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Sample records for allergic asthma models

  1. Astragalin Attenuates Allergic Inflammation in a Murine Asthma Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiping; Cheng, Yue; Zhang, Xiaoshuang; Zhang, Xue; Chen, Shuxian; Hu, Zongmiao; Zhou, Chunmei; Zhang, Enhu; Ma, Shiping

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to determine the protective effects and the underlying mechanisms of astragalin (AG) on ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic inflammation in a mouse model of allergic asthma. Our study demonstrated that AG inhibited OVA-induced increases in eosinophil count; IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and IgE were recovered in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and increased IFN-γ level in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Histological studies demonstrated that AG substantially inhibited OVA-induced eosinophilia in lung tissue. Western blot analysis demonstrated that AG treatments markedly inhibited OVA-induced SOCS-3 expression and enhancement of SOCS-5 expression in an asthma model. Our findings support the possible use of AG as a therapeutic drug for patients with allergic asthma.

  2. Abietic acid attenuates allergic airway inflammation in a mouse allergic asthma model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi; Zhaoyu, Liu; Xiangming, Fang; Chunyi, Lin; Jiayu, Pan; Lu, Shen; Jitao, Chen; Liangcai, Chen; Jifang, Liu

    2016-09-01

    Abietic acid (AA), one of the terpenoids isolated from Pimenta racemosa var. grissea, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. However, the anti-allergic effects of AA remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-allergic effects of AA in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma murine model. The model of mouse asthma was established by induction of OVA. AA (10, 20, 40mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage 1h after the OVA treatment on days 21 to 23. At 24h after the last challenge, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were collected to assess pathological changes, cytokines production, and NF-κB expression. The results showed that AA attenuated lung histopathologic changes, inflammatory cells infiltration, and bronchial hyper-responsiveness. AA also inhibited OVA-induced the nitric oxide (NO), IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and OVA-specific IgE production, as well as NF-κB activation. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that AA exhibited protective effects against OVA-induced allergic asthma in mice and the possible mechanism was involved in inhibiting NF-κB activation. PMID:27318791

  3. Genetics Home Reference: allergic asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions allergic asthma allergic asthma Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Asthma is a breathing disorder characterized by inflammation of ...

  4. Development of an experimental model of maternal allergic asthma during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Vicki L; Moss, Timothy J M; Wooldridge, Amy L; Gatford, Kathryn L; Liravi, Bahar; Kim, Dasom; Muhlhausler, Beverly S; Morrison, Janna L; Davies, Andrew; De Matteo, Robert; Wallace, Megan J; Bischof, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Maternal asthma during pregnancy adversely affects pregnancy outcomes but identification of the cause/s, and the ability to evaluate interventions, is limited by the lack of an appropriate animal model. We therefore aimed to characterise maternal lung and cardiovascular responses and fetal-placental growth and lung surfactant levels in a sheep model of allergic asthma. Immune and airway functions were studied in singleton-bearing ewes, either sensitised before pregnancy to house dust mite (HDM, allergic, n = 7) or non-allergic (control, n = 5), and subjected to repeated airway challenges with HDM (allergic group) or saline (control group) throughout gestation. Maternal lung, fetal and placental phenotypes were characterised at 140 ± 1 days gestational age (term, ∼147 days). The eosinophil influx into lungs was greater after HDM challenge in allergic ewes than after saline challenge in control ewes before mating and in late gestation. Airway resistance increased throughout pregnancy in allergic but not control ewes, consistent with increased airway smooth muscle in allergic ewes. Maternal allergic asthma decreased relative fetal weight (-12%) and altered placental phenotype to a more mature form. Expression of surfactant protein B mRNA was 48% lower in fetuses from allergic ewes than controls, with a similar trend for surfactant protein D. Thus, allergic asthma in pregnant sheep modifies placental phenotype, and inhibits fetal growth and lung development consistent with observations from human pregnancies. Preconceptional allergen sensitisation and repeated airway challenges in pregnant sheep therefore provides an animal model to identify mechanisms of altered fetal development and adverse pregnancy outcomes caused by maternal asthma in pregnancy.

  5. Hormetic Effect of Chronic Hypergravity in a Mouse Model of Allergic Asthma and Rhinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Tae Young; Jung, Ah-Yeoun; Kim, Young Hyo

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of chronic hypergravity in a mouse model of allergic asthma and rhinitis. Forty BALB/c mice were divided as: group A (n = 10, control) sensitized and challenged with saline, group B (n = 10, asthma) challenged by intraperitoneal and intranasal ovalbumin (OVA) to induce allergic asthma and rhinitis, and groups C (n = 10, asthma/rotatory control) and D (n = 10, asthma/hypergravity) exposed to 4 weeks of rotation with normogravity (1G) or hypergravity (5G) during induction of asthma/rhinitis. Group D showed significantly decreased eosinophils, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in their BAL fluid compared with groups B and C (p < 0.05). In real-time polymerase chain reaction using lung homogenate, the expression of IL-1β was significantly upregulated (p < 0.001) and IL-4 and IL-10 significantly downregulated (p < 0.05) in group D. Infiltration of inflammatory cells into lung parenchyma and turbinate, and the thickness of respiratory epithelium was significantly reduced in group D (p < 0.05). The expression of Bcl-2 and heme oxygenase-1 were significantly downregulated, Bax and extracellular dismutase significantly upregulated in Group D. Therefore, chronic hypergravity could have a hormetic effect for allergic asthma and rhinitis via regulation of genes involved in antioxidative and proapoptotic pathways. It is possible that we could use hypergravity machinery for treating allergic respiratory disorders.

  6. Hormetic Effect of Chronic Hypergravity in a Mouse Model of Allergic Asthma and Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Tae Young; Jung, Ah-Yeoun; Kim, Young Hyo

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of chronic hypergravity in a mouse model of allergic asthma and rhinitis. Forty BALB/c mice were divided as: group A (n = 10, control) sensitized and challenged with saline, group B (n = 10, asthma) challenged by intraperitoneal and intranasal ovalbumin (OVA) to induce allergic asthma and rhinitis, and groups C (n = 10, asthma/rotatory control) and D (n = 10, asthma/hypergravity) exposed to 4 weeks of rotation with normogravity (1G) or hypergravity (5G) during induction of asthma/rhinitis. Group D showed significantly decreased eosinophils, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in their BAL fluid compared with groups B and C (p < 0.05). In real-time polymerase chain reaction using lung homogenate, the expression of IL-1β was significantly upregulated (p < 0.001) and IL-4 and IL-10 significantly downregulated (p < 0.05) in group D. Infiltration of inflammatory cells into lung parenchyma and turbinate, and the thickness of respiratory epithelium was significantly reduced in group D (p < 0.05). The expression of Bcl-2 and heme oxygenase-1 were significantly downregulated, Bax and extracellular dismutase significantly upregulated in Group D. Therefore, chronic hypergravity could have a hormetic effect for allergic asthma and rhinitis via regulation of genes involved in antioxidative and proapoptotic pathways. It is possible that we could use hypergravity machinery for treating allergic respiratory disorders. PMID:27251783

  7. [Epigenetics in allergic diseases and asthma].

    PubMed

    Castro-Rodríguez, José A; Krause, Bernardo J; Uauy, Ricardo; Casanello, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases and asthma are the result of complex interactions between genetic predisposition and environmental factors. Asthma is one of the most prevalent chronic disease among children. In this article we review some environmental factors like: allergen exposition, tobacco, bacteria, microbial components, diet, obesity and stress, which influences during intrauterine and infancy life in the epigenetic regulation of asthma and allergic diseases. The review has been done in three models: in-vitro, animal and human. PMID:27055949

  8. [Epigenetics in allergic diseases and asthma].

    PubMed

    Castro-Rodríguez, José A; Krause, Bernardo J; Uauy, Ricardo; Casanello, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases and asthma are the result of complex interactions between genetic predisposition and environmental factors. Asthma is one of the most prevalent chronic disease among children. In this article we review some environmental factors like: allergen exposition, tobacco, bacteria, microbial components, diet, obesity and stress, which influences during intrauterine and infancy life in the epigenetic regulation of asthma and allergic diseases. The review has been done in three models: in-vitro, animal and human.

  9. DOSE-DEPENDENT INCREASE IN THE PRODUCTION OF NERVE GROWTH FACTOR, NEUROTROPHIN-3, AND NEUROTROPHIN-4 IN A PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM-INDUCED ALLERGIC ASTHMA MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory


    Increased levels of neurotrophins (nerve growth factor [NGF], brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], neurotrophin [NT]-3, and/or NT-4) have been associated with asthma as well as in animal models of allergic asthma. In our mouse model for fungal allergic asthma, repeated ...

  10. Pericytes contribute to airway remodeling in a mouse model of chronic allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Folestad, Erika; Rowley, Jessica E.; Noll, Elisa M.; Walker, Simone A.; Lloyd, Clare M.; Rankin, Sara M.; Pietras, Kristian; Eriksson, Ulf; Fuxe, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Myofibroblast accumulation, subepithelial fibrosis, and vascular remodeling are complicating features of chronic asthma, but the mechanisms are not clear. Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) regulate the fate and function of various mesenchymal cells and have been implicated as mediators of lung fibrosis. However, it is not known whether PDGF-BB signaling via PDGFRβ, which is critical for the recruitment of pericytes to blood vessels, plays a role in airway remodeling in chronic asthma. In the present study, we used a selective PDGFRβ inhibitor (CP-673451) to investigate the role of PDGFRβ signaling in the development of airway remodeling and lung dysfunction in an established mouse model of house dust mite-induced chronic allergic asthma. Unexpectedly, we found that pharmacological inhibition of PDGFRβ signaling in the context of chronic aeroallergen exposure led to exacerbated lung dysfunction and airway smooth muscle thickening. Further studies revealed that the inflammatory response to aeroallergen challenge in mice was associated with decreased PDGF-BB expression and the loss of pericytes from the airway microvasculature. In parallel, cells positive for pericyte markers accumulated in the subepithelial region of chronically inflamed airways. This process was exacerbated in animals treated with CP-673451. The results indicate that perturbed PDGF-BB/PDGFRβ signaling and pericyte accumulation in the airway wall may contribute to airway remodeling in chronic allergic asthma. PMID:25637607

  11. Pericytes contribute to airway remodeling in a mouse model of chronic allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jill R; Folestad, Erika; Rowley, Jessica E; Noll, Elisa M; Walker, Simone A; Lloyd, Clare M; Rankin, Sara M; Pietras, Kristian; Eriksson, Ulf; Fuxe, Jonas

    2015-04-01

    Myofibroblast accumulation, subepithelial fibrosis, and vascular remodeling are complicating features of chronic asthma, but the mechanisms are not clear. Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) regulate the fate and function of various mesenchymal cells and have been implicated as mediators of lung fibrosis. However, it is not known whether PDGF-BB signaling via PDGFRβ, which is critical for the recruitment of pericytes to blood vessels, plays a role in airway remodeling in chronic asthma. In the present study, we used a selective PDGFRβ inhibitor (CP-673451) to investigate the role of PDGFRβ signaling in the development of airway remodeling and lung dysfunction in an established mouse model of house dust mite-induced chronic allergic asthma. Unexpectedly, we found that pharmacological inhibition of PDGFRβ signaling in the context of chronic aeroallergen exposure led to exacerbated lung dysfunction and airway smooth muscle thickening. Further studies revealed that the inflammatory response to aeroallergen challenge in mice was associated with decreased PDGF-BB expression and the loss of pericytes from the airway microvasculature. In parallel, cells positive for pericyte markers accumulated in the subepithelial region of chronically inflamed airways. This process was exacerbated in animals treated with CP-673451. The results indicate that perturbed PDGF-BB/PDGFRβ signaling and pericyte accumulation in the airway wall may contribute to airway remodeling in chronic allergic asthma. PMID:25637607

  12. Long term evaluation of mesenchymal stem cell therapy in a feline model of chronic allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Trzil, Julie E; Masseau, Isabelle; Webb, Tracy L; Chang, Chee-hoon; Dodam, John R; Cohn, Leah A; Liu, Hong; Quimby, Jessica M; Dow, Steven W; Reinero, Carol R

    2014-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) decrease airway eosinophilia, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and remodeling in murine models of acutely induced asthma. We hypothesized that MSCs would diminish these hallmark features in a chronic feline asthma model. Objective To document effects of allogeneic, adipose-derived MSCs on airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and remodeling over time and investigate mechanisms by which MSCs alter local and systemic immunologic responses in chronic experimental feline allergic asthma. Methods Cats with chronic, experimentally-induced asthma received six intravenous infusions of MSCs (0.36–2.5X10E7 MSCs/infusion) or placebo bimonthly at the time of study enrollment. Cats were evaluated at baseline and longitudinally for one year. Outcome measures included: bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytology to assess airway eosinophilia; pulmonary mechanics and clinical scoring to assess AHR; and thoracic computed tomographic (CT) scans to assess structural changes (airway remodeling). CT scans were evaluated using a scoring system for lung attenuation (LA) and bronchial wall thickening (BWT). To assess mechanisms of MSC action, immunologic assays including allergen-specific IgE, cellular IL-10 production, and allergen-specific lymphocyte proliferation were performed. Results There were no differences between treatment groups or over time with respect to airway eosinophilia or AHR. However, significantly lower LA and BWT scores were noted in CT images of MSC-treated animals compared to placebo-treated cats at month 8 of the study (LA p=0.0311; BWT p=0.0489). No differences were noted between groups in the immunologic assays. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance When administered after development of chronic allergic feline asthma, MSCs failed to reduce airway inflammation and AHR. However, repeated administration of MSCs at the start of study did reduce computed tomographic measures of airway remodeling by month 8, though

  13. Polygonum multiflorum Decreases Airway Allergic Symptoms in a Murine Model of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Chen; Lee, Yueh-Lun; Wang, Chien-N; Tsai, Hsing-Chuan; Chiu, Chun-Lung; Liu, Leroy F; Lin, Hung-Yun; Wu, Reen

    2016-01-01

    The root of Polygonum multiflorum (also called He-Shou-Wu in Chinese) is a common herb and medicinal food in Asia used for its anti-aging properties. Our study investigated the therapeutic potential of an extract of the root of Polygonum multiflorum (PME) in allergic asthma by using a mouse model. Feeding of 0.5 and 1 mg/mouse PME inhibited ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma symptoms, including airway inflammation, mucus production, and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR), in a dose-dependent manner. To discern PME's mechanism of action, we examined the profile and cytokine production of inflammatory cells in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF). We found that eosinophils, the main inflammatory cell infiltrate in the lung of OVA-immunized mice, significantly decreased after PME treatment. Th2 cytokine levels, including interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13, eotaxin, and the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[Formula: see text], decreased in PME-treated mice. Elevated mRNA expression of Th2 transcription factor GATA-3 in the lung tissue was also inhibited after oral feeding of PME in OVA-immunized mice. Thus, we conclude that PME produces anti-asthma activity through the inhibition of Th2 cell activation. PMID:26916919

  14. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; Moraes de Carvalho, Katharinne Ingrid; Silva Mendes, Diego da; Melo, Christianne Bandeira; Martins, Marco Aurélio; Silva Dias, Celidarque da; Piuvezam, Márcia Regina; and others

    2013-11-15

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca{sup ++} influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. - Highlights: • Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Chondrodendron platyphyllum. • Curine inhibits eosinophil influx and activation and airway hyper-responsiveness. • Curine

  15. Effects of Caryota mitis profilin-loaded PLGA nanoparticles in a murine model of allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiaojun; Zeng, Xiaowei; Zhang, Xinxin; Ma, Li; Liu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Haiqiong; Mei, Lin; Liu, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Background Pollen allergy is the most common allergic disease. However, tropical pollens, such as those of Palmae, have seldom been investigated compared with the specific immunotherapy studies done on hyperallergenic birch, olive, and ragweed pollens. Although poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) has been extensively applied as a biodegradable polymer in medical devices, it has rarely been utilized as a vaccine adjuvant to prevent and treat allergic disease. In this study, we investigated the immunotherapeutic effects of recombinant Caryota mitis profilin (rCmP)-loaded PLGA nanoparticles and the underlying mechanisms involved. Methods A mouse model of allergenic asthma was established for specific immunotherapy using rCmP-loaded PLGA nanoparticles as the adjuvant. The model was evaluated by determining airway hyperresponsiveness and levels of serum-specific antibodies (IgE, IgG, and IgG2a) and cytokines, and observing histologic sections of lung tissue. Results The rCmP-loaded PLGA nanoparticles effectively inhibited generation of specific IgE and secretion of the Th2 cytokine interleukin-4, facilitated generation of specific IgG2a and secretion of the Th1 cytokine interferon-gamma, converted the Th2 response to Th1, and evidently alleviated allergic symptoms. Conclusion PLGA functions more appropriately as a specific immunotherapy adjuvant for allergen vaccines than does conventional Al(OH)3 due to its superior efficacy, longer potency, and markedly fewer side effects. The rCmP-loaded PLGA nanoparticles developed herein offer a promising avenue for specific immunotherapy in allergic asthma. PMID:24376349

  16. INCREASED PRODUCTION OF NERVE GROWTH FACTOR, NEUROTROPHIN-3, AND NEUROTROPHIN-4 IN A PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM -INDUCED ALLERGIC ASTHMA MODEL IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased levels of neurotrophins (nerve growth factor [NGF], brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], neurotrophin [NT]-3, and/or NT-4) have been associated with asthmatics and in animal models of allergic asthma. In our mouse model for fungal allergic asthma, repeated pulmona...

  17. Asthma and Respiratory Allergic Disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases such as allergy is complex and poorly understood. The causes of chronic allergic diseases including asthma involve to a large extent, immunomodulation of the adaptive and particularly the innate immune systems and are markedly influen...

  18. Anti-asthmatic effects of matrine in a mouse model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Wang, Jing; Ma, Zhanqing; Ma, Shiping

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the anti-asthmatic effects of matrine and the possible mechanisms. Asthma model was established by ovalbumin-induced. A total of 50 mice were randomly assigned to five experimental groups: control, model, dexamethasone (2 mg/kg) and matrine (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg). Airway resistance (Raw) was measured, histological studies were evaluated by the hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining, interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-13 were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), IL-4 and IL-13 signal protein STAT6 was measured by western blotting. Our study demonstrated that matrine inhibited OVA-induced increases in Raw and eosinophil count; IL-4 and IL-13 were recovered. Histological studies demonstrated that matrine substantially inhibited OVA-induced eosinophilia in lung tissue. Western blotting studies demonstrated that matrine substantially inhibited STAT6 protein level. These findings suggest that matrine may effectively ameliorate the progression of asthma and could be used as a therapy for patients with allergic asthma.

  19. Epigenetic regulation of asthma and allergic disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics of asthma and allergic disease is a field that has expanded greatly in the last decade. Previously thought only in terms of cell differentiation, it is now evident the epigenetics regulate many processes. With T cell activation, commitment toward an allergic phenotype is tightly regulated by DNA methylation and histone modifications at the Th2 locus control region. When normal epigenetic control is disturbed, either experimentally or by environmental exposures, Th1/Th2 balance can be affected. Epigenetic marks are not only transferred to daughter cells with cell replication but they can also be inherited through generations. In animal models, with constant environmental pressure, epigenetically determined phenotypes are amplified through generations and can last up to 2 generations after the environment is back to normal. In this review on the epigenetic regulation of asthma and allergic diseases we review basic epigenetic mechanisms and discuss the epigenetic control of Th2 cells. We then cover the transgenerational inheritance model of epigenetic traits and discuss how this could relate the amplification of asthma and allergic disease prevalence and severity through the last decades. Finally, we discuss recent epigenetic association studies for allergic phenotypes and related environmental risk factors as well as potential underlying mechanisms for these associations. PMID:24932182

  20. DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC ASTHMA RESPONSES TO PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    Indoor mold has been associated with development of allergic asthma. Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and its viable conidia can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. The hypothesis o...

  1. Silencing of c-kit with small interference RNA attenuates inflammation in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Wang, Tao; Dong, Jia-Jia; Liao, Zeng-Lin; Wen, Fu-Qiang

    2012-07-01

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by the inflammation of the airways due to infiltration and activation of several inflammatory cells that produce cytokines. c-kit, a proto-oncogene that encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor, has been found to be associated with allergic inflammation. The aim of the present study was to assess whether silencing of c-kit with small interference RNA (siRNA) would attenuate inflammation in allergic asthma. A mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma was treated with systemic administration of anti-c-kit siRNA to inhibit the expression of the c-kit gene. siRNAs were injected through the vena caudalis. We measured inflammatory response in both anti-c-kit siRNA-treated and control mice. Systemic administration of siRNA could effectively inhibit the expression of the c-kit gene and reduce the infiltration of inflammatory cells (eosinophils and lymphocytes) into the lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In addition, we found that c-kit siRNA can decrease the production of the T-helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines, interleukin 4 (IL-4) and IL-5, but has no influence on IFN-γ generation. These results show that inhibition of c-kit expression with siRNA can reduce the inflammatory response in allergic asthma.

  2. Exposure to triclosan augments the allergic response to ovalbumin in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stacey E; Franko, Jennifer; Kashon, Michael L; Anderson, Katie L; Hubbs, Ann F; Lukomska, Ewa; Meade, B Jean

    2013-03-01

    During the last decade, there has been a remarkable and unexplained increase in the prevalence of asthma. These studies were conducted to investigate the role of dermal exposure to triclosan, an endocrine-disrupting compound, on the hypersensitivity response to ovalbumin (OVA) in a murine model of asthma. Triclosan has had widespread use in the general population as an antibacterial and antifungal agent and is commonly found in consumer products such as soaps, deodorants, toothpastes, shaving creams, mouthwashes, and cleaning supplies. For these studies, BALB/c mice were exposed dermally to concentrations of triclosan ranging from 0.75 to 3% (0.375-1.5mg/mouse/day) for 28 consecutive days. Concordantly, mice were ip injected with OVA (0.9 µg) and aluminum hydroxide (0.5mg) on days 1 and 10 and challenged with OVA (125 µg) by pharyngeal aspiration on days 19 and 27. Compared with the animals exposed to OVA alone, increased spleen weights, OVA-specific IgE, interleukin-13 cytokine levels, and numbers of lung eosinophils were demonstrated when mice were coexposed to OVA and triclosan. Statistically significant increases in OVA-specific and nonspecific airway hyperreactivity were observed for all triclosan coexposed groups compared with the vehicle and OVA controls. In these studies, exposure to triclosan alone was not demonstrated to be allergenic; however, coexposure with a known allergen resulted in enhancement of the hypersensitivity response to that allergen, suggesting that triclosan exposure may augment the allergic responses to other environmental allergens.

  3. Benzaldehyde suppresses murine allergic asthma and rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae Young; Park, Chang-Shin; Kim, Kyu-Sung; Heo, Min-Jeong; Kim, Young Hyo

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the antiallergic effects of oral benzaldehyde in a murine model of allergic asthma and rhinitis, we divided 20 female BALB/c mice aged 8-10 weeks into nonallergic (intraperitoneally sensitized and intranasally challenged to normal saline), allergic (intraperitoneally sensitized and intranasally challenged to ovalbumin), and 200- and 400-mg/kg benzaldehyde (allergic but treated) groups. The number of nose-scratching events in 10 min, levels of total and ovalbumin-specific IgE in serum, differential counts of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, titers of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) in BAL fluid, histopathologic findings of lung and nasal tissues, and expressions of proteins involved in apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3), inflammation (COX-2), antioxidation (extracellular SOD, HO-1), and hypoxia (HIF-1α, VEGF) in lung tissue were evaluated. The treated mice had significantly fewer nose-scratching events, less inflammatory cell infiltration in lung and nasal tissues, and lower HIF-1α and VEGF expressions in lung tissue than the allergic group. The number of eosinophils and neutrophils and Th2 cytokine titers in BAL fluid significantly decreased after the treatment (P<0.05). These results imply that oral benzaldehyde exerts antiallergic effects in murine allergic asthma and rhinitis, possibly through inhibition of HIF-1α and VEGF.

  4. Cyclic nitroxide radicals attenuate inflammation and Hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Assayag, Miri; Goldstein, Sara; Samuni, Amram; Berkman, Neville

    2015-10-01

    The effects of stable cyclic nitroxide radicals have been extensively investigated both in vivo and in vitro demonstrating anti-inflammatory, radioprotective, anti-mutagenic, age-retardant, hypotensive, anti-cancer and anti-teratogenic activities. Yet, these stable radicals have not been evaluated in asthma and other airway inflammatory disorders. The present study investigated the effect of 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-N-oxyl (TPL) and 3-carbamoyl-proxyl (3-CP) in a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma. Both 3-CP and TPL were non-toxic when administered either orally (1% w/w nitroxide-containing chow) or via intraperitoneal (IP) injection (∼300 mg/kg). Feeding the mice orally demonstrated that 3-CP was more effective than TPL in reducing inflammatory cell recruitment into the airway and in suppressing airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) in OVA-challenged mice. To characterize the optimal time-window of intervention and mode of drug administration, 3-CP was given orally during allergen sensitization, during allergen challenge or during both sensitization and challenge stages, and via IP injection or intranasal instillation for 3 days during the challenge period. 3-CP given via all modes of delivery markedly inhibited OVA-induced airway inflammation, expression of cytokines, AHR and protein nitration of the lung tissue. Oral administration during the entire experiment was the most efficient delivery of 3-CP and was more effective than dexamethasone a potent corticosteroid used for asthma treatment. Under a similar administration regimen (IP injection before the OVA challenge), the effect of 3-CP was similar to that of dexamethasone and even greater on AHR and protein nitration. The protective effect of the nitroxides, which preferentially react with free radicals, in suppressing the increase of main asthmatic inflammatory markers substantiate the key role played by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the molecular mechanism of

  5. Differential effects of rapamycin and dexamethasone in mouse models of established allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Brandt, Eric B; Hershey, Gurjit K Khurana; Le Cras, Timothy D

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays an important role in cell growth/differentiation, integrating environmental cues, and regulating immune responses. Our lab previously demonstrated that inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin prevented house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic asthma in mice. Here, we utilized two treatment protocols to investigate whether rapamycin, compared to the steroid, dexamethasone, could inhibit allergic responses during the later stages of the disease process, namely allergen re-exposure and/or during progression of chronic allergic disease. In protocol 1, BALB/c mice were sensitized to HDM (three i.p. injections) and administered two intranasal HDM exposures. After 6 weeks of rest/recovery, mice were re-exposed to HDM while being treated with rapamycin or dexamethasone. In protocol 2, mice were exposed to HDM for 3 or 6 weeks and treated with rapamycin or dexamethasone during weeks 4-6. Characteristic features of allergic asthma, including IgE, goblet cells, airway hyperreactivity (AHR), inflammatory cells, cytokines/chemokines, and T cell responses were assessed. In protocol 1, both rapamycin and dexamethasone suppressed goblet cells and total CD4(+) T cells including activated, effector, and regulatory T cells in the lung tissue, with no effect on AHR or total inflammatory cell numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Rapamycin also suppressed IgE, although IL-4 and eotaxin 1 levels were augmented. In protocol 2, both drugs suppressed total CD4(+) T cells, including activated, effector, and regulatory T cells and IgE levels. IL-4, eotaxin, and inflammatory cell numbers were increased after rapamycin and no effect on AHR was observed. Dexamethasone suppressed inflammatory cell numbers, especially eosinophils, but had limited effects on AHR. We conclude that while mTOR signaling is critical during the early phases of allergic asthma, its role is much more limited once disease is established.

  6. Exposure to triclosan augments the allergic response to ovalbumin in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stacey E; Franko, Jennifer; Kashon, Michael L; Anderson, Katie L; Hubbs, Ann F; Lukomska, Ewa; Meade, B Jean

    2013-03-01

    During the last decade, there has been a remarkable and unexplained increase in the prevalence of asthma. These studies were conducted to investigate the role of dermal exposure to triclosan, an endocrine-disrupting compound, on the hypersensitivity response to ovalbumin (OVA) in a murine model of asthma. Triclosan has had widespread use in the general population as an antibacterial and antifungal agent and is commonly found in consumer products such as soaps, deodorants, toothpastes, shaving creams, mouthwashes, and cleaning supplies. For these studies, BALB/c mice were exposed dermally to concentrations of triclosan ranging from 0.75 to 3% (0.375-1.5mg/mouse/day) for 28 consecutive days. Concordantly, mice were ip injected with OVA (0.9 µg) and aluminum hydroxide (0.5mg) on days 1 and 10 and challenged with OVA (125 µg) by pharyngeal aspiration on days 19 and 27. Compared with the animals exposed to OVA alone, increased spleen weights, OVA-specific IgE, interleukin-13 cytokine levels, and numbers of lung eosinophils were demonstrated when mice were coexposed to OVA and triclosan. Statistically significant increases in OVA-specific and nonspecific airway hyperreactivity were observed for all triclosan coexposed groups compared with the vehicle and OVA controls. In these studies, exposure to triclosan alone was not demonstrated to be allergenic; however, coexposure with a known allergen resulted in enhancement of the hypersensitivity response to that allergen, suggesting that triclosan exposure may augment the allergic responses to other environmental allergens. PMID:23192912

  7. Exposure to Triclosan Augments the Allergic Response to Ovalbumin in a Mouse Model of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacey E.; Franko, Jennifer; Kashon, Michael L.; Anderson, Katie L.; Hubbs, Ann F.; Lukomska, Ewa; Meade, B. Jean

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, there has been a remarkable and unexplained increase in the prevalence of asthma. These studies were conducted to investigate the role of dermal exposure to triclosan, an endocrine-disrupting compound, on the hypersensitivity response to ovalbumin (OVA) in a murine model of asthma. Triclosan has had widespread use in the general population as an antibacterial and antifungal agent and is commonly found in consumer products such as soaps, deodorants, toothpastes, shaving creams, mouthwashes, and cleaning supplies. For these studies, BALB/c mice were exposed dermally to concentrations of triclosan ranging from 0.75 to 3% (0.375–1.5 mg/mouse/day) for 28 consecutive days. Concordantly, mice were ip injected with OVA (0.9 μg) and aluminum hydroxide (0.5 mg) on days 1 and 10 and challenged with OVA (125 μg) by pharyngeal aspiration on days 19 and 27. Compared with the animals exposed to OVA alone, increased spleen weights, OVA-specific IgE, interleukin-13 cytokine levels, and numbers of lung eosinophils were demonstrated when mice were coexposed to OVA and triclosan. Statistically significant increases in OVA-specific and nonspecific airway hyperreactivity were observed for all triclosan coexposed groups compared with the vehicle and OVA controls. In these studies, exposure to triclosan alone was not demonstrated to be allergenic; however, coexposure with a known allergen resulted in enhancement of the hypersensitivity response to that allergen, suggesting that triclosan exposure may augment the allergic responses to other environmental allergens. PMID:23192912

  8. Exposure to particulate hexavalent chromium exacerbates allergic asthma pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Brent C.; Constant, Stephanie L.; Patierno, Steven R.; Jurjus, Rosalyn A.; Ceryak, Susan M.

