)--indications, mechanism, and efficacy: Position paper prepared by the Section of Immunotherapy, Polish Society of Allergy.

    PubMed

    Jutel, Marek; Bartkowiak-Emeryk, Małgorzata; Bręborowicz, Anna; Cichocka-Jarosz, Ewa; Emeryk, Andrzej; Gawlik, Radosław; Gonerko, Paweł; Rogala, Barbara; Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna; Samoliński, Bolesław

    2016-01-01

    SLIT (sublingual immunotherapy,) induces allergen-specific immune tolerance by sublingual administration of a gradually increasing dose of an allergen. The mechanism of SLIT is comparable to those during SCIT (subcutaneous immunotherapy), with the exception of local oral dendritic cells, pre-programmed to elicit tolerance. In the SLIT dose, to achieve the same efficacy as in SCIT, it should be 50-100 times higher with better safety profile. The highest quality evidence supporting the efficacy of SLIT lasting 1-3 years has been provided by the large scale double-blind, placebo-controlled (DBPC) trials for grass pollen extracts, both in children and adults with allergic rhinitis. Current indications for SLIT are allergic rhinitis (and conjunctivitis) in both children and adults sensitized to pollen allergens (trees, grass, Parietaria), house dust mites (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae), cat fur, as well as mild to moderate controlled atopic asthma in children sensitized to house dust mites. There are positive findings for both asthma and new sensitization prevention. Severe adverse events, including anaphylaxis, are very rare, and no fatalities have been reported. Local adverse reactions develop in up to 70 - 80% of patients. Risk factors for SLIT adverse events have not been clearly identified. Risk factors of non-adherence to treatment might be dependent on the patient, disease treatment, physician-patient relationship, and variables in the health care system organization. PMID:27012173

  19. The relationship between autoimmunity and specific immunotherapy for allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bozek, Andrzej; Kołodziejczyk, Krzysztof; Bednarski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a 20-year post-specific immunotherapy (SIT) observational evaluation for an assessment of any manifestations of autoimmune disease or the appearance of autoantibodies in serum. In total, 1,888 patients (902 women and 986 men) were observed. The mean age of the patients was 34.1±12.4 y at the start of the prospective observation after finishing SIT. New incidences of autoimmune disease and/or the presence of autoantibodies in serum were monitored. The SIT group was compared with control groups consisting of allergic patients who had very received SIT and with non-allergic subjects. There were no significant differences in the autoimmune disease prevalence between the allergic patients with or without SIT. However, significantly higher prevalence of 4 different autoimmune diseases (AID) were observed in the non-allergic patients during the same period. Additionally, the incidence of 8 different autoantibodies was significantly higher in non-allergic patients than in control subjects. Hashimoto disease was the most common autoimmune disease observed. The results of this long-term observational study indicated a lack of a significant prevalence of new instances of autoimmune disease during 20 y of observation post-SIT and at a rate lower than that of non-allergic control subjects, suggesting that SIT is safe in this regard in the long term. PMID:26431066

  20. [Immunotherapy of malignant diseases].

    PubMed

    Dorval, T; Michon, J; Tartour, E; Fridman, W H

    1995-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has been carried out since the early fifties and first involved nonspecific system (BCG, Corynebacterium parvum, levamisole...). More recently, the production of cytokines as interferons or interleukin 2, the introduction of monoclonal antibodies have allowed a new development to cancer immunotherapy. Nevertheless, these new approaches have to be considered as a step in the biological therapy of cancer.

  1. Cancer immunotherapy targeting neoantigens.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong-Chen; Robbins, Paul F

    2016-02-01

    Neoantigens are antigens encoded by tumor-specific mutated genes. Studies in the past few years have suggested a key role for neoantigens in cancer immunotherapy. Here we review the discoveries of neoantigens in the past two decades and the current advances in neoantigen identification. We also discuss the potential benefits and obstacles to the development of effective cancer immunotherapies targeting neoantigens.

  2. [Immunotherapy of malignant diseases].

    PubMed

    Dorval, T; Michon, J; Tartour, E; Fridman, W H

    1995-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has been carried out since the early fifties and first involved nonspecific system (BCG, Corynebacterium parvum, levamisole...). More recently, the production of cytokines as interferons or interleukin 2, the introduction of monoclonal antibodies have allowed a new development to cancer immunotherapy. Nevertheless, these new approaches have to be considered as a step in the biological therapy of cancer. PMID:7542946

  3. IgE ELISA using antisera derived from epsilon chain antigenic peptides detects allergen-specific IgE in allergic horses.

    PubMed

    Kalina, Warren V; Pettigrew, Howard D; Gershwin, Laurel J

    2003-05-12

    Equine disease with an allergic etiology is common. Environmental antigens most often implicated as allergens in horses include molds, dusty hay, grass pollen, hay dust mites, and insect saliva. Although intradermal testing with allergen is a useful diagnostic tool for some species, skin testing frequently produces false positive results in horses. Allergen deprivation as a diagnostic tool is often impossible and at best it is ineffective at diagnosing the specific allergic reactivity. Synthesis of IgE after exposure to allergen is the instigator of the allergic process. While IgE exerts its effect after binding strongly to mast cell Fc receptors, the presence of free IgE in the serum can be used to quantify and determine the allergen specificity of the allergic disease. A lack of widely available reagents for detection of equine IgE has limited this approach in horses. We have used the nucleotide sequence of equine IgE to prepare a peptide-based immunogen to elicit equine epsilon chain-specific antisera. Selection of peptides was based on antigenic attributes of the deduced amino acid sequence of the equine epsilon chain. Six peptides were selected for conjugation to carrier molecules and rabbit immunization. Of these, one peptide elicited antisera that was successfully used in enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) to screen horse serum from 64 allergic horses for allergen-specific IgE. Twenty-four of the 64 horses showed positive reactivity to one or more of the following allergens: grass, grain mill dust, mosquito, and horsefly. This study demonstrates the usefulness of peptide-based immunogens for development of antisera to rare or difficult to purify antigens such as IgE. Resultant antisera has great usefulness in diagnostic assays for equine allergy and as a research tool. PMID:12730014

  4. Designing a Multimer Allergen for Diagnosis and Immunotherapy of Dog Allergic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Ola B.; Neimert-Andersson, Theresa; Bronge, Mattias; Grundström, Jeanette; Sarma, Ranjana; Uchtenhagen, Hannes; Kikhney, Alexey; Sandalova, Tatyana; Holmgren, Erik; Svergun, Dmitri; Achour, Adnane; van Hage, Marianne; Grönlund, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Background Dog dander extract used for diagnosis and allergen-specific immunotherapy is often of variable and of poor quality. Objective To assemble four well-established dog allergen components into one recombinant folded protein for improved diagnosis and vaccination of allergy to dog. Methods A linked molecule, comprising the four dog lipocalin allergens Can f 1, Can f 2, Can f 4 and Can f 6 was constructed. The tetrameric protein was structurally characterized by small angle X-ray scattering, and compared with each single recombinant lipocalin allergen or an equimolar mix of the four allergens by analytical size exclusion chromatography, circular dichroism, allergen-specific IgE in serum by ELISA and allergen-dependent capacity to activate basophils. The immunogenicity of the fusion protein was evaluated in immunized mice by assessing splenocyte proliferation and antibody production. Results The linked tetrameric construct was produced as a soluble fusion protein, with the specific folds of the four individual allergens conserved. This multi-allergen molecule was significantly more efficient (p<0.001) than each single recombinant allergen in binding to dog-specific IgE, and the epitope spectrum was unaffected compared to an equimolar mix of the four allergens. Basophil degranulation revealed that the biologic activity of the linked molecule was retained. Immunization of mice with the linked construct induced comparable allergen-specific IgG responses with blocking capacity towards all included allergens and generated comparably low T-cell responses. Conclusion We provide the first evidence for a linked recombinant molecule covering the major dog allergens for potential use in diagnostics and allergy vaccination of dog allergic patients. PMID:25353166

  5. Carbohydrate modified ultrafine ceramic nanoparticles for allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ravi Shankar; Sahu, Satish; Sudheesh, M S; Madan, Jitender; Kumar, Manoj; Dixit, Vinod Kumar

    2011-08-01

    The uses of drug-delivery systems in allergen specific immunotherapy appear to be a promising approach due to their ability to act as adjuvants, transport the allergens to immune-competent cells and tissues and reduce the number of administrations. The aim of this work was to evaluate the carbohydrate modified ultrafine ceramic core based nanoparticles (aquasomes) as adjuvant/delivery vehicle in specific immunotherapy using ovalbumin (OVA) as an allergen model. Prepared nanoparticles were characterized for size, shape, zeta potential, antigen integrity, surface adsorption efficiency and in vitro release. The humoral and cellular-induced immune responses generated by OVA adsorbed aquasomes were studied by two intradermal immunizations in BALB/c mice. OVA sensitized mice were treated with OVA adsorbed aquasomes and OVA adsorbed aluminum hydroxide following established protocol. Fifteen days after therapy, animals were challenged with OVA and different signs of anaphylactic shock were evaluated. Developed aquasomes possessed a negative zeta potential (-11.3 mV) and an average size of 47 nm with OVA adsorption efficiency of ~60.2 μg mg(-1) of hydroxyapatite core. In vivo immune response after two intradermal injections with OVA adsorbed aquasomes resulted in a mixed Th1/Th2-type immune response. OVA-sensitized mice model, treatment with OVA adsorbed aquasomes elicited lower levels of IgE (p<0.05), serum histamine and higher survival rate in comparison with alum adsorbed OVA. Symptoms of anaphylactic shock in OVA aquasome-treated mice were weaker than the one induced in the alum adsorbed OVA group. Results from this study demonstrate the valuable use of aquasomes in allergen immunotherapy. PMID:21333772

  6. Determinants of efficacy and safety in epicutaneous allergen immunotherapy: summary of three clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Senti, G; von Moos, S; Tay, F; Graf, N; Johansen, P; Kündig, T M

    2015-01-01

    The results of our third trial on epicutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (EPIT) will be presented and discussed in the context of our previous trials. This monocentric, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase I/IIa trial included 98 patients with grass pollen rhinoconjunctivitis. Prior to the pollen season 2009, patients received six patches (allergen extract: n = 48; placebo: n = 50) with weekly intervals, administered onto tape-stripped skin. Allergen EPIT produced a median symptom improvement of 48% in 2009 and 40% in the treatment-free follow-up year 2010 as compared to 10% and 15% improvement after placebo EPIT (P = 0.003). After allergen EPIT but not placebo EPIT, conjunctival allergen reactivity was significantly decreased and allergen-specific IgG4 responses were significantly elevated (P < 0.001). In conclusion, our three EPIT trials found that allergen EPIT can ameliorate hay fever symptoms. Overall, treatment efficacy appears to be determined by the allergen dose. Local side-effects are determined by the duration of patch administration, while risk of systemic allergic side-effects is related to the degree of stratum corneum disruption. PMID:25704072

  7. Oral immunotherapy for allergic diseases using transgenic rice seeds: current state and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Mayumi; Nishimura, Tomoe; Kaminuma, Osamu; Mori, Akio; Hiroi, Takachika

    2013-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (IT) has been shown to provide clinical benefit for patients with allergic diseases. At present, subcutaneous and sublingual ITs are mainly authorized for clinical treatment. Oral administration of allergens seems to be the easiest way to achieve IT, though it has yet to be translated to the clinical setting, mainly due to the requirement of a large amount of allergens. Plants, especially rice seeds, have recently been recognized as superior allergen carriers for oral administration, because of their high productivity, stability and safety. Therefore, in order to establish clinically applicable oral IT, we have been developing transgenic rice seeds (Tg rice), in which major epitopes of cedar pollen allergens or house-dust mites (HDM) are expressed. The efficacy of this orally administered Tg rice was confirmed in murine models of allergic rhinitis and bronchial asthma. In the safety study of the Tg rice, no adverse effects on cynomolgus macaques were observed. In this review, we summarized the current state and future prospects of allergen-specific IT, focusing particularly on oral IT with allergen-expressing Tg rice.

  8. Determinants of efficacy and safety in epicutaneous allergen immunotherapy: summary of three clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Senti, G; von Moos, S; Tay, F; Graf, N; Johansen, P; Kündig, T M

    2015-06-01

    The results of our third trial on epicutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (EPIT) will be presented and discussed in the context of our previous trials. This monocentric, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase I/IIa trial included 98 patients with grass pollen rhinoconjunctivitis. Prior to the pollen season 2009, patients received six patches (allergen extract: n = 48; placebo: n = 50) with weekly intervals, administered onto tape-stripped skin. Allergen EPIT produced a median symptom improvement of 48% in 2009 and 40% in the treatment-free follow-up year 2010 as compared to 10% and 15% improvement after placebo EPIT (P = 0.003). After allergen EPIT but not placebo EPIT, conjunctival allergen reactivity was significantly decreased and allergen-specific IgG4 responses were significantly elevated (P < 0.001). In conclusion, our three EPIT trials found that allergen EPIT can ameliorate hay fever symptoms. Overall, treatment efficacy appears to be determined by the allergen dose. Local side-effects are determined by the duration of patch administration, while risk of systemic allergic side-effects is related to the degree of stratum corneum disruption.

  9. Trends in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Joseph F.

    2010-01-01

    Modulation of the immune system for therapeutic ends has a long history, stretching back to Edward Jenner’s use of cowpox to induce immunity to smallpox in 1796. Since then, immunotherapy, in the form of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, has enabled doctors to treat and prevent a variety of infectious diseases, including cholera, poliomyelitis, diphtheria, measles and mumps. Immunotherapy is now increasingly being applied to oncology. Cancer immunotherapy attempts to harness the power and specificity of the immune system for the treatment of malignancy. Although cancer cells are less immunogenic than pathogens, the immune system is capable of recognizing and eliminating tumor cells. However, tumors frequently interfere with the development and function of immune responses. Thus, the challenge for cancer immunotherapy is to apply advances in cellular and molecular immunology and develop strategies that effectively and safely augment antitumor responses. PMID:20703326

  10. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  11. Cancer immunotherapy in children

    Cancer.gov

    More often than not, cancer immunotherapies that work in adults are used in modified ways in children. Seldom are new therapies developed just for children, primarily because of the small number of pediatric patients relative to the adult cancer patient

  12. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  13. Epitope-specific T cell tolerance to phospholipase A2 in bee venom immunotherapy and recovery by IL-2 and IL-15 in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Blesken, T; Wymann, D; Alkan, S S; Müller, U; Blaser, K

    1996-01-01

    Bee venom phospholipase A2 (PLA) is the major allergen in bee sting allergy. It displays three peptide and a glycopeptide T cell epitopes, which are recognized by both allergic and non-allergic bee venom sensitized subjects. In this study PLA- and PLA epitope-specific T cell and cytokine responses in PBMC of bee sting allergic patients were investigated before and after 2 mo of rush immunotherapy with whole bee venom. After successful immunotherapy, PLA and T cell epitope peptide-specific T cell proliferation was suppressed. In addition the PLA- and peptide-induced secretion of type 2 (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13), as well as type 1 (IL-2 and IFN-gamma) cytokines were abolished, whereas tetanus toxoid-induced cytokine production and proliferation remained unchanged. By culturing PBMC with Ag in the presence of IL-2 or IL-15 the specifically tolerized T cell response could be restored with respect to specific proliferation and secretion of the type 1 T cell cytokines, IL-2 and IFN-gamma. In contrast, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 remained suppressed. Treatment of tolerized T cells with IL-4 only partially restored proliferation and induced formation of distinct type 2 cytokine pattern. In spite of the allergen-specific tolerance in T cells, in vitro produced anti-PLA IgE and IgG4 Ab and their corresponding serum levels slightly increased during immunotherapy, while the PLA-specific IgE/IgG4 ratio changed in favor of IgG4. These findings indicate that bee venom immunotherapy induces a state of peripheral tolerance in allergen-specific T cells, but not in specific B cells. The state of T cell tolerance and cytokine pattern can be in vitro modulated by the cytokines IL-2, IL-4, and IL-15, suggesting the importance of microenvironmental cytokines leading to success or failure in immunotherapy. PMID:8833918

  14. Mechanisms of Aeroallergen Immunotherapy: Subcutaneous Immunotherapy and Sublingual Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Cevdet; Kucuksezer, Umut Can; Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2016-02-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is an effective way to treat allergic disorders, targeting the underlying mechanisms and altering the disease course by inducing a long-lasting clinical and immune tolerance to allergens. Although sublingual and subcutaneous routes are used in daily practice, many novel ways to decrease side effects and duration and increase efficacy have been pursued. Further studies are needed to develop biomarkers for the identification of AIT responder patients and also to use the developed knowledge in allergy prevention studies. Future directions in AIT include treatments for autoimmune diseases, chronic infections, organ transplantation, and breaking immune tolerance to cancer cells.

  15. [Cancer genetic immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Paul, S; Regulier, E; Etienne, R

    2002-01-01

    The concept of cancer immunotherapy and the resulting technical advances have evolved considerably during the last decade. However, cancer treatment by recombinant IL-2 or IFN-alpha still represents today the best therapeutic way for the treatment of renal carcinoma, melanoma and in some cases lymphoma. The immunotherapy approaches such as vaccination, gene and cellular therapy, have not yet demonstrated a sufficient clinical efficacy for the treatment of solid tumors. The goal of this review is to summarize the different approaches to cancer immunotherapy developed today. Specific approaches such as antigenic vaccination will be first described, then non-specific approaches such as gene transfer on the tumor site of immuno-stimulating genes will be discussed. PMID:12507600

  16. Immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Koido, Shigeo; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Homma, Sadamu; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Takakura, Kazuki; Saito, Keisuke; Ito, Zensho; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Kajihara, Mikio; Uchiyama, Kan; Arihiro, Seiji; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Masato; Gong, Jianlin; Tajiri, Hisao

    2013-12-14

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is on the rise, and the prognosis for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease is extremely poor. Although chemotherapy and radiation therapy can improve survival rates, it is imperative to integrate alternative strategies such as immunotherapy to improve outcomes for patients with advanced CRC. In this review, we will discuss the effect of immunotherapy for inducing cytotoxic T lymphocytes and the major immunotherapeutic approaches for CRC that are currently in clinical trials, including peptide vaccines, dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines, whole tumor cell vaccines, viral vector-based cancer vaccines, adoptive cell transfer therapy, antibody-based cancer immunotherapy, and cytokine therapy. The possibility of combination therapies will also be discussed along with the challenges presented by tumor escape mechanisms. PMID:24379570

  17. Immunotherapy for Gastroesophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Emily F.; Smyth, Elizabeth C.

    2016-01-01

    Survival for patients with advanced oesophageal and stomach cancer is poor; together these cancers are responsible for more than a million deaths per year globally. As chemotherapy and targeted therapies such as trastuzumab and ramucirumab result in modest improvements in survival but not long-term cure for such patients, development of alternative treatment approaches is warranted. Novel immunotherapy drugs such as checkpoint inhibitors have been paradigm changing in melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer and urothelial cancers. In this review, we assess the early evidence for efficacy of immunotherapy in patients with gastroesophageal cancer in addition to considering biomarkers associated with response to these treatments. Early results of Anti- Programmed Cell Death Protein-1 (anti-PD-1), anti-PD-L1 and anti-Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte assosciated protein-4 (anti-CTLA4) trials are examined, and we conclude with a discussion on the future direction for immunotherapy for gastroesophageal cancer patients. PMID:27669318

  18. The sitting statue of Vargas.

    PubMed

    Goihman-Yahr, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    Medicine and health care in Venezuela have had a roller coaster evolution in parallel with advances and retreats of democracy and of efforts to modernize. The most prominent of the founding fathers of Venezuelan medicine has a sitting statue in the homonymous hospital. After a blossoming of medicine, health care, and research led by dermatology that lasted for nearly four decades, the system went into a tailspin that mirrors what took place in the governmental institutions and in the economy. The statue of Vargas seems to warn Venezuelans that if the decay goes too far, it may become irreversible.

  19. The sitting statue of Vargas.

    PubMed

    Goihman-Yahr, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    Medicine and health care in Venezuela have had a roller coaster evolution in parallel with advances and retreats of democracy and of efforts to modernize. The most prominent of the founding fathers of Venezuelan medicine has a sitting statue in the homonymous hospital. After a blossoming of medicine, health care, and research led by dermatology that lasted for nearly four decades, the system went into a tailspin that mirrors what took place in the governmental institutions and in the economy. The statue of Vargas seems to warn Venezuelans that if the decay goes too far, it may become irreversible. PMID:21679877

  20. [Investigation of mold fungi in air samples of elementary schools and evaluation of allergen-specific IgE levels in students' sera].

    PubMed

    Ovet, Habibe; Ergin, Cağrı; Kaleli, Ilknur

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric fungal spores play important role in allergic reactions in atopic individuals. Monitorization of those spores found in the environment of atopic cases is crucial for the choice of the antigens that will be included in allergen screening procedures and precautions to be taken against mold-originated health problems. Since most of the people spend plenty of time indoors in recent years, the effects of exposure to indoor air fungi on human health have gained importance. This study was aimed to investigate the indoor air mold distribution of elementary schools in Denizli province (located in west Anatolia, Turkey) and to compare the allergen-specific IgE levels of children against the most frequently detected mold genus. A questionnaire (MM080) was distributed to the 4967 students (6-8 year-old) attending first and second degrees of 16 different elementary schools with scattered locations in city center. This questionnaire form included the questions related to the general information about the child, school environment, allergic complaints since last year, home environment and nutrition. Response rate to the questionnaire was 51.6% (2565/4967). Air samples were collected from 18 classrooms in March 2009, during which high rates of allergic symptoms were observed according to the questionnaire results. Mold fungi belonging to 10 different genera (Penicillium spp. 46%; Aspergillus spp. 18%; Cladosporium spp. 17%; Alternaria spp. 15%; Drechslera spp. 1%; Chrysosporium, Fusarium, Conidiobolus and Cladothecium species 0.5%; unidentified 1%) were isolated from indoor air of classrooms. Since the most frequently detected mold was Penicillium spp. (46%), the 48 children with atopic symptoms were called to the hospital for the determination of total IgE and Penicillium specific IgE in their sera. Twenty two students accepted the invitation and serum total IgE (Immulite 2000; Diagnostic Product Corporation, USA) and allergen-specific IgE (Penicillium brevicompactum

  1. Costimulation of CD3/TcR complex with either integrin or nonintegrin ligands protects CD4+ allergen-specific T-cell clones from programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Agea, E; Bistoni, O; Bini, P; Migliorati, G; Nicoletti, I; Bassotti, G; Riccardi, C; Bertotto, A; Spinozzi, F

    1995-08-01

    An optimal stimulation of CD4+ cells in an immune response requires not only signals transduced via the TcR/CD3 complex, but also costimulatory signals delivered as a consequence of interactions between T-cell surface-associated costimulatory receptors and their counterparts on antigen-presenting cells (APC). The intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, CD54) efficiently costimulates proliferation of resting, but not antigen-specific, T cells. In contrast, CD28 and CD2 support interleukin (IL)-2 synthesis and proliferation of antigen-specific T cells more efficiently than those of resting T cells. The molecular basis for this differential costimulation of T cells is poorly understood. Cypress-specific T-cell clones (TCC) were generated from four allergic subjects during in vivo seasonal exposure to the allergen. Purified cypress extract was produced directly from fresh collected pollen and incubated with the patients' mononuclear cells. Repeated allergen stimulation was performed in T-cell cultures supplemented with purified extract and autologous APC. The limiting-dilution technique was then adopted to generate allergen-specific TCC, which were also characterized by their cytokine secretion pattern as Th0 (IL-4 plus interferon-gamma) or Th2 (IL-4). Costimulation-induced proliferation or apoptosis was measured by propidium iodide cytofluorometric assay. By cross-linking cypress-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell clones with either anti-CD3 or anti-CD2, anti-CD28, and anti-CD54 monoclonal antibodies, we demonstrated that CD4+ clones (with Th0- or Th2-type cytokine production pattern) undergo programmed cell death only after anti-CD3 stimulation, whereas costimulation with either anti-CD54 or anti-CD28 protects target cells from apoptosis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7503404

  2. Airway inflammation and IgE production induced by dust mite allergen-specific memory/effector Th2 cell line can be effectively attenuated by IL-35.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Hui; Loo, Evelyn Xiu-Ling; Kuo, I-Chun; Soh, Gim Hooi; Goh, Denise Li-Meng; Lee, Bee Wah; Chua, Kaw Yan

    2011-07-01

    CD4(+) memory/effector T cells play a central role in orchestrating the rapid and robust immune responses upon re-encounter with specific Ags. However, the immunologic mechanism(s) underlying these responses are still not fully understood. To investigate this, we generated an allergen (major house dust mite allergen, Blo t 5)-specific murine Th2 cell line that secreted IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13, but not IL-9 or TNF-α, upon activation by the cognate Ag. These cells also exhibited CD44(high)CD62L(-) and CD127(+) (IL-7Rα(+)) phenotypes, which are characteristics of memory/effector T cells. Experiments involving adoptive transfer of this Th2 cell line in mice, followed by three intranasal challenges with Blo t 5, induced a dexamethasone-sensitive eosinophilic airway inflammation. This was accompanied by elevation of Th2 cytokines and CC- and CXC-motif chemokines, as well as recruitment of lymphocytes and polymorphic mononuclear cells into the lungs. Moreover, Blo t 5-specific IgE was detected 4 d after the last intranasal challenge, whereas elevation of Blo t 5-specific IgG1 was found at week two. Finally, pulmonary delivery of the pVAX-IL-35 DNA construct effectively downregulated Blo t 5-specific allergic airway inflammation, and i.m. injection of pVAX-IL-35 led to long-lasting suppression of circulating Blo t 5-specific and total IgE. This model provides a robust research tool to elucidate the immunopathogenic role of memory/effector Th2 cells in allergic airway inflammation. Our results suggested that IL-35 could be a potential therapeutic target for allergic asthma through its attenuating effects on allergen-specific CD4(+) memory/effector Th2 cell-mediated airway inflammation.

  3. Allergen-specific regulation of allergic rhinitis in mice by intranasal exposure to IgG1 monoclonal antibody Fab fragments against pathogenic allergen.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Daiko; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Sae-Wong, Chutha; Yoshino, Shin

    2014-09-01

    Fab fragments (Fabs) have the ability to bind to specific antigens but lack the Fc portion for binding to receptors on immune and inflammatory cells that play a critical role in allergic diseases. In the present study, we investigated whether Fabs of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) inhibited allergic rhinitis in mice. BALB/c mice sensitized by intraperitoneal injections of ovalbumin (OVA) plus alum on days 0 and 14 were intranasally challenged with OVA on days 28-30, and 35. Fabs prepared by the digestion of an anti-OVA IgG1 mAb (O1-10) with papain were also intranasally administered 15min before each OVA challenge. The results showed that treatment with O1-10 Fabs significantly suppressed the sneezing frequency, associated with decrease of OVA-specific IgE in the serum and infiltration by mast cells in the nasal mucosa seen following the fourth antigenic challenge; additionally, the level of mouse mast cell protease-1, a marker of mast cell activation, in serum was decreased. Furthermore, infiltration of eosinophils and goblet cell hyperplasia in the nasal mucosa at the fourth challenge were inhibited by treatment with O1-10 Fabs. In conclusion, these results suggest that intranasal exposure to Fabs of a pathogenic antigen-specific IgG1 mAb may be effective in regulating allergic rhinitis through allergen capture by Fabs in the nasal mucosa before the interaction of the intact antibody and allergen.

  4. Allergen-specific immune response suppresses interleukin 10 expression in B cells via increasing micro-RNA-17-92 cluster.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiao-Rui; Qiu, Shu-Qi; Yang, Li-Tao; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Gui; Liu, Jiang-Qi; Zeng, Lu; Li, Xiao-Xi; Mo, Li-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10-expressing B cells play a critical role in the immune homeostasis in the body; its regulation has not been fully understood. Micro-RNA (miR)-17-92 cluster has strong regulation in the immunity. This study tests a hypothesis that miR-17-92 cluster suppresses IL-10 expression in B cells. In this study, peripheral B cells were collected from patients with allergic rhinitis (AR). The B cells were treated with specific allergens, dust mite extracts, in the culture. The expressions of miR-17-92 cluster and IL-10 in the culture were assessed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that the levels of miR-19a, but not the rest of the 5 members (miR-17, miR-18a, miR-19b, miR-20a, and miR-92a), were significantly higher in peripheral B cells from AR patients as than in B cells from healthy participants. Exposure of B cells from AR patients to specific allergen, dust mite extracts, significantly increased the levels if miR-19a and suppressed the expression of IL-10 in B cells. The levels of histone deacetylase 11 and acetylated H3K9 were higher, and the RNA polymerase II and c-Maf (the IL-10 transcription factor) were lower, at the IL-10 promoter locus. In conclusion, miR-19a mediates the allergen-specific immune response-decreased IL-10 expression in B cells. PMID:27491928

  5. Oral sensitization with shrimp tropomyosin induces in mice allergen-specific IgE, T cell response and systemic anaphylactic reactions.

    PubMed

    Capobianco, Francescamaria; Butteroni, Cinzia; Barletta, Bianca; Corinti, Silvia; Afferni, Claudia; Tinghino, Raffaella; Boirivant, Monica; Di Felice, Gabriella

    2008-08-01

    Appropriate murine models of shrimp tropomyosin (ST) allergy would be useful in investigating the mechanisms underlying food allergy in human subjects, as well as for the pre-clinical evaluation of efficacy and safety of novel therapeutic approaches. These models should mimic immune and clinical features of human disease, including anaphylactic response. We sensitized C3H/HeJ mice by the oral route with purified ST using cholera toxin (CT) as adjuvant. ST-specific IgE, IgG1, IgG2a and IgA responses were evaluated by ELISA. Spleen cell proliferation and cytokine production by allergen-specific activation were assessed. Jejunum and colon fragments were collected to evaluate the local expression of cytokine genes by PCR. Local and systemic anaphylactic reactions induced by oral ST challenge were scored according to symptoms observed. Faecal samples were collected to assess local IgA production and histamine levels. Oral sensitization with ST plus CT induced in mice significant levels of serum IgE and IgG1 and faecal IgA. ST-specific cell proliferation and IL-4, IL-13 and IFN-gamma cytokine production were induced in the spleen. After oral challenge, 100% of mice had anaphylactic symptoms while no symptoms were observed in challenged naive mice. Faecal histamine content after ST challenge appeared significantly increased in sensitized mice when compared with that observed in pre-immune mice. Jejunum mRNA expression of T(h)2 cytokines was up-regulated by ST sensitization. These results support the importance of the oral way of sensitization and of the in-depth characterization of the anaphylactic response for the development of a suitable in vivo model of food allergy.

  6. Evaluation of new sensitizations in asthmatic children monosensitized to house dust mite by specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Harmanci, Koray; Razi, Cem H; Toyran, Muge; Kanmaz, Gozde; Cengizlier, Mehmet R

    2010-03-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) is one of the treatment modalities recomended for the management of asthma and allergic rhinitis by international guidelines. A potential benefit of immunotherapy (IT) is to prevent the development of sensitisation to new allergens. There is stil no conclusion on this subject. One hundred twenty-two children 8-18 years old with intermittent asthma, with or without allergic rhinitis, all of whom were monosensitised to house dust mite (HDM) were selected. Sixty two of these children accepted to receive SIT with HDM extract for 4 years and the remaining 60 did not accept SIT and were treated with asthma medications only. This second group of children served as the control group. At the end of the 4-year study period, 36 of the 53 patients (67.9%) in the SIT group showed no new sensitizations, compared to 38 of 52 (73.0%) in the control group (p = 0.141). The most frequent new sensitizations at the end of the study were pollens, grasses and olive polen, followed by animal dander, alternaria and cockroach. In conclusion, SIT may not prevent the onset of new sensitizations in asthmatic children monosensitized to house dust mites. Further investigation is required to clarify the immunologic mechanisms and other factors by which SIT reduces or not the development of new sensitizations in monosensitized children. PMID:20527510

  7. Evaluation of a spontaneous canine model of immunoglobulin E-mediated food hypersensitivity: dynamic changes in serum and fecal allergen-specific immunoglobulin E values relative to dietary change.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Hilary A; Hammerberg, Bruce

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of the pilot study reported here was to evaluate serum and fecal total and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) responses to dietary change in five Maltese x beagle dogs with suspected food hypersensitivity, compared with those of five clinically normal dogs. Clinical parameters (pruritus, otitis, and diarrhea) improved in the Maltese x beagle dogs during feeding of a novel diet, and signs were exacerbated by oral allergen provocation. Relative concentrations of serum and fecal wheat-, corn-, and milk-specific IgE were determined by use of an ELISA. The onset of clinical signs of disease was accompanied by an increase in serum allergen-specific IgE concentrations. In contrast, changes in clinical signs of disease or allergen-specific IgE values were not seen in the control group undergoing the same regimen. Total serum IgE concentration was measured by use of the ELISA, and comparison with known quantities of a monoclonal IgE allowed absolute values to be reported. Values were high in the Maltese x beagle colony (7 to 34 microg/ml), compared with those in the control dogs (0.7 to 6 microg/ml). Total serum and total fecal IgE concentrations did not change in either group during the study. Although allergen-specific IgE was detected in the feces of both groups, significant interassay variability made interpretation of the results difficult. The authors concluded that these Maltese x beagle dogs satisfied the currently recognized clinical criteria for the diagnosis of canine food hypersensitivity. Furthermore, the clinical and serologic responses seen in these dogs in response to oral allergen provocation suggest that this may be a useful model for the study of spontaneous food hypersensitivity.

  8. Effects of venom immunotherapy on serum level of CCL5/RANTES in patients with Hymenoptera venom allergy.

    PubMed

    Gawlik, Radoslaw; Glück, Joanna; Jawor, Barbara; Rogala, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Hymenoptera venoms are known to cause life-threatening IgE-mediated anaphylactic reactions in allergic individuals. Venom immunotherapy is a recommended treatment of insect allergy with still the mechanism not being completely understood. We decided to assess the serum CCL5/RANTES level in patients who experienced severe anaphylactic reaction to Hymenoptera venom and to find out changes in the course of immunotherapy. Twenty patients (9 men, 11 women, mean age: 31.91 ± 7.63 years) with history of anaphylactic reaction after insect sting were included into the study. Diagnosis was made according to sIgE and skin tests. All of them were enrolled into rush venom immunotherapy with bee or wasp venom extracts (Pharmalgen, ALK-Abello, Horsholm, Denmark). Serum levels of CCL5/RANTES were measured using a commercially available ELISA kit (R&D Systems, Minneapolis, MN). CCL5/RANTES serum concentration are higher in insect venom allergic patients than in healthy controls (887.5 ± 322.77 versus 387.27 ± 85.11 pg/ml). Serum concentration of CCL5/RANTES in insect venom allergic patient was significantly reduced in the course of allergen immunotherapy already after 6 days of vaccination (887.5 ± 322.77 versus 567.32 ± 92.16 pg/ml). CCL5/RANTES serum doesn't correlate with specific IgE. Chemokine CCL5/RANTES participates in allergic inflammation induced by Hymenoptera venom allergens. Specific immunotherapy reduces chemokine CCL5/RANTES serum level already after initial days of venom immunotherapy.

  9. Active Immunotherapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chodon, Thinle; Koya, Richard C; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    Clinical progress in the field of cancer immunotherapy has been slow for many years but within the last 5 years, breakthrough successes have brought immunotherapy to the forefront in cancer therapy. Promising results have been observed in a variety of cancers including solid tumors and hematological malignancies with adoptive cell therapy using natural host tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, host cells that have been genetically engineered with antitumor T-cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors, immune checkpoint inhibitors like anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1 or PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies and oncolytic virus-based immunotherapy. However, most treatment modalities have shown limited efficacy with single therapy. The complex nature of cancer with intra- and inter-tumor antigen and genomic heterogeneity coupled with the immune suppressive microenvironment emphasizes the prospect of personalized targeted immunotherapy to manipulate the patient's own immune system against cancer. For successful, robust and long-lasting cure of cancer, a multi-modal approach is essential, combining anti-tumor cell therapy with manipulation of multiple pathways in the tumor microenvironment to ameliorate tumor-induced immunosuppression. PMID:26575466

  10. Immunotherapy in asthma.

    PubMed

    Warrington, Richard

    2010-09-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways in which many cells and cellular elements play a role. Chronic inflammation is associated with airway hyper-responsiveness that leads to recurrent episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness and coughing, as well as variable airflow obstruction within the lung. With time, such airflow obstruction may become permanent due to remodeling. It has been treated for more than 100 years by subcutaneous immunotherapy with allergen extracts but in recent years, other forms and types of immunotherapy have been introduced. Perhaps the most successful of these to date, is sublingual immunotherapy, which has attained significant usage in European countries but has yet to make inroads into clinical practice in North America. Other mechanisms to modify the inflammatory responses of asthma have included immunotherapy with recombinant allergens, the use of allergen peptides targeting antigen-specific T cells and the administration of Toll-like receptor agonists coupled to allergen proteins. As the inflammatory responses in asthma frequently involve IgE, a modified monoclonal antibody to IgE and interfering with its binding to the IgE receptor have gained acceptance for treating severe allergic asthma. Other monoclonal antibodies or recombinant receptor antagonists are being assessed for their ability to block other contributors to the inflammatory response. Finally, attempts have been made to generate autoantibody responses to cytokines implicated in asthma. Most of these therapies aim to modify or inhibit the so-called Th 2 immune response, which is implicated in many forms of asthma, or to inhibit cytokines involved in these responses. However, an added benefit of classical immunotherapy seems to be the ability to prevent the allergic progression to new sensitivities and new forms of allergic disease.

  11. Decline of Ves v 5-specific blocking capacity in wasp venom-allergic patients after stopping allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Möbs, C; Müller, J; Rudzio, A; Pickert, J; Blank, S; Jakob, T; Spillner, E; Pfützner, W

    2015-06-01

    While allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) is very efficient in hymenoptera venom (HV)-allergic patients, long-term outcome after finishing AIT is not well investigated, especially regarding mechanisms that are suggested to contribute to allergen-specific tolerance. Here, we analyse the Ves v 5-inhibitory activity of sera from wasp venom-allergic patients using the novel cell-free enzyme-linked immunosorbent facilitated antigen binding (ELIFAB) assay. Compared to pre-AIT, sera from patients undergoing AIT displayed an increased ability to inhibit Ves v 5 binding by IgE antibodies. In contrast, this inhibitory activity was reduced in patients having finished AIT 5-12 years ago. Allergen-blocking capacity correlated with serum concentrations of Ves v 5-specific IgG4 which rose during AIT but almost reached pretreatment levels in patients who had stopped AIT more than 5 years ago. These data raise questions about how long allergen tolerance is maintained in AIT-treated HV-allergic patients and suggest that the ELIFAB assay might be an easy-to-use tool assessing long-term tolerance in patients treated with HV-AIT.

  12. Gated SIT Vidicon Streak Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, D. L.; Yates, G. J.; Black, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    A recently developed prototype streak tube designed to produce high gain and resolution by incorporating the streak and readout functions in one envelope thereby minimizing photon-to-charge transformations and eliminating external coupling losses is presented. The tube is based upon a grid-gated Silicon-Intensified-Target Vidicon (SITV) with integral Focus Projection Scan (FPS) TV readout. Demagnifying electron optics (m=0.63) in the image section map the 40-mm-diameter photocathode image unto a 25-mm-diameter silicon target where gains >= 103 are achieved with only 10 KV accelerating voltage. This is compared with much lower gains (~ 50) at much higher voltages (~ 30 KV) reported for streak tubes using phosphor screens. Because SIT technology is well established means for electron imaging in vacuum, such fundamental problems as "backside thinning" required for electron imaging unto CCDs do not exist. The high spatial resolution (~ 30 1p/mm), variable scan formats, and high speed electrostatic deflection (250 mm2 areas are routinely rastered with 256 scan lines in 1.6 ms) available from FPS readout add versatility not available in CCD devices. Theoretical gain and spatial resolution for this design (developed jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and General Electric Co.) are compared with similar calculations and measured data obtained for RCA 73435 streaks fiber optically coupled to (1) 25-mm-diameter SIT FPS vidicons and (2) 40-mm-diameter MCPTs (proximity-focused microchannel plate image intensifier tubes) fiber optically coupled to 18-mm-diameter Sb2S3 FPS vidicons. Sweep sensitivity, shutter ratio, and record lengths for nanosecond duration (20 to 200 ns) streak applications are discussed.

  13. Effects of geohelminth infection and age on the associations between allergen-specific IgE, skin test reactivity and wheeze: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Moncayo, A-L; Vaca, M; Oviedo, G; Workman, L J; Chico, M E; Platts-Mills, T A E; Rodrigues, L C; Barreto, M L; Cooper, P J

    2013-01-01

    Background Most childhood asthma in poor populations in Latin America is not associated with aeroallergen sensitization, an observation that could be explained by the attenuation of atopy by chronic helminth infections or effects of age. Objective To explore the effects of geohelminth infections and age on atopy, wheeze, and the association between atopy and wheeze. Methods A case-control study was done in 376 subjects (149 cases and 227 controls) aged 7–19 years living in rural communities in Ecuador. Wheeze cases, identified from a large cross-sectional survey, had recent wheeze and controls were a random sample of those without wheeze. Atopy was measured by the presence of allergen-specific IgE (asIgE) and skin prick test (SPT) responses to house dust mite and cockroach. Geohelminth infections were measured in stools and anti-Ascaris IgE in plasma. Results The fraction of recent wheeze attributable to anti-Ascaris IgE was 45.9%, while those for SPT and asIgE were 10.0% and 10.5% respectively. The association between atopy and wheeze was greater in adolescents than children. Although Anti-Ascaris IgE was strongly associated with wheeze (adj. OR 2.24 (95% CI 1.33–3.78, P = 0.003) and with asIgE (adj. OR 5.34, 95% CI 2.49–11.45, P < 0.001), the association with wheeze was independent of asIgE. There was some evidence that the association between atopy and wheeze was greater in uninfected subjects compared with those with active geohelminth infections. Conclusions and clinical relevance Atopy to house dust mite and cockroach explained few wheeze cases in our study population, while the presence of anti-Ascaris IgE was an important risk factor. Our data provided only limited evidence that active geohelminth infections attenuated the association between atopy and wheeze in endemic areas or that age modified this association. The role of allergic sensitization to Ascaris in the development of wheeze, independent of atopy, requires further investigation. PMID

  14. Immunotherapy in food allergy.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Toral; Bryce, Paul J

    2010-05-01

    Food allergies are caused by immune responses to food proteins and represent a breakdown of oral tolerance. They can range from mild pruritus to life-threatening anaphylaxis. The only current consensus for treatment is food avoidance, which is fraught with compliance issues. For this reason, there has been recent interest in immunotherapy, which may induce desensitization and possibly even tolerance. Through these effects, immunotherapy may decrease the potential for adverse serious reactions with accidental ingestions while potentially leading to an overall health benefit. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of food allergy and give an overview of the various immunotherapeutic options and current supporting evidence, as well as look towards the future of potential novel therapeutic modalities.

  15. Immunotherapy for tularemia.

    PubMed

    Skyberg, Jerod A

    2013-11-15

    Francisella tularensis is a gram-negative bacterium that causes the zoonotic disease tularemia. Francisella is highly infectious via the respiratory route (~10 CFUs) and pulmonary infections due to type A strains of F. tularensis are highly lethal in untreated patients (> 30%). In addition, no vaccines are licensed to prevent tularemia in humans. Due to the high infectivity and mortality of pulmonary tularemia, F. tularensis has been weaponized, including via the introduction of antibiotic resistance, by several countries. Because of the lack of efficacious vaccines, and concerns about F. tularensis acquiring resistance to antibiotics via natural or illicit means, augmentation of host immunity, and humoral immunotherapy have been investigated as countermeasures against tularemia. This manuscript will review advances made and challenges in the field of immunotherapy against tularemia.

  16. Immunotherapy of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Märten, Angela

    2008-05-01

    Patients with carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas have especially poor prognosis with a five-year survival rate of <1% and a median survival of 4-6 months. Pancreatic carcinoma is a systemic disease, insensitive to radiotherapy and mostly to chemotherapy. Accordingly, new treatment modalities are worth being investigated. One of the promising approaches is immunotherapy. Several phase I/II trials that have been published show interesting results, whereupon antibody-based strategies seem to fail and unspecific stimulation or vaccination with peptides look encouraging. Furthermore, phase II trials dealing with combination therapies are highly promising. One of them, a combination of chemoradiotherapy plus interferon-alpha is currently tested in a randomized phase III trial. As most of the trials had enrolled only limited numbers of patients and most of the trials were not conducted and/or reported according to the new standards it is difficult to draw final conclusions from the discussed trials. Immuno-monitoring was performed only in 40% of the discussed publications. In all cases immune responses were observed and correlation with the clinical outcome is discussed. Immunotherapy of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and especially combination therapies including immunotherapy is an up-and-coming approach and needs to be investigated in well conducted phase III randomized controlled trials accompanied by appropriate immuno-monitoring.

  17. Immunotherapy of Cancer in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, John M.; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Zarour, Hassane; Kalinski, Pawel; Ferrone, Soldano

    2012-01-01

    The immunotherapy of cancer has made significant strides in the past few years due to improved understanding of the underlying principles of tumor biology and immunology. These principles have been critical in the development of immunotherapy in the laboratory and in the implementation of immunotherapy in the clinic. This improved understanding of immunotherapy, enhanced by increased insights into the mechanism of tumor immune response and its evasion by tumors, now permits manipulation of this interaction and elucidates the therapeutic role of immunity in cancer. Also important, this improved understanding of immunotherapy and the mechanisms underlying immunity in cancer has fueled an expanding array of new therapeutic agents for a variety of cancers. Pegylated interferon-α2b as an adjuvant therapy and ipilimumab as therapy for advanced disease, both of which were approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for melanoma in March 2011, are 2 prime examples of how an increased understanding of the principles of tumor biology and immunology have been translated successfully from the laboratory to the clinical setting. Principles that guide the development and application of immunotherapy include antibodies, cytokines, vaccines, and cellular therapies. The identification and further elucidation of the role of immunotherapy in different tumor types, and the development of strategies for combining immunotherapy with cytotoxic and molecularly targeted agents for future multimodal therapy for cancer will enable even greater progress and ultimately lead to improved outcomes for patients receiving cancer immunotherapy. PMID:22576456

  18. Assessing Sitting across Contexts: Development of the Multicontext Sitting Time Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, Geoffrey P.; Pettee Gabriel, Kelley K.; Kohl, Harold W., III.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the development and preliminary evaluation of the Multicontext Sitting Time Questionnaire (MSTQ). Method: During development of the MSTQ, contexts and domains of sitting behavior were utilized as recall cues to improve the accuracy of sitting assessment. The terms "workday" and "nonworkday" were used to…

  19. Effects of local nasal immunotherapy in allergic airway inflammation: Using urea denatured Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sheng-Jie; Liao, En-Chih; Tsai, Jaw-Ji

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvements in anti-allergy medication, the prevalence of allergic airway inflammation remains high, affecting up to 40% of the population worldwide. Allergen immunotherapy is effective for inducing tolerance but has the adverse effect of severe allergic reaction. This can be avoided by denaturing with urea. In this study, we demonstrated that the serum level of allergen-specific IgE in mice sensitized with native Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p) crude extract after receiving local nasal immunotherapy (LNIT) with urea-denatured Der p crude extract (DN-Dp) significantly decreased compared to that in the normal saline (NS) treatment group. Expressions of IL-4 were significantly reduced in lung tissues after treatment. Inflammation around the bronchial epithelium improved and airway hypersensitivity was down-regulated. LNIT with DN-Dp can down-regulate IL-1b, IL-6 and TNF-a expression and then decrease Der p-induced allergic airway inflammation. This therapeutic modality may be used as an alternative treatment for airway allergic diseases.