    2012-02-15

    Airborne hexavalent chromate, Cr(VI), has been identified by the Environmental Protection Agency as a possible health threat in urban areas, due to the carcinogenic potential of some of its forms. Particulate chromates are produced in many different industrial settings, with high levels of aerosolized forms historically documented. Along with an increased risk of lung cancer, a high incidence of allergic asthma has been reported in workers exposed to certain inhaled particulate Cr(VI) compounds. However, a direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma has not been established. We recently showed that inhaled particulate Cr(VI) induces an innate neutrophilic inflammatory response in BALB/c mice. In the current studies we investigated how the inflammation induced by inhaled particulate Cr(VI) might alter the pathology of an allergic asthmatic response. We used a well-established mouse model of allergic asthma. Groups of ovalbumin protein (OVA)-primed mice were challenged either with OVA alone, or with a combination of OVA and particulate zinc chromate, and various parameters associated with asthmatic responses were measured. Co-exposure to particulate Cr(VI) and OVA mediated a mixed form of asthma in which both eosinophils and neutrophils are present in airways, tissue pathology is markedly exacerbated, and airway hyperresponsiveness is significantly increased. Taken together these findings suggest that inhalation of particulate forms of Cr(VI) may augment the severity of ongoing allergic asthma, as well as alter its phenotype. Such findings may have implications for asthmatics in settings in which airborne particulate Cr(VI) compounds are present at high levels. -- Highlights: ► Allergic asthma correlated with exposure to certain inhaled particulate chromates. ► Direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma not established. ► Cr exacerbated pathology and airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-challenged mouse. ► Particulate Cr

  9. Current and future biomarkers in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Zissler, U M; Esser-von Bieren, J; Jakwerth, C A; Chaker, A M; Schmidt-Weber, C B

    2016-04-01

    Diagnosis early in life, sensitization, asthma endotypes, monitoring of disease and treatment progression are key motivations for the exploration of biomarkers for allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. The number of genes related to allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma increases steadily; however, prognostic genes have not yet entered clinical application. We hypothesize that the combination of multiple genes may generate biomarkers with prognostic potential. The current review attempts to group more than 161 different potential biomarkers involved in respiratory inflammation to pave the way for future classifiers. The potential biomarkers are categorized into either epithelial or infiltrate-derived or mixed origin, epithelial biomarkers. Furthermore, surface markers were grouped into cell-type-specific categories. The current literature provides multiple biomarkers for potential asthma endotypes that are related to T-cell phenotypes such as Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and Tregs and their lead cytokines. Eosinophilic and neutrophilic asthma endotypes are also classified by epithelium-derived CCL-26 and osteopontin, respectively. There are currently about 20 epithelium-derived biomarkers exclusively derived from epithelium, which are likely to innovate biomarker panels as they are easy to sample. This article systematically reviews and categorizes genes and collects current evidence that may promote these biomarkers to become part of allergic rhinitis or allergic asthma classifiers with high prognostic value. PMID:26706728

  10. ALLERGIC DISEASES AND ASTHMA IN ADOLESCENTS.

    PubMed

    Adamia, N; Jorjoliani, L; Khachapuridze, D; Katamadze, N; Chkuaseli, N

    2015-06-01

    The goal of our research was to find out, whether asthma phenotyping, based on presence of accompanying allergic diseases is significant for asthma classification or not. Research was conducted on the basis of questioning of random and representative cohorts of Tbilisi children's population, by cross-section method of epidemiological research. Special extended screening questionnaire was developed for epidemiological study of allergic diseases. Diagnostic criterion for allergy was analyzed and representative cohort was selected. Research was conducted in 2010-2014 period. Studied population included 1450 children from 2 to 17 years age representing Tbilisi general population (of them, 850 girls and 600 boys). As a result of research the following findings were made: asthma was confirmed where at least two of the listed was present: diagnosis of asthma made by doctor, asthma symptoms and consumption of drugs against asthma. Allergic rhinitis was confirmed, where more than one of the listed symptoms was present and children should not have caught cold, rhinorrhea, nasal obstruction or snore, combined or IgE with some inhalation allergen. Atopic dermatitis was confirmed if the subject had atopic dermatitis at a time of interview or clinical study. Markers of asthma severity were based on number of asthma episodes and number of symptoms, or regular consumption of corticosteroids, number of missed days at school and answer of subjects to the question: for the past year what was the degree of discomfort attributable to asthma ("very high" - "absolutely not"). Allergic sensitization was assessed based on the skin prick-test and test of specific immunoglobulin E in serum and was deemed positive where the average diameter of blebs in skin prick tests was 3 mm larger than negative control and IgE-0,35kU/l. Lung function was assessed by means of respirometers, by evaluating maximal forced expiration data and flow-volume curves. Allergic rhinitis was regarded as the most

  11. Pharmacodynamic evaluation of RP3128, a novel and potent CRAC channel inhibitor in guinea pig models of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Sutovska, Martina; Kocmalova, Michaela; Franova, Sona; Vakkalanka, Swaroop; Viswanadha, Srikant

    2016-02-01

    The increase in intracellular Ca(2+) levels through the activation of Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels is essential for mediating a wide scale of immune cell responses. Emerging evidence indicates an involvement of abnormal CRAC channel activity in human diseases such as certain types of immunodeficiency, autoimmunity and allergic disorders. This objective of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potency of a novel CRAC channel inhibitor, RP3128, in experimental models of allergic asthma using guinea pigs. Ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation was determined upon acute and long-term (14 days) oral administration of RP3128. In vivo changes in specific airways resistance (sRaw) and amplitude of isometric contraction (mN) of ASM (in vitro) were estimated to evaluate bronchodilatory effect upon acute and long-term administration of RP3128 or salbutamol. Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), immunohistochemical and histological analysis of cellular infiltration in airways tissue, and levels of cytokines in plasma as well as bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), were determined using Bio-Plex® 200 System (BIO-RAD, USA). Ciliary beat frequency (CBF, in Hz) was estimated using a high-speed video camera and LabVIEW™ Software. Additionally, the impact of RP3128 and budesonide on mucociliary clearance was determined. Acute and long-term administration of RP3128 resulted in significant bronchodilation. Long-term administration of RP3128 exceeded the bronchodilatory effect of salbutamol and significantly decreased eNO and cytokine levels in plasma and BALF, which together with histological and immunohistochemical analysis validated its anti-inflammatory effect compared to budesonide. Data demonstrate the therapeutic potential of RP3128 in respiratory diseases causally associated with allergic inflammation. PMID:26724844

  12. [Monoclonal antibody therapy for allergic asthma].

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Masanori; Matsuse, Takeshi

    2002-03-01

    Allergic responses at the level of the respiratory system are mostly mediated by IgE-dependent mechanisms. The first selective anti-IgE therapy, a recombinant humanized monoclonal anti-IgE antibody(rhuMAb-E25), binds with high affinity to the Fc epsilon RI receptor binding site on IgE, thereby reducing the amount of free IgE available to bind to Fc epsilon RI receptors on mast cells and basophils. In addition, administration of rhuMAb-E25 indirectly reduces Fc epsilon RI receptor density on cells involved in allergic responses. rhuMAb-E25 has been shown to reduce allergic responses in atopic individuals and to improve symptoms and reduce rescue medication and corticosteroid use in patient with allergic asthma. The clinical effectiveness of rhuMAb-E25 supports the central role of IgE in allergic reaction and the viability of anti-IgE therapy as an effective immunological intervention for allergic asthma.

  13. Application of vitamin E to antagonize SWCNTs-induced exacerbation of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinquan; Li, Li; Chen, Hanqing; Chang, Qing; Liu, Xudong; Wu, Yang; Wei, Chenxi; Li, Rui; Kwan, Joseph K C; Yeung, King Lun; Xi, Zhuge; Lu, Zhisong; Yang, Xu

    2014-01-01

    The aggravating effects of zero-dimensional, particle-shaped nanomaterials on allergic asthma have been previously investigated, but similar possible effects of one-dimensional shaped nanomaterials have not been reported. More importantly, there are no available means to counteract the adverse nanomaterial effects to allow for their safe use. In this study, an ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized rat asthma model was established to investigate whether single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) aggravate allergic asthma. The results showed that SWCNTs in rats exacerbated OVA-induced allergic asthma and that this exacerbation was counteracted by concurrent administration vitamin E. A mechanism involving the elimination of reactive oxygen species, downregulation of Th2 responses, reduced Ig production, and the relief of allergic asthma symptoms was proposed to explain the antagonistic effects of vitamin E. This work could provide a universal strategy to effectively protect people with allergic asthma from SWCNTs or similar nanomaterial-induced aggravating effects. PMID:24589727

  14. Application of vitamin E to antagonize SWCNTs-induced exacerbation of allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinquan; Li, Li; Chen, Hanqing; Chang, Qing; Liu, Xudong; Wu, Yang; Wei, Chenxi; Li, Rui; Kwan, Joseph K. C.; Yeung, King Lun; Xi, Zhuge; Lu, Zhisong; Yang, Xu

    2014-01-01

    The aggravating effects of zero-dimensional, particle-shaped nanomaterials on allergic asthma have been previously investigated, but similar possible effects of one-dimensional shaped nanomaterials have not been reported. More importantly, there are no available means to counteract the adverse nanomaterial effects to allow for their safe use. In this study, an ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized rat asthma model was established to investigate whether single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) aggravate allergic asthma. The results showed that SWCNTs in rats exacerbated OVA-induced allergic asthma and that this exacerbation was counteracted by concurrent administration vitamin E. A mechanism involving the elimination of reactive oxygen species, downregulation of Th2 responses, reduced Ig production, and the relief of allergic asthma symptoms was proposed to explain the antagonistic effects of vitamin E. This work could provide a universal strategy to effectively protect people with allergic asthma from SWCNTs or similar nanomaterial-induced aggravating effects. PMID:24589727

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of tilmicosin in a noninfectious mouse model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Ci, Xinxin; Chu, Xiao; Xiang, Hua; Li, Xiangchao; Deng, Xuming

    2011-12-01

    Tilmicosin, a semi-synthetic tylosin-derived macrolide antibiotic commonly used by veterinarians, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory activity. However, possible use in asthma treatment has not yet been studied. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory properties of tilmicosin using a murine asthma model. BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged by intraperitoneal (i.p.) or nasal administration of ovalbumin. Tilmicosin (10 and 20 mg/kg) treatment resulted in a marked reduction in the presence of several types of immune cells and cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of mice. Levels of ovalbumin-specific Immunoglobulin E (IgE) were significantly decreased following treatment with tilmicosin (10 and 20 mg/kg). Histological studies using H&E (haematoxylin and eosin) and AB-PAS (alcian blue-periodic acid-Schiff) staining demonstrated that tilmicosin substantially inhibited both ovalbumin-induced inflammatory cells in lung tissues and goblet cell hyperplasia in the airway. These findings provided new insight into the immunopharmacological role of tilmicosin in terms of its effects in a murine model of asthma.

  16. Association between Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Control in Peruvian School Children: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Uceda, Mónica; Ziegler, Otto; Lindo, Felipe; Herrera-Pérez, Eder

    2013-01-01

    Background. Asthma and allergic rhinitis are highly prevalent conditions that cause major illness worldwide. This study aimed to assess the association between allergic rhinitis and asthma control in Peruvian school children. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 256 children with asthma recruited in 5 schools from Lima and Callao cities. The outcome was asthma control assessed by the asthma control test. A score test for trend of odds was used to evaluate the association between allergic rhinitis severity and the prevalence of inadequate asthma control. A generalized linear regression model was used to estimate the adjusted prevalence ratios of inadequate asthma control. Results. Allergic rhinitis was present in 66.4% of the population with asthma. The trend analysis showed a positive association between allergic rhinitis and the probability of inadequate asthma control (P < 0.001). It was associated with an increased prevalence of inadequate asthma control, with adjusted prevalence ratios of 1.53 (95% confidence interval: 1.19−1.98). Conclusion. This study indicates that allergic rhinitis is associated with an inadequate level of asthma control, giving support to the recommendation of evaluating rhinitis to improve asthma control in children. PMID:23984414

  17. Epigenetic changes associated with disease progression in a mouse model of childhood allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Collison, Adam; Siegle, Jessica S; Hansbro, Nicole G; Kwok, Chau-To; Herbert, Cristan; Mattes, Joerg; Hitchins, Megan; Foster, Paul S; Kumar, Rakesh K

    2013-07-01

    Development of asthma in childhood is linked to viral infections of the lower respiratory tract in early life, with subsequent chronic exposure to allergens. Progression to persistent asthma is associated with a Th2-biased immunological response and structural remodelling of the airways. The underlying mechanisms are unclear, but could involve epigenetic changes. To investigate this, we employed a recently developed mouse model in which self-limited neonatal infection with a pneumovirus, followed by sensitisation to ovalbumin via the respiratory tract and low-level chronic challenge with aerosolised antigen, leads to development of an asthmatic phenotype. We assessed expression of microRNA by cells in the proximal airways, comparing changes over the period of disease progression, and used target prediction databases to identify genes likely to be up- or downregulated as a consequence of altered regulation of microRNA. In parallel, we assessed DNA methylation in pulmonary CD4(+) T cells. We found that a limited number of microRNAs exhibited marked up- or downregulation following early-life infection and sensitisation, for many of which the levels of expression were further changed following chronic challenge with the sensitizing antigen. Targets of these microRNAs included genes involved in immune or inflammatory responses (e.g. Gata3, Kitl) and in tissue remodelling (e.g. Igf1, Tgfbr1), as well as genes for various transcription factors and signalling proteins. In pulmonary CD4(+) T cells, there was significant demethylation at promoter sites for interleukin-4 and interferon-γ, the latter increasing following chronic challenge. We conclude that, in this model, progression to an asthmatic phenotype is linked to epigenetic regulation of genes associated with inflammation and structural remodelling, and with T-cell commitment to a Th2 immunological response. Epigenetic changes associated with this pattern of gene activation might play a role in the development of

  18. Environmental risk factors and allergic bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G; Liccardi, G; D'Amato, M; Holgate, S

    2005-09-01

    The prevalence of allergic respiratory diseases such as bronchial asthma has increased in recent years, especially in industrialized countries. A change in the genetic predisposition is an unlikely cause of the increase in allergic diseases because genetic changes in a population require several generations. Consequently, this increase may be explained by changes in environmental factors, including indoor and outdoor air pollution. Over the past two decades, there has been increasing interest in studies of air pollution and its effects on human health. Although the role played by outdoor pollutants in allergic sensitization of the airways has yet to be clarified, a body of evidence suggests that urbanization, with its high levels of vehicle emissions, and a westernized lifestyle are linked to the rising frequency of respiratory allergic diseases observed in most industrialized countries, and there is considerable evidence that asthmatic persons are at increased risk of developing asthma exacerbations with exposure to ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide and inhalable particulate matter. However, it is not easy to evaluate the impact of air pollution on the timing of asthma exacerbations and on the prevalence of asthma in general. As concentrations of airborne allergens and air pollutants are frequently increased contemporaneously, an enhanced IgE-mediated response to aeroallergens and enhanced airway inflammation could account for the increasing frequency of allergic respiratory allergy and bronchial asthma. Pollinosis is frequently used to study the interrelationship between air pollution and respiratory allergy. Climatic factors (temperature, wind speed, humidity, thunderstorms, etc) can affect both components (biological and chemical) of this interaction. By attaching to the surface of pollen grains and of plant-derived particles of paucimicronic size, pollutants could modify not only the morphology of these antigen-carrying agents but also their allergenic

  19. Environmental risk factors and allergic bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G; Liccardi, G; D'Amato, M; Holgate, S

    2005-09-01

    The prevalence of allergic respiratory diseases such as bronchial asthma has increased in recent years, especially in industrialized countries. A change in the genetic predisposition is an unlikely cause of the increase in allergic diseases because genetic changes in a population require several generations. Consequently, this increase may be explained by changes in environmental factors, including indoor and outdoor air pollution. Over the past two decades, there has been increasing interest in studies of air pollution and its effects on human health. Although the role played by outdoor pollutants in allergic sensitization of the airways has yet to be clarified, a body of evidence suggests that urbanization, with its high levels of vehicle emissions, and a westernized lifestyle are linked to the rising frequency of respiratory allergic diseases observed in most industrialized countries, and there is considerable evidence that asthmatic persons are at increased risk of developing asthma exacerbations with exposure to ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide and inhalable particulate matter. However, it is not easy to evaluate the impact of air pollution on the timing of asthma exacerbations and on the prevalence of asthma in general. As concentrations of airborne allergens and air pollutants are frequently increased contemporaneously, an enhanced IgE-mediated response to aeroallergens and enhanced airway inflammation could account for the increasing frequency of allergic respiratory allergy and bronchial asthma. Pollinosis is frequently used to study the interrelationship between air pollution and respiratory allergy. Climatic factors (temperature, wind speed, humidity, thunderstorms, etc) can affect both components (biological and chemical) of this interaction. By attaching to the surface of pollen grains and of plant-derived particles of paucimicronic size, pollutants could modify not only the morphology of these antigen-carrying agents but also their allergenic

  20. Long-lived Th2 memory in experimental allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Mojtabavi, Nazanin; Dekan, Gerhard; Stingl, Georg; Epstein, Michelle M

    2002-11-01

    Although life-long immunity against pathogens is beneficial, immunological memory responses directed against allergens are potentially harmful. Because there is a paucity of information about Th2 memory cells in allergic disease, we established a model of allergic asthma in BALB/c mice to explore the generation and maintenance of Th2 memory. We induced disease without the use of adjuvants, thus avoiding Ag depots, and found that unlike allergic asthma in mice immunized with adjuvant, immunizing with soluble and aerosol OVA resulted in pathological lung lesions resembling human disease. To test memory responses we allowed mice with acute disease to recover and then re-exposed them to aerosol OVA a second time. Over 400 days later these mice developed OVA-dependent eosinophilic lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, mucus hypersecretion, and IgE. Over 1 year after recuperating from acute disease, mice had persistent lymphocytic lung infiltrates, Ag-specific production of IL-4 and IL-5 from spleen and lung cells in vitro, and elevated IgG1. Moreover, when recuperated mice were briefly aerosol challenged, we detected early expression of Th2 cytokine RNA in lungs. Taken together, these data demonstrate the presence of long-lived Th2 memory cells in spleen and lungs involved in the generation of allergic asthma upon Ag re-exposure.

  1. Clara cells drive eosinophil accumulation in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S S; Ehmke, M; Marsh, L M; Dietze, J; Dudda, J C; Conrad, M L; Renz, H; Nockher, W A

    2012-02-01

    Development of allergic asthma is a complex process involving immune, neuronal and tissue cells. In the lung, Clara cells represent a major part of the "immunomodulatory barrier" of the airway epithelium. To understand the contribution of these cells to the inflammatory outcome of asthma, disease development was assessed using an adjuvant-free ovalbumin model. Mice were sensitised with subcutaneous injections of 10 μg endotoxin-free ovalbumin in conjunction with naphthalene-induced Clara cell depletion. Clara epithelial cell depletion in the lung strongly reduced eosinophil influx, which correlated with decreased eotaxin levels and, moreover, diminished the T-helper cell type 2 inflammatory response, including interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13. In contrast, airway hyperresponsiveness was increased. Further investigation revealed Clara cells as the principal source of eotaxin in the lung. These findings are the first to show that Clara airway epithelial cells substantially contribute to the infiltration of eotaxin-responsive CCR3+ immune cells and augment the allergic immune response in the lung. The present study identifies Clara cells as a potential therapeutic target in inflammatory lung diseases such as allergic asthma.

  2. Dimethyl sulfoxide in a 10% concentration has no effect on oxidation stress induced by ovalbumin-sensitization in a guinea-pig model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Mikolka, P; Mokra, D; Drgova, A; Petras, M; Mokry, J

    2012-04-01

    In allergic asthma, activated cells produce various substances including reactive oxygen species (ROS). As heterogenic pathophysiology of asthma results to different response to the therapy, testing novel interventions continues. Because of water-insolubility of some potentially beneficial drugs, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is often used as a solvent. Based on its antioxidant properties, this study evaluated effects of DMSO on mobilization of leukocytes into the lungs, and oxidation processes induced by ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitization in a guinea-pig model of allergic asthma. Guinea-pigs were divided into OVA-sensitized and naive animals. One group of OVA-sensitized animals and one group of naive animals were pretreated with 10% DMSO, the other two groups were given saline. After sacrificing animals, blood samples were taken and total antioxidant status (TAS) in the plasma was determined. Left lungs were saline-lavaged and differential leukocyte count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) was made. Right lung tissue was homogenized, TAS and products of lipid and protein oxidation were determined in the lung homogenate and in isolated mitochondria. OVA-sensitization increased total number of cells and percentages of eosinophils and neutrophils in BAL fluid; increased lipid and protein oxidation in the lung homogenate and mitochondria, and decreased TAS in the lungs and plasma compared with naive animals. However, no differences were observed in DMSO-instilled animals compared to controls. In conclusion, OVA-sensitization increased mobilization of leukocytes into the lungs and elevated production of ROS, accompanied by decrease in TAS. 10% DMSO had no effect on lipid and protein oxidation in a guinea-pig model of allergic asthma. PMID:22653905

  3. Allergic reaction to mint leads to asthma.

    PubMed

    Szema, Anthony M; Barnett, Tisha

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory and cutaneous adverse reactions to mint can result from several different mechanisms including IgE-mediated hypersensitivity, delayed-type hypersensitivity (contact dermatitis), and nonimmunologic histamine release. Reactions to cross-reacting plants of the Labiatae family, such as oregano and thyme, as well as to the chemical turpentine, may clue the clinician in on the diagnosis of mint allergy. Contact dermatitis can result from menthol in peppermint. Contact allergens have been reported in toothpastes, which often are mint-flavored. Allergic asthma from mint is less well-recognized. A case of a 54-year-old woman with dyspnea on exposure to the scent of peppermint is presented in whom mint exposure, as seemingly innocuous as the breath of others who had consumed Tic Tac candies, exacerbated her underlying asthma. This case highlights the importance of testing with multiple alternative measures of specific IgE to mint, including skin testing with mint extract, and skin testing with fresh mint leaves. Additionally, this cases suggests that asthma can result from inhaling the scent of mint and gives consideration to obtaining confirmatory pre- and postexposure pulmonary function data by both impulse oscillometry and spirometry. PMID:22852115

  4. Allergic reaction to mint leads to asthma

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Tisha

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory and cutaneous adverse reactions to mint can result from several different mechanisms including IgE-mediated hypersensitivity, delayed-type hypersensitivity (contact dermatitis), and nonimmunologic histamine release. Reactions to cross-reacting plants of the Labiatae family, such as oregano and thyme, as well as to the chemical turpentine, may clue the clinician in on the diagnosis of mint allergy. Contact dermatitis can result from menthol in peppermint. Contact allergens have been reported in toothpastes, which often are mint-flavored. Allergic asthma from mint is less well-recognized. A case of a 54-year-old woman with dyspnea on exposure to the scent of peppermint is presented in whom mint exposure, as seemingly innocuous as the breath of others who had consumed Tic Tac candies, exacerbated her underlying asthma. This case highlights the importance of testing with multiple alternative measures of specific IgE to mint, including skin testing with mint extract, and skin testing with fresh mint leaves. Additionally, this cases suggests that asthma can result from inhaling the scent of mint and gives consideration to obtaining confirmatory pre- and postexposure pulmonary function data by both impulse oscillometry and spirometry. PMID:22852115

  5. Allergic and non-allergic rhinitis: relationship with nasal polyposis, asthma and family history.

    PubMed

    Gelardi, M; Iannuzzi, L; Tafuri, S; Passalacqua, G; Quaranta, N

    2014-02-01

    Rhinitis and rhinosinusitis (with/without polyposis), either allergic or non-allergic, represent a major medical problem. Their associated comorbidities and relationship with family history have so far been poorly investigated. We assessed these aspects in a large population of patients suffering from rhinosinusal diseases. Clinical history, nasal cytology, allergy testing and direct nasal examination were performed in all patients referred for rhinitis/rhinosinusitis. Fibre optic nasal endoscopy, CT scan and nasal challenge were used for diagnosis, when indicated. A total of 455 patients (60.7% male, age range 4-84 years) were studied; 108 (23.7%) had allergic rhinitis, 128 (28.1%) rhinosinusitis with polyposis, 107 (23.5%) non-allergic rhinitis (negative skin test); 112 patients had associated allergic and non-allergic rhinitis, the majority with eosinophilia. There was a significant association between non-allergic rhinitis and family history of nasal polyposis (OR = 4.45; 95%CI = 1.70-11.61; p = 0.0019), whereas this association was no longer present when allergic rhinitis was also included. Asthma was equally frequent in non-allergic and allergic rhinitis, but more frequent in patients with polyposis. Aspirin sensitivity was more frequent in nasal polyposis, independent of the allergic (p = 0.03) or non-allergic (p = 0.01) nature of rhinitis. Nasal polyposis is significantly associated with asthma and positive family history of asthma, partially independent of the allergic aetiology of rhinitis.

  6. Allergen-specific immunotherapy in pediatric allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) is the only curative way that can change the immunologic response to allergens and thus can modify the natural progression of allergic diseases. There are some important criteria which contributes significantly on efficacy of AIT, such as the allergen extract used for treatment, the dose and protocol, patient selection in addition to the severity and control of asthma. The initiation of AIT in allergic asthma should be considered in intermittent, mild and moderate cases which coexisting with other allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, and in case of unacceptable adverse effects of medications. Two important impact of AIT; steroid sparing effect and preventing from progression to asthma should be taken into account in pediatric asthma when making a decision on starting of AIT. Uncontrolled asthma remains a significant risk factor for adverse events and asthma should be controlled both before and during administration of AIT. The evidence concerning the efficacy of subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for treatment of pediatric asthma suggested that SCIT decreases asthma symptoms and medication scores, whereas SLIT can ameliorate asthma symptoms. Although the effectiveness of SCIT has been shown for both seasonal and perennial allergens, the data for SLIT is less convincing for perennial allergies in pediatric asthma. PMID:27489785

  7. Allergen-specific immunotherapy in pediatric allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Yukselen, Ayfer

    2016-07-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) is the only curative way that can change the immunologic response to allergens and thus can modify the natural progression of allergic diseases. There are some important criteria which contributes significantly on efficacy of AIT, such as the allergen extract used for treatment, the dose and protocol, patient selection in addition to the severity and control of asthma. The initiation of AIT in allergic asthma should be considered in intermittent, mild and moderate cases which coexisting with other allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, and in case of unacceptable adverse effects of medications. Two important impact of AIT; steroid sparing effect and preventing from progression to asthma should be taken into account in pediatric asthma when making a decision on starting of AIT. Uncontrolled asthma remains a significant risk factor for adverse events and asthma should be controlled both before and during administration of AIT. The evidence concerning the efficacy of subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for treatment of pediatric asthma suggested that SCIT decreases asthma symptoms and medication scores, whereas SLIT can ameliorate asthma symptoms. Although the effectiveness of SCIT has been shown for both seasonal and perennial allergens, the data for SLIT is less convincing for perennial allergies in pediatric asthma. PMID:27489785

  8. Airway Epithelial Regulation of Allergic Sensitization in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Poynter, Matthew E.

    2012-01-01

    While many of the contributing cell types and mediators of allergic asthma are known, less well understood are the factors that influence the development of allergic responses that lead to the development of allergic asthma. As the first airway cell type to respond to inhaled factors, the epithelium orchestrates downstream interactions between dendritic cells (DCs) and CD4+ T cells that quantitatively and qualitatively dictate the degree and type of the allergic asthma phenotype, making the epithelium of critical importance for the genesis of allergies that later manifest in allergic asthma. Amongst the molecular processes of critical importance in airway epithelium is the transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB). This review will focus primarily on the genesis of pulmonary allergies and the participation of airway epithelial NF-κB activation therein, using examples from our own work on nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exposure and genetic modulation of airway epithelial NF-κB activation. In addition, the mechanisms through which Serum Amyloid A (SAA), an NF-κB-regulated, epithelial-derived mediator, influences allergic sensitization and asthma severity will be presented. Knowledge of the molecular and cellular processes regulating allergic sensitization in the airways has the potential to provide powerful insight into the pathogenesis of allergy, as well as targets for the prevention and treatment of asthma. PMID:22579987

  9. Absence of α4 but not β2 integrins restrains development of chronic allergic asthma using mouse genetic models

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Ena Ray; Jiang, Yi; Henderson, William R.; Latchman, Yvette; Papayannopoulou, Thalia

    2013-01-01

    Objective Chronic asthma is characterized by ongoing recruitment of inflammatory cells and airway hyperresponsiveness leading to structural airway remodeling. Although α4β1 and β2 integrins regulate leukocyte migration in inflammatory diseases and play decisive roles in acute asthma, their role has not been explored under the chronic asthma setting. To extend our earlier studies with α4Δ/Δ and β2−/− mice, which showed that both a4 and b2 integrins have nonredundant regulatory roles in acute ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma, we explored to what extent these molecular pathways control development of structural airway remodeling in chronic asthma. Materials and Methods Control, α4Δ/Δ, and β2−/−mouse groups, sensitized by intraperitoneal OVA as allergen, received intratracheal OVA periodically over days 8 to 55 to induce a chronic asthma phenotype. Post-OVA assessment of inflammation and pulmonary function (airway hyperresponsiveness), together with airway modeling measured by goblet cell metaplasia, collagen content of lung, and transforming growth factor β1 expression in lung homogenates, were evaluated. Results In contrast to control and β2−/− mice, α4Δ/Δ mice failed to develop and maintain the composite chronic asthma phenotype evaluated as mentioned and subepithelial collagen content was comparable to baseline. These data indicate that β2 integrins, although required for inflammatory migration in acute asthma, are dispensable for structural remodeling in chronic asthma. Conclusion α4 integrins appear to have a regulatory role in directing transforming growth factor β-induced collagen deposition and structural alterations in lung architecture likely through interactions of Th2 cells, eosinophils, or mast cells with endothelium, resident airway cells, and/or extracellular matrix. PMID:19463772

  10. Associated Markers for Adult-onset Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Bedolla-Barajas, Martín; Morales-Romero, Jaime; Ramses-Bedolla-Pulido, Tonatiuh; Fabiola-García-Padilla, Lourdes; Hernández-Colín, Dante

    2015-10-01

    The clinical behavior of asthma varies with age at onset. This study was undertaken to identify associated markers of adult-onset allergic asthma (age ≥20 years).This cross-sectional study compared two groups: 58 patients with asthma onset at ≥20 years and 66 with onset at ≥20 years. They were compared depending on results of clinical history, and body mass index (BMI), aeroallergen sensitization, total serum IgE, eosinophil count, asthma control test, and asthma severity level.Ages at first asthma episode were 10.0 ± 6.6 and 33.4 ± 10.5 (p<0.001) in the <20 and ≥20 group, respectively. BMI was higher in adult asthmatic subjects (29.8 versus 27.1, P=0.017), but BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) was not associated with asthma onset in ≥20 years (odds ratio [OR] = 1.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.759 to 3.211; p= 0.227). After multivariate analysis, allergic rhinitis and IgE ≥150 IU/mL were negatively correlated with asthma onset in ≥20 years old (OR adjusted [ORa] = 0.255, 95% CI 0.078 to 0.837, P= 0.024, and ORa =0.385, 95% CI 0.175 to 0.849, p= 0.018, respectively).Adult-onset allergic asthma was not different from early-onset asthma. PMID:26742445

  11. Associated Markers for Adult-onset Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Bedolla-Barajas, Martín; Morales-Romero, Jaime; Ramses-Bedolla-Pulido, Tonatiuh; Fabiola-García-Padilla, Lourdes; Hernández-Colín, Dante

    2015-10-01

    The clinical behavior of asthma varies with age at onset. This study was undertaken to identify associated markers of adult-onset allergic asthma (age ≥20 years).This cross-sectional study compared two groups: 58 patients with asthma onset at ≥20 years and 66 with onset at ≥20 years. They were compared depending on results of clinical history, and body mass index (BMI), aeroallergen sensitization, total serum IgE, eosinophil count, asthma control test, and asthma severity level.Ages at first asthma episode were 10.0 ± 6.6 and 33.4 ± 10.5 (p<0.001) in the <20 and ≥20 group, respectively. BMI was higher in adult asthmatic subjects (29.8 versus 27.1, P=0.017), but BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) was not associated with asthma onset in ≥20 years (odds ratio [OR] = 1.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.759 to 3.211; p= 0.227). After multivariate analysis, allergic rhinitis and IgE ≥150 IU/mL were negatively correlated with asthma onset in ≥20 years old (OR adjusted [ORa] = 0.255, 95% CI 0.078 to 0.837, P= 0.024, and ORa =0.385, 95% CI 0.175 to 0.849, p= 0.018, respectively).Adult-onset allergic asthma was not different from early-onset asthma.