  20. Topical skin treatment with Fab fragments of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody suppresses allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Sae-Wong, Chutha; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Kangsanant, Sureeporn; Yoshino, Shin

    2016-05-15

    Fab fragments (Fabs), which lack effector functions due to the absence of the Fc portion, maintain the ability to bind to specific allergens. In the present study, we examined whether Fabs of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) were able to regulate allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice. BALB/c mice passively sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE mAb were repeatedly challenged with OVA applied to the skin after sodium dodecyl sulfate treatment. Fabs prepared by the digestion of anti-OVA IgG1 mAb (O1-10) with papain were applied to the skin 30min before the OVA challenges followed by measurement of clinical symptoms including erythema/hemorrhage, edema, scarring/dryness, and excoriation/erosion of the skin. Treatment with O1-10 Fabs, but not intact O1-10, showed inhibition of clinical symptoms (P<0.01) induced by the repeated OVA challenges in the sensitized mice; O1-10 Fabs suppressed histological changes such as epidermal hyperplasia (P<0.01) and the accumulation of mast cells (P<0.01) and neutrophils (P<0.01). Furthermore, treatment with O1-10 Fabs inhibited the increase in levels of IL-13 (P<0.01) and IL-17A production (P<0.05) in the lymph nodes of the sensitized mice. Additionally, the increased level of OVA in serum following the repeated OVA challenges in the sensitized mice was reduced by the treatment (P<0.05). These results suggest that topical application of pathogenic allergen-specific IgG1 mAb Fabs to the skin of mice is effective in suppressing allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions, suggesting that allergen-specific mAb Fabs could be used as a tool to regulate allergen-induced atopic dermatitis. PMID:26970183

  1. New directions in immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cox, Linda; Compalati, Enrico; Kundig, Thomas; Larche, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is effective in reducing the clinical symptoms associated with allergic rhinitis, asthma and venom-induced anaphylaxis. Subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) with unmodified allergen extracts are the most widely prescribed AIT regimens. The efficacy of these 2 routes appears comparable, but the safety profile with SLIT is more favorable allowing for home administration and requiring less patient time. However, both require that the treatment is taken regularly over several years, e.g., monthly in a supervised medical setting with SCIT and daily at home with SLIT. Despite the difference in treatment settings, poor adherence has been reported with both routes. Emerging evidence suggests that AIT may be effective in other allergic conditions such as atopic dermatitis, venom sting-induced large local reactions, and food allergy. Research with oral immunotherapy (OIT) for food allergies suggest that many patients can be desensitized during treatment, but questions remain about whether this can produce long term tolerance. Further studies are needed to identify appropriate patients and treatment regimens with these conditions. Efforts to develop safer and more effective AIT for inhalant allergies have led to investigations with modified allergens and alternate routes. Intralymphatic (ILIT) has been shown to produce long-lasting clinical benefits after three injections comparable to a 3-year course of SCIT. Epicutaneous (EPIT) has demonstrated promising results for food and inhalant allergies. Vaccine modifications, such as T cell epitopes or the use of viral-like particles as an adjuvant, have been shown to provide sustained clinical benefits after a relatively short course of treatment compared to the currently available AIT treatments, SLIT and SCIT. These newer approaches may increase the utilization and adherence to AIT because the multi-year treatment requirement of currently available AIT is a likely deterrent for

  2. Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Farlow, Martin R; Brosch, Jared R

    2013-08-01

    The immune system plays a significant role in Alzheimer disease (AD). β-Amyloid deposition in the cortex is thought to be an initiating event in AD and the widely believed amyloid hypothesis proposes removal of amyloid may delay disease progression. Human trials of active or passive immune agents have failed to show benefit and increased adverse events of vasogenic edema and microhemorrhages. Evidence suggests the illness may be too advanced by the time patients are symptomatic with dementia. Future directions include better understanding of how and where immunotherapies should be targeted and treating patients at earlier stages of the illness.

  3. [Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Falkentoft, Alexander Christian; Hasselbalch, Steen Gregers

    2016-01-18

    Passive anti-beta-amyloid (Aß) immunotherapy has been shown to clear brain Aß deposits. Results from phase III clinical trials in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients with two monoclonal antibodies bapineuzumab and solanezumab and intravenous immunoglobulin have been disappointing. Subsequent analysis of pooled data from both phase III trials with solanezumab showed a reduction in cognitive decline in patients with mild AD. Solanezumab and new monoclonal antibodies are being tested in patients with prodromal and preclinical AD in search for a disease-modifying treatment. PMID:26815584

  4. Adherence to Sublingual Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mauro, Marina; Leo, Gualtiero; Ridolo, Erminia

    2016-02-01

    Adherence is a major issue in any medical treatment. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is particularly affected by a poor adherence because a flawed application prevents the immunological effects that underlie the clinical outcome of the treatment. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced in the 1990s, and the early studies suggested that adherence and compliance to such a route of administration was better than the traditional subcutaneous route. However, the recent data from manufacturers revealed that only 13% of patients treated with SLIT reach the recommended 3-year duration. Therefore, improved adherence to SLIT is an unmet need that may be achieved by various approaches. The utility of patient education and accurate monitoring during the treatment was demonstrated by specific studies, while the success of technology-based tools, including online platforms, social media, e-mail, and a short message service by phone, is currently considered to improve the adherence. This goal is of pivotal importance to fulfill the object of SLIT that is to modify the natural history of allergy, ensuring a long-lasting clinical benefit, and a consequent pharmaco-economic advantage, when patients complete at least a 3-year course of treatment. PMID:26758865

  5. Immunotherapy for TB.

    PubMed

    Doherty, T Mark

    2012-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis was one of the first human pathogens to be identified as the cause of a specific disease--TB. TB was also one of the first specific diseases for which immunotherapy was attempted. In more than a century since, multiple different immunotherapies have been attempted, alongside vaccination and antibiotic treatment, with varying degrees of success. Despite this, TB remains a major worldwide health problem that causes nearly 2 million deaths annually and has infected an estimated 2 billion people. A major reason for this is that M. tuberculosis is an ancient human pathogen that has evolved complex strategies for persistence in the human host. It has thus been long understood that, to effectively control TB, we will need to address the ability of the pathogen to establish a persistent, latent infection in most infected individuals. This review discusses what is presently known about the interaction of M. tuberculosis with the immune system, and how this knowledge has been used to design immunotherapeutic strategies.

  6. Systemic Reactions to Dust Mite Subcutaneous Immunotherapy: A 3-Year Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiang; Huang, Nan; Li, Wenjing; Hu, Lintao; Wang, Xiaolong; Wang, Yin; Xiang, Ning; Liu, Guanghui

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The incidence of allergen specific immunotherapy-related systemic reactions (SRs) varies among different studies, and many factors are likely to contribute to SRs. This study aims to investigate the incidence, characteristics, and risk factors of SRs to standardize dust mite-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) in Central China. Methods All patients receiving standardized dust mites (100-100,000 SQ-U/mL; Alutard SQ, Hørsholn, Denmark) immunotherapy were followed up. Recorded data included demographics, diagnosis, patient status, pulmonary function testing results before and after each injection, allergen dosage, and details of SRs. Results From June 2011 to August 2014, a total of 208 patients received 4,369 injections; 27 (13.0%) patients experienced 48 (1.1%) systemic reactions. Most of the SRs were grade 2 reactions (n=30, 62.5%), followed by grade 1 (n=11, 22.9%), grade 3 (n=7, 14.6%), and no fatal reactions occurred. Forty-six SRs (95.8%) occurred within 30 minutes. Higher SR rates were associated with high concentration extracts (100,000 SQ-U/mL), injections with concomitant local reactions (LRs), children, asthma and high sensitivity (skin prick test 3+/4+ and/or sIgE≥17.5 kUA/L) (P<0.05). The estimated odds of SRs increased in children (OR=6.57; 95% CI: 1.88-22.97, P=0.003), asthmatic patients (OR=4.10; 95% CI: 1.72-9.80, P=0.002), and injections with LRs (OR=2.41; 95% CI: 1.33-4.36, P=0.004). Conclusions The incidence of SRs to dust mite SCIT was low, and multiple factors were associated with the increased incidence of SRs. Children, asthmatics and patients with concomitant LR may be prone to develop SRs. PMID:27334780

  7. Modified immunotherapy for alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Yoshimasu, Takashi; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2016-07-01

    Squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE) is a commonly used contact sensitizer in immunotherapy for alopecia areata (AA). Severe contact dermatitis is induced by the currently high recommended sensitization dose of 1%-2% SADBE, often decreasing patient compliance. We assessed a modified immunotherapy for AA using SADBE at a starting concentration of 0.01% without sensitization. After one or two weeks of initial 0.01% SADBE application, the concentration of SADBE was increased gradually to 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% until the patients felt itching or erythema at the AA lesion site. The modified immunotherapy showed a response rate of 69.4% (25/36), equivalent to conventional immunotherapy using SADBE starting at 1%-2% sensitization. Furthermore, we investigated the combination therapy of SADBE and multiple courses of steroid pulses for AA. The response rate for combination therapy was 73.7% (28/38); however, the group receiving combination therapy showed a significant prevalence of severe AA compared with the group receiving modified immunotherapy only. We reviewed the efficacy and safety of modified immunotherapy without initial sensitization and combination therapy with immunotherapy and multiple courses of pulses for AA.

  8. Mouse Models of Tumor Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ngiow, Shin Foong; Loi, Sherene; Thomas, David; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is now evolving into a major therapeutic option for cancer patients. Such clinical advances also promote massive interest in the search for novel immunotherapy targets, and to understand the mechanism of action of current drugs. It is projected that a series of novel immunotherapy agents will be developed and assessed for their therapeutic activity. In light of this, in vivo experimental mouse models that recapitulate human malignancies serve as valuable tools to validate the efficacy and safety profile of immunotherapy agents, before their transition into clinical trials. In this review, we will discuss the major classes of experimental mouse models of cancer commonly used for immunotherapy assessment and provide examples to guide the selection of appropriate models. We present some new data concerning the utility of a carcinogen-induced tumor model for comparing immunotherapies and combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy. We will also highlight some recent advances in experimental modeling of human malignancies in mice that are leading towards personalized therapy in patients.

  9. Imaging Biomarkers in Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Juergens, Rosalyn A.; Zukotynski, Katherine A.; Singnurkar, Amit; Snider, Denis P.; Valliant, John F.; Gulenchyn, Karen Y.

    2016-01-01

    Immune-based therapies have been in use for decades but recent work with immune checkpoint inhibitors has now changed the landscape of cancer treatment as a whole. While these advances are encouraging, clinicians still do not have a consistent biomarker they can rely on that can accurately select patients or monitor response. Molecular imaging technology provides a noninvasive mechanism to evaluate tumors and may be an ideal candidate for these purposes. This review provides an overview of the mechanism of action of varied immunotherapies and the current strategies for monitoring patients with imaging. We then describe some of the key researches in the preclinical and clinical literature on the current uses of molecular imaging of the immune system and cancer. PMID:26949344

  10. Immunotherapy in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Emily H; Horn, Leora

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has not traditionally been viewed as an immune-responsive tumor. However, it is becoming evident that tumor-induced immune suppression is vital to malignant progression. Immunotherapies act by enhancing the patient's innate immune response and hold promise for inducing long-term responses in select patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Immune checkpoint inhibitors, in particular, inhibitors to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1) and programmed death receptor ligand 1 (PD-L1) have shown promise in early studies and are currently in clinical trials in both small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer patients. Two large randomized phase III trials recently demonstrated superior overall survival (OS) in patients treated with anti-PD-1 therapy compared to chemotherapy in the second-line setting.

  11. Tau immunotherapy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, Einar M

    2014-01-01

    Disappointing findings from recent phase III trials on amyloid-β (Aβ) immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) have shifted the focus of such treatments to the tau protein. As tau pathology correlates better with the degree of dementia than Aβ plaque burden, it is a more attractive target once cognitive impairments are evident, while Aβ therapies may be better suited for the presymptomatic phase of the disease. Over 12 years ago, we initiated a tau immunotherapy program, seeking to alleviate the functional impairments associated with tau lesions in tauopathies. We have reported that various active and passive tau immunizations diminish tau pathology and improve function, including cognition, in different mouse models. Both extra- and intracellular pathways are likely involved. The antibodies may block the spread of tau pathology via microglial phagocytosis of the antibody-tau complex and facilitate lysosomal tau clearance in neurons after endosomal uptake. We have observed such antibody internalization following intracarotid injection in mice and in various culture models. These include brain slices and primary neurons from tangle mice as well as human neuroblastoma cell lines. Antibody targeting of different intracellular protein aggregates, including α-synuclein, Aβ and superoxide dismutase has been reported by others. Now, several laboratories have confirmed and extended our findings using various active and passive tau immunizations in different models, thereby clearly establishing the feasibility of this approach for clinical trials. We are also working on imaging approaches to monitor tau pathology, its consequences and the efficacy of treatments. Dire need exists for such diagnostic methods for tauopathies. Overall, therapies and diagnostic tools targeting tau pathology have a great potential for AD and other tauopathies.

  12. Genomic determinants of cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Miao, Diana; Van Allen, Eliezer M

    2016-08-01

    Cancer immunotherapies - including therapeutic vaccines, adoptive cell transfer, oncolytic viruses, and immune checkpoint blockade - yield durable responses in many cancer types, but understanding of predictors of response is incomplete. Genomic characterization of human cancers has already contributed to the success of targeted therapies; in cancer immunotherapy, identification of tumor-specific antigens through whole-exome sequencing may be key to designing individualized, highly immunogenic therapeutic vaccines. Additionally, pre-treatment tumor mutational and gene expression signatures can predict which patients are most likely to benefit from cancer immunotherapy. Continued work in harnessing genomic, transcriptomic, and immunological data from clinical cohorts of immunotherapy-treated patients will bring the promises of precision medicine to immuno-oncology.

  13. Immunotherapy of allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Spiewak, Radoslaw

    2011-08-01

    The term 'immunotherapy' refers to treating diseases by inducing, enhancing or suppressing immune responses. As allergy is an excessive, detrimental immune reaction to otherwise harmless environmental substances, immunotherapy of allergic disease is aimed at the induction of tolerance toward sensitizing antigens. This article focuses on the historical developments, present state and future outlook for immunotherapy with haptens as a therapeutic modality for allergic contact dermatitis. Inspired by the effectiveness of immunotherapy in respiratory allergies, attempts were undertaken at curing allergic contact dermatitis by means of controlled administration of the sensitizing haptens. Animal and human experiments confirmed that tolerance to haptens can be induced most effectively when the induction of tolerance precedes attempted sensitization. In real life, however, therapy is sought by people who are already sensitized and an effective reversal of hypersensitivity seems more difficult to achieve. Decades of research on Rhus hypersensitivity led to a conclusion that immunotherapy can suppress Rhus dermatitis, however, only to a limited degree, for a short period of time, and at a high risk of side effects, which makes this method therapeutically unprofitable. Methodological problems with most available studies of immunotherapy of contact allergy to nickel make any definite conclusions impossible at this stage.

  14. Local reactions from subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Coop, Christopher A

    2013-12-01

    Local reactions from subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy are very common during the course of immunotherapy. These local reactions are not bothersome to patients. Local reactions from immunotherapy also do not predict future local or systemic reactions. This review discusses the studies that show that local reactions are not predictive of future reactions and that dose adjustments for local reactions from allergen immunotherapy are unnecessary. The article also focuses on factors that lead to patient noncompliance with immunotherapy and evaluates methods to prevent local reactions from subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy. PMID:24283844

  15. Local reactions from subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Coop, Christopher A

    2013-12-01

    Local reactions from subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy are very common during the course of immunotherapy. These local reactions are not bothersome to patients. Local reactions from immunotherapy also do not predict future local or systemic reactions. This review discusses the studies that show that local reactions are not predictive of future reactions and that dose adjustments for local reactions from allergen immunotherapy are unnecessary. The article also focuses on factors that lead to patient noncompliance with immunotherapy and evaluates methods to prevent local reactions from subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy.

  16. Fiberoptic intubation with patients in sitting position.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Yung; Chien, Jui-Teng; Huang, Shen-Jer

    2007-09-01

    Flexible fiberoptic endoscope is the most valuable tool for anesthesiologists to manage difficult airways. Correctly positioning of the patient during fiberoptic intubation aids the clinician to rapidly secure the airway, because it not only saves time, but also minimizes the risk of repeated attempts of intubation with possible serious consequences in the wake. In general, fiberoptic intubation is carried out with the patient in the supine position, but there are situations in which the intubation requires the subjects to be in the sitting position. The sitting position also changes the position of performing anesthesiologist relative to the patient, presenting an inverse view contrary to that of traditional laryngoscopy. We can often obtain a superior view from fiberoptic intubation. Fiberoptic intubation in the sitting position can be applied to all patients, as long as there is no contraindication of having a patient be sat. PMID:17972620

  17. Association between sitting and occupational LBP

    PubMed Central

    Black, Katia M.; Korn, Hayley; Nordin, Margareta

    2006-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) has been identified as one of the most costly disorders among the worldwide working population. Sitting has been associated with risk of developing LBP. The purpose of this literature review is to assemble and describe evidence of research on the association between sitting and the presence of LBP. The systematic literature review was restricted to those occupations that require sitting for more than half of working time and where workers have physical co-exposure factors such as whole body vibration (WBV) and/or awkward postures. Twenty-five studies were carefully selected and critically reviewed, and a model was developed to describe the relationships between these factors. Sitting alone was not associated with the risk of developing LBP. However, when the co-exposure factors of WBV and awkward postures were added to the analysis, the risk of LBP increased fourfold. The occupational group that showed the strongest association with LBP was Helicopter Pilots (OR=9.0, 90% CI 4.9–16.4). For all studied occupations, the odds ratio (OR) increased when WBV and/or awkward postures were analyzed as co-exposure factors. WBV while sitting was also independently associated with non-specific LBP and sciatica. Vibration dose, as well as vibration magnitude and duration of exposure, were associated with LBP in all occupations. Exposure duration was associated with LBP to a greater extent than vibration magnitude. However, for the presence of sciatica, this difference was not found. Awkward posture was also independently associated with the presence of LBP and/or sciatica. The risk effect of prolonged sitting increased significantly when the factors of WBV and awkward postures were combined. Sitting by itself does not increase the risk of LBP. However, sitting for more than half a workday, in combination with WBV and/or awkward postures, does increase the likelihood of having LBP and/or sciatica, and it is the combination of those risk factors, which leads

  18. Association Between Specific Timothy Grass Antigens and Changes in Thelper 1 and 2 Cell Responses Following Specific Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schulten, Véronique; Tripple, Victoria; Sidney, John; Greenbaum, Jason; Frazier, April; Alam, Rafeul; Broide, David; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Background Different populations of T cells are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. Objective We investigated changes in T-helper (Th) cell populations in patients with allergies following specific immunotherapy (SIT). Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from patients with allergies who received specific immunotherapy (SIT) and those who did not (controls). We tested the ability of peptides from 93 Timothy grass (TG) proteins to induce T-cell responses (cytokine production). We used ELISPOT and staining assays for intracellular cytokines to measure production of interleukin (IL)4, IL5, IL13, interferon (IFN)γ, and IL10. Results Compared with PBMC from controls, PBMC from patients who received SIT produced lower levels of Th2 cytokines upon incubation with several different TG peptides. These data were used to select 20 peptides to be tested an independent cohort of 20 patients with allergies who received SIT and 20 controls. We again observed a significant decrease in production of Th2 cytokines, and an increase in production of the Th1 cytokine IFNγ, in PBMC from the validation groups. These changes correlated with improved symptoms after SIT. Immunization with this selected pool of peptides (or their associated antigens) could protect a substantial proportion of the population from TG allergy. Conclusions We observed a significant decrease in production of Th2 cytokines by PBMC from patients who received SIT for TG allergy, compared with those who did not. These changes might be used to monitor response to therapy. The decrease occurred in response to antigens that elicit little (if any) immunoglobulin (Ig)E responses; these antigens might be developed for use in immunotherapy. PMID:25042980

  19. Intra and inter-laboratory reproducibility of a monoclonal antibody cocktail based ELISA for detection of allergen specific IgE in dogs: proficiency monitoring of macELISA in six laboratories.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kenneth W; Blankenship, Karen D; McCurry, Zachary M; McKinney, Brennan; Ruffner, Rick; Esch, Robert E; Tambone, Cecilia; Faas, Rebecca; Hermes, Darren; Brazis, Pilar; Drouet, Laurent

    2012-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of results yielded using a monoclonal antibody based ELISA for detection of allergen specific IgE when run in six separate affiliated laboratories. On two separate occasions, duplicate samples of 15 different sera pools were independently evaluated by each laboratory in a single blinded fashion. The average intra-assay variance among reactive assay calibrators in all laboratories was 6.2% (range 2.6-18.2%), while the average intra-laboratory inter-assay variance was 12.1% (range 8.0-17.1%). The overall inter-assay inter-laboratory variance was consistent among laboratories and averaged 15.6% (range 15.1-16.6%). All laboratories yielded similar profiles and magnitudes of responses for replicate unknown samples; dose-response profiles observed in each of the laboratories were indistinguishable. Considering positive/negative results, inter-assay inter-laboratory concordance of results exceeded 95%. Correlation of OD values between and among all laboratories was strong (r>0.9, p<0.001). Correlation of OD values between the two separate evaluations was also high for all allergens except olive, which was attributed to lot-to-lot differences of allergen coated wells. Collectively, the results demonstrated that the monoclonal antibody based ELISA for measuring allergen specific canine IgE is reproducible, and documents that consistency of results can be achieved not only in an individual laboratory, but between laboratories using the same monoclonal-based ELISA.

  20. Immunotherapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Penelope A; Shepherd, Frances A

    2008-06-01

    Reports of tumor regression after infection date back as far as 1550 bc. In the twentieth century, Dr. William Coley, witnessing regression of a malignant tumor in one of his patients after a bacterial infection, developed the first cancer treatment vaccine derived from killed bacteria, with some reported success. However, despite decades of research, no specific, active tumor vaccine has been approved for the treatment of cancer. In lung cancer, initial attempts to modulate the immune system with nonspecific therapies were unsuccessful. However, more sophisticated specific vaccines have now been developed, and an increasing number are being evaluated in randomized phase 3 trials, raising hopes that vaccines may be an additional novel therapy for patients with lung cancer. This article reviews the following seven vaccines, which have entered randomized trials: L-BLP25 (Stimuvax), BEC-2, 1E10, PF-3512676 (Promune), melanoma-associated antigen A3 immunotherapeutic, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-transduced allogeneic cancer cellular immunotherapy, and belagenpumatucel-L (Lucanix).

  1. Immunotherapy for Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Kosten, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Substance use disorders continue to be major medical and social problems worldwide. Current medications for substance use disorders have many limitations such as cost, availability, medication compliance, dependence, diversion of some to illicit use and relapse to addiction after discontinuing their use. Immunotherapies using either passive monoclonal antibodies or active vaccines have distinctly different mechanisms and therapeutic utility from small molecule approaches to treatment. They have great potential to help the patient achieve and sustain abstinence and have fewer of the above limitations. This review covers the cocaine vaccine development in detail and provides an overview of directions for developing anti-addiction vaccines against the abuse of other substances. The notable success of the first placebo-controlled clinical trial of a cocaine vaccine, TA-CD, has led to an ongoing multi-site, Phase IIb clinical trial in 300 subjects. The results from these trials are encouarging further development of the cocaine vacine as one of the first anti-addiction vaccines to go forward to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for review and approval for human use. PMID:22229313

  2. Immunotherapy of Brain Cancer.

    PubMed

    Roth, Patrick; Preusser, Matthias; Weller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The brain has long been considered an immune-privileged site precluding potent immune responses. Nevertheless, because of the failure of conventional anti-cancer treatments to achieve sustained control of intracranial neoplasms, immunotherapy has been considered as a promising strategy for decades. However, several efforts aimed at exploiting the immune system as a therapeutic weapon were largely unsuccessful. The situation only changed with the introduction of the checkpoint inhibitors, which target immune cell receptors that interfere with the activation of immune effector cells. Following the observation of striking effects of drugs that target CTLA-4 or PD-1 against melanoma and other tumor entities, it was recognized that these drugs may also be active against metastatic tumor lesions in the brain. Their therapeutic activity against primary brain tumors is currently being investigated within clinical trials. In parallel, other immunotherapeutics such as peptide vaccines are at an advanced stage of clinical development. Further immunotherapeutic strategies currently under investigation comprise adoptive immune cell transfer as well as inhibitors of metabolic pathways involved in the local immunosuppression frequently found in brain tumors. Thus, the ongoing implementation of immunotherapeutic concepts into clinical routine may represent a powerful addition to the therapeutic arsenal against various brain tumors. PMID:27260656

  3. Immunotherapy of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Dirk; Halama, Niels; Zörnig, Inka; Klug, Paula; Krauss, Jürgen; Haag, Georg-Martin

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the immune response, reflected by high T cell infiltrates in primary tumors and metastases, influences the clinical course of colorectal cancer (CRC). Therefore, immunotherapy concepts have been adapted from other tumor entities, which typically rely on the activation of T cells in the tumor microenvironment (e.g. blockade of the immune checkpoint molecules PD-1 and CTLA-4). However, most of the strategies using the approved checkpoint inhibitors and/or combination strategies have more or less failed to produce impressive results in early phase trials in CRC. Therefore, a number of novel targets for checkpoint inhibition are currently in early phase clinical testing (TIM-3, Lag-3, OX40, GITR, 4-1BB, CD40, CD70). A simple activation of infiltrating T cells will not, however, lead to a meaningful anti-tumor response without modulating the environmental factors in CRC. Thus, it is absolutely necessary to improve our understanding of the complex regulation of the tumor microenvironment in CRC to design individual combination treatments leading to effective immune control. PMID:27259331

  4. Immunotherapy for malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Suryadevara, Carter M; Verla, Terence; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Reap, Elizabeth A; Choi, Bryan D; Fecci, Peter E; Sampson, John H

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas (MG) are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor. Most patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and malignant glial tumor, die within 12-15 months. Moreover, conventional treatment, which includes surgery followed by radiation and chemotherapy, can be highly toxic by causing nonspecific damage to healthy brain and other tissues. The shortcomings of standard-of-care have thus created a stimulus for the development of novel therapies that can target central nervous system (CNS)-based tumors specifically and efficiently, while minimizing off-target collateral damage to normal brain. Immunotherapy represents an investigational avenue with the promise of meeting this need, already having demonstrated its potential against B-cell malignancy and solid tumors in clinical trials. T-cell engineering with tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is one proven approach that aims to redirect autologous patient T-cells to sites of tumor. This platform has evolved dramatically over the past two decades to include an improved construct design, and these modern CARs have only recently been translated into the clinic for brain tumors. We review here emerging immunotherapeutic platforms for the treatment of MG, focusing on the development and application of a CAR-based strategy against GBM.

  5. Lymphoma Immunotherapy: Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Zappasodi, Roberta; de Braud, Filippo; Di Nicola, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The rationale to treat lymphomas with immunotherapy comes from long-standing evidence on their distinctive immune responsiveness. Indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, in particular, establish key interactions with the immune microenvironment to ensure prosurvival signals and prevent antitumor immune activation. However, reports of spontaneous regressions indicate that, under certain circumstances, patients develop therapeutic antitumor immunity. Several immunotherapeutic approaches have been thus developed to boost these effects in all patients. To date, targeting CD20 on malignant B cells with the antibody rituximab has been the most clinically effective strategy. However, relapse and resistance prevent to cure approximately half of B-NHL patients, underscoring the need of more effective therapies. The recognition of B-cell receptor variable regions as B-NHL unique antigens promoted the development of specific vaccines to immunize patients against their own tumor. Despite initial promising results, this strategy has not yet demonstrated a sufficient clinical benefit to reach the regulatory approval. Several novel agents are now available to stimulate immune effector functions or counteract immunosuppressive mechanisms, such as engineered antitumor T cells, co-stimulatory receptor agonist, and immune checkpoint-blocking antibodies. Thus, multiple elements can now be exploited in more effective combinations to break the barriers for the induction of anti-lymphoma immunity. PMID:26388871

  6. Monoclonal antibodies in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Reisfeld, R A

    1992-06-01

    The preceding article focused on some novel approaches for the adjuvant treatment of human melanoma and neuroblastoma with mAbs against antigens preferentially expressed on these tumors. It should be emphasized that the major goal of the immunotherapy modalities described here is to apply them in an adjuvant setting for the treatment of micrometastases. The major aim is to decrease the rate of development of metastases in a setting of very low tumor burden and ultimately achieve a prolongation in life span. The combination of powerful modern technologies achieving genetic engineering of mAbs, resulting in more human-like molecules, will lead to a reevaluation of these reagents alone or in combination with molecularly defined cytokines and growth factors for the immunotherapy of cancer. The initial, albeit anectodal, findings, of phase I clinical trials mentioned in this article lead to cautious optimism that immunotherapy may find a place and will eventually contribute to the adjuvant treatment of cancer.

  7. Emerging nanotechnologies for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Sourabh; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-05-01

    Founded on the growing insight into the complex cancer-immune system interactions, adjuvant immunotherapies are rapidly emerging and being adapted for the treatment of various human malignancies. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, for example, have already shown clinical success. Nevertheless, many approaches are not optimized, require frequent administration, are associated with systemic toxicities and only show modest efficacy as monotherapies. Nanotechnology can potentially enhance the efficacy of such immunotherapies by improving the delivery, retention and release of immunostimulatory agents and biologicals in targeted cell populations and tissues. This review presents the current status and emerging trends in such nanotechnology-based cancer immunotherapies including the role of nanoparticles as carriers of immunomodulators, nanoparticles-based cancer vaccines, and depots for sustained immunostimulation. Also highlighted are key translational challenges and opportunities in this rapidly growing field.

  8. Immunotherapy of Childhood Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Stephen S; Chou, Alexander J; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant tumors of bone and soft tissue origin. Although more than 100 different histologic subtypes have been described, the majority of pediatric cases belong to the Ewing's family of tumors, rhabdomyosarcoma and osteosarcoma. Most patients that present with localized stage are curable with surgery and/or chemotherapy; however, those with metastatic disease at diagnosis or those who experience a relapse continue to have a very poor prognosis. New therapies for these patients are urgently needed. Immunotherapy is an established treatment modality for both liquid and solid tumors, and in pediatrics, most notably for neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma. In the past, immunomodulatory agents such as interferon, interleukin-2, and liposomal-muramyl tripeptide phosphatidyl-ethanolamine have been tried, with some activity seen in subsets of patients; additionally, various cancer vaccines have been studied with possible benefit. Monoclonal antibody therapies against tumor antigens such as disialoganglioside GD2 or immune checkpoint targets such as CTLA-4 and PD-1 are being actively explored in pediatric sarcomas. Building on the success of adoptive T cell therapy for EBV-related lymphoma, strategies to redirect T cells using chimeric antigen receptors and bispecific antibodies are rapidly evolving with potential for the treatment of sarcomas. This review will focus on recent preclinical and clinical developments in targeted agents for pediatric sarcomas with emphasis on the immunobiology of immune checkpoints, immunoediting, tumor microenvironment, antibody engineering, cell engineering, and tumor vaccines. The future integration of antibody-based and cell-based therapies into an overall treatment strategy of sarcoma will be discussed.

  9. Investigation of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit in an above knee amputee

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fan; Zhang, Fan; Huang, He

    2013-01-01

    the objective of this pilot study is twofold: 1) to extract key factors/features in sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit (STS) performed by an above knee (AK) amputee; 2) to propose a convenient way to quantify symmetry. One male unilateral transfemoral amputee participated in the pilot study. The subject was instructed to rise in a comfortable and natural manner and conduct a series of sit-to-stand, stand-to-sit. We simultaneously measured kinematics, kinetics and muscle activities. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the dimension and identify modes and a convenient index of STS symmetry (slope of the major axis of the error ellipse) is proposed using the insole pressure sensors. Based on the preliminary results it is recommended that kinematics and kinetics in both the sagittal and frontal planes be considered for an AK amputee performing STS. The information might be useful for further research on amputee STS. PMID:22256034

  10. Cancer immunotherapy using tumor cryoablation.

    PubMed

    Sidana, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    Cryoablation is increasingly being used as a primary treatment for localized cancers and as a salvage therapy for metastatic cancers. Anecdotal clinical reports and animal experiments have confirmed an induction of systemic antitumor immune response by tumor cryoablation. To capitalize on the stimulatory effects of cryoablation for cancer immunotherapy, this response must be intensified using other immunomodulatory agents. This article reviews the preclinical and clinical evidence and discusses the mechanism of the antitumor immune response generated by cryoablation. The rationale and evidence behind several immunotherapy approaches that can be combined with cryoablation to devise a cryoimmunotherapeutic strategy with a potential to impact the progression of metastatic disease are described.

  11. Specific immunotherapy plus Clostridium butyricum alleviates ulcerative colitis in patients with food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Bin Lan, B; Yang, Fan; Lu, Dong; Lin, Zhenlv

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant T cell activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation, such as ulcerative colitis (UC). C. butyricum (Cb) is a probiotic and has been employed in the treatment of immune diseases. This study tests a hypothesis that specific immunotherapy (SIT) plus oral Cb (an over-the-counter probiotic) alleviates the UC symptoms. In this study, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, clinical study at our hospital. A total of 80 patients with relapsing-remitting ulcerative colitis and high levels of specific IgE antibody was randomly divided into 4 groups, and were treated with SIT or/and Cb, or placebo, respectively for 1 year. The results showed that a food antigen-specific Th2 polarization immune response was observed in UC patients with food allergy (FA). The frequency of regulatory B cells was significantly less in UC patients with FA as compared with healthy subjects. The UC patients with FA were treated with SIT and Cb showed significant amelioration of UC clinical symptoms, reduction of using UC-control medicines, and suppression of the skewed Th2 polarization, which did not occur in those treated with either SIT alone, or Cb alone, or placebo. In conclusion, combination of SIT and Cb efficiently alleviates a fraction of UC patients. PMID:27167186

  12. Update on Allergy Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    This article summarizes and provides commentary regarding guidelines on the administration of immunotherapy (IT) for allergic airway disease. Recent investigations have provided important insights into the immunologic mechanism of IT and the prominent role of interleukin-10-producing regulatory T lymphocytes. The most important aspect of successful IT is the administration of an appropriate dose of an extract containing a sufficient concentration of the relevant allergen. This is largely possible now only with standardized extracts. When the major allergen content of successful IT extracts was quantified, efficacy was demonstrated across a surprisingly narrow concentration range (approximately 5-24 μg per injection), irrespective of the extract. This presumably reflects the concentration of an antigen that drives an immune response toward tolerance. It may be predicted that as major allergen content is quantified in currently nonstandardized extracts, effective IT will also be achieved by administering a dose in this range, in contrast to current practices involving fairly arbitrary dosing decisions. With the availability of nonsedating antihistamines, intranasal corticosteroids, and the leukotriene modifiers, inadequate pharmacologic response or intolerable side effects are less commonly the major indications for starting IT for allergic rhinitis (AR). However, with the recognition that a relatively short course (3-5 years) of IT can provide long-term immunomodulation and clinical benefit, a desire to avoid long-term pharmacotherapy and the associated high costs may be the primary indication for IT in AR cases. While evidence overwhelmingly supports the beneficial influences of IT in asthma cases, the positioning of IT for this disorder is not established. The observed prevention of asthma in children who have AR is intriguing, but further studies are required to assess the extent to which the prevalence and severity of chronic asthma will be reduced when these

  13. Disialoganglioside directed immunotherapy of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Modak, Shakeel; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2007-02-01

    Achieving a cure for metastatic neuroblastoma remains a challenge despite sensitivity to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Most patients achieve remission, but a failure to eliminate minimal residual disease (MRD) often leads to relapse. Immunotherapy is potentially useful for chemotherapy-resistant disease and may be particularly effective for low levels of MRD that are below the threshold for detection by routine radiological and histological methods. Disialoganglioside (GD2), a surface glycolipid antigen that is ubiquitous and abundant on neuroblastoma cells is an ideal target for immunotherapy. Anti-GD2 monoclonal antibodies currently form the mainstay of neuroblastoma immunotherapy and their safety profile has been well-established. Although responses in patients with gross disease have been observed infrequently, histologic responses of bone marrow disease are consistently achieved in >75 percent of patients with primary refractory neuroblastoma. The advent of highly sensitive and specific molecular assays to measure MRD has confirmed the efficacy anti-GD2 antibody immunotherapy in patients with subclinical disease. Such markers will allow further optimization of other anti-MRD therapies. We review the current status of anti-GD2 clinical trials for neuroblastoma and novel preclinical GD2-targeted strategies for this rare but often lethal childhood cancer.

  14. Technological advances in adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oelke, Mathias; Krueger, Christine; Schneck, Jonathan P

    2005-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy is an attractive and elegant strategy for treating a variety of life-threatening diseases. Several approaches have been developed to generate antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells for adoptive T-cell therapy in cancer and infectious diseases. Currently, many approaches are based on either the use of autologous peptide pulsed dendritic cells as antigen-presenting cells or nonspecific expansion of T cells. Unfortunately, current approaches lack the ability to serve as reproducible and economically viable methods. Several groups are developing new artificial approaches to overcome problems associated with dendritic cells and the nonspecific expansion of T-cell clones in order to make adoptive immunotherapy more feasible and effective. Thus, by increasing the availability of adoptive immunotherapy, we will be able to better determine the efficacy of the approaches in the treatment of a variety of diseases. In this review, we focus on technological advances that will facilitate adoptive immunotherapy. Specifically, we summarize current strategies which are either based on artificial antigen-presenting cells or on T-cell receptor gene transfer. PMID:15753966

  15. Immunotherapy toxic in obese mice.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    New research shows immunotherapy can cause lethal inflammation in both young and aged mice that are obese. Restricting calories in aged mice protected them from toxicity, and giving young obese mice a drug for autoimmune disease prevented the fatal reactions. PMID:25583780

  16. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vacchelli, Erika; Bravo-San Pedro, José-Manuel; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V; Eggermont, Alexander M; Fearon, Douglas T; Fridman, Wolf H; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E; Pienta, Kenneth J; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J; Speiser, Daniel E; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K; Talmadge, James E; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S; Whiteside, Theresa L; Wolchok, Jedd D; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-12-30

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into "passive" and "active" based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches.

  17. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Pedro, José-Manuel Bravo-San; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N.; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P.; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Eggermont, Alexander M.; Fearon, Douglas T.; Fridman, Wolf H.; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M.; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E.; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T.; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Talmadge, James E.; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J.; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into “passive” and “active” based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches. PMID:25537519

  18. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vacchelli, Erika; Bravo-San Pedro, José-Manuel; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V; Eggermont, Alexander M; Fearon, Douglas T; Fridman, Wolf H; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E; Pienta, Kenneth J; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J; Speiser, Daniel E; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K; Talmadge, James E; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S; Whiteside, Theresa L; Wolchok, Jedd D; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-12-30

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into "passive" and "active" based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches. PMID:25537519

  19. Future perspectives in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mountzios, Giannis; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The advent of immunotherapy has transformed the treatment paradigm of several solid tumors and is expected to influence the therapeutic algorithm even more in the future following the results of numerous ongoing clinical trials in a wide range of malignancies. Exploiting the anti-cancer effect of the immune system with the use of vaccines, viral vectors, and more lately with immune check-point inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor modification, has been proven a successful therapeutic strategy in a broad spectrum of tumors. In particular, immune check-point inhibition in melanoma, non-small-cell lung cancer and renal cancer, peptide vaccination in prostate cancer and glioblastoma, and oncolytic immunotherapy in melanoma are well-established therapeutic modalities that have obtained approval by regulatory authorities and are already in clinical use. A large number of ongoing clinical trials involving thousands of patients are currently seeking to define the appropriate tumor type, therapeutic setting, treatment combination and patient populations in order to maximize clinical benefit from immunotherapeutic agents. In this context, identification of the patients whose tumors are most likely to respond to immunotherapy by the use of appropriate biomarkers will be crucial for the optimal implementation of immunotherapy into the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:27563660

  20. Engineering opportunities in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jeanbart, Laura; Swartz, Melody A

    2015-11-24

    Immunotherapy has great potential to treat cancer and prevent future relapse by activating the immune system to recognize and kill cancer cells. A variety of strategies are continuing to evolve in the laboratory and in the clinic, including therapeutic noncellular (vector-based or subunit) cancer vaccines, dendritic cell vaccines, engineered T cells, and immune checkpoint blockade. Despite their promise, much more research is needed to understand how and why certain cancers fail to respond to immunotherapy and to predict which therapeutic strategies, or combinations thereof, are most appropriate for each patient. Underlying these challenges are technological needs, including methods to rapidly and thoroughly characterize the immune microenvironment of tumors, predictive tools to screen potential therapies in patient-specific ways, and sensitive, information-rich assays that allow patient monitoring of immune responses, tumor regression, and tumor dissemination during and after therapy. The newly emerging field of immunoengineering is addressing some of these challenges, and there is ample opportunity for engineers to contribute their approaches and tools to further facilitate the clinical translation of immunotherapy. Here we highlight recent technological advances in the diagnosis, therapy, and monitoring of cancer in the context of immunotherapy, as well as ongoing challenges.

  1. Analysis of sitting forces on stationary chairs for daily activities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lingling; Tackett, Bob; Tor, Onder; Zhang, Jilei

    2016-04-01

    No literature related to the study of sitting forces on chairs sat on by people who weighed over 136 kg was found. The Business Institutional Furniture Manufactures Association needs force data for development of performance test standards to test chairs for users who weigh up to 181 kg. 20 participants who weighed from 136 to 186 kg completed 6 tasks on an instrumented chair in the sequence of sitting down, remaining seated and rising. Effects of sitting motion, armrest use and seat cushion thickness on vertical sitting forces and centre-of-force were investigated. Results indicated hard sitting down yielded the highest sitting force of 213% in terms of participants' body weights. Armrest use affected sitting forces of normal sitting down, but not of rising and hard sitting down. Cushion thickness affected sitting forces of normal and hard sitting down and shifting, but not of rising, static seating or stretching backward situations. Practitioner Summary: Results of the sitting force and centre-of-force data obtained for this research can help furniture manufacturers develop new product performance test standards for creating reliable engineering design and manufacturing quality and durable products to meet a niche market need. PMID:26257071

  2. Analysis of sitting forces on stationary chairs for daily activities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lingling; Tackett, Bob; Tor, Onder; Zhang, Jilei

    2016-04-01

    No literature related to the study of sitting forces on chairs sat on by people who weighed over 136 kg was found. The Business Institutional Furniture Manufactures Association needs force data for development of performance test standards to test chairs for users who weigh up to 181 kg. 20 participants who weighed from 136 to 186 kg completed 6 tasks on an instrumented chair in the sequence of sitting down, remaining seated and rising. Effects of sitting motion, armrest use and seat cushion thickness on vertical sitting forces and centre-of-force were investigated. Results indicated hard sitting down yielded the highest sitting force of 213% in terms of participants' body weights. Armrest use affected sitting forces of normal sitting down, but not of rising and hard sitting down. Cushion thickness affected sitting forces of normal and hard sitting down and shifting, but not of rising, static seating or stretching backward situations. Practitioner Summary: Results of the sitting force and centre-of-force data obtained for this research can help furniture manufacturers develop new product performance test standards for creating reliable engineering design and manufacturing quality and durable products to meet a niche market need.

  3. Sit-to-Stand and Stand-to-Sit Control Mechanisms of Two-Wheeled Wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Abdul Ghani, N M; Tokhi, M O

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a mechanism for standing and sitting transformation of a wheelchair using a two-wheeled inverted pendulum concept with reduced torque requirement, in simulation studies. The motivation of this work is to design a compact standing mechanism to help an elderly/disabled person with functional limitation in lower extremities to maneuver in small and confined spaces and enable them to perform standard daily life routines independently. The wheelchair system at the upright standing position is tested with different travel distances, and the challenge is to control both sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit operations in a stable manner using flexible-joint humanoid. An additional spring/damping element is incorporated at each wheel to provide a comfortable ride for the user especially during stand-to-sit transformation task. A PD-fuzzy control with modular structure is implemented, and the performance of the system is observed through visual nastran 4d (vn4d) visualization software and simulation in matlab. The stand-to-sit performance tests have shown more than 38% reduction in tilt and back seat angles fluctuation in linear travel motion using a suspension system, while the initial tilt torque needed is 50% less than the amount required in previous designs. PMID:26902396

  4. Sit-to-Stand and Stand-to-Sit Control Mechanisms of Two-Wheeled Wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Abdul Ghani, N M; Tokhi, M O

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a mechanism for standing and sitting transformation of a wheelchair using a two-wheeled inverted pendulum concept with reduced torque requirement, in simulation studies. The motivation of this work is to design a compact standing mechanism to help an elderly/disabled person with functional limitation in lower extremities to maneuver in small and confined spaces and enable them to perform standard daily life routines independently. The wheelchair system at the upright standing position is tested with different travel distances, and the challenge is to control both sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit operations in a stable manner using flexible-joint humanoid. An additional spring/damping element is incorporated at each wheel to provide a comfortable ride for the user especially during stand-to-sit transformation task. A PD-fuzzy control with modular structure is implemented, and the performance of the system is observed through visual nastran 4d (vn4d) visualization software and simulation in matlab. The stand-to-sit performance tests have shown more than 38% reduction in tilt and back seat angles fluctuation in linear travel motion using a suspension system, while the initial tilt torque needed is 50% less than the amount required in previous designs.

  5. Development and in-house validation of allergen-specific ELISA tests for the quantification of Dau c 1.01, Dau c 1.02 and Dau c 4 in carrot extracts (Daucus carota).

    PubMed

    Foetisch, Kay; Dahl, Lotte; Jansen, Baerbel; Becker, Wolf-Meinhard; Lidholm, Jonas; van Ree, Ronald; Broll, Hermann; Kaul, Susanne; Vieths, Stefan; Holzhauser, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Even though carrot allergy is common in Europe, the amount of different allergens in carrots is still unknown due to a lack of methods for quantitative allergen measurements. The current study aimed at the development of quantitative ELISA tests for the known carrot allergens, namely Dau c 1.01, Dau c 1.02, and Dau c 4 in pure carrot extracts. Monoclonal antibodies targeting the major carrot allergen isoforms Dau c 1.01 and Dau c 1.02 were generated and combined in sandwich ELISA with rabbit antisera against Api g 1, the celery homologue of Dau c 1. A competitive ELISA for the carrot profilin Dau c 4 was based on a polyclonal rabbit antiserum. The three ELISA tests were allergen-specific and displayed detection limits between 0.4 and 6 ng allergen/ml of carrot extract. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) as a means of intraassay variability of the Dau c 1.01, Dau c 1.02 and Dau c 4 ELISA tests was 8.1%, 6.9%, and 11.9%, and the mean interassay CV 13.3%, 37.1% and 15.6%, respectively. Target recovery ranged between 93 and 113%. In conclusion, the specific, accurate and reproducible quantification of three important carrot allergens may help to identify less allergenic carrot varieties, as well as to standardize the amount of allergens in extracts used for carrot allergy diagnosis.

  6. Use of humanized rat basophilic leukemia reporter cell lines as a diagnostic tool for detection of allergen-specific IgE in allergic patients: time for a reappraisal?

    PubMed

    Falcone, Franco H; Alcocer, Marcos J C; Okamoto-Uchida, Yoshimi; Nakamura, Ryosuke

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between allergens and specific IgE is at the heart of the allergic response and as such lies at the center of techniques used for diagnosis of allergic sensitization. Although serological tests are available, in vivo tests such as double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFC) and skin prick test (SPT) associated to the patients' clinical history are still the main guides to clinicians in many practices around the world. More recently, complex protein arrays and basophil activation tests, requiring only small amounts of whole blood, have been developed and refined, but are yet to enter clinical practice. Similarly, the use of rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cell lines for detection of allergen-specific IgE has been made possible by stable transfection of the human FcεRI α chain into this cell line more than 20 years ago, but has not found widespread acceptance among clinicians. Here, we review the perceived limitations of diagnostic applications of humanized RBL systems. Furthermore, we illustrate how the introduction of reporter genes into humanized RBL cells is able to overcome most of these limitations, and has the potential to become a new powerful tool to complement the armamentarium of allergists. A demonstration of the usefulness of humanized RBL reporter systems for elucidation of complex IgE sensitization patterns against wheat proteins and a section on the use of fluorescence-based reporter systems in combination with allergen arrays close the review. PMID:26452547

  7. [Cancer immunotherapy by immuno-checkpoint blockade].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    As cancer immunotherapies utilizing anti-tumor T-cell responses, immuno-checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell immunotherapy have recently achieved durable responses even in advanced cancer patients with metastases. Administration of antibodies on the T-cell surface, CTLA-4 and PD-1 (or PD-1 ligand PD-L1), resulted in tumor regression of not only melanoma and renal cell cancer which were known to be relatively sensitive to immunotherapy, but also various malignancies including lung, bladder, ovarian, gastric, and head and neck cancers, as well as hematological malignancies such as Hodgkin and B-cell malignant lymphomas. These findings have changed the status of immunotherapy in the development of cancer treatments. Currently, development of combinations employing cancer immunotherapy with immuno-checkpoint blockade, as well as personalized cancer immunotherapy based on the evaluation of pretreatment immune status, are in progress.

  8. Targeted cytokines for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lode, H N; Reisfeld, R A

    2000-01-01

    Targeting of cytokines into the tumor microenvironment using antibody-cytokine fusion proteins, called immunocytokines, represents a novel approach in cancer immunotherapy. This article summarizes therapeutic efficacy and immune mechanisms involved in targeting interleukin-2 (IL-2) to neuroectodermal tumors using ganglioside GD2-specific antibody-IL-2 fusion protein (ch14.18-IL-2). Treatment of established melanoma metastases with ch14.18-IL-2 resulted in eradication of disease followed by a vaccination effect protecting mice from lethal challenges with wild-type tumor calls. In a syngeneic neuroblastoma model, targeted IL-2 was effective in the amplification of a weak memory immune response previously induced by IL-12 gene therapy using an engineered linear version of this heterodimeric cytokine. These findings show that targeted IL-2 may provide an effective tool in cancer immunotherapy and establish the missing link between T cell-mediated vaccination and objective clinical responses.

  9. RESEARCH ADVANCES IN NEUROBLASTOMA IMMUNOTHERAPY.

    PubMed

    Booker, Latania Y; Ishola, Titilope A; Bowen, Kanika A; Chung, Dai H

    2009-05-01

    Neuroblastoma is the third most common pediatric cancer in the United States and is responsible for 15% of pediatric cancer-related deaths. Despite major advances in multimodal therapy, the clinical outcome for several patients remains poor. Due to the desperate need for innovativation and improved success in the treatment and management of neuroblastoma, research interests in immunotherapy have been on the rise in recent years. Current immunotherapeutic approaches under investigation include antibodies targeting the neuroblastoma antigen GD2, cytokine stimulation of immune cells, use of immunocytokine conjugates, radioimmunotherapy, and tumor-primed dendritic cells. Immunotherapy could serve as a safe alternative or adjunct to current therapeutic protocols and would presumptively have fewer deleterious effects making it more favorable to patients.

  10. Lentiviral vectors in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Robyn Aa; Berinstein, Elliot M; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Basic science advances in cancer immunotherapy have resulted in various treatments that have recently shown success in the clinic. Many of these therapies require the insertion of genes into cells to directly kill them or to redirect the host's cells to induce potent immune responses. Other analogous therapies work by modifying effector cells for improved targeting and enhanced killing of tumor cells. Initial studies done using γ-retroviruses were promising, but safety concerns centered on the potential for insertional mutagenesis have highlighted the desire to develop other options for gene delivery. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) have been identified as potentially more effective and safer alternative delivery vehicles. LVs are now in use in clinical trials for many different types of inherited and acquired disorders, including cancer. This review will discuss current knowledge of LVs and the applications of this viral vector-based delivery vehicle to cancer immunotherapy.

  11. Powered Sit-to-Stand and Assistive Stand-to-Sit Framework for a Powered Transfemoral Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Varol, Huseyin Atakan; Sup, Frank; Goldfarb, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This work extends the three level powered knee and ankle prosthesis control framework previously developed by the authors by adding sitting mode. A middle level finite state based impedance controller is designed to accommodate sitting, sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions. Moreover, a high level Gaussian Mixture Model based intent recognizer is developed to distinguish between standing and sitting modes and switch the middle level controllers accordingly. Experimental results with unilateral transfemoral amputee subject show that sitting down and standing up intent can be inferred from the prosthesis sensor signals by the intent recognizer. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the prosthesis generates net active power of 50 W during standing up and dissipates up to 50 W of power during stand-to-sit transition at the knee joint. PMID:20046838

  12. Novel immunotherapies in lymphoid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Batlevi, Connie Lee; Matsuki, Eri; Brentjens, Renier J.; Younes, Anas

    2016-01-01

    The success of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab in the treatment of lymphoid malignancies provided proof-of-principle for exploiting the immune system therapeutically. Since the FDA approval of rituximab in 1997, several novel strategies that harness the ability of T cells to target cancer cells have emerged. Reflecting on the promising clinical efficacy of these novel immunotherapy approaches, the FDA has recently granted ‘breakthrough’ designation to three novel treatments with distinct mechanisms. First, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T-cell therapy is promising for the treatment of adult and paediatric relapsed and/or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Second, blinatumomab, a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE®) antibody, is now approved for the treatment of adults with Philadelphia-chromosome-negative relapsed and/or refractory B-precursor ALL. Finally, the monoclonal antibody nivolumab, which targets the PD-1 immune-checkpoint receptor with high affinity, is used for the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma following treatment failure with autologous-stem-cell transplantation and brentuximab vedotin. Herein, we review the background and development of these three distinct immunotherapy platforms, address the scientific advances in understanding the mechanism of action of each therapy, and assess the current clinical knowledge of their efficacy and safety. We also discuss future strategies to improve these immunotherapies through enhanced engineering, biomarker selection, and mechanism-based combination regimens. PMID:26525683

  13. House dust allergy and immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Wayne R.

    2012-01-01

    HDM allergy is associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. In many countries childhood asthma is predominantly found in HDM-allergic children with their probability of developing disease being proportional to their IgE antibody titers and the early development of Th2 responses. While the pathogenesis is complex and increasingly linked to infection the immunologically-based allergen immunotherapy and anti-IgE antibody therapy are highly beneficial. Immunotherapy could be a short-term treatment providing lifelong relief but the current regimens depend on repeated administration of allergen over years. Immunological investigations point to a contribution of responses outside the Th2 pathway and multiple potential but unproven control mechanisms. Over half of the IgE antibodies are directed to the group 1 and 2 allergens with most of remainder to the group 4, 5, 7 and 21 allergens. This hierarchy found in high and low responders provides a platform for introducing defined allergens into immunotherapy and defined reagents for investigation. PMID:22894952

  14. [Current Approaches in Cancer Immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Otáhal, P; Trněný, M

    2015-01-01

    Methods of cancer immunotherapy have finally entered clinical medicine after years of preclinical research. Currently, there are several methods, which have proven to be very effective even in cases of incurable cancer. Antitumor monoclonal antibodies are among major therapeutic anti-cancer drugs and have been successfully used for many ears. Novel group of antibodies are immunomodulatory antibodies which can break tumor -specific immune tolerance and induce regression of tumors by nonspecific activation of immune system. Bispecific antibodies represent a novel class of anticancer agents which can induce expansion of T cells in vivo, blinatumomab is an example of such agents and is currently available for the treatment of acute B -cell leukemia. Cellular immunotherapy is also very effective, especially the use of Chimeric receptor modified T-cells for the therapy of B- cell lymphoproliferative diseases. Although it is a very complicated and expensive method, it is highly effective approach which can induce remission even in previously hopeless conditions. The goal of this article is to explain the basic principles of cancer immunotherapy and summarize the newest findings in this field.

  15. Supracerebellar infratentorial sitting craniotomy for a pinealoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Omar; Chang, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Pinealoblastomas are WHO grade IV tumors of the pineal region and comprise up to 50% of all pineal parenchymal tumors. They are highly aggressive tumors that spread along the craniospinal axis and are most commonly seen in children. The standard of care involves maximal surgical resection and chemoradiation following tissue diagnosis. We present the rare case of a large pinealoblastoma in an 18-year-old girl who presented with headaches and Parinaud's syndrome from tectal compression. An attempt was made at endoscopic transventricular biopsy of the tumor at an outside hospital, but it was aborted given bleeding at the biopsy site. We performed a supracerebellar infratentorial approach in a sitting position to achieve a gross-total resection of the tumor. This video case illustrates techniques for setting up a sitting craniotomy and approaching a previously biopsied hemorrhagic pinealoblastoma. The venous conglomerate at the tentorial incisura was found to be enveloped by the tumor and a thickened arachnoid scar. Surgical anatomy of the third ventricle and the pineal region is illustrated in this case through the process of surgical dissection and tumor resection. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/CzB0lFQ7AyI .

  16. Mutants of the major ryegrass pollen allergen, Lol p 5, with reduced IgE-binding capacity: candidates for grass pollen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Swoboda, Ines; De Weerd, Nicole; Bhalla, Prem L; Niederberger, Verena; Sperr, W R; Valent, Peter; Kahlert, Helga; Fiebig, Helmut; Verdino, Petra; Keller, Walter; Ebner, Christof; Spitzauer, Susanne; Valenta, Rudolf; Singh, Mohan B

    2002-01-01

    More than 400 million individuals are sensitized to grass pollen allergens. Group 5 allergens represent the most potent grass pollen allergens recognized by more than 80 % of grass pollen allergic patients. The aim of our study was to reduce the allergenic activity of group 5 allergens for specific immunotherapy of grass pollen allergy. Based on B- and T-cell epitope mapping studies and on sequence comparison of group 5 allergens from different grasses, point mutations were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis in highly conserved sequence domains of Lol p 5, the group 5 allergen from ryegrass. We obtained Lol p 5 mutants with low IgE-binding capacity and reduced allergenic activity as determined by basophil histamine release and by skin prick testing in allergic patients. Circular dichroism analysis showed that these mutants exhibited an overall structural fold similar to the recombinant Lol p 5 wild-type allergen. In addition, Lol p 5 mutants retained the ability to induce proliferation of group 5 allergen-specific T cell lines and clones. Our results demonstrate that a few point mutations in the Lol p 5 sequence yield mutants with reduced allergenic activity that represent potential vaccine candidates for immunotherapy of grass pollen allergy.

  17. Specific immunotherapy in combination with Clostridium butyricum inhibits allergic inflammation in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanhong; Xu, Ling-Zhi; Peng, Kangsheng; Wu, Wei; Wu, Ruijin; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Gui; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Liu, Jun; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Zhanju; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2015-12-02

    The current therapy on allergic inflammation is unsatisfactory. Probiotics improve the immunity in the body. This study aims to test a hypothesis that administration with Clostridium butyricum (C. butyricum) enforces the effect of specific immunotherapy (SIT) on intestinal allergic inflammation. In this study, an ovalbumin (OVA) specific allergic inflammation mouse model was created. The mice were treated with SIT or/and C. butyricum. The results showed that the intestinal allergic inflammation was only moderately alleviated by SIT, which was significantly enforced by a combination with C. butyricum; treating with C. butyricum alone did not show much inhibitory efficacy. The increase in the frequency of the interleukin (IL)-10-producing OVA-specific B cell (OVAsBC) was observed in mice in parallel to the inhibitory effect on the intestinal allergic inflammation. The in vitro treatment of the OVAsBCs with OVA increased the histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC1) phosphorylation, modulated the transcription of the Bcl6 gene, and triggered the OVAsBCs to differentiate to the IgE-producing plasma cells. Exposure to both OVA and butyrate sodium in the culture increased the expression of IL-10 in OVAsBCs. In conclusion, administration with C. butyricum enforces the inhibitory effect of SIT on allergic inflammation in the mouse intestine.

  18. Interrupting Sitting Time with Regular Walks Attenuates Postprandial Triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, M; Edamoto, K; Kidokoro, T; Yanaoka, T; Kashiwabara, K; Takahashi, M; Burns, S

    2016-02-01

    We compared the effects of prolonged sitting with the effects of sitting interrupted by regular walking and the effects of prolonged sitting after continuous walking on postprandial triglyceride in postmenopausal women. 15 participants completed 3 trials in random order: 1) prolonged sitting, 2) regular walking, and 3) prolonged sitting preceded by continuous walking. During the sitting trial, participants rested for 8 h. For the walking trials, participants walked briskly in either twenty 90-sec bouts over 8 h or one 30-min bout in the morning (09:00-09:30). Except for walking, both exercise trials mimicked the sitting trial. In each trial, participants consumed a breakfast (08:00) and lunch (11:00). Blood samples were collected in the fasted state and at 2, 4, 6 and 8 h after breakfast. The serum triglyceride incremental area under the curve was 15 and 14% lower after regular walking compared with prolonged sitting and prolonged sitting after continuous walking (4.73±2.50 vs. 5.52±2.95 vs. 5.50±2.59 mmol/L∙8 h respectively, main effect of trial: P=0.023). Regularly interrupting sitting time with brief bouts of physical activity can reduce postprandial triglyceride in postmenopausal women. PMID:26509374

  19. Modifications to the Standard Sit-and-Reach Flexibility Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Laurence E.; Pelham, Thomas W.; Burke, Darren G.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To present several modifications of the standard sit-and-reach protocol. Background: Many exercises designed to increase strength and aerobic capacity tend to decrease the flexibility of the erector spinae and hamstrings musculature. Less-than-ideal flexibility in these soft tissues may increase the risk of injury during training, competition, or activities of daily living. The most widely used measures of flexibility have been either the stand-and-reach or the sit-and-reach, but both are limited to a single measure. Description: Using the new multitest flexometer, we were able to take 6 flexibility measures beyond the stand-and-reach test: standard active sit-and-reach, standard passive sit-and-reach, modified active sit-and-reach with external rotators slackened, modified passive sit-and-reach with external rotators slackened, modified active sit-and-reach with the hamstrings, gastrocnemii, and external rotators slackened, and modified passive sit-and-reach with the hamstrings, gastrocnemii, and external rotators slackened. Clinical Advantages: This modified sit-and-reach protocol allows the indirect assessment of the influence of the 4 major muscle groups that affect sit-and-reach scores: erector spinae, hip rotators, hamstrings, and gastrocnemii. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:16558547

  20. A Fusion Protein Consisting of the Vaccine Adjuvant Monophosphoryl Lipid A and the Allergen Ovalbumin Boosts Allergen-Specific Th1, Th2, and Th17 Responses In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Lothar; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Vieths, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background. The detoxified TLR4-ligand Monophosphoryl Lipid A (MPLA) is the first approved TLR-agonist used as adjuvant in licensed vaccines but has not yet been explored as part of conjugated vaccines. Objective. To investigate the immune-modulating properties of a fusion protein consisting of MPLA and Ovalbumin (MPLA : Ova). Results. MPLA and Ova were chemically coupled by stable carbamate linkage. MPLA : Ova was highly pure without detectable product-related impurities by either noncoupled MPLA or Ova. Light scattering analysis revealed MPLA : Ova to be aggregated. Stimulation of mDC and mDC : DO11.10 CD4+ TC cocultures showed a stronger activation of both mDC and Ova-specific DO11.10 CD4+ TC by MPLA : Ova compared to the mixture of both components. MPLA : Ova induced both strong proinflammatory (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokine responses from mDCs while also boosting allergen-specific Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokine secretion. Conclusion. Conjugation of MPLA and antigen enhanced the immune response compared to the mixture of both components. Due to the nonbiased boost of Ova-specific Th2 and Th17 responses while also inducing Th1 responses, this fusion protein may not be a suitable vaccine candidate for allergy treatment but may hold potential for the treatment of other diseases that require a strong stimulation of the host's immune system (e.g., cancer). PMID:27340679

  1. Immunotherapy Not Working? Check Your Microbiota.

    PubMed

    West, Nathan R; Powrie, Fiona

    2015-12-14

    Gut microbes have ascended to prominence as key modulators of host immunity, raising the possibility that they could influence the outcome of cancer immunotherapy. Two recent studies address this question by identifying specific gut-resident bacteria as drivers of checkpoint blockade immunotherapy in pre-clinical tumor models. PMID:26678336

  2. Neoantigen-based cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bobisse, Sara; Foukas, Periklis G; Coukos, George; Harari, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    Emerging clinical evidence on the role of the antitumor activity of the immune system has generated great interest in immunotherapy in all cancer types. Recent clinical data clearly demonstrated that human tumor cells express antigenic peptides (epitopes) that can be recognized by autologous tumor-specific T cells and that enhancement of such immune reactivity can potentially lead to cancer control and cancer regression in patients with advanced disease. However, in most cases, it is unclear which tumor antigens (Ags) mediated cancer regression. Mounting evidence indicates that numerous endogenous mutated cancer proteins, a hallmark of tumor cells, can be processed into peptides and presented on the surface of tumor cells, leading to their immune recognition in vivo as "non-self" or foreign. Massively parallel sequencing has now overcome the challenge of rapidly identifying the comprehensive mutational spectrum of individual tumors (i.e., the "mutanome") and current technologies, as well as computational tools, have emerged that allow the identification of private epitopes derived from their mutanome and called neoantigens (neoAgs). On this basis, both CD4(+) and CD8(+) neoantigen-specific T cells have been identified in multiple human cancers and shown to be associated with a favorable clinical outcome. Notably, emerging data also indicate that neoantigen recognition represents a major factor in the activity of clinical immunotherapies. In the post-genome era, the mutanome holds promise as a long-awaited 'gold mine' for the discovery of unique cancer cell targets, which are exclusively tumor-specific and unlikely to drive immune tolerance, hence offering the chance for highly promising clinical programs of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27563649

  3. Neoantigen-based cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bobisse, Sara; Coukos, George; Harari, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Emerging clinical evidence on the role of the antitumor activity of the immune system has generated great interest in immunotherapy in all cancer types. Recent clinical data clearly demonstrated that human tumor cells express antigenic peptides (epitopes) that can be recognized by autologous tumor-specific T cells and that enhancement of such immune reactivity can potentially lead to cancer control and cancer regression in patients with advanced disease. However, in most cases, it is unclear which tumor antigens (Ags) mediated cancer regression. Mounting evidence indicates that numerous endogenous mutated cancer proteins, a hallmark of tumor cells, can be processed into peptides and presented on the surface of tumor cells, leading to their immune recognition in vivo as “non-self” or foreign. Massively parallel sequencing has now overcome the challenge of rapidly identifying the comprehensive mutational spectrum of individual tumors (i.e., the “mutanome”) and current technologies, as well as computational tools, have emerged that allow the identification of private epitopes derived from their mutanome and called neoantigens (neoAgs). On this basis, both CD4+ and CD8+ neoantigen-specific T cells have been identified in multiple human cancers and shown to be associated with a favorable clinical outcome. Notably, emerging data also indicate that neoantigen recognition represents a major factor in the activity of clinical immunotherapies. In the post-genome era, the mutanome holds promise as a long-awaited ‘gold mine’ for the discovery of unique cancer cell targets, which are exclusively tumor-specific and unlikely to drive immune tolerance, hence offering the chance for highly promising clinical programs of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27563649

  4. Oral Immunotherapy for Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Burbank, Allison J; Sood, Puja; Vickery, Brian P; Wood, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Food allergy is a potentially life-threatening condition with no approved therapies, apart from avoidance and injectable epinephrine for acute allergic reactions. Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is an experimental treatment in which food-allergic patients consume gradually increasing quantities of the food to increase their threshold for allergic reaction. This therapy carries significant risk of allergic reactions. The ability of OIT to desensitize patients to particular foods is well-documented, although the ability to induce tolerance has not been established. This review focuses on recent studies for the treatment of food allergies such as cow's milk, hen's egg, and peanut.

  5. Immunology and Immunotherapy of Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This review demonstrates the importance of immunobiology and immunotherapy research for understanding and treating neuroblastoma. Principal results The first suggestions of immune system-neuroblastoma interactions came from in vitro experiments showing that lymphocytes from patients were cytotoxic for their own tumor cells and from evaluations of tumors from patients that showed infiltrations of immune system cells. With the development of monoclonal antibody (mAb) technology, a number of mAbs were generated against neuroblastoma cells lines and were used to define tumor associated antigens. Disialoganglioside (GD2) is one such antigen that is highly expressed by virtually all neuroblastoma cells and so is a useful target for both identification and treatment of tumor cells with mAbs. Preclinical research using in vitro and transplantable tumor models of neuroblastoma has demonstrated that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can specifically recognize and kill tumor cells as a result of vaccination or of genetic engineering that endows them with chimeric antigen receptors. However, CTL based clinical trials have not progressed beyond pilot and phase I studies. In contrast, anti-GD2 mAbs have been extensively studied and modified in pre-clinical experiments and have progressed from phase I through phase III clinical trials. Thus, the one proven beneficial immunotherapy for patients with high-risk neuroblastoma uses a chimeric anti-GD2 mAb combined with IL-2 and GM-CSF to treat patients after they have received intensive cyto-reductive chemotherapy, irradiation, and surgery. Ongoing pre-clinical and clinical research emphasizes vaccine, adoptive cell therapy, and mAb strategies. Recently it was shown that the neuroblastoma microenvironment is immunosuppressive and tumor growth promoting, and strategies to overcome this are being developed to enhance anti-tumor immunotherapy. Conclusions Our understanding of the immunobiology of neuroblastoma has increased

  6. Synthetic biology in cellular immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Deboki; Wong, Wilson W.

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of genetically engineered T cells with cancer-targeting receptors has shown tremendous promise for eradicating tumors in clinical trials. This form of cellular immunotherapy presents a unique opportunity to incorporate advanced systems and synthetic biology approaches to create cancer therapeutics with novel functions. Here, we first review the development of synthetic receptors, switches, and circuits to control the location, duration, and strength of T cell activity against tumors. In addition, we discuss the cellular engineering and genome editing of host cells (or the chassis) to improve the efficacy of cell-based cancer therapeutics, and to reduce the time and cost of manufacturing. PMID:26088008

  7. Oral Immunotherapy for Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Burbank, Allison J; Sood, Puja; Vickery, Brian P; Wood, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Food allergy is a potentially life-threatening condition with no approved therapies, apart from avoidance and injectable epinephrine for acute allergic reactions. Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is an experimental treatment in which food-allergic patients consume gradually increasing quantities of the food to increase their threshold for allergic reaction. This therapy carries significant risk of allergic reactions. The ability of OIT to desensitize patients to particular foods is well-documented, although the ability to induce tolerance has not been established. This review focuses on recent studies for the treatment of food allergies such as cow's milk, hen's egg, and peanut. PMID:26617227

  8. Immunotherapy: It Takes a Village

    PubMed Central

    Pardoll, Drew

    2016-01-01

    We in the cancer immunology and immunotherapy community are thrilled that Science named “Cancer immunotherapy” as 2013’s Breakthrough of the Year (J. Couzin-Frankel, 20 December 2013, p. 1432). The rapid succession of clinical successes by blocking antibodies to two immune checkpoints, CTLA-4 and PD-1, and by chimeric antigen-receptor-transduced T cells, shows the power of basic immunology when translated to therapy. As such, I write to acknowledge some of the key scientists whose basic discoveries paved the way for the clinical successes outlined in the Breakthrough issue. PMID:24723594

  9. The future of specific immunotherapy: strategies and challenges for the next generation of allergy vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, P

    2011-07-01

    : The use of specific immunotherapy (SIT) for allergic disorders has recently been extended by introduction of a convenient, tablet-based, disease-modifying vaccine against grass pollen allergy. Allergy immunotherapy tablet (AIT) programmes targeting house dust mite and other allergies are currently in late-phase development. Next-generation allergy vaccines can have optimised potency and onset of action without compromising safety or convenience. Key to achieving these objectives is a combination of evidence-based mode-of-action studies and biomarker-centric translational research approaches. This will rely on using biobank and bioinformatics resources for multi-omic characterisations of the 'immunome' of allergic disease. Other important areas are ongoing paediatric trials and long-term studies in adults for further defining the potential role of SIT in allergic disease and primary prevention of asthma. Finally, combining cellular- and serological-based assays, and developments in targeted delivery platforms and component-resolved diagnostics will lead to increased ability to stratify patients, with more personalised diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Allergen hybrids – next generation vaccines for Fagales pollen immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pichler, U; Hauser, M; Hofer, H; Himly, M; Hoflehner, E; Steiner, M; Mutschlechner, S; Hufnagl, K; Ebner, C; Mari, A; Briza, P; Bohle, B; Wiedermann, U; Ferreira, F; Wallner, M

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Trees belonging to the order of Fagales show a distinct geographical distribution. While alder and birch are endemic in the temperate zones of the Northern Hemisphere, hazel, hornbeam and oak prefer a warmer climate. However, specific immunotherapy of Fagales pollen-allergic patients is mainly performed using birch pollen extracts, thus limiting the success of this intervention in birch-free areas. Objectives T cells are considered key players in the modification of an allergic immune response during specific immunotherapy (SIT), therefore we thought to combine linear T cell epitope-containing stretches of the five most important Fagales allergens from birch, hazel, alder, oak and hornbeam resulting in a Fagales pollen hybrid (FPH) molecule applicable for SIT. Methods A Fagales pollen hybrid was generated by PCR-based recombination of low IgE-binding allergen epitopes. Moreover, a structural-variant FPH4 was calculated by in silico mutagenesis, rendering the protein unable to adopt the Bet v 1-like fold. Both molecules were produced in Escherichia coli, characterized physico-chemically as well as immunologically, and tested in mouse models of allergic sensitization as well as allergy prophylaxis. Results Using spectroscopic analyses, both proteins were monomeric, and the secondary structure elements of FPH resemble the ones typical for Bet v 1-like proteins, whereas FPH4 showed increased amounts of unordered structure. Both molecules displayed reduced binding capacities of Bet v 1-specific IgE antibodies. However, in a mouse model, the proteins were able to induce high IgG titres cross-reactive with all parental allergens. Moreover, prophylactic treatment with the hybrid proteins prevented pollen extract-induced allergic lung inflammation in vivo. Conclusion The hybrid molecules showed a more efficient uptake and processing by dendritic cells resulting in a modified T cell response. The proteins had a lower IgE-binding capacity compared with the

  11. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities. PMID:26486534

  12. Oral immunotherapy for allergic conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Waka; Fukuda, Ken; Harada, Yosuke; Yagita, Hideo; Fukushima, Atsuki

    2014-11-01

    Antigen-specific immunotherapy is expected to be a desirable treatment for allergic diseases. Currently, antigen-specific immunotherapy is performed by administering disease-causing antigens subcutaneously or sublingually. These approaches induce long-term remission in patients with allergic rhinitis or asthma. The oral route is an alternative to subcutaneous and sublingual routes, and can also induce long-term remission, a phenomenon known as "oral tolerance." The effectiveness of oral tolerance has been reported in the context of autoimmune diseases, food allergies, asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis in both human patients and animal models. However, few studies have examined its efficacy in animal models of allergic conjunctivitis. Previously, we showed that ovalbumin feeding suppressed ovalbumin-induced experimental allergic conjunctivitis, indicating the induction of oral tolerance is effective in treating experimental allergic conjunctivitis. In recent years, transgenic rice has been developed that can induce oral tolerance and reduce the severity of anaphylaxis. The major Japanese cedar pollen antigens in transgenic rice, Cryptomeria japonica 1 and C. japonica 2, were deconstructed by molecular shuffling, fragmentation, and changes in the oligomeric structure. Thus, transgenic rice may be an effective treatment for allergic conjunctivitis.

  13. Cancer immunotherapy and immunological memory.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kenji; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

      Human immunological memory is the key distinguishing hallmark of the adaptive immune system and plays an important role in the prevention of morbidity and the severity of infection. The differentiation system of T cell memory has been clarified using mouse models. However, the human T cell memory system has great diversity induced by natural antigens derived from many pathogens and tumor cells throughout life, and profoundly differs from the mouse memory system constructed using artificial antigens and transgenic T cells. We believe that only human studies can elucidate the human immune system. The importance of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy has been pointed out, and the trafficking properties and long-lasting anti-tumor capacity of memory T cells play a crucial role in the control of malignant tumors. Adoptive cell transfer of less differentiated T cells has consistently demonstrated superior anti-tumor capacity relative to more differentiated T cells. Therefore, a human T cell population with the characteristics of stem cell memory is thought to be attractive for peptide vaccination and adoptive cell transfer. A novel human memory T cell population that we have identified is closer to the naive state than previous memory T cells in the T cell differentiation lineage, and has the characteristics of stem-like chemoresistance. Here we introduce this novel population and describe the fundamentals of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Sublingual immunotherapy: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Cox, Linda S; Larenas Linnemann, Désirée; Nolte, Hendrik; Weldon, David; Finegold, Ira; Nelson, Harold S

    2006-05-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has been used with increasing frequency in Europe and is viewed with increasing interest by allergists in the United States. To address this interest, a Joint Task Force of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology's Immunotherapy and Allergy Diagnostic Committees reviewed the available literature on SLIT and prepared this report. The task force concluded that despite clear evidence that SLIT is an effective treatment, many questions remained unanswered, including effective dose, treatment schedules, and overall duration of treatment. Until these have been determined, an assessment of the cost/benefit ratio of the treatment cannot be made. SLIT does appear to be associated with few serious side effects, but it has not been administered in high-risk asthmatic patients, nor in the studies reviewed has it been administered as a mixture of non-cross-reacting allergens. Furthermore, there is currently no allergy extract approved for this use in the United States, nor is there a Current Procedural Terminology code for billing purposes. All of these factors should be given careful consideration by anyone contemplating initiating SLIT treatment for their allergic patients. PMID:16675328

  15. Novel immunotherapies for hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michelle H.; Paulos, Chrystal M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The immune system is designed to discriminate between self and tumor tissue. Through genetic recombination, there is fundamentally no limit to the number of tumor antigens that immune cells can recognize. Yet, tumors use a variety of immunosuppressive mechanisms to evade immunity. Insight into how the immune system interacts with tumors is expanding rapidly and has accelerated the translation of immunotherapies into medical breakthroughs. Herein, we appraise the state of the art in immunotherapy with a focus on strategies that exploit the patient’s immune system to kill cancer. We review various forms of immune-based therapies, which have shown significant promise in patients with hematological malignancies, including (i) conventional monoclonal therapies like rituximab, (ii) engineered monoclonal antibodies called bispecific T cell engagers (BiTEs), (iii) monoclonal antibodies and pharmaceutical drugs that block inhibitory T-cell pathways (i.e. PD-1, CTLA-4 and IDO), and (iv) adoptive cell transfer (ACT) therapy with T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or T-cell receptors (TCRs). We also assess the idea of using these therapies in combination and conclude by suggesting multi-prong approaches to improve treatment outcomes and curative responses in patients. PMID:25510273

  16. Cancer immunotherapy and immunological memory.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kenji; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

      Human immunological memory is the key distinguishing hallmark of the adaptive immune system and plays an important role in the prevention of morbidity and the severity of infection. The differentiation system of T cell memory has been clarified using mouse models. However, the human T cell memory system has great diversity induced by natural antigens derived from many pathogens and tumor cells throughout life, and profoundly differs from the mouse memory system constructed using artificial antigens and transgenic T cells. We believe that only human studies can elucidate the human immune system. The importance of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy has been pointed out, and the trafficking properties and long-lasting anti-tumor capacity of memory T cells play a crucial role in the control of malignant tumors. Adoptive cell transfer of less differentiated T cells has consistently demonstrated superior anti-tumor capacity relative to more differentiated T cells. Therefore, a human T cell population with the characteristics of stem cell memory is thought to be attractive for peptide vaccination and adoptive cell transfer. A novel human memory T cell population that we have identified is closer to the naive state than previous memory T cells in the T cell differentiation lineage, and has the characteristics of stem-like chemoresistance. Here we introduce this novel population and describe the fundamentals of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27181230

  17. Multiple grass mixes as opposed to single grasses for allergen immunotherapy in allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Gangl, K; Niederberger, V; Valenta, R

    2013-11-01

    Grass pollen allergy affects approximately 40% of allergic patients. Subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy (SCIT) is the only allergen-specific and disease-modifying treatment available. Currently available therapeutic vaccines for the treatment of grass pollen allergy are based on natural grass pollen extracts which are either made from pollen of one cross-reactive grass species or from several related grass species. Clinical studies have shown that SCIT performed with timothy grass pollen extract is effective for the treatment of grass pollen allergy. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that recombinant timothy grass pollen allergens contain the majority of relevant epitopes and can be used for SCIT in clinical trials. However, recent in vitro studies have suggested that mixes consisting of allergen extracts from several related grass species may have advantages for SCIT over single allergen extracts. Here, we review current knowledge regarding the disease-relevant allergens in grass pollen allergy, available clinical studies comparing SCIT with allergen extracts from timothy grass or from mixes of several related grass species of the Pooideae subfamily, in vitro cross-reactivity studies performed with natural allergen extracts and recombinant allergens and SCIT studies performed with recombinant timothy grass pollen allergens. In vitro and clinical studies performed with natural allergen extracts reveal no relevant advantages of using multiple grass mixes as opposed to single grass pollen extracts. Several studies analysing the molecular composition of natural allergen extracts and the molecular profile of patients' immune responses after SCIT with allergen extracts indicate that the major limitation for the production of a high quality grass pollen vaccine resides in intrinsic features of natural allergen extracts which can only be overcome with recombinant allergen-based technologies.

  18. Sustained unresponsiveness to peanut in subjects who have completed peanut oral immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vickery, Brian P.; Scurlock, Amy M.; Kulis, Michael; Steele, Pamela H.; Kamilaris, Janet; Berglund, Jelena P.; Burk, Caitlin; Hiegel, Anne; Carlisle, Suzanna; Christie, Lynn; Perry, Tamara T.; Pesek, Robbie D.; Sheikh, Saira; Virkud, Yamini; Smith, P. Brian; Shamji, Mohamed H.; Durham, Stephen R.; Jones, Stacie M.; Burks, A. Wesley

    2013-01-01

    Background Although peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) has been conclusively shown to cause desensitization, it is currently unknown whether clinical protection persists after stopping therapy. Objective Our primary objective was to determine whether peanut OIT can induce sustained unresponsiveness following withdrawal of OIT. Methods We conducted a pilot clinical trial of peanut OIT at two U.S. centers. Subjects aged 1–16 were recruited and treated for up to five years with peanut OIT. The protocol was modified over time to permit dose increases to a maximum of 4000 mg peanut protein/day. Blood was collected at multiple time points. Clinical endpoints were measured with 5000 mg double-blinded, placebo-controlled food challenges once specific criteria were met. Results Of the 39 subjects originally enrolled, 24 completed the protocol and had evaluable outcomes. 12/24 (50%) successfully passed a challenge one month after stopping OIT and achieved sustained unresponsiveness. Peanut was added to the diet. At baseline and the time of challenge, such subjects had smaller skin tests as well as lower IgE levels specific for peanut, Ara h 1, and Ara h 2, and lower ratios of peanut-specific:total IgE, compared to subjects not passing. There were no differences in peanut IgG4 levels or functional activity at end-of-study. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of sustained unresponsiveness after peanut OIT, occurring in half of subjects treated up to five years. OIT favorably modified the peanut-specific immune response in all subjects completing the protocol. Smaller skin tests and lower allergen-specific IgE levels were predictive of successful outcome. PMID:24361082

  19. Beware of the Sitting Trap in Learning and Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breithecker, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    The author urges the reader to consider the vital role that ergonomic furniture design can have on the lives of our children in schools. He writes that Western civilizations include teaching how to sit still in their schools' "hidden curriculum." Most teachers seem to associate learning with quiet, disciplined sitting. "They are making…

  20. Influence of dual-task on sit-to-stand-to-sit postural control in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ângela; Sousa, Andreia S P; Couras, Joana; Rocha, Nuno; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2015-11-01

    Postural control deficits are the most disabling aspects of Parkinson's disease (PD), resulting in decreased mobility and functional independence. The aim of this study was to assess the postural control stability, revealed by variables based on the centre of pressure (CoP), in individuals with PD while performing a sit-to-stand-to-sit sequence under single- and dual-task conditions. An observational, analytical and cross-sectional study was performed. The sample consisted of 9 individuals with PD and 9 healthy controls. A force platform was used to measure the CoP displacement and velocity during the sit-to-stand-to-sit sequence. The results were statistically analysed. Individuals with PD required greater durations for the sit-to-stand-to-sit sequence than the controls (p < 0.05). The anteroposterior and mediolateral CoP displacement were higher in the individuals with PD (p < 0.05). However, only the anteroposterior CoP velocity in the stand-to-sit phase (p = 0.006) was lower in the same individuals. Comparing the single- and dual-task conditions in both groups, the duration, the anteroposterior CoP displacement and velocity were higher in the dual-task condition (p < 0.05). The individuals with PD presented reduced postural control stability during the sit-to-stand-to-sit sequence, especially when under the dual-task condition. These individuals have deficits not only in motor performance, but also in cognitive performance when performing the sit-to-stand-to-sit sequence in their daily life tasks. Moreover, both deficits tend to be intensified when two tasks are performed simultaneously.

  1. Effects of a dynamic chair on pelvic mobility, fatigue, and work efficiency during work performed while sitting: a comparison of dynamic sitting and static sitting.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Hironori; Mitsuhashi, Toshitaka; Sako, Shunji; Goto, Ryokichi; Nakai, Tomohiro; Inaba, Ryoichi

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] Working while sitting for long periods can cause lumbar pain, fatigue, and reduced work efficiency. How a dynamic chair with a seat that moves three-dimensionally affects pelvic mobility before and after work, work efficiency, and post-work fatigue were examined. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 17 healthy adults (10 males, 7 females, mean age 21.8 ± 2.7 years). Subjects performed a 30-min Kraepelin test under two conditions: sitting in a standard office chair and sitting in a dynamic sitting balance chair. Root mean square (RMS) values of pelvic movement measured by a triaxial accelerometer during 30 minutes of work, finger-floor distance before and after work, lumbar fatigue, and pelvic movement RMS values during finger-floor distance measurement were used as outcome measures. [Results] Pelvic movement RMS values collected every 5 minutes during 30 minutes of work were significantly higher while sitting in the dynamic balance chair. Changes in pelvic movement RMS values during finger-floor distance measurement after work and amount of work performed during 30 minutes were significantly higher and lumbar fatigue was significantly lower for the dynamic balance chair. [Conclusion] Dynamic sitting maintained or increased pelvic flexibility. The dynamic balance chair may effectively help workers work continuously in seated postures with little fatigue. PMID:27390410

  2. Effects of a dynamic chair on pelvic mobility, fatigue, and work efficiency during work performed while sitting: a comparison of dynamic sitting and static sitting

    PubMed Central

    Tanoue, Hironori; Mitsuhashi, Toshitaka; Sako, Shunji; Goto, Ryokichi; Nakai, Tomohiro; Inaba, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Working while sitting for long periods can cause lumbar pain, fatigue, and reduced work efficiency. How a dynamic chair with a seat that moves three-dimensionally affects pelvic mobility before and after work, work efficiency, and post-work fatigue were examined. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 17 healthy adults (10 males, 7 females, mean age 21.8 ± 2.7 years). Subjects performed a 30-min Kraepelin test under two conditions: sitting in a standard office chair and sitting in a dynamic sitting balance chair. Root mean square (RMS) values of pelvic movement measured by a triaxial accelerometer during 30 minutes of work, finger-floor distance before and after work, lumbar fatigue, and pelvic movement RMS values during finger-floor distance measurement were used as outcome measures. [Results] Pelvic movement RMS values collected every 5 minutes during 30 minutes of work were significantly higher while sitting in the dynamic balance chair. Changes in pelvic movement RMS values during finger-floor distance measurement after work and amount of work performed during 30 minutes were significantly higher and lumbar fatigue was significantly lower for the dynamic balance chair. [Conclusion] Dynamic sitting maintained or increased pelvic flexibility. The dynamic balance chair may effectively help workers work continuously in seated postures with little fatigue. PMID:27390410

  3. Effects of a dynamic chair on pelvic mobility, fatigue, and work efficiency during work performed while sitting: a comparison of dynamic sitting and static sitting.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Hironori; Mitsuhashi, Toshitaka; Sako, Shunji; Goto, Ryokichi; Nakai, Tomohiro; Inaba, Ryoichi

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] Working while sitting for long periods can cause lumbar pain, fatigue, and reduced work efficiency. How a dynamic chair with a seat that moves three-dimensionally affects pelvic mobility before and after work, work efficiency, and post-work fatigue were examined. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 17 healthy adults (10 males, 7 females, mean age 21.8 ± 2.7 years). Subjects performed a 30-min Kraepelin test under two conditions: sitting in a standard office chair and sitting in a dynamic sitting balance chair. Root mean square (RMS) values of pelvic movement measured by a triaxial accelerometer during 30 minutes of work, finger-floor distance before and after work, lumbar fatigue, and pelvic movement RMS values during finger-floor distance measurement were used as outcome measures. [Results] Pelvic movement RMS values collected every 5 minutes during 30 minutes of work were significantly higher while sitting in the dynamic balance chair. Changes in pelvic movement RMS values during finger-floor distance measurement after work and amount of work performed during 30 minutes were significantly higher and lumbar fatigue was significantly lower for the dynamic balance chair. [Conclusion] Dynamic sitting maintained or increased pelvic flexibility. The dynamic balance chair may effectively help workers work continuously in seated postures with little fatigue.

  4. Improved Endpoints for Cancer Immunotherapy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; Janetzki, Sylvia; Hodi, F. Stephen; Ibrahim, Ramy; Anderson, Aparna; Humphrey, Rachel; Blumenstein, Brent; Wolchok, Jedd

    2010-01-01

    Unlike chemotherapy, which acts directly on the tumor, cancer immunotherapies exert their effects on the immune system and demonstrate new kinetics that involve building a cellular immune response, followed by changes in tumor burden or patient survival. Thus, adequate design and evaluation of some immunotherapy clinical trials require a new development paradigm that includes reconsideration of established endpoints. Between 2004 and 2009, several initiatives facilitated by the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute and partner organizations systematically evaluated an immunotherapy-focused clinical development paradigm and created the principles for redefining trial endpoints. On this basis, a body of clinical and laboratory data was generated that supports three novel endpoint recommendations. First, cellular immune response assays generate highly variable results. Assay harmonization in multicenter trials may minimize variability and help to establish cellular immune response as a reproducible biomarker, thus allowing investigation of its relationship with clinical outcomes. Second, immunotherapy may induce novel patterns of antitumor response not captured by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors or World Health Organization criteria. New immune-related response criteria were defined to more comprehensively capture all response patterns. Third, delayed separation of Kaplan–Meier curves in randomized immunotherapy trials can affect results. Altered statistical models describing hazard ratios as a function of time and recognizing differences before and after separation of curves may allow improved planning of phase III trials. These recommendations may improve our tools for cancer immunotherapy trials and may offer a more realistic and useful model for clinical investigation. PMID:20826737

  5. Potentiality of immunotherapy against hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Nobuhiro; Sawada, Yu; Endo, Itaru; Uemura, Yasushi; Nakatsura, Tetsuya

    2015-09-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the predominant form of primary liver cancer, is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Despite the high incidence, treatment options remain limited for advanced HCC, and as a result prognosis continues to be poor. Current therapeutic options, surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, have only modest efficacy. New treatment modalities to prolong survival and to minimize the risk of adverse response are desperately needed for patients with advanced HCC. Tumor immunotherapy is a promising, novel treatment strategy that may lead to improvements in both treatment-associated toxicity and outcome. The strategies have developed in part through genomic studies that have yielded candidate target molecules and in part through basic biology studies that have defined the pathways and cell types regulating immune response. Here, we summarize the various types of HCC immunotherapy and argue that the new-found field of HCC immunotherapy might provide critical advantages in the effort to improve prognosis of patients with advanced HCC. Already several immunotherapies, such as tumor-associated antigen therapy, immune checkpoint inhibitors and cell transfer immunotherapy, have demonstrated safety and feasibility in HCC patients. Unfortunately, immunotherapy currently has low efficacy in advanced stage HCC patients; overcoming this challenge will place immunotherapy at the forefront of HCC treatment, possibly in the near future.

  6. Chosen postures during specific sitting activities.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Irene; Kilincsoy, Umit; Vink, Peter

    2011-11-01

    This research study analysed the interaction between people's postures and activities while in semi-public/leisure situations and during transportation (journey by train). In addition, the use of small electronic devices received particular emphasis. Video recordings in German trains and photographs in Dutch semi-public spaces were analysed using a variation of Branton and Grayson's (An evaluation of train seats by observation of sitting behaviour. Ergonomics, 10 (1), (1967), 35-51) postural targeting forms and photos. The analysis suggests a significant relationship between most activities and the position of the head, trunk and arms during transportation situations. The relationship during public situations is less straightforward. Watching, talking/discussing and reading were the most observed activities for the transportation and leisure situations combined. Surprisingly, differences in head, trunk, arm and leg postures were not significant when using small electronic devices. Important issues not considered in this study include the duration of the activities, the gender and age of observed subjects and the influence of the time of day. These are interesting issues to consider and include for future research. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This study shows what activities people choose to carry out and their related postures when not forced to a specific task (e.g. driving). The results of this study can be used for designing comfortable seating in the transportation industry (car passenger, train, bus and aircraft seats) and semi-public/leisure spaces.

  7. Immunotherapy and chemotherapy in children with neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Nesbit, M E; Kersey, J; Finklestein, J; Weiner, J; Simmons, R

    1976-09-01

    Recent advances with immunotherapy in animal tumors suggested that trials with a combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy in human malignant tumors might be worthwhile. A pilot program with Vibrio cholera neuraminidase-treated tumor cells plus BCG was tested in 3 patients who had had chemotherapy for disseminated neuroblastoma. Two of these children were in "complete remission" after radiation therapy and chemotherapy before the administration of immunotherapy. Relapse occurred in 5-6 months in all 3 patients. These disappointing results are discussed in relation to problems of current chemotherapy in disseminated neuroblastoma including results obtained at second-look operations in patients obtaining "complete remission."

  8. Rationale for combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dalgleish, Angus G

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has usually been considered as an alternative to more traditional modalities. Moreover, it has previously been felt that chemotherapy is inherently immunosuppressive and not suitable for combining with immunotherapy. In this review, the concept of combining different modalities that result in cell death, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy, with immunotherapy is explored. Tumors actively cause immune suppression which can be reversed by their removal but when this is not possible, enhancing the immune response with nonspecific immune stimulation can enhance the response to other modalities, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Additionally, several chemotherapy agents at low doses selectively inhibit regulatory and suppressor cells.

  9. Immunotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Specialist Financial Support Online Chats Support Groups Peer-to-Peer Support LLS Community Blogs Caregiver Support Other Helpful ... Information Specialist Financial Support Online Chats Support Groups Peer-to-Peer Support LLS Community Blogs Caregiver Support ...

  10. Immunotherapy. Neuroblastoma as a model.

    PubMed

    Cheung, N K

    1991-04-01

    Combinations of aggressive therapy and radiotherapy directed at the primary tumor site as well as dose intensive chemotherapy against metastases can effectively induce complete remissions in patients with stage IV neuroblastomas. By virtue of its tumor specificity, the use of immunotherapy at the time when microscopic residual disease is present holds great promise in eradicating the tumors permanently. Monoclonal antibodies can accumulate selectively and at high concentrations in neuroblastomas. They have the potential of initiating complement activation and inflammation at the tumor site. Hematopoietic factors and cytokines can reinforce the body with tumoricidal leukocytes. Ex vivo activation of autologous white cells as well as arming by genetic manipulation can also produce tumor-seeking vehicles that may be therapeutically useful. As the knowledge of tumor and host immunobiology accumulates, the optimal combination of these approaches will become apparent.

  11. Targeting neoantigens for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong-Chen; Robbins, Paul F

    2016-07-01

    Studies first carried out in the 1980s have demonstrated murine T cells can recognize mutated gene products, known as neoantigens, and that these T cells are capable of mediating tumor rejection. The first human tumor antigens isolated in the early 1990s were the products of non-mutated genes expressed in a tissue-specific manner; subsequent studies have indicated that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes that are cultured in vitro frequently recognize mutated gene products. In addition, correlative studies indicate that clinical responses to therapies involving the use of antibodies directed against checkpoint inhibitors such as CTLA-4 and PD-1 may be associated with mutational burden, providing indirect evidence that these responses may primarily be mediated by neoantigen-reactive T cells. The importance of neoantigen-reactive T cells may be elucidated by the results of ongoing and future studies aimed at leveraging information gained from mutational profiling to enhance the potency of immunotherapies.