  12. PSYCHOLOGICAL AND ALLERGIC ASPECTS OF ASTHMA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HIRT, MICHAEL L.

    FOCUSED HISTORICALLY AND CHOSEN TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN PSYCHOSOCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF ASTHMA, THE COLLECTION CONTAINS 18 PAPERS BY DIFFERENT AUTHORS. AREAS OF PSYCHOSOMATIC MEDICINE COVERED ARE (1) PRINCIPLES OF RESEARCH (ONE ARTICLE), (2) HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENTS, THEORETICAL MODELS, AND CORE PROBLEMS (THREE ARTICLES), AND (3) THE HYPOTHESIS,…

  13. Systems Biology of Asthma and Allergic Diseases: A Multiscale Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bunyavanich, Supinda; Schadt, Eric E.

    2014-01-01

    Systems biology is an approach to understanding living systems that focuses on modeling diverse types of high-dimensional interactions to develop a more comprehensive understanding of complex phenotypes manifested by the system. High throughput molecular, cellular, and physiologic profiling of populations is coupled with bioinformatic and computational techniques to identify new functional roles for genes, regulatory elements, and metabolites in the context of the molecular networks that define biological processes associated with system physiology. Given the complexity and heterogeneity of asthma and allergic diseases, a systems biology approach is attractive, as it has the potential to model the myriad connections and interdependencies between genetic predisposition, environmental perturbations, regulatory intermediaries, and molecular sequelae that ultimately lead to diverse disease phenotypes and treatment responses across individuals. The increasing availability of high-throughput technologies has enabled system-wide profiling of the genome, transcriptome, epigenome, microbiome, and metabolome, providing fodder for systems biology approaches to examine asthma and allergy at a more holistic level. In this article, we review the technologies and approaches for system-wide profiling as well as their more recent applications to asthma and allergy. We discuss approaches for integrating multiscale data through network analyses and provide perspective on how individually-captured health profiles will contribute to more accurate systems biology views of asthma and allergy. PMID:25468194

  14. Systems biology of asthma and allergic diseases: a multiscale approach.

    PubMed

    Bunyavanich, Supinda; Schadt, Eric E

    2015-01-01

    Systems biology is an approach to understanding living systems that focuses on modeling diverse types of high-dimensional interactions to develop a more comprehensive understanding of complex phenotypes manifested by the system. High-throughput molecular, cellular, and physiologic profiling of populations is coupled with bioinformatic and computational techniques to identify new functional roles for genes, regulatory elements, and metabolites in the context of the molecular networks that define biological processes associated with system physiology. Given the complexity and heterogeneity of asthma and allergic diseases, a systems biology approach is attractive, as it has the potential to model the myriad connections and interdependencies between genetic predisposition, environmental perturbations, regulatory intermediaries, and molecular sequelae that ultimately lead to diverse disease phenotypes and treatment responses across individuals. The increasing availability of high-throughput technologies has enabled system-wide profiling of the genome, transcriptome, epigenome, microbiome, and metabolome, providing fodder for systems biology approaches to examine asthma and allergy at a more holistic level. In this article we review the technologies and approaches for system-wide profiling, as well as their more recent applications to asthma and allergy. We discuss approaches for integrating multiscale data through network analyses and provide perspective on how individually captured health profiles will contribute to more accurate systems biology views of asthma and allergy.

  15. Novel genes in Human Asthma Based on a Mouse Model of Allergic Airway Inflammation and Human Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Temesi, Gergely; Virág, Viktor; Hadadi, Éva; Ungvári, Ildikó; Fodor, Lili E; Bikov, András; Nagy, Adrienne; Gálffy, Gabriella; Tamási, Lilla; Horváth, Ildikó; Kiss, András; Hullám, Gábor; Gézsi, András; Sárközy, Péter; Antal, Péter; Buzás, Edit

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Based on a previous gene expression study in a mouse model of asthma, we selected 60 candidate genes and investigated their possible roles in human asthma. Methods In these candidate genes, 90 SNPs were genotyped using MassARRAY technology from 311 asthmatic children and 360 healthy controls of the Hungarian (Caucasian) population. Moreover, gene expression levels were measured by RT PCR in the induced sputum of 13 asthmatics and 10 control individuals. t-tests, chi-square tests, and logistic regression were carried out in order to assess associations of SNP frequency and expression level with asthma. Permutation tests were performed to account for multiple hypothesis testing. Results The frequency of 4 SNPs in 2 genes differed significantly between asthmatic and control subjects: SNPs rs2240572, rs2240571, rs3735222 in gene SCIN, and rs32588 in gene PPARGC1B. Carriers of the minor alleles had reduced risk of asthma with an odds ratio of 0.64 (0.51-0.80; P=7×10-5) in SCIN and 0.56 (0.42-0.76; P=1.2×10-4) in PPARGC1B. The expression levels of SCIN, PPARGC1B and ITLN1 genes were significantly lower in the sputum of asthmatics. Conclusions Three potentially novel asthma-associated genes were identified based on mouse experiments and human studies. PMID:25374748

  16. Effect of dexamethasone and Nigella sativa on inducible nitric oxide synthase in the lungs of a murine model of allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed; Abass, Ayman; Zalata, Khaled; Abd Al-Galel, Tarek; Allam, Umamma; Karrouf, Gamal

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Nigella sativa (NS) fixed oil in comparison to dexamethasone (Dex) on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), peripheral blood eosinophils (PBE), allergen specific serum IgG1 and interleukins and airway inflammation in a murine model of allergic asthma. Thirty-one mice were divided into four groups. Group I (n = 6) served as the control group. Group II (n = 10) mice were sensitized intraperitoneally and challenged intratracheally with cone albumin with no treatment. Group III(n = 6) mice were sensitized, challenged, and treated with Dex for 17 days starting at 24 hours after the first challenge. Group IV (n = 9) mice were sensitized, challenged, and treated with NS fixed oil for 17 days as well. For all groups, the following procedures were carried out: immunohistochemical study of iNOS in lung tissues, detection of PBE percentage, and histopathological examination of lung tissues for inflammatory cells. Lung tissue iNOS expression increased in sensitized, non-treated mice compared with controls, but this increase was not significant. NS fixed oil treatment significantly reduced PBE and lung inflammation but did not significantly reduce lung tissue iNOS expression compared with the control group. These effects were comparable to the effects of Dex. These results suggest that Nigella sativa exhibits immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effect which may be useful for treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:25150073

  17. Omalizumab therapy for children and adolescents with severe allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ciro

    2015-01-01

    Omalizumab, a therapeutic humanized monoclonal antibody specific for human IgE, was introduced in clinical practice more than a decade ago as an add-on therapy for moderate-to-severe allergic asthma in patients aged ≥12 years. Omalizumab has been demonstrated to be effective in adults with uncontrolled persistent asthma, with an excellent safety profile. In simple terms, omalizumab works by inhibiting the allergic cascade, that is, by neutralization of the circulating free IgE. This leads to reduction in the quantity of cell-bound IgE, downregulation of high-affinity IgE receptors, and, eventually, prevention of mediator release from effector cells. Evidence is far less abundant on the role of omalizumab in pediatric asthma. Although efficacy and safety of omalizumab in children and adolescents with uncontrolled, persistent allergic asthma has been recognized as well, further studies are needed to clarify a number of open questions in this specific patient population.

  18. T cell treatment with small interfering RNA for suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 modulates allergic airway responses in a murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Atsushi; Inoue, Hiromasa; Nakano, Takako; Matsunaga, Yuko; Matsuno, Yukiko; Matsumoto, Takafumi; Fukuyama, Satoru; Kan-O, Keiko; Matsumoto, Koichiro; Tsuda-Eguchi, Miyuki; Nagakubo, Daisuke; Yoshie, Osamu; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Kubo, Masato; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2011-04-01

    CD4(+) T cells, particularly T helper (Th) 2 cells, play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of allergic asthma. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins control the balance of CD4(+) T cell differentiation. Mice that lack SOCS3 in T cells by crossing SOCS3-floxed mice with Lck-Cre-transgenic mice have reduced allergen-induced eosinophilia in the airways. Here, we studied the effects of SOCS3 silencing with small interfering (si) RNA in primary CD4(+) T cells on Th2 cell differentiation and on asthmatic responses in mice. Th2 cells were generated from ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cell receptor-transgenic mice in vitro and transferred into recipient mice. Transfection of SOCS3-specific siRNA attenuated Th2 response in vitro. Adoptive transfer of SOCS3-siRNA T cells exhibited markedly suppressed airway hyperresponsiveness and eosinophilia after OVA challenge, with a concomitant decrease in OVA-specific CD4(+) T cell accumulation in the airways. To investigate the mechanism of this impaired CD4(+) T cell accumulation, we inactivated SOCS3 of T cells by crossing SOCS3-floxed (SOCS3(flox/flox)) mice with CD4-Cre transgenic mice. CD4-Cre × SOCS3(flox/flox) mice exhibited fewer IL-4-producing cells and more reduced eosinophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids than control mice in a model of OVA-induced asthma. Expression of CCR3 and CCR4 in CD4(+) T cells was decreased in CD4-Cre × SOCS3(flox/flox) mice. CCR4 expression was also decreased in CD4(+) T cells after transfer of SOCS3 siRNA-treated T cells. These findings suggest that the therapeutic modulation of SOCS3 expression in CD4(+) T cells might be effective in preventing the development of allergic asthma.

  19. Antiasthmatic Effects of Eugenol in a Mouse Model of Allergic Asthma by Regulation of Vitamin D3 Upregulated Protein 1/NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chenglin; Dong, Zewu

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the antiasthmatic effects of eugenol (EUG) and the possible mechanisms. Asthma model was established by ovalbumin induction. A total of 50 mice were randomly assigned to five experimental groups: control, OVA, OVA + dexamethasone (2 mg/kg), OVA + EUG (10 mg/kg), and OVA + EUG (20 mg/kg). Airway resistance (Raw) were measured, histological studies were evaluated by the hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining, interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Vitamin D3 upregulated protein 1 (VDUP1), IκBα, P-IκBα, NF-κBP65, and p-NF-κBP65 were measured by Western blotting. Our study demonstrated that EUG inhibited OVA-induced increases in Raw and eosinophil count; IL-4 and IL-5 were recovered. Histological studies demonstrated that EUG substantially inhibited OVA-induced eosinophilia in the lung tissue. Western blotting studies demonstrated that EUG substantially inhibited P-IκBα, NF-κBP65, and p-NF-κBP65 protein levels and increased VDUP1 and IκBα protein levels. These findings suggest that EUG may effectively ameliorate the progression of asthma and could be used as a therapy for patients with allergic asthma.

  20. Epidemiology and current status of allergic rhinitis, asthma, and associated allergic diseases in Korea: ARIA Asia-Pacific workshop report.

    PubMed

    Park, Hae Sim; Choi, Gil Soon; Cho, Joong Sang; Kim, You-Young

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of allergic rhinitis and asthma has recently increased in Korea, and both conditions are recognized as major chronic respiratory diseases requiring active intervention. The prevalence of rhinitis among asthmatic patients is high, ranging from 60 to 80%, and could seriously affect asthma severity and outcome. We suggest that allergic rhinitis should be properly evaluated in asthmatic patients to achieve better asthma control.

  1. Asthma, Allergic Rhinitis, and Sleep Problems in Urban Children

    PubMed Central

    Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne; Kopel, Sheryl J.; Boergers, Julie; Ramos, Kara; LeBourgeois, Monique; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Esteban, Cynthia A.; Seifer, Ronald; Fritz, Gregory K.; Klein, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In this study, we examine the association of asthma (asthma symptoms, asthma control, lung function) and sleep problems in a group of urban children. The role of allergic rhinitis (AR), a comorbid condition of asthma, on children's sleep problems is also examined. Finally, we investigate whether sleep hygiene moderates the association between asthma and sleep problems, and whether there are differences in these associations based on ethnic background. Methods: Non-Latino White, Latino, and African American urban children with asthma (n = 195) ages 7–9 (47% female) and their primary caregivers participated in a baseline visit involving interview-based questionnaires on demographics, asthma and rhinitis control, and caregiver report of children's sleep problems and sleep hygiene. Children and their caregivers participated in a clinical evaluation of asthma and AR, followed by a month monitoring period of children's asthma using objective and subjective methods. Results: Total sleep problem scores were higher in children of the sample who were from African American and Latino backgrounds, compared to non-Latino white children. Poor asthma control was predictive of higher levels of sleep problems in the entire sample. Poorer AR control also was related to more sleep problems, over and above children's asthma in the sample. This association was more robust in non-Latino white children. Poor sleep hygiene heightened the association between poor asthma control and sleep problems in the entire sample and in African American children. Conclusions: Multidisciplinary interventions integrating the co-management of asthma, AR, and the effects of both illnesses on children's sleep, need to be developed and tailored to children and their families' ethnic background. Citation: Koinis-Mitchell D, Kopel SJ, Boergers J, Ramos K, LeBourgeois M, McQuaid EL, Esteban CA, Seifer R, Fritz GK, Klein RB. Asthma, allergic rhinitis, and sleep problems in urban children. J Clin

  2. Experiences with monoclonal antibody therapy for allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Boushey, H A

    2001-08-01

    Identification of the central role IgE plays in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases made it a key target for therapy. The first selective anti-IgE therapy, a unique humanized monoclonal anti-IgE antibody (omalizumab), binds with high affinity to the Fc(epsilon)RI receptor binding site on IgE, thereby reducing the amount of free IgE available to bind to Fc(epsilon)RI receptors on mast calls, basophils, and other cells. In addition, administration of omalizumab indirectly reduces Fc(epsilon)RI receptor density on cells involved in allergic responses. In two bronchoprovocation trials involving patients with mild allergic asthma, omalizumab attenuated both early- and late-phase allergic responses. Omalizumab was subsequently evaluated as a treatment for asthma in large, multicenter, randomized, double-blind phase II and III trials involving patients with moderate to severe asthma who required corticosteroid therapy. When added to treatment with oral or inhaled corticosteroids, omalizumab reduced symptoms and exacerbations, improved lung function and quality of life, and reduced the need for rescue medications. These benefits persisted even in the "corticosteroid reduction" phase of these trials, when omalizumab treatment was shown to allow patients to reduce or discontinue their inhaled and/or oral corticosteroids. These effects of omalizu-mab in improving asthma control, as well as its excellent safety profile, may ultimately make this agent a useful addition to the physician's armamentarium of treatments for asthma.

  3. Allergic rhinitis and asthma: epidemiology and common pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Khan, David A

    2014-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis and asthma are common diseases that frequently occur together. This concept has been referred to in the literature as united airway disease. Epidemiological studies have shown that the majority of patients with asthma have concomitant rhinitis and the presence of rhinitis is an increased risk factor for development of asthma. Patients with asthma and rhinitis share common physiology including heightened bronchial hyperresponsiveness and heightened reactivity to a variety of stimuli. Immunopathology of allergic rhinitis is also similar with the predominance of T-helper type 2 inflammation and tissue eosinophilia. Although several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the united airway theory, some of the best lines of evidence suggest that local airway inflammation can result in a systemic inflammatory response. Pharmacotherapeutic studies have shown that the treatment of rhinitis can improve asthma and vice versa. Nevertheless, systemic approaches such as immunotherapy lead to better outcomes for treating both disease states simultaneously. This article will focus on the data supporting the common epidemiology, shared pathophysiology, and therapeutic interventions aimed at allergic rhinitis and asthma as united airway diseases.

  4. MicroRNA regulation of allergic inflammation and asthma.

    PubMed

    Pua, Heather H; Ansel, K Mark

    2015-10-01

    Allergic diseases are prevalent and clinically heterogeneous, and are the pathologic consequence of inappropriate or exaggerated type 2 immune responses. In this review, we explore the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating allergic inflammation. We discuss how miRNAs, acting through target genes to modulate gene expression networks, impact multiple facets of immune cell function critical for type 2 immune responses including cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and effector functions. Human and mouse studies indicate that miRNAs are significant regulators of allergic immune responses. Finally, investigations of extracellular miRNAs offer promise for noninvasive biomarkers and therapeutic strategies for allergy and asthma.

  5. Extrinsic and intrinsic asthma: influence of classification on family history of asthma and allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Sibbald, B

    1980-05-01

    The distributions of asthma, hay fever and eczema were examined in the first degree relatives of 516 asthmatics grouped according to atopic status, history of hay fever/eczema and history of asthma provoked by pollens, dust or animals. The prevalences of both asthma and eczema in relatives were strongly correlated with the presence of hay fever/eczema in probands and to a lesser extent with their atopic status. The prevalence of hay fever in relatives was strongly correlated with both the presence of hay fever/eczema and the degree of atopy in probands. In contrast, allergic provocation of asthma in probands did not influence the prevalences of asthma, hay fever or eczema. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that there is an increased risk of asthma in relatives of atopic asthmatics which may arise from the enhanced susceptibility to asthma of individuals who inherit both a predisposition to asthma and a predisposition to atopy.

  6. Vitamin E and D regulation of allergic asthma immunopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cook-Mills, Joan M.; Avila, Pedro C.

    2014-01-01

    Asthma occurs as complex interactions of the environmental and genetics. Clinical studies and animal models of asthma indicate dietary factors such as vitamin E and vitamin D as protective for asthma risk. In this review, we discuss opposing regulatory functions of tocopherol isoforms of vitamin E and regulatory functions of vitamin D in asthma and how the variation in global prevalence of asthma may be explained, at least in part, by these dietary components. PMID:25175918

  7. Antagonism of TIM-1 blocks the development of disease in a humanized mouse model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Sonar, Sanchaita Sriwal; Hsu, Yen-Ming; Conrad, Melanie Lynn; Majeau, Gerard R; Kilic, Ayse; Garber, Ellen; Gao, Yan; Nwankwo, Chioma; Willer, Gundi; Dudda, Jan C; Kim, Hellen; Bailly, Véronique; Pagenstecher, Axel; Rennert, Paul D; Renz, Harald

    2010-08-01

    Studies in mice and humans have revealed that the T cell, immunoglobulin, mucin (TIM) genes are associated with several atopic diseases. TIM-1 is a type I membrane protein that is expressed on T cells upon stimulation and has been shown to modulate their activation. In addition to a recently described interaction with dendritic cells, TIM-1 has also been identified as a phosphatidylserine recognition molecule, and several protein ligands have been proposed. Our understanding of its activity is complicated by the possibility that TIM-1 possesses multiple and diverse binding partners. In order to delineate the function of TIM-1, we generated monoclonal antibodies directed to a cleft formed within the IgV domain of TIM-1. We have shown here that antibodies that bind to this defined cleft antagonize TIM-1 binding to specific ligands and cells. Notably, these antibodies exhibited therapeutic activity in a humanized SCID model of experimental asthma, ameliorating inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness. Further experiments demonstrated that the effects of the TIM-1-specific antibodies were mediated via suppression of Th2 cell proliferation and cytokine production. These results demonstrate that modulation of the TIM-1 pathway can critically influence activated T cells in a humanized disease model, suggesting that TIM-1 antagonists may provide potent therapeutic benefit in asthma and other immune-mediated disorders.

  8. Intranasal Administration of Recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis Inducing IL-17A Autoantibody Attenuates Airway Inflammation in a Murine Model of Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wanting; Chen, Ling; Guo, Sheng; Wu, Liangxia; Zhang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder, previous studies have shown that IL-17A contributes to the development of asthma, and there is a positive correlation between the level of IL-17A and the severity of disease. Here, we constructed recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing fusion protein Ag85A-IL-17A (rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a) and evaluated whether it could attenuate allergic airway inflammation, and further investigated the underlying mechanism. In this work, the murine model of asthma was established with ovalbumin, and mice were intranasally vaccinated with rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a. Autoantibody of IL-17A in sera was detected, and the airway inflammatory cells infiltration, the local cytokines and chemokines production and the histopathological changes of lung tissue were investigated. We found that the administration of rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a induced the autoantibody of IL-17A in sera. The vaccination of rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a remarkably reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells and the secretion of mucus in lung tissue and significantly decreased the numbers of the total cells, eosinophils and neutrophils in BALF. Th1 cells count in spleen, Th1 cytokine levels in BALF and supernatant of splenocytes and mediastinal lymph nodes, and T-bet mRNA in lung tissue were significantly increased with rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a administration. Meanwhile, rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a vaccination markedly decreased Th2 cells count, Th2 cytokine and Th17 cytokine levels in BALF and supernatant of splenocytes and mediastinal lymph nodes, and chemokines mRNA expression in lung tissue. These data confirmed that recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis in vivo could induce autoantibody of IL-17A, which attenuated asthmatic airway inflammation.

  9. Intranasal Administration of Recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis Inducing IL-17A Autoantibody Attenuates Airway Inflammation in a Murine Model of Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wanting; Chen, Ling; Guo, Sheng; Wu, Liangxia; Zhang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder, previous studies have shown that IL-17A contributes to the development of asthma, and there is a positive correlation between the level of IL-17A and the severity of disease. Here, we constructed recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing fusion protein Ag85A-IL-17A (rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a) and evaluated whether it could attenuate allergic airway inflammation, and further investigated the underlying mechanism. In this work, the murine model of asthma was established with ovalbumin, and mice were intranasally vaccinated with rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a. Autoantibody of IL-17A in sera was detected, and the airway inflammatory cells infiltration, the local cytokines and chemokines production and the histopathological changes of lung tissue were investigated. We found that the administration of rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a induced the autoantibody of IL-17A in sera. The vaccination of rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a remarkably reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells and the secretion of mucus in lung tissue and significantly decreased the numbers of the total cells, eosinophils and neutrophils in BALF. Th1 cells count in spleen, Th1 cytokine levels in BALF and supernatant of splenocytes and mediastinal lymph nodes, and T-bet mRNA in lung tissue were significantly increased with rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a administration. Meanwhile, rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a vaccination markedly decreased Th2 cells count, Th2 cytokine and Th17 cytokine levels in BALF and supernatant of splenocytes and mediastinal lymph nodes, and chemokines mRNA expression in lung tissue. These data confirmed that recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis in vivo could induce autoantibody of IL-17A, which attenuated asthmatic airway inflammation. PMID:26974537

  10. Oxidative airway inflammation leads to systemic and vascular oxidative stress in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Naif O; Nadeem, A; Al-Harbi, Mohamed M; Imam, F; Al-Shabanah, Othman A; Ahmad, Sheikh F; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M; Bahashwan, Saleh A

    2015-05-01

    Oxidant-antioxidant imbalance plays an important role in repeated cycles of airway inflammation observed in asthma. It is when reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelm antioxidant defenses that a severe inflammatory state becomes apparent and may impact vasculature. Several studies have shown an association between airway inflammation and cardiovascular complications; however so far none has investigated the link between airway oxidative stress and systemic/vascular oxidative stress in a murine model of asthma. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of oxidative stress encountered in asthmatic airways in modulation of vascular/systemic oxidant-antioxidant balance. Rats were sensitized intraperitoneally with ovalbumin (OVA) in the presence of aluminum hydroxide followed by several intranasal (i.n.) challenges with OVA. Rats were then assessed for airway and vascular inflammation, oxidative stress (ROS, lipid peroxides) and antioxidants measured as total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and thiol content. Challenge with OVA led to increased airway inflammation and oxidative stress with a concomitant increase in vascular inflammation and oxidative stress. Oxidative stress in the vasculature was significantly inhibited by antioxidant treatment, N-acetyl cysteine; whereas hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhalation worsened it. Therefore, our study shows that oxidative airway inflammation is associated with vascular/systemic oxidative stress which might predispose these patients to increased cardiovascular risk.

  11. Interaction of vitamin E isoforms on asthma and allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Cook-Mills, Joan; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Green, Jeremy; Larkin, Emma K; Dupont, William D; Shu, Xiao Ou; Gross, Myron; Bai, Chunxue; Gao, Yu-Tang; Hartman, Terryl J; Rosas-Salazar, Christian; Hartert, Tina

    2016-10-01

    Prospective epidemiological studies, observational cross-sectional studies and some randomised prevention trials have demonstrated inconsistent findings of the impact of vitamin E on asthma risk. The goals of this study were to explore whether this differing association of vitamin E on asthma risk is due to an interaction of vitamin E isoforms. To address this question, in a population-based asthma incidence study we assessed the interaction between the plasma concentrations of vitamin E isoforms α-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol on asthma risk. Second, to understand the mechanisms of any interaction of these isoforms, we conducted experimental supplementation of α-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol isoforms in mice on the outcome of allergic airway inflammation. We found that in the highest γ-tocopherol tertile, low levels of α-tocopherol were associated with increased asthma risk, while highest tertile α-tocopherol levels trended to be protective. Similarly, in a mouse model of asthma, diet supplementation with α-tocopherol decreased lung inflammation in response to house dust mite (HDM) challenge. In contrast, diet supplementation with γ-tocopherol increased lung inflammation in response to HDM. These human and animal studies provide evidence for the competing effects of the vitamin E isoforms, in physiological concentrations, on asthma and allergic airway disease.

  12. Interaction of vitamin E isoforms on asthma and allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Cook-Mills, Joan; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Green, Jeremy; Larkin, Emma K; Dupont, William D; Shu, Xiao Ou; Gross, Myron; Bai, Chunxue; Gao, Yu-Tang; Hartman, Terryl J; Rosas-Salazar, Christian; Hartert, Tina

    2016-10-01

    Prospective epidemiological studies, observational cross-sectional studies and some randomised prevention trials have demonstrated inconsistent findings of the impact of vitamin E on asthma risk. The goals of this study were to explore whether this differing association of vitamin E on asthma risk is due to an interaction of vitamin E isoforms. To address this question, in a population-based asthma incidence study we assessed the interaction between the plasma concentrations of vitamin E isoforms α-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol on asthma risk. Second, to understand the mechanisms of any interaction of these isoforms, we conducted experimental supplementation of α-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol isoforms in mice on the outcome of allergic airway inflammation. We found that in the highest γ-tocopherol tertile, low levels of α-tocopherol were associated with increased asthma risk, while highest tertile α-tocopherol levels trended to be protective. Similarly, in a mouse model of asthma, diet supplementation with α-tocopherol decreased lung inflammation in response to house dust mite (HDM) challenge. In contrast, diet supplementation with γ-tocopherol increased lung inflammation in response to HDM. These human and animal studies provide evidence for the competing effects of the vitamin E isoforms, in physiological concentrations, on asthma and allergic airway disease. PMID:27257004

  13. Asthma and Allergic Diseases in Pregnancy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Asthma and allergic disorders can affect the course and outcome of pregnancy. Pregnancy itself may also affect the course of asthma and related diseases. Optimal management of these disorders during pregnancy is vital to ensure the welfare of the mother and the baby. Specific pharmacological agents for treatment of asthma or allergic diseases must be cautiously selected and are discussed here with respect to safety considerations in pregnancy. Although most drugs do not harm the fetus, this knowledge is incomplete. Any drug may carry a small risk that must be balanced against the benefits of keeping the mother and baby healthy. The goals and principles of management for acute and chronic asthma, rhinitis, and dermatologic disorders are the same during pregnancy as those for asthma in the general population. Diagnosis of allergy during pregnancy should mainly consist of the patient's history and in vitro testing. The assured and well-evaluated risk factors revealed for sensitization in mother and child are very limited, to date, and include alcohol consumption, exposure to tobacco smoke, maternal diet and diet of the newborn, drug usage, and insufficient exposure to environmental bacteria. Consequently, the recommendations for primary and secondary preventive measures are also very limited in number and verification. PMID:21151812

  14. The immune profile associated with acute allergic asthma accelerates clearance of influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Samarasinghe, Amali E; Woolard, Stacie N; Boyd, Kelli L; Hoselton, Scott A; Schuh, Jane M; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2014-01-01

    Asthma was the most common comorbidity in hospitalized patients during the 2009 influenza pandemic. For unknown reasons, hospitalized asthmatics had less severe outcomes and were less likely to die from pandemic influenza. Our data with primary human bronchial cells indicate that changes intrinsic to epithelial cells in asthma may protect against cytopathology induced by influenza virus. To further study influenza virus pathogenesis in allergic hosts, we aimed to develop and characterize murine models of asthma and influenza comorbidity to determine structural, physiological and immunological changes induced by influenza in the context of asthma. Aspergillus fumigatus-sensitized and -challenged C57BL/6 mice were infected with pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, either during peak allergic inflammation or during airway remodeling to gain insight into disease pathogenesis. Mice infected with the influenza virus during peak allergic inflammation did not lose body weight and cleared the virus rapidly. These mice exhibited high eosinophilia, preserved airway epithelial cell integrity, increased mucus, reduced interferon response and increased insulin-like growth factor-1. In contrast, weight loss and viral replication kinetics in the mice that were infected during the late airway remodeling phase were equivalent to flu-only controls. These mice had neutrophils in the airways, damaged airway epithelial cells, less mucus production, increased interferons and decreased insulin-like growth factor-1. The state of the allergic airways at the time of influenza virus infection alters host responses against the virus. These murine models of asthma and influenza comorbidity may improve our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of viral infections in humans with asthma. PMID:24469764

  15. Targeted inhibition of KCa3.1 channel attenuates airway inflammation and remodeling in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Hua; Xu, Jian-Rong; Wang, Yan-Xia; Xu, Guang-Ni; Xu, Zu-Peng; Yang, Kai; Wu, Da-Zheng; Cui, Yong-Yao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2013-06-01

    KCa3.1 has been suggested to be involved in regulating cell activation, proliferation, and migration in multiple cell types, including airway inflammatory and structural cells. However, the contributions of KCa3.1 to airway inflammation and remodeling and subsequent airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in allergic asthma remain to be explored. The main purpose of this study was to elucidate the roles of KCa3.1 and the potential therapeutic value of KCa3.1 blockers in chronic allergic asthma. Using real-time PCR, Western blotting, or immunohistochemical analyses, we explored the precise role of KCa3.1 in the bronchi of allergic mice and asthmatic human bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMCs). We found that KCa3.1 mRNA and protein expression were elevated in the bronchi of allergic mice, and double labeling revealed that up-regulation occurred primarily in airway smooth muscle cells. Triarylmethane (TRAM)-34, a KCa3.1 blocker, dose-dependently inhibited the generation and maintenance of the ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation associated with increased Th2-type cytokines and decreased Th1-type cytokine, as well as subepithelial extracellular matrix deposition, goblet-cell hyperplasia, and AHR in a murine model of asthma. Moreover, the pharmacological blockade and gene silencing of KCa3.1, which was evidently elevated after mitogen stimulation, suppressed asthmatic human BSMC proliferation and migration, and arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. In addition, the KCa3.1 activator 1-ethylbenzimidazolinone-induced membrane hyperpolarization and intracellular calcium increase in asthmatic human BSMCs were attenuated by TRAM-34. We demonstrate for the first time an important role for KCa3.1 in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and remodeling in allergic asthma, and we suggest that KCa3.1 blockers may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for asthma.