  12. Dendritic cell immunotherapy: clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Pietersz, Geoffrey A; Tsibanis, Anastasios; Tsikkinis, Annivas; Stojanovska, Lily; McKenzie, Ian FC; Vassilaros, Stamatis

    2014-01-01

    The use of tumour-associated antigens for cancer immunotherapy studies is exacerbated by tolerance to these self-antigens. Tolerance may be broken by using ex vivo monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with self-antigens. Targeting tumour-associated antigens directly to DCs in vivo is an alternative and simpler strategy. The identification of cell surface receptors on DCs, and targeting antigens to DC receptors, has become a popular approach for inducing effective immune responses against cancer antigens. Many years ago, we demonstrated that targeting the mannose receptor on macrophages using the carbohydrate mannan to DCs led to appropriate immune responses and tumour protection in animal models. We conducted Phase I, I/II and II, clinical trials demonstrating the effectiveness of oxidised mannan-MUC1 in patients with adenocarcinomas. Here we summarise DC targeting approaches and their efficacy in human clinical trials. PMID:25505969

  13. Topical Immunotherapy in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurcharan; Lavanya, MS

    2010-01-01

    Alopecia Areata (AA) is a common non-scarring alopecia directed against the anagenic hair follicle. Various treatment modalities have been used for the treatment of severe AA. Topical immunotherapy is the best documented treatment so far for severe and refractory AA. Dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE), and diphencyprone (DPCP) are the contact allergens used for this purpose. DNCB has been found to be mutagenic by the Ames test and is largely replaced by DPCP and SADBE. DPCP and SADBE are both known to be non-mutagenic compounds and have comparable efficacy results and relapse rates. SADBE requires special solvents and additives to maintain its potency and is more expensive than the rest. DPCP has a response rate varying from 60% in severe Alopecia Areata to 17% in patients with alopecia totalis or universalis, and shows about 88 to 100% high response rate in patients with patchy Alopecia Areata. PMID:21188022

  14. [Current immunotherapy of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Paul, F; Ruprecht, K

    2015-08-01

    Following the introduction of interferon beta 1b as the first immunomodulatory therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS) in 1993, there are currently nine substances or substance classes approved for the treatment of MS (i.e. alemtuzumab, azathioprine, dimethyl fumarate, fingolimod, glatiramer acetate, interferon beta, mitoxantrone, natalizumab and teriflunomide). Major developments during the last 5 years include the approval of orally administered medications (i.e. fingolimod, teriflunomide and dimethyl fumarate), a monoclonal antibody (alemtuzumab), as well as glatiramer acetate with an administration frequency three times a week and a pegylated formulation of interferon beta 1a. The broadened therapeutic options enable a more differentiated and individualized therapy of MS; however, evidence-based data for therapeutic decision-making relevant in clinical practice are not always available. Rare but potentially severe and even life-threatening side effects of immunotherapies for MS require continuous pharmacovigilance and adherence to risk management plans. PMID:26253589

  15. Oral Immunotherapy for Food Allergies.

    PubMed

    Feuille, Elizabeth; Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is a promising investigational therapy for food allergy. Clinical trials in peanut, milk, egg, and wheat allergy provide evidence that OIT can effectively desensitize a majority of individuals to a food allergen. While a portion of subjects demonstrate sustained unresponsiveness, the majority regain sensitivity with allergen avoidance. The safety and tolerability of OIT continue to limit its use in some patients. Virtually all studies report adverse reactions that are more frequent during dose escalation but may also occur during maintenance therapy. Recent studies have identified adjunctive therapies (such as omalizumab) which may mitigate adverse effects. There is a paucity of data on the long-term safety and efficacy of OIT. Further study is required before OIT is ready for routine clinical practice. This review is intended to provide the reader with an up-to-date understanding of OIT, including its mechanisms, efficacy, safety profile, and potential utility in clinical practice. PMID:27355816

  16. Who Will Benefit from Cancer Immunotherapy?

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified a “genetic signature” in the tumors of patients with advanced melanoma who responded to a form of immunotherapy called checkpoint blockade. The results could be the basis for a test that identifies likely responders.

  17. Immunotherapy: Disrupting the Cancer Treatment World

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACS » + - Text Size Immunotherapy: Disrupting the Cancer Treatment World By Elizabeth Mendes June 16, 2014 This story ... of cancer research in depth. The cancer research world is dedicating increasing energy to a rapidly evolving ...

  18. New types of immunotherapy in children.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Noel; Penagos, Martin; Portnoy, Jay M

    2008-11-01

    Injection immunotherapy has been shown to be particularly beneficial in treating allergic rhinitis, mild to moderate asthma, and anaphylaxis caused by bee and wasp venom. It also produces a long-term, antigen-specific, protective immune effect and is the only treatment that offers the possibility of reducing the risk of asthma development in children with allergic rhinitis. Nonetheless, the potentially severe side effects associated with this form of immunotherapy limit its widespread use. Diverse preparations are being developed to increase its safety and improve its efficacy. These include alternative routes of administration, particularly the sublingual route; use of novel adjuvants, such as CpG oligonucleotides and mycobacterial vaccines; and other approaches, such as peptide immunotherapy, recombinant allergens, DNA vaccination, and combined therapy. Some of these immunotherapy forms have been evaluated in children.

  19. PROSTVAC® targeted immunotherapy candidate for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shore, Neal D

    2014-01-01

    Targeted immunotherapies represent a valid strategy for the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. A randomized, double-blind, Phase II clinical trial of PROSTVAC® demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in overall survival and a large, global, Phase III trial with overall survival as the primary end point is ongoing. PROSTVAC immunotherapy contains the transgenes for prostate-specific antigen and three costimulatory molecules (designated TRICOM). Research suggests that PROSTVAC not only targets prostate-specific antigen, but also other tumor antigens via antigen cascade. PROSTVAC is well tolerated and has been safely combined with other cancer therapies, including hormonal therapy, radiotherapy, another immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Even greater benefits of PROSTVAC may be recognized in earlier-stage disease and low-disease burden settings where immunotherapy can trigger a long-lasting immune response.

  20. Defining the critical hurdles in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Scientific discoveries that provide strong evidence of antitumor effects in preclinical models often encounter significant delays before being tested in patients with cancer. While some of these delays have a scientific basis, others do not. We need to do better. Innovative strategies need to move into early stage clinical trials as quickly as it is safe, and if successful, these therapies should efficiently obtain regulatory approval and widespread clinical application. In late 2009 and 2010 the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC), convened an "Immunotherapy Summit" with representatives from immunotherapy organizations representing Europe, Japan, China and North America to discuss collaborations to improve development and delivery of cancer immunotherapy. One of the concepts raised by SITC and defined as critical by all parties was the need to identify hurdles that impede effective translation of cancer immunotherapy. With consensus on these hurdles, international working groups could be developed to make recommendations vetted by the participating organizations. These recommendations could then be considered by regulatory bodies, governmental and private funding agencies, pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions to facilitate changes necessary to accelerate clinical translation of novel immune-based cancer therapies. The critical hurdles identified by representatives of the collaborating organizations, now organized as the World Immunotherapy Council, are presented and discussed in this report. Some of the identified hurdles impede all investigators; others hinder investigators only in certain regions or institutions or are more relevant to specific types of immunotherapy or first-in-humans studies. Each of these hurdles can significantly delay clinical translation of promising advances in immunotherapy yet if overcome, have the potential to improve outcomes of patients with cancer. PMID:22168571

  1. Defining the critical hurdles in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fox, Bernard A; Schendel, Dolores J; Butterfield, Lisa H; Aamdal, Steinar; Allison, James P; Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Atkins, Michael B; Bartunkova, Jirina; Bergmann, Lothar; Berinstein, Neil; Bonorino, Cristina C; Borden, Ernest; Bramson, Jonathan L; Britten, Cedrik M; Cao, Xuetao; Carson, William E; Chang, Alfred E; Characiejus, Dainius; Choudhury, A Raja; Coukos, George; de Gruijl, Tanja; Dillman, Robert O; Dolstra, Harry; Dranoff, Glenn; Durrant, Lindy G; Finke, James H; Galon, Jerome; Gollob, Jared A; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Grizzi, Fabio; Guida, Michele; Håkansson, Leif; Hege, Kristen; Herberman, Ronald B; Hodi, F Stephen; Hoos, Axel; Huber, Christoph; Hwu, Patrick; Imai, Kohzoh; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Janetzki, Sylvia; June, Carl H; Kalinski, Pawel; Kaufman, Howard L; Kawakami, Koji; Kawakami, Yutaka; Keilholtz, Ulrich; Khleif, Samir N; Kiessling, Rolf; Kotlan, Beatrix; Kroemer, Guido; Lapointe, Rejean; Levitsky, Hyam I; Lotze, Michael T; Maccalli, Cristina; Maio, Michele; Marschner, Jens-Peter; Mastrangelo, Michael J; Masucci, Giuseppe; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelius; Murphy, William J; Nelson, Brad; Nicolini, Andrea; Nishimura, Michael I; Odunsi, Kunle; Ohashi, Pamela S; O'Donnell-Tormey, Jill; Old, Lloyd J; Ottensmeier, Christian; Papamichail, Michael; Parmiani, Giorgio; Pawelec, Graham; Proietti, Enrico; Qin, Shukui; Rees, Robert; Ribas, Antoni; Ridolfi, Ruggero; Ritter, Gerd; Rivoltini, Licia; Romero, Pedro J; Salem, Mohamed L; Scheper, Rik J; Seliger, Barbara; Sharma, Padmanee; Shiku, Hiroshi; Singh-Jasuja, Harpreet; Song, Wenru; Straten, Per Thor; Tahara, Hideaki; Tian, Zhigang; van Der Burg, Sjoerd H; von Hoegen, Paul; Wang, Ena; Welters, Marij Jp; Winter, Hauke; Withington, Tara; Wolchok, Jedd D; Xiao, Weihua; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zwierzina, Heinz; Marincola, Francesco M; Gajewski, Thomas F; Wigginton, Jon M; Disis, Mary L

    2011-01-01

    Scientific discoveries that provide strong evidence of antitumor effects in preclinical models often encounter significant delays before being tested in patients with cancer. While some of these delays have a scientific basis, others do not. We need to do better. Innovative strategies need to move into early stage clinical trials as quickly as it is safe, and if successful, these therapies should efficiently obtain regulatory approval and widespread clinical application. In late 2009 and 2010 the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC), convened an "Immunotherapy Summit" with representatives from immunotherapy organizations representing Europe, Japan, China and North America to discuss collaborations to improve development and delivery of cancer immunotherapy. One of the concepts raised by SITC and defined as critical by all parties was the need to identify hurdles that impede effective translation of cancer immunotherapy. With consensus on these hurdles, international working groups could be developed to make recommendations vetted by the participating organizations. These recommendations could then be considered by regulatory bodies, governmental and private funding agencies, pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions to facilitate changes necessary to accelerate clinical translation of novel immune-based cancer therapies. The critical hurdles identified by representatives of the collaborating organizations, now organized as the World Immunotherapy Council, are presented and discussed in this report. Some of the identified hurdles impede all investigators; others hinder investigators only in certain regions or institutions or are more relevant to specific types of immunotherapy or first-in-humans studies. Each of these hurdles can significantly delay clinical translation of promising advances in immunotherapy yet if overcome, have the potential to improve outcomes of patients with cancer. PMID:22168571

  2. Cancer Immunotherapy: A Treatment for the Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blattman, Joseph N.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    2004-07-01

    Cancer immunotherapy attempts to harness the exquisite power and specificity of the immune system for the treatment of malignancy. Although cancer cells are less immunogenic than pathogens, the immune system is clearly capable of recognizing and eliminating tumor cells. However, tumors frequently interfere with the development and function of immune responses. Thus, the challenge for immunotherapy is to use advances in cellular and molecular immunology to develop strategies that effectively and safely augment antitumor responses.

  3. Defining the critical hurdles in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fox, Bernard A; Schendel, Dolores J; Butterfield, Lisa H; Aamdal, Steinar; Allison, James P; Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Atkins, Michael B; Bartunkova, Jirina; Bergmann, Lothar; Berinstein, Neil; Bonorino, Cristina C; Borden, Ernest; Bramson, Jonathan L; Britten, Cedrik M; Cao, Xuetao; Carson, William E; Chang, Alfred E; Characiejus, Dainius; Choudhury, A Raja; Coukos, George; de Gruijl, Tanja; Dillman, Robert O; Dolstra, Harry; Dranoff, Glenn; Durrant, Lindy G; Finke, James H; Galon, Jerome; Gollob, Jared A; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Grizzi, Fabio; Guida, Michele; Håkansson, Leif; Hege, Kristen; Herberman, Ronald B; Hodi, F Stephen; Hoos, Axel; Huber, Christoph; Hwu, Patrick; Imai, Kohzoh; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Janetzki, Sylvia; June, Carl H; Kalinski, Pawel; Kaufman, Howard L; Kawakami, Koji; Kawakami, Yutaka; Keilholtz, Ulrich; Khleif, Samir N; Kiessling, Rolf; Kotlan, Beatrix; Kroemer, Guido; Lapointe, Rejean; Levitsky, Hyam I; Lotze, Michael T; Maccalli, Cristina; Maio, Michele; Marschner, Jens-Peter; Mastrangelo, Michael J; Masucci, Giuseppe; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelius; Murphy, William J; Nelson, Brad; Nicolini, Andrea; Nishimura, Michael I; Odunsi, Kunle; Ohashi, Pamela S; O'Donnell-Tormey, Jill; Old, Lloyd J; Ottensmeier, Christian; Papamichail, Michael; Parmiani, Giorgio; Pawelec, Graham; Proietti, Enrico; Qin, Shukui; Rees, Robert; Ribas, Antoni; Ridolfi, Ruggero; Ritter, Gerd; Rivoltini, Licia; Romero, Pedro J; Salem, Mohamed L; Scheper, Rik J; Seliger, Barbara; Sharma, Padmanee; Shiku, Hiroshi; Singh-Jasuja, Harpreet; Song, Wenru; Straten, Per Thor; Tahara, Hideaki; Tian, Zhigang; van Der Burg, Sjoerd H; von Hoegen, Paul; Wang, Ena; Welters, Marij Jp; Winter, Hauke; Withington, Tara; Wolchok, Jedd D; Xiao, Weihua; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zwierzina, Heinz; Marincola, Francesco M; Gajewski, Thomas F; Wigginton, Jon M; Disis, Mary L

    2011-12-14

    Scientific discoveries that provide strong evidence of antitumor effects in preclinical models often encounter significant delays before being tested in patients with cancer. While some of these delays have a scientific basis, others do not. We need to do better. Innovative strategies need to move into early stage clinical trials as quickly as it is safe, and if successful, these therapies should efficiently obtain regulatory approval and widespread clinical application. In late 2009 and 2010 the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC), convened an "Immunotherapy Summit" with representatives from immunotherapy organizations representing Europe, Japan, China and North America to discuss collaborations to improve development and delivery of cancer immunotherapy. One of the concepts raised by SITC and defined as critical by all parties was the need to identify hurdles that impede effective translation of cancer immunotherapy. With consensus on these hurdles, international working groups could be developed to make recommendations vetted by the participating organizations. These recommendations could then be considered by regulatory bodies, governmental and private funding agencies, pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions to facilitate changes necessary to accelerate clinical translation of novel immune-based cancer therapies. The critical hurdles identified by representatives of the collaborating organizations, now organized as the World Immunotherapy Council, are presented and discussed in this report. Some of the identified hurdles impede all investigators; others hinder investigators only in certain regions or institutions or are more relevant to specific types of immunotherapy or first-in-humans studies. Each of these hurdles can significantly delay clinical translation of promising advances in immunotherapy yet if overcome, have the potential to improve outcomes of patients with cancer.

  4. Developments in immunotherapy for gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Diaz, J L; Wanta, S M; Fishbein, T M; Kroemer, A

    2015-08-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are the most commonly occurring cancer worldwide. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second and third most commonly diagnosed cancer in women and men, respectively. Despite the advent of screening and the declining incidence of CRC overall, most patients are not diagnosed at an early, localized stage. Due to resistance to chemotherapy, recurrence, and metastatic disease, those diagnosed with advanced disease have only a 12% 5-year survival rate. Given the overwhelming global impact of CRC, the need for advanced therapy is crucial. Targeted immunotherapy in addition to surgical resection, traditional chemotherapy, and radiation therapy is on the rise. For the purpose of this review, we focused on the advances of immunotherapy, particularly in CRC, with mention of research pertaining to particular advances in immunotherapy for other aspects of the GI system. We review basic immunology and the microenvironment surrounding colorectal tumors that lead to immune system evasion and poor responses to chemotherapy. We also examined the way these obstacles are proving to be the targets of tumor specific immunotherapy. We will present current FDA approved immunotherapies such as monoclonal antibodies (mAb) targeting tumor specific antigens, as well as vaccines, adoptive cell therapy, cytokines, and check-point inhibitors. A summation of prior research, current clinical trials, and prospective therapies in murine models help delineate our current status and future strategies on CRC immunotherapy.

  5. Oncolytic Immunotherapy for Treatment of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsun, A; Miao, X N; Wang, C M; Yu, D C

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy entails the treatment of disease by modulation of the immune system. As detailed in the previous chapters, the different modes of achieving immune modulation are many, including the use of small/large molecules, cellular therapy, and radiation. Oncolytic viruses that can specifically attack, replicate within, and destroy tumors represent one of the most promising classes of agents for cancer immunotherapy (recently termed as oncolytic immunotherapy). The notion of oncolytic immunotherapy is considered as the way in which virus-induced tumor cell death (known as immunogenic cancer cell death (ICD)) allows the immune system to recognize tumor cells and provide long-lasting antitumor immunity. Both immune responses toward the virus and ICD together contribute toward successful antitumor efficacy. What is now becoming increasingly clear is that monotherapies, through any of the modalities detailed in this book, are neither sufficient in eradicating tumors nor in providing long-lasting antitumor immune responses and that combination therapies may deliver enhanced efficacy. After the rise of the genetic engineering era, it has been possible to engineer viruses to harbor combination-like characteristics to enhance their potency in cancer immunotherapy. This chapter provides a historical background on oncolytic virotherapy and its future application in cancer immunotherapy, especially as a combination therapy with other treatment modalities.

  6. 10. Photocopy of old photo shows men sitting in front ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of old photo shows men sitting in front of the saloon, late 19th or early 20th century. Original photograph at Idaho Historical Society, Boise, Idaho. - Miners' Exchange Block, Main & Wall Streets, Idaho City, Boise County, ID

  7. Death Threats and a Sit-In Divide Penn State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Describes how death threats against black students at Penn State prompted an extended sit-in and a debate over whether the university was doing enough to protect black students and promote diversity. (EV)

  8. 12. View of disassembled steam engine sitting in open shed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View of disassembled steam engine sitting in open shed showing base, columns and entablature. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Steam Engine & Mill, 2.65 Mi. N of PR Rt. 2 Bridge over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  9. 52. CLOSEUP AERIAL VIEW OF THE MERCURY CAPSULE SITTING ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. CLOSE-UP AERIAL VIEW OF THE MERCURY CAPSULE SITTING ON TOP OF THE REDSTONE ROCKET IN THE TEST STAND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  10. 17. Detail showing roller nest for vertical strut sitting atop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Detail showing roller nest for vertical strut sitting atop granite pier cap. View to southwest. - Selby Avenue Bridge, Spanning Short Line Railways track at Selby Avenue between Hamline & Snelling Avenues, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  11. 250. VIEW OF FLAME AND TORCH PLATFORM SITTING AT THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    250. VIEW OF FLAME AND TORCH PLATFORM SITTING AT THE BASE OF FORT WOOD AFTER REMOVAL ON JULY 4, 1984, WITH SCAFFOLDED STATUE RISING IN BACKGROUND - Statue of Liberty, Liberty Island, Manhattan, New York County, NY

  12. 47. View of flame and torch platform sitting at the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. View of flame and torch platform sitting at the base of Fort Wood after removal on July 4, 1984, with scaffolded statue rising in background. October 1984. - Statue of Liberty, Liberty Island, Manhattan, New York County, NY

  13. Can arterial stiffness parameters be measured in the sitting position?

    PubMed

    Nürnberger, Jens; Michalski, Rene; Türk, Tobias R; Opazo Saez, Anabelle; Witzke, Oliver; Kribben, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    Despite the introduction of arterial stiffness measurements in the European recommendation, pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AI) are still not used routinely in clinical practice. It would be of advantage if such measurements were done in the sitting position as is done for blood pressure. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether there is a difference in stiffness parameters in sitting vs. supine position. Arterial stiffness was measured in 24 healthy volunteers and 20 patients with cardiovascular disease using three different devices: SphygmoCor (Atcor Medical, Sydney, Australia), Arteriograph (TensioMed, Budapest, Hungary) and Vascular Explorer (Enverdis, Jena, Germany). Three measurements were performed in supine position followed by three measurements in sitting position. Methods were compared using correlation and Bland-Altman analysis. There was a significant correlation between PWV in supine and sitting position (Arteriograph: P<0.0001, r=0.93; Vascular Explorer; P<0.0001, r=0.87). There were significant correlations between AI sitting and AI supine using Arteriograph (P<0.0001, r=0.97), Vascular Explorer (P<0.0001, r=0.98) and SphygmoCor (P<0.0001, r=0.96). When analyzed by Bland-Altman, PWV and AI measurements in supine vs. sitting showed good agreement. There was no significant difference in PWV obtained with the three different devices (Arteriograph 7.5±1.6 m s(-1), Vascular Explorer 7.3±0.9 m s(-1), SphygmoCor 7.0±1.8 m s(-1)). AI was significantly higher using the Arteriograph (17.6±15.0%) than Vascular Explorer and SphygmoCor (10.2±15.1% and 10.3±18.1%, respectively). The close agreement between sitting and supine measurements suggests that both PWV and AI can be reliably measured in the sitting position.

  14. 43. INTERIOR VIEW, CRUSHING ADDITION. THE SYMONS VIBRATING SCREEN SITS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. INTERIOR VIEW, CRUSHING ADDITION. THE SYMONS VIBRATING SCREEN SITS ON TOP OF THE PLATFORM. OVERSIZE ORE IS FED BY CHUTE TO THE GYRATORY SECONDARY CRUSHER (MISSING) SITTING ON CONCRETE FOUNDATIONS TO LOWER RIGHT. UNDERSIZE ORE WAS FED BY THE LOWER CHUTE (CENTER LEFT) TO THE 24 INCH BELT CONVEYOR UNDER THE SECONDARY CRUSHER. THE DRYER ROOM IS BEYOND. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  15. Cancer immunotherapy out of the gate: the 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute International Immunotherapy Symposium.

    PubMed

    Tontonoz, Matthew; Gee, Connie E

    2015-05-01

    The 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute (CRI) International Immunotherapy Symposium was held from October 5-8, 2014, in New York City. Titled "Cancer Immunotherapy: Out of the Gate," the symposium began with a Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium satellite meeting focused on issues in immunotherapy drug development, followed by five speaker sessions and a poster session devoted to basic and clinical cancer immunology research. The second annual William B. Coley lecture was delivered by Lieping Chen, one of the four recipients of the 2014 William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Tumor Immunology; the other three recipients were Gordon Freeman, Tasuku Honjo, and Arlene Sharpe. Prominent themes of the conference were the use of genomic technologies to identify neoantigens and the emergence of new immune modulatory molecules, beyond CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1, as new therapeutic targets for immunotherapy.

  16. Cancer immunotherapy out of the gate: the 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute International Immunotherapy Symposium.

    PubMed

    Tontonoz, Matthew; Gee, Connie E

    2015-05-01

    The 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute (CRI) International Immunotherapy Symposium was held from October 5-8, 2014, in New York City. Titled "Cancer Immunotherapy: Out of the Gate," the symposium began with a Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium satellite meeting focused on issues in immunotherapy drug development, followed by five speaker sessions and a poster session devoted to basic and clinical cancer immunology research. The second annual William B. Coley lecture was delivered by Lieping Chen, one of the four recipients of the 2014 William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Tumor Immunology; the other three recipients were Gordon Freeman, Tasuku Honjo, and Arlene Sharpe. Prominent themes of the conference were the use of genomic technologies to identify neoantigens and the emergence of new immune modulatory molecules, beyond CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1, as new therapeutic targets for immunotherapy. PMID:25941356

  17. Occupational Sitting and Physical Activity Among University Employees

    PubMed Central

    FOUNTAINE, CHARLES J.; PIACENTINI, MEREDITH; LIGUORI, GARY A.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obese in the U.S. has been thoroughly documented. With the advent of inactivity physiology research and the subsequent interest in sedentary behavior, the work environment has come under closer scrutiny as a potential opportunity to reverse inactivity. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the sitting and physical activity (PA) habits among different classifications of university employees. University employees (n=625) completed an online survey based on the Occupational Sitting and Physical Activity Questionnaire (OSPAQ). Participants were instructed to describe time spent sitting, standing, walking, and in heavy physical labor during the last seven days, along with the number of breaks from sitting taken per hour. To establish habitual patterns of PA outside of work, employees recalled their participation in structured PA in the past seven days. Prior to data analysis, employees were categorized as Administration, Faculty, Staff, or Facilities Management. Statistically significant differences were found among employee classifications for min sit/d, p<.001; min stand/d, p<.001; min walk/d, p<.001; and min heavy labor/d, p<.001. No significant differences were found for breaks/h from sitting, p=.259 or participation in structured PA, p=. 33. With the exception of facilities management workers, university employees spent 75% of their workday seated. In conjunction with low levels of leisure time PA, university employees appear to be prime candidates for workplace interventions to reduce physical inactivity. PMID:27182407

  18. Physical Activity, Study Sitting Time, Leisure Sitting Time, and Sleep Time Are Differently Associated With Obesity in Korean Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Il Gyu; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, So Young; Sim, Songyong; Choi, Hyo Geun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Low physical activity, long leisure sitting time, and short sleep time are risk factors for obesity, but the association with study sitting time is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between these factors and obesity. We analyzed the association between physical activity, study sitting time, leisure sitting time, and sleep time and subject weight (underweight, healthy weight, overweight, and obese), using data from a large population-based survey, the 2013 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey. Data from 53,769 participants were analyzed using multinomial logistic regression analyses with complex sampling. Age, sex, region of residence, economic level, smoking, stress level, physical activity, sitting time for study, sitting time for leisure, and sleep time were adjusted as the confounders. Low physical activity (adjusted odds ratios [AORs] = 1.03, 1.12) and long leisure sitting time (AORs = 1.15, 1.32) were positively associated with overweight and obese. Low physical activity (AOR = 1.33) and long leisure sitting time (AOR = 1.12) were also associated with underweight. Study sitting time was negatively associated with underweight (AOR = 0.86) but was unrelated to overweight (AOR = 0.97, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.91–1.03) and obese (AOR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.84–1.04). Sleep time (<6 hours; ≥6 hours, <7 hours; ≥7 hours, <8 hours) was adversely associated with underweight (AORs = 0.67, 0.79, and 0.88) but positively associated with overweight (AORs = 1.19, 1.17, and 1.08) and obese (AORs = 1.33, 1.36, and 1.30) in a dose–response relationship. In adolescents, increasing physical activity, decreasing leisure sitting time, and obtaining sufficient sleep would be beneficial in maintaining a healthy weight. However, study sitting time was not associated with overweight or obese. PMID:26554807

  19. European Sitting Championship: Prevalence and Correlates of Self-Reported Sitting Time in the 28 European Union Member States

    PubMed Central

    Loyen, Anne; van der Ploeg, Hidde P.; Bauman, Adrian; Brug, Johannes; Lakerveld, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Objective Sedentary behaviour is increasingly recognized as an important health risk, but comparable data across Europe are scarce. The objective of this study was to explore the prevalence and correlates of self-reported sitting time in adults across and within the 28 European Union Member States. Methods This study reports data from the Special Eurobarometer 412. In 2013, 27,919 randomly selected Europeans (approximately 1000 per Member State) were interviewed face-to-face. Sitting time on a usual day was self-reported and dichotomised into sitting less- and more than 7.5 hours per day. Uni- and multivariate odds ratios of sitting more than 7.5 hours per day were assessed by country and socio-demographic variables using binary logistic regression analyses. The analyses were stratified by country to study the socio-demographic correlates of sitting time within the different countries. Results A total of 26,617 respondents were included in the analyses. Median sitting time was five hours per day. Across Europe, 18.5 percent of the respondents reported to sit more than 7.5 hours per day, with substantial variation between countries (ranging from 8.9 to 32.1 percent). In general, northern European countries reported more sitting than countries in the south of Europe. ‘Current occupation’ and ‘age when stopped education’ were found to be the strongest correlates of sitting time, both across Europe and within most Member States. Compared to manual workers, the odds ratio of sitting more than 7.5 hours per day was 5.00 for people with white collar occupations, 3.84 for students, and 3.65 for managers. Conclusions There is substantial variation in self-reported sitting time among European adults across countries as well as socio-demographic groups. While regular surveillance of (objectively measured) sedentary behaviour is needed, the results of this study provide entry points for developing targeted interventions aimed at highly sedentary populations, such as

  20. Melanoma immunotherapy dominates the field.

    PubMed

    Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis; Gogas, Helen

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of melanoma is increasing worldwide and despite early detection and intervention, the number of patients dying from metastatic disease continues to rise. The prognosis of advanced melanoma remains poor, with median survival between 6 and 9 months. Over the past 30 years and despite extensive clinical research, the treatment options for metastatic disease were limited and melanoma is still considered as one of the most therapy-resistant malignancies. Single-agent and combination chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biochemotherapy, immunotherapy, targeted agent therapy and combination regimens failed to show a significant improvement in overall survival (OS). Recent advances and in-depth understanding of the biology of melanoma, have contributed to the development of new agents. Based on the molecular and immunological background of the disease, these new drugs have shown benefit in overall and progression-free survival (PFS). As the picture of the disease begins to change, oncologists need to alter their approach to melanoma treatment and consider disease biology together with targeted individualized treatment. In this review the authors attempt to offer an insight in the present and past melanoma treatment options, with a focus on the recently approved immunotherapeutic agents and the clinical perspectives of these new weapons against metastatic melanoma. PMID:27563656

  1. Melanoma immunotherapy dominates the field

    PubMed Central

    Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma is increasing worldwide and despite early detection and intervention, the number of patients dying from metastatic disease continues to rise. The prognosis of advanced melanoma remains poor, with median survival between 6 and 9 months. Over the past 30 years and despite extensive clinical research, the treatment options for metastatic disease were limited and melanoma is still considered as one of the most therapy-resistant malignancies. Single-agent and combination chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biochemotherapy, immunotherapy, targeted agent therapy and combination regimens failed to show a significant improvement in overall survival (OS). Recent advances and in-depth understanding of the biology of melanoma, have contributed to the development of new agents. Based on the molecular and immunological background of the disease, these new drugs have shown benefit in overall and progression-free survival (PFS). As the picture of the disease begins to change, oncologists need to alter their approach to melanoma treatment and consider disease biology together with targeted individualized treatment. In this review the authors attempt to offer an insight in the present and past melanoma treatment options, with a focus on the recently approved immunotherapeutic agents and the clinical perspectives of these new weapons against metastatic melanoma. PMID:27563656

  2. Immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2005-09-01

    Immunotherapeutic strategies have become part of standard cancer treatment. Chimeric and humanized antibodies have demonstrated activity against a variety of tumors. Although the humanized anti-CD33 antibody HuM195 has only modest activity against overt acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it can eliminate minimal residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia. High-dose radioimmunotherapy with b-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45, and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of antileukemic therapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conversely, a-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213 or actinium-225 offers the possibility of selective tumor cell kill while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Targeted chemotherapy with the anti-CD33- calicheamicin construct gemtuzumab ozogamicin has produced remissions in relapsed AML and appears promising when used in combination with standard chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. T-cell recognition of peptide antigens presented on the cell surface in combination with major histocompatibility complex antigen provides another potentially promising approach for the treatment of AML. PMID:16091194

  3. Advances in the understanding of cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shore, Neal D

    2015-09-01

    The principal role of the immune system is to prevent and eradicate pathogens and infections. The key characteristics or features of an effective immune response include specificity, trafficking, antigen spread and durability (memory). The immune system is recognised to have a critical role in controlling cancer through a dynamic relationship with tumour cells. Normally, at the early stages of tumour development, the immune system is capable of eliminating tumour cells or keeping tumour growth abated; however, tumour cells may evolve multiple pathways over time to evade immune control. Immunotherapy may be viewed as a treatment designed to boost or restore the ability of the immune system to fight cancer, infections and other diseases. Immunotherapy manifests differently from traditional cancer treatments, eliciting delayed response kinetics and thus may be more effective in patients with lower tumour burden, in whom disease progression may be less rapid, thereby allowing ample time for the immunotherapy to evolve. Because immunotherapies may have a different mechanism of action from traditional cytotoxic or targeted biological agents, immunotherapy techniques have the potential to combine synergistically with traditional therapies.

  4. Immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Dave

    2010-01-01

    Summary In 1999 a vaccine approach was found to reduce amyloid deposits in transgenic mice overproducing the amyloid precursor protein. This was followed closely by demonstrations that vaccines or passive immunotherapy could rescue memory deficits in these mice. Initial human clinical trials revealed apparent autoimmune reactions in a subset of patients, but also some cases of cognitive benefit and amyloid clearance. Further work with passive immunotherapy in mouse models confirmed exceptional clearing abilities of anti-amyloid antibodies even in older mice. However, in parallel with parenchymal amyloid clearance was the appearance of microhemorrhages and increased vascular amyloid deposition. Additional clinical trials with passive immunotherapy confirmed occasional appearance of microhemorrhage and occurrence of vasogenic edema in some patients, particularly those with the apolipoprotein E4 genotype. Recent data with positron emission tomography demonstrates trial participants passively immunized with anti-Aβ antibodies have reduced signals with amyloid binding ligands after 18 mo of therapy. Several anti-Aβ immunotherapies have reached phase 3 testing and immunotherapy is likely to be the first test of the amyloid hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Identifying antibody variants that retain amyloid clearance with fewer adverse reactions remains a major focus of translational research in this area. PMID:21158978

  5. Immunotherapy for tuberculosis: what's the better choice?

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuliang; Zhao, Jinqiu

    2012-06-01

    A Th1/Th2 imbalance in tuberculosis (TB) patients caused by a decreased Th1 response and an increased Th2 response is a significant factor in the pathogenesis and development of TB. Protective immune responses to TB include bacteriostatic and bactericidal responses. Unfortunately, however, immunoprotection and immune pathology co-exist in TB patients. Immunotherapy for TB principally aims to restore the Th1/Th2 balance by enhancing the Th1 response and suppressing the excessive Th2 response. Immunotherapy for TB can be classified into three categories: immune-enhancing therapy using cytokines, immunosuppressive therapy, and immunomodulatory therapy. Immunomodulatory therapy targets the Th1/Th2 imbalance and includes cytokine regulation therapy, antibody regulation therapy, a multi-dose heat-inactivated Mycobacterium vaccae vaccine, thymosin hormones and a DNA vaccine. A new approach in supplementary TB immunotherapy is to simultaneously up-regulate the Th1 response and down-regulate the Th2 response. While immunotherapy can contribute to TB treatment, it may also cause immunopathological injury. Therefore, immunotherapy needs to be improved and further studied to maximize its potential.

  6. Cancer Immunotherapy for Gliomas: Overview and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naoya

    2016-07-15

    Immunotherapy has been highlighted because we have obtained much evidence, which includes theoretical backborn as well as favorable results from clinical trials. As immunotherapy gives an apparently different cytotoxic mechanism and a little adverse event, the promising results are getting a lot of attention. In this article, cancer immunotherapy for gliomas is reviewed thoroughly from the literature, focusing on the clinical trial results.

  7. Two-Arm Randomized Pilot Intervention Trial to Decrease Sitting Time and Increase Sit-To-Stand Transitions in Working and Non-Working Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Jacqueline; Takemoto, Michelle; Bolling, Khalisa; Atkin, Andrew; Carlson, Jordan; Rosenberg, Dori; Crist, Katie; Godbole, Suneeta; Lewars, Brittany; Pena, Claudia; Merchant, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Background Excessive sitting has been linked to poor health. It is unknown whether reducing total sitting time or increasing brief sit-to-stand transitions is more beneficial. We conducted a randomized pilot study to assess whether it is feasible for working and non-working older adults to reduce these two different behavioral targets. Methods Thirty adults (15 workers and 15 non-workers) age 50–70 years were randomized to one of two conditions (a 2-hour reduction in daily sitting or accumulating 30 additional brief sit-to-stand transitions per day). Sitting time, standing time, sit-to-stand transitions and stepping were assessed by a thigh worn inclinometer (activPAL). Participants were assessed for 7 days at baseline and followed while the intervention was delivered (2 weeks). Mixed effects regression analyses adjusted for days within participants, device wear time, and employment status. Time by condition interactions were investigated. Results Recruitment, assessments, and intervention delivery were feasible. The ‘reduce sitting’ group reduced their sitting by two hours, the ‘increase sit-to-stand’ group had no change in sitting time (p < .001). The sit-to-stand transition group increased their sit-to-stand transitions, the sitting group did not (p < .001). Conclusions This study was the first to demonstrate the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of specific sedentary behavioral goals. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT02544867 PMID:26735919

  8. Development of Novel Immunotherapies for Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hujaily, Ensaf M.; Oldham, Robyn A. A.; Hari, Parameswaran; Medin, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a disorder of terminally differentiated plasma cells characterized by clonal expansion in the bone marrow (BM). It is the second-most common hematologic malignancy. Despite significant advances in therapeutic strategies, MM remains a predominantly incurable disease emphasizing the need for the development of new treatment regimens. Immunotherapy is a promising treatment modality to circumvent challenges in the management of MM. Many novel immunotherapy strategies, such as adoptive cell therapy and monoclonal antibodies, are currently under investigation in clinical trials, with some already demonstrating a positive impact on patient survival. In this review, we will summarize the current standards of care and discuss major new approaches in immunotherapy for MM. PMID:27618026

  9. Immunotherapy advances in uro-genital malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ratta, Raffaele; Zappasodi, Roberta; Raggi, Daniele; Grassi, Paolo; Verzoni, Elena; Necchi, Andrea; Di Nicola, Massimo; Salvioni, Roberto; de Braud, Filippo; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer has made significant progresses over the last 20 years. Multiple efforts have been attempted to restore immune-mediated tumor elimination, leading to the development of several targeted immunotherapies. Data from recent clinical trials suggest that these agents might improve the prognosis of patients with advanced genito-urinary (GU) malignancies. Nivolumab has been the first immune checkpoint-inhibitor approved for pre-treated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Pembrolizumab and atezolizumab have shown promising results in both phase I and II trials in urothelial carcinoma. Brentuximab vedotin has demonstrated early signals of clinical activity and immunomodulatory effects in highly pre-treated patients with testicular germ cell tumors. In this review, we have summarized the major clinical achievements of immunotherapy in GU cancers, focusing on immune checkpoint blockade as well as the new immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) under clinical evaluation for these malignancies.

  10. Development of Novel Immunotherapies for Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Al-Hujaily, Ensaf M; Oldham, Robyn A A; Hari, Parameswaran; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a disorder of terminally differentiated plasma cells characterized by clonal expansion in the bone marrow (BM). It is the second-most common hematologic malignancy. Despite significant advances in therapeutic strategies, MM remains a predominantly incurable disease emphasizing the need for the development of new treatment regimens. Immunotherapy is a promising treatment modality to circumvent challenges in the management of MM. Many novel immunotherapy strategies, such as adoptive cell therapy and monoclonal antibodies, are currently under investigation in clinical trials, with some already demonstrating a positive impact on patient survival. In this review, we will summarize the current standards of care and discuss major new approaches in immunotherapy for MM. PMID:27618026

  11. Immunotherapy in prostate cancer: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Masanori; Koga, Noriko; Moriya, Fukuko; Itoh, Kyogo

    2016-01-01

    Although treatment options for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have increased over the last decade, there remains a need for strategies that can provide durable disease control and long-term benefit. Recently, immunotherapy has emerged as a viable and attractive strategy for the treatment of CRPC. To date, there are multiple strategies to target the immune system, and several approaches including therapeutic cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors have been most successful in clinical trials. With regard to this, we report the results of the most recent clinical trials investigating immunotherapy in CRPC and discuss the future development of immunotherapy for CRPC, as well as the potential importance of biomarkers in the future progress of this field.

  12. Immunotherapy in acute arsenic poisoning.

    PubMed

    Leikin, J B; Goldman-Leikin, R E; Evans, M A; Wiener, S; Hryhorczuk, D O

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the use of immunotherapy on the treatment of sodium arsenite toxicity. Female balb/c mice injected with arsanilic acid conjugated to a carrier protein (ovalbumin) were shown to produce antibodies (arsenic reactive serum, ARS) reactive with arsanilic acid and sodium arsenite. Serum was tested for anti-ARS antibodies using a solid phase radioimmunoassay. The antisera bound to ARS conjugated to the synthetic copolymer glutamic acid60 tyrosine30 when diluted as high as 1:4096. Following multiple injections of 100 micrograms of arsanilic acid--ovalbumin compound, mortality on injection with sodium arsenite 0.87 mg/kg i.p. one week later decreased to 0 deaths in 22 pretreated mice vs 9 deaths in 29 untreated mice (31% mortality; p less than .005). No decrease in mortality was noted at higher challenges (1.15 mg/kg) of sodium arsenite. Antisera from pretreated mice was injected 0.1 cc i.p. into 12 week old female balb/c mice followed by an injection of sodium arsenite 0.87 mg/kg i.p. at 10 minutes. Again a protective effect was observed with 0 deaths in 18 mice vs eight deaths in 21 mice (38%; p less than .005). Seventeen additional mice were given an injection of 0.87 mg/kg i.p. of sodium arsenite. After 30 minutes, all mice became symptomatic whereupon antisera 0.1 cc i.p. was given. The one day mortality (2/17, 12%) was possibly lower than the combined control mortality (17/50, 34%; p less than 0.07). There was no change in mortality noted when antisera was administered to mice acutely exposed to 5 mg/kg HgCl2.

  13. Training affects the development of postural adjustments in sitting infants.

    PubMed Central

    Hadders-Algra, M; Brogren, E; Forssberg, H

    1996-01-01

    1. The present study addressed the question of whether daily balance training can affect the development of postural adjustments in sitting infants. 2. Postural responses during sitting on a moveable platform were assessed in twenty healthy infants at 5-6, 7-8 and 9-10 months of age. Multiple surface EMGs and kinematics were recorded while the infants were exposed to slow and fast horizontal forward (Fw) and backward (Bw) displacements of the platform. After the first session the parents of nine infants trained their child's sitting balance daily. 3. At the youngest age, when none of the infants could sit independently, the muscle activation patterns were direction specific and showed a large variation. This variation decreased with increasing age, resulting in selection of the most complete responses. Training facilitated response selection both during Fw and Bw translations. This suggests a training effect on the first level of the central pattern generator (CPG) model of postural control. 4. Training also affected the development of response modulation during Fw translations. It accelerated the development of: (1) the ability to modulate EMG amplitude with respect to platform velocity and initial sitting position, (2) antagonist activity and (3) a distal onset of the response. These findings point to a training effect on the second level of the CPG model of postural adjustments. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:8735713

  14. A new twist on old ideas: How sitting reorients crawlers

    PubMed Central

    Soska, Kasey C.; Robinson, Scott R.; Adolph, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, crawling and sitting are considered distinct motor behaviors with different postures and functions. Ten- to 12-month-old infants were observed in the laboratory or in their homes while being coaxed to crawl continuously over long, straight walkways (Study 1; N = 20) and during spontaneous crawling during free play (Study 2; N = 20). In every context, infants stopped crawling to sit 3-6 times per minute. Transitions from crawling to sitting frequently turned infants’ bodies away from the direction of heading; subsequent transitions back to crawling were offset by as much as 180° from the original direction of heading. Apparently, body reorientations result from the biomechanics of transitioning between crawling and sitting. Findings indicate that sustained, linear crawling is likely an epiphenomenon of how gait is studied in standard paradigms. Postural transitions between crawling and sitting are ubiquitous and can represent a functional unit of action. These transitions and the accompanying body reorientations likely have cascading effects for infants’ exploration, visual perception, and spatial cognition. PMID:25041056

  15. Immunotherapies: The Blockade of Inhibitory Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan-Ling; Liang, Jing; Zhang, Wen; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    T lymphocytes require signaling by the T cell receptor and by nonclonotypic cosignaling receptors. The costimulatory and inhibitory signals profoundly influence the course of immune responses by amplifying or reducing the transcriptional effects of T cell receptor triggering. The inhibitory receptors such as CTLA-4, PD-1, and BTLA have recently drawn much attention as potential targets for immunotherapies. This review focuses on the progress that has been made with the mentioned receptors in the field of immunotherapies for autoimmune diseases, malignancies, infectious diseases, and transplantation. PMID:23197939

  16. Immunotherapy for advanced melanoma: future directions.

    PubMed

    Valpione, Sara; Campana, Luca G

    2016-02-01

    As calculated by the meta-analysis of Korn et al., the prognosis of metastatic melanoma in the pretarget and immunological therapy era was poor, with a median survival of 6.2 and a 1-year life expectancy of 25.5%. Nowadays, significant advances in melanoma treatment have been gained, and immunotherapy is one of the promising approaches to get to durable responses and survival improvement. The aim of the present review is to highlight the recent innovations in melanoma immunotherapy and to propose a critical perspective of the future directions of this enthralling oncology subspecialty.

  17. Sit-to-Stand Trainer: An Apparatus for Training "Normal-Like" Sit to Stand Movement.

    PubMed

    Matjacic, Zlatko; Zadravec, Matjaz; Oblak, Jakob

    2016-06-01

    Sit-to-stand (STS) transfer training is probably the most demanding task in rehabilitation. We have developed an innovative STS trainer that offers variable levels of mechanical support and speeds of STS transfer. In a group of neurologically intact individuals we compared kinematics, kinetics and electromyography (EMG) patterns of STS transfer assessed in three experimental conditions with increasing degree of mechanical support (MIN STS-T, MED STS-T, and MAX STS-T) to natural, unassisted STS movement (NO STS-T). The resulting ankle, knee, hip joint and trunk angles in experimental conditions MED STS-T and MIN STS-T were very similar to experimental condition NO STS-T. Vertical ground reaction forces and EMG patterns in the tibialis anterior, quadriceps and hamstrings show a clear trend toward "normal" patterns as the level of mechanical support from the device is progressively reduced. We have further tested the feasibility of the STS trainer in five stroke subjects at two levels of support showing that increased voluntary effort is needed when the support is reduced. Based on these results we conclude that negligible constraints are imposed by the device on a user's STS transfer kinematics, which is an important prerequisite for considering clinical use of the device for training in neurologically impaired.

  18. Peanut oral immunotherapy transiently expands circulating Ara h 2-specific B cells with a homologous repertoire in unrelated individuals

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sarita U.; Ogunniyi, Adebola O.; Calatroni, Agustin; Tadigotla, Vasisht R.; Ruiter, Bert; Ma, Alex; Moon, James; Love, J.Christopher; Shreffler, Wayne G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Peanut oral immunotherapy (PNOIT) induces persistent tolerance to peanut in a subset of patients and induces specific antibodies which may play a role in clinical protection. The contribution of induced antibody clones to clinical tolerance in PNOIT is unknown, however. Objective We hypothesized that PNOIT induces a clonal, allergen-specific B cell response, which could serve as a surrogate for clinical outcomes. Methods We used a fluorescent Ara h 2 multimer for affinity-selection of Ara h 2-specific B cells, and subsequent single cell immunoglobulin amplification. Diversity of related clones was evaluated by next-generation sequencing (NGS) of immunoglobulin heavy chains from circulating memory B cells using 2×250 paired-end sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Results Expression of class-switched antibodies from Ara h 2 positive cells confirms enrichment for Ara h 2 specificity. PNOIT induces an early and transient expansion of circulating Ara h 2 specific memory B cells that peaks at week 7. Ara h 2-specific sequences from memory cells have rates of non-silent mutations consistent with affinity maturation. The repertoire of Ara h 2-specific antibodies is oligoclonal. NGS-based repertoire analysis of circulating memory B cells, reveals evidence for convergent selection of related sequences in 3 unrelated subjects, suggesting the presence of similar Ara h 2-specific B cell clones. Conclusions Using a novel affinity selection approach to identify antigen-specific B cells, we demonstrate that the early PNOIT induced Ara h 2-specific BCR repertoire is oligoclonal, somatically hypermutated and shares similar clonal groups among unrelated individuals consistent with convergent selection. PMID:25985925

  19. Comparison of the basophil activation test versus the nasal provocation test in establishing eligibility for specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Leśniak, Małgorzata; Dyga, Wojciech; Rusinek, Barbara; Mazur, Marcel; Czarnobilska, Ewa

    2016-08-25

    INTRODUCTION    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is the most common atopic disease. Specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only effective treatment method for AR. In uncertain diagnostic cases, before establishing eligibility for SIT, nasal provocation tests (NPTs) should be performed. However, there are numerous contraindications to performing NPTs, and there is ongoing search for an alternative in vitro method. OBJECTIVES    The aim of the study was to determine whether a specific in vitro provocation, that is, the basophil activation test (BAT), may replace a specific in vivo provocation, that is, the NPT, in establishing patient's eligibility for SIT. PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study included 30 patients with AR caused by allergy to house dust mite or birch pollen, referred for SIT. The assessment of basophil activation by measuring CD63 antigen expression was performed using the Flow2 CAST test. Basophils were stimulated with allergen preparation (concentrations of 5000, 500, and 50 standardized biological units) used in NPTs. BAT results were expressed as stimulation index (SI) and basophil reactivity (BR). RESULTS    Allergen concentrations of 500 and 50 SBU proved to be appropriate for basophil stimulation. Median SI and BR were higher for positive NPT results than for negative NPT results (P <0.001). Sensitivity for SI and BR was in the range from 83% to 100%; specificity, from 78% to 89%; positive predictive value, from 75% to 87%; and negative predictive value, from 89% to 100%. We observed a high correlation of the analyzed parameters for the allergen concentrations of 500 and 50 SBU (range, 0.58-0.74; P <0.05). CONCLUSIONS    If there are contraindications to performing the NPT, BAT may be regarded as an alternative in establishing patients' eligibility for SIT. The optimal concentrations of allergen preparations are 500 and 50 SBU. Both SI and BR are good indicators of basophil activation. PMID:27578221

  20. Biomarkers for glioma immunotherapy: the next generation

    PubMed Central

    Ung, Timothy H.; Neira, Justin A.; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    The term “biomarker” historically refers to a single parameter, such as the expression level of a gene or a radiographic pattern, used to indicate a broader biological state. Molecular indicators have been applied to several aspects of cancer therapy: to describe the genotypic and phenotypic state of neoplastic tissue for prognosis, to predict susceptibility to anti-proliferative agents, to validate the presence of specific drug targets, and to evaluate responsiveness to therapy. For glioblastoma (GBM), immunohistochemical and radiographic biomarkers accessible to the clinical lab have informed traditional regimens, but while immunotherapies have emerged as potentially disruptive weapons against this diffusely infiltrating, heterogeneous tumor, biomarkers with strong predictive power have not been fully established. The cancer immunotherapy field, through the recently accelerated expansion of trials, is currently leveraging this wealth of clinical and biological data to define and revise the use of biomarkers for improving prognostic accuracy, personalization of therapy, and evaluation of responses across the wide variety of tumors. Technological advancements in DNA sequencing, cytometry, and microscopy have facilitated the exploration of more integrated, high-dimensional profiling of the disease system—incorporating both immune and tumor parameters—rather than single metrics, as biomarkers for therapeutic sensitivity. Here we discuss the utility of traditional GBM biomarkers in immunotherapy and how the impending transformation of the biomarker paradigm—from single markers to integrated profiles—may offer the key to bringing predictive, personalized immunotherapy to GBM patients. PMID:25724916

  1. Role of IL-2 in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Caicun; Ren, Shengxiang

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is one of the key cytokines with pleiotropic effects on immune system. It has been approved for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma and metastatic melanoma. Recent progress has been made in our understanding of IL-2 in regulating lymphocytes that has led to exciting new directions for cancer immunotherapy. While improved IL-2 formulations might be used as monotherapies, their combination with other anticancer immunotherapies, such as adoptive cell transfer regimens, antigen-specific vaccination, and blockade of immune checkpoint inhibitory molecules, for example cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1) mono-antibodies, would held the promise of treating metastatic cancer. Despite the comprehensive studies of IL-2 on immune system have established the application of IL-2 for cancer immunotherapy, a number of poignant obstacles remain for future research. In the present review, we will focus on the key biological features of IL-2, current applications, limitations, and future directions of IL-2 in cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Current progress in immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Foley, Kelly; Kim, Victoria; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Zheng, Lei

    2016-10-10

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal cancers with few treatment options. Immune-based strategies to treat pancreatic cancer, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors, therapeutic vaccines, and combination immunotherapies, are showing promise where other approaches have failed. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, including anti-CTLA4, anti-PD-1, and anti-PD-L1 antibodies, are effective as single agents in immune sensitive cancers like melanoma, but lack efficacy in immune insensitive cancers including pancreatic cancer. However, these inhibitors are showing clinical activity, even in traditionally non-immunogenic cancers, when combined with other interventions, including chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and therapeutic vaccines. Therapeutic vaccines given together with immune modulating agents are of particular interest because vaccines are the most efficient way to induce effective anti-tumor T cell responses, which is required for immunotherapies to be effective. In pancreatic cancer, early studies suggest that vaccines can induce T cells that have the potential to recognize and kill pancreatic cancer cells, but the tumor microenvironment inhibits effective T cell trafficking and function. While progress has been made in the development of immunotherapies for pancreatic cancer over the last several years, additional trials are needed to better understand the signals within the tumor microenvironment that are formidable barriers to T cell infiltration and function. Additionally, as more pancreatic specific antigens are identified, immunotherapies will continue to be refined to provide the most significant clinical benefit.

  3. Targeted immunotherapy for pediatric solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Lisa M.; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metastatic and refractory pediatric solid tumor malignancies continue to have a poor outcome despite the > 80% cure rates appreciated in many pediatric cancers. Targeted immunotherapy is impacting treatment and survival in these aggressive tumors. We review current promising immunotherapeutic approaches in the pediatric oncology solid tumor setting. PMID:27141344

  4. Bioinformatics for cancer immunology and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Charoentong, Pornpimol; Angelova, Mihaela; Efremova, Mirjana; Gallasch, Ralf; Hackl, Hubert; Galon, Jerome; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2012-11-01

    Recent mechanistic insights obtained from preclinical studies and the approval of the first immunotherapies has motivated increasing number of academic investigators and pharmaceutical/biotech companies to further elucidate the role of immunity in tumor pathogenesis and to reconsider the role of immunotherapy. Additionally, technological advances (e.g., next-generation sequencing) are providing unprecedented opportunities to draw a comprehensive picture of the tumor genomics landscape and ultimately enable individualized treatment. However, the increasing complexity of the generated data and the plethora of bioinformatics methods and tools pose considerable challenges to both tumor immunologists and clinical oncologists. In this review, we describe current concepts and future challenges for the management and analysis of data for cancer immunology and immunotherapy. We first highlight publicly available databases with specific focus on cancer immunology including databases for somatic mutations and epitope databases. We then give an overview of the bioinformatics methods for the analysis of next-generation sequencing data (whole-genome and exome sequencing), epitope prediction tools as well as methods for integrative data analysis and network modeling. Mathematical models are powerful tools that can predict and explain important patterns in the genetic and clinical progression of cancer. Therefore, a survey of mathematical models for tumor evolution and tumor-immune cell interaction is included. Finally, we discuss future challenges for individualized immunotherapy and suggest how a combined computational/experimental approaches can lead to new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cancer, improved diagnosis, and prognosis of the disease and pinpoint novel therapeutic targets.

  5. Immunity to TB and targets for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes

    2012-02-01

    For centuries the treatment of TB has presented an enormous challenge to global health. In the 20th century, the treatment of TB patients with long-term multidrug therapy gave hope that TB could be controlled and cured; however, contrary to these expectations and coinciding with the emergence of AIDS, the world has witnessed a rampant increase in hard-to-treat cases of TB, along with the emergence of highly virulent and multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. Unfortunately, these bacteria are now circulating around the world, and there are few effective drugs to treat them. As a result, the prospects for improved treatment and control of TB in the 21st century have worsened and we urgently need to identify new therapies that deal with this problem. The potential use of immunotherapy for TB is now of greater consideration than ever before, as immunotherapy could potentially overcome the problem of drug resistance. TB immunotherapy targets the already existing host anti-TB immune response and aims to enhance killing of the bacilli. For this purpose, several approaches have been used: the use of anti-Mycobacteria antibodies; enhancing the Th1 protective responses by using mycobacterial antigens or increasing Th1 cytokines; interfering with the inflammatory process and targeting of immunosuppressive pathways and targeting the cell activation/proliferation pathways. This article reviews our current understanding of TB immunity and targets for immunotherapy that could be used in combination with current TB chemotherapy.

  6. Emerging Opportunities and Challenges in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Theresa L; Demaria, Sandra; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Maria E; Zarour, Hassane M; Melero, Ignacio

    2016-04-15

    Immunotherapy strategies against cancer are emerging as powerful weapons for treatment of this disease. The success of checkpoint inhibitors against metastatic melanoma and adoptive T-cell therapy with chimeric antigen receptor T cells against B-cell-derived leukemias and lymphomas are only two examples of developments that are changing the paradigms of clinical cancer management. These changes are a result of many years of intense research into complex and interrelated cellular and molecular mechanisms controling immune responses. Promising advances come from the discovery of cancer mutation-encoded neoantigens, improvements in vaccine development, progress in delivery of cellular therapies, and impressive achievements in biotechnology. As a result, radical transformation of cancer treatment is taking place in which conventional cancer treatments are being integrated with immunotherapeutic agents. Many clinical trials are in progress testing potential synergistic effects of treatments combining immunotherapy with other therapies. Much remains to be learned about the selection, delivery, and off-target effects of immunotherapy used alone or in combination. The existence of numerous escape mechanisms from the host immune system that human tumors have evolved still is a barrier to success. Efforts to understand the rules of immune cell dysfunction and of cancer-associated local and systemic immune suppression are providing new insights and fuel the enthusiasm for new therapeutic strategies. In the future, it might be possible to tailor immune therapy for each cancer patient. The use of new immune biomarkers and the ability to assess responses to therapy by noninvasive monitoring promise to improve early cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Personalized immunotherapy based on individual genetic, molecular, and immune profiling is a potentially achievable future goal. The current excitement for immunotherapy is justified in view of many existing opportunities for harnessing

  7. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation.

  8. MALLEABLE CHARGE BUCKET, SITTING ON A ROTATING TRACK, IS FILLED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MALLEABLE CHARGE BUCKET, SITTING ON A ROTATING TRACK, IS FILLED WITH IRON, COKE AND LIMESTONE FROM A SKIP HOIST LOADED IN THE YARD BELOW. THE FILLED CHARGE BUCKET TIPS, TOPPLING ITS LOAD INTO EITHER OF THE TWO MALLEABLE CUPOLAS IN THE MALLEABLE FOUNDRY. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  9. 11. View inside Building 802, the "Sitting Area" looking from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. View inside Building 802, the "Sitting Area" looking from the "Sleeping Quarters" toward the doors to the "Control Area", facing north. - Naval Air Station Fallon, 100-man Fallout Shelter, 800 Complex, off Carson Road near intersection of Pasture & Berney Roads, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  10. 10. View inside Building 802, the "Sitting Area" looking from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View inside Building 802, the "Sitting Area" looking from the "Control Area" towards the doors to the "Sleeping Quarters", facing south. - Naval Air Station Fallon, 100-man Fallout Shelter, 800 Complex, off Carson Road near intersection of Pasture & Berney Roads, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  11. General view of a fully assembled Solid Rocket Booster sitting ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of a fully assembled Solid Rocket Booster sitting atop the Mobile Launch Platform in the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  12. Training Tribal Lay Advocates at Sitting Bull College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelley, W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Students in Sitting Bull College's lay advocate program develop a well-rounded understanding of the law, enabling them to represent defendants in tribal courts. The program offers legal training for its students--and illustrates how American Indian nations can broaden legal representation for Native defendants in tribal courts. It is one of only…

  13. Parking lot at rear of lowlift pumping station that sits ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Parking lot at rear of low-lift pumping station that sits on former preliminary sedimentation basin. The concrete pads adjacent to the low-lift pumping station contained the "Aer-O-Mix" aerators. - Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Plant, 10700 and 10701 Columbia Pike, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  14. 7. View of cut stone apron sitting at edge of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View of cut stone apron sitting at edge of concrete apron. Photograph taken from east side of lower dam. VIEW WEST - Loleta Recreation Area, Lower Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  15. Sitting Bull, The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoop, Faith Yingling

    Sitting Bull was a complex man, living in complicated times. A Hunkpapa Sioux, he grew up on the Great Plains of South Dakota. His early years, as described in this biography, were taken up with the hunt, forays against Crow Indians, and his development as a warrior and leader through the Vision Quest and Sun Dance. A man of considerable talents,…

  16. The sitting position in neurosurgery: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Porter, J M; Pidgeon, C; Cunningham, A J

    1999-01-01

    The potential for serious complications after venous air embolism and successful malpractice liability claims are the principle reasons for the dramatic decline in the use of the sitting position in neurosurgical practice. Although there have been several studies substantiating the relative safety compared with the prone or park bench positions, its use will continue to decline as neurosurgeons abandon its application and trainees in neurosurgery are not exposed to its relative merits. How can individual surgeons continue to use this position? Will individual, difficult surgical access cases be denied the obvious technical advantages of the sitting position? Limited use of the sitting position should remain in the neurosurgeon's armamentarium. However, several caveats must be emphasized. Assessment of the relative risk-benefit, based on the individual patient's physical status and surgical implications for the particular intracranial pathology, is of paramount importance. The patient should be informed of the specific risks of venous air embolism, quadriparesis and peripheral nerve palsies. Appropriate charting of patient information provided and special consent issues are essential. An anaesthetic input into the decision to use the sitting position is a sine qua non. The presence of a patient foramen ovale is an absolute contraindication. Preoperative contrast echocardiography should be used as a screening technique to detect the population at risk of paradoxical air embolism caused by the presence of a patent foramen ovale. The technique involves i.v. injection of saline agitated with air and a Valsalva manoeuvre is applied and released. Use of this position necessitates supplementary monitoring to promptly detect and treat venous air embolism. Doppler ultrasonography is the most sensitive of the generally available monitors to detect intracardiac air. The use of a central venous catheter is recommended, with the tip positioned close to the superior vena cava

  17. Physical Activity, Screen Time, and Sitting among US Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Valerie; Staiano, Amanda E.; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe daily levels of sitting, moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA), television viewing, and computer use in a representative sample of US adolescents and to make comparisons between sex, race/ethnicity, weight status, and age groups. Methods Results are based on 3556 adolescents aged 12-19 years from the 2007-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Participants self-reported demographic variables and their sitting, MVPA, and television viewing (2011-2012 only) and computer use (2011-2012 only) levels. Height and weight were measured to calculate body mass index. Descriptive data were calculated and ANOVA, chi-square, and logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine demographic differences. Results On average, 7.5 hours/day were spent sitting, with females sitting more than males across the majority of demographic groups. Furthermore, obese males sat more than non-overweight males. For MVPA, the overall sample participated in a median 34 minutes/day, with females participating in less MVPA than males across all demographic groups. Additionally, non-overweight males participated in more MVPA than obese males, and non-Hispanic white females participated in more MVPA than females in all other race/ethnicity groups. For television viewing and computer use, 38% and 22% of the sample engaged in more than 2 hours/day, respectively, and several race/ethnicity differences were observed. Conclusions This study provides the first US population estimates on the levels of sitting and updates population estimates of MVPA, television viewing and computer use in US adolescents. Continued efforts are needed to promote healthy active lifestyles in American adolescents. PMID:25050541

  18. Workshop on immunotherapy combinations. Society for immunotherapy of cancer annual meeting Bethesda, November 3, 2011

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Although recent FDA approvals on ipilimumab and sipuleucel-T represent major milestones, the ultimate success of immunotherapy approaches will likely benefit from appropriate combinations with other immunotherapeutic and/or non-immunotherapeutic approaches. However, implementation of ideal combinations in the clinic may still face formidable challenges in regulatory, drug-availability and intellectual property aspects. The 2011 SITC annual meeting hosted a workshop on combination immunotherapy to discuss: 1) the most promising combinations found in the laboratory; 2) early success of combination immunotherapy in clinical trials; 3) industry perspectives on combination approaches, and 4) relevant regulatory issues. The integrated theme was how to accelerate the implementation of efficacious combined immunotherapies for cancer patients. Rodent animal models are providing many examples of synergistic combinations that typically include more than two agents. However, mouse and human immunology differ in a significant number of mechanisms and hence we might be missing opportunities peculiar to humans. Nonetheless, incisive animal experimentation with deep mechanistic insight remains the best compass that we can use to guide our paths in combinatorial immunotherapy. Combination immunotherapy clinical trials are already in progress and preliminary results are extremely promising. As a key to translate promising combinations into clinic, real and “perceived” business and regulatory hurdles were debated. A formidable step forward would be to be able to test combinations of investigational agents prior to individual approval. Taking together the FDA and the industrial perspective on combinatorial immunotherapy, the audience was left with the clear message that this is by no means an impossible task. The general perception is that the road ahead of us is full of combination clinical trials which hopefully will bring clinical benefit to our cancer patients at a fast pace

  19. A randomized trial of immunotherapy for persistent genital warts

    PubMed Central

    Jardine, David; Lu, Jieqiang; Pang, James; Palmer, Cheryn; Tu, Quanmei; Chuah, John; Frazer, Ian H.

    2012-01-01

    Aim To determine whether immunotherapy with HPV6 L1 virus like particles (VLPs) without adjuvant (VLP immunotherapy) reduces recurrence of genital warts following destructive therapy. Trial design A randomized placebo controlled blinded study of treatment of recurrent genital warts amenable to destructive therapy, conducted independently in Australia and China. Methods Patients received conventional destructive therapy of all evident warts together with intramuscular administration of 1, 5 or 25 µg of VLP immunotherapy, or of placebo immunotherapy (0.9% NaCl), as immunotherapy at week 0 and week 4. Primary outcome, assessed at week 8, was recurrence of visible warts. Results Of 33 protocol compliant Brisbane recipients of placebo immunotherapy, 11 were disease free at two months, and a further 9 demonstrated reduction of > 50% in total wart area. Wart area reduction following destructive treatment correlated with prior duration of disease. Among 102 protocol compliant Brisbane recipients of VLP immunotherapy, disease reduction was significantly greater than among the placebo immunotherapy (50% ± s.e.m. 7%) recipients for subjects receiving 5 µg or 25 µg of VLP immunotherapy/dose (71% ± s.e.m.7%) but not for those receiving 1 µg VLP immunotherapy/dose (42% ± 7%). Of 52 protocol compliant placebo immunotherapy recipients in Wenzhou, 37 were disease free at two months, and a further 8 had > 50% disease reduction. Prior disease duration was much shorter in Wenzhou subject (8.1 ± 1.1 mo) than in Brisbane subjects (53.7 ± 5.5 mo). No significant reduction in mean wart area was observed for the 168 Wenzhou protocol compliant subjects who also received VLP immunotherapy. Conclusions This study confirms the findings in a previous open label trial that administration of VLP immunotherapy may assist in clearance of recurrent genital warts in patients for whom destructive therapy is unsuccessful and that unsuccessful destructive therapy is more common with increasing

  20. Metabolic and Energy Cost of Sitting, Standing, and a Novel Sitting/Stepping Protocol in Recreationally Active College Students

    PubMed Central

    FOUNTAINE, CHARLES J.; JOHANN, JOSH; SKALKO, CRAIG; LIGUORI, GARY A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the differences in metabolic and energy cost (MEC) of college students while seated, standing, and during a sitting/stepping protocol. Participants were assessed via indirect calorimetry for 20 min in each of the following conditions: 1) seated in a standard office chair, 2) standing in place, and 3) a sitting/stepping protocol in which participants performed 1 min of stepping in place at 90 bpm, sat for 9 min, then repeated the stepping and sitting sequence once more. Participants completed each of the 3 trials in the aforementioned order, preceded with a 3 min acclimation period in each condition. A significant difference in MEC was observed between the 3 conditions, p < 0.001. Pairwise comparisons indicated that the sitting/stepping protocol resulted in significantly greater MEC than the seated and standing conditions (p < 0.001). Additionally, the standing protocol resulted in significantly greater MEC than the seated protocol (p < 0.001). The significant differences and large effect sizes between conditions indicate that interspersing sedentary bouts with brief activity can substantially increase MEC. Broader application of these findings may provide health promotion professionals with novel strategies to reduce sedentary behavior and improve health. PMID:27182423

  1. Mechanisms underlying allergy vaccination with recombinant hypoallergenic allergen derivatives.

    PubMed

    Linhart, Birgit; Valenta, Rudolf

    2012-06-19

    Hundred years ago therapeutic vaccination with allergen-containing extracts has been introduced as a clinically effective, disease-modifying, allergen-specific and long-lasting form of therapy for allergy, a hypersensitivity disease affecting more than 25% of the population. Today, the structures of most of the disease-causing allergens have been elucidated and recombinant hypoallergenic allergen derivatives with reduced allergenic activity have been engineered to reduce side effects during allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT). These recombinant hypoallergens have been characterized in vitro, in experimental animal models and in clinical trials in allergic patients. This review provides a summary of the molecular, immunological and preclinical evaluation criteria applied for this new generation of allergy vaccines. Furthermore, we summarize the mechanisms underlying SIT with recombinant hypoallergens which are thought to be responsible for their therapeutic effect.

  2. [Sublingual immunotherapy in children. Immunotherapy Committee of the Spanish Society for Clinical Immunology and Pediatric Allergology].

    PubMed

    Lleonart, R; Muñoz, F; Eseverri, J L; Martínez-Cañabate, A; Tabar, A I; Pedemonte, C

    2003-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy is currently attracting growing interest because of its ease of administration and, according to previous studies, its infrequent and mild adverse effects. However, at least in children, the efficacy of this therapy has not been completely demonstrated. In addition, the mechanisms of action remain to be elucidated since few studies have been published and the results have been contradictory and sometimes inconclusive. For this reason, we performed a literature review through the MEDLINE database, selecting double-blind studies carried out in children. Only 10 studies meeting these requirements were retrieved. All the studies were performed by European researchers and nine were published in European journals. Efficacy was evaluated by clinical parameters and by reduction in medication use. The results on efficacy are not homogeneous, although most support the utility of this route of administration. Moreover, reports of allergens other than those used in these studies dust mites and grass pollens are lacking. In conclusion, further studies evaluating the efficacy of this therapy in children are required. Among the general population, if the efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy in the treatment of sensitization to hymenoptera venoms were demonstrated, as has been the case with subcutaneous immunotherapy, the utility of this route of administration would be definitively confirmed. Finally, sublingual immunotherapy could be used in children who have shown systemic reactions to subcutaneous immunotherapy or who refuse to undergo injections.

  3. Perceived body discomfort and trunk muscle activity in three prolonged sitting postures

    PubMed Central

    Waongenngarm, Pooriput; Rajaratnam, Bala S.; Janwantanakul, Prawit

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the perceived discomfort and trunk muscle activity in three different 1-hour sitting postures. [Subjects] A repeated-measures design study was conducted on 10 healthy subjects. [Methods] Each subject sat for an hour in three sitting postures (i.e., upright, slumped, and forward leaning sitting postures). Subjects rated perceived body discomfort using Borg’s CR-10 scale at the beginning and after 1 hour sitting. The electromyographic activity of the trunk muscle activity was recorded during the 1-hour period of sitting. [Results] The forward leaning sitting posture led to higher Borg scores in the low back than those in the upright (p = 0.002) and slumped sitting postures (p < 0.001). The forward leaning posture was significantly associated with increased iliocostalis lumborum pars thoracis (ICL) and superficial lumbar multifidus (MF) muscle activity compared with the upright and slumped sitting postures. The upright sitting posture was significantly associated with increased internal oblique (IO)/transversus abdominis (TrA) and ICL muscle activity compared with the slumped sitting posture. [Conclusion] The sitting posture with the highest low back discomfort after prolonged sitting was the forward leaning posture. Sitting in an upright posture is recommended because it increases IO/TrA muscle activation and induces only relatively moderate ICL and MF muscle activation. PMID:26311951

  4. A practical view of immunotherapy for food allergy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy is common and sometimes life threatening for Korean children. The current standard treatment of allergen avoidance and self-injectable epinephrine does not change the natural course of food allergy. Recently, oral, sublingual, and epicutaneous immunotherapies have been studied for their effectiveness against food allergy. While various rates of desensitization (36% to 100%) and tolerance (28% to 75%) have been induced by immunotherapies for food allergy, no single established protocol has been shown to be both effective and safe. In some studies, immunologic changes after immunotherapy for food allergy have been revealed. Adverse reactions to these immunotherapies have usually been localized, but severe systemic reactions have been observed in some cases. Although immunotherapy cannot be recommended for routine practice yet, results from recent studies demonstrate that immunotherapies are promising for the treatment of food allergy. PMID:26958062

  5. Prospects for immunotherapy and vaccines against Cryptosporidium

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Jan R

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp is a ubiquitous parasite that has long been recognized as a frequent cause of protozoal diarrhea in humans. While infections in immunocompetent hosts are usually self-limiting, immunocompromised individuals can develop severe, chronic, and life-threatening illness. Vaccine development or immunotherapy that prevents disease or reduces the severity of infection is a relevant option since efficacious drug treatments are lacking. In particular, children in developing countries might benefit the most from a vaccine since cryptosporidiosis in early childhood has been reported to be associated with subsequent impairment in growth, physical fitness, and intellectual capacity. In this review, immunotherapies that have been used clinically are described as well as experimental vaccines and their evaluation in vivo. PMID:24638018

  6. [Transcutaneous applications for vaccination and immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Krämer, Isabel; Zabel, Franziska; Kündig, Thomas M; Johansen, Pål

    2014-10-15

    Although Edward Jenner applied the first vaccines by scratching cow pox material into the skin, the profound immunological properties of the skin have become evident through research and discoveries only in the last 20 years. The immunological cells in the epidermis and the dermis are suitable targets for transcutaneous vaccination and immunotherapy. However, as the skin represents a natural barrier for topically administered large molecules, novel methods to overcome this barrier function have been described. There are chemical, biochemical and physical methods, many of which are pain-free and therefore especially suitable for children. Also for adults non-invasive methods of vaccination and immunotherapy are attractive as self-administration is feasible. Future products are currently undergoing clinical tests which provide promising results.

  7. Immunotherapy for neuroblastoma: turning promise into reality.

    PubMed

    Gray, Juliet C; Kohler, Janice A

    2009-12-01

    Neuroblastoma is one of the commonest and most aggressive paediatric malignancies. The majority of children present with metastatic disease for which long-term survival remains poor despite intensive multi-modal therapies. Toxicity from current treatment regimes is already significant, and there is little room to further intensify therapy. Alternative treatment strategies are therefore needed in order to improve survival. Immunotherapy is an attractive therapeutic option for these children as it potentially offers a much more specific and less toxic treatment than conventional therapies. This review discusses the different immunotherapy strategies that may be useful in neuroblastoma, their advantages and disadvantages and the challenges that need to be overcome to successfully use them clinically.

  8. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Megan A; Nair, Smita K; Holl, Eda K

    2015-01-01

    RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s) of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy.

  9. Era of cancer immunotherapy has come.

    PubMed

    Nakatsura, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

      The dramatic and long durable anti-tumor effect of immune checkpoint blockade, such as anti-CTLA-4 Ab, anti-PD-1 Ab, and anti-PD-L1 Ab was surprised the world. In addition, CAR-T cell therapy that target the CD19 indicates a very high response rate to the CD19-positive hematologic malignancies. Now, no one doubts the presence of immunity against cancer.  Further, accordingly, tumor-specific neoantigen are attention now, the clinical trials of individualized peptide vaccination that target patient individual neoantigens has begun in the Western. On the other hand, the peptide vaccine therapy that target common self-antigen is not yet been approved in Japan, the development is struggling.  In this paper, I overview the cancer immunotherapy and neoantigen and introduce some development of cancer immunotherapy in Japan.

  10. Development of PROSTVAC immunotherapy in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Parminder; Pal, Sumanta K; Alex, Anitha; Agarwal, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    PROSTVAC immunotherapy is a heterologous prime-boost regimen of two different recombinant pox-virus vectors; vaccinia as the primary immunotherapy, followed by boosters employing fowlpox, to provoke immune responses against prostate-specific antigen. Both vectors contain transgenes for prostate-specific antigen and a triad of T-cell costimulatory molecules (TRICOM). In a placebo-controlled Phase II trial of men with minimally symptomatic, chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, PROSTVAC was well tolerated and associated with a 44% reduction in death. With a novel mechanism of action, and excellent tolerability, PROSTVAC has the potential to dramatically alter the treatment landscape of prostate cancer, not only as a monotherapy, but also in combination with other novel agents, such as immune check point inhibitors and novel androgen receptor blockers. A Phase III trial recently completed accrual. PMID:26235179

  11. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Megan A.; Nair, Smita K.; Holl, Eda K.

    2015-01-01

    RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s) of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26665011

  12. Evolving Immunotherapy Strategies in Urothelial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brancato, Sam J.; Lewi, Keidren; Agarwal, Piyush K.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of nonmuscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) represents the importance of immunotherapy in the treatment of cancer. Despite its clinical efficacy, up to 30% of patients will ultimately experience progression to muscle-invasive disease. This, along with an improved understanding of the biologic pathways involved, has led to efforts to improve, enhance, or alter the immune response in the treatment of urothelial carcinoma. A number of novel therapeutic approaches currently are being pursued, including recombinant BCG to induce T helper type 1 (Th1) immune responses, nonlive Mycobacterium agents, targeted agents toward cancer-associated antigens, immune-modulating vaccines, and adoptive T-cell therapies. Here, we review the current and future immunotherapy treatment options for patients with urothelial cancer. PMID:25993187

  13. Molecular biomarkers for grass pollen immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Florin-Dan

    2014-01-01

    Grass pollen allergy represents a significant cause of allergic morbidity worldwide. Component-resolved diagnosis biomarkers are increasingly used in allergy practice in order to evaluate the sensitization to grass pollen allergens, allowing the clinician to confirm genuine sensitization to the corresponding allergen plant sources and supporting an accurate prescription of allergy immunotherapy (AIT), an important approach in many regions of the world with great plant biodiversity and/or where pollen seasons may overlap. The search for candidate predictive biomarkers for grass pollen immunotherapy (tolerogenic dendritic cells and regulatory T cells biomarkers, serum blocking antibodies biomarkers, especially functional ones, immune activation and immune tolerance soluble biomarkers and apoptosis biomarkers) opens new opportunities for the early detection of clinical responders for AIT, for the follow-up of these patients and for the development of new allergy vaccines. PMID:25237628

  14. Molecular biomarkers for grass pollen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Florin-Dan

    2014-03-26

    Grass pollen allergy represents a significant cause of allergic morbidity worldwide. Component-resolved diagnosis biomarkers are increasingly used in allergy practice in order to evaluate the sensitization to grass pollen allergens, allowing the clinician to confirm genuine sensitization to the corresponding allergen plant sources and supporting an accurate prescription of allergy immunotherapy (AIT), an important approach in many regions of the world with great plant biodiversity and/or where pollen seasons may overlap. The search for candidate predictive biomarkers for grass pollen immunotherapy (tolerogenic dendritic cells and regulatory T cells biomarkers, serum blocking antibodies biomarkers, especially functional ones, immune activation and immune tolerance soluble biomarkers and apoptosis biomarkers) opens new opportunities for the early detection of clinical responders for AIT, for the follow-up of these patients and for the development of new allergy vaccines.

  15. [Transcutaneous applications for vaccination and immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Krämer, Isabel; Zabel, Franziska; Kündig, Thomas M; Johansen, Pål

    2014-10-15

    Although Edward Jenner applied the first vaccines by scratching cow pox material into the skin, the profound immunological properties of the skin have become evident through research and discoveries only in the last 20 years. The immunological cells in the epidermis and the dermis are suitable targets for transcutaneous vaccination and immunotherapy. However, as the skin represents a natural barrier for topically administered large molecules, novel methods to overcome this barrier function have been described. There are chemical, biochemical and physical methods, many of which are pain-free and therefore especially suitable for children. Also for adults non-invasive methods of vaccination and immunotherapy are attractive as self-administration is feasible. Future products are currently undergoing clinical tests which provide promising results. PMID:25305116

  16. The sweet side of tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Freire, Teresa; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2012-07-01

    Carbohydrate signatures on tumor cells have functional implications in tumor growth and metastasis and constitute valuable tools in cancer diagnosis and immunotherapy. Increasing data regarding the mechanisms by which they are recognized by the immune system are facilitating the design of more efficient immunotherapeutic protocols based on cancer-associated glycan structures. Recent molecular and proteomic studies revealed that carbohydrates are recognized, not only by B cells and antibodies, but also by cells from the innate arm of immunity, as well as by T cells, and are able to induce specific T-cell immunity and cytotoxicity. In this review, we discuss and update the different strategies targeting tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens that are being evaluated for antitumor immunotherapy, an approach that will be highly relevant, especially when combined with other strategies, in the future fight against cancer.

  17. Dendritic cell-based immunotherapy in mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Robin; Lievense, Lysanne A; Heuvers, Marlies E; Maat, Alexander P; Hendriks, Rudi W; Hoogsteden, Henk C; Hegmans, Joost P; Aerts, Joachim G

    2012-10-01

    Mesothelioma is a rare thoracic malignancy with a dismal prognosis. Current treatment options are scarce and clinical outcomes are rather disappointing. Due to the immunogenic nature of mesothelioma, several studies have investigated immunotherapeutic strategies to improve the prognosis of patients with mesothelioma. In the last decade, progress in knowledge of the modulation of the immune system to attack the tumor has been remarkable, but the optimal strategy for immunotherapy has yet to be unraveled. Because of their potent antigen-presenting capacity, dendritic cells are acknowledged as a promising agent in immunotherapeutic approaches in a number of malignancies. This review gives an update and provides a future perspective in which immunotherapy may improve the outcome of mesothelioma therapy.

  18. Immunotherapy for gastric premalignant lesions and cancer.

    PubMed

    Zorzetto, Valerio; Maddalo, Gemma; Basso, Daniela; Farinati, Fabio

    2012-06-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis, a precancerous change for gastric cancer, shows a loss of appropriate glands, Helicobacter pylori infection and autoimmune gastritis being the two main etiologic factors. While H. pylori eradication is the mandatory treatment for the former, no etiologic treatment is available for the latter, in which a Th1-type response, modulated by Tregs and Th17 cells, is involved. H. pylori-related atrophic gastritis is a risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, while autoimmune atrophic gastritis is also linked to a substantial risk of gastric type I carcinoid, related to the chronic stimulus exerted by hypergastrinemia on enterochromaffin-like cells. Several studies have been published on gastric cancer treatment through an active specific immunotherapy, aimed at improving the immunoregulatory response and increasing the circulating tumor-specific T cells. No study on immunotherapy of carcinoids is available but, in our experience, the administration of an antigastrin 17 vaccine induced carcinoid regression in two out of three patients treated.

  19. Prospects for immunotherapy and vaccines against Cryptosporidium.

    PubMed

    Mead, Jan R

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp is a ubiquitous parasite that has long been recognized as a frequent cause of protozoal diarrhea in humans. While infections in immunocompetent hosts are usually self-limiting, immunocompromised individuals can develop severe, chronic, and life-threatening illness. Vaccine development or immunotherapy that prevents disease or reduces the severity of infection is a relevant option since efficacious drug treatments are lacking. In particular, children in developing countries might benefit the most from a vaccine since cryptosporidiosis in early childhood has been reported to be associated with subsequent impairment in growth, physical fitness, and intellectual capacity. In this review, immunotherapies that have been used clinically are described as well as experimental vaccines and their evaluation in vivo.

  20. Cancer Immunotherapy for Gliomas: Overview and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    HASHIMOTO, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has been highlighted because we have obtained much evidence, which includes theoretical backborn as well as favorable results from clinical trials. As immunotherapy gives an apparently different cytotoxic mechanism and a little adverse event, the promising results are getting a lot of attention. In this article, cancer immunotherapy for gliomas is reviewed thoroughly from the literature, focusing on the clinical trial results. PMID:27087194

  1. Treatment of peanut allergy with rush immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oppenheimer, J J; Nelson, H S; Bock, S A; Christensen, F; Leung, D Y

    1992-08-01

    Peanut and peanut products are a common food in the diet. Peanuts are also one of the most common foods responsible for food-induced anaphylaxis. Patients rarely lose sensitivity to peanuts. Although the ideal treatment is avoidance, this is often not possible because of hidden exposures; therefore, a more effective treatment is needed. Subjects with confirmed peanut allergy were treated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study with peanut immunotherapy or placebo. Objective measures of efficacy included changes in symptom score during double-blind placebo-controlled peanut challenge (DBPCPC) and titrated end point prick skin tests (PST). Three subjects treated with peanut immunotherapy completed the study. These subjects displayed a 67% to 100% decrease in symptoms induced by DBPCPC. Subjects also had a 2- to 5-log reduction in end point PST reactivity to peanut extract. One placebo-treated subject completed the study. This subject had essentially no change in DBPCPC symptom scores or PST sensitivity to peanut. Two other placebo-treated subjects underwent a second PST session. These subjects had a 1- to 2-log increase in skin test sensitivity to peanut. All peanut-treated subjects were able to reach maintenance dose, and in no case did an anaphylactic reaction occur secondary to the peanut immunotherapy. The current study provides preliminary data demonstrating the efficacy of injection therapy with peanut extract and provides a future line of clinical investigation for the treatment of this potentially lethal disease. It should be noted, however, that the rate of systemic reactions with rush immunotherapy was 13.3%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Immunotherapy of neuroblastoma: present, past and future.

    PubMed

    Raffaghello, Lizzia; Pistoia, Vito

    2006-04-01

    Neuroblastoma is a neuroectodermal tumor of childhood with poor prognosis and low survival in patients with advanced-stage disease who respond to conventional therapies but unfortunately, often present relapse. Therefore, the search for novel therapeutic strategies is warranted and represents the objective of many investigators. Among the new, innovative approaches, immunotherapy has attracted much interest. However, until recently, little information was available about the immunogenicity of human neuroblastoma.

  3. ATMPs for Cancer Immunotherapy: A Regulatory Overview.

    PubMed

    Galli, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses European regulatory requirements for development of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) for cancer immunotherapy approaches, describing the framework for clinical trials and for marketing authorization.Regulatory critical issues and challenges for developing ATMP are also discussed, with focus on potency determination, long-term follow-up, comparability, and insertional mutagenesis issues. Some of the most critical features of GMP application to ATMP are also described.

  4. Immunotherapy for lung cancer: advances and prospects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. To date, surgery is the first choice treatment, but most clinically diagnosed cases are inoperable. While chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are the next considered options for such cases, these treatment modalities have adverse effects and are sometimes lethal to patients. Thus, new effective strategies with minimal side effects are urgently needed. Cancer immunotherapy provides either active or passive immunity to target tumors. Multiple immunotherapy agents have been proposed and tested for potential therapeutic benefit against lung cancer, and some pose fewer side effects as compared to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this article, we discuss studies focusing on interactions between lung cancer and the immune system, and we place an emphasis on outcome evidence in order to create a knowledge base well-grounded in clinical reality. Overall, this review highlights the need for new lung cancer treatment options, with much ground to be paved for future advances in the field. We believe that immunotherapy agents alone or with other forms of treatment can be recognized as next modality of lung cancer treatment. PMID:27168951

  5. Immunotherapy for lung cancer: advances and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. To date, surgery is the first choice treatment, but most clinically diagnosed cases are inoperable. While chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are the next considered options for such cases, these treatment modalities have adverse effects and are sometimes lethal to patients. Thus, new effective strategies with minimal side effects are urgently needed. Cancer immunotherapy provides either active or passive immunity to target tumors. Multiple immunotherapy agents have been proposed and tested for potential therapeutic benefit against lung cancer, and some pose fewer side effects as compared to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this article, we discuss studies focusing on interactions between lung cancer and the immune system, and we place an emphasis on outcome evidence in order to create a knowledge base well-grounded in clinical reality. Overall, this review highlights the need for new lung cancer treatment options, with much ground to be paved for future advances in the field. We believe that immunotherapy agents alone or with other forms of treatment can be recognized as next modality of lung cancer treatment. PMID:27168951

  6. Laser immunotherapy of canine and feline neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, J. P.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Davidson, Ellen B.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Lehenbauer, Terry W.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    1998-07-01

    The major cause of treatment failure in human and veterinary cancer patients is tumor invasion and metastasis. The inability of local therapy (surgery, radiation, photodynamic therapy) to eradicate a metastatic cancer presents a challenge in the therapy of residual or micrometastatic disease. Because of its local therapy limitations, chromophore-enhanced selective photothermal laser treatment has been augmented with a superimposed laser-induced systemic photobiological reaction, laser immunotherapy. Laser immunotherapy is a novel cancer treatment consisting of: (1) a laser in the infrared wavelength range (i.e. 805 nm solid state laser); (2) a photosensitizer of the corresponding absorption peak [i.e. indocyanine green (ICG)]; and (3) an immunoadjuvant [i.e. glycated chitosan gel (GCG)]. The intratumor injection of the photosensitizer (ICG) and immunoadjuvant (GCG) solution is followed by noninvasive laser irradiation. The laser energy causes tumor cell destruction by photothermal interaction to reduce the tumor burden and at the same time exposes tumor antigens. The immunoadjuvant concomitantly stimulates the host to mount a systemic anti-tumor immune response against the remaining cells of the tumor and to induce a long-term, tumor-specific immunity. This study investigates the feasibility of utilizing laser immunotherapy as an adjunctive therapy for the control of feline fibrosarcoma in future.

  7. Immunotherapy with the storage mite lepidoglyphus destructor.

    PubMed

    Armentia-Medina, A; Tapias, J A; Martín, J F; Ventas, P; Fernández, A

    1995-01-01

    We carried out a double-blind clinical trial of immunotherapy on 35 patients sensitized to the storage mite Lepidoglyphus destructor (Ld). Before and after 12 months of specific hyposensitization (Abelló Lab., Spain) we performed in vivo (skin tests with Ld, methacholine and challenge tests), and in vitro tests (specific IgE, IgG, IgG1 and IgG4 to Ld and specific IgE, IgG, IgG1 and IgG4 to their major allergen Lep dI). We also monitored the efficacy and safety of the immunotherapy with clinical and analytical controls (symptoms and medication score, detection of immune complexes). After therapy we found a significant decrease in specific skin reactivity, dose of positive challenge tests, and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Sputum eosinophilia decreased. Specific IgE to Ld was increased and we also observed an increase in specific IgG1 and IgG4 to Ld and Lep DI. The placebo group showed no changes in these variables. There were no severe secondary reactions after treatment with the extract. Patients-self-evaluation was favourable and their labour absence decreased. No development of circulating immune complexes was associated with this immunotherapy. PMID:8526179

  8. Oral immunotherapy in birch pollen hay fever.

    PubMed

    Taudorf, E; Laursen, L C; Lanner, A; Björksten, B; Dreborg, S; Søborg, M; Weeke, B

    1987-08-01

    Previous controlled trials with oral administration of allergen have not demonstrated any treatment effect in patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis or asthma. In the present double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we have tested the effect of oral immunotherapy in adult patients with birch pollinosis. Thirty-nine patients completed this 18-month study comprising two birch pollen seasons. The patients received enterosoluble capsules daily, and the actively treated patients reached a cumulated dose of 280 times 10(6) biologic units of birch pollen extract, which is about 200 times higher than the dose used in conventional subcutaneous immunotherapy. We found a significant decrease in eye symptom scores and conjunctival sensitivity to birch pollen, as determined by conjunctival provocation test, as well as a numerical but nonsignificant decrease in nasal symptom scores, nasal sensitivity as determined by nasal provocation test, and antiallergic medication. The treatment was safe, and only a few slight side effects were observed. We thus conclude that our study demonstrates a clinical effect of oral immunotherapy in birch pollinosis.

  9. Unsupported eyes closed sitting and quiet standing share postural control strategies in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Grangeon, Murielle; Gauthier, Cindy; Duclos, Cyril; Lemay, Jean-Francois; Gagnon, Dany

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to (1) compare postural stability between sitting and standing in healthy individuals and (2) define center-of-pressure (COP) measures during sitting that could also explain standing stability. Fourteen healthy individuals randomly maintained (1) two short-sitting positions with eyes open or closed, with or without hand support, and (2) one standing position with eyes open with both upper limbs resting alongside the body. Thirty-six COP measures based on time and frequency series were computed. Greater COP displacement and velocity along with lower frequency measures were found for almost all directional components during standing compared with both sitting positions. The velocity, 95% confidence ellipse area, and centroidal frequency were found to be correlated between unsupported sitting and standing. Despite evidenced differences between sitting and standing, similarities in postural control were highlighted when sitting stability was the most challenging. These findings support further investigation between dynamic sitting and standing balance. PMID:24718916

  10. 26. Photocopy of ca. 1890 photograph showing SECOND FLOOR SITTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopy of ca. 1890 photograph showing SECOND FLOOR SITTING ROOMS IN THE ELL. Photographed during the occupancy of Dr. and Mrs. Erwin Agnew. Note the following furnishing: 1) Gothic reed organ in right foreground; 2) 'Eastlake' overmantle in background; 3) Mantle mirror in neo-grecian style; 4) 'Anglo-Japanese' fire screen near fireplace; 5) Corner cabinet is Centennial Colonial Revival; 6) American Indian snow shoes and Japanese fan on rear wall - Parry House, 1921 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  11. Current Status and Perspective of Immunotherapy in Gastrointestinal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Bum Jun; Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Jung Han

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is at dawn of the Renaissance after the Medieval Dark Ages. Recent advances of understanding tumor immunology and molecular drug development are leading us to the epoch of cancer immunotherapy. Some types of immunotherapy have shown to provide survival benefit for patients with solid tumors such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, or non-small cell lung cancer. Several studies have suggested that immune checkpoint inhibition might be effective in some patients with gastrointestinal cancers. However, the era of cancer immunotherapy in gastrointestinal cancers is still in an inchoate stage. Here we briefly review the current status and perspective of immunotherapeutic approaches in patients with gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:27698896

  12. Current Status and Perspective of Immunotherapy in Gastrointestinal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Bum Jun; Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Jung Han

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is at dawn of the Renaissance after the Medieval Dark Ages. Recent advances of understanding tumor immunology and molecular drug development are leading us to the epoch of cancer immunotherapy. Some types of immunotherapy have shown to provide survival benefit for patients with solid tumors such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, or non-small cell lung cancer. Several studies have suggested that immune checkpoint inhibition might be effective in some patients with gastrointestinal cancers. However, the era of cancer immunotherapy in gastrointestinal cancers is still in an inchoate stage. Here we briefly review the current status and perspective of immunotherapeutic approaches in patients with gastrointestinal cancers.

  13. Allergen immunotherapy, routes of administration and cytokine networks: an update.

    PubMed

    Cuppari, Caterina; Leonardi, Salvatore; Manti, Sara; Filippelli, Martina; Alterio, Tommaso; Spicuzza, Lucia; Rigoli, Luciana; Arrigo, Teresa; Lougaris, Vassilios; Salpietro, Carmelo

    2014-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is a disease-modifying therapy, effective for the treatment of allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, conjunctivitis or stinging insect allergy. Allergen immunotherapy involves the administration of increasing doses of allergens with the aim of ameliorating the allergic response. Although precise underlying mechanisms of the induction of immune tolerance remain unclear, immunotherapy has been associated with the induction of distinct subsets of Tregs that eventually lead to peripheral tolerance by inducing a deviation from Th2 to Th1 immune responses. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the mechanisms of immunotherapy in relationship to different routes of administration and also provides a unifying view.