  16. miR-155: A Novel Target in Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Li, Junyao; Gao, Peng; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNAs of 18–24 nucleotides in length, function to posttranscriptionally regulate protein expression. miR-155 was one of the first identified and, to date, the most studied miRNA, and has been linked to various cellular processes such as modulation of immune responses and oncogenesis. Previous studies have identified miR-155 as a crucial positive regulator of Th1 immune response in autoimmune diseases, but as a suppressor of Th2 immunity in allergic disorders. However, recent studies have found new evidence that miR-155 plays an indispensible role in allergic asthma. This review summarizes the recent findings with respect to miR-155 in immune responses and the underlying mechanisms responsible for miR-155-related allergic diseases, as well as the similarities between miR-155 and glucocorticoids in immunity. PMID:27783037

  17. Potential of Immunoglobulin A to Prevent Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gloudemans, Anouk K.; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Smits, Hermelijn H.

    2013-01-01

    Allergic asthma is characterized by bronchial hyperresponsiveness, a defective barrier function, and eosinophilic lower airway inflammation in response to allergens. The inflammation is dominated by Th2 cells and IgE molecules and supplemented with Th17 cells in severe asthma. In contrast, in healthy individuals, allergen-specific IgA and IgG4 molecules are found but no IgE, and their T cells fail to proliferate in response to allergens, probably because of the development of regulatory processes that actively suppress responses to allergens. The presence of allergen-specific secretory IgA has drawn little attention so far, although a few epidemiological studies point at a reverse association between IgA levels and the incidence of allergic airway disease. This review highlights the latest literature on the role of mucosal IgA in protection against allergic airway disease, the mechanisms described to induce secretory IgA, and the role of (mucosal) dendritic cells in this process. Finally, we discuss how this information can be used to translate into the development of new therapies for allergic diseases based on, or supplemented with, IgA boosting strategies. PMID:23690823

  18. Allergic sensitization to ornamental plants in patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Ömür; Erkekol, Ferda Öner; Misirloigil, Zeynep; Demirel, Yavuz Selim; Mungan, Dilşad

    2014-01-01

    Ornamental plants (OPs) can lead to immediate-type sensitization and even asthma and rhinitis symptoms in some cases. This study aimed to evaluate sensitization to OPs in patients with asthma and/or allergic rhinitis and to determine the factors affecting the rate of sensitization to OPs. A total of 150 patients with asthma and/or allergic rhinitis and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Demographics and disease characteristics were recorded. Skin-prick tests were performed with a standardized inhalant allergen panel. Skin tests by "prick-to-prick" method with the leaves of 15 Ops, which are known to lead to allergenic sensitization, were performed. Skin tests with OPs were positive in 80 patients (47.1%). There was no significant difference between OP sensitized and nonsensitized patients in terms of gender, age, number of exposed OPs, and duration of exposure. Skin test positivity rate for OPs was significantly high in atopic subjects, patients with allergic rhinitis, food sensitivity, and indoor OP exposure, but not in patients with pollen and latex allergy. Most sensitizing OPs were Yucca elephantipes (52.5%), Dieffenbachia picta (50.8%), and Euphorbia pulcherrima (47.5%). There was significant correlation between having Saintpaulia ionantha, Croton, Pelargonium, Y. elephantipes, and positive skin test to these plants. Sensitivity to OPs was significantly higher in atopic subjects and patients with allergic rhinitis, food allergy, and indoor OP exposure. Furthermore, atopy and food sensitivity were found as risk factors for developing sensitization to indoor plants. Additional trials on the relationship between sensitization to OPs and allergic symptoms are needed. PMID:24717779

  19. Intranasal sirna targeting c-kit reduces airway inflammation in experimental allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Chen, Hui; Li, Ya-Ming; Wang, Sheng-Yu; Diao, Xin; Liu, Kai-Ge

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is characterized by airway inflammation caused by infiltration and activation of inflammatory cells that produce cytokines. Many studies have revealed that c-kit, a proto-oncogene, and its ligand, stem cell factor (SCF), play an important role in the development of asthmatic inflammation. Intranasal small interference RNA (siRNA) nanoparticles targeting specific viral gene could inhibit airway inflammation. In this study, we assessed whether silencing of c-kit with intranasal small interference RNA could reduce inflammation in allergic asthma. A mouse model of experimental asthma was treated with intranasal administration of anti-c-kit siRNA to inhibit the expression of the c-kit gene. We assessed the inflammatory response in both anti-c-kit siRNA-treated and control mice. Local administration of siRNA effectively inhibited the expression of the c-kit gene and reduced airway mucus secretion and the infiltration of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Moreover, c-kit siRNA reduced the production of SCF, interleukin-4 (IL-4), and IL-5, but had no effect on interferon-γ (IFN-γ) generation. These results show that intranasal siRNA nanoparticles targeting c-kit can decrease the inflammatory response in experimental allergic asthma.

  20. Childhood asthma prediction models: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Smit, Henriette A; Pinart, Mariona; Antó, Josep M; Keil, Thomas; Bousquet, Jean; Carlsen, Kai H; Moons, Karel G M; Hooft, Lotty; Carlsen, Karin C Lødrup

    2015-12-01

    Early identification of children at risk of developing asthma at school age is crucial, but the usefulness of childhood asthma prediction models in clinical practice is still unclear. We systematically reviewed all existing prediction models to identify preschool children with asthma-like symptoms at risk of developing asthma at school age. Studies were included if they developed a new prediction model or updated an existing model in children aged 4 years or younger with asthma-like symptoms, with assessment of asthma done between 6 and 12 years of age. 12 prediction models were identified in four types of cohorts of preschool children: those with health-care visits, those with parent-reported symptoms, those at high risk of asthma, or children in the general population. Four basic models included non-invasive, easy-to-obtain predictors only, notably family history, allergic disease comorbidities or precursors of asthma, and severity of early symptoms. Eight extended models included additional clinical tests, mostly specific IgE determination. Some models could better predict asthma development and other models could better rule out asthma development, but the predictive performance of no single model stood out in both aspects simultaneously. This finding suggests that there is a large proportion of preschool children with wheeze for which prediction of asthma development is difficult.

  1. CROSS REACTIVITY IN ALLERGIC ASTHMA-LIKE RESPONSES BETWEEN MOLD AND HOUSE DUST MITE IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molds are ubiquitous in the environment and exposures to molds contribute to various human diseases including allergic asthma. Some mold allergens have been implicated as the causal agent for allergic asthma. Western blot analysis demonstrated IgE-binding cross-reactivity among m...

  2. Genetic Variation along the Histamine Pathway in Children with Allergic versus Nonallergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Anvari, Sara; Vyhlidal, Carrie A; Dai, Hongying; Jones, Bridgette L

    2015-12-01

    Histamine is an important mediator in the pathogenesis of asthma. Variation in genes along the histamine production, response, and degradation pathway may be important in predicting response to antihistamines. We hypothesize that differences exist among single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes of the histamine pathway between children with allergic versus nonallergic asthma. Children (7-18 yr of age; n = 202) with asthma were classified as allergic or nonallergic based on allergy skin testing. Genotyping was performed to detect known SNPs (n = 10) among genes (HDC, HNMT, ABP1, HRH1, and HRH4) within the histamine pathway. Chi square tests and Cochran-Armitage Trend were used to identify associations between genetic variants and allergic or nonallergic asthma. Significance was determined by P < 0.05 and false-positive report probability. After correction for race differences in genotype were observed, HRH1-17 TT (6% allergic versus 0% nonallergic; P = 0.04), HNMT-464 TT (41% allergic versus 29% nonallergic; P = 0.04), and HNMT-1639 TT (30% allergic versus 20% nonallergic; P = 0.04) were overrepresented among children with allergic asthma. Genotype differences specifically among the African-American children were also observed: HRH1-17 TT (13% allergic versus 0% nonallergic; P = 0.04) and HNMT-1639 TT (23% allergic versus 3% nonallergic; P = 0.03) genotypes were overrepresented among African-American children with allergic asthma. Our study suggests that genetic variation within the histamine pathway may be associated with an allergic versus nonallergic asthma phenotype. Further studies are needed to determine the functional significance of identified SNPs and their impact on antihistamine response in patients with asthma and allergic disease.

  3. Rapamycin attenuates airway hyperreactivity, goblet cells, and IgE in experimental allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Kramer, Elizabeth L; Brandt, Eric B; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Le Cras, Timothy D

    2011-12-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway integrates environmental cues, promotes cell growth/differentiation, and regulates immune responses. Although inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin has potent immunosuppressive activity, mixed effects have been reported in OVA-induced models of allergic asthma. We investigated the impact of two rapamycin treatment protocols on the major characteristics of allergic asthma induced by the clinically relevant allergen, house dust mite (HDM). In protocol 1, BALB/c mice were exposed to 10 intranasal HDM doses over a period of 24 d and treated with rapamycin simultaneously during the sensitization/exposure period. In protocol 2, rapamycin was administered after the mice had been sensitized to HDM (i.p. injection) and prior to initiation of two intranasal HDM challenges over 4 d. Airway hyperreactivity (AHR), IgE, inflammatory cells, cytokines, leukotrienes, goblet cells, and activated T cells were assessed. In protocol 1, rapamycin blocked HDM-induced increases in AHR, inflammatory cell counts, and IgE, as well as attenuated goblet cell metaplasia. In protocol 2, rapamycin blocked increases in AHR, IgE, and T cell activation and reduced goblet cell metaplasia, but it had no effect on inflammatory cell counts. Increases in IL-13 and leukotrienes were also blocked by rapamycin, although increases in IL-4 were unaffected. These data demonstrated that rapamycin can inhibit cardinal features of allergic asthma, including increases in AHR, IgE, and goblet cells, most likely as a result of its ability to reduce the production of two key mediators of asthma: IL-13 and leukotrienes. These findings highlight the importance of the mTOR pathway in allergic airway disease. PMID:22021618

  4. Rapamycin attenuates airway hyperreactivity, goblet cells, and IgE in experimental allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Kramer, Elizabeth L; Brandt, Eric B; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Le Cras, Timothy D

    2011-12-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway integrates environmental cues, promotes cell growth/differentiation, and regulates immune responses. Although inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin has potent immunosuppressive activity, mixed effects have been reported in OVA-induced models of allergic asthma. We investigated the impact of two rapamycin treatment protocols on the major characteristics of allergic asthma induced by the clinically relevant allergen, house dust mite (HDM). In protocol 1, BALB/c mice were exposed to 10 intranasal HDM doses over a period of 24 d and treated with rapamycin simultaneously during the sensitization/exposure period. In protocol 2, rapamycin was administered after the mice had been sensitized to HDM (i.p. injection) and prior to initiation of two intranasal HDM challenges over 4 d. Airway hyperreactivity (AHR), IgE, inflammatory cells, cytokines, leukotrienes, goblet cells, and activated T cells were assessed. In protocol 1, rapamycin blocked HDM-induced increases in AHR, inflammatory cell counts, and IgE, as well as attenuated goblet cell metaplasia. In protocol 2, rapamycin blocked increases in AHR, IgE, and T cell activation and reduced goblet cell metaplasia, but it had no effect on inflammatory cell counts. Increases in IL-13 and leukotrienes were also blocked by rapamycin, although increases in IL-4 were unaffected. These data demonstrated that rapamycin can inhibit cardinal features of allergic asthma, including increases in AHR, IgE, and goblet cells, most likely as a result of its ability to reduce the production of two key mediators of asthma: IL-13 and leukotrienes. These findings highlight the importance of the mTOR pathway in allergic airway disease.

  5. Mouse Models of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Debeuf, Nincy; Haspeslagh, Eline; van Helden, Mary; Hammad, Hamida; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2016-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the conducting airways characterized by the presence of allergen-specific IgE, Th2 cytokine production, eosinophilic airway inflammation, bronchial hyperreactivity, mucus overproduction, and structural changes in the airways. Investigators have tried to mimic these features of human allergic asthma in murine models. Whereas the surrogate allergen ovalbumin has been extremely valuable for unravelling underlying mechanisms of the disease, murine asthma models depend nowadays on naturally occurring allergens, such as house dust mite (HDM), cockroach, and Alternaria alternata. Here we describe a physiologically relevant model of acute allergic asthma based on sensitization and challenge with HDM extracts, and compare it with the ovalbumin/alum-induced asthma model. Moreover, we propose a detailed readout of the asthma phenotype, determining the degree of eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids by flow cytometry, visualizing goblet cell metaplasia, and measuring Th cytokine production by lung-draining mediastinal lymph node cells restimulated with HDM. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27248433

  6. Prevalence of allergic rhinitis based on the SACRA questionnaire among Japanese nursing professionals with asthma.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masanari; Kurai, Jun; Sano, Hiroyuki; Torai, Saeko; Yanase, Hirokazu; Funakoshi, Tomoaki; Fukada, Atsuko; Hayakawa, Sachiko; Kitano, Hiroya; Shimizu, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Although adult asthma is attributable to occupational factors and asthma and rhinitis are related, relatively few studies have investigated the prevalence of occupational rhinitis based on occupation, and knowledge of occupational rhinitis in Japan is currently limited. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the prevalence of allergic rhinitis among Japanese nursing professionals with asthma. A postal survey was conducted from October to December 2013 using translated versions of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey for the prevalence of asthma and State of the Impact of Allergic Rhinitis on Asthma Control questionnaire for the prevalence of rhinitis. Of 4,634 Japanese nursing professionals, 497 subjects had asthma, and 270 of these 497 subjects had allergic rhinitis (54.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 49.7-58.7). Latex allergy was significantly associated with allergic rhinitis (odds ratio, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.21-2.60). There was no relationship between employment period and prevalent allergic rhinitis. The results of this study provide fundamental information regarding occupational health among Japanese nursing professionals, including the prevalence of allergic rhinitis among Japanese nursing professionals with asthma and latex allergy as a potential risk factor for prevalent allergic rhinitis.

  7. Nedocromil sodium versus albuterol in the management of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    de Jong, J W; Teengs, J P; Postma, D S; van der Mark, T W; Koëter, G H; de Monchy, J G

    1994-01-01

    In a double-blind, double-placebo, randomized crossover study, we compared the effects of 6 wk of treatment with the anti-inflammatory drug nedocromil sodium (16 mg/day) with 6 wk of treatment with the bronchodilator drug albuterol (800 micrograms/day) in 29 adults with allergic asthma. After 3 and 6 wk of treatment with nedocromil sodium, patients were significantly less hyperresponsive to propranolol (p = 0.002 and p = 0.02) and almost significantly less hyperresponsive to histamine (p = 0.071 and p = 0.065). FEV1 and FVC percent predicted tended to be higher, morning PEF values increased significantly (p = 0.038 and p = 0.03), and diurnal and day-to-day PEF variation decreased (p = 0.03 and p = 0.093, p = 0.005 and p = 0.096, respectively) with nedocromil sodium treatment compared with albuterol treatment. Almost all symptoms (daytime and nighttime asthma, wheezing, shortness of breath) and the additional bronchodilator use were significantly reduced with nedocromil sodium treatment compared with albuterol treatment. Treatment with the anti-inflammatory drug nedocromil sodium was shown to be superior to treatment with the bronchodilator drug albuterol. The patient's clinical situation may deteriorate when beta 2-agonists are used continuously. Nedocromil sodium has good clinical effect, and it may serve as a first-line choice for antiinflammatory therapy in asthma.

  8. NAC Manchester Asthma and Allergy Study (NACMAAS): risk factors for asthma and allergic disorders in adults.

    PubMed

    Simpson, B M; Custovic, A; Simpson, A; Hallam, C L; Walsh, D; Marolia, H; Campbell, J; Woodcock, A

    2001-03-01

    Asthma and atopic disorders are the most common chronic diseases in the developed countries. Knowledge of the risk factors for these disorders may facilitate the development of preventive strategies aimed at reducing prevalence rates. To investigate the risk factors for asthma and allergic diseases in a large number of adults who are the parents of children in the National Asthma Campaign Manchester Asthma and Allergy Study. All pregnant women and their partners attending "Booking" antenatal clinics were invited to take part in the study. Questionnaire data were collected including the history of asthma and other atopic diseases, pet ownership and smoking habits, and skin prick tests were performed. The prevalence of atopy and the risk factors for asthma and allergic disorders were investigated in all subjects who completed the questionnaire and underwent skin testing. Statistical analysis was carried out using logistic regression. Initially, risk factors were assessed by univariate analysis to see how each potential explanatory variable affected the probability of having allergic disease. Variables were then tested in a forward stepwise multivariate analysis. In 5687 adult subjects there was a very high (48.2%) prevalence of atopy, and 9.7% of subjects had a diagnosis of asthma. In a multivariate regression analysis sensitization to dust mite, cat, dog and mixed grasses were all independently associated with asthma. The odds ratios for current asthma increased with the increasing number of positive skin tests (any two allergens - OR 4.3, 95% CI 3.3-5.5; any three allergens - OR 7.0 95% CI 5.3-9.3; all four allergens - OR 10.4, 95% CI 7.7-14; P < 0.00001). Dog ownership (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.10-1.57; P = 0.003) and current smoking (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.15-1.62; P = 0.0004) were significantly and directly associated with "asthma ever". Thirteen per cent of participants reported a history of eczema. In the multivariate analysis the strongest independent associate of eczema

  9. Leukemia inhibitory factor in the neuroimmune communication pathways in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Min-Juan; Lao, Xue-Jun; Liu, Sheng-Ming; Xu, Zhen-Hua; Zou, Wei-Feng

    2014-03-20

    In the pathogenesis of asthma, central sensitization is suggested to be an important neural mechanism, and neurotrophins and cytokines are likely to be the major mediators in the neuroimmune communication pathways of asthma. However, their impact on the central nervous system in allergic asthma remains unclear. We hypothesize that central neurogenic inflammation develops in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma, and nerve growth factor (NGF) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) are important mediators in its development. An asthma model of rats was established by sensitization and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA). For further confirmation of the role of LIF in neurogenic inflammation, a subgroup was pretreated with intraperitoneally (i.p.) LIF antibody before OVA challenge. The levels of LIF and NGF were measured with reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry stain in lung tissue, airway-specific dorsal root ganglia (DRG, C7-T5) and brain stem of asthmatic rats, anti-LIF pretreated rats and controls. A significantly increased number of LIF- and NGF-immunoreactive cells were detected in lung tissue, DRG and the brain stem of asthmatic rats. In the asthma group a significantly increase level of mRNA encoding LIF and NGF in lung tissue was detected, but not in DRG and the brain stem. Pretreatment with LIF antibody decreased the level of LIF and NGF in all tissues. LIF is an important mediator in the crosstalk between nerve and immune systems. Our study demonstrate that the increased level of LIF and NGF in DRG and brain stem may be not based on result from de novo synthesis, but rather on result from retrograde nerve transport or passage across the blood-brain-barrier.

  10. Type 2 innate lymphoid cells: at the cross-roads in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    van Rijt, Leonie; von Richthofen, Helen; van Ree, Ronald

    2016-07-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the lower airways that affects millions of people worldwide. Allergic asthma is a T helper 2 cell (Th2)-mediated disease, in which Th2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and IL-13 are closely associated with the symptoms. IL-4 is needed by B cells to switch toward an IgE response, IL-5 recruits and activates eosinophils while IL-13 increases mucus production. The identification of type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2), which are able to rapidly produce large amounts of IL-5 and IL-13 in response to epithelial derived cytokines, implicated a new key player besides Th2 cells. ILCs constitute a family of innate lymphocytes distinct from T and B cells. ILC2s are located in various epithelial compartments in mice and human, including the lung. The recent finding of increased numbers of ILC2s in the airways of severe asthma patients prompts further research to clarify their immunological function. Murine studies have shown that ILC2s are an early innate source of IL-5 and IL-13 after allergen exposure, which induce airway eosinophilic infiltration, mucus hyperproduction, and airway hyperresponsiveness but not allergen-specific IgE production. ILC2s contribute to the initiation as well as to the maintenance of the adaptive type 2 immune response. Here, we review the recent progress on our understanding of the role of ILC2s in the immunopathology of allergic asthma, in particular by studies using murine models which have elucidated fundamental mechanisms by which ILC2s act.

  11. Origin, Localization, and Immunoregulatory Properties of Pulmonary Phagocytes in Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Franziska; Ender, Fanny; Schmudde, Inken; Lewkowich, Ian P.; Köhl, Jörg; König, Peter; Laumonnier, Yves

    2016-01-01

    , and function of the diverse pulmonary antigen-presenting cell subsets, in particular with regard to the development and regulation of allergic asthma. While most data are from mouse models of experimental asthma, we have also included available human data to judge the translational value of the findings obtained in experimental asthma models. PMID:27047494

  12. [GA(2)LEN (Global Allergy and Asthma European Network): European network of excellence for asthma and allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Gjomarkaj, M; Pace, E; Canonica, G W; Bonini, S; Ricci, G; Burney, P; Zuberbier, T; Van Cauwenberge, P; Bousquet, J

    2009-12-01

    Allergic diseases represent some of the main health problems in Europe. These are increasing in prevalence, seriousness and social cost. The Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA(2)LEN), a network of excellence of the 6 degrees management program, was created in the 2005 with the aim to gather the European leader institutions of the research and clinical assistance fields, in order to guarantee the excellence and avoid the fragmentation of the energy spent in fighting allergy diseases in general. The GA(2)LEN has drawn a great advantage from the personal efforts of every single researcher who have proved their strong motivation in carrying on this "pan-European" model of collaboration. The network has been organized in order to increase the team work in scientific research projects in allergic and asthma disease field, making the GA(2)LEN the worldwide leader in this area. On these basis research projects have been carried on about which first data have been already published. The activities of the GA(2)LEN include in general the establishment of a lasting organization of the planning phase, the activity linked to every single project and to the improving on the existing projects, as well as the draft of new guidelines. This review reports the main achieved goals. PMID:20010485

  13. Global burden of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis with asthma and its complication chronic pulmonary aspergillosis in adults.

    PubMed

    Denning, David W; Pleuvry, Alex; Cole, Donald C

    2013-05-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) complicates asthma and may lead to chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) yet global burdens of each have never been estimated. Antifungal therapy has a place in the management of ABPA and is the cornerstone of treatment in CPA, reducing morbidity and probably mortality. We used the country-specific prevalence of asthma from the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) report applied to population estimates to calculate adult asthma cases. From five referral cohorts (China, Ireland, New Zealand, Saudi Arabia and South Africa), we estimated the prevalence of ABPA in adults with asthma at 2.5% (range 0.72-3.5%) (scoping review). From ABPA case series, pulmonary cavitation occurred in 10% (range 7-20%), allowing an estimate of CPA prevalence worldwide using a deterministic scenario-based model. Of 193 million adults with active asthma worldwide, we estimate that 4,837,000 patients (range 1,354,000-6,772,000) develop ABPA. By WHO region, the ABPA burden estimates are: Europe, 1,062,000; Americas, 1,461,000; Eastern Mediterranean, 351,000; Africa, 389,900; Western Pacific, 823,200; South East Asia, 720,400. We calculate a global case burden of CPA complicating ABPA of 411,100 (range 206,300-589,400) at a 10% rate with a 15% annual attrition. The global burden of ABPA potentially exceeds 4.8 million people and of CPA complicating ABPA ˜ 400,000, which is more common than previously appreciated. Both conditions respond to antifungal therapy justifying improved case detection. Prospective population and clinical cohort studies are warranted to more precisely ascertain the frequency of ABPA and CPA in different locations and ethnic groups and validate the model inputs.

  14. Soluble ADAM33 initiates airway remodeling to promote susceptibility for allergic asthma in early life

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Elizabeth R.; Kelly, Joanne F.C.; Howarth, Peter H.; Wilson, David I.; Holgate, Stephen T.; Davies, Donna E.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airways disease that usually begins in early life and involves gene-environment interactions. Although most asthma exhibits allergic inflammation, many allergic individuals do not have asthma. Here, we report how the asthma gene a disintegrin and metalloprotease 33 (ADAM33) acts as local tissue susceptibility gene that promotes allergic asthma. We show that enzymatically active soluble ADAM33 (sADAM33) is increased in asthmatic airways and plays a role in airway remodeling, independent of inflammation. Furthermore, remodeling and inflammation are both suppressed in Adam33-null mice after allergen challenge. When induced in utero or added ex vivo, sADAM33 causes structural remodeling of the airways, which enhances postnatal airway eosinophilia and bronchial hyperresponsiveness following subthreshold challenge with an aeroallergen. This substantial gene-environment interaction helps to explain the end-organ expression of allergic asthma in genetically susceptible individuals. Finally, we show that sADAM33-induced airway remodeling is reversible, highlighting the therapeutic potential of targeting ADAM33 in asthma. PMID:27489884

  15. Allergic rhinitis and its impact on asthma update (ARIA 2008)--western and Asian-Pacific perspective.

    PubMed

    Pawankar, Ruby; Bunnag, Chaweewan; Chen, Yuzhi; Fukuda, Takeshi; Kim, You-Young; Le, Lan Thi Tuyet; Huong, Le Thi Thu; O'Hehir, Robyn E; Ohta, Ken; Vichyanond, Pakit; Wang, De-Yun; Zhong, Nanshan; Khaltaev, Nikolai; Bousquet, Jean

    2009-12-01

    The prevalence of allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma is markedly increasing worldwide as societies adopt western life styles. Allergic sensitization is an important risk factor for asthma and AR, and asthma often co-exists with AR. An estimated 300 million people worldwide have asthma, about 50% of whom live in developing countries and about 400 million people suffer from AR. Yet, AR is often under-diagnosed and under-treated due to a lack of appreciation of the disease burden and its impact on quality of life, as well as its social impact at school and at the workplace. However, AR with or without asthma is a huge economic burden. Thus, there was clearly a need for a global evidence-based document which would highlight the interactions between the upper and lower airways including diagnosis, epidemiology, common risk factors, management and prevention. The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) document was first published in 2001 as a state-of-the-art guideline for the specialist, the general practitioner and other health care professionals. Subsequent new evidence regarding the pathomechanisms, new drugs and increased knowledge have resulted in the publication of the ARIA 2008 update. The present review summarizes the ARIA update with particular emphasis on the current status of AR and asthma in the Asia-Pacific region and discusses the Western and Asian perspective.