  14. The effects of vision on sit-to-stand movement

    PubMed Central

    Siriphorn, Akkradate; Chamonchant, Dannaovarat; Boonyong, Sujitra

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] It is well known that vision is an important factor contributing to postural control. However, there has been little discussion about the effect of vision on sit-to-stand movement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of constrained vision on sit-to-stand movement. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three healthy subjects (11 males, 12 females) aged 18–23 years with normal body mass indices were recruited for this study. Each participant was asked to stand as quickly as possible from a height-adjustable chair 3 times under 2 conditions: with eyes closed (EC) and eyes open (EO). The weight transfer time, rising index, and center of gravity sway velocity were measured using a NeuroCom Balance Master. [Results] The results show there were significant differences between the EC and EO conditions in the weight transfer time and the centre of gravity sway velocity. No significant difference was found between the EC and EO conditions in the rising index. These findings suggest that visual perception may play a role in balance control while performing sit-to-stand movement. PMID:25642044

  15. Stature recovery after sitting on land and in water.

    PubMed

    Camilotti, Bárbara Maria; Rodacki, André L F; Israel, Vera Lúcia; Fowler, Neil E

    2009-12-01

    Back pain treatment in water has been commonly used although there is little evidence about its effects. One purported advantage for exercise is the reduced loading due to the buoyant force. The purpose of this study was to compare stature change, as a marker of spinal loading, after sitting in aquatic and dry land environments. Fourteen asymptomatic volunteers had their stature measured in a precision stadiometer, before and after a bout of physical activity and during a recovery period either sitting in water (head out of water immersion; HOWI) and sitting in a chair on land (SITT). Stature loss following exercise was as expected similar in both groups (SITT=89.2+/-5.4% and HOWI=86.5+/-8.1%; p=0.33). When stature recovery was compared between the water and land environments, HOWI (102.2+/-8.7%) showed greater recovery than SITT (86.5+/-6.3%) after 30 min (p<0.05). These results suggest that HOWI facilitated more rapid stature recovery through lower spinal loading and supports use of this technique to reduce spinal loading during recovery.

  16. Effects of Vestibular Stimulation on Sitting Behaviors among Preschoolers with Severe Handicaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuharski, Tracy; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A multiple baseline design across subjects assessed effects of vestibular stimulation on acquisition of erect and symmetrical sitting of three preschoolers with severe and multiple handicaps. All three Ss made gains in erect sitting. Results from the symmetrical sitting measure were less conclusive. (Author/CL)

  17. Too Much Sitting: The Population-Health Science of Sedentary Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Neville; Healy, Geneviève N; Matthews, Charles E.; Dunstan, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Even when adults meet physical activity guidelines, sitting for prolonged periods can compromise metabolic health. TV time and objective-measurement studies show deleterious associations, and breaking up sedentary time is beneficial. Sitting time, TV time, and time sitting in automobiles increase premature mortality risk. Further evidence from prospective studies, intervention trials, and population-based behavioral studies is required. PMID:20577058

  18. Impact of Prolonged Sitting on Lower and Upper Limb Micro- and Macrovascular Dilator Function

    PubMed Central

    Restaino, Robert M.; Holwerda, Seth W.; Credeur, Daniel P.; Fadel, Paul J.; Padilla, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Sedentary behavior in the workplace and increased daily sitting time are on the rise; however, studies investigating the impact of sitting on vascular function remain limited. Herein we hypothesized that 6 hours of uninterrupted sitting would impair limb micro- and macrovascular dilator function and this impairment could be improved with a bout of walking. Resting blood flow, reactive hyperemia to 5 min cuff occlusion (microvascular reactivity) and associated FMD (macrovascular reactivity) were assessed in popliteal and brachial arteries of young men at baseline (Pre Sit) and after 6 hours of uninterrupted sitting (Post Sit). Measures were then repeated after a 10 min walk (~1000 steps). Sitting resulted in a marked reduction of resting popliteal artery mean blood flow and mean shear rate (6-hr mean shear rate, −52±8 s−1 vs. Pre Sit, p<0.05). Interestingly, reductions were also found in the brachial artery (6-hr mean shear rate, −169±41 s−1 vs. Pre Sit, p<0.05). Likewise, following 6 hours of sitting, cuff-induced reactive hyperemia was reduced in both the lower leg (−43±7% vs. Pre Sit, p<0.05) and forearm (−31±11% vs. Pre Sit, p<0.05). In contrast, popliteal, but not brachial, artery FMD was blunted with sitting. Notably, lower leg reactive hyperemia and FMD were restored after walking. Collectively, these data suggest that prolonged sitting markedly reduces lower leg micro- and macrovascular dilator function but these impairments can be fully normalized with a short bout of walking. In contrast, upper arm microvascular reactivity is selectively impaired with prolonged sitting and walking does not influence this effect. PMID:25929229

  19. Immunotherapy in urothelial carcinoma: fade or future standard?

    PubMed Central

    Breyer, Johannes; Burger, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy of non-muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma by Bacillus-Calmette-Guérin (BCG) instillation is a well-established treatment option since decades. Despite this fact, the immunocellular basis was first studied in recent years. New aspects of immunotherapy, also for progressed bladder carcinoma, might follow promising research on immunological targets. PMID:27785423

  20. Systemic cancer immunotherapy with Toll-like receptor 7 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Hotz, Christian; Bourquin, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 agonists represent a promising strategy for the immunotherapy of cancer. We have recently investigated the influence of TLR tolerance on the efficacy of systemic tumor treatment with TLR7 ligands. We propose that considering the kinetics of receptor sensitivity highly improves the outcome of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:22720251

  1. Immediate effects of dynamic sitting exercise on the lower back mobility of sedentary young adults

    PubMed Central

    Chatchawan, Uraiwan; Jupamatangb, Unthika; Chanchitc, Sunisa; Puntumetakul, Rungthip; Donpunha, Wanida; Yamauchi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dynamic sitting exercises during prolonged sitting on the lower back mobility of sedentary young adults. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy-one subjects aged between 18–25 years participated in this study. Following a randomized crossover study design, subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: sitting only and dynamic sitting exercise. The dynamic sitting exercise was a combination of lower back hyperextension and abdominal drawing-in movements which were repeated 6 times in a 1-minute period and performed every 20 minutes during a 2-hour sitting session. Lumbar range of movement was measured with the modified-modified Schober test, and the pain intensity was evaluated using the visual analog scale. [Results] After the experiment, the lumbar range of movement was significantly impaired in the sitting only group; however, it was significantly improved in the dynamic sitting exercise group. There were significant differences in lumbar range of movement of both flexion and extension between the groups. No significant difference in pain intensity between the groups was found. [Conclusion] These results suggest that dynamic sitting exercises during prolonged sitting can prevent decreases in lumbar range of movement in both back flexion and extension following a 2-hour sitting period. PMID:26696698

  2. SitA contributes to the virulence of Klebsiella pneumoniae in a mouse infection model.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei-Sheng W; Syu, Wan-Jr; Ho, Wen-Li; Lin, Ching-Nan; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Wang, Shao-Hung

    2014-02-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen, which causes a wide range of nosocomial infections. Recently, antibiotic resistance makes K. pneumoniae infection difficult to deal with. Investigation on virulence determinants of K. pneumoniae can provide more information about pathogenesis and unveil new targets for treatment or vaccine development. In this study, SitA, a Fur-regulated divalent cation transporter, was found significantly increased when K. pneumoniae was cultured in a nutrient-limited condition. A sitA-deletion strain (ΔsitA) was created to characterize the importance of SitA in virulence. ΔsitA showed higher sensitivity toward hydroperoxide than its parental strain. In a mouse intraperitoneal infection model, the survival rate of mice infected with ΔsitA strain increased greatly when compared with that of mice infected with the parental strain, suggesting that sitA deletion attenuates the bacterial virulence in vivo. To test whether ΔsitA strain is a potential vaccine candidate, mice were immunized with inactivated bacteria and then challenged with the wild-type strain. The results showed that using ΔsitA mutant protected mice better than using the wild-type strain or the capsule-negative congenic bacteria. In summary, SitA was found being important for the growth of K. pneumoniae in vivo and deleting sitA might be a potential approach to generate vaccines against K. pneumoniae.

  3. Immunotherapy for Melanoma: Current Status and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrescu, Doru T.; Ichim, Thomas E.; Riordan, Neil H.; Marincola, Francesco M.; Nardo, Anna Di; Kabigting, Filamer D.; Dasanu, Constantin A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Immunotherapy is an important modality in the therapy of patients with malignant melanoma. As our knowledge about this disease continues to expand, so does the immunotherapeutic armamentarium. Nevertheless, successful preclinical models do not always translate into clinically meaningful results. The authors give a comprehensive analysis of most recent advances in the immune anti-melanoma therapy, including interleukins, interferons, other cytokines, adoptive immunotherapy, biochemotherapy, as well as the use of different vaccines. We also present the fundamental concepts behind various immune enhancement strategies, passive immunotherapy, as well as the use of immune adjuvants. This review brings into discussion the results of newer and older clinical trials, as well as potential limitations and drawbacks seen with the utilization of various immune therapies in malignant melanoma. Development of novel therapeutic approaches, along with optimization of existing therapies, continues to hold a great promise in the field of melanoma therapy research. Use of anti-CTLA4 and anti-PD1 antibodies, realization of the importance of co-stimulatory signals, which translated into the use of agonist CD40 monoclonal antibodies, as well as activation of innate immunity through enhanced expression of co-stimulatory molecules on the surface of dendritic cells by TLR agonists are only a few items on the list of recent advances in the treatment of melanoma. The need to engineer better immune interactions and to boost positive feedback loops appear crucial for the future of melanoma therapy, which ultimately resides in our understanding of the complexity of immune responses in this disease. PMID:20551839

  4. Immunobiology and immunotherapy in genitourinary malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Grivas, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has traditionally been a critical component of the cancer treatment armamentarium in genitourinary (GU) cancers. It has an established role in the management of carefully selected patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) [e.g., high dose interleukin-2 (IL-2)] and non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) [e.g., intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)]. In 2010, the sipuleucel-T vaccine was approved by the FDA for the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), based on a phase III trial showing overall survival (OS) benefit compared to placebo. The immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab (anti-PD-1) recently received FDA approval for the management of patients with advanced RCC patients previously treated with anti-angiogenic therapy, based on OS benefit compared to everolimus. Recently, large clinical trials demonstrated meaningful clinical benefit, including durable responses, as well as a good tolerability/safety profile with the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors in advanced RCC and chemotherapy-resistant advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC), while FDA just approved atezolizumab for platinum-treated advanced UC. Numerous interesting trials in different cancers are ongoing. Several combinations of immune checkpoint blockade with chemotherapeutics, vaccines, targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors & monoclonal antibodies, epigenetic modifiers, anti-angiogenic agents, tumor microenvironment & myeloid cell targeting therapies, metabolic modification strategies, radiation, and others, are being tested in clinical trials. Comprehensive understanding of the factors underlying antitumor immune responses in physiologically relevant animal models and humans will refine further the clinical benefit of immunotherapy. Discovery and validation of appropriate molecular biomarkers via coordinated translational research efforts, rational clinical trial designs with suitable endpoints and well-defined eligibility criteria

  5. Immunobiology and immunotherapy in genitourinary malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tsiatas, Marinos; Grivas, Petros

    2016-07-01

    Immunotherapy has traditionally been a critical component of the cancer treatment armamentarium in genitourinary (GU) cancers. It has an established role in the management of carefully selected patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) [e.g., high dose interleukin-2 (IL-2)] and non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) [e.g., intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)]. In 2010, the sipuleucel-T vaccine was approved by the FDA for the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), based on a phase III trial showing overall survival (OS) benefit compared to placebo. The immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab (anti-PD-1) recently received FDA approval for the management of patients with advanced RCC patients previously treated with anti-angiogenic therapy, based on OS benefit compared to everolimus. Recently, large clinical trials demonstrated meaningful clinical benefit, including durable responses, as well as a good tolerability/safety profile with the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors in advanced RCC and chemotherapy-resistant advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC), while FDA just approved atezolizumab for platinum-treated advanced UC. Numerous interesting trials in different cancers are ongoing. Several combinations of immune checkpoint blockade with chemotherapeutics, vaccines, targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors & monoclonal antibodies, epigenetic modifiers, anti-angiogenic agents, tumor microenvironment & myeloid cell targeting therapies, metabolic modification strategies, radiation, and others, are being tested in clinical trials. Comprehensive understanding of the factors underlying antitumor immune responses in physiologically relevant animal models and humans will refine further the clinical benefit of immunotherapy. Discovery and validation of appropriate molecular biomarkers via coordinated translational research efforts, rational clinical trial designs with suitable endpoints and well-defined eligibility criteria

  6. Postoperative immunotherapy of murine C1300-neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Fowler, C L; Brooks, S P; Rossman, J E; Cooney, D R

    1990-02-01

    Low-dose cyclophosphamide (CY) is an immunomodulating agent that down-regulates T suppressor cell function. This study investigates postoperative immunotherapy with CY as an alternate treatment for advanced immunogenic tumors such as neuroblastoma that typically respond poorly to traditional high-dose chemotherapy. A/J mice with 1.5-cm subcutaneous C1300-neuroblastoma (C1300-NB) tumors were divided into the following treatment groups: I, untreated (n = 14); II, 85% tumor resection (n = 18); III, sham-operated (n = 18); IV, multiple-dose CY (n = 6); V, 85% resection and single-dose CY (n = 14); VI, 85% resection and multiple-dose CY (n = 14). CY (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was given initially 24 hours post-operatively to groups IV, V, and VI. Groups IV and VI also received weekly maintenance doses of 25 mg/kg CY. Results showed significantly increased survival (log-rank test) in CY-treated groups (IV, V, VI) compared with control groups (I,II,III). Cures were observed only in groups receiving partial resection plus CY (V, 7%; VI, 29%). Although surgical debulking of tumor alone (II) did not enhance survival, the procedure normalized depressed total lymphocyte counts and the subpopulation of Lyt 2,3+ (T suppressor/cytolytic cells) in the immediate postoperative period during which immunotherapy with CY was instigated. This may have contributed to the success of CY immunotherapy. To characterize the tumor-host immune interaction, additional studies were performed. Results showed the following. (1) Mice cured by debulking plus CY (from groups V and VI) could not be successfully reimplanted with C1300-NB, demonstrating immunologic mediation by CY.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Specific immunotherapy in ovarian cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Alipour, Soroush; Zoghi, Samaneh; Khalili, Nastaran; Hirbod-Mobarakeh, Armin; Emens, Leisha A; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-10-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynecological cancer. Several approaches of active and passive immunotherapy for EOC have been studied. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the clinical efficacy of specific immunotherapy in patients with EOC. We found 4524 references in seven databases and we included ten controlled clinical trials with 2285 patients with EOC reporting five active immunotherapeutic agents and three passive immunotherapies. Meta-analysis of six studies showed that overall there was not any significant difference in overall survival and recurrence-free survival between patients undergoing specific immunotherapy and those in control group. Most of the studies we evaluated reported a positive outcome from treatment with specific immunotherapy, although this was not significant. PMID:27605068

  8. Specific immunotherapy in ovarian cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Alipour, Soroush; Zoghi, Samaneh; Khalili, Nastaran; Hirbod-Mobarakeh, Armin; Emens, Leisha A; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-10-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynecological cancer. Several approaches of active and passive immunotherapy for EOC have been studied. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the clinical efficacy of specific immunotherapy in patients with EOC. We found 4524 references in seven databases and we included ten controlled clinical trials with 2285 patients with EOC reporting five active immunotherapeutic agents and three passive immunotherapies. Meta-analysis of six studies showed that overall there was not any significant difference in overall survival and recurrence-free survival between patients undergoing specific immunotherapy and those in control group. Most of the studies we evaluated reported a positive outcome from treatment with specific immunotherapy, although this was not significant.

  9. [Antigravity suit used for neurosurgical operations in sitting position].

    PubMed

    Szpiro-Zurkowska, A; Milczarek, Z; Marchel, A; Jagielski, J

    1996-01-01

    The aviator's antigravity suit (G-suit) was used for 40 operations on neurosurgical patients operated on in sitting position. The G-suit was filled with air to 0.2 atmosphere (20 kPa) pressure in 26 cases, and 0.3 atm. (30 kPa) in 14 cases. In all cases G-suit filling was followed by central venous pressure rise and mean arterial pressure rise. Venous air embolism was found in 5 (12.5%) patients. No other complications connected with the use of G-suit were observed.

  10. Harnessing the Microbiome to Enhance Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michelle H.; Diven, Marshall A.; Huff, Logan W.; Paulos, Chrystal M.

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota plays a key role in regulating the innate and adaptive immune system. Herein, we review the immunological aspects of the microbiota in tumor immunity in mice and man, with a focus on toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists, vaccines, checkpoint modulators, chemotherapy, and adoptive T cell transfer (ACT) therapies. We propose innovative treatments that may safely harness the microbiota to enhance T cell-based therapies in cancer patients. Finally, we highlight recent developments in tumor immunotherapy, particularly novel ways to modulate the microbiome and memory T cell responses to human malignancies. PMID:26101781

  11. Immunotherapy strategies for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Tang; Lu, Xiu-Min; Chen, Kai-Ting; Shu, Ya-Hai; Qiu, Chun-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) of adult mammalian after traumatic injury is limited, which often causes permanent functional motor and sensory loss. After spinal cord injury (SCI), the lack of regeneration is mainly attributed to the presence of a hostile microenvironment, glial scarring, and cavitation. Besides, inflammation has also been proved to play a crucial role in secondary degeneration following SCI. The more prominent treatment strategies in experimental models focus mainly on drugs and cell therapies, however, only a few strategies applied in clinical studies and therapies still have only limited effects on the repair of SCI. Recently, the interests in immunotherapy strategies for CNS are increasing in number and breadth. Immunotherapy strategies have made good progresses in treating many CNS degenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), stroke, and multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the strategies begin to be considered to the treatment of SCI and other neurological disorders in recent years. Besides anti-inflamatory therapy, immunization with protein vaccines and DNA vaccines has emerged as a novel therapy strategy because of the simplicity of preparation and application. An inflammatory response followed by spinal cord injury, and is controled by specific signaling molecules, such as some cytokines playing a crucial role. As a result, appropriate immunoregulation, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokines may be an effective therapy strategy for earlier injury of spinal cord. In addition, myelinassociated inhibitors (MAIs) in the injured spinal cord, such as Nogo, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and oligodendrocyte- myelin glycoprotein (OMgp) are known to prevent axonal regeneration through their co-receptors, and to trigger demyelinating autoimmunity through T cell-mediated harmful autoimmune response. The antagonism of the MAIs through vaccinating with

  12. Fighting cancer with magnetic nanoparticles and immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, L.; Mejías, R.; Barber, D. F.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; Serna, C. J.; Lázaro, F. J.; Morales, M. P.

    2012-03-01

    IFN-γ-adsorbed DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles can be used as an efficient in vivo drug delivery system for tumor immunotherapy. Magnetic nanoparticles, with adsorbed interferon-γ, were targeted to the tumor site by application of an external magnetic field. A relevant therapeutic dosage of interferon in the tumor was detected and led to a notable reduction in tumor size. In general, only 10% of the total injected nanoparticles after multiple exposures were found in tissues by AC susceptibility measurements of the corresponding resected tissues. Magnetic nanoparticle biodistribution is affected by the application of an external magnetic field.

  13. Solving the Problem of Nonadherence to Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G; Lockey, Richard F

    2016-02-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) can improve allergic response by modifying the underlying disease. Many patients are nonadherent, and do not achieve full benefit. Numerous studies reveal that fewer than 10% of patients complete a full course and that most abandon treatment in the first year. The development and testing of interventions to improve AIT are emerging. Data from adherence interventions in other chronic conditions provide guidance to allergists/immunologists. Evidence-based communication strategies-patient-centered care, motivational interviewing, and shared-decision making-underscore the importance of taking time to establish trust, understand patient concerns and priorities, and involve the patient in decisions regarding AIT.

  14. Study of acceleration of center of mass during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Na, Eunjin; Hwang, Hyesun; Woo, Youngkeun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the center of mass during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit activities in the timed up and go test between healthy subjects and patients with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy participants and thirty patients with stroke volunteered for this study. Acceleration of the center of mass was measured using a wireless tri-axial accelerometer during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit activities in the timed up and go test. Accelerometer data were analyzed using BTS G-studio software. [Results] The phase duration was significantly longer and the anterior-posterior, mediolateral, and vertical acceleration ranges were significantly lower during sit-to-stand for patients with stroke than for healthy controls. Further, phase duration and the mediolateral acceleration range during stand-to-sit differed significantly between healthy controls and subjects with stroke. [Conclusions] During training for the sit-to-stand activity, the focus should be all three balance dimensions, but during training for the stand-to-sit activity, the focus should be on improving mediolateral balance and asymmetrical foot positioning should be recommended. PMID:27799669

  15. A stochastic model for immunotherapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baar, Martina; Coquille, Loren; Mayer, Hannah; Hölzel, Michael; Rogava, Meri; Tüting, Thomas; Bovier, Anton

    2016-01-01

    We propose an extension of a standard stochastic individual-based model in population dynamics which broadens the range of biological applications. Our primary motivation is modelling of immunotherapy of malignant tumours. In this context the different actors, T-cells, cytokines or cancer cells, are modelled as single particles (individuals) in the stochastic system. The main expansions of the model are distinguishing cancer cells by phenotype and genotype, including environment-dependent phenotypic plasticity that does not affect the genotype, taking into account the effects of therapy and introducing a competition term which lowers the reproduction rate of an individual in addition to the usual term that increases its death rate. We illustrate the new setup by using it to model various phenomena arising in immunotherapy. Our aim is twofold: on the one hand, we show that the interplay of genetic mutations and phenotypic switches on different timescales as well as the occurrence of metastability phenomena raise new mathematical challenges. On the other hand, we argue why understanding purely stochastic events (which cannot be obtained with deterministic models) may help to understand the resistance of tumours to therapeutic approaches and may have non-trivial consequences on tumour treatment protocols. This is supported through numerical simulations. PMID:27063839

  16. Personalized cancer immunotherapy using Systems Medicine approaches.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shailendra K; Jaitly, Tanushree; Schmitz, Ulf; Schuler, Gerold; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Vera, Julio

    2016-05-01

    The immune system is by definition multi-scale because it involves biochemical networks that regulate cell fates across cell boundaries, but also because immune cells communicate with each other by direct contact or through the secretion of local or systemic signals. Furthermore, tumor and immune cells communicate, and this interaction is affected by the tumor microenvironment. Altogether, the tumor-immunity interaction is a complex multi-scale biological system whose analysis requires a systemic view to succeed in developing efficient immunotherapies for cancer and immune-related diseases. In this review we discuss the necessity and the structure of a systems medicine approach for the design of anticancer immunotherapies. We support the idea that the approach must be a combination of algorithms and methods from bioinformatics and patient-data-driven mathematical models conceived to investigate the role of clinical interventions in the tumor-immunity interaction. For each step of the integrative approach proposed, we review the advancement with respect to the computational tools and methods available, but also successful case studies. We particularized our idea for the case of identifying novel tumor-associated antigens and therapeutic targets by integration of patient's immune and tumor profiling in case of aggressive melanoma.

  17. Melanoma immunotherapy: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Farid; Renno, Waleed; Klepacek, Ivo; Ibrahim, Ghada; Asfar, Sami; Dashti, Hussein; Romero, Pedro; Dashti, Ali; Behbehani, Abdullah

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of cancer and its related morbidity and mortality remain on the increase in both developing and developed countries. Cancer remains a huge burden on the health and social welfare sectors worldwide and its prevention and cure remain two golden goals that science strives to achieve. Among the treatment options for cancer that have emerged in the past 100 years, cancer vaccine immunotherapy seems to present a promising and relatively safer approach as compared to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The identification of different tumour antigens in the last fifteen years using a variety of techniques, together with the molecular cloning of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs)- and tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs)-defined tumour antigens allowed more refining of the cancer vaccines that are currently used in different clinical trials. In a proportion of treated patients, some of these vaccines have resulted in partial or complete tumour regression, while they have increased the disease-free survival rate in others. These outcomes are more evident now in patients suffering from melanoma. This review provides an update on melanoma vaccine immunotherapy. Different cancer antigens are reviewed with a detailed description of the melanoma antigens discovered so far. The review also summarises clinical trials and individual clinical cases in which some of the old and current methods to vaccinate against or treat melanoma were used. These include vaccines made of autologous or allogenic melanoma tumour cells, melanoma peptides, recombinant bacterial or viral vectors, or dendritic cells. PMID:16248801

  18. Personalized cancer immunotherapy using Systems Medicine approaches.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shailendra K; Jaitly, Tanushree; Schmitz, Ulf; Schuler, Gerold; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Vera, Julio

    2016-05-01

    The immune system is by definition multi-scale because it involves biochemical networks that regulate cell fates across cell boundaries, but also because immune cells communicate with each other by direct contact or through the secretion of local or systemic signals. Furthermore, tumor and immune cells communicate, and this interaction is affected by the tumor microenvironment. Altogether, the tumor-immunity interaction is a complex multi-scale biological system whose analysis requires a systemic view to succeed in developing efficient immunotherapies for cancer and immune-related diseases. In this review we discuss the necessity and the structure of a systems medicine approach for the design of anticancer immunotherapies. We support the idea that the approach must be a combination of algorithms and methods from bioinformatics and patient-data-driven mathematical models conceived to investigate the role of clinical interventions in the tumor-immunity interaction. For each step of the integrative approach proposed, we review the advancement with respect to the computational tools and methods available, but also successful case studies. We particularized our idea for the case of identifying novel tumor-associated antigens and therapeutic targets by integration of patient's immune and tumor profiling in case of aggressive melanoma. PMID:26174229

  19. Tecemotide: An antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wurz, Gregory T; Kao, Chiao-Jung; Wolf, Michael; DeGregorio, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) has made possible the development of antigen-specific cancer immunotherapies such as tecemotide. One of those is mucin 1 (MUC1), a cell membrane glycoprotein expressed on some epithelial tissues such as breast and lung. In cancer, MUC1 becomes overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated, exposing the immunogenic tandem repeat units in the extracellular domain of MUC1. Designed to target tumor associated MUC1, tecemotide is being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials for treatment of unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as maintenance therapy following chemoradiotherapy. Additional Phase II studies in other indications are ongoing. This review discusses the preclinical and clinical development of tecemotide, ongoing preclinical studies of tecemotide in human MUC1 transgenic mouse models of breast and lung cancer, and the potential application of these models for optimizing the timing of chemoradiotherapy and tecemotide immunotherapy to achieve the best treatment outcome for patients. PMID:25483673

  20. Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalopathies and Immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Gastaldi, Matteo; Thouin, Anaïs; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 15 years it has become clear that rare but highly recognizable diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including newly identified forms of limbic encephalitis and other encephalopathies, are likely to be mediated by antibodies (Abs) to CNS proteins. The Abs are directed against membrane receptors and ion channel-associated proteins that are expressed on the surface of neurons in the CNS, such as N-methyl D-aspartate receptors and leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein and contactin-associated protein like 2, that are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels. The diseases are not invariably cancer-related and are therefore different from the classical paraneoplastic neurological diseases that are associated with, but not caused by, Abs to intracellular proteins. Most importantly, the new antibody-associated diseases almost invariably respond to immunotherapies with considerable and sometimes complete recovery, and there is convincing evidence of their pathogenicity in the relatively limited studies performed so far. Treatments include first-line steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, and plasma exchange, and second-line rituximab and cyclophosphamide, followed in many cases by steroid-sparing agents in the long-term. This review focuses mainly on N-methyl D-aspartate receptor- and voltage-gated potassium channel complex-related Abs in adults, the clinical phenotypes, and treatment responses. Pediatric cases are referred to but not reviewed in detail. As there have been very few prospective studies, the conclusions regarding immunotherapies are based on retrospective studies. PMID:26692392

  1. Algenpantucel-L immunotherapy in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Coveler, Andrew L; Rossi, Gabriela R; Vahanian, Nicholas N; Link, Charles; Chiorean, E Gabriela

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the 4th leading cause of cancer death in the USA and the EU. A minority of patients presents with surgically resectable and potentially curable disease, but among these, 80% are destined to relapse and overall survival rates with adjuvant chemotherapy average 24 months. Immunotherapy is a promising therapeutic option and a potential paradigm shift in the treatment of patients with pancreatic cancer, and may be particularly effective when used early in the disease course to prevent metastatic spread. Algenpantucel-L (HyperAcute Pancreas, NewLink Genetics, Ames, IA, USA) is a whole-cell immunotherapy consisting of irradiated allogeneic pancreatic cancer cells genetically engineered to express the murine enzyme α-GT, which results in hyperacute rejection of the tumor cells with complement- and antibody-dependent cytotoxicity. Phase II clinical trial data has been encouraging, particularly for patients who demonstrated humoral immunologic responses. Here, we report preliminary results and biomarkers correlations with clinical activity of algenpantucel-L in pancreatic cancer.

  2. Combination immunotherapies for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Pozzilli, Paolo; Maddaloni, Ernesto; Buzzetti, Raffaella

    2015-05-01

    Immunotherapies for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have been the focus of intense basic and clinical research over the past few decades. Restoring β-cell function is the ultimate goal of intervention trials that target the immune system in T1DM. In an attempt to achieve this aim, different combination therapies have been proposed over the past few years that are based on treatments tackling the various mechanisms involved in the destruction of β cells. The results of clinical trials have not matched expectations based on the positive results from preclinical studies. The heterogeneity of T1DM might explain the negative results obtained, but previous trials have not addressed this issue. However, novel promising combination therapies are being developed, including those that couple immunomodulators with drugs that stimulate β-cell regeneration in order to restore normoglycaemia. This strategy is an encouraging one to pursue the goal of finding a cure for T1DM. This Review summarizes the available data about combination immunotherapies in T1DM, particularly addressing their clinical importance. The available data supporting the use of registered drugs, such as proton pump inhibitors and incretin-based agents, that have been shown to induce β-cell regeneration will also be discussed.

  3. Tecemotide: an antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wurz, Gregory T; Kao, Chiao-Jung; Wolf, Michael; DeGregorio, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    The identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) has made possible the development of antigen-specific cancer immunotherapies such as tecemotide. One of those is mucin 1 (MUC1), a cell membrane glycoprotein expressed on some epithelial tissues such as breast and lung. In cancer, MUC1 becomes overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated, exposing the immunogenic tandem repeat units in the extracellular domain of MUC1. Designed to target tumor associated MUC1, tecemotide is being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials for treatment of unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as maintenance therapy following chemoradiotherapy. Additional Phase II studies in other indications are ongoing. This review discusses the preclinical and clinical development of tecemotide, ongoing preclinical studies of tecemotide in human MUC1 transgenic mouse models of breast and lung cancer, and the potential application of these models for optimizing the timing of chemoradiotherapy and tecemotide immunotherapy to achieve the best treatment outcome for patients. PMID:25483673

  4. The SAP, a new family of proteins, associate and function positively with the SIT4 phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Luke, M M; Della Seta, F; Di Como, C J; Sugimoto, H; Kobayashi, R; Arndt, K T

    1996-01-01

    SIT4 is the catalytic subunit of a type 2A-related protein phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is required for G1 cyclin transcription and for bud formation. SIT4 associates with several high-molecular-mass proteins in a cell cycle-dependent fashion. We purified two SIT4-associated proteins, SAP155 and SAP190, and cloned the corresponding genes. By sequence homology, we isolated two additional SAP genes, SAP185 and SAP4. Through such an association is not yet proven for SAP4, each of SAP155, SAP185, and SAP190 physically associates with SIT4 in separate complexes. The SAPs function positively with SIT4, and by several criteria, the loss of all four SAPs is equivalent to the loss of SIT4. The data suggest that the SAPs are not functional in the absence of SIT4 and likewise that SIT4 is not functional in the absence of the SAPs. The SAPs are hyperphoshorylated in cells lacking SIT4, raising the possibility that the SAPs are substrates of SIT4. By sequence similarity, the SAPs fall into two groups, the SAP4/SAP155 group and the SAP185/SAP190 group. Overexpression of a SAP from one group does not suppress the defects due to the loss of the other group. These findings and others indicate that the SAPs have distinct functions. PMID:8649382

  5. Prompts to Disrupt Sitting Time and Increase Physical Activity at Work, 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Rote, Aubrianne E.; Welch, Whitney A.; Maeda, Hotaka; Hart, Teresa L.; Cho, Young Ik; Strath, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to assess change in sitting and physical activity behavior in response to a workplace intervention to disrupt prolonged sitting time. Methods Sixty office workers were randomized to either a Stand group (n = 29), which received hourly prompts (computer-based and wrist-worn) to stand up, or a Step group (n = 31), which received the same hourly prompts and an additional prompt to walk 100 steps or more upon standing. An ActivPAL monitor was used to assess sitting and physical activity behavior on the same 3 consecutive workdays during baseline and intervention periods. Mixed-effect models with random intercepts and random slopes for time were performed to assess change between groups and across time. Results Both groups significantly reduced duration of average sitting bouts (Stand group, by 16%; Step group, by 19%) and the number of sitting bouts of 60 minutes or more (Step group, by 36%; Stand group, by 54%). The Stand group significantly reduced total sitting time (by 6.6%), duration of the longest sitting bout (by 29%), and number of sitting bouts of 30 minutes or more (by 13%) and increased the number of sit-to-stand transitions (by 15%) and standing time (by 23%). Stepping time significantly increased in the Stand (by 14%) and Step (by 29%) groups, but only the Step group significantly increased (by 35%) the number of steps per workday. Differences in changes from baseline to intervention between groups were not significant for any outcome. Conclusion Interventions that focus on disrupting sitting time only in the workplace may result in less sitting. When sitting time disruptions are paired with a physical activity prompt, people may be more likely to increase their workday physical activity, but the effect on sitting time may be attenuated. PMID:24784909

  6. A European perspective on immunotherapy for food allergies.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Kirsten

    2012-05-01

    Food allergies are common, and frequently, the only treatment option is strict avoidance. Unfortunately, many patients accidentally ingest allergenic foods, which can result in severe anaphylactic reactions. Several immunotherapies are being developed for food allergies; these involve oral, sublingual, epicutaneous, or subcutaneous administration of small amounts of native or modified allergens to induce immune tolerance. Oral immunotherapy seems to be the most promising approach based on results from small uncontrolled and controlled studies. However, it is a challenge to compare results among immunotherapy trials because of differences in protocols. Studies conducted thus far have tested the most prevalent food allergens: it is not clear whether their results can be extended to other allergens. Sublingual administration of immunotherapy has shown some efficacy and fewer side effects than oral administration in some trials, yet neither approach can be recommended for routine practice. Controlled studies with larger numbers of subjects are needed to determine short- and long-term efficacy and side effects. In Europe immunotherapy trials for food allergies face many ethical and regulatory issues. Guidelines from the European Medicine Agency on the clinical development of products for specific immunotherapy of allergic diseases do not adequately address immunotherapy for food allergies, especially for therapies that orally administer native food or that include pediatric patients.

  7. Cancer immunotherapy: Strategies for personalization and combinatorial approaches.

    PubMed

    Sathyanarayanan, Vishwanath; Neelapu, Sattva S

    2015-12-01

    The results of recent clinical trials using novel immunotherapy strategies such as immune checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell therapy approaches including CAR T-cell therapy have clearly established immunotherapy as an important modality for the treatment of cancer besides the traditional approaches of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy or targeted therapy. However, to date immunotherapy has been shown to induce durable clinical benefit in only a fraction of the patients. The use of combination strategies is likely to increase the number of patients that might benefit from immunotherapy. Indeed, over the last decade, the characterization of multiple immune resistance mechanisms used by the tumor to evade the immune system and the development of agents that target those mechanisms has generated a lot of enthusiasm for cancer immunotherapy. But a critical issue is to determine how best to combine such agents. This review will focus on novel immunotherapy agents currently in development and discuss strategies to develop and personalize combination cancer immunotherapy strategies.

  8. Immunotherapy coming of age: What will it take to make it standard of care for glioblastoma?

    PubMed Central

    Heimberger, Amy B.; Sampson, John H.

    2011-01-01

    With the recent approval by the FDA of an immunotherapy for prostate cancer and another positive immunotherapy trial in melanoma, immunotherapy may finally be coming of age. So what will it take for it to become part of the standard treatment for glioblastoma? To put this question into perspective, we summarize critical background information in neuro-immunology, address immunotherapy clinical trial design, and discuss a number of extrinsic factors that will impact the development of immunotherapy in neuro-oncology. PMID:21149252

  9. Endothelial dysfunction following prolonged sitting is mediated by a reduction in shear stress.

    PubMed

    Restaino, Robert M; Walsh, Lauren K; Morishima, Takuma; Vranish, Jennifer R; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A; Fadel, Paul J; Padilla, Jaume

    2016-03-01

    We and others have recently reported that prolonged sitting impairs endothelial function in the leg vasculature; however, the mechanism(s) remain unknown. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that a sustained reduction in flow-induced shear stress is the underlying mechanism by which sitting induces leg endothelial dysfunction. Specifically, we examined whether preventing the reduction in shear stress during sitting would abolish the detrimental effects of sitting on popliteal artery endothelial function. In 10 young healthy men, bilateral measurements of popliteal artery flow-mediated dilation were performed before and after a 3-h sitting period during which one foot was submerged in 42°C water (i.e., heated) to increase blood flow and thus shear stress, whereas the contralateral leg remained dry and served as internal control (i.e., nonheated). During sitting, popliteal artery mean shear rate was reduced in the nonheated leg (pre-sit, 42.9 ± 4.5 s(-1); and 3-h sit, 23.6 ± 3.3 s(-1); P < 0.05) but not in the heated leg (pre-sit, 38.9 ± 3.4 s(-1); and 3-h sit, 63.9 ± 16.9 s(-1); P > 0.05). Popliteal artery flow-mediated dilation was impaired after 3 h of sitting in the nonheated leg (pre-sit, 7.1 ± 1.4% vs. post-sit, 2.8 ± 0.9%; P < 0.05) but not in the heated leg (pre-sit: 7.3 ± 1.5% vs. post-sit, 10.9 ± 1.8%; P > 0.05). Collectively, these data suggest that preventing the reduction of flow-induced shear stress during prolonged sitting with local heating abolishes the impairment in popliteal artery endothelial function. Thus these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction is mediated by a reduction in shear stress. PMID:26747508

  10. Immunoproteasomes and immunotherapy-a smoking gun for lung cancer?

    PubMed

    Spits, Menno; Neefjes, Jacques

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer is the second most prevalent cancer in both women and men with some 221,200 new cases and 158,040 deaths reported in 2015. Almost 90% of these are non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and these patients have a very poor prognosis. Recently a new treatment option for NSCLC appeared that strongly improved treatment responses-immunotherapy. Here we review the various forms of immunotherapy and how immune modification of proteasomes in lung cancer may support the immune system in controlling NSCLC. These immunoproteasomes then support recognition of NSCLC and may act as a biomarker for selecting responding patients to immunotherapy. PMID:27501321

  11. Improving cancer immunotherapy by targeting the STATe of MDSCs

    PubMed Central

    de Haas, Nienke; de Koning, Coco; Spilgies, Lisanne; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.; Hato, Stanleyson V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer immunotherapy is a promising therapeutic avenue; however, in practice its efficacy is hampered by an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment that consists of suppressive cell types like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Eradication or reprogramming of MDSCs could therefore enhance clinical responses to immunotherapy. Here, we review clinically available drugs that target MDSCs, often through inhibition of STAT signaling, which is essential for MDSC accumulation and suppressive functions. Interestingly, several drugs used for non-cancerous indications and natural compounds similarly inhibit MDSCs by STAT inhibition, but have fewer side effects than anticancer drugs. Therefore, they show great potential for combination strategies with immunotherapy. PMID:27622051

  12. Malignant melanoma-The cradle of anti-neoplastic immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Koller, Kristian M; Wang, Wenge; Schell, Todd D; Cozza, Eugene M; Kokolus, Kathleen M; Neves, Rogerio I; Mackley, Heath B; Pameijer, Colette; Leung, Anna; Anderson, Bryan; Mallon, Carol A; Robertson, Gavin; Drabick, Joseph J

    2016-10-01

    One of the defining characteristics of the malignant phenotype is the ability to evade the host immune system. Immunotherapy as a treatment modality represents a new dawn in the way we think about the treatment of a variety of malignancies. The story of immunotherapy traces its roots to its relationship with malignant melanoma. In this article, we review the intertwined history of immunotherapy and melanoma, including the early significant history, a discussion on immune mechanisms, resistance, local and systemic immunotherapeutic modalities, and speculate on possible novel future treatment options. PMID:27637351

  13. Improving cancer immunotherapy by targeting the STATe of MDSCs

    PubMed Central

    de Haas, Nienke; de Koning, Coco; Spilgies, Lisanne; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.; Hato, Stanleyson V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer immunotherapy is a promising therapeutic avenue; however, in practice its efficacy is hampered by an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment that consists of suppressive cell types like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Eradication or reprogramming of MDSCs could therefore enhance clinical responses to immunotherapy. Here, we review clinically available drugs that target MDSCs, often through inhibition of STAT signaling, which is essential for MDSC accumulation and suppressive functions. Interestingly, several drugs used for non-cancerous indications and natural compounds similarly inhibit MDSCs by STAT inhibition, but have fewer side effects than anticancer drugs. Therefore, they show great potential for combination strategies with immunotherapy.

  14. Evolving synergistic combinations of targeted immunotherapies to combat cancer.

    PubMed

    Melero, Ignacio; Berman, David M; Aznar, M Angela; Korman, Alan J; Pérez Gracia, José Luis; Haanen, John

    2015-08-01

    Immunotherapy has now been clinically validated as an effective treatment for many cancers. There is tremendous potential for synergistic combinations of immunotherapy agents and for combining immunotherapy agents with conventional cancer treatments. Clinical trials combining blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1) may serve as a paradigm to guide future approaches to immuno-oncology combination therapy. In this Review, we discuss progress in the synergistic design of immune-targeting combination therapies and highlight the challenges involved in tailoring such strategies to provide maximal benefit to patients. PMID:26205340

  15. Immunotherapy for Infectious Diseases: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Akshay; Ahuja, Jasmine; Crane, John K

    2015-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy for established infections, as opposed to active immunization to prevent disease, remains a tiny niche in the world of antimicrobial therapies. Many of the passive immunotherapies currently available are directed against bacterial toxins, such as botulism, or are intended for agents of bioterrorism such as anthrax, which fortunately has remained rare. The emergence of Ebola virus and multi-drug resistant pathogens, however, may breathe new life into the immunotherapy field as researchers seek non-antibiotic interventions for infectious diseases. PMID:26575462

  16. Frequency of the sit to stand task: An observational study of free-living adults.

    PubMed

    Dall, Philippa M; Kerr, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The sit to stand movement is a key determinant of functional independence. Knowledge of the frequency with which the sit to stand movement is performed throughout the day could inform workplace ergonomics, but has rarely been examined. Healthy adults (n=140) were recruited from the general population. Free-living activity for each participant was reported using an activity monitor. On average, participants performed 60 (+/-22) sit to stand movements each day. Participants in indoor sedentary occupations performed significantly more sit to stand movements per day than participants in outdoor active occupations (66 vs. 54; n=102; p=0.003). Participants (n=33) performed significantly more sit to stand movements on working days than on non-working days (65 vs. 55; p=0.018). This analysis provides contemporary data for sit to stand frequency in a predominantly working population, and demonstrates that work and employment have a significant effect on that frequency. PMID:19450792

  17. New vaccines for Mammalian allergy using molecular approaches.

    PubMed

    van Hage, Marianne; Pauli, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) offers a disease specific causative treatment by modifying the allergen-specific immune response allowing tolerance to higher doses of allergen and preventing progression of allergic diseases. It may be considered in patients allergic to furry animals. Current mammalian allergy vaccines are still prepared from relatively poorly defined allergen extracts and may induce immediate and late phase side effects. Although the mechanisms of SIT are still not fully understood, the more recent approaches report different strategies to reduce both allergen-specific IgE as well as T cell reactivity. The availability of recombinant allergens and synthetic peptides from the mammalian species has contributed to formulating new allergy vaccines to improve SIT for furry animal allergy. The majority of studies have focused on the major cat allergen Fel d 1 due to its extensive characterization in terms of IgE and T cell epitopes and to its dominant role in cat allergy. Here we review the most recent approaches, e.g., synthetic peptides, recombinant allergen derivatives, different hypoallergenic molecules, and recombinant allergens coupled to virus-like particles or immunomodulatory substances as well as strategies targeting the allergen to Fcγ receptors and the MHC class II pathway using a new route for administration. Many of the new vaccines hold promise but only a few of them have been investigated in clinical trials which will be the gold standard for evaluation of safety and efficacy in allergic patients.

  18. New Vaccines for Mammalian Allergy Using Molecular Approaches

    PubMed Central

    van Hage, Marianne; Pauli, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) offers a disease specific causative treatment by modifying the allergen-specific immune response allowing tolerance to higher doses of allergen and preventing progression of allergic diseases. It may be considered in patients allergic to furry animals. Current mammalian allergy vaccines are still prepared from relatively poorly defined allergen extracts and may induce immediate and late phase side effects. Although the mechanisms of SIT are still not fully understood, the more recent approaches report different strategies to reduce both allergen-specific IgE as well as T cell reactivity. The availability of recombinant allergens and synthetic peptides from the mammalian species has contributed to formulating new allergy vaccines to improve SIT for furry animal allergy. The majority of studies have focused on the major cat allergen Fel d 1 due to its extensive characterization in terms of IgE and T cell epitopes and to its dominant role in cat allergy. Here we review the most recent approaches, e.g., synthetic peptides, recombinant allergen derivatives, different hypoallergenic molecules, and recombinant allergens coupled to virus-like particles or immunomodulatory substances as well as strategies targeting the allergen to Fcγ receptors and the MHC class II pathway using a new route for administration. Many of the new vaccines hold promise but only a few of them have been investigated in clinical trials which will be the gold standard for evaluation of safety and efficacy in allergic patients. PMID:24672521

  19. The girl who would not sit--case report.

    PubMed

    Matheiken, Shevonne

    2015-09-01

    A 21 year old girl presented with severe fear of contamination leading to 11 hours of cleaning per day and refusal to sit down anywhere except at home or in mother's car. She also had a moderate depressive episode secondary to social stressors and further isolation due to her lack of time to socialize as cleaning was her priority. She was supported according to the biopsychosocial model of care i.e. An antidepressant (Sertraline), 1:1 psychology and alternative housing away from precipitating and perpetuating stressors. She improved significantly over 6 months, but the cultural issues and stigma continued to hinder the longer-term care plans. The importance of understanding the beliefs and customs of the Travellers' community is highlighted with this case report. PMID:26417833

  20. Postural control responses sitting on unstable board during visual stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Y.; Shindo, M.; Kuno, S.; Kawakita, T.; Watanabe, S.

    2001-08-01

    Concerning with the relation of vection induced by the optokinetic stimulation and the body movement, especially we attended to the neck joint movement, which counteracted to the shoulder movement. Then, we analyzed the mechanisms of the sitting postural control by using the seesaw board. By the optokinetic stimulation through the head mounted display (H.M.D.), the vection was leaded, and it affected to the sway of the body on the seesaw board. In this experiment, we found that the movement of upper part of body except for the head was the same direction to the seesaw board but the head moved out of phase to the seesaw board. This phenomenon will be suggested that the unstable condition of sway is balanced by the counter swing of head and the neck muscle tonus is controlled by acting of the vestiburo-collic reflex.

  1. M.S. Coleman sits inside the orbiter Columbia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-93 Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) sits inside the orbiter Columbia during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities that include emergency exit training and a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Other crew members participating are Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as a Shuttle commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. The targeted launch date for STS-93 is no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B.