  16. IκB kinase β inhibitor, IMD-0354, prevents allergic asthma in a mouse model through inhibition of CD4(+) effector T cell responses in the lung-draining mediastinal lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Maślanka, Tomasz; Otrocka-Domagała, Iwona; Zuśka-Prot, Monika; Mikiewicz, Mateusz; Przybysz, Jagoda; Jasiecka, Agnieszka; Jaroszewski, Jerzy J

    2016-03-15

    IκB kinase (IKK) is important for nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation under inflammatory conditions. It has been demonstrated that IMD-0354, i.e. a selective inhibitor of IKKβ, inhibited allergic inflammation in a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma. The present study attempts to shed light on the involvement of CD4(+) effector (Teff) and regulatory (Treg) T cells in the anti-asthmatic action of IMD-0354. The animals were divided into three groups: vehicle treated, PBS-sensitized/challenged mice (PBS group); vehicle treated, OVA-sensitized/challenged mice (OVA group); and IMD-0354-treated, OVA-sensitized/challenged mice. The analyzed parameters included the absolute counts of Treg cells (Foxp3(+)CD25(+)CD4(+)), activated Teff cells (Foxp3(-)CD25(+)CD4(+)) and resting T cells (CD25(-)CD4(+)) in the mediastinal lymph nodes (MLNs), lungs and peripheral blood. Moreover, lung histopathology was performed to evaluate lung inflammation. It was found that the absolute number of cells in all studied subsets was considerably increased in the MLNs and lungs of mice from OVA group as compared to PBS group. All of these effects were fully prevented by treatment with IMD-0354. Histopathological examination showed that treatment with IMD-0354 protected the lungs from OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation. Our results indicate that IMD-0354 exerts anti-asthmatic action, at least partially, by blocking the activation and clonal expansion of CD4(+) Teff cells in the MLNs, which, consequently, prevents infiltration of the lungs with activated CD4(+) Teff cells. The beneficial effects of IMD-0354 in a mouse model of asthma are not mediated through increased recruitment of Treg cells into the MLNs and lungs and/or local generation of inducible Treg cells. PMID:26868187

  17. A Systematic Review on the Development of Asthma and Allergic Diseases in Relation to International Immigration: The Leading Role of the Environment Confirmed

    PubMed Central

    Cabieses, Báltica; Uphoff, Eleonora; Pinart, Mariona; Antó, Josep Maria; Wright, John

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases is rising worldwide. Evidence on potential causal pathways of asthma and allergies is growing, but findings have been contradictory, particularly on the interplay between allergic diseases and understudied social determinants of health like migration status. This review aimed at providing evidence for the association between migration status and asthma and allergies, and to explore the mechanisms between migration status and the development of asthma and allergies. Methods and Findings Systematic review on asthma and allergies and immigration status in accordance with the guidelines set by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. The pooled odds ratio (OR) of the prevalence of asthma in immigrants compared to the host population was 0.60 (95% CI 0.45–0.84), and the pooled OR for allergies was 1.01 (95% CI 0.62–1.69). The pooled OR for the prevalence of asthma in first generation versus second generation immigrants was 0.37 (95% CI 0.25–0.58). Comparisons between populations in their countries of origin and those that emigrated vary depending on their level of development; more developed countries show higher rates of asthma and allergies. Conclusions Our findings suggest a strong influence of the environment on the development of asthma and allergic diseases throughout the life course. The prevalence of asthma is generally higher in second generation than first generation immigrants. With length of residence in the host country the prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases increases steadily. These findings are consistent across study populations, host countries, and children as well as adults. Differences have been found to be significant when tested in a linear model, as well as when comparing between early and later age of migration, and between shorter and longer time of residence. PMID:25141011

  18. Bee venom phospholipase A2 suppresses allergic airway inflammation in an ovalbumin-induced asthma model through the induction of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Soojin; Baek, Hyunjung; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Gihyun; Lee, Hyeonhoon; Kang, Geun-Hyung; Lee, Gyeseok; Bae, Hyunsu

    2015-12-01

    Bee venom (BV) is one of the alternative medicines that have been widely used in the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. We previously demonstrated that BV induces immune tolerance by increasing the population of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in immune disorders. However, the major component and how it regulates the immune response have not been elucidated. We investigated whether bee venom phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) exerts protective effects that are mediated via Tregs in OVA-induced asthma model. bvPLA2 was administered by intraperitoneal injection into control and OVA-challenged mice. The Treg population, total and differential bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cell count, Th2 cytokines, and lung histological features were assessed. Treg depletion was used to determine the involvement of Treg migration and the reduction of asthmatic symptoms. The CD206-dependence of bvPLA2-treated suppression of airway inflammation was evaluated in OVA-challenged CD206(-/-) mice. The bvPLA2 treatment induced the Tregs and reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the lung in the OVA-challenged mice. Th2 cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were reduced in bvPLA2-treated mice. Although bvPLA2 suppressed the number of inflammatory cells after OVA challenge, these effects were not observed in Treg-depleted mice. In addition, we investigated the involvement of CD206 in bvPLA2-mediated immune tolerance in OVA-induced asthma model. We observed a significant reduction in the levels of Th2 cytokines and inflammatory cells in the BALF of bvPLA2-treated OVA-induced mice but not in bvPLA2-treated OVA-induced CD206(-/-) mice. These results demonstrated that bvPLA2 can mitigate airway inflammation by the induction of Tregs in an OVA-induced asthma model. PMID:26734460

  19. Microbiome and Asthma: What Have Experimental Models Already Taught Us?

    PubMed Central

    Bonamichi-Santos, R.; Aun, M. V.; Agondi, R. C.; Kalil, J.; Giavina-Bianchi, P.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease that imposes a substantial burden on patients, their families, and the community. Although many aspects of the pathogenesis of classical allergic asthma are well known by the scientific community, other points are not yet understood. Experimental asthma models, particularly murine models, have been used for over 100 years in order to better understand the immunopathology of asthma. It has been shown that human microbiome is an important component in the development of the immune system. Furthermore, the occurrence of many inflammatory diseases is influenced by the presence of microbes. Again, experimental models of asthma have helped researchers to understand the relationship between the microbiome and respiratory inflammation. In this review, we discuss the evolution of murine models of asthma and approach the major studies involving the microbiome and asthma. PMID:26266269

  20. Mechanistic impact of outdoor air pollution on asthma and allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingling; Qiu, Zhiming; Chung, Kian Fan

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, asthma and allergic diseases, such as allergic rhinitis and eczema, have become increasingly common, but the reason for this increased prevalence is still unclear. It has become apparent that genetic variation alone is not sufficient to account for the observed changes; rather, the changing environment, together with alterations in lifestyle and eating habits, are likely to have driven the increase in prevalence, and in some cases, severity of disease. This is particularly highlighted by recent awareness of, and concern about, the exposure to ubiquitous environmental pollutants, including chemicals with oxidant-generating capacities, and their impact on the human respiratory and immune systems. Indeed, several epidemiological studies have identified a variety of risk factors, including ambient pollutant gases and airborne particles, for the prevalence and the exacerbation of allergic diseases. However, the responsible pollutants remain unclear and the causal relationship has not been established. Recent studies of cellular and animal models have suggested several plausible mechanisms, with the most consistent observation being the direct effects of particle components on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the resultant oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. This review attempts to highlight the experimental findings, with particular emphasis on several major mechanistic events initiated by exposure to particulate matters (PMs) in the exposure-disease relationship. PMID:25694815

  1. RELATIVE POTENCY OF FUNGAL EXTRACTS IN INDUCING ALLERGIC ASTHMA-LIKE RESPONSES IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor mold has been associated with the development of allergic asthma. However, relative potency of molds in the induction of allergic asthma is not clear. In this study, we tested the relative potency of fungal extracts (Metarizium anisophilae [MACA], Stachybotrys ...

  2. Nanoparticle uptake by airway phagocytes after fungal spore challenge in murine allergic asthma and chronic bronchitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In healthy lungs, deposited micrometer-sized particles are efficiently phagocytosed by macrophages present on airway surfaces; however, uptake of nanoparticles (NP) by macrophages appears less effective and is largely unstudied in lung disease. Using mouse models of allergic asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we investigated NP uptake after challenge with common biogenic ambient air microparticles. Methods Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells from diseased mice (allergic asthma: ovalbumin [OVA] sensitized and COPD: Scnn1b-transgenic [Tg]) and their respective healthy controls were exposed ex vivo first to 3-μm fungal spores of Calvatia excipuliformis and then to 20-nm gold (Au) NP. Electron microscopic imaging was performed and NP uptake was assessed by quantitative morphometry. Results Macrophages from diseased mice were significantly larger compared to controls in OVA-allergic versus sham controls and in Scnn1b-Tg versus wild type (WT) mice. The percentage of macrophages containing AuNP tended to be lower in Scnn1b-Tg than in WT mice. In all animal groups, fungal spores were localized in macrophage phagosomes, the membrane tightly surrounding the spore, whilst AuNP were found in vesicles largely exceeding NP size, co-localized in spore phagosomes and occasionally, in the cytoplasm. AuNP in vesicles were located close to the membrane. In BAL from OVA-allergic mice, 13.9 ± 8.3% of all eosinophils contained AuNP in vesicles exceeding NP size and close to the membrane. Conclusions Overall, AuNP uptake by BAL macrophages occurred mainly by co-uptake together with other material, including micrometer-sized ambient air particles like fungal spores. The lower percentage of NP containing macrophages in BAL from Scnn1b-Tg mice points to a change in the macrophage population from a highly to a less phagocytic phenotype. This likely contributes to inefficient macrophage clearance of NP in lung disease. Finally, the AuNP containing

  3. Cost-Effectiveness of Bronchial Thermoplasty, Omalizumab, and Standard Therapy for Moderate-to-Severe Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zafari, Zafar; Sadatsafavi, Mohsen; Marra, Carlo A.; Chen, Wenjia; FitzGerald, J. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) is a recently developed treatment for patients with moderate-to-severe asthma. A few studies have suggested the clinical efficacy of this intervention. However, no study has evaluated the cost-effectiveness of BT compared to other alternative treatments for moderate-to-severe allergic asthma, which currently include omalizumab and standard therapy. Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of standard therapy, BT, and omalizumab for moderate-to-severe allergic asthma in the USA. Methods A probabilistic Markov model with weekly cycles was developed to reflect the course of asthma progression over a 5-year time horizon. The study population was adults with moderate-to-severe allergic asthma whose asthma remained uncontrolled despite using high-dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS, with or without long-acting beta-agonists [LABA]). A perspective of the health-care system was adopted with asthma-related costs as well as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and exacerbations as the outcomes. Results For standard therapy, BT, and omalizumab, the discounted 5-year costs and QALYs were $15,400 and 3.08, $28,100 and 3.24, and $117,000 and 3.26, respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of BT versus standard therapy and omalizumab versus BT was $78,700/QALY and $3.86 million/QALY, respectively. At the willingness-to-pay (WTP) of $50,000/QALY and $100,000/QALY, the probability of BT being cost-effective was 9%, and 67%, respectively. The corresponding expected value of perfect information (EVPI) was $155 and $1,530 per individual at these thresholds. In sensitivity analyses, increasing the costs of BT from $14,900 to $30,000 increased its ICER relative to standard therapy to $178,000/QALY, and decreased the ICER of omalizumab relative to BT to $3.06 million/QALY. Reducing the costs of omalizumab by 25% decreased its ICER relative to BT by 29%. Conclusions Based on the available evidence, our study suggests that there

  4. Time trends of the prevalence of asthma and allergic disease in Austrian children.

    PubMed

    Schernhammer, E S; Vutuc, C; Waldhör, T; Haidinger, G

    2008-03-01

    After a substantial increase in the prevalence of atopic disease in Europe, recent studies indicate that a plateau has been reached. However, variation across countries and age groups exists. We studied the prevalence and time trends of asthma and allergic disease among schoolchildren in Austria, a country with traditionally low rates of asthma, hay fever, and eczema. As part of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC), symptoms and physician diagnoses of asthma and allergic disease of 13,399 Austrian children aged 6-7 yr and 1516 children aged 12-14 yr were surveyed between 1995 and 1997. A similar survey was conducted between 2001 and 2003. Among children aged 6-7 yr, significant increases were seen in the prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma (+16%; p = 0.013), hay fever (+22%; p < 0.001), and eczema (+37%; p < 0.001) between 1995 and 2003. These changes were paralleled by an increase in the prevalence of symptoms typical for hay fever (itchy eyes and runny nose), but not by an increase in wheeze. Among children aged 12-14 yr, the lifetime prevalence of diagnosed asthma increased by 32%, of hay fever by 19%, and of eczema by 28% (all, p < 0.001). These changes were paralleled by increases in the prevalence of wheezing as documented by both questions before and after a video showing wheezing children but not by symptoms typical for hay fever such as itchy eyes and runny nose. In conclusion, in Austria, contrary to other European countries, the prevalence of asthma and allergic disease increased among schoolchildren. Additional studies are needed to continue monitoring the dynamics of the prevalence of asthma and allergic disease in Austria and to explore trends in their risk factors. PMID:18086231

  5. Weighted Road Density and Allergic Disease in Children at High Risk of Developing Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Hansell, Anna L.; Rose, Nectarios; Cowie, Christine T.; Belousova, Elena G.; Bakolis, Ioannis; Ng, Kitty; Toelle, Brett G.; Marks, Guy B.; Almqvist, plus Catarina; Ampon, Rosario D; Ayer, Julian; Bird, Tessa; Brew, Bronwyn K; Britton, Warwick J; Celermajer, David; Cowell, Christopher T; Crisafulli, Daniele; Criss, Sally; Davis, Stella; Nabil Ezz, Wafaa; Forbes, Samantha; Garden, Frances L; Kemp, Andrew S; Knezevic, Natalia; Krause, William; Leeder, Stephen R; Mellis, Craig M; Mihrshahi, Seema; Neumann, Mark; Peat, Jennifer K; Quinones-Lucio, Andres; Skilton, Michael; Tattam, Anne; Tovey, Euan R; Vanlaar, Carl H.; Vukasin, Nicola; Wainwright, Craig; Webb, Karen L; Weber-Chrysochoou, Christina; Woolcock, Ann J; Zhou, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence for an association between traffic-related air pollution and allergic disease is inconsistent, possibly because the adverse effects may be limited to susceptible subgroups and these have not been identified. This study examined children in the Childhood Asthma Prevention Study (CAPS), potentially susceptible to air pollution effects because of a family history of asthma. Methods We examined cross-sectional associations at age eight years between road density within 75 m and 50 m of home address weighted by road type (traffic density), as a proxy for traffic-related air pollution, on the following allergic and respiratory outcomes: skin prick tests (SPTs), total and specific serum IgE, pre- and post-bronchodilator lung function, airway hyperresponsiveness, exhaled NO, and reported asthma and rhinitis. Results Weighted road density was positively associated with allergic sensitisation and allergic rhinitis. Adjusted relative risk (RR) for house dust mite (HDM) positive SPT was 1.25 (95% CI: 1.06–1.48), for detectable house dust mite-specific IgE was 1.19 (95% CI: 1.01–1.41) and for allergic rhinitis was 1.30 (95% CI: 1.03–1.63) per 100 m local road or 33.3 m motorway within 50 m of home. Associations were also seen with small decrements of peak and mid-expiratory flows and increased risk of asthma, current wheeze and rhinitis in atopic children. Conclusion Associations between road density and allergic disease were found in a potentially susceptible subgroup of children at high risk of developing atopy and asthma. PMID:24949625

  6. Effects of inhalational anaesthetics in experimental allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Burburan, S M; Silva, J D; Abreu, S C; Samary, C S; Guimarães, I H L; Xisto, D G; Morales, M M; Rocco, P R M

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated whether isoflurane, halothane and sevoflurane attenuate the inflammatory response and improve lung morphofunction in experimental asthma. Fifty-six BALB/c mice were sensitised and challenged with ovalbumin and anaesthetised with isoflurane, halothane, sevoflurane or pentobarbital sodium for one hour. Lung mechanics and histology were evaluated. Gene expression of pro-inflammatory (tumour necrosis factor-α), pro-fibrogenic (transforming growth factor-β) and pro-angiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor) mediators, as well as oxidative process modulators, were analysed. These modulators included nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2, sirtuin, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Isoflurane, halothane and sevoflurane reduced airway resistance, static lung elastance and atelectasis when compared with pentobarbital sodium. Sevoflurane minimised bronchoconstriction and cell infiltration, and decreased tumour necrosis factor-α, transforming growth factor-β, vascular endothelial growth factor, sirtuin, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, while increasing nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 expression. Sevoflurane down-regulated inflammatory, fibrogenic and angiogenic mediators, and modulated oxidant-antioxidant imbalance, improving lung function in this model of asthma. PMID:24666314

  7. The Impact of Aspergillus fumigatus Viability and Sensitization to Its Allergens on the Murine Allergic Asthma Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sumali; Hoselton, Scott A.; Schuh, Jane M.

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a ubiquitously present respiratory pathogen. The outcome of a pulmonary disease may vary significantly with fungal viability and host immune status. Our objective in this study was (1) to assess the ability of inhaled irradiation-killed or live A. fumigatus spores to induce allergic pulmonary disease and (2) to assess the extent to which inhaled dead or live A. fumigatus spores influence pulmonary symptoms in a previously established allergic state. Our newly developed fungal delivery apparatus allowed us to recapitulate human exposure through repeated inhalation of dry fungal spores in an animal model. We found that live A. fumigatus spore inhalation led to a significantly increased humoral response, pulmonary inflammation, and airway remodeling in naïve mice and is more likely to induce allergic asthma symptoms than the dead spores. In contrast, in allergic mice, inhalation of dead and live conidia recruited neutrophils and induced goblet cell metaplasia. This data suggests that asthma symptoms might be exacerbated by the inhalation of live or dead spores in individuals with established allergy to fungal antigens, although the extent of symptoms was less with dead spores. These results are likely to be important while considering fungal exposure assessment methods and for making informed therapeutic decisions for mold-associated diseases. PMID:24063011

  8. The impact of diet on asthma and allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Julia, Valerie; Macia, Laurence; Dombrowicz, David

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of allergic diseases is increasing, both in developed and developing countries, concomitantly with the rise in living standards and the adoption of a 'western lifestyle'. For two decades, the hygiene hypothesis - which proposes that the lack of early childhood exposure to infectious agents increases susceptibility to allergic diseases in later life - provided the conceptual framework for unravelling the mechanisms that could account for the increased incidence of allergic diseases. In this Review, we discuss recent evidence that highlights the role of diet as a key factor influencing immune homeostasis and the development of allergic diseases through a complex interplay between nutrients, their metabolites and immune cell populations. Although further investigations are still required to understand these complex relationships, recent data have established a possible connection between metabolic homeostasis and allergic diseases.

  9. Protective Effects of Intratracheally-Administered Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 on Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Asthma in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Baek, Hyunjung; Shin, Dasom; Lee, Gihyun; Park, Sangwon; Lee, Sujin; Choi, Dabin; Kim, Woojin; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a common chronic disease characterized by bronchial inflammation, reversible airway obstruction, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Current therapeutic options for the management of asthma include inhaled corticosteroids and β2 agonists, which elicit harmful side effects. In the present study, we examined the capacity of phospholipase A2 (PLA2), one of the major components of bee venom (BV), to reduce airway inflammation and improve lung function in an experimental model of asthma. Allergic asthma was induced in female BALB/c mice by intraperitoneal administration of ovalbumin (OVA) on days 0 and 14, followed by intratracheal challenge with 1% OVA six times between days 22 and 30. The infiltration of immune cells, such as Th2 cytokines in the lungs, and the lung histology, were assessed in the OVA-challenged mice in the presence and absence of an intratracheal administration of bvPLA2. We showed that the intratracheal administration of bvPLA2 markedly suppressed the OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation by reducing AHR, overall area of inflammation, and goblet cell hyperplasia. Furthermore, the suppression was associated with a significant decrease in the production of Th2 cytokines, such as IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, and a reduction in the number of total cells, including eosinophils, macrophages, and neutrophils in the airway. PMID:27669297

  10. Protective Effects of Intratracheally-Administered Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 on Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Asthma in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Baek, Hyunjung; Shin, Dasom; Lee, Gihyun; Park, Sangwon; Lee, Sujin; Choi, Dabin; Kim, Woojin; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a common chronic disease characterized by bronchial inflammation, reversible airway obstruction, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Current therapeutic options for the management of asthma include inhaled corticosteroids and β2 agonists, which elicit harmful side effects. In the present study, we examined the capacity of phospholipase A2 (PLA2), one of the major components of bee venom (BV), to reduce airway inflammation and improve lung function in an experimental model of asthma. Allergic asthma was induced in female BALB/c mice by intraperitoneal administration of ovalbumin (OVA) on days 0 and 14, followed by intratracheal challenge with 1% OVA six times between days 22 and 30. The infiltration of immune cells, such as Th2 cytokines in the lungs, and the lung histology, were assessed in the OVA-challenged mice in the presence and absence of an intratracheal administration of bvPLA2. We showed that the intratracheal administration of bvPLA2 markedly suppressed the OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation by reducing AHR, overall area of inflammation, and goblet cell hyperplasia. Furthermore, the suppression was associated with a significant decrease in the production of Th2 cytokines, such as IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, and a reduction in the number of total cells, including eosinophils, macrophages, and neutrophils in the airway. PMID:27669297

  11. The genetics of asthma and allergic disease: a 21st century perspective.

    PubMed

    Ober, Carole; Yao, Tsung-Chieh

    2011-07-01

    Asthma and allergy are common conditions with complex etiologies involving both genetic and environmental contributions. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and meta-analyses of GWAS have begun to shed light on both common and distinct pathways that contribute to asthma and allergic diseases. Associations with variation in genes encoding the epithelial cell-derived cytokines, interleukin-33 (IL-33) and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), and the IL1RL1 gene encoding the IL-33 receptor, ST2, highlight the central roles for innate immune response pathways that promote the activation and differentiation of T-helper 2 cells in the pathogenesis of both asthma and allergic diseases. In contrast, variation at the 17q21 asthma locus, encoding the ORMDL3 and GSDML genes, is specifically associated with risk for childhood onset asthma. These and other genetic findings are providing a list of well-validated asthma and allergy susceptibility genes that are expanding our understanding of the common and unique biological pathways that are dysregulated in these related conditions. Ongoing studies will continue to broaden our understanding of asthma and allergy and unravel the mechanisms for the development of these complex traits. PMID:21682736

  12. Allergic Patients with Long-Term Asthma Display Low Levels of Bifidobacterium adolescentis.

    PubMed

    Hevia, Arancha; Milani, Christian; López, Patricia; Donado, Carmen D; Cuervo, Adriana; González, Sonia; Suárez, Ana; Turroni, Francesca; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ventura, Marco; Sánchez, Borja; Margolles, Abelardo

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests a relationship between specific allergic processes, such as atopic eczema in children, and an aberrant fecal microbiota. However, little is known about the complete microbiota profile of adult individuals suffering from asthma. We determined the fecal microbiota in 21 adult patients suffering allergic asthma (age 39.43 ± 10.98 years old) and compare it with the fecal microbiota of 22 healthy controls (age 39.29 ± 9.21 years old) using culture independent techniques. An Ion-Torrent 16S rRNA gene-based amplification and sequencing protocol was used to determine the fecal microbiota profile of the individuals. Sequence microbiota analysis showed that the microbial alpha-diversity was not significantly different between healthy and allergic individuals and no clear clustering of the samples was obtained using an unsupervised principal component analysis. However, the analysis of specific bacterial groups allowed us to detect significantly lower levels of bifidobacteria in patients with long-term asthma. Also, in allergic individuals the Bifidobacterium adolescentis species prevailed within the bifidobacterial population. The reduction in the levels on bifidobacteria in patients with long-term asthma suggests a new target in allergy research and opens possibilities for the therapeutic modulation of the gut microbiota in this group of patients.

  13. Allergic Patients with Long-Term Asthma Display Low Levels of Bifidobacterium adolescentis

    PubMed Central

    Hevia, Arancha; Milani, Christian; López, Patricia; Donado, Carmen D.; Cuervo, Adriana; González, Sonia; Suárez, Ana; Turroni, Francesca; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ventura, Marco; Sánchez, Borja; Margolles, Abelardo

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests a relationship between specific allergic processes, such as atopic eczema in children, and an aberrant fecal microbiota. However, little is known about the complete microbiota profile of adult individuals suffering from asthma. We determined the fecal microbiota in 21 adult patients suffering allergic asthma (age 39.43 ± 10.98 years old) and compare it with the fecal microbiota of 22 healthy controls (age 39.29 ± 9.21 years old) using culture independent techniques. An Ion-Torrent 16S rRNA gene-based amplification and sequencing protocol was used to determine the fecal microbiota profile of the individuals. Sequence microbiota analysis showed that the microbial alpha-diversity was not significantly different between healthy and allergic individuals and no clear clustering of the samples was obtained using an unsupervised principal component analysis. However, the analysis of specific bacterial groups allowed us to detect significantly lower levels of bifidobacteria in patients with long-term asthma. Also, in allergic individuals the Bifidobacterium adolescentis species prevailed within the bifidobacterial population. The reduction in the levels on bifidobacteria in patients with long-term asthma suggests a new target in allergy research and opens possibilities for the therapeutic modulation of the gut microbiota in this group of patients. PMID:26840903

  14. Inhibition of acidic mammalian chitinase by RNA interference suppresses ovalbumin-sensitized allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ching-Jen; Liu, Yu-Kuo; Liu, Chao-Lin; Shen, Chia-Ning; Kuo, Ming-Ling; Su, Chien-Chang; Tseng, Ching-Ping; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Shen, Chia-Rui

    2009-12-01

    Asthma, a chronic helper T cell type 2-mediated inflammatory disease, is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Growing evidence suggests that increased expression of acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) may play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. In the present study, we sought to develop an RNA interference approach to suppress allergic asthma in mice through silencing of AMCase expression. Mice sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) were intratracheally administered a recombinant adeno-associated virus expressing short hairpin RNA (rAAV-shRNA) against AMCase. In OVA-sensitized mice, the development of allergic symptoms was significantly associated with elevated AMCase expression. After administration of rAAV-shRNA, there was a significant reduction of AMCase expression in the lung and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cells of sensitized mice. Sensitized mice receiving rAAV-shRNA showed a significant improvement in allergic symptoms, including airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), eosinophil infiltration, eotaxin, interleukin-13 secretion in BALF, and serum OVA-specific IgE level. Our data suggest the hyperexpression of AMCase in asthma can be suppressed by rAAV-mediated shRNA. Silencing AMCase expression by shRNA may be a promising therapeutic strategy in asthma.

  15. Analysis of the quality of life of patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis after immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Szynkiewicz, Ewa; Cegła, Bernadeta; Bartuzi, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Aim To assess the quality of life of Polish patients with asthma and/or allergic rhinitis before the implementation and after 30–36 months of immunotherapy. Material and methods Two hundred patients have been involved in the study: 101 with allergic asthma and 99 with pollinosis. In order to collect research material, the Polish versions of AQLQ (Asthma Quality of Life) and RQLQ (Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life) questionnaires have been used. The self-administered questionnaires concerned such data as age, sex and the patients’ subjective evaluation of their quality of life. Results The average increase in quality of life of patients with asthma was 0.84 and of patients with allergic rhinitis – 1.50. A hypothesis was made that changes of quality of life in each examined group differed significantly. A test for two fractions showed that for patients with asthma it was 7.74 and for patients with allergic rhinitis – 10.38. A statistical analysis showed no such relation in the group of patients with asthma (coefficient of correlation = 0.08) and a slight correlation in the group of patients with allergic rhinitis (coefficient of correlation = 0.20). Applied tests did not show any significant differences, which means that an average increase in quality of life does not depend on sex and age of both examined groups. Conclusions On the basis of the research conducted among patients before and after a 3-year period of immunotherapy, the following conclusions have been drawn: 1) immunotherapy significantly improves the objective quality of life in both groups; 2) a slight correlation has been identified between the objective and subjective dimension of quality of life amongst patients with asthma, what contributes to a better quality of life; 3) in both study groups, no significant relationship between gender or age and improvement in quality of life has been noted; 4) immunotherapy, from the point of view of the improvement of quality of life, is a valuable

  16. 167 Allergen Sensitization in Children with Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Rigalt, Ann Michelle; Maselli, Juan Pablo; Alvarado, Ninotchka; Carpio, Paola; Chur, Víctor; Mayén, Patricia; Morán, Edgar; Pinto, Mario; Rodríguez, Juan Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Background There are no previous studies published reporting allergen sensitizations in the population of most Central American countries, including Guatemala. There are many types of climates in different regions, with variable altitude, humidity, etc. The purpose of this study was to determine the most common allergen sensitizations in children with Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma in 4 different regions. Methods The study was performed on 461 children aged 5 to 15 years, from 4 different regions in Guatemala. A questionnaire was given to record information regarding family history of atopic disease and symptoms of Rhinitis and Asthma. The diagnosis was made in the presence of at least 3 symptoms of each disease. Scratch testing was performed using a commercially available device and a panel of 8 allergen extracts: Cypress Arizona, Dog, Cat, Dermatophagoides farinae and pteronyssinus, Cockroach Mix, Mold Mix and Bermuda grass. Results Patient average age was 8.3 years, 55% male and 45% female. Patient distribution by region was 35% from Huehuetenango, 29% Chiquimula, 18% Mazatenango and 18% Quetzaltenango. Family history of allergic rhinitis was present in 46% of patients, asthma in 51% and atopic dermatitis in 33%. The most common diagnosis was rhinitis in 86% of patients, 52% had asthma and 43%, both rhinitis and asthma. 98% had a positive Histamine Control and all a Negative Saline Control. 36% of patients had no allergy sensitization to allergens tested and 64% showed positive skin tests. The most frequent allergic sensitization was to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (44%) and farinae (43%), followed by Cockroach (28%). We also found less frequently, positive skin tests to grass (14%), Cat (14%), Mold (10%), Dog (8%) and Cypress (6%). The regions with higher dust mite sensitization were Quetzaltenango (51–55%) and Huehuetenango (45–51%). Conclusions The most common allergen sensitizations in children with allergic rhinitis and asthma in Guatemala are dust

  17. Underdiagnosed and Undertreated Allergic Rhinitis in Urban School-Aged Children with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Robert B.; Kopel, Sheryl J.; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Fritz, Gregory K.; Seifer, Ronald; York, Daniel; Golova, Natalie; Jandasek, Barbara; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne

    2014-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a risk factor for the development of asthma, and if poorly controlled, it may exacerbate asthma. We sought to describe AR symptoms and treatment in a larger study about asthma, sleep, and school performance. We examined the proportion (1) who met criteria for AR in an urban sample of school children with persistent asthma symptoms, (2) whose caregivers stated that they were not told of their child's allergies, (3) who had AR but were not treated or were undertreated for the disease, as well as (4) caregivers and healthcare providers' perceptions of the child's allergy status compared with study assessment, and (5) associations between self-report of asthma and AR control over a 4-week monitoring period. One hundred sixty-six children with persistent asthma participated in a clinical evaluation of asthma and rhinitis, including allergy testing. Self-report of asthma control and rhinitis control using the Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) and Rhinitis Control Assessment Test (RCAT) were measured 1 month after the study clinic session. Persistent rhinitis symptoms were reported by 72% of participants; 54% of rhinitis symptoms were moderate in severity, though only 33% of the sample received adequate treatment. AR was newly diagnosed for 53% during the clinic evaluation. Only 15% reported using intranasal steroids. Participants with poorly controlled AR had poorer asthma control compared with those with well-controlled AR. This sample of urban school-aged children with persistent asthma had underdiagnosed and undertreated AR. Healthcare providers and caregivers in urban settings need additional education about the role of allergies in asthma, recognition of AR symptoms, and AR's essential function in the comanagement of asthma. Barriers to linkages with allergy specialists need to be identified. PMID:24963455

  18. Perinatal and Early Childhood Environmental Factors Influencing Allergic Asthma Immunopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gaffin, Jonathan M.; Kanchongkittiphon, Watcharoot; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of asthma has increased dramatically over the past several decades. While hereditary factors are highly important, the rapid rise outstrips the pace of genomic variation. Great emphasis has been placed on potential modifiable early life exposures leading to childhood asthma. Methods We reviewed the recent medical literature for important studies discussing the role of the perinatal and early childhood exposures and the inception of childhood asthma. Results and Discussion Early life exposure to allergens (House dust mite (HDM), furred pets, cockroach, rodent and mold)air pollution (nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and particulate matter (PM)) and viral respiratory tract infections (Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human rhinovirus (hRV)) have been implicated in the development of asthma in high risk children. Conversely, exposure to microbial diversity in the perinatal period may diminish the development of atopy and asthma symptoms. PMID:24952205

  19. Comparison of Oral Montelukast and Intranasal Fluticasone in Patients with Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Apar; Sagadevan, Suresh; Narasimhan, Meenakshi; Shanmuganathan, Aruna; Vallabhaneni, Viswambhar; Rajalingam, Ragulan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Even though the links between upper and lower airway had been of interest to clinicians since long back, it has not attracted the attention of the researchers till recent past. But the evidence is still far from conclusive, due to limited number of randomized controlled trials available on subjects with concomitant allergic rhinitis and asthma. This gap in the knowledge is even more conspicuous in Indian population. Aim The current study is conducted with an objective of comparing the efficacy and tolerability of intranasal Fluticasone and oral Montelukast in treatment of allergic rhinitis and bronchial asthma. Materials and Methods The study was a prospective randomized, single blinded, comparative, parallel group study, with two intervention groups conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital in Chennai, Southern India. One hundred and twenty patients diagnosed with concomitant diagnosis of allergic rhinitis and bronchial asthma was randomly allocated to either Fluticasone propionate aqueous nasal spray or oral Montelukast group. Results Out of total 120 subjects recruited, 108 subjects were included in the final analysis. The mean reduction in asthma and rhinitis symptom scores and improvement in PEFR was higher for Group A, compared to Group B during all the follow-up periods. No statistically significant difference was observed in proportion of subjects reporting exacerbations in the current study. Both the treatments were well tolerated. Conclusion Addition of intranasal Fluticasone propionate to Salmeterol plus Fluticasone is beneficial in improving asthma control, allergic rhinitis control and lung functions as compared to oral Montelukast. Thereby the use of intranasal Fluticasone Propionate in comparison to oral Montelukast in control of Allergic Rhinitis is justified as per the significant improvement in outcome measures. PMID:27656477

  20. Influence of subcutaneous specific immunotherapy on drug costs in children suffering from allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous specific immunotherapy (SCIT) is an effective treatment attenuating the progression of allergic asthma. To date, there is a lack of studies investigating the economic consequences of SCIT on health care expenditures. Methods A health-economic piggy-back analysis of SCIT was conducted based on a RCT that enrolled 65 children and adolescents with allergic asthma. Patients were allocated into two groups: A group receiving SCIT with a high-dose hypoallergenic house dust mite preparation plus asthma medication and a control group receiving only asthma medication. For both groups asthma control was achieved before the start of the SCIT treatment and was maintained during the study. Both, costs and cost-effectiveness of SCIT with the high-dose hypoallergenic house dust mite preparation were investigated based on total medication costs, incremental medication costs and treatment effects (measured as lung function), respectively. A bootstrap analysis was performed to validate the results. Results A steady decline in medication costs could be observed in the SCIT group one year after treatment start compared to the control group. This cost trend became statistically significant 3 years after SCIT started. The calculated potential savings in the SCIT group correlated with an improved lung function. The distribution of the bootstrap results revealed that the probability of SCIT having a superior effectiveness compared to the control group is around 90%. Conclusion SCIT with a high-dose hypoallergenic preparation received by children and adolescents suffering from mite induced allergic asthma reduces the allergic medication intake and has cost-saving effects. Additional costs associated with SCIT may be completely compensated by drug cost savings 4 years after end of SCIT. Additionally, SCIT is superior compared to routine care as measured by the lung function that improved in SCIT-treated patients. Trial registration: (EudraCT no. 2004 – 003892 – 35

  1. Estrogen Signaling Modulates Allergic Inflammation and Contributes to Sex Differences in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Keselman, Aleksander; Heller, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory disease that affects ~300 million people worldwide. It is characterized by airway constriction that leads to wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath. The most common treatments are corticosteroids and β2-adrenergic receptor antagonists, which target inflammation and airway smooth muscle constriction, respectively. The incidence and severity of asthma is greater in women than in men, and women are more prone to develop corticosteroid-resistant or “hard-to-treat” asthma. Puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, menopause, and oral contraceptives are known to contribute to disease outcome in women, suggesting a role for estrogen and other hormones impacting allergic inflammation. Currently, the mechanisms underlying these sex differences are poorly understood, although the effect of sex hormones, such as estrogen, on allergic inflammation is gaining interest. Asthma presents as a heterogeneous disease. In typical Th2-type allergic asthma, interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 predominate, driving IgE production and recruitment of eosinophils into the lungs. Chronic Th2-inflammation in the lung results in structural changes and activation of multiple immune cell types, leading to a deterioration of lung function over time. Most immune cells express estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ, or the membrane-bound G-protein-coupled ER) to varying degrees and can respond to the hormone. Together these receptors have demonstrated the capacity to regulate a spectrum of immune functions, including adhesion, migration, survival, wound healing, and antibody and cytokine production. This review will cover the current understanding of estrogen signaling in allergic inflammation and discuss how this signaling may contribute to sex differences in asthma and allergy. PMID:26635789

  2. Seasonal changes of proapoptotic soluble Fas ligand level in allergic rhinitis combined with asthma.

    PubMed

    Mezei, Györgyi; Lévay, Magdolna; Sepler, Zsuzsanna; Héninger, Erika; Kozma, Gergely Tibor; Cserháti, Endre

    2006-09-01

    The function of apoptosis is to eliminate unnecessary or dangerous cells. The balance between production and death is important in the control of cell numbers within physiological ranges. Cells involved in allergic reactions may have altered apoptosis. The aim of this study was to examine the seasonal changes of programmed cell death in children with pollen allergy. We measured serum levels of soluble Fas (sFas) and soluble Fas ligand (sFasL), and examined whether there was any correlation between soluble apoptosis markers and development of asthma and or rhinitis in children with pollen allergy. We examined two groups of patients with ragweed pollen allergy. The first group consisted of 17 children with 'rhinitis only'. The second group consisted of 16 children with 'asthma + rhinitis'. For seasonal analysis we pooled the two groups and termed this the 'ragweed sensitive' group (n = 33, 5-18 yr, 25 boys, eight girls). Measurements (sFas and sFasL) were taken during the ragweed pollen allergy season, while control measurements were performed during the symptom-free period. There was no difference in sFas levels measured during and after [1941 +/- 68, 1963 +/- 83 pg/ml (mean+/-s.e.m, respectively)] the pollen season in the 'ragweed sensitive' group. The sFasL level showed seasonal change, which was significantly higher (p = 0.0086) in the symptomatic period compared to the symptom-free state (99 +/- 13 and 53 +/- 16 pg/ml, respectively). There was a difference between the 'rhinitis only' and the 'asthma + rhinitis' groups in the measured parameters of apoptosis. Children having allergic rhinitis combined with asthma had a significantly (p = 0.03) higher sFas level in the symptom-free state than the 'rhinitis only' group did (2115 +/- 156 and 1820 +/- 52 pg/ml, respectively). During the allergic symptom state the sFasL level of the 'asthma + rhinitis' group was significantly higher (p = 0.025) than that of the 'rhinitis only' group (125 +/- 20 and 75 +/- 14 pg

  3. [ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma). Achievements in 10 years and future needs in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E; Sánchez-Borges, Mario; Zernotti, Mario E; Larenas-Linnemann, Désireé; Cruz, Alvaro A; González-Díaz, Sandra N; Ivancevich, Juan C; Aldrey-Palacios, Oscar; Sisul, Juan C; Solé, Dirceu; Cepeda, Alfonso M; Jares, Edgardo J; Calvo Gil, Mario; Valentin-Rostán, Marylin; Yáñez, Anahí; Gereda, José; Cardona-Villa, Ricardo; Rosario, Nelson; Croce, Víctor H; Bachert, Claus; Canonica, G Walter; Demoly, Pascal; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Samolinski, Boleslaw; Schünemann, Holger J; Yorgancioglu, Arzu; Ansotegui, Ignacio J; Khaltaev, Nikolai; Bedbrook, Anna; Zuberbier, Torsten; Bousquet, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis and asthma represent global problems of public health affecting all age groups; asthma and allergic rhinitis frequently coexist in the same patients. In Latin American prevalence of allergic rhinitis, although variable, is very high. Allergic rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) started during a workshop of the World Health Organization performed in 1999 and was published in 2001. ARIA proposed a new classification of allergic rhinitis in intermittent or persistent and mild or moderate-severe. This approach of classification reflects more nearly the impact of allergic rhinitis in patients. In its review of 2010 ARIA developed guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of allergic rhinitis and of clinical practices for management of comorbidities of allergic rhinitis and asthma based on GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Development and Evaluation). ARIA has been spread and implemented in more than 50 countries. In Latin American an intense activity has been developed to spread these recommendations in almost all the countries of the region and it is important to record the obtained goals in the diffusion and implementation of ARIA, as well as to identify the unsatisfied needs from the clinical, research and implementation points of view. Final objective is to reinforce the priority that allergy and asthma should have, especially in children, in the programs of public health, as they have been prioritized in European Union in 2011.

  4. ALLERGIC ASTHMA AND THE DEVELOPING IMMUNE SYSTEM: A PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: The predisposition towards atopic disease begins early in life, and that the risk of developing asthma is heightened following prenatal exposure to some compounds. Nonetheless, the effect of gestational aeroallergen exposure on the developing immune system is unclear....

  5. Airway oxidative stress causes vascular and hepatic inflammation via upregulation of IL-17A in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Naif O; Nadeem, Ahmed; Al-Harbi, Mohammed M; Ansari, Mushtaq A; AlSharari, Shakir D; Bahashwan, Saleh A; Attia, Sabry M; Al-Hosaini, Khaled A; Al Hoshani, Ali R; Ahmad, Sheikh F

    2016-05-01

    Oxidants are generated in asthmatic airways due to infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes and resident cells in the lung. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical may leak into systemic circulation when generated in uncontrolled manner and may impact vasculature. Our previous studies have shown an association between airway inflammation and systemic inflammation; however so far none has investigated the impact of airway oxidative inflammation on hepatic oxidative stress and Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine markers in liver/vasculature in a murine model of asthma. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of oxidative stress encountered in asthmatic airways in modulation of systemic/hepatic Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines balance and hepatic oxidative stress. Mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with cockroach extract (CE) in the presence of aluminum hydroxide followed by several intranasal (i.n.) challenges with CE. Mice were then assessed for systemic/hepatic inflammation through assessment of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines and oxidative stress (iNOS, protein nitrotyrosine, lipid peroxides and myeloperoxidase activity). Challenge with CE led to increased Th2/Th17 cytokines in blood/liver and hepatic oxidative stress. However, only Th17 related pro-inflammatory markers were upregulated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhalation in vasculature and liver, whereas antioxidant treatment, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) downregulated them. Hepatic oxidative stress was also upregulated by H2O2 inhalation, whereas NAC attenuated it. Therefore, our study shows that airway oxidative inflammation may contribute to systemic inflammation through upregulation of Th17 immune responses in blood/liver and hepatic oxidative stress. This might predispose these patients to increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disorders.

  6. Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma in Asia Pacific and the ARIA Update 2008

    PubMed Central

    Bunnag, Chaweewan; Khaltaev, Nikolai; Bousquet, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: The prevalence of allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma are markedly increasing to epidemic proportions worldwide as societies adopt Western lifestyles. An estimated 300 million persons worldwide have asthma, about 50% of whom live in developing countries, and about 400 million people suffer from AR. AR has a marked impact on quality of life, socially, at school, and in the workplace and is a huge socioeconomic burden. Thus, there was clearly a need for a global evidence-based guideline not only for managing AR but also highlighting the interactions between the upper and lower airways including diagnosis, epidemiology, common risk factors, management, and prevention. The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) document was first published in 2001 as a state-of-the-art document for the specialist, the general practitioner, and other health care professionals. Subsequent research and increasing knowledge have resulted in the ARIA 2008 update. The present review summarizes the ARIA update with particular emphasis on the current status of AR and asthma in Asia Pacific. PMID:23268481

  7. Allergen challenge induces Ifng dependent GTPases in the lungs as part of a Th1 transcriptome response in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Dharajiya, Nilesh; Vaidya, Swapnil; Sinha, Mala; Luxon, Bruce; Boldogh, Istvan; Sur, Sanjiv

    2009-01-01

    According to the current paradigm, allergic airway inflammation is mediated by Th2 cytokines and pro-inflammatory chemokines. Since allergic inflammation is self-limited, we hypothesized that allergen challenge simultaneously induces anti-inflammatory genes to counter-balance the effects of Th2 cytokines and chemokines. To identify these putative anti-inflammatory genes, we compared the gene expression profile in the lungs of ragweed-sensitized mice four hours after challenge with either PBS or ragweed extract (RWE) using a micro-array platform. Consistent with our hypothesis, RWE challenge concurrently upregulated Th1-associated early target genes of the Il12/Stat4 pathway, such as p47 and p65 GTPases (Iigp, Tgtp and Gbp1), Socs1, Cxcl9, Cxcl10 and Gadd45g with the Th2 genes Il4, Il5, Ccl2 and Ccl7. These Th1-associated genes remain upregulated longer than the Th2 genes. Augmentation of the local Th1 milieu by administration of Il12 or CpG prior to RWE challenge further upregulated these Th1 genes. Abolition of the Th1 response by disrupting the Ifng gene increased allergic airway inflammation and abrogated RWE challenge-induced upregulation of GTPases, Cxcl9, Cxcl10 and Socs1, but not Gadd45g. Our data demonstrate that allergen challenge induces two sets of Th1-associated genes in the lungs: 1) Ifng-dependent genes such as p47 and p65 GTPases, Socs1, Cxcl9 and Cxcl10 and 2) Ifng-independent Th1-inducing genes like Gadd45g. We propose that allergen-induced airway inflammation is regulated by simultaneous upregulation of Th1 and Th2 genes, and that persistent unopposed upregulation of Th1 genes resolves allergic inflammation. PMID:20027288

  8. Prevalence and socioeconomic associations of asthma and allergic rhinitis in northern [corrected] Africa.

    PubMed

    Georgy, V; Fahim, H I; El-Gaafary, M; Walters, S

    2006-10-01

    The aims of the current study were to ascertain the prevalence of asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms in Cairo, Egypt (northern Africa), and to elucidate the socioeconomic factors associated with symptom prevalence and severity. A translated and adapted version of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire was distributed to a sample of 2,645 11-15-yr-olds in state and fee-paying schools in Cairo. The overall prevalences of wheeze ever, wheeze during the last year and physician-diagnosed asthma were 26.5% (697 out of 2,631), 14.7% (379 out of 2,570) and 9.4% (246 out of 2,609), respectively. The prevalence of rhinoconjunctivitis was 15.3% (399 out of 2,616). Asthma symptoms were independently associated with attendance at a state school, parental asthma, age, history of rhinitis and owning a pet cat. Rhinoconjunctivitis was independently associated with attendance at a state school, father's education, parental history of asthma, asthma symptoms and owning a pet cat. In spite of a higher prevalence of severe asthma symptoms in state schools prevalence of physician diagnosis of asthma was the same in both school types, suggesting inequalities in access to healthcare. In conclusion, the prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma in Cairo was 9.4%, while the prevalence of rhinoconjunctivitis was 15.3%. There is a higher prevalence and increased severity of asthma symptoms in children of lower socioeconomic groups, as defined by state school attendance in Cairo.

  9. Disparate geographic prevalences of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic eczema among adolescents in five Canadian cities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Yu; Pizzichini, Marcia M M; Becker, Allan B; Duncan, Joanne M; Ferguson, Alexander C; Greene, Justina M; Rennie, Donna C; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan; Taylor, Brett W; Sears, Malcolm R

    2010-08-01

    To assess concordance of prevalence rates of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic eczema symptoms among adolescents in five Canadian cities. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase 3 written questionnaires were answered by 8334 adolescents aged 13 to 14 in Vancouver, Saskatoon, Winnipeg, Hamilton and Halifax, Canada. Prevalence rates of current symptoms ranged from 13.7-33.0% for wheezing, 14.6-22.6% for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and 8.2-10.4% for atopic eczema. Using Hamilton as reference, the prevalence of wheezing was significantly higher in Halifax (OR = 1.58; 95% CI 1.36-1.84) and Saskatoon (1.27; 1.07-1.50) and significantly lower in Vancouver (0.51; 0.44-0.59). In contrast, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis was significantly more prevalent in Winnipeg (1.39; 1.16-1.68) and Halifax (1.36; 1.14-1.61) and trended lower in Saskatoon (0.81; 0.66-1.00). Atopic eczema was significantly more prevalent in Winnipeg (1.31; 1.01-1.69) and Vancouver (1.28; 1.04-1.58). Multivariable logistic regression analyses showed the region of residence, being born in Canada, recent use of acetaminophen and heavy exposure to traffic exhaust were significantly associated with all three allergic conditions, while obesity and having two or more smokers at home was only associated with increased risk for wheezing. Chinese ethnicity decreased that risk. Among five Canadian centres, the highest prevalence rates of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis or atopic eczema were not observed in the same regions as the highest prevalence rates of wheezing. This disparity in regional variations in the prevalence rates suggests dissimilar risk factors for the development or expression of wheezing (asthma), allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic eczema.

  10. DUOX1 mediates persistent epithelial EGFR activation, mucous cell metaplasia, and airway remodeling during allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Habibovic, Aida; Hristova, Milena; Heppner, David E.; Danyal, Karamatullah; Ather, Jennifer L.; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M.W.; Irvin, Charles G.; Poynter, Matthew E.; Lundblad, Lennart K.; Dixon, Anne E.; Geiszt, Miklos

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation with mucous metaplasia and airway remodeling are hallmarks of allergic asthma, and these outcomes have been associated with enhanced expression and activation of EGFR signaling. Here, we demonstrate enhanced expression of EGFR ligands such as amphiregulin as well as constitutive EGFR activation in cultured nasal epithelial cells from asthmatic subjects compared with nonasthmatic controls and in lung tissues of mice during house dust mite–induced (HDM-induced) allergic inflammation. EGFR activation was associated with cysteine oxidation within EGFR and the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src, and both amphiregulin production and oxidative EGFR activation were diminished by pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of the epithelial NADPH oxidase dual oxidase 1 (DUOX1). DUOX1 deficiency also attenuated several EGFR-dependent features of HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation, including neutrophilic inflammation, type 2 cytokine production (IL-33, IL-13), mucous metaplasia, subepithelial fibrosis, and central airway resistance. Moreover, targeted inhibition of airway DUOX1 in mice with previously established HDM-induced allergic inflammation, by intratracheal administration of DUOX1-targeted siRNA or pharmacological NADPH oxidase inhibitors, reversed most of these outcomes. Our findings indicate an important function for DUOX1 in allergic inflammation related to persistent EGFR activation and suggest that DUOX1 targeting may represent an attractive strategy in asthma management. PMID:27812543

  11. Is Folate Status a Risk Factor for Asthma or Other Allergic Diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Zhang, Hong-Ping; Zhang, Xin; Liang, Zong-An; Ji, Yu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose It is controversial whether folate status is a risk factor for the development of asthma or other allergic diseases. This study was conducted to investigate whether indirect or direct exposure to folate and impaired folate metabolism, reflected as methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism, would contribute to the development of asthma and other allergic diseases. Methods Electronic databases were searched to identify all studies assessing the association between folate status and asthma or other allergic diseases. Two reviewers independently assessed the eligibility of studies and extracted data. The relative risk (RR) or odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) was calculated and pooled. Results Twenty-six studies (16 cohort, 7 case-control, and 3 cross-sectional studies) were identified. Maternal folic acid supplementation was not associated with the development of asthma, atopic dermatitis (AD), eczema, and sensitization in the offspring, whereas exposure during early pregnancy was related to wheeze occurrence in the offspring (RR=1.06, 95% CI=[1.02-1.09]). The TT genotype of MTHFR C677T polymorphism was at high risk of asthma (OR=1.41, 95% CI=[1.07-1.86]). Conclusions It is indicated that maternal folic acid supplementation during early pregnancy may increase the risk of wheeze in early childhood and that the TT genotype of MTHFR C677T polymorphism impairing folic acid metabolism would be at high risk of asthma development. These results might provide additional information for recommendations regarding forced folate consumption or folic acid supplements during pregnancy based on its well-established benefits for the prevention of congenital malformations. However, currently available evidence is of low quality which is needed to further elucidate. PMID:26333700

  12. Short-term Effects of Ambient Air Pollution on Emergency Department Visits for Asthma: An Assessment of Effect Modification by Prior Allergic Disease History

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Jungwoo; Cho, Jaelim; Cho, Seong-Kyung; Choi, Yoon Jung; Shin, Dong Chun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this study was to investigate the short-term effect of ambient air pollution on emergency department (ED) visits in Seoul for asthma according to patients’ prior history of allergic diseases. Methods Data on ED visits from 2005 to 2009 were obtained from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. To evaluate the risk of ED visits for asthma related to ambient air pollutants (carbon monoxide [CO], nitrogen dioxide [NO2], ozone [O3], sulfur dioxide [SO2], and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <10 μm [PM10]), a generalized additive model with a Poisson distribution was used; a single-lag model and a cumulative-effect model (average concentration over the previous 1-7 days) were also explored. The percent increase and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for each interquartile range (IQR) increment in the concentration of each air pollutant. Subgroup analyses were done by age, gender, the presence of allergic disease, and season. Results A total of 33 751 asthma attack cases were observed during the study period. The strongest association was a 9.6% increase (95% CI, 6.9% to 12.3%) in the risk of ED visits for asthma per IQR increase in O3 concentration. IQR changes in NO2 and PM10 concentrations were also significantly associated with ED visits in the cumulative lag 7 model. Among patients with a prior history of allergic rhinitis or atopic dermatitis, the risk of ED visits for asthma per IQR increase in PM10 concentration was higher (3.9%; 95% CI, 1.2% to 6.7%) than in patients with no such history. Conclusions Ambient air pollutants were positively associated with ED visits for asthma, especially among subjects with a prior history of allergic rhinitis or atopic dermatitis. PMID:27744674

  13. Regulation of the development of asthmatic inflammation by in situ CD4(+)Foxp3 (+) T cells in a mouse model of late allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Tomomi; Hayashi, Toshiharu; Mizuno, Takuya

    2014-10-01

    CD4(+)Foxp3(+)T cells (Tregs) mediate homeostatic peripheral tolerance by suppressing helper T2 cells in allergy. However, the regulation of asthmatic inflammation by local (in situ) Tregs in asthma remains unclear. BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) (asthma group) developed asthmatic inflammation with eosinophils and lymphocytes, but not mast cells. The number of Tregs in the circulation, pulmonary lymph nodes (pLNs), and thymi significantly decreased in the asthma group compared to the control group without OVA sensitization and challenge in the effector phase. The development of asthmatic inflammation is inversely related to decreased Tregs with reduced mRNA expression such as interleukin (IL)-4, transforming growth factor-β1, and IL-10, but not interferon-γ, in pLNs. Moreover, M2 macrophages increased in the local site. The present study suggests that Tregs, at least in part, may regulate the development of asthmatic inflammation by cell-cell contact and regional cytokine productions.

  14. Data on the oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipiprant) in patients with uncontrolled allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Erpenbeck, Veit J; Popov, Todor A; Miller, David; Weinstein, Steven F; Spector, Sheldon; Magnusson, Baldur; Osuntokun, Wande; Goldsmith, Paul; Weiss, Markus; Beier, Jutta

    2016-12-01

    This article contains data on clinical endpoints (Peak Flow Expiratory Rate, fractional exhaled nitric oxide and total IgE serum levels) and plasma pharmacokinetic parameters concerning the use of the oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipiprant) in mild to moderate asthma patients. Information on experimental design and methods on how this data was obtained is also described. Further interpretation and discussion of this data can be found in the article "The oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipiprant): a phase II study in uncontrolled allergic asthma" (Erpenbeck et al., in press) [1]. PMID:27656673

  15. Recurrent aerosol antigen exposure induces distinct patterns of experimental allergic asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    Jungsuwadee, Paiboon; Dekan, Gerhard; Stingl, Georg; Epstein, Michelle M

    2002-02-01

    Patients with allergic asthma present clinically with chronic or intermittent disease caused by either persistent or periodic allergen exposure. We sought to generate clinically relevant disease in mice, which would reflect the relapsing, remitting, and constant nature of this syndrome. We generated and compared acute onset, remission, relapse, and overt phases of the disease and found that acute disease was characterized by airway hyperreactivity, eosinophilic lung inflammation, excessive mucus production, and antigen-specific antibody and was rapidly followed by a remission. Mice rechallenged with aerosol antigen during the remission or treated with repeated aerosol challenges developed relapse and overt disease, respectively. Recurrent antigen exposure induced a progressive increase in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid immunoglobulin, mucus production, and a change in inflammatory infiltrates indicating a transition from acute to chronic inflammation. These data demonstrate distinct phases of disease representing a clinical spectrum of experimental allergic asthma and may have important implications for new treatment strategies.

  16. Survey on the impact of comorbid allergic rhinitis in patients with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Valovirta, Erkka; Pawankar, Ruby

    2006-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma are inflammatory conditions of the airways that often occur concomitantly. This global survey was undertaken to understand patient perspectives regarding symptoms, treatments, and the impact on their well-being of comorbid AR and asthma. Methods Survey participants were adults with asthma (n = 813) and parents of children with asthma (n = 806) from four countries each in the Asia-Pacific region and Europe. Patients included in the survey also had self-reported, concomitant AR symptoms. Patients and parents were recruited by telephone interview or by direct interview. Results Most patients (73%) had pre-existing symptoms of AR when their asthma was first diagnosed. Shortness of breath (21%) was the most troublesome symptom for adults, and wheezing (17%) and coughing (17%) the most troublesome for children. Patients used different medications for treating asthma (most commonly short-acting β-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids) and for treating AR (most commonly oral antihistamines). The concomitant presence of AR and asthma disrupted the ability to get a good night's sleep (79%), to participate in leisure and sports activities (75%), to concentrate at work or school (69% of adults, 73% of children), and to enjoy social activities (57% of adults, 51% of children). Most patients (79%) reported worsening asthma symptoms when AR symptoms flared up. Many (56%) avoided the outdoors during the allergy season because of worsening asthma symptoms. Many (60%) indicated difficulty in effectively treating both conditions, and 72% were concerned about using excessive medication. In general, respondents from the Asia-Pacific region reported more disruption of activities caused by symptoms and more concerns and difficulties with medications than did those from Europe. Differences between the two regions in medication use included more common use of inhaled corticosteroids in Europe and more common use of Chinese herbal remedies in the

  17. The role of autophagy in allergic inflammation: a new target for severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing-Nan; Suh, Dong-Hyeon; Trinh, Hoang Kim Tu; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Park, Hae-Sim; Shin, Yoo Seob

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy has been investigated for its involvement in inflammatory diseases, but its role in asthma has been little studied. This study aimed to explore the possible role of autophagy and its therapeutic potential in severe allergic asthma. BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) on days 0 and 14, followed by primary OVA challenge on days 28–30. The mice received a secondary 1 or 2% OVA challenge on days 44–46. After the final OVA challenge, the mice were assessed for airway responsiveness (AHR), cell composition and cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). LC3 expression in lung tissue was measured by western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Autophagosomes were detected by electron microscopy. 3-Methyladenine (3-MA) treatment and Atg5 knockdown were applied to investigate the potential role of autophagy in allergic asthma mice. AHR, inflammation in BALF and LC3 expression in lung tissue were significantly increased in the 2% OVA-challenged mice compared with the 1% OVA-challenged mice (P<0.05). In addition, eosinophils showed prominent formation of autophagosomes and increased LC3 expression compared with other inflammatory cells in BALF and lung tissue. After autophagy was inhibited by 3-MA and Atg5 shRNA treatment, AHR, eosinophilia, interleukin (IL)-5 levels in BALF and histological inflammatory findings were much improved. Finally, treatment with an anti-IL-5 antibody considerably reduced LC3 II expression in lung homogenates. Our findings suggest that autophagy is closely correlated with the severity of asthma through eosinophilic inflammation, and its modulation may provide novel therapeutic approaches for severe allergic asthma. PMID:27364893

  18. The impact of Vitamin D deficiency on asthma, allergic rhinitis and wheezing in children: An emerging public health problem

    PubMed Central

    Bener, Abdulbari; Ehlayel, Mohammad S.; Bener, Hale Z.; Hamid, Qutayba

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D deficiency has been declared a public health problem for both adults and children worldwide. Asthma and related allergic diseases are the leading causes of morbidity in children. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential role of Vitamin D deficiency in childhood asthma and other allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis and wheezing. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Primary Health Care Centers (PHCs), from March 2012 to October 2013. A total of 2350 Qatari children below the age of 16 were selected from PHCs, and 1833 agreed to participate in this study giving a response rate of (78%). Face-to-face interviews with parents of all the children were based on a questionnaire that included variables such as socio-demographic information, assessment of nondietary covariates, Vitamin D intake, type of feeding, and laboratory investigations. Their health status was assessed by serum Vitamin D (25-hydoxyvitamin D), family history and body mass index. Results: Most of the children who had asthma (38.5%), allergic rhinitis (34.8%) and wheezing (35.7%) were below 5 years. Consanguinity was significantly higher in parents of children with allergic rhinitis (48.6%), followed by those with asthma (46.4%) and wheezing (40.8%) than in healthy children (35.9%) (P < 0.001). The proportion of severe Vitamin D deficiency was significantly higher in children with wheezing (23.4%), allergic rhinitis (18.5%), and asthma (17%) than in healthy children (10.5%). Exposure to the sun was significantly less in Vitamin D deficient children with asthma (60.3%), allergic rhinitis (62.5%) and wheezing (64.4%) than in controls (47.1%) (P = 0.008). It was found that Vitamin D deficiency was a significant correlate for asthma (odds ratio [OR] =2.31; P < 0.001), allergic rhinitis (OR = 1.59; P < 0.001) and wheezing (relative risk = 1.29; P = 0.05). Conclusion: The study findings revealed a high prevalence of Vitamin D

  19. The natural course of eczema from birth to age 7 years and the association with asthma and allergic rhinitis: a population-based birth cohort study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chian-Yin; Lin, Ming-Chih; Lin, Heng-Kuei; Lin, Ching-Heng; Fu, Lin-Shien; Fu, Yun-Chin

    2013-01-01

    Although "atopic march" is a popular concept, the relationship between eczema and subsequent asthma is far from clear. However, some cohort studies have shown the possibility of two different allergic phenotypes in those who present with early eczema in terms of their persistency. We checked the cohort data from 308,849 children born in 2000 in Taiwan, to evaluate the different courses of eczema and their relationships to subsequent asthma and allergic rhinitis (AR) at age 7 years. We examined the age prevalence of eczema, asthma, and AR up to 7 years of age. We grouped all cases according to their course of eczema, as well as wheezing, and determined the rates of asthma and AR at age 7 years. We checked the adjusted risk factors by multiple logistic regression model. We also examined the distributions of wheezing types in different eczema groups. We found the "atopic march" pattern of allergic diseases based on their age prevalence. Early eczema was associated with asthma and AR at the age of 7 years. Those with eczema symptoms persisting after 36 months of age had a higher risk than those with transient eczema. Early wheeze also contributed to asthma and AR later in childhood. In addition, late-onset eczema had a completely different wheeze distribution compared with other groups and also had a higher risk for asthma and AR than transient eczema. In conclusion, different eczema phenotypes could be found in this population-based cohort. This article emphasizes the special attention to the persistency and late-onset eczema in clinical practice.

  20. Acupuncture Treatment of a Patient with Persistent Allergic Rhinitis Complicated by Rhinosinusitis and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ae-Ran; Choi, Jun-Yong; Kim, Jong-In; Jung, So-Young; Choi, Sun-Mi

    2011-01-01

    A pathophysiologic relationship between allergic rhinitis and rhinosinusitis and asthma has long been suggested. However, few clinical studies of acupuncture have been conducted on these comorbid conditions. A 48-year-old male suffering from persistent allergic rhinitis with comorbid chronic rhinosinusitis and asthma since the age of 18 years was studied. He complained of nasal obstruction, sneezing, cough, rhinorrhea and moderate dyspnea. He occasionally visited local ear-nose-throat clinics for his nasal symptoms, but gained only periodic symptom relief. The patient was treated with acupuncture, infrared radiation to the face and electro-acupuncture. Needles were inserted at bilateral LI20, GV23, LI4 and EX-1 sites with De-qi. Electro-acupuncture was performed simultaneously at both LI20 sites and additional traditional Korean acupuncture treatments were performed. Each session lasted for 10 min and the sessions were carried out twice a week for 5 weeks. The patient's Mini-Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality-of-Life Questionnaire score decreased from 38, at the beginning of treatment, to 23, 3 weeks after the last treatment. The Total Nasal Symptom Score was reduced from six (baseline) to five, 3 weeks after the last treatment. There was significant clinical improvement in the forced expiratory volume in 1 s—from 3.01 to 3.50 l—with discontinuation of the inhaled corticosteroid, and no asthma-related complaints were reported. Further clinical studies investigating the effectiveness of acupuncture for the patients suffering from allergic rhinitis and/or rhinosinusitis with comorbid asthma are needed. PMID:21785632

  1. AN EXTRACT OF PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM INDUCES DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC ASTHMA RESPONSES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. Our hypothesis is that soluble components of P. chrysogenum (PCE) can dose-dependently induce responses typ...