  2. Analysis of Cytokine Production by Peanut-Reactive T Cells Identifies Residual Th2 Effectors in Highly Allergic Children Who Received Peanut Oral Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Julia A.; Commins, Scott P.; Agrawal, Rachana; Hulse, Kathryn E.; Yu, Mingxi D.; Cronin, Julia; Heymann, Peter W.; Pomes, Anna; Platts-Mills, Thomas; Workman, Lisa; Woodfolk, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Only limited evidence is available regarding the cytokine repertoire of effector T cells associated with peanut allergy, and how these responses relate to IgE antibodies to peanut components. Objective To interrogate T-cell effector cytokine populations induced by Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 among peanut allergic (PA) children in the context of IgE, and to evaluate their modulation during oral immunotherapy (OIT). Methods Peanut-reactive effector T cells were analyzed in conjunction with specific IgE profiles in PA children using intracellular staining and multiplex assay. Cytokine-expressing T cell subpopulations were visualized using SPICE. Results Ara h 2 dominated the antibody response to peanut as judged by prevalence and quantity among a cohort of children with IgE to peanut. High IgE (>15 kUA/L) was almost exclusively associated with dual sensitization to Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, and was age-independent. Among PA children, IL-4-biased responses to both major allergens were induced, regardless of whether IgE antibodies to Ara h 1 were present. Among subjects receiving OIT in whom high IgE was maintained, Th2 reactivity to peanut components persisted despite clinical desensitization and modulation of allergen-specific immune parameters including augmented specific IgG4 antibodies, Th1 skewing and enhanced IL-10. The complexity of cytokine-positive subpopulations within peanut-reactive IL-4+ and IFN-γ+ T cells was similar to that observed in those who received no OIT, but was modified with extended therapy. Nonetheless, high Foxp3 expression was a distinguishing feature of peanut-reactive IL-4+ T cells irrespective of OIT, and a correlate of their ability to secrete type 2 cytokines. Conclusion Though total numbers of peanut-reactive IL-4+ and IFN-γ+ T cells are modulated by OIT in highly allergic children, complex T-cell populations with pathogenic potential persist in the presence of recognized immune markers of successful immunotherapy. [Clinical

  3. Suitability of commercial barometric pressure sensors to distinguish sitting and standing activities for wearable monitoring.

    PubMed

    Massé, F; Bourke, A K; Chardonnens, J; Paraschiv-Ionescu, A; Aminian, K

    2014-06-01

    Despite its medical relevance, accurate recognition of sedentary (sitting and lying) and dynamic activities (e.g. standing and walking) remains challenging using a single wearable device. Currently, trunk-worn wearable systems can differentiate sitting from standing with moderate success, as activity classifiers often rely on inertial signals at the transition period (e.g. from sitting to standing) which contains limited information. Discriminating sitting from standing thus requires additional sources of information such as elevation change. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the suitability of barometric pressure, providing an absolute estimate of elevation, for evaluating sitting and standing periods during daily activities. Three sensors were evaluated in both calm laboratory conditions and a pilot study involving seven healthy subjects performing 322 sitting and standing transitions, both indoor and outdoor, in real-world conditions. The MS5611-BA01 barometric pressure sensor (Measurement Specialties, USA) demonstrated superior performance to counterparts. It discriminates actual sitting and standing transitions from stationary postures with 99.5% accuracy and is also capable to completely dissociate Sit-to-Stand from Stand-to-Sit transitions.

  4. Center of pressure and the projection of the time-course of sitting skill acquisition.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Joshua L; Harbourne, Regina T; Vallabhajosula, Srikant; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2013-09-01

    A normal time-course for the acquisition of sitting is essential. A delay in sitting may affect other developmental milestones, resulting in deficiencies in overall skill. Therefore, our aim was to identify variables whose measures at the very beginning of sitting would allow for the projection of the evolution of the sitting skill. Center of pressure data were collected from the postural sway of twenty-six typically developing infants while sitting on a force platform with a beginning ability to sit upright. Spatial, temporal and frequency variables of postural sway were obtained from both the medial/lateral and anterior/posterior directions of sway. Discriminant function analysis was conducted to identify potential predictors of the duration between onset and fully independent sitting. Gender (p=0.025), median frequency (p=0.006), and correlation dimension (p=0.002) were identified to be predictive of grouping with 73.1% correct classification of the participating infants into short, mid, and long delay groups. In conclusion, measures taken at the earliest stage of sitting may allow the projection of the time-course to achieve independent sitting for typical infants. This approach may be useful for monitoring typical development.

  5. The sitting and rising test for assessing people with chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shamay S.M.; Fong, Shirley S.M.; Chan, Wayne L.S.; Hung, Ben K.Y.; Chung, Ricci K.S.; Chim, Tina H.T.; Kwong, Patrick W.H.; Liu, Tai-Wa; Tse, Mimi M.Y.; Chung, Raymond C.K.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the inter-rater and test-retest reliability of the sitting-rising test (SRT), the correlations of sitting-rising test scores with measures of strength, balance, community integration and quality of life, as well as the cut-off score which best discriminates people with chronic stroke from healthy older adults were investigated. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects with chronic stroke (n=30) and healthy older adults (n=30) were recruited. The study had a cross-sectional design, and was carried out in a university rehabilitation laboratory. Sitting-rising test performance was scored on two occasions. Other measurements included ankle dorsiflexor and plantarflexor strength, the Fugl-Meyer assessment, the Berg Balance Scale, the timed up and go test, the five times sit-to-stand test, the limits of stability test, and measures of quality of health and community integration. [Results] Sitting-rising test scores demonstrated good to excellent inter-rater and test-retest reliabilities (ICC=0.679 to 0.967). Sitting-rising test scores correlated significantly with ankle strength, but not with other test results. The sitting-rising test showed good sensitivity and specificity. A cut-off score of 7.8 best distinguished healthy older adults from stroke subjects. [Conclusions] The sitting-rising test is a reliable and sensitive test for assessing the quality of sitting and rising movements. Further studies with a larger sample are required to investigate the test’s validity. PMID:27390398

  6. GD2-targeted immunotherapy and radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dobrenkov, Konstantin; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2014-10-01

    Ganglioside GD2 is a tumor-associated surface antigen found in a broad spectrum of human cancers and stem cells. They include pediatric embryonal tumors (neuroblastoma, retinoblastoma, brain tumors, osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma), as well as adult cancers (small cell lung cancer, melanoma, soft tissue sarcomas). Because of its restricted normal tissue distribution, GD2 has been proven safe for antibody targeting. Anti-GD2 antibody is now incorporated into the standard of care for the treatment of high-risk metastatic neuroblastoma. Building on this experience, novel combinations of antibodies, cytokines, cells, and genetically engineered products all directed at GD2 are rapidly moving into the clinic. In this review, past and present immunotherapy trials directed at GD2 will be summarized, highlighting the lessons learned and the future directions.

  7. MYCN as a target for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Himoudi, Nourredine; Yan, Mengyong; Papanastasiou, Antigoni; Anderson, John

    2008-05-01

    MYCN is a potential target for cancer immunotherapy by virtue of its overexpression in numerous human malignancies and its functional role in tumour progression. Here we show limited expression of MYCN in normal human tissues indicating that anti-MYCN immune responses are unlikely to cross react with self tissues. An HLA-A2 restricted ten amino acid peptide epitope from MYCN, VILKKATEYV, was used to stimulate cytotoxic T cell lines from the peripheral blood of normal blood donors, and from a patient with MYCN amplified neuroblastoma. Strong and specific activity was seen against each MYCN overexpressing cell line and against autologous tumour cells. We generated two CTL clones capable of killing cells pulsed with as low as 0.5 nM of VIL peptide. Therefore strong and specific immune responses against MYCN expressing tumours are possible in patients with the most common HLA class 1 type in the Caucasian population.

  8. Targeting natural killer cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Guillerey, Camille; Huntington, Nicholas D; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-08-19

    Alteration in the expression of cell-surface proteins is a common consequence of malignant transformation. Natural killer (NK) cells use an array of germline-encoded activating and inhibitory receptors that scan for altered protein-expression patterns, but tumor evasion of detection by the immune system is now recognized as one of the hallmarks of cancer. NK cells display rapid and potent immunity to metastasis or hematological cancers, and major efforts are now being undertaken to fully exploit NK cell anti-tumor properties in the clinic. Diverse approaches encompass the development of large-scale NK cell-expansion protocols for adoptive transfer, the establishment of a microenvironment favorable to NK cell activity, the redirection of NK cell activity against tumor cells and the release of inhibitory signals that limit NK cell function. In this Review we detail recent advances in NK cell-based immunotherapies and discuss the advantages and limitations of these strategies. PMID:27540992

  9. Biological Response Modifier in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ronghua; Luo, Feifei; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Luman; Yang, Jiao; Deng, Yuting; Huang, Enyu; Qian, Jiawen; Lu, Zhou; Jiang, Xuechao; Zhang, Dan; Chu, Yiwei

    2016-01-01

    Biological response modifiers (BRMs) emerge as a lay of new compounds or approaches used in improving cancer immunotherapy. Evidences highlight that cytokines, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, and noncoding RNAs are of crucial roles in modulating antitumor immune response and cancer-related chronic inflammation, and BRMs based on them have been explored. In particular, besides some cytokines like IFN-α and IL-2, several Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists like BCG, MPL, and imiquimod are also licensed to be used in patients with several malignancies nowadays, and the first artificial small noncoding RNA (microRNA) mimic, MXR34, has entered phase I clinical study against liver cancer, implying their potential application in cancer therapy. According to amounts of original data, this chapter will review the regulatory roles of TLR signaling, some noncoding RNAs, and several key cytokines in cancer and cancer-related immune response, as well as the clinical cases in cancer therapy based on them.

  10. Development of Passive Immunotherapies for Synucleinopathies.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Ann-Louise; Kallunki, Pekka; Fog, Karina

    2016-02-01

    Immunotherapy using antibodies targeting alpha-synuclein has proven to be an effective strategy for ameliorating pathological and behavioral deficits induced by excess pathogenic alpha-synuclein in various animal and/or cellular models. However, the process of selecting the anti-alpha-synuclein antibody with the best potential to treat synucleinopathies in humans is not trivial. Critical to this process is a better understanding of the pathological processes involved in the synucleinopathies and how antibodies are able to influence these. We will give an overview of the first proof-of-concept studies in rodent disease models and discuss challenges associated with developing antibodies against alpha-synuclein resulting from the distribution and structural characteristics of the protein. We will also provide a status on the passive immunization approaches targeting alpha-synuclein that have entered, or are expected to enter, clinical evaluation.

  11. The Role of Immunotherapy in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kocoglu, Mehmet; Badros, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is the second most common hematologic malignancy. The treatment of this disease has changed considerably over the last two decades with the introduction to the clinical practice of novel agents such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs. Basic research efforts towards better understanding of normal and missing immune surveillence in myeloma have led to development of new strategies and therapies that require the engagement of the immune system. Many of these treatments are under clinical development and have already started providing encouraging results. We, for the second time in the last two decades, are about to witness another shift of the paradigm in the management of this ailment. This review will summarize the major approaches in myeloma immunotherapies. PMID:26784207

  12. Honeybee venom immunotherapy: certainties and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bilò, M Beatrice; Antonicelli, Leonardo; Bonifazi, Floriano

    2012-11-01

    The honeybee is an interesting insect because of the fundamental agricultural role it plays, together with the composition of its venom, which presents new diagnostic and immunotherapeutic challenges. This article examines various aspects of honeybee venom allergy from epidemiology to diagnosis and treatment, with special emphasis on venom immunotherapy (VIT). Honeybee venom allergy represents a risk factor for severe systemic reaction in challenged allergic patients, for the diminished effectiveness of VIT, for more frequent side effects during VIT and relapse after cessation of treatment. Some strategies are available for reducing the risk of honeybee VIT-induced side effects; however, there is considerable room for further improvement in these all-important areas. At the same time, sensitized and allergic beekeepers represent unique populations for epidemiological, venom allergy immunopathogenesis and VIT mechanism studies.

  13. GD2-targeted immunotherapy and radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dobrenkov, Konstantin; Cheung, Nai-Kong

    2014-01-01

    Ganglioside GD2 is a tumor-associated surface antigen found in a broad spectrum of human cancers and stem cells. They include pediatric embryonal tumors (neuroblastoma, retinoblastoma, brain tumors, osteosarcoma, Ewing’s sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma), as well as adult cancers (small cell lung cancer, melanoma, soft tissue sarcomas). Because of its restricted normal tissue distribution, GD2 has been proven safe for antibody targeting. Anti-GD2 antibody is now incorporated into the standard of care for the treatment of high risk metastatic neuroblastoma. Building on this experience, novel combinations of antibody, cytokines, cells and genetically engineered products all directed at GD2 are rapidly moving into the clinic. In the review, past and present immunotherapy trials directed at GD2 will be summarized, highlighting the lessons learned and the future directions. PMID:25440605

  14. Toxicities of Immunotherapy for the Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jeffrey S.; Yang, James C.; Atkins, Michael B.; Disis, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    The toxicities of immunotherapy for cancer are as diverse as the type of treatments that have been devised. These range from cytokine therapies that induce capillary leakage to vaccines associated with low levels of autoimmunity to cell therapies that can induce damaging cross-reactivity with normal tissue to checkpoint protein inhibitors that induce immune-related adverse events that are autoinflammatory in nature. The thread that ties these toxicities together is their mechanism-based immune nature and the T-cell–mediated adverse events seen. The basis for the majority of these adverse events is a hyperactivated T-cell response with reactivity directed against normal tissue, resulting in the generation of high levels of CD4 T-helper cell cytokines or increased migration of cytolytic CD8 T cells within normal tissues. The T-cell immune response is not tissue specific and may reflect a diffuse expansion of the T-cell repertoire that induces cross-reactivity with normal tissue, effectively breaking tolerance that is active with cytokines, vaccines, and checkpoint protein inhibitors and passive in the case of adoptive cell therapy. Cytokines seem to generate diffuse and nonspecific T-cell reactivity, whereas checkpoint protein inhibition, vaccines, and adoptive cell therapy seem to activate more specific T cells that interact directly with normal tissues, potentially causing specific organ damage. In this review, we summarize the toxicities that are unique to immunotherapies, emphasizing the need to familiarize the oncology practitioner with the spectrum of adverse events seen with newly approved and emerging modalities. PMID:25918278

  15. Brain tumor immunotherapy: an immunologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Lampson, Lois A

    2003-01-01

    Key concepts in brain tumor immunotherapy are reviewed. "Immunotherapy" can refer to a fully-developed, tumor-specific immune response, or to its individual cellular or molecular mediators. The immune response is initiated most efficiently in organized lymphoid tissue. After initiation, antigen-specific T lymphocytes (T cells) survey the tissues--including the brain. If the T cells re-encounter their antigen at a tumor site, they can be triggered to carry out their effector functions. T cells can attack tumor in many ways, directly and indirectly, through cell-cell contact, secreted factors, and attraction and activation of other cells, endogenous or blood-borne. Recent work expands the list of candidate tumor antigens: they are not limited to cell surface proteins and need not be absolutely tumor-specific. Once identified, tumor antigens can be targeted immunologically, or in novel ways. The immune response is under complex regulatory control. Most current work aims to enhance initiation of the response (for example, with tumor vaccines), rather than enhancing the effector phase at the tumor site. The effector phase includes a rich, interactive set of cells and mediators; some that are not usually stressed are of particular interest against tumor in the brain. Within the brain, immune regulation varies from site to site, and local neurochemicals (such as substance P or glutamate) can contribute to local control. Given the complexity of a tumor, the brain, and the immune response, animal models are essential, but more emphasis should be given to their limitations and to step-by-step analysis, rather than animal "cures".

  16. Nanochemistry-based immunotherapy for HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Lori, F; Calarota, S A; Lisziewicz, J

    2007-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART), i.e. the combination of three or more drugs against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has greatly improved the clinical outcome of HIV-1-infected individuals. However, HAART is unable to reconstitute HIV-specific immunity and eradicate the virus. Several observations in primate models and in humans support the notion that cell-mediated immunity can control viral replication and slow disease progression. Thus, besides drugs, an immunotherapy that induces long-lasting HIV-specific T-cell responses could play a role in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. To induce such immune responses, DermaVir Patch has been developed. DermaVir consists of an HIV-1 antigen-encoding plasmid DNA that is chemically formulated in a nanoparticle. DermaVir is administered under a patch after a skin preparation that supports the delivery of the nanoparticle to Langerhans cells (LC). Epidermal LC trap and transport the nanomedicine to draining lymph nodes. While in transit, LC mature into dendritic cells (DC), which can efficiently present the DNA-encoded antigens to naïve T-cells for the induction of cellular immunity. Pre-clinical studies and Phase I clinical testing of DermaVir in HIV-1-infected individuals have demonstrated the safety and tolerability of DermaVir Patch. To further modulate cellular immunity, molecular adjuvants might be added into the nanoparticle. DermaVir Patch represents a new nanomedicine platform for immunotherapy of HIV/AIDS. In this review, the antiviral activity of DermaVir-induced cellular immunity is discussed. Furthermore, the action of some cytokines currently being tested as adjuvants are highlighted and the adjuvant effect of cytokine plasmid DNA included in the DermaVir nanoparticle is reviewed.

  17. Brain Tumor Immunotherapy: What have We Learned so Far?

    PubMed Central

    Van Gool, Stefaan Willy

    2015-01-01

    High grade glioma is a rare brain cancer, incurable in spite of modern neurosurgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Novel approaches are in research, and immunotherapy emerges as a promising strategy. Clinical experiences with active specific immunotherapy demonstrate feasibility, safety and most importantly, but incompletely understood, prolonged long-term survival in a fraction of the patients. In relapsed patients, we developed an immunotherapy schedule and we categorized patients into clinically defined risk profiles. We learned how to combine immunotherapy with standard multimodal treatment strategies for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme patients. The developmental program allows further improvements related to newest scientific insights. Finally, we developed a mode of care within academic centers to organize cell-based therapies for experimental clinical trials in a large number of patients. PMID:26137448

  18. Optimizing Dendritic Cell-Based Approaches for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Jashodeep; Terhune, Julia H.; Lowenfeld, Lea; Cintolo, Jessica A.; Xu, Shuwen; Roses, Robert E.; Czerniecki, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells uniquely suited for cancer immunotherapy. They induce primary immune responses, potentiate the effector functions of previously primed T-lymphocytes, and orchestrate communication between innate and adaptive immunity. The remarkable diversity of cytokine activation regimens, DC maturation states, and antigen-loading strategies employed in current DC-based vaccine design reflect an evolving, but incomplete, understanding of optimal DC immunobiology. In the clinical realm, existing DC-based cancer immunotherapy efforts have yielded encouraging but inconsistent results. Despite recent U.S. Federal and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of DC-based sipuleucel-T for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, clinically effective DC immunotherapy as monotherapy for a majority of tumors remains a distant goal. Recent work has identified strategies that may allow for more potent “next-generation” DC vaccines. Additionally, multimodality approaches incorporating DC-based immunotherapy may improve clinical outcomes. PMID:25506283

  19. Advances in strategies and methodologies in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lam, Samuel S K; Zhou, Feifan; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Raker, Joseph; Chen, Wei R

    2015-04-01

    Since the invention of Coley's toxin by William Coley in early 1900s, the path for cancer immunotherapy has been a convoluted one. Although still not considered standard of care, with the FDA approval of trastuzumab, Provenge and ipilimumab, the medical and scientific community has started to embrace the possibility that immunotherapy could be a new hope for cancer patients with otherwise untreatable metastatic diseases. This review aims to summarize the development of some major strategies in cancer immunotherapy, from the earliest peptide vaccine and transfer of tumor specific antibodies/T cells to the more recent dendritic cell (DC) vaccines, whole cell tumor vaccines, and checkpoint blockade therapy. Discussion of some major milestones and obstacles in the shaping of the field and the future perspectives is included. Photoimmunotherapy is also reviewed as an example of emerging new therapies combining phototherapy and immunotherapy.

  20. Immunotherapy: A useful strategy to help combat multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Curiel, Tyler J.

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) renders cancer cells relatively invulnerable to treatment with many standard cytotoxic anti-cancer agents. Cancer immunotherapy could be an important adjunct other strategies to treat MDR positive cancers, as resistance to immunotherapy generally is unrelated to mechanisms of resistance to cytotoxic agents. Immunotherapy to combat MDR positive tumors could use any of the following strategies: direct immune attack against MDR positive cells, using MDR as an immune target to deliver cytotoxic agents, capitalization on other immune properties of MDR positive cells, or conditional immunotoxins expressed under MDR control. Additional insights into the immunogenic potential of some cytotoxic agents can also be brought to bear on these strategies. This review will highlight key concepts in cancer immunotherapy and illustrate immune principles and strategies that have been or could be used to help destroy MDR positive tumor cells, either alone or in rational combinations. PMID:22483359

  1. Immunotherapy for food allergies: a myth or a reality?

    PubMed

    Praticò, Andrea D; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Food allergy is a worldwide issue, with an estimated prevalence of 2-10%. An effective treatment is not available for people affected and the only management is the avoidance of the allergen. Oral immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy have been tested by several authors, in particular for milk, egg and peanuts allergy, with significant results in term of desensitization induction. The achievement of tolerance is by the contrary doubtful, with different results obtained. In this review, we reviewed protocols of oral and sublingual immunotherapy for food allergy published in literature, mainly against milk, egg and peanut. At present, immunotherapy does not represent the gold standard in the treatment of food allergy, even if it can desensitize patients.

  2. Development of immunoglobulins to venoms during specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Palma-Carlos, M L; Santos, M C; Pedro, E; Branco-Ferreira, M; Spínola, A; Palma-Carlos, A G

    1999-03-01

    Immunotherapy against venoms (itv) is an efficacious treatment for most subjects who are allergic to hymnenoptera venoms. The authors studied 8 patients: 7 who were allergic to honey been venom and 1 who was allergic to wasp venom, followed for two years during immunotherapy with an aqueous extract of pure venoms from ALBAY Dome Hollister Stier. Specific IgE and IgG4 were evaluated by the Elisa Cap Technique of Pharmacia at different times: T0 before immunotherapy, T1 (one year after) and T2 (2 years after). A significant fall of specific IgE (p < 0.02) and a significant increase in specific IgG4 (p < 0.008) were seen during the two years in all patients. Four of the patients were re-stung and none had systemic reactions. These results suggest that increase in specific IgG4 is correlated with the protective effect of immunotherapy. PMID:10226679

  3. Cancer immunotherapy: harnessing the immune system to battle cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiping

    2015-09-01

    The recent clinical successes of immune checkpoint blockade and chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapies represent a turning point in cancer immunotherapy. These successes also underscore the importance of understanding basic tumor immunology for successful clinical translation in treating patients with cancer. The Reviews in this Review Series focus on current developments in cancer immunotherapy, highlight recent advances in our understanding of basic aspects of tumor immunology, and suggest how these insights can lead to the development of new immunotherapeutic strategies.

  4. Cancer immunotherapy: harnessing the immune system to battle cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yiping

    2015-01-01

    The recent clinical successes of immune checkpoint blockade and chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapies represent a turning point in cancer immunotherapy. These successes also underscore the importance of understanding basic tumor immunology for successful clinical translation in treating patients with cancer. The Reviews in this Review Series focus on current developments in cancer immunotherapy, highlight recent advances in our understanding of basic aspects of tumor immunology, and suggest how these insights can lead to the development of new immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26325031

  5. Physical Activity, Study Sitting Time, Leisure Sitting Time, and Sleep Time Are Differently Associated With Obesity in Korean Adolescents: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Kong, Il Gyu; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, So Young; Sim, Songyong; Choi, Hyo Geun

    2015-11-01

    Low physical activity, long leisure sitting time, and short sleep time are risk factors for obesity, but the association with study sitting time is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between these factors and obesity.We analyzed the association between physical activity, study sitting time, leisure sitting time, and sleep time and subject weight (underweight, healthy weight, overweight, and obese), using data from a large population-based survey, the 2013 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey. Data from 53,769 participants were analyzed using multinomial logistic regression analyses with complex sampling. Age, sex, region of residence, economic level, smoking, stress level, physical activity, sitting time for study, sitting time for leisure, and sleep time were adjusted as the confounders.Low physical activity (adjusted odds ratios [AORs] = 1.03, 1.12) and long leisure sitting time (AORs = 1.15, 1.32) were positively associated with overweight and obese. Low physical activity (AOR = 1.33) and long leisure sitting time (AOR = 1.12) were also associated with underweight. Study sitting time was negatively associated with underweight (AOR = 0.86) but was unrelated to overweight (AOR = 0.97, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.91-1.03) and obese (AOR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.84-1.04). Sleep time (<6 hours; ≥6 hours, <7 hours; ≥7 hours, <8 hours) was adversely associated with underweight (AORs = 0.67, 0.79, and 0.88) but positively associated with overweight (AORs = 1.19, 1.17, and 1.08) and obese (AORs = 1.33, 1.36, and 1.30) in a dose-response relationship.In adolescents, increasing physical activity, decreasing leisure sitting time, and obtaining sufficient sleep would be beneficial in maintaining a healthy weight. However, study sitting time was not associated with overweight or obese. PMID:26554807

  6. Cancer immunotherapy: accomplishments to date and future promise.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Karim Y; Patel, Shyam A; Nahas, George R; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2013-10-01

    Cancer remains a devastating disease as existing therapies are too often ineffective and toxicities remain unacceptably high. Immunotherapies for cancer offer the promise of the specificity and memory of the immune system against malignant cells to achieve durable cure with minimal toxicity. Beginning with the success of bone marrow transplantation for blood-borne cancers, and the more recent development of monoclonal antibody therapeutics for a variety of tumors, immunotherapies are already among the most successful class of treatments for cancer. Greater understanding of immunoregulatory mechanisms and improved techniques for immune cell manipulation and engineering have led to new immunomodulatory approaches and cell-based therapies for cancer that have generated great excitement within the biomedical community. As these technologies continue to improve, and as new approaches for harnessing the power and specificity of the immune system are developed, immunotherapies will play an increasingly important role in the treatment of cancer. Here, we review the history of immunotherapies for cancer and discuss existing and emerging immunotherapy technologies that hope to translate the promise of immunotherapy into clinical reality.

  7. Immunotherapy of Childhood Cancer: From Biologic Understanding to Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, Alan S.; Capitini, Christian M.; Mackall, Crystal L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Most children with cancer can be cured with combination regimens of chemotherapy, radiation, and/or surgery. However, standard therapies are toxic to normal tissues, cancer cells commonly develop resistance to chemotherapy, and relapsed malignancy is a leading cause of mortality in pediatrics. Elucidation of the principles of the normal immune response and tumor biology, coupled with technological developments, have led to important advances in the field of cancer immunotherapy. This review summarizes the biologic basis of cancer immunotherapy and highlights recent examples of progress in the application of novel humoral and cellular immunotherapies to children and adolescents with malignancy. Recent Findings Clinical trials of immunotherapy for pediatric cancer have recently been initiated. To date, most immune-based therapies have been well tolerated and some have shown clinically significant activity against specific refractory high-risk malignancies. Summary Recent clinical trial results provide proof-of-principle that cancer immunotherapy has the capacity to overcome chemotherapy resistance without the usual toxicities associated with cytotoxic regimens. Immunotherapy holds promise in the treatment of children and adolescents with cancer and has the potential to improve both survival and quality of life. PMID:19952749

  8. Evaluation on the immunotherapy efficacies of synthetic peptide vaccines in asthmatic mice with group I and II allergens from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaopin; Xu, Pengfei; Xu, Haifeng; Zhu, Haibin

    2015-01-01

    that of PBS group. In Conclusion, The recombinant protein T1-8, has effectively alleviated the allergic inflammation of airways and lungs in the experimental mice, suggesting that this synthetic peptide may be used as candidate vaccines for asthma on allergen-specific immunotherapy basis. PMID:26884956

  9. A Fuzzy Controller for Lower Limb Exoskeletons during Sit-to-Stand and Stand-to-Sit Movement Using Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Reza, Sharif Muhammad Taslim; Ahmad, Norhafizan; Choudhury, Imtiaz Ahmed; Ghazilla, Raja Ariffin Raja

    2014-01-01

    Human motion is a daily and rhythmic activity. The exoskeleton concept is a very positive scientific approach for human rehabilitation in case of lower limb impairment. Although the exoskeleton shows potential, it is not yet applied extensively in clinical rehabilitation. In this research, a fuzzy based control algorithm is proposed for lower limb exoskeletons during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit movements. Surface electromyograms (EMGs) are acquired from the vastus lateralis muscle using a wearable EMG sensor. The resultant acceleration angle along the z-axis is determined from a kinematics sensor. Twenty volunteers were chosen to perform the experiments. The whole experiment was accomplished in two phases. In the first phase, acceleration angles and EMG data were acquired from the volunteers during both sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit motions. During sit-to-stand movements, the average acceleration angle at activation was 11° – 48° and the EMG varied from −0.19 mV to +0.19 mV. On the other hand, during stand-to-sit movements, the average acceleration angle was found to be 57.5°–108° at the activation point and the EMG varied from −0.32 mV to +0.32 mV. In the second phase, a fuzzy controller was designed from the experimental data. The controller was tested and validated with both offline and real time data using LabVIEW. PMID:24599193

  10. Deep abdominal muscle thickness measured under sitting conditions during different stability tasks

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Hideyuki; Akasaka, Kiyokazu; Otsudo, Takahiro; Sawada, Yutaka; Okubo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate ultrasonically determined changes in the thickness of the transversus abdominis and internal oblique muscles during different sitting conditions. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy men volunteered to participate in this study. Four different sitting conditions including (A) sitting, (B) sitting with left hip flexion, (C) sitting with an abdominal hollowing maneuver (AHM), and (D) sitting with an AHM and left hip flexion, were used. Subjective exercise difficulty was evaluated. [Results] Transversus abdominis and internal oblique muscle thicknesses significantly differed between conditions, with significantly greater thickness between positions from (A) to (D). Stability of the surface when sitting had no effect on the muscle thickness of the transversus abdominis. By contrast, sitting on an unstable surface caused an increase in muscle thickness of the internal oblique in each condition. The subjects reported progressively increasing difficulty in performing each exercise in a stable position from (A) to (D), while the difficulty in an unstable position was significantly different between (A) and (B), and between (C) and (D). [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that task (B) on a stable surface should be chosen for maximal activation of transversus abdominis without inducing overactivation of the internal oblique muscle. PMID:27134381

  11. The Validity of the Modified Sit-and-Reach Test in College-Age Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minkler, Sharin; Patterson, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    Reports a study that examined the criterion-related validity of the modified sit-and-reach test against criterion measures of hamstring and low back flexibility in college students. Results indicated the modified sit-and-reach test moderately related to hamstring flexibility, but its relation to low back flexibility was low. (SM)

  12. Foucault and Colonial Strategy in Douglas C. Jones' "Arrest Sitting Bull"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Peter G.

    2004-01-01

    "Arrest Sitting Bull," a novel written by Douglas C. Jones that relates the personal stories of individuals involved in the military and the political domination of the Sioux Indian during the period leading to the Sitting Bull killing is described. The incessant quest to establish and maintain control and the integral roles played by fear and…

  13. Collaborative Inquiry in Reading Recovery, or "Why Sit in a Circle?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Emily

    2000-01-01

    In Reading Recovery, training participants sit in a circle to discuss lessons that have been communally observed. The rationale for sitting in a circle without a table for discussion can be better understood by considering these two ideas: (1) the role of language in learning; and (2) the way conversation is affected by the physical positioning of…

  14. On sitting and doing: ethnography as action in global health.

    PubMed

    Pigg, Stacy Leigh

    2013-12-01

    Contemporary discussions within the arenas of medical anthropology and global health are often restricted by the driving imperatives to "do something" about a particular health problem. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Nepal in 1997, which sought to follow the translation of AIDS prevention policies into local awareness, this paper addresses the need to revitalize theories of ethnography for an understanding of global health goals. The Nepal example underscores how the path toward decisions is never entirely clear, nor is it always obvious who benefits or loses from different approaches, even as public health discourse seeks to set a strict agenda around what the problem is and what should be done about it. Ethnography shows that definitions of what matters as well as understandings of why certain things matter are formulated from specific social locations. The paper therefore advocates for a practice of patient ethnographic "sitting" as a means to understanding, as a form of critical reflexivity, and as a diagnostic of the politics of relevance.

  15. The Feasibility of Reducing Sitting Time in Overweight and Obese Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Dori E.; Gell, Nancy M.; Jones, Salene M.W.; Renz, Anne; Kerr, Jacqueline; Gardiner, Paul A.; Arterburn, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Overweight and obese older adults have high sedentary time. We tested the feasibility and preliminary effects of a sedentary time reduction intervention among adults over age 60 with a body mass index over 27 kg/m2 using a nonrandomized one arm design. Methods Participants (N = 25, Mean Age = 71.4, Mean BMI = 34) completed an 8-week theory-based intervention targeting reduced total sitting time and increased sit-to-stand transitions. An inclinometer (activPAL™) measured the primary outcomes, change in total sitting time and sit-to-stand transitions. Secondary outcomes included physical activity (ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer), self-reported sedentary behaviors, physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery), depressive symptoms (PHQ-8), quality of life (PROMIS), and study satisfaction. Paired t-tests examined pre-post test changes in sitting time, sit-to-stand transitions, and secondary outcomes. Results Inclinometer measured sitting time decreased by 27 minutes/day (p < .05) and sit-to-stand transitions increased by 2 per day (p > .05) while standing time increased by 25 minutes/day p < .05). Accelerometer measured sedentary time, light-intensity and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity improved (all p values ≤ .05). Self-reported sitting time, gait speed, and depressive symptoms also improved (all p values < .05). Effect sizes were small. Study satisfaction was high. Conclusions Reducing sitting time is feasible and the intervention shows preliminary evidence of effectiveness among older adults with overweight and obesity. Randomized trials of sedentary behavior reduction in overweight and obese older adults, most of whom have multiple chronic conditions, may be promising. PMID:25794518

  16. Sublingual immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization position paper 2013 update

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have prepared this document, “Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2013 Update”, according to the evidence-based criteria, revising and updating chapters of the originally published paper, “Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2009”, available at http://www.waojournal.org. Namely, these comprise: “Mechanisms of sublingual immunotherapy;” “Clinical efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy” – reporting all the data of all controlled trials published after 2009; “Safety of sublingual immunotherapy” – with the recently published Grading System for adverse reactions; “Impact of sublingual immunotherapy on the natural history of respiratory allergy” – with the relevant evidences published since 2009; “Efficacy of SLIT in children” – with detailed analysis of all the studies; “Definition of SLIT patient selection” – reporting the criteria for eligibility to sublingual immunotherapy; “The future of immunotherapy in the community care setting”; “Methodology of clinical trials according to the current scientific and regulatory standards”; and “Guideline development: from evidence-based medicine to patients' views” – including the evolution of the methods to make clinical recommendations. Additionally, we have added new chapters to cover a few emerging crucial topics: “Practical aspects of schedules and dosages and counseling for adherence” – which is crucial in clinical practice for all treatments; “Perspectives and new approaches” – including recombinant allergens, adjuvants, modified allergens, and the concept of validity of the single products. Furthermore, “Raising public awareness about sublingual immunotherapy”, as a need for our patients, and strategies to increase awareness of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) among patients, the medical community, all healthcare stakeholders, and public opinion, are also reported in detail. PMID:24679069

  17. Immunocytokines: a promising approach to cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lode, H N; Xiang, R; Becker, J C; Gillies, S D; Reisfeld, R A

    1998-12-01

    Recombinant antibody-cytokine fusion proteins are immunocytokines that achieve high cytokine concentrations in the tumor microenvironment and thereby effectively stimulate cellular immune responses against malignancies. The activation and expansion of immune effector cells, such as CD8+ T lymphocytes, by interleukin-2 immunocytokines resulted in the eradication of established pulmonary and hepatic metastases of murine melanoma and colorectal carcinoma in syngeneic mouse models. These immunocytokines were equally effective in eliminating established bone marrow and liver metastases of murine neuroblastoma by activating natural killer cells. The effective eradication of metastases by immunocytokines resulted in significant prolongation in life span of mice over that of controls receiving equivalent mixtures of antibody and interleukin-2, which failed to reduce the growth of disseminated metastases. Proof of concept was established, indicating that immunocytokine-induced activation and expansion of immune effector cells in the tumor microenvironment can effectively eradicate established tumor metastases. This promising new approach to cancer immunotherapy may lead to clinical applications that improve treatment of cancer patients with minimal residual disease in an adjuvant setting.

  18. [Adoptive immunotherapy with interleukin 2 in oncology].

    PubMed

    Favrot, M; Bouffet, E; Négrier, S; Combaret, V; Philip, I; Philip, T

    1990-01-01

    Forty-seven patients with renal carcinoma were included in first line or rescue protocols of immunotherapy including IL2 alone or in association with LAK cells, INF alpha or TNF. The toxicity was mild and the mortality was 2% (1 patient). The response rate was 26%. Nineteen children with neuroblastoma received IL2 either alone or in combination with LAK cells. The morbidity and mortality were higher in patients with end stage disease who had previously received high dose and prolonged chemotherapy. In contrast, the toxicity was mild and transient in patients treated in the months following autologous bone marrow transplantation. The only complete response observed was in 1 child treated with IL2, 4 months after high dose chemotherapy and ABMT. Immunological analysis showed that the immunomodulatory effect of IL2 is very different depending on whether IL2 is used alone or in combination with other cytokines; moreover, the biological effect of IL2 is dependent on the immunological status of the patients prior to IL2 therapy.

  19. Aptamers: A Feasible Technology in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Soldevilla, M M; Villanueva, H; Pastor, F

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single-chained RNA or DNA oligonucleotides (ODNs) with three-dimensional folding structures which allow them to bind to their targets with high specificity. Aptamers normally show affinities comparable to or higher than that of antibodies. They are chemically synthesized and therefore less expensive to manufacture and produce. A variety of aptamers described to date have been shown to be reliable in modulating immune responses against cancer by either blocking or activating immune receptors. Some of them have been conjugated to other molecules to target the immune system and reduce off-target side effects. Despite the success of first-line treatments against cancer, the elevated number of relapsing cases and the tremendous side effects shown by the commonly used agents hinder conventional treatments against cancer. The advantages provided by aptamers could enhance the therapeutic index of a given strategy and therefore enhance the antitumor effect. Here we recapitulate the provided benefits of aptamers with immunomodulatory activity described to date in cancer therapy and the benefits that aptamer-based immunotherapy could provide either alone or combined with first-line treatments in cancer therapy.

  20. Aptamers: A Feasible Technology in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, H.; Pastor, F.

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single-chained RNA or DNA oligonucleotides (ODNs) with three-dimensional folding structures which allow them to bind to their targets with high specificity. Aptamers normally show affinities comparable to or higher than that of antibodies. They are chemically synthesized and therefore less expensive to manufacture and produce. A variety of aptamers described to date have been shown to be reliable in modulating immune responses against cancer by either blocking or activating immune receptors. Some of them have been conjugated to other molecules to target the immune system and reduce off-target side effects. Despite the success of first-line treatments against cancer, the elevated number of relapsing cases and the tremendous side effects shown by the commonly used agents hinder conventional treatments against cancer. The advantages provided by aptamers could enhance the therapeutic index of a given strategy and therefore enhance the antitumor effect. Here we recapitulate the provided benefits of aptamers with immunomodulatory activity described to date in cancer therapy and the benefits that aptamer-based immunotherapy could provide either alone or combined with first-line treatments in cancer therapy. PMID:27413756

  1. Driving an improved CAR for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaopei; Yang, Yiping

    2016-08-01

    The recent clinical success of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy for B cell malignancies represents a paradigm shift in cancer immunotherapy. Unfortunately, application of CAR T cell-mediated therapy for solid tumors has so far been disappointing, and the reasons for this poor response in solid tumors remain unknown. In this issue of the JCI, Cherkassky and colleagues report on their use of a murine model of human pleural mesothelioma to explore potential factors that limit CAR T cell efficacy. Their studies have uncovered the importance of the tumor microenvironment in the inhibition of CAR T cell functions, revealed a critical role for the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway in CAR T cell exhaustion within the tumor microenvironment, and demonstrated improved antitumor effects with a CAR T cell-intrinsic PD-1 blockade strategy using a dominant negative form of PD-1. Together, the results of this study lay the groundwork for further evaluation of mechanisms underlying CAR T cell immune evasion within the tumor microenvironment for the improvement of CAR T cell-mediated therapy for solid tumors.

  2. Immunotherapy for advanced melanoma: fulfilling the promise.

    PubMed

    Gogas, Helen; Polyzos, Aristidis; Kirkwood, John

    2013-12-01

    The incidence of melanoma is increasing worldwide and despite early detection and intervention, the number of patients dying from metastatic disease continues to rise. The prognosis of advanced melanoma remains poor, with median survival between 6 and 9 months. Over the past thirty years and despite extensive clinical research, the treatment options for metastatic disease were limited and melanoma is still considered as one of the most therapy-resistant malignancies. Single-agent and combination chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biochemotherapy, immunotherapy, targeted agent therapy and combination regimes failed to show significant improvement in overall survival. Recent advances and in-depth understanding of the biology of melanoma, have contributed in the development of new agents. Based on the molecular and immunological background of the disease, the new drugs have shown benefit in overall and progression free survival. As the picture of the disease begins to change, oncologists need to alter their approach to melanoma treatment and consider disease biology together with targeted individualized treatment. In this review the authors attempt to offer an insight in present and past melanoma treatment options, with a focus on the recently approved immunotherapeutic agents and the clinical perspectives of these new weapons against metastatic melanoma. PMID:23725878

  3. Driving an improved CAR for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaopei; Yang, Yiping

    2016-08-01

    The recent clinical success of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy for B cell malignancies represents a paradigm shift in cancer immunotherapy. Unfortunately, application of CAR T cell-mediated therapy for solid tumors has so far been disappointing, and the reasons for this poor response in solid tumors remain unknown. In this issue of the JCI, Cherkassky and colleagues report on their use of a murine model of human pleural mesothelioma to explore potential factors that limit CAR T cell efficacy. Their studies have uncovered the importance of the tumor microenvironment in the inhibition of CAR T cell functions, revealed a critical role for the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway in CAR T cell exhaustion within the tumor microenvironment, and demonstrated improved antitumor effects with a CAR T cell-intrinsic PD-1 blockade strategy using a dominant negative form of PD-1. Together, the results of this study lay the groundwork for further evaluation of mechanisms underlying CAR T cell immune evasion within the tumor microenvironment for the improvement of CAR T cell-mediated therapy for solid tumors. PMID:27454296

  4. Toll-like Receptors in Tumor Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Paulos, Chrystal M.; Kaiser, Andrew; Wrzesinski, Claudia; Hinrichs, Christian S.; Cassard, Lydie; Boni, Andrea; Muranski, Pawel; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Palmer, Douglas C.; Yu, Zhiya; Antony, Paul A.; Gattinoni, Luca; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2007-01-01

    Lymphodepletion with chemotherapeutic agents or total body irradiation (TBI) before adoptive transfer of tumor-specific T cells is a critical advancement in the treatment of patients with melanoma. More than 50% of patients that are refractory to other treatments experience an objective or curative response with this approach. Emerging data indicate that the key mechanisms underlying how TBI augments the functions of adoptively transferred T cells include (a) the depletion of regulatory Tcells (Treg) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells that limit the function and proliferation of adoptively transferred cells; (b) the removal of immune cells that act as “sinks” for homeostatic cytokines, whose levels increase after lymphodepletion; and (c) the activation of the innate immune system via Toll-like receptor 4 signaling, which is engaged by microbial lipopolysaccharide that translocated across the radiation-injured gut. Here, we review these mechanisms and focus on the effect of Toll-like receptor agonists in adoptive immunotherapy. We also discuss alternate regimens to chemotherapy or TBI, which might be used to safely treat patients with advanced disease and promote tumor regression. PMID:17875756

  5. Multiple myeloma, immunotherapy and minimal residual disease.

    PubMed

    Kusenda, J; Kovarikova, A

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable heterogeneous hematological malignancy in which relapse is characterized by re-growth of residual tumor and immune suppression with a complex biology that affects many aspects of the disease and its response to treatment. The bone marrow microenvironment, including immune cells, plays a central role in MM pathogenesis, survival, and drug resistance. The advances in basic and translational research, introduction of novel agents, particularly combination therapies, improved indicators of quality of life and survival. Minimal residual disease (MRD) detection by multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) has revolutionized monitoring of treatment response in MM. The importance of MFC methodology will be further strengthened by the ongoing international standardization efforts. Results of MRD testing provide unique and clinically important information and demonstrated the prognostic significance of MRD in patients, leading to regulate treatment intensity in many contemporary protocols. In this review, we will summarize the principal approaches in MM immunotherapy, focusing how new agents have potential in the treatment of MM and application of MRD detection by MFC as a surrogate endpoint would allow quicker evaluation of treatment outcomes and rapid identification of effective new therapies.

  6. Advances in cancer immunology and cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Voena, Claudia; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    After decades of setbacks, cancer immunology is living its Golden Age. Recent advances in cancer immunology have provided new therapeutic approaches to treat cancer. The objective clinical response observed in patients treated with antibodies that block the immune checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell-death protein 1 (PD-1)/programmed cell-death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathways, has led to their FDA approval for the treatment of melanoma in 2011 and in 2014, respectively. The anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab has received the FDA-approval in March 2015 for squamous lung cancer treatment. In addition, antibodies targeting PD-1 or PD-L1 have demonstrated their efficacy and safety in additional tumors, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), renal cell carcinoma (RCC), bladder cancer, and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Almost at the same time, the field of adoptive cell transfer has exploded. The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T technology has provided strong evidence of efficacy in the treatment of B cell malignancies, and different T cell based treatments are currently under investigation for different types of tumors. In this review we will discuss the latest advances in cancer immunology and immunotherapy as well as new treatments now under development in the clinic and potential strategies that have shown promising results in preclinical models. PMID:27011048

  7. Sarcoma Immunotherapy: Past Approaches and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, S. P.; Tap, W. D.; Schwartz, G. K.; Carvajal, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomas are heterogeneous malignant tumors of mesenchymal origin characterized by more than 100 distinct subtypes. Unfortunately, 25–50% of patients treated with initial curative intent will develop metastatic disease. In the metastatic setting, chemotherapy rarely leads to complete and durable responses; therefore, there is a dire need for more effective therapies. Exploring immunotherapeutic strategies may be warranted. In the past, agents that stimulate the immune system such as interferon and interleukin-2 have been explored and there has been evidence of some clinical activity in selected patients. In addition, many cancer vaccines have been explored with suggestion of benefit in some patients. Building on the advancements made in other solid tumors as well as a better understanding of cancer immunology provides hope for the development of new and exciting therapies in the treatment of sarcoma. There remains promise with immunologic checkpoint blockade antibodies. Further, building on the success of autologous cell transfer in hematologic malignancies, designing chimeric antigen receptors that target antigens that are over-expressed in sarcoma provides a great deal of optimism. Exploring these avenues has the potential to make immunotherapy a real therapeutic option in this orphan disease. PMID:24778572

  8. Combining radiotherapy and immunotherapy: A revived partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Demaria, Sandra; Bhardwaj, Nina; McBride, William H.; Formenti, Silvia C. . E-mail: silvia.formenti@med.nyu.edu

    2005-11-01

    Ionizing radiation therapy (RT) is an important local modality for the treatment of cancer. The current rationale for its use is based largely on the ability of RT to kill the cancer cells by a direct cytotoxic effect. Nevertheless, considerable evidence indicates that RT effects extend beyond the mere elimination of the more radiosensitive fraction of cancer cells present within a tumor at the time of radiation exposure. For instance, a large body of evidence is accumulating on the ability of RT to modify the tumor microenvironment and generate inflammation. This might have far-reaching consequences regarding the response of a patient to treatment, especially if radiation-induced tumor cell kill were to translate into the generation of effective antitumor immunity. Although much remains to be learned about how radiation can impact tumor immunogenicity, data from preclinical studies provide the proof of principle that different immunotherapeutic strategies can be combined with RT to enhance antitumor effects. Conversely, RT could be a useful tool to combine with immunotherapy. This article will briefly summarize what is known about the impact of RT on tumor immunity, including tumor-associated antigens, antigen-presenting cells, and effector mechanisms. In addition, the experimental evidence supporting the contention that RT can be used as a tool to induce antitumor immunity is discussed, and a new approach to radioimmunotherapy of cancer is proposed.

  9. [Immunotherapies for multiple sclerosis : review and update].