  2. The immunoregulatory and fibrotic roles of activin A in allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, C L; Rolland, J M; O'Hehir, R E

    2015-01-01

    Activin A, a member of the TGF-β superfamily of cytokines, was originally identified as an inducer of follicle stimulating hormone release, but has since been ascribed roles in normal physiological processes, as an immunoregulatory cytokine and as a driver of fibrosis. In the last 10–15 years, it has also become abundantly clear that activin A plays an important role in the regulation of asthmatic inflammation and airway remodelling. This review provides a brief introduction to the activin A/TGF-β superfamily, focussing on the regulation of receptors and signalling pathways. We examine the contradictory evidence for generalized pro- vs. anti-inflammatory effects of activin A in inflammation, before appraising its role in asthmatic inflammation and airway remodelling specifically by evaluating data from both murine models and clinical studies. We identify key issues to be addressed, paving the way for safe exploitation of modulation of activin A function for treatment of allergic asthma and other inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:25962695

  3. Zingiber mioga (Thunb.) Roscoe attenuates allergic asthma induced by ovalbumin challenge.

    PubMed

    Shin, Na-Rae; Shin, In-Sik; Jeon, Chan-Mi; Hong, Ju-Mi; Kwon, Ok-Kyoung; Kim, Hui-Seong; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Hahn, Kyu-Woung; Ahn, Kyung-Seop

    2015-09-01

    Zingiber mioga (Thunb.) Roscoe (ZM) is a traditional medicine, used to treat inflammatory diseases. The present study aimed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of ZM on the inflammatory response in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‑stimulated RAW264.7 murine macrophage cells and in a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)‑induced allergic asthma. Mice received OVA sensitization on day 0 and 14, and were challenged with OVA between days 21 and 23. ZM was administered to the mice at a dose of 30 mg/kg, 1 h prior to OVA challenge. In LPS‑stimulated RAW264.7 cells, ZM significantly decreased nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α production in a concentration‑dependent manner, and mRNA expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), TNF‑α and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑9 was reduced. In addition, treatment with ZM decreased the inflammatory cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the mice, and reduced the expression of interleukin (IL)‑4, IL‑5, IL‑13, eotaxin and immunoglobulin E. ZM also reduced airway hyperresponsiveness in OVA‑challenged mice, and attenuated the infiltration of inflammatory cells and mucus production in the airways, with a decrease in the expression of iNOS and MMP‑9 in lung tissue. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that ZM effectively inhibits inflammatory responses. Therefore, it may be that ZM has potential as a therapeutic agent for use in inflammatory diseases.

  4. Fullerene carbon-70 derivatives dampen anaphylaxis and allergic asthma pathogenesis in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Sarah Brooke

    Fullerenes are carbon nanospheres that can be solublized by the addition of polar chemical groups to the carbon cage, forming fullerene derivatives. One specifically derivatized fullerene compound, termed C 70-Tetragylocolate (C70-TGA), has been shown to stabilize mast cell responses in vitro thus we hypothesized it may have an effect on mast cell-driven diseases such as asthma and systemic anaphylaxis. To observe the effects of C70-TGA on systemic anaphylaxis, mice were subjected to a model of passive systemic anaphylaxis. In this model, mice were injected with DNP-specific IgE 16 hours prior to challenge, then treated with C 70-TGA. Immediately prior to DNP challenge, mice were subjected to a second injection of C70-TGA. Following DNP challenge, body temperature was recorded and blood was collected for quantitation of histamine levels. Treatment with C70-TGA significantly reduced body temperature drop associated with systemic anaphylaxis and serum histamine levels. To observe the effects of C70-TGA on chronic features of asthma in vivo, we utilized a heavily MC influenced model of asthma pathogenesis. Mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of ovalbumin (OVA) in saline, challenged intranasally (i.n.) with OVA, and one of two treatment strategies was pursued. In one, C70-TGA was given i.n. throughout disease development. In the other, C70-TGA was given following an initial set of challenges to allow disease to develop prior to treatment; mice were then re-challenged with OVA to assess the effect on established disease. We found that C70-TGA treatment significantly reduced airway inflammation and eosinophilia and dramatically reduced bronchoconstriction in either model. Cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 and serum IgE levels are significantly reduced in C70-TGA treated animals. Interestingly, we also saw an increase in the anti-inflammatory eicosanoid 11, 12-epoxyeicosatreinoic acid (11,12-EET) in the BAL fluid, suggesting the involvement of this mediator in

  5. The Cohort for Childhood Origin of Asthma and allergic diseases (COCOA) study: design, rationale and methods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper describes the background, aim, and design of a prospective birth-cohort study in Korea called the COhort for Childhood Origin of Asthma and allergic diseases (COCOA). COCOA objectives are to investigate the individual and interactive effects of genetics, perinatal environment, maternal lifestyle, and psychosocial stress of mother and child on pediatric susceptibility to allergic diseases. Methods/Design The participants in COCOA represents a Korean inner-city population. Recruitment started on 19 November, 2007 and will continue until 31 December, 2015. Recruitment is performed at five medical centers and eight public-health centers for antenatal care located in Seoul. Participating mother-baby pairs are followed from before birth to adolescents. COCOA investigates whether the following five environmental variables contribute causally to the development and natural course of allergic diseases: (1) perinatal indoor factors (i.e. house-dust mite, bacterial endotoxin, tobacco smoking, and particulate matters 2.5 and 10), (2) perinatal outdoor pollutants, (3) maternal prenatal psychosocial stress and the child’s neurodevelopment, (4) perinatal nutrition, and (5) perinatal microbiome. Cord blood and blood samples from the child are used to assess whether the child’s genes and epigenetic changes influence allergic-disease susceptibility. Thus, COCOA aims to investigate the contributions of genetics, epigenetics, and various environmental factors in early life to allergic-disease susceptibility in later life. How these variables interact to shape allergic-disease susceptibility is also a key aim. The COCOA data collection schedule includes 11 routine standardized follow-up assessments of all children at 6 months and every year until 10 years of age, regardless of allergic-disease development. The mothers will complete multiple questionnaires to assess the baseline characteristics, the child’s exposure to environmental factors, maternal pre

  6. Nrf2 reduces allergic asthma in mice through enhanced airway epithelial cytoprotective function.

    PubMed

    Sussan, Thomas E; Gajghate, Sachin; Chatterjee, Samit; Mandke, Pooja; McCormick, Sarah; Sudini, Kuladeep; Kumar, Sarvesh; Breysse, Patrick N; Diette, Gregory B; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K; Biswal, Shyam

    2015-07-01

    Asthma development and pathogenesis are influenced by the interactions of airway epithelial cells and innate and adaptive immune cells in response to allergens. Oxidative stress is an important mediator of asthmatic phenotypes in these cell types. Nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a redox-sensitive transcription factor that is the key regulator of the response to oxidative and environmental stress. We previously demonstrated that Nrf2-deficient mice have heightened susceptibility to asthma, including elevated oxidative stress, inflammation, mucus, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) (Rangasamy T, Guo J, Mitzner WA, Roman J, Singh A, Fryer AD, Yamamoto M, Kensler TW, Tuder RM, Georas SN, Biswal S. J Exp Med 202: 47-59, 2005). Here we dissected the role of Nrf2 in lung epithelial cells and tested whether genetic or pharmacological activation of Nrf2 reduces allergic asthma in mice. Cell-specific activation of Nrf2 in club cells of the airway epithelium significantly reduced allergen-induced AHR, inflammation, mucus, Th2 cytokine secretion, oxidative stress, and airway leakiness and increased airway levels of tight junction proteins zonula occludens-1 and E-cadherin. In isolated airway epithelial cells, Nrf2 enhanced epithelial barrier function and increased localization of zonula occludens-1 to the cell surface. Pharmacological activation of Nrf2 by 2-trifluoromethyl-2'-methoxychalone during the allergen challenge was sufficient to reduce allergic inflammation and AHR. New therapeutic options are needed for asthma, and this study demonstrates that activation of Nrf2 in lung epithelial cells is a novel potential therapeutic target to reduce asthma susceptibility.

  7. The prevalence of asthma and allergic symptoms in Manisa, Turkey (A western city from a country bridging Asia and Europe).

    PubMed

    Sakar, Aysin; Yorgancioglu, Arzu; Dinc, Gonul; Yuksel, Hasan; Celik, Pinar; Dagyildizi, Lale; Coskun, Evsen; Kaya, Ece; Ozyurt, Beyhan; Ozcan, Cemil

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of asthma and allergic symptoms in Manisa city center, Turkey, to evaluate the determinants effective on those values, and to review the prevalence rates reported from different parts of the country. Data were collected from 610 households and complete interviews were conducted with 1,336 adults over 18 years of age by using European Community Respiratory Health Survey-ECRHS questionnaire. The prevalences of current asthma, cumulative asthma and asthma-like symptoms were found in 1.2, 1.0 and 25.0%, respectively, of the 20-44 years age group and the prevalences of allergic rhinitis, allergic dermatitis and family atopy were found in 14.5, 10.9, and 15.2%, respectively, in all age group. Wheezing with breathlessness, wheezing without cold, woken up with shortness of breath and woken up with cold were reported by 9.1%, 6.9%, 6% and 16.1% of the study population, respectively. Gender, age, active or passive smoking, family atopy and home condition effect on prevalence of asthma and allergic symptoms. In this study prevalence of asthma correlated with the studies reporting low prevalence rates of Turkey.

  8. Link between environmental air pollution and allergic asthma: East meets West

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingling; Qiu, Zhiming; Huang, Shau-Ku

    2015-01-01

    With the levels of outdoor air pollution from industrial and motor vehicle emissions rising rapidly in the fastly-industrializing countries of South East Asia, the prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases has also been increasing to match those in the West. Epidemiological and experimental exposure studies indicate a harmful impact of outdoor air pollution from vehicles and factories both on the development of allergic diseases and asthma and the increase in asthma symptoms and exacerbations. The level of outdoor pollution in Asia is much higher and more diverse than those encountered in Western countries. This may increase the impact of outdoor pollution on health, particularly lung health in Asia. This review discusses the constituents of air pollution in Asia with a special focus on studies in mainland China and Taiwan where the levels of pollution have reached high levels and where such high levels particularly in winter can cause a thick haze that reduces visibility. The onus remains on regulatory and public health authorities to curb the sources of pollution so that the health effects on the population particularly those with lung and cardiovascular diseases and with increased susceptibility can be mitigated. PMID:25694814

  9. Role of omega-3 fatty acids and their metabolites in asthma and allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Jun; Arita, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), are found naturally in fish oil and are commonly thought to be anti-inflammatory nutrients, with protective effects in inflammatory diseases including asthma and allergies. The mechanisms of these effects remain mostly unknown but are of great interest for their potential therapeutic applications. Large numbers of epidemiological and observational studies investigating the effect of fish intake or omega-3 fatty acid supplementation during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adulthood on asthmatic and allergic outcomes have been conducted. They mostly indicate protective effects and suggest a causal relationship between decreased intake of fish oil in modernized diets and an increasing number of individuals with asthma or other allergic diseases. Specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPM: protectins, resolvins, and maresins) are generated from omega-3 fatty acids such as EPA and DHA via several enzymatic reactions. These mediators counter-regulate airway eosinophilic inflammation and promote the resolution of inflammation in vivo. Several reports have indicated that the biosynthesis of SPM is impaired, especially in severe asthma, which suggests that chronic inflammation in the lung might result from a resolution defect. This article focuses on the beneficial aspects of omega-3 fatty acids and offers recent insights into their bioactive metabolites including resolvins and protectins.

  10. Link between environmental air pollution and allergic asthma: East meets West.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingling; Qiu, Zhiming; Chung, Kian Fan; Huang, Shau-Ku

    2015-01-01

    With the levels of outdoor air pollution from industrial and motor vehicle emissions rising rapidly in the fastly-industrializing countries of South East Asia, the prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases has also been increasing to match those in the West. Epidemiological and experimental exposure studies indicate a harmful impact of outdoor air pollution from vehicles and factories both on the development of allergic diseases and asthma and the increase in asthma symptoms and exacerbations. The level of outdoor pollution in Asia is much higher and more diverse than those encountered in Western countries. This may increase the impact of outdoor pollution on health, particularly lung health in Asia. This review discusses the constituents of air pollution in Asia with a special focus on studies in mainland China and Taiwan where the levels of pollution have reached high levels and where such high levels particularly in winter can cause a thick haze that reduces visibility. The onus remains on regulatory and public health authorities to curb the sources of pollution so that the health effects on the population particularly those with lung and cardiovascular diseases and with increased susceptibility can be mitigated.

  11. Foetal Exposure to Maternal Passive Smoking Is Associated with Childhood Asthma, Allergic Rhinitis, and Eczema

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. L.; Lam, T. H.; Leung, T. H.; Wong, W. H. S.; Schooling, M.; Leung, G. M.; Lau, Y. L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. We examined the hypothesis that foetal exposure to maternal passive smoking is associated with childhood asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema. Methods. The study was a population-based cross-sectional survey of Hong Kong Chinese children aged ≤14 years carried out in 2005 to 2006. Results. Foetal exposure to maternal passive smoking was significantly associated with wheeze ever (OR 2.05; 95% CI 1.58–2.67), current wheeze (OR 2.06; 95% CI 1.48–2.86), allergic rhinitis ever (OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.09–1.37), and eczema ever (OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.38–1.87). Foetal exposure to maternal active smoking was significantly associated with asthma ever (OR 2.10; 95% CI 1.14–3.84), wheeze ever (OR 2.46; 95% CI 1.27–4.78), and current wheeze (OR 2.74; 95% CI 1.24–6.01) but not with allergic rhinitis ever (OR 1.01; 95% CI 0.70–1.46) or eczema ever (OR 1.38; 95% CI 0.87–2.18). The dose response relationship between wheeze ever and current wheeze with increasing exposure, from no exposure to maternal passive smoking and then to maternal active smoking, further supports causality. Conclusion. There is significant association between foetal exposure to maternal passive smoking and maternal active smoking with childhood asthma and related atopic illnesses. Further studies are warranted to explore the potential causal relationship. PMID:22927783

  12. Presence of other allergic disease modifies the effect of early childhood traffic-related air pollution exposure on asthma prevalence.

    PubMed

    Dell, Sharon D; Jerrett, Michael; Beckerman, Bernard; Brook, Jeffrey R; Foty, Richard G; Gilbert, Nicolas L; Marshall, Laura; Miller, J David; To, Teresa; Walter, Stephen D; Stieb, David M

    2014-04-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a surrogate measure of traffic-related air pollution (TRAP), has been associated with incident childhood asthma. Timing of exposure and atopic status may be important effect modifiers. We collected cross-sectional data on asthma outcomes from Toronto school children aged 5-9years in 2006. Lifetime home, school and daycare addresses were obtained to derive birth and cumulative NO2 exposures for a nested case-control subset of 1497 children. Presence of other allergic disease (a proxy for atopy) was defined as self-report of one or more of doctor-diagnosed rhinitis, eczema, or food allergy. Generalized estimating equations were used to adjust for potential confounders, and examine hypothesized effect modifiers while accounting for clustering by school. In children with other allergic disease, birth, cumulative and 2006 NO2 were associated with lifetime asthma (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.08-1.98; 1.37, 95% CI 1.00-1.86; and 1.60, 95% CI 1.09-2.36 respectively per interquartile range increase) and wheeze (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.10-1.89; 1.31, 95% CI 1.02-1.67; and 1.60, 95% CI 1.16-2.21). No or weaker effects were seen in those without allergic disease, and effect modification was amplified when a more restrictive algorithm was used to define other allergic disease (at least 2 of doctor diagnosed allergic rhinitis, eczema or food allergy). The effects of modest NO2 levels on childhood asthma were modified by the presence of other allergic disease, suggesting a probable role for allergic sensitization in the pathogenesis of TRAP initiated asthma.

  13. Guinea pig models of asthma.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Alice E; Mazzone, Stuart B

    2014-01-01

    Described in this unit are methods for establishing guinea pig models of asthma. Sufficient detail is provided to enable investigators to study bronchoconstriction, cough, airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling. PMID:25446291

  14. RELATIVE POTENCY OF MOLD AND HOUSE DUST MITE EXTRACTS IN INDUCING ALLERGIC RESPONSES IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Mold has been associated with the exacerbation of allergic asthma. However, its role in induction of allergic asthma is not clear. Using a previously developed mouse model for allergic asthma, we compared potencies of two fungal extracts (Metarhizium anisop...

  15. Protective effect of curcumin on acute airway inflammation of allergic asthma in mice through Notch1-GATA3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chong, Lei; Zhang, Weixi; Nie, Ying; Yu, Gang; Liu, Liu; Lin, Li; Wen, Shunhang; Zhu, Lili; Li, Changchong

    2014-10-01

    Curcumin, a natural product derived from the plant Curcuma longa, has been found to have anti-inflammatory, antineoplastic and antifibrosis effects. It has been reported that curcumin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice through inhibiting NF-κB and its downstream transcription factor GATA3. It also has been proved the antineoplastic effect of curcumin through down-regulating Notch1 receptor and its downstream nuclear transcription factor NF-κB levels. In this study, we aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin on acute allergic asthma and its underlying mechanisms. 36 male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups (normal, asthma, asthma+budesonide and asthma+curcumin groups). BALF (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) and lung tissues were analyzed for airway inflammation and the expression of Notch1, Notch2, Notch3, Notch4 and the downstream transcription factor GATA3. Our findings showed that the levels of Notch1 and Notch2 receptors were up-regulated in asthma group, accompanied by the increased expression of GATA3. But the expression of Notch2 receptor was lower than Notch1 receptor. Curcumin pretreatment improved the airway inflammatory cells infiltration and reversed the increasing levels of Notch1/2 receptors and GATA3. Notch3 receptor was not expressed in all of the four groups. Notch4 receptor protein and mRNA expression level in the four groups had no significant differences. The results of the present study suggested that Notch1 and Notch2 receptor, major Notch1 receptor, played an important role in the development of allergic airway inflammation and the inhibition of Notch1-GATA3 signaling pathway by curcumin can prevent the development and deterioration of the allergic airway inflammation. This may be a possible therapeutic option of allergic asthma.

  16. Comparative responses to nasal allergen challenge in allergic rhinitic subjects with or without asthma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nasal allergen challenge (NAC) is useful to study the pathophysiology of rhinitis, and multiple challenges may more adequately approximate natural exposure. Objective To determine the effect of 4 consecutive daily NAC, on clinical and inflammatory parameters in rhinitics with or without asthma. Methods Rhinitic subjects were recruited: 19 with mild asthma and 13 without asthma. Subjects underwent a control challenge (normal saline) followed by 4 consecutive daily NAC. Allergen challenge consisted of spraying the chosen allergen extract into each nostril until a positive nasal response occurred. Symptoms were recorded on a Likert scale, and oral peak expiratory and nasal peak inspiratory flows allowed assessment of a nasal blockage index (NBI), for a period of 7 hours. Induced sputum and nasal lavage were performed on control day and after 1 and 4 days of NAC. Results Compared with the control day, there was a significant increase in symptom scores and NBI 10 minutes after each last daily NAC in both groups (p < 0.05). Symptom scores and NBI were similar for the 2 groups, except for nasal obstruction and rhinorrhea, which were more marked in subjects with asthma and rhinitis, respectively. Nasal lavage eosinophils were increased after 4 days of challenges in both groups, but there was no change in sputum eosinophils. No cumulative effect or any late response were observed in any of the groups over the challenge period. Conclusion Multiple NAC may be a useful tool to study the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis or its relationships with asthma. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01286129 PMID:21507261

  17. COMPARISON OF LUNG ATTENUATION AND HETEROGENEITY BETWEEN CATS WITH EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED ALLERGIC ASTHMA, NATURALLY OCCURRING ASTHMA AND NORMAL CATS.

    PubMed

    Masseau, Isabelle; Banuelos, Alina; Dodam, John; Cohn, Leah A; Reinero, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling is a prominent feature of feline allergic asthma but requires biopsy for characterization. Computed tomography (CT) has appeal as a minimally invasive diagnostic test. The purpose of this prospective case-control study was to compare indices of airway remodeling between cats with experimentally induced, spontaneous asthma and healthy unaffected cats using CT. We hypothesized that experimental and spontaneous feline asthma would have similar CT airway remodeling characteristics and that these would be significantly different in healthy cats. Experimentally induced asthmatic research cats (n = 5), spontaneously asthmatic pet cats (n = 6), and healthy research cats (n = 5) were scanned unrestrained using a 64-detector row CT scanner. Inspiratory breath-hold CT scans were also performed in experimentally induced asthmatic and healthy cats. Mean ± extent variation of lung attenuation for each cat was determined using an airway inspector software program and CT images were scored for lung heterogeneity by a board-certified veterinary radiologist who was unaware of cat group status. Groups were compared using one-way ANOVA (unrestrained scans) and the Student's t-test (anesthetized scans) with significance defined as P < 0.10. Experimentally asthmatic and spontaneously asthmatic cats had significantly (P = 0.028 and P = 0.073, respectively) increased lung attenuation compared to healthy cats. Heterogeneity scores were higher in experimentally induced asthmatic cat than in healthy cats. Objective quantification of lung heterogeneity and lung volume did not differ among the three groups (P = 0.311, P = 0.181, respectively). Findings supported our hypothesis. Inspiratory breath-hold anesthetized CT scans facilitated discrimination between asthmatic and healthy cats in comparison to unrestrained CT scans.

  18. Nutrition in early life and the risk of asthma and allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Wyness, Laura

    2014-07-01

    The prevalence of reported cases of asthma and allergic disease has seen a marked increase throughout the world since the 1960s, particularly in more developed, westernised countries. A key focus of research in this area has been the possible adverse effects of foetal and infant exposure to food allergens. There is some evidence that foetal and infant exposure to a range of allergens via the mother and her breast milk is important in the development of normal immune tolerance. Current advice is that pregnant and breastfeeding women do not need to avoid potential food allergens unless they are allergic themselves, or are advised to modify their diet by a health professional. Delaying the introduction of common food allergies beyond 6 months is unlikely to reduce the likelihood of food allergy and allergic disease. The findings of current ongoing trials investigating the potential benefits of early introduction on allergenic foods into the diet of children-as well as the comprehensive review of complementary and young-child feeding advice currently being conducted by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition-will help inform guidance in this area.

  19. Systemic and local eosinophil inflammation during the birch pollen season in allergic patients with predominant rhinitis or asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kämpe, Mary; Stålenheim, Gunnemar; Janson, Christer; Stolt, Ingrid; Carlson, Marie

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to investigate inflammation during the birch pollen season in patients with rhinitis or asthma. Methods Subjects with birch pollen asthma (n = 7) or rhinitis (n = 9) and controls (n = 5) were studied before and during pollen seasons. Eosinophils (Eos), eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and human neutrophil lipocalin were analysed. Results Allergic asthmatics had a larger decline in FEV1 after inhaling hypertonic saline than patients with rhinitis (median) (-7.0 vs.-0.4%, p = 0.02). The asthmatics had a lower sesonal PEFR than the rhinitis group. The seasonal increase in B-Eos was higher among patients with asthma (+0.17 × 109/L) and rhinitis (+0.27 × 109/L) than among controls (+0.01 × 109/L, p = 0.01). Allergic asthmatics and patients with rhinitis had a larger increase in sputum ECP (+2180 and +310 μg/L) than the controls (-146 μg/L, p = 0.02). No significant differences in inflammatory parameters were found between the two groups of allergic patients. Conclusion Patients with allergic asthma and rhinitis have the same degree of eosinophil inflammation. Despite this, only the asthmatic group experienced an impairment in lung function during the pollen season. PMID:17967188

  20. INTERCONNECTION BETWEEN NITRIC OXIDE FORMATION AND HYPERSENSITIVITY PARAMETERS UNDER GUINEA PIG MODEL OF ACUTE ASTHMA WITH MULTIPLE CHALLENGES.

    PubMed

    Parilova, O O; Shandrenko, S G

    2015-01-01

    An immunoregulatory role of nitric oxide (NO) in the development of adaptive immune responses associated with allergic diseases is very important. The present study extended these observations by the examination of the reciprocal changes in characteristic immunologic parameters of the disease and NO level of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells under guinea pig model of acute asthma with multiple challenges. Development of guinea pig Th2 mediated asthma was accompanied by increasing the level of allergic markers: ovalbumin (OVA) specific IgG and IL-4. We demonstrated that the infiltrate of airway cells contributes to NO synthesis in the respiratory tract during allergic inflammation. The level of intracellular NO formation significantly correlated with plasma allergen specific IgG value in OVA-induced asthma. The presented data evidence that the elevated intracellular NO level in BAL fluid may reflect a nitrosative stress in respiratory tract in general, when allergic asthma exacerbation is present.

  1. Calcium-sensing receptor antagonists abrogate airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yarova, Polina L.; Stewart, Alecia L.; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Britt, Rodney D; Thompson, Michael A.; Lowe, Alexander P. P.; Freeman, Michelle; Aravamudan, Bharathi; Kita, Hirohito; Brennan, Sarah C.; Schepelmann, Martin; Davies, Thomas; Yung, Sun; Cholisoh, Zakky; Kidd, Emma J.; Ford, William R.; Broadley, Kenneth J.; Rietdorf, Katja; Chang, Wenhan; Khayat, Mohd E. Bin; Ward, Donald T.; Corrigan, Christopher J.; Ward, Jeremy P. T.; Kemp, Paul J.; Pabelick, Christina M.; Prakash, Y. S.; Riccardi, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation are fundamental hallmarks of allergic asthma that are accompanied by increases in certain polycations, such as eosinophil cationic protein. Levels of these cations in body fluids correlate with asthma severity. We show that polycations and elevated extracellular calcium activate the human recombinant and native calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), leading to intracellular calcium mobilization, cyclic adenosine monophosphate breakdown, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. These effects can be prevented by CaSR antagonists, termed calcilytics. Moreover, asthmatic patients and allergen-sensitized mice expressed more CaSR in ASMs than did their healthy counterparts. Indeed, polycations induced hyper-reactivity in mouse bronchi, and this effect was prevented by calcilytics and absent in mice with CaSR ablation from ASM. Calcilytics also reduced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in allergen-sensitized mice in vivo. These data show that a functional CaSR is up-regulated in asthmatic ASM and targeted by locally produced polycations to induce hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Thus, calcilytics may represent effective asthma therapeutics. PMID:25904744

  2. Respiratory and allergic diseases: from upper respiratory tract infections to asthma.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Raja

    2002-06-01

    Patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis may benefit from hydration and a diet low in sodium, omega-6 fatty acids, and transfatty acids, but high in omega-3 fatty acids (i.e., fish, almonds, walnuts, pumpkin, and flax seeds), onions, and fruits and vegetables (at least five servings a day). Physicians may need to be more cautious when prescribing antibiotics to children in their first year of life when they are born to families with a history of atopy. More research is needed to establish whether supplementation with probiotics (lactobacillus and bifidobacterium) during the first year of life or after antibiotic use decreases the risk of developing asthma and allergic rhinitis. Despite a theoretic basis for the use of vitamin C supplements in asthmatic patients, the evidence is still equivocal, and long-term studies are needed. The evidence is stronger for exercise-induced asthma, in which the use of vitamin C supplementation at a dosage of 1 to 2 g per day may be helpful. It is also possible that fish oil supplements, administered in a dosage of 1 to 1.2 g of EPA and DHA per day, also may be helpful to some patients with asthma. Long-term studies of fish oil and vitamin C are needed for more definite answers. For the patient interested in incorporating nutritional approaches, vitamin C and fish oils have a safe profile. However, aspirin-sensitive individuals should avoid fish oils, and red blood cell magnesium levels may help in making the decision whether to use additional magnesium supplements. Combination herbal formulas should be used in the treatment of asthma with medical supervision and in collaboration with an experienced herbalist or practitioner of TCM. Safe herbs, such as Boswellia and gingko, may be used singly as adjuncts to a comprehensive plan of care if the patient and practitioner have an interest in trying them while staying alert for drug-herb interactions. No data on the long-term use of these single herbs in asthma exist. For the motivated

  3. The relationship between bifidobacteria and allergic asthma and/or allergic dermatitis: a prospective study of 0-3 years-old children in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Akay, Hatice Kubra; Bahar Tokman, Hrisi; Hatipoglu, Nevin; Hatipoglu, Huseyin; Siraneci, Rengin; Demirci, Mehmet; Borsa, Baris Ata; Yuksel, Pelin; Karakullukcu, Asiye; Kangaba, Achille Aime; Sirekbasan, Serhat; Aka, Sibel; Mamal Torun, Muzeyyen; Kocazeybek, Bekir S

    2014-08-01

    Bifidobacteria are beneficial bacteria for humans. These bacteria are particularly effective at protecting against infectious diseases and modulating the immune response. It was shown that in newborns, the fecal distribution of the colonizing Bifidobacterium species influences the prevalence of allergic diseases. This study aimed to compare the faecal Bifidobacterium species of allergic children to those of healthy children to detect species level differences in faecal distribution. Stool samples were obtained from 99 children between 0 and 3 years of age whose clinical symptoms and laboratory reports were compatible with atopic dermatitis and allergic asthma. Samples were also obtained from 102 healthy children who were similar to the case group with respect to age and sex. Bifidobacteria were isolated by culture and identified at the genus level by API 20 A. In addition, 7 unique species-specific primers were used for the molecular characterization of bifidobacteria. The McNemar test was used for statistical analyses, and p < 0.05 was accepted as significant. Bifidobacterium longum was detected in 11 (11.1%) of the allergic children and in 31 (30.3%) of the healthy children. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference in the prevalence of B. longum between these two groups (X(2): 11.2, p < 0.001). However, no significant differences in the prevalence of other Bifidobacterium species were found between faecal samples from healthy and allergic children. (p > 0.05). The significant difference in the isolation of B. longum from our study groups suggests that this species favors the host by preventing the development of asthma and allergic dermatitis. Based on these results, we propose that the production of probiotics in accordance with country-specific Bifidobacterium species densities would improve public health. Thus, country-specific prospective case-control studies that collect broad data sets are needed.