    PubMed

    Havla, J; Kümpfel, T; Hohlfeld, R

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, presumably autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system. Early stages of the disease are characterized by conspicuous inflammation of the white and grey matter. During later stages, presumably secondary neurodegeneration leads to physical disability progression. Over the last decade increasingly effective therapeutic options have been approved. Currently 11 immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive therapies targeting relapse rate, disease progression and paraclinical disease activity are available, mostly for relapsing forms of MS. However, the ideal of "precision medicine" is still in the distant future since biomarkers for individualized treatment are lacking. For implementation of risk-management plans to minimize the risk of severe side effects, interdisciplinary collaboration between neurologists and internists is essential. In this review article we summarize practical aspects of the implemented risk-management plans, and discuss possible side effects and special caveats of the three new immunotherapies teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, and alemtuzumab. This article is based on, among others, the recently updated guidelines of the German Society of Neurology. Particular attention is given to the risks of new therapies, monitoring, and on special aspects needing attention when changing treatments. Teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, and alemtuzumab expand treatment options for relapsing-remitting MS. Treatment selection should take into consideration the safety profile of the substance, previous and concomitant diseases, and other individual factors. This requires in-depth consultation and individual assessment of current disease activity, the potential efficacy of the therapy, and the possible risks and side effects. PMID:25720530

  10. Recent advances in immunotherapy for hepatocellular cancer.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H

    2007-02-10

    There is a continuing need for innovative, alternative therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Immunotherapy of cancer is attractive because of the exquisite specificity of the immune response. Activation of an HCC-specific response can be accomplished by strategies targeting tumour-associated antigens (for example: alpha fetoprotein (AFP)) or viral antigens in those patients infected with hepatitis B or C. Uncharacterised and mutated antigens can also be targeted with whole tumour cell or tumour lysate-based immunisation strategies. Viral vectors coding for genes which make the patient's tumour immunogenic can allow the immune system to naturally evolve specificity against immunogenic target antigens. Strategies which have been tested in human clinical trials include adoptive transfer of lymphocytes, cytokine injections, autologous tumour-pulsed dendritic cells (DC) as well as AFP-derived peptides in adjuvant and pulsed onto autologous DC. These trials, testing novel immune-based interventions in HCC subjects, have resulted in immunological responses and some have impacted recurrence and survival of HCC subjects.

  11. Targeting lentiviral vectors for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Arce, Frederick; Breckpot, Karine; Collins, Mary; Escors, David

    2012-01-01

    Delivery of tumour-associated antigens (TAA) in a way that induces effective, specific immunity is a challenge in anti-cancer vaccine design. Circumventing tumour-induced tolerogenic mechanisms in vivo is also critical for effective immunotherapy. Effective immune responses are induced by professional antigen presenting cells, in particular dendritic cells (DC). This requires presentation of the antigen to both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the context of strong co-stimulatory signals. Lentiviral vectors have been tested as vehicles, for both ex vivo and in vivo delivery of TAA and/or activation signals to DC, and have been demonstrated to induce potent T cell mediated immune responses that can control tumour growth. This review will focus on the use of lentiviral vectors for in vivo gene delivery to DC, introducing strategies to target DC, either targeting cell entry or gene expression to improve safety of the lentiviral vaccine or targeting dendritic cell activation pathways to enhance performance of the lentiviral vaccine. In conclusion, this review highlights the potential of lentiviral vectors as a generally applicable ‘off-the-shelf’ anti-cancer immunotherapeutic. PMID:22983382

  12. Effects of laser immunotherapy on tumor microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Wood, Ethan W.; Hasanjee, Aamr; Chen, Wei R.; Vaughan, Melville B.

    2014-02-01

    The microenvironments of tumors are involved in a complex and reciprocal dialog with surrounding cancer cells. Any novel treatment must consider the impact of the therapy on the microenvironment. Recently, clinical trials with laser immunotherapy (LIT) have proven to effectively treat patients with late-stage, metastatic breast cancer and melanoma. LIT is the synergistic combination of phototherapy (laser irradiation) and immunological stimulation. One prominent cell type found in the tumor stroma is the fibroblast. Fibroblast cells can secrete different growth factors and extracellular matrix modifying molecules. Furthermore, fibroblast cells found in the tumor stroma often express alpha smooth muscle actin. These particular fibroblasts are coined cancer-associated fibroblast cells (CAFs). CAFs are known to facilitate the malignant progression of tumors. A collagen lattice assay with human fibroblast cells is used to elucidate the effects LIT has on the microenvironment of tumors. Changes in the contraction of the lattice, the differentiation of the fibroblast cells, as well as the proliferation of the fibroblast cells will be determined.

  13. Oral immunotherapy and tolerance induction in childhood.

    PubMed

    Tang, M L K; Martino, D J

    2013-09-01

    Prevalence rates of food allergy have increased rapidly in recent decades. Of concern, rates of increase are greatest among children under 5 yrs of age and for those food allergies that persist into adulthood such as peanut or tree nut allergy and shellfish allergy. Given these trends, the overall prevalence of food allergy will compound over time as the number of children affected by food allergy soars and a greater proportion of food-allergic children are left with persistent disease into adulthood. It is therefore vital to identify novel curative treatment approaches for food allergy. Acquisition of oral tolerance to the diverse array of ingested food antigens and intestinal microbiota is an active immunologic process that is successfully established in the majority of individuals. In subjects who develop food allergy, there is a failure or loss of oral tolerance acquisition to a limited number of food allergens. Oral immunotherapy (OIT) offers a promising approach to induce specific oral tolerance to selected food allergens and represents a potential strategy for long-term curative treatment of food allergy. This review will summarize the current understanding of oral tolerance and clinical trials of OIT for the treatment of food allergy.

  14. Dendritic Cells as Pharmacological Tools for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Anguille, Sébastien; Smits, Evelien L; Bryant, Christian; Van Acker, Heleen H; Goossens, Herman; Lion, Eva; Fromm, Phillip D; Hart, Derek N; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F; Berneman, Zwi N

    2015-10-01

    Although the earliest—rudimentary—attempts at exploiting the immune system for cancer therapy can be traced back to the late 18th Century, it was not until the past decade that cancer immunotherapeutics have truly entered mainstream clinical practice. Given their potential to stimulate both adaptive and innate antitumor immune responses, dendritic cells (DCs) have come under intense scrutiny in recent years as pharmacological tools for cancer immunotherapy. Conceptually, the clinical effectiveness of this form of active immunotherapy relies on the completion of three critical steps: 1) the DCs used as immunotherapeutic vehicles must properly activate the antitumor immune effector cells of the host, 2) these immune effector cells must be receptive to stimulation by the DCs and be competent to mediate their antitumor effects, which 3) requires overcoming the various immune-inhibitory mechanisms used by the tumor cells. In this review, following a brief overview of the pivotal milestones in the history of cancer immunotherapy, we will introduce the reader to the basic immunobiological and pharmacological principles of active cancer immunotherapy using DCs. We will then discuss how current research is trying to define the optimal parameters for each of the above steps to realize the full clinical potential of DC therapeutics. Given its high suitability for immune interventions, acute myeloid leukemia was chosen here to showcase the latest research trends driving the field of DC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  15. [The role of immunotherapy in the prevention of allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Lugović-Mihić, Liborija; Duvancić, Tomislav

    2011-01-01

    Immunotherapy through repeated administration of allergens and augmentation of doses (hyposensibilization) with the purpose of decreasing the severity of type I allergic reactions or even its complete elimination is known already for a longer period of time. This type of therapy is especially beneficial in allergies to Hymenoptera venom, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, allergic asthma and is implemented in patients with previously proven allergy to appropriate allergens (insects, pollen, house dust mite, pet dander and other). The most common form of therapy is subcutaneous immunotherapy which includes a series of injections containing specific allergens (allergy vaccines) with increasingly larger doses administered subcutaneously during a period of 3-5 years. There are also other forms of immunotherapy (for instance sublingual immunotherapy) although these are less effective. Repetition of the hyposensibilization procedure leads to further reduction in severity of allergy disease in the majority of patients. The efficacy of immunotherapy is also proven by a lower risk of allergic rhinitis patients developing asthma as well as by prevention of new sensibilizations.

  16. Recent advances and future of immunotherapy for glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Neha; Calinescu, Alexandra; Candolfi, Marianela; Chandran, Mayuri; Mineharu, Yohei; Assad, Antonela S; Koschmann, Carl; Nunez, Felipe; Lowenstein, Pedro; Castro, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Outcome for glioma (GBM) remains dismal despite advances in therapeutic interventions including chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgical resection. The overall survival benefit observed with immunotherapies in cancers such as melanoma and prostate cancer has fuelled research into evaluating immunotherapies for GBM. Areas covered Preclinical studies have brought a wealth of information for improving the prognosis of GBM and multiple clinical studies are evaluating a wide array of immunotherapies for GBM patients. This review highlights advances in the development of immunotherapeutic approaches. We discuss the strategies and outcomes of active and passive immunotherapies for GBM including vaccination strategies, gene therapy, check point blockade and adoptive T cell therapies. We also focus on immunoediting and tumor neoantigens that can impact the efficacy of immunotherapies. Expert opinion Encouraging results have been observed with immunotherapeutic strategies; some clinical trials are reaching phase III. Significant progress has been made in unraveling the molecular and genetic heterogeneity of GBM and its implications to disease prognosis. There is now consensus related to the critical need to incorporate tumor heterogeneity into the design of therapeutic approaches. Recent data also indicates that an efficacious treatment strategy will need to be combinatorial and personalized to the tumor genetic signature. PMID:27411023

  17. Selection of patients for sublingual versus subcutaneous immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Larenas Linnemann, Désirée E S; Blaiss, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is the sole treatment for IgE-mediated allergic diseases directed at the underlying mechanism. The two widely accepted administration routes are sublingual (SLIT) and subcutaneous (SCIT). We reviewed how patients should best be selected for immunotherapy and how the optimal administration route can be defined. Before deciding SCIT or SLIT, appropriate selection of patients for allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is mandatory. To be eligible for AIT, subjects must have a clear medical history of allergic disease, with exacerbation of symptoms on exposure to one or more allergens and a corresponding positive skin or in vitro test. Then the route of administration should be based on: published evidence of clinical and immunologic efficacy (which varies per allergic disease and per allergen); mono- or multi-allergen immunotherapy, for SLIT multi-allergen immunotherapy was not effective; safety: adverse events with SLIT are more frequent, but less severe; and, costs and patient preferences, closely related to adherence issues. All these are discussed in the article.

  18. Immune-Checkpoint Blockade and Active Immunotherapy for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Brian J.; Pollack, Ian F.; Okada, Hideho

    2013-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has made tremendous progress, including promising results in patients with malignant gliomas. Nonetheless, the immunological microenvironment of the brain and tumors arising therein is still believed to be suboptimal for sufficient antitumor immune responses for a variety of reasons, including the operation of “immune-checkpoint” mechanisms. While these mechanisms prevent autoimmunity in physiological conditions, malignant tumors, including brain tumors, actively employ these mechanisms to evade from immunological attacks. Development of agents designed to unblock these checkpoint steps is currently one of the most active areas of cancer research. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the field of brain tumor immunology with particular foci in the area of immune-checkpoint mechanisms and development of active immunotherapy strategies. In the last decade, a number of specific monoclonal antibodies designed to block immune-checkpoint mechanisms have been developed and show efficacy in other cancers, such as melanoma. On the other hand, active immunotherapy approaches, such as vaccines, have shown encouraging outcomes. We believe that development of effective immunotherapy approaches should ultimately integrate those checkpoint-blockade agents to enhance the efficacy of therapeutic approaches. With these agents available, it is going to be quite an exciting time in the field. The eventual success of immunotherapies for brain tumors will be dependent upon not only an in-depth understanding of immunology behind the brain and brain tumors, but also collaboration and teamwork for the development of novel trials that address multiple layers of immunological challenges in gliomas. PMID:24202450

  19. Less Sitting, More Physical Activity, or Higher Fitness?

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Claude; Blair, Steven N; Katzmarzyk, Peter T

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiological studies have found that time spent in sedentary behaviors, levels of physical activity, and cardiorespiratory fitness are all associated with mortality rates. They are also related to the risks of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, aging-associated frailty, and cancer. The evidence is such that the National Institutes of Health recently launched a new Common Fund initiative aimed at identifying the molecular transducers of adaptation to physical activity in various tissues and organs. It has been estimated that 9.4% of all 57 million deaths in the world in 2008 could be attributed to physical inactivity, which translates into more than 5 million deaths worldwide. Physical inactivity has a deleterious effect that is comparable to smoking and obesity. Importantly, this global estimate relates to levels of physical activity and does not take into account sedentary behavior and cardiorespiratory fitness. Currently, there are national and international guidelines for physical activity level that are highly concordant. The weekly recommendations include 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity, 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity activity, or some combination of moderate and vigorous activity with 2 days of resistance exercise. However, these guidelines offer no recommendations regarding sedentary time or goals for cardiorespiratory fitness levels. It will be increasingly important for disease prevention, successful aging, and reduction of premature mortality to broaden the focus of the public health message to include not only more physical activity but also less sitting and higher cardiorespiratory fitness. We briefly review the evidence and discuss key issues to be addressed to make this approach a reality. PMID:26422244

  20. Persons with unilateral transfemoral amputation have altered lumbosacral kinetics during sitting and standing movements.

    PubMed

    Hendershot, Brad D; Wolf, Erik J

    2015-07-01

    Increases in spinal loading have been related to altered movements of the lower back during gait among persons with lower limb amputation, movements which are self-perceived by these individuals as contributing factors in the development of low back pain. However, the relationships between altered trunk kinematics and associated changes in lumbosacral kinetics during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit movements in this population have not yet been assessed. Three-dimensional lumbosacral kinetics (joint moments and powers) were compared between 9 persons with unilateral transfemoral amputation (wearing both a powered and passive knee device), and 9 uninjured controls, performing five consecutive sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit movements. During sit-to-stand movements, lumbosacral joint moments and powers were significantly larger among persons with transfemoral amputation relative to uninjured controls. During stand-to-sit movements, lumbosacral joint moments and powers were also significantly larger among persons with transfemoral amputation relative to uninjured controls, with the exception of sagittal joint powers. Minimal differences in kinetic measures were noted between the powered and passive knee devices among persons with transfemoral amputation across all conditions. Altered lumbosacral kinetics during sitting and standing movements, important activities of daily living, may play a biomechanical role in the onset and/or recurrence of low back pain or injury among persons with lower-limb amputation. PMID:26050872

  1. Persons with unilateral transfemoral amputation have altered lumbosacral kinetics during sitting and standing movements.

    PubMed

    Hendershot, Brad D; Wolf, Erik J

    2015-07-01

    Increases in spinal loading have been related to altered movements of the lower back during gait among persons with lower limb amputation, movements which are self-perceived by these individuals as contributing factors in the development of low back pain. However, the relationships between altered trunk kinematics and associated changes in lumbosacral kinetics during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit movements in this population have not yet been assessed. Three-dimensional lumbosacral kinetics (joint moments and powers) were compared between 9 persons with unilateral transfemoral amputation (wearing both a powered and passive knee device), and 9 uninjured controls, performing five consecutive sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit movements. During sit-to-stand movements, lumbosacral joint moments and powers were significantly larger among persons with transfemoral amputation relative to uninjured controls. During stand-to-sit movements, lumbosacral joint moments and powers were also significantly larger among persons with transfemoral amputation relative to uninjured controls, with the exception of sagittal joint powers. Minimal differences in kinetic measures were noted between the powered and passive knee devices among persons with transfemoral amputation across all conditions. Altered lumbosacral kinetics during sitting and standing movements, important activities of daily living, may play a biomechanical role in the onset and/or recurrence of low back pain or injury among persons with lower-limb amputation.

  2. Effect of a Dynamic Air Cushion on the Development of Leg Edema during Wheelchair Sitting.

    PubMed

    Murata, Jun; Murata, Shin; Ohyama, Michie; Kogo, Haruki; Matsubara, Shohzo

    2014-06-01

    [Purpose] To clarify how a novel dynamic cushion affects the leg edema evoked by wheelchair sitting, we measured the changes in leg volume induced during wheelchair sitting with the dynamic air cushion or a static cushion. [Subjects and Methods] Nine healthy male subjects participated in this study. Leg edema during wheelchair sitting was evaluated with strain gauge plethysmography (the gauge was placed around the middle portion of the lower thigh). Following a period of rest, each subject was asked to sit on a wheelchair containing the dynamic cushion for 15 min. Then, the protocol was repeated with a static cushion. The angles of the knee and ankle joints were set to 90 degrees, and no footrests were used. [Results] The change in leg volume observed during sitting on the dynamic cushion (0.00 ± 0.03 mL/100 mL) was smaller than that observed during sitting on the static cushion (0.02 ± 0.02 mL/100 mL). [Conclusion] These results suggested that the dynamic cushion relieved leg edema during wheelchair sitting.

  3. Prolonged Sitting is Associated with Attenuated Heart Rate Variability during Sleep in Blue-Collar Workers.

    PubMed

    Hallman, David M; Sato, Tatiana; Kristiansen, Jesper; Gupta, Nidhi; Skotte, Jørgen; Holtermann, Andreas

    2015-11-19

    Prolonged sitting is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases and mortality. However, research into the physiological determinants underlying this relationship is still in its infancy. The aim of the study was to determine the extent to which occupational and leisure-time sitting are associated with nocturnal heart rate variability (HRV) in blue-collar workers. The study included 138 blue-collar workers (mean age 45.5 (SD 9.4) years). Sitting-time was measured objectively for four days using tri-axial accelerometers (Actigraph GT3X+) worn on the thigh and trunk. During the same period, a heart rate monitor (Actiheart) was used to sample R-R intervals from the electrocardiogram. Time and frequency domain indices of HRV were only derived during nighttime sleep, and used as markers of cardiac autonomic modulation. Regression analyses with multiple adjustments (age, gender, body mass index, smoking, job-seniority, physical work-load, influence at work, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity) were used to investigate the association between sitting time and nocturnal HRV. We found that occupational sitting-time was negatively associated (p < 0.05) with time and frequency domain HRV indices. Sitting-time explained up to 6% of the variance in HRV, independent of the covariates. Leisure-time sitting was not significantly associated with any HRV indices (p > 0.05). In conclusion, objectively measured occupational sitting-time was associated with reduced nocturnal HRV in blue-collar workers. This indicates an attenuated cardiac autonomic regulation with increasing sitting-time at work regardless of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. The implications of this association for cardiovascular disease risk warrant further investigation via long-term prospective studies and intervention studies.

  4. Prolonged Sitting is Associated with Attenuated Heart Rate Variability during Sleep in Blue-Collar Workers

    PubMed Central

    Hallman, David M; Sato, Tatiana; Kristiansen, Jesper; Gupta, Nidhi; Skotte, Jørgen; Holtermann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged sitting is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases and mortality. However, research into the physiological determinants underlying this relationship is still in its infancy. The aim of the study was to determine the extent to which occupational and leisure-time sitting are associated with nocturnal heart rate variability (HRV) in blue-collar workers. The study included 138 blue-collar workers (mean age 45.5 (SD 9.4) years). Sitting-time was measured objectively for four days using tri-axial accelerometers (Actigraph GT3X+) worn on the thigh and trunk. During the same period, a heart rate monitor (Actiheart) was used to sample R-R intervals from the electrocardiogram. Time and frequency domain indices of HRV were only derived during nighttime sleep, and used as markers of cardiac autonomic modulation. Regression analyses with multiple adjustments (age, gender, body mass index, smoking, job-seniority, physical work-load, influence at work, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity) were used to investigate the association between sitting time and nocturnal HRV. We found that occupational sitting-time was negatively associated (p < 0.05) with time and frequency domain HRV indices. Sitting-time explained up to 6% of the variance in HRV, independent of the covariates. Leisure-time sitting was not significantly associated with any HRV indices (p > 0.05). In conclusion, objectively measured occupational sitting-time was associated with reduced nocturnal HRV in blue-collar workers. This indicates an attenuated cardiac autonomic regulation with increasing sitting-time at work regardless of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. The implications of this association for cardiovascular disease risk warrant further investigation via long-term prospective studies and intervention studies. PMID:26610534

  5. Sublingual Immunotherapy: A Useful Tool for the Allergist in Private Practice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of the author's experience with Sublingual Immunotherapy in a private office setting. Sublingual Immunotherapy should be considered by any allergy practitioner as a useful tool. Sublingual Immunotherapy is safe while at the same time it is effective. It enables the practitioner to treat asthmatics and young children without the concerns implicit with allergy injections. PMID:27340673

  6. Adult total wellness: group differences based on sitting time and physical activity level

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An increasing body of evidence associates a high level of sitting time with poor health outcomes. The benefits of moderate to vigorous-intensity physical activities to various aspects of health are now well documented; however, individuals may engage in moderate-intensity physical activity for at least 30 minutes on five or more days of the week and still exhibit a high level of sitting time. This purpose of this study was to examine differences in total wellness among adults relative to high/low levels of sitting time combined with insufficient/sufficient physical activity (PA). The construct of total wellness incorporates a holistic approach to the body, mind and spirit components of life, an approach which may be more encompassing than some definitions of health. Methods Data were obtained from 226 adult respondents (27 ± 6 years), including 116 (51%) males and 110 (49%) females. Total PA and total sitting time were assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) (short-version). The Wellness Evaluation of Lifestyle Inventory was used to assess total wellness. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was utilised to assess the effects of the sitting time/physical activity group on total wellness. A covariate was included to partial out the effects of age, sex and work status (student or employed). Cross-tabulations were used to show associations between the IPAQ derived high/low levels of sitting time with insufficient/sufficient PA and the three total wellness groups (i.e. high level of wellness, moderate wellness and wellness development needed). Results The majority of the participants were located in the high total sitting time and sufficient PA group. There were statistical differences among the IPAQ groups for total wellness [F (2,220) = 32.5 (p <0.001)]. A Chi-square test revealed a significant difference in the distribution of the IPAQ categories within the classification of wellness [χ2 (N = 226) = 54.5, p < .001

  7. Immunotherapy in human colorectal cancer: Challenges and prospective

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xuan; Suo, Jian; Yan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Human colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed malignancies and the prognosis for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease is extremely poor. Although new chemotherapeutic regimen improves survival rates, therapy with better efficacy and less adverse effects is drastically needed. Immunotherapy has been investigated in human CRC for decades with limited success. However, recent developments of immunotherapy, particularly immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy, have achieved promising clinical benefits in many types of cancer and revived the hope for utilizing such therapy in human CRC. In this review, we will discuss important immunological landscape within the CRC microenvironment and introduce immunoscore system to better describe immunophenotyping in CRC. We will also discuss different immunotherapeutic approaches currently utilized in different phases of clinical trials. Some of those completed or ongoing trials are summarized. Finally, we provide a brief prospective on the future human CRC immunotherapy.

  8. Prostate cancer as a model for tumour immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Drake, Charles G

    2010-08-01

    Advances in basic immunology have led to an improved understanding of the interactions between the immune system and tumours, generating renewed interest in approaches that aim to treat cancer immunologically. As clinical and preclinical studies of tumour immunotherapy illustrate several immunological principles, a review of these data is broadly instructive and is particularly timely now that several agents are beginning to show evidence of efficacy. This is especially relevant in the case of prostate cancer, as recent approval of sipuleucel-T by the US Food and Drug Administration marks the first antigen-specific immunotherapy approved for cancer treatment. Although this Review focuses on immunotherapy for prostate cancer, the principles discussed are applicable to many tumour types, and the approaches discussed are highlighted in that context.

  9. Harnessing immunosurveillance: current developments and future directions in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Drakes, Maureen L; Stiff, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    Despite improved methods of cancer detection and disease management over the last few decades, cancer remains a major public health problem in many societies. Conventional therapies, such as chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery, are not usually sufficient to prevent disease recurrence. Therefore, efforts have been focused on developing novel therapies to manage metastatic disease and to prolong disease-free and overall survival, by modulating the immune system to alleviate immunosuppression, and to enhance antitumor immunity. This review discusses protumor mechanisms in patients that circumvent host immunosurveillance, and addresses current immunotherapy modalities designed to target these mechanisms. Given the complexity of cancer immunosuppressive mechanisms, we propose that identification of novel disease biomarkers will drive the development of more targeted immunotherapy. Finally, administration of different classes of immunotherapy in combination regimens, will be the ultimate route to impact low survival rates in advanced cancer patients. PMID:27471706

  10. Oral immunotherapy for food allergy: mechanisms and role in management.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Węgrzyn, A; Albin, S

    2015-02-01

    With the emergence of food allergy as an important public health problem, it has become clear that there is an unmet need in regard to treatment. In particular, IgE-mediated food allergy that is associated with risk of fatal anaphylaxis has been the subject of multiple studies in the past decade. The growing body of evidence derived from multiple centres and various study designs indicates that for IgE-mediated food allergy, immunomodulation through food immunotherapy is possible; however, the extent of protection afforded by such treatment is highly variable. At this time, the capacity for food immunotherapy to restore permanent tolerance to food has not been demonstrated conclusively. This review will discuss these topics as they apply to the most important studies of food oral immunotherapy.

  11. Strategies to genetically engineer T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Spear, Timothy T; Nagato, Kaoru; Nishimura, Michael I

    2016-06-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most promising and innovative approaches to treat cancer, viral infections, and other immune-modulated diseases. Adoptive immunotherapy using gene-modified T cells is an exciting and rapidly evolving field. Exploiting knowledge of basic T cell biology and immune cell receptor function has fostered innovative approaches to modify immune cell function. Highly translatable clinical technologies have been developed to redirect T cell specificity by introducing designed receptors. The ability to engineer T cells to manifest desired phenotypes and functions is now a thrilling reality. In this review, we focus on outlining different varieties of genetically engineered T cells, their respective advantages and disadvantages as tools for immunotherapy, and their promise and drawbacks in the clinic. PMID:27138532

  12. Propionibacterium acnes in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Lin, Ya-Ching; Two, Aimee; Shu, Chih-Wen; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multi-factorial disease, is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting an estimated 80% of Americans at some point during their lives. The gram-positive and anaerobic Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacterium has been implicated in acne inflammation and pathogenesis. Therapies for acne vulgaris using antibiotics generally lack bacterial specificity, promote the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and cause adverse effects. Immunotherapy against P. acnes or its antigens (sialidase and CAMP factor) has been demonstrated to be effective in mice, attenuating P. acnes-induced inflammation; thus, this method may be applied to develop a potential vaccine targeting P. acnes for acne vulgaris treatment. This review summarizes reports describing the role of P. acnes in the pathogenesis of acne and various immunotherapy-based approaches targeting P. acnes, suggesting the potential effectiveness of immunotherapy for acne vulgaris as well as P. acnes-associated diseases.

  13. T-Cell-Based Immunotherapy for Osteosarcoma: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhan; Li, Binghao; Ren, Yingqing; Ye, Zhaoming

    2016-01-01

    Even though combining surgery with chemotherapy has significantly improved the prognosis of osteosarcoma patients, advanced, metastatic, or recurrent osteosarcomas are often non-responsive to chemotherapy, making development of novel efficient therapeutic methods an urgent need. Adoptive immunotherapy has the potential to be a useful non-surgical modality for treatment of osteosarcoma. Recently, alternative strategies, including immunotherapies using naturally occurring or genetically modified T cells, have been found to hold promise in the treatment of hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. In this review, we will discuss possible T-cell-based therapies against osteosarcoma with a special emphasis on combination strategies to improve the effectiveness of adoptive T cell transfer and, thus, to provide a rationale for the clinical development of immunotherapies.

  14. Cancer Immunotherapy: Selected Targets and Small-Molecule Modulators.

    PubMed

    Weinmann, Hilmar

    2016-03-01

    There is a significant amount of excitement in the scientific community around cancer immunotherapy, as this approach has renewed hope for many cancer patients owing to some recent successes in the clinic. Currently available immuno-oncology therapeutics under clinical development and on the market are mostly biologics (antibodies, proteins, engineered cells, and oncolytic viruses). However, modulation of the immune system with small molecules offers several advantages that may be complementary and potentially synergistic to the use of large biologicals. Therefore, the discovery and development of novel small-molecule modulators is a rapidly growing research area for medicinal chemists working in cancer immunotherapy. This review provides a brief introduction into recent trends related to selected targets and pathways for cancer immunotherapy and their small-molecule pharmacological modulators.

  15. Immunotherapy in human colorectal cancer: Challenges and prospective

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xuan; Suo, Jian; Yan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Human colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed malignancies and the prognosis for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease is extremely poor. Although new chemotherapeutic regimen improves survival rates, therapy with better efficacy and less adverse effects is drastically needed. Immunotherapy has been investigated in human CRC for decades with limited success. However, recent developments of immunotherapy, particularly immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy, have achieved promising clinical benefits in many types of cancer and revived the hope for utilizing such therapy in human CRC. In this review, we will discuss important immunological landscape within the CRC microenvironment and introduce immunoscore system to better describe immunophenotyping in CRC. We will also discuss different immunotherapeutic approaches currently utilized in different phases of clinical trials. Some of those completed or ongoing trials are summarized. Finally, we provide a brief prospective on the future human CRC immunotherapy. PMID:27605872

  16. New insights into antigen specific immunotherapy for chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a stem cell disease in which BCR/ABL plays an important role as an oncoprotein and a molecular and immunogenic target. Despite the success of targeted therapy using tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), CML remains largely incurable, most likely due to the treatment resistance of leukemic stem cells. Several immunotherapies have been developed for CML in different stages and relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. In the this review, several specific immunotherapeutic approaches for CML, including vaccination and adoptive cellular immunotherapy, are discussed along with results from clinical trials, and the value of such immunotherapies in the era of imatinib and leukemia-associated antigens (LAAs), which are capable of inducing specific T cell responses and are appropriate target structures for the immunological targeting of CML cells, are also summarized. PMID:23241263

  17. Immunotherapy in human colorectal cancer: Challenges and prospective.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuan; Suo, Jian; Yan, Jun

    2016-07-28

    Human colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed malignancies and the prognosis for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease is extremely poor. Although new chemotherapeutic regimen improves survival rates, therapy with better efficacy and less adverse effects is drastically needed. Immunotherapy has been investigated in human CRC for decades with limited success. However, recent developments of immunotherapy, particularly immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy, have achieved promising clinical benefits in many types of cancer and revived the hope for utilizing such therapy in human CRC. In this review, we will discuss important immunological landscape within the CRC microenvironment and introduce immunoscore system to better describe immunophenotyping in CRC. We will also discuss different immunotherapeutic approaches currently utilized in different phases of clinical trials. Some of those completed or ongoing trials are summarized. Finally, we provide a brief prospective on the future human CRC immunotherapy. PMID:27605872

  18. Past, present and future targets for immunotherapy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Carlton L; English, Diana P; Roque, Dana M; Pasternak, Monica; Santin, Alessandro D

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the US. Treatments have improved with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy and advanced surgical techniques but disease recurrence is common and fatal in nearly all cases. Current evidence suggests that the immune system and its ability to recognize and eliminate microscopic disease is paramount in preventing recurrence. Ovarian cancer immunotherapy is targeting tumors through active, passive and adoptive approaches. The goal of immunotherapy is to balance the activation of the immune system against cancer while preventing the potential for tremendous toxicity elicited by immune modulation. In this paper we will review the different immunotherapies available for ovarian cancer as well as current ongoing studies and potential future directions.

  19. Melanoma immunotherapy: historical precedents, recent successes and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, Marieke I G; Rozati, Sima; Goldinger, Simone M; Widmer, Daniel S; Dummer, Reinhard; Levesque, Mitchell P

    2013-02-01

    The idea of cancer immunotherapy has been around for more than a century; however, the first immunotherapeutic ipilimumab, an anti-CTLA-4 antibody, has only recently been approved by the US FDA for melanoma. With an increasing understanding of the immune response, it is expected that more therapies will follow. This review aims to provide a general overview of immunotherapy in melanoma. We first explain the development of cancer immunotherapy more than a century ago and the general opinions about it over time. This is followed by a general overview of the immune reaction in order to give insight into the possible targets for therapy. Finally, we will discuss the current therapies for melanoma, their shortcomings and why it is important to develop patient stratification criteria. We conclude with an overview of recent discoveries and possible future therapies.

  20. Immunotherapy and lung cancer: current developments and novel targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Duarte; Turner, Alice; Silva, Maria Dília; Marques, Dânia Sofia; Mellidez, Juan Carlos; Wannesson, Luciano; Mountzios, Giannis; de Mello, Ramon Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a highly prevalent and aggressive disease. In the metastatic setting, major advances include the incorporation of immunotherapy and targeted therapies into the clinician's therapeutic armamentarium. Standard chemotherapeutic regimens have long been reported to interfere with the immune response to the tumor; conversely, antitumor immunity may add to the effects of those therapies. The aim of immunotherapy is to specifically enhance the immune response directed to the tumor. Recently, many trials addressed the role of such therapies for metastatic NSCLC treatment: ipilimumab, tremelimumab, nivolumab and lambrolizumab are immunotherapeutic agents of main interest in this field. In addition, anti-tumor vaccines, such as MAGE-A3, Tecetomide, TG4010, CIMAvax, ganglioside vaccines, tumor cell vaccines and dendritic cell vaccines, emerged as potent inducers of immune response against the tumor. The current work aims to address the most recent developments regarding these innovative immunotherapies and their implementation in the treatment of metastatic NSCLC.

  1. Sublingual immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mauro, Marina; Ridolo, Erminia

    2015-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced in the 1980s as a safer option to subcutaneous immunotherapy and in the latest decade achieved significant advances. Its efficacy in allergic rhinitis is supported by a number of meta-analyses. The development of SLIT preparations in tablets to fulfill the requirements of regulatory agencies for quality of allergen extracts made available optimal products for grass-pollen-induced allergic rhinitis. Preparations of other allergens based on the same production methods are currently in progress. A notable outcome of SLIT, that is shared with subcutaneous immunotherapy, is the evident cost-effectiveness, showing significant cost savings as early as 3 months from starting the treatment, that become as high as 80% compared with drug treatment in the ensuing years.

  2. T-Cell-Based Immunotherapy for Osteosarcoma: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhan; Li, Binghao; Ren, Yingqing; Ye, Zhaoming

    2016-01-01

    Even though combining surgery with chemotherapy has significantly improved the prognosis of osteosarcoma patients, advanced, metastatic, or recurrent osteosarcomas are often non-responsive to chemotherapy, making development of novel efficient therapeutic methods an urgent need. Adoptive immunotherapy has the potential to be a useful non-surgical modality for treatment of osteosarcoma. Recently, alternative strategies, including immunotherapies using naturally occurring or genetically modified T cells, have been found to hold promise in the treatment of hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. In this review, we will discuss possible T-cell-based therapies against osteosarcoma with a special emphasis on combination strategies to improve the effectiveness of adoptive T cell transfer and, thus, to provide a rationale for the clinical development of immunotherapies. PMID:27683579

  3. Propionibacterium acnes in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Lin, Ya-Ching; Two, Aimee; Shu, Chih-Wen; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multi-factorial disease, is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting an estimated 80% of Americans at some point during their lives. The gram-positive and anaerobic Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacterium has been implicated in acne inflammation and pathogenesis. Therapies for acne vulgaris using antibiotics generally lack bacterial specificity, promote the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and cause adverse effects. Immunotherapy against P. acnes or its antigens (sialidase and CAMP factor) has been demonstrated to be effective in mice, attenuating P. acnes-induced inflammation; thus, this method may be applied to develop a potential vaccine targeting P. acnes for acne vulgaris treatment. This review summarizes reports describing the role of P. acnes in the pathogenesis of acne and various immunotherapy-based approaches targeting P. acnes, suggesting the potential effectiveness of immunotherapy for acne vulgaris as well as P. acnes-associated diseases. PMID:26264195

  4. Past, present and future targets for immunotherapy in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Carlton L; English, Diana P; Roque, Dana M; Pasternak, Monica; Santin, Alessandro D

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the US. Treatments have improved with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy and advanced surgical techniques but disease recurrence is common and fatal in nearly all cases. Current evidence suggests that the immune system and its ability to recognize and eliminate microscopic disease is paramount in preventing recurrence. Ovarian cancer immunotherapy is targeting tumors through active, passive and adoptive approaches. The goal of immunotherapy is to balance the activation of the immune system against cancer while preventing the potential for tremendous toxicity elicited by immune modulation. In this paper we will review the different immunotherapies available for ovarian cancer as well as current ongoing studies and potential future directions. PMID:25524384

  5. Cellular immunotherapy for refractory hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other aggressive refractory hematological malignancies unresponsive to upfront therapy remain difficult conditions to treat. Often, the focus of therapy is centered on achieving complete remission of disease in order to proceed with a consolidative stem cell transplant. At issue with this paradigm is the multitude of patients who are unable to achieve complete remission with standard chemotherapeutic options. A major benefit of transplantation is the graft versus tumor effect that follows successful engraftment. However, with this graft versus tumor effect comes the risk of graft versus host disease. Therefore, alternative treatment options that utilize immunotherapy while minimizing toxicity are warranted. Herein, we propose a novel treatment protocol in which haploidentical peripheral blood stem cells are infused into patients with refractory hematological malignancies. The end goal of cellular therapy is not engraftment but instead is the purposeful rejection of donor cells so as to elicit a potent immune reaction that appears to break host tumor tolerance. Methods/design The trial is a FDA and institutional Rhode Island Hospital/The Miriam Hospital IRB approved Phase I/II study to determine the efficacy and safety of haploidentical peripheral blood cell infusions into patients with refractory hematological malignancies. The primary objective is the overall response rate while secondary objectives will assess the degree and duration of response as well as safety considerations. Patients with refractory acute leukemias and aggressive lymphomas over the age of 18 are eligible. Donors will be selected amongst family members. Full HLA typing of patients and donors will occur as will chimerism assessments. 1-2x108 CD3+ cells/kilogram will be infused on Day 0 without preconditioning. Patients will be monitored for their response to therapy, in particular for the development of a cytokine release syndrome (CRS) that has been

  6. Discovering Differences in Acoustic Emission Between Healthy and Osteoarthritic Knees Using a Four-Phase Model of Sit-Stand-Sit Movements

    PubMed Central

    Shark, Lik-Kwan; Chen, Hongzhi; Goodacre, John

    2010-01-01

    By performing repeated sit-stand-sit movements to create stress on knee joints, short transient bursts of high frequency acoustic emission (AE) released by the knee joints were acquired from two age matched groups consisting of healthy and osteoarthritic (OA) knees, and significant differences between these two groups were discovered from the signal analysis performed. The analysis is based on a four-phase model of sit-stand-sit movements and a two-feature descriptor of AE bursts. The four phases are derived from joint angle measurement during movement, and they consist of the ascending-acceleration and ascending-deceleration phases in the sit-to-stand movement, followed by the descending-acceleration and descending-deceleration phases in the stand-to-sit movement. The two features are extracted from AE measurement during movement, and they consist of the peak magnitude value and average signal level of each AE burst. The proposed analysis method is shown to provide a high sensitivity for differentiation of the two age matched healthy and OA groups, with the most significant difference found to come from the peak magnitude value in the ascending-deceleration phase, clear quantity and strength differences in the image based visual display of their AE feature profiles due to substantially more AE bursts from OA knee joints with higher peak magnitude values and higher average signal levels, and two well separated clusters in the space formed by the principal components. These results provide ample support for further development of AE as a novel tool to facilitate dynamic integrity assessment of knee joints in clinic and home settings. PMID:21379396

  7. Combined Cancer Immunotherapy Against Aurora Kinase A.

    PubMed

    Kaštánková, Iva; Poláková, Ingrid; Dušková, Martina; Šmahel, Michal

    2016-05-01

    Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is a centrosomal protein that is overexpressed in a number of human malignancies and can contribute to tumor progression. As we used this protein as a target of DNA immunization, we increased its immunogenicity by the addition of the PADRE helper epitope and decreased its potential oncogenicity by mutagenesis of the kinase domain. For in vitro analysis of induced immune responses in mice, we identified the Aurka(220-228) nonapeptide representing an H-2Kb epitope. As DNA vaccination against the Aurka self-antigen by a gene gun did not show any antitumor effect, we combined DNA immunization with anti-CD25 treatment that depletes mainly regulatory T cells. Whereas 1 anti-CD25 dose injected before DNA vaccination did not enhance the activation of Aurka-specific splenocytes, 3 doses administered on days of immunizations augmented about 10-fold immunity against Aurka. However, an opposite effect was found for antitumor immunity-only 1 anti-CD25 dose combined with DNA vaccination reduced tumor growth. Moreover, the administration of 3 doses of anti-CD25 antibody alone accelerated tumor growth. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating cells showed that 3 anti-CD25 doses not only efficiently depleted regulatory T cells but also activated helper T cells and CD3(-)CD25(+) cells. Next, we found that blockade of the PD-1 receptor initiated 1 week after the first immunization was necessary for significant inhibition of tumor growth with therapeutic DNA vaccination against Aurka combined with depletion of CD25 cells. Our results suggest that combined cancer immunotherapy should be carefully evaluated to achieve the optimal antitumor effect. PMID:27070447

  8. Amyloid-ß-directed immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lannfelt, L; Relkin, N R; Siemers, E R

    2014-01-01

    Lannfelt L, Relkin NR, Siemers ER (Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY; and Eli Lilly and Co., Indianapolis, IN, USA). Amyloid-ß-directed immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s disease. (Key Symposium). J Intern Med 2014; 275: 284–295. Current treatment options for Alzheimer's disease (AD) are limited to medications that reduce dementia symptoms. Given the rapidly ageing populations in most areas of the world, new therapeutic interventions for AD are urgently needed. In recent years, a number of drug candidates targeting the amyloid-ß (Aß) peptide have advanced into clinical trials; however, most have failed because of safety issues or lack of efficacy. The Aß peptide is central to the pathogenesis, and immunotherapy against Aß has attracted considerable interest. It offers the possibility to reach the target with highly specific drugs. Active immunization and passive immunization have been the most widely studied approaches to immunotherapy of AD. A favourable aspect of active immunization is the capacity for a small number of vaccinations to generate a prolonged antibody response. A potential disadvantage is the variability in the antibody response across patients. The potential advantages of passive immunotherapy include the reproducible delivery of a known amount of therapeutic antibodies to the patient and rapid clearance of those antibodies if side effects develop. A disadvantage is the requirement for repeated infusions of antibodies over time. After more than a decade of research, anti-amyloid immunotherapy remains one of the most promising emerging strategies for developing disease-modifying treatments for AD. In this review, we examine the presently ongoing Aß-directed immunotherapies that have passed clinical development Phase IIa. PMID:24605809

  9. Tumor microenvironment: hypoxia and buffer capacity for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenghu; Gao, Shangxian; Qu, Zhonghua; Zhang, Lining

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, significant progress has been made in the study of tumor biology and anti-tumor immunotherapy. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of tumor progression still remain obscure. As we know, tumor microenvironment that can directly influence tumor development and prognosis has attracted much attention of large number of immunologists. Accumulated evidence has suggested that tumor microenvironment is in a hypoxic condition, under which immune cells may exhibit distinct functions compared to those under normal oxygen tension. The article we propose here will offer a novel point of view for understanding tumor microenvironment in order to instruct clinical immunotherapy. Just like the pH buffer system in human body, interactions of immune cells in tumor microenvironment may also constitute a buffer system, the balance of which is of great importance during immunotherapy for tumors. However, many protocols for tumor immunotherapy in clinic at present have not taken it into account, so the therapeutic outcome is often disappointing. In the present study, we have demonstrated the effect of Corynebacterium parvum, a well known immune stimulator, on malignant melanoma. Cell ingredients in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and their anti-tumor effect have been altered when dosage of Corynebacterium parvum is changed. So, to obtain better therapeutic purposes, what we should do first is to detect an index to evaluate immune buffer capacity for the patient during tumor immunotherapy, then to choose appropriate drug doses to augment buffer capacity for their immune buffer system. Taken together, the hypothesis proposed here may help understand the pathogenesis of tumor progression and design more effective strategy for clinical immunotherapy for tumors. PMID:17360127

  10. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients. PMID:27158196

  11. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients.

  12. Vaccines versus immunotherapy: Overview of approaches in deciding between options

    PubMed Central

    Dalgleish, Angus G

    2015-01-01

    This review compares the optimal use of vaccines vs. other forms of immunotherapy, which includes cytokines, such as IL-2, monoclonal antibodies, such as the ‘checkpoint inhibitors’, against CTLA-4 and PD-1. The review includes both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines using a variety of technologies. It is already established that vaccines can be enhanced by other immunotherapies, such as cytokines (IL-2) and there is scope for combining both of these with the ‘checkpoint’ antibodies. Moreover, both can be enhanced with other modalities, such as radiotherapy, ablative therapy and both high and low dose chemotherapies. PMID:25625932

  13. Current Immunotherapies for Sarcoma: Clinical Trials and Rationale

    PubMed Central

    Mitsis, Demytra; Francescutti, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoma tumors are rare and heterogeneous, yet they possess many characteristics that may facilitate immunotherapeutic responses. Both active strategies including vaccines and passive strategies involving cellular adoptive immunotherapy have been applied clinically. Results of these clinical trials indicate a distinct benefit for select patients. The recent breakthrough of immunologic checkpoint inhibition is being rapidly introduced to a variety of tumor types including sarcoma. It is anticipated that these emerging immunotherapies will exhibit clinical efficacy for a variety of sarcomas. The increasing ability to tailor immunologic therapies to sarcoma patients will undoubtedly generate further enthusiasm and clinical research for this treatment modality. PMID:27703409

  14. MUC1 as a target antigen for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Acres, Bruce; Limacher, Jean-Marc

    2005-08-01

    The cancer-associated antigen MUC1 is overexpressed and modified by tumor cells in over half of all cancer cases. Despite various complexities associated with this antigen, it is well worth pursuing as a vaccine for the immunotherapy of cancer. In this review, the authors describe the discovery of MUC1 and its association with cancer, recent observations showing that the immunology of MUC1 is complicated, animal data showing that it can be a target for immune-mediated tumor rejection, and finally, preliminary clinical results to show that vaccine-based immunotherapy with MUC1 does have an impact on the therapy of cancer. PMID:16117706

  15. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients. PMID:27158196

  16. Gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Larson, Sarah; De Oliveira, Satiro N

    2014-01-01

    The rapid expansion of available cancer immunotherapies has resulted in favorable early outcomes. Specifically the use of gene therapy to introduce chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) and T cell receptors (TCRs) in T cells creates new immunotherapy options for patients. While showing early success with these approaches, limitations remain that can be overcome by the use of modification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to express CARs and TCRs. With modern gene therapy technologies, increased safety and control of the modification of the HSCs can be achieved through the use of a suicide gene.

  17. Porous silicon advances in drug delivery and immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Savage, D; Liu, X; Curley, S; Ferrari, M; Serda, RE

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical applications of porous silicon include drug delivery, imaging, diagnostics and immunotherapy. This review summarizes new silicon particle fabrication techniques, dynamics of cellular transport, advances in the multistage vector approach to drug delivery, and the use of porous silicon as immune adjuvants. Recent findings support superior therapeutic efficacy of the multistage vector approach over single particle drug delivery systems in mouse models of ovarian and breast cancer. With respect to vaccine development, multivalent presentation of pathogen-associated molecular patterns on the particle surface creates powerful platforms for immunotherapy, with the porous matrix able to carry both antigens and immune modulators. PMID:23845260

  18. Exercise Not an 'Antidote' to Too Much Sitting, Heart Experts Say

    MedlinePlus

    ... rather than "Sit and Speak" while talking on cell phones or land lines. Introduce walking meetings to the ... all day long, set an alarm on your cell phone (on low) to remind yourself to stand up ...

  19. Hour of Exercise a Day May Offset Sitting's Toll on Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_160102.html Hour of Exercise a Day May Offset Sitting's Toll on Health Study found ... News) -- Just one hour of physical activity a day -- something as simple as a brisk walk or ...

  20. Safe and comfortable assistance for elderly during lie-to-sit transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervez, Aslam; Ryu, Jeha

    2009-12-01

    While assisting elderly in mobility tasks (such as walking, sit-to-stand, and lie-to-sit etc.) the elderly and robots work cooperatively and remain in continuous physical contact during the task. In order to realize a safe and comfortable assistance to elderly, the natural motion patterns of the elderly during a particular task should be respected and augmented by the robot. This paper is focused on designing robot motion paths that accommodate the natural movement patterns of elderly and are based on modeling the caregivers' actions reported in the biomechanics and elder-care literature. As an example, one such motion path for lie-to-sit and sit-to-stand activities is implemented on SpiderBot-II and experimental results are reported in the paper. Proposed motion path is compared with conventional motion path by evaluating through quantitative safety and comfort indices for mobility assistance robots.