  4. Delay of growth and development in children with bronchial asthma, atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Baum, W F; Schneyer, U; Lantzsch, A M; Klöditz, E

    2002-04-01

    The elevated incidence of short stature (body height < (-)x - 2s), skeletal retardation and delayed puberty in children with bronchial asthma or atopic dermatitis is generally attributed to the severity of the disorder. However, a series of findings indicate a causal influence of the atopy and the existence of atopic skeletal retardation per se.The observation that children with atopic disorders, whether bronchial asthma, atopic dermatitis or allergic rhinitis, exhibit a rate of short stature that is twice to five times higher than normal indicates atopic and thus genetically determined influences. The elevated prevalence of short stature associated with allergic rhinitis is especially significant, as this disorder cannot be included among the severe chronic disorders. The fact that skeletal retardation is more prevalent in boys than in girls by a ratio of about 2:1 and that a significantly more marked retardation of bone maturation is found in atopic in comparisons with non-atopic asthmatics also lend support to this postulation. The clinical relevance of atopic growth retardation is also supported by the close interaction of pathophysiological basal mechanisms of bone metabolism and the atopy status. Thus the local growth factor prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), which is important for bone metabolism, is also a messenger substance for the immediate and late allergic reaction. The platelet-activating factor (PAF), as one of the strongest mediators in the pathogenesis of allergic disorders, influences the PGE(2) synthesis in the osteoblasts. These relationships show that atopy-dependent imbalances in the complex system of local and systemic growth factors can certainly lead to disturbance of skeletal maturation which may delay growth and development in atopic children. In order to verify these assumptions it is necessary to research the interaction of local growth factors (particularly the roles of PGE(2), PAF and IGF I) in the skeletons of children of short stature

  5. Epidemiology and current status of allergic rhinitis and asthma in Thailand -- ARIA Asia-Pacific Workshop report.

    PubMed

    Bunnag, C; Jareoncharsri, P; Tantilipikorn, P; Vichyanond, P; Pawankar, R

    2009-03-01

    The allergic diseases of the airway, i.e. allergic rhinitis and asthma, are on the increase in Thailand and their prevalence shows no signs of abating. When compared with a previous study, the incidence of wheezing had increased 4 fold (from 4.2% to 18.3%), and allergic rhinitis increased nearly 3 fold (from 17.9% to 44.2%). The results of the ISAAC phase III study revealed that the frequency of allergic diseases of the respiratory tract increased significantly from the ISAAC phase I survey performed in 1995; i.e. asthma increased from 12.2% to 14.5%, and allergic rhinitis from 37.9% to 50.6%. Allergic rhinitis exerts a major impact on the quality of life of Thai patients. The results of skin prick testing have indicated the leading causes of indoor (house-dust mites, house dust, cockroaches, dogs and cats) and outdoor pollen (Bermuda grass, para grass, sedge, careless weed) allergens. Molds (represented by Cladosporium), although prominent in an aeroallergen survey, returned a low percentage of positive skin prick reactions, and therefore, were considered low in allergenicity. In Thailand, there are clinical practice guidelines for both allergic rhinitis and asthma which are comparable to the international guidelines like ARIA and GINA. Sufficient kinds of pharmacotherapy are on the National List of Essential Drugs. Yet due to the limited number of trained allergists, many patients are seen by general physicians, and often, the appropriate diagnostic tests and treatments are not provided. In addition, the financial burden for quality health care may be prohibitive for those without private health insurance in spite of the implementation of a universal health care system for all Thai citizens, which is less than optimal.

  6. Respiratory and allergic diseases: from upper respiratory tract infections to asthma.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Raja

    2002-06-01

    Patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis may benefit from hydration and a diet low in sodium, omega-6 fatty acids, and transfatty acids, but high in omega-3 fatty acids (i.e., fish, almonds, walnuts, pumpkin, and flax seeds), onions, and fruits and vegetables (at least five servings a day). Physicians may need to be more cautious when prescribing antibiotics to children in their first year of life when they are born to families with a history of atopy. More research is needed to establish whether supplementation with probiotics (lactobacillus and bifidobacterium) during the first year of life or after antibiotic use decreases the risk of developing asthma and allergic rhinitis. Despite a theoretic basis for the use of vitamin C supplements in asthmatic patients, the evidence is still equivocal, and long-term studies are needed. The evidence is stronger for exercise-induced asthma, in which the use of vitamin C supplementation at a dosage of 1 to 2 g per day may be helpful. It is also possible that fish oil supplements, administered in a dosage of 1 to 1.2 g of EPA and DHA per day, also may be helpful to some patients with asthma. Long-term studies of fish oil and vitamin C are needed for more definite answers. For the patient interested in incorporating nutritional approaches, vitamin C and fish oils have a safe profile. However, aspirin-sensitive individuals should avoid fish oils, and red blood cell magnesium levels may help in making the decision whether to use additional magnesium supplements. Combination herbal formulas should be used in the treatment of asthma with medical supervision and in collaboration with an experienced herbalist or practitioner of TCM. Safe herbs, such as Boswellia and gingko, may be used singly as adjuncts to a comprehensive plan of care if the patient and practitioner have an interest in trying them while staying alert for drug-herb interactions. No data on the long-term use of these single herbs in asthma exist. For the motivated

  7. Complete right lung agenesis presenting with bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Ram Avadh Singh; Ranganath, T G; Garg, Rajiv; Anand, Shipra

    2012-01-01

    A 26 year-old lady presented with episodic breathlessness, chest tightness, recurrent nasal obstruction and excessive sneezing, mainly during change of season along with opacity of the right hemithorax on chest x-ray. Further detailed work-up including spirometry, high-resolution CT scan of the thorax and fibre-optic bronchoscopy confirmed complete right lung agenesis in patients with bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. Complete control of symptoms was achieved with formeterol 6 μg and mometasone 200 μg (via dry powder inhaler) and intranasal fluticasone 50 μg (nasal spray) 2 puffs twice daily and oral montelukast 10 mg with levocetirizine 5 mg once daily. PMID:23001088

  8. Potent ameliorating effect of Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) antagonist YC-1 on combined allergic rhinitis and asthma syndrome (CARAS) in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Liu, Chun; Wu, Liucheng; Zhu, Shunxing

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have implicated that Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) plays an integral role in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis and asthma. In the present study, we showed that HIF-1α antagonist YC-1, 3-(5-hydroxymethyl-2-furyl)-1-benzylindazole, elicited a potent allergy-ameliorating effect in a rat model of ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized combined allergic rhinitis and asthma syndrome (CARAS). We revealed that YC-1 administration markedly impaired the total number and percentage of eosinophil in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL Fluid) of the rats, suggesting that YC-1 might attenuate lung and nasal mucosal inflammation in OVA-sensitized rats. Moreover, histological examination found that OVA-induced pathological alterations were evidently attenuated following YC-1 administration. In addition, immunohistochemistrial analysis indicated that YC-1 treatment decreased the expression of HIF-1α in rat lungs and nasal mucosa. Notably, Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), two important regulators of inflammatory responses, were also significantly down-regulated following YC-1 administration. Real-time PCR analysis confirmed that YC-1 impaired the expression of HIF-1α, NF-κB and PPARα in CARAS model. These findings together indicated that YC-1 exerted remarkable anti-allergic effects through the modulation of inflammatory pathways, implying that YC-1 may potentially serve as a novel anti-CARAS medicine in clinical patients. PMID:27498367

  9. Urban Tree Canopy and Asthma, Wheeze, Rhinitis, and Allergic Sensitization to Tree Pollen in a New York City Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lovasi, Gina S.; O’Neil-Dunne, Jarlath P.M.; Lu, Jacqueline W.T.; Sheehan, Daniel; Perzanowski, Matthew S.; MacFaden, Sean W.; King, Kristen L.; Matte, Thomas; Miller, Rachel L.; Hoepner, Lori A.; Perera, Frederica P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Urban landscape elements, particularly trees, have the potential to affect airflow, air quality, and production of aeroallergens. Several large-scale urban tree planting projects have sought to promote respiratory health, yet evidence linking tree cover to human health is limited. Objectives: We sought to investigate the association of tree canopy cover with subsequent development of childhood asthma, wheeze, rhinitis, and allergic sensitization. Methods: Birth cohort study data were linked to detailed geographic information systems data characterizing 2001 tree canopy coverage based on LiDAR (light detection and ranging) and multispectral imagery within 0.25 km of the prenatal address. A total of 549 Dominican or African-American children born in 1998–2006 had outcome data assessed by validated questionnaire or based on IgE antibody response to specific allergens, including a tree pollen mix. Results: Tree canopy coverage did not significantly predict outcomes at 5 years of age, but was positively associated with asthma and allergic sensitization at 7 years. Adjusted risk ratios (RRs) per standard deviation of tree canopy coverage were 1.17 for asthma (95% CI: 1.02, 1.33), 1.20 for any specific allergic sensitization (95% CI: 1.05, 1.37), and 1.43 for tree pollen allergic sensitization (95% CI: 1.19, 1.72). Conclusions: Results did not support the hypothesized protective association of urban tree canopy coverage with asthma or allergy-related outcomes. Tree canopy cover near the prenatal address was associated with higher prevalence of allergic sensitization to tree pollen. Information was not available on sensitization to specific tree species or individual pollen exposures, and results may not be generalizable to other populations or geographic areas. PMID:23322788

  10. Improving the power to detect risk variants for allergic disease by defining case-control status based on both asthma and hay fever.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Manuel A R

    2014-12-01

    Asthma and hay fever are likely to share hundreds if not thousands of genetic risk variants. Despite this, the extent to which the power to identify shared risk variants could be improved by considering information from both diseases when designing or analyzing genetic studies has not been studied in detail. Simulations were performed to quantify the power to detect an association between case-control status and a bi-allelic risk variant shared between asthma and hay fever across a range of disease and genetic models, as well as different ascertainment and analytical strategies. For a fixed sample size, when designing a new genome-wide association study (GWAS), selecting for genotyping cases with both asthma and hay fever (A+H+), and controls with neither disease (A-H-) was the study design that provided the greatest power to identify a shared risk variant. On the other hand, when analyzing an existing GWAS, power was greatest across a wide range of scenarios, when cases were defined as individuals who suffered from either disease (A+ or H+) and controls as those who suffered from neither (A-H-). Bivariate analysis of asthma and hay fever provided comparable but slightly decreased power. In conclusion, new GWAS can be designed and existing GWAS reanalyzed more efficiently to identify risk variants for allergic disease by using ascertainment or analytical strategies that consider both asthma and hay fever information. PMID:25296694

  11. Improving the power to detect risk variants for allergic disease by defining case-control status based on both asthma and hay fever.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Manuel A R

    2014-12-01

    Asthma and hay fever are likely to share hundreds if not thousands of genetic risk variants. Despite this, the extent to which the power to identify shared risk variants could be improved by considering information from both diseases when designing or analyzing genetic studies has not been studied in detail. Simulations were performed to quantify the power to detect an association between case-control status and a bi-allelic risk variant shared between asthma and hay fever across a range of disease and genetic models, as well as different ascertainment and analytical strategies. For a fixed sample size, when designing a new genome-wide association study (GWAS), selecting for genotyping cases with both asthma and hay fever (A+H+), and controls with neither disease (A-H-) was the study design that provided the greatest power to identify a shared risk variant. On the other hand, when analyzing an existing GWAS, power was greatest across a wide range of scenarios, when cases were defined as individuals who suffered from either disease (A+ or H+) and controls as those who suffered from neither (A-H-). Bivariate analysis of asthma and hay fever provided comparable but slightly decreased power. In conclusion, new GWAS can be designed and existing GWAS reanalyzed more efficiently to identify risk variants for allergic disease by using ascertainment or analytical strategies that consider both asthma and hay fever information.

  12. Aberrant expression of regulatory cytokine IL-35 and pattern recognition receptor NOD2 in patients with allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chun Kwok; Leung, Ting Fan; Chu, Ida Miu Ting; Dong, Jie; Lam, Yvonne Yi On; Lam, Christopher Wai Kei

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the plasma concentration of the novel regulatory cytokine IL-35 and intracytosolic pattern recognition receptors nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors in granulocytes and explored their potential implication in disease severity monitoring of allergic asthma. The expression of circulating IL-35 and other pro-inflammatory mediators in asthmatic patients or control subjects were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The intracellular expressions of NOD1 and NOD2 in CCR3+ granulocytes were assessed using flow cytometry. Plasma concentrations of IL-35, IL-17A, basophil activation marker basogranulin, and eosinophilic airway inflammation biomarker periostin were significantly elevated in allergic asthmatic patients compared to non-atopic control subjects (all probability (p) <0.05). Both granulocyte markers exhibited significant and positive correlation with plasma IL-35 concentration in asthmatic patients (all p < 0.05). Significant positive correlation was also identified between plasma concentrations of IL-35 and periostin with disease severity score in asthmatic patients (both p < 0.05). The basophil activation allergenicity test was positive in allergic asthmatic patients but not in control subjects. Despite significantly elevated eosinophil count in allergic asthmatic patients, downregulation of NOD2 in CCR3+ granulocytes was observed in these patients (both p < 0.05). A negative correlation between plasma concentrations of tumor necrosis factor family member LIGHT and soluble herpesvirus entry mediator was observed in patients with elevated plasma concentration of IL-35 (p < 0.05). Aberrant expression of NOD2 in granulocytes may be contributed to the impaired innate immunity predisposing allergic asthma. IL-35 may serve as a potential surrogate biomarker for disease severity of allergic asthma.

  13. Atopic dermatitis, asthma and allergic rhinitis in general practice and the open population: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Pols, D. H. J.; Wartna, J. B.; Moed, H.; van Alphen, E. I.; Bohnen, A. M.; Bindels, P. J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine whether significant differences exist between the self-reported prevalence of atopic disorders in the open population compared with physician diagnosed prevalence of atopic disorders in general practice. Methods Medline (OvidSP), PubMed Publisher, EMBASE, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials Register databases were systematically reviewed for articles providing data on the prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema in a GP setting. Studies were only included when they had a cross-sectional or cohort design and included more than 100 children (aged 0-18 years) in a general practice setting. All ISAAC studies (i.e. the open population) that geographically matched a study selected from the first search, were also included. A quality assessment was conducted. The primary outcome measures were prevalence of eczema, asthma and allergic rhinitis in children aged 0-18 years. Results The overall quality of the included studies was good. The annual and lifetime prevalences of the atopic disorders varied greatly in both general practice and the open population. On average, the prevalence of atopic disorders was higher in the open population. Conclusion There are significant differences between the self-reported prevalence of atopic disorders in the open population compared with physician diagnosed prevalence of atopic disorders in general practice. Data obtained in the open population cannot simply be extrapolated to the general practice setting. This should be taken into account when considering a research topic or requirements for policy development. GPs should be aware of the possible misclassification of allergic disorders in their practice. Key PointsEpidemiological data on atopic disorders in children can be obtained from various sources, each having its own advantages and limitations.On average, the prevalence of atopic disorders is higher in the open population.GPs should take into account the possible

  14. Chloride Channel 3 Channels in the Activation and Migration of Human Blood Eosinophils in Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gaurav, Rohit; Bewtra, Againdra K.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase is responsible for respiratory burst in immune cells. Chloride channel 3 (CLC3) has been linked to the respiratory burst in eosinophils and neutrophils. The effect of cytokines and the involvement of CLC3 in the regulation of NADPH-dependent oxidative stress and on cytokine-mediated migration of eosinophils are not known. Human peripheral blood eosinophils were isolated from healthy individuals and from individuals with asthma by negative selection. Real-time PCR was used to detect the expression of NADPH oxidases in eosinophils. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurement was done with flow cytometry. Superoxide generation was measured with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, eotaxin, and CLC3 blockers. CLC3 dependence of eosinophils in TGF-β– and eotaxin-induced migration was also examined. The messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts of NADPH oxidase (NOX) 2, dual oxidase (DUOX) 1, and DUOX2 were detected in blood eosinophils, with very low expression of NOX1, NOX3, and NOX5 and no NOX4 mRNA. The level of NOX2 mRNA transcripts increased with disease severity in the eosinophils of subjects with asthma compared with healthy nonatopic volunteers. Change in granularity and size in eosinophils, but no change in intracellular ROS, was observed with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). PMA, TGF-β, and eotaxin used the CLC3-dependent pathway to increase superoxide radicals. TGF-β and eotaxin induced CLC3-dependent chemotaxis of eosinophils. These findings support the requirement of CLC3 in the activation and migration of human blood eosinophils and may provide a potential novel therapeutic target to regulate eosinophil hyperactivity in allergic airway inflammation in asthma. PMID:25514499

  15. Differences in allergen-induced T cell activation between allergic asthma and rhinitis: Role of CD28, ICOS and CTLA-4

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Th2 cell activation and T regulatory cell (Treg) deficiency are key features of allergy. This applies for asthma and rhinitis. However with a same atopic background, some patients will develop rhinitis and asthma, whereas others will display rhinitis only. Co-receptors are pivotal in determining the type of T cell activation, but their role in allergic asthma and rhinitis has not been explored. Our objective was to assess whether allergen-induced T cell activation differs from allergic rhinitis to allergic rhinitis with asthma, and explore the role of ICOS, CD28 and CTLA-4. Methods T cell co-receptor and cytokine expressions were assessed by flow cytometry in PBMC from 18 house dust mite (HDM) allergic rhinitics (R), 18 HDM allergic rhinitics and asthmatics (AR), 13 non allergic asthmatics (A) and 20 controls, with or without anti-co-receptors antibodies. Results In asthmatics (A+AR), a constitutive decrease of CTLA-4+ and of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells was found, with an increase of IFN-γ+ cells. In allergic subjects (R + AR), allergen stimulation induced CD28 together with IL-4 and IL-13, and decreased the proportion of CTLA-4+, IL-10+ and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells. Anti-ICOS and anti-CD28 antibodies blocked allergen-induced IL-4 and IL-13. IL-13 production also involved CTLA-4. Conclusions T cell activation differs between allergic rhinitis and asthma. In asthma, a constitutive, co-receptor independent, Th1 activation and Treg deficiency is found. In allergic rhinitis, an allergen-induced Treg cell deficiency is seen, as well as an ICOS-, CD28- and CTLA-4-dependent Th2 activation. Allergic asthmatics display both characteristics. PMID:21356099

  16. Mouse models to unravel the role of inhaled pollutants on allergic sensitization and airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Air pollutant exposure has been linked to a rise in wheezing illnesses. Clinical data highlight that exposure to mainstream tobacco smoke (MS) and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) as well as exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) could promote allergic sensitization or aggravate symptoms of asthma, suggesting a role for these inhaled pollutants in the pathogenesis of asthma. Mouse models are a valuable tool to study the potential effects of these pollutants in the pathogenesis of asthma, with the opportunity to investigate their impact during processes leading to sensitization, acute inflammation and chronic disease. Mice allow us to perform mechanistic studies and to evaluate the importance of specific cell types in asthma pathogenesis. In this review, the major clinical effects of tobacco smoke and diesel exhaust exposure regarding to asthma development and progression are described. Clinical data are compared with findings from murine models of asthma and inhalable pollutant exposure. Moreover, the potential mechanisms by which both pollutants could aggravate asthma are discussed. PMID:20092634

  17. Prevalence and risk factors of asthma and allergic diseases in primary schoolchildren living in Bushehr, Iran: phase I, III ISAAC protocol.

    PubMed

    Farrokhi, Shokrollah; Gheybi, Mohammad Kazzem; Movahhed, Ali; Dehdari, Reyhaneh; Gooya, Mostafa; Keshvari, Saman; Gholampour, Hossein; Mansourian, Zohreh; Khosravi, Yasaman; Ghahramani, Forough; Zandi, Sahar; Etemadan, Razieh; Tahmasebi, Rahim; Reaisi, Alireza; Keshmiri, Saeed; Fadaizadeh, Lida; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza

    2014-10-01

    Asthma and allergic diseases present a major health burden. Information on the prevalence of these diseases indicates that these diseases are increasing in various parts of the world. It was hoped that this study would be helpful to health system policy-makers in planning allergy prevention programs in the region.The prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases and relation between the various risk factors involved were assessed among schoolchildren in the city of Bushehr, Iran. The ISAAC Phase I and III questionnaires were completed by parents of 1280 children aged 6-7 years and self-completed by 1115 students aged 13-14 years.The prevalence of atopic eczema, allergic rhinitis and asthma among 6-7 year-old students were 12.1%, 11.8% and 6.7%, respectively. While, the prevalence of these diseases among 13-14 year-old students were found to be 19%, 30% and 7.6%, respectively. There was an association between asthma and allergic rhinitis as well as eczema (p<0.05). Consumption of fast food as a risk factor was significantly associated with asthma (p=0.03).The prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases was high among schoolchildren in the city of Bushehr, Iran. Also an association was observed between the fast food consumption and asthma. PMID:25150076

  18. Anti-IgE monoclonal antibody (omalizumab) in the treatment of atopic asthma and allergic respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Gennaro; Liccardi, Gennaro; Noschese, Paolo; Salzillo, Antonello; D'Amato, Maria; Cazzola, Mario

    2004-09-01

    Since the discovery of immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies thirty-six years ago, our understanding of the mechanisms of allergy has improved to such an extent that we can now better differentiate allergy from non-allergic hypersensitivity, and allergic/atopic from intrinsic/non-atopic bronchial asthma. IgE antibodies are crucial immune mediators of airway inflammation in allergic atopic asthma and IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions are the likely mechanisms of allergen-induced airway obstruction. In addition, IgE may cause chronic airway inflammation in asthma through effector cells activated via high-affinity (Fcepsilon RI) or low-affinity (Fcepsilon RII) IgE receptors. Therapeutic anti-IgE antibodies able to reduce free IgE levels and to block the binding of IgE to Fcepsilon RI without cross-linking IgE and triggering degranulation of IgE-sensitised cells have been developed. This non-anaphylactogenic anti-IgE monoclonal antibody (rhuMAb-E25; omalizumab) binds IgE at the same site as these antibodies bind Fcepsilon RI and Fcepsilon RII. As a consequence, omalizumab inhibits IgE effector functions by blocking IgE binding to high-affinity receptors on IgE effector cells and does not cause mast cell or basophil activation because it cannot bind to IgE on cell surfaces where the Fcepsilon R1 receptor already masks the anti-IgE epitope. Studies in patients with atopic asthma demonstrated that omalizumab decreases serum IgE levels and allergen-induced bronchoconstriction during both the early and late-phase responses to inhaled allergen. In several clinical controlled trials omalizumab resulted to be able to reduce asthma-related symptoms, to decrease corticosteroid use and to improve quality of life of asthmatic patients. The anti-IgE approach to asthma treatment has several advantages, including concomitant treatment of other IgE-mediated diseases (allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, atopic dermatitis and food allergies), a favourable side-effect profile

  19. Role of anti-IgE monoclonal antibody (omalizumab) in the treatment of bronchial asthma and allergic respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Gennaro

    2006-03-01

    IgE molecules play a crucial role in allergic respiratory diseases and may cause chronic airway inflammation in asthma through activation of effector cells via high-affinity (FcepsilonRI) or low-affinity (FcepsilonRII) IgE receptors. Since the discovery of IgE antibodies our understanding of the mechanisms of allergy has improved to such an extent that we can differentiate allergic/atopic from intrinsic respiratory diseases. Therapeutic anti-IgE antibodies, able to reduce free IgE levels and to block the binding of IgE to FcepsilonRI without crosslinking IgE and triggering degranulation of IgE-sensitized cells have been developed. This non-anaphylactogenic anti-IgE monoclonal antibody (omalizumab) binds IgE at the same site as these antibodies bind FcepsilonRI and FcepsilonRII. Consequently, omalizumab inhibits IgE effector functions by blocking IgE binding to high-affinity receptors on IgE effector cells and does not cause mast cell or basophil activation because it cannot bind to IgE on cell surfaces where the FcepsilonR1 receptor already masks the anti-IgE epitope. Studies in patients with atopic asthma showed that omalizumab decreases serum IgE levels and allergen-induced bronchoconstriction during both the early and late-phase responses to inhaled allergen. In several clinical controlled trials omalizumab resulted effective in reducing asthma-related symptoms, decreasing corticosteroid use and improving quality of life of asthmatic patients. Recent studies show the benefits of omalizumab as add-on therapy in patients with severe persistent asthma who are inadequately controlled by optimal pharmacological therapy. The anti-IgE approach to asthma treatment has several advantages, including concomitant treatment of other IgE-mediated diseases such as allergic rhinitis, a favorable safety profile and a convenient dosing frequency.

  20. Inhaled multiwalled carbon nanotubes potentiate airway fibrosis in murine allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Ryman-Rasmussen, Jessica P; Tewksbury, Earl W; Moss, Owen R; Cesta, Mark F; Wong, Brian A; Bonner, James C

    2009-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are gaining increasing attention due to possible health risks from occupational or environmental exposures. This study tested the hypothesis that inhaled multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) would increase airway fibrosis in mice with allergic asthma. Normal and ovalbumin-sensitized mice were exposed to a MWCNT aerosol (100 mg/m(3)) or saline aerosol for 6 hours. Lung injury, inflammation, and fibrosis were examined by histopathology, clinical chemistry, ELISA, or RT-PCR for cytokines/chemokines, growth factors, and collagen at 1 and 14 days after inhalation. Inhaled MWCNT were distributed throughout the lung and found in macrophages by light microscopy, but were also evident in epithelial cells by electron microscopy. Quantitative morphometry showed significant airway fibrosis at 14 days in mice that received a combination of ovalbumin and MWCNT, but not in mice that received ovalbumin or MWCNT only. Ovalbumin-sensitized mice that did not inhale MWCNT had elevated levels IL-13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 in lung lavage fluid, but not platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA. In contrast, unsensitized mice that inhaled MWCNT had elevated PDGF-AA, but not increased levels of TGF-beta1 and IL-13. This suggested that airway fibrosis resulting from combined ovalbumin sensitization and MWCNT inhalation requires PDGF, a potent fibroblast mitogen, and TGF-beta1, which stimulates collagen production. Combined ovalbumin sensitization and MWCNT inhalation also synergistically increased IL-5 mRNA levels, which could further contribute to airway fibrosis. These data indicate that inhaled MWCNT require pre-existing inflammation to cause airway fibrosis. Our findings suggest that individuals with pre-existing allergic inflammation may be susceptible to airway fibrosis from inhaled MWCNT.

  1. Inhaled Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Potentiate Airway Fibrosis in Murine Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ryman-Rasmussen, Jessica P.; Tewksbury, Earl W.; Moss, Owen R.; Cesta, Mark F.; Wong, Brian A.; Bonner, James C.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are gaining increasing attention due to possible health risks from occupational or environmental exposures. This study tested the hypothesis that inhaled multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) would increase airway fibrosis in mice with allergic asthma. Normal and ovalbumin-sensitized mice were exposed to a MWCNT aerosol (100 mg/m3) or saline aerosol for 6 hours. Lung injury, inflammation, and fibrosis were examined by histopathology, clinical chemistry, ELISA, or RT-PCR for cytokines/chemokines, growth factors, and collagen at 1 and 14 days after inhalation. Inhaled MWCNT were distributed throughout the lung and found in macrophages by light microscopy, but were also evident in epithelial cells by electron microscopy. Quantitative morphometry showed significant airway fibrosis at 14 days in mice that received a combination of ovalbumin and MWCNT, but not in mice that received ovalbumin or MWCNT only. Ovalbumin-sensitized mice that did not inhale MWCNT had elevated levels IL-13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in lung lavage fluid, but not platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA. In contrast, unsensitized mice that inhaled MWCNT had elevated PDGF-AA, but not increased levels of TGF-β1 and IL-13. This suggested that airway fibrosis resulting from combined ovalbumin sensitization and MWCNT inhalation requires PDGF, a potent fibroblast mitogen, and TGF-β1, which stimulates collagen production. Combined ovalbumin sensitization and MWCNT inhalation also synergistically increased IL-5 mRNA levels, which could further contribute to airway fibrosis. These data indicate that inhaled MWCNT require pre-existing inflammation to cause airway fibrosis. Our findings suggest that individuals with pre-existing allergic inflammation may be susceptible to airway fibrosis from inhaled MWCNT. PMID:18787175

  2. Association of ADAM33 gene polymorphisms with adult allergic asthma and rhinitis in a Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Su, Dongju; Zhang, Ximei; Sui, Hong; Lü, Fuzhen; Jin, Lianhong; Zhang, Jing

    2008-01-01

    Background Rhinitis and asthma are very common diseases involving genetic and environmental factors. Most patients with asthma also have rhinitis, which suggests the concept of 'one airway, one disease.' A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 33 (ADAM33) is the first asthma-susceptible gene to be discovered by positional cloning. To evaluate the potential influence of ADAM33 gene polymorphisms on allergic rhinitis (AR) and allergic asthma (AS), a case-control study was conducted on the Han population of northeast China. Methods Six polymorphic sites (V4, T+1, T2, T1, S1, and Q-1) were genotyped in 128 patients with AR, 181 patients with AS, and 151 healthy controls (CTR). Genotypes were determined by the polymerase chain restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test with Haploview software. Results The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), V4 G/C, T+1 A/G, and T1 G/A, of the ADAM33 gene may be the causal variants in AR, whereas ADAM33 V4 G/C, T2 A/G, T1 G/A, and Q-1A/G may participate in the susceptibility of AS. Conclusion These results suggest that polymorphisms of the ADAM33 gene may modify individual susceptibility to AR and AS in a Chinese Han population. PMID:18778489

  3. Prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases in primary school children in Edirne, Turkey, two surveys 10 years apart.

    PubMed

    Selcuk, Ziya Toros; Demir, Ahmet Ugur; Tabakoglu, Erhan; Caglar, Tuncay

    2010-06-01

    To assess change in prevalence and risk factors of asthma and allergic diseases among primary school children in rural and urban parts of Edirne, Turkey, a series of cross-sectional studies were conducted in 1994 and 2004. A questionnaire was administered to the parents of primary school children aged 7-12, in urban and rural parts of Edirne, Turkey (5412 in 1994 and 5735 in 2004). Response rates in 1994 and 2004 were 84% and 82.5%, respectively. There were significant differences between the age distribution, urban habitation (1994: 70.1%, 2004: 75.8%, p < 0.001), passive smoking (1994: 74.7%, 2004: 60.0%, p < 0.001), and family atopy (1994: 12.7%, 2004: 18.2%, p < 0.001) between the two surveys. Current prevalence of asthma and wheeze increased in the 2004 when compared to 1994 in both rural and urban regions (current asthma for rural and urban regions, 5.2% and 5.8% in 1994; 8.6% and 12.1% in 2004, respectively). Female-to-male ratio of current asthma increased from 0.7 in 1994 to 0.9 in 2004. Comparison of the risk factors in the two surveys suggested urban habitation and factors other than family atopy, passive smoking and no breast feeding as possible contributors for the increasing asthma and wheeze. Prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases increased among school children in Edirne, Turkey from 1994 to 2004. Life style changes and urbanization could be related to this increasing trend.

  4. Maternal Influences over Offspring Allergic Responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Asthma occurs as a result of complex interactions of environmental and genetic factors. Clinical studies and animal models of asthma indicate offspring of allergic mothers have increased risk of development of allergies. Environmental factors including stress-induced corticosterone and vitamin E isoforms during pregnancy regulate the risk for offspring development of allergy. In this review, we discuss mechanisms for the development of allergic disease early in life, environmental factors that may impact the development of risk for allergic disease early in life, and how the variation in global prevalence of asthma may be explained, at least in part, by some environmental components. PMID:25612797

  5. Intra-airway administration of small interfering RNA targeting plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 attenuates allergic asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shintaro; Hattori, Noboru; Senoo, Tadashi; Onari, Yojiro; Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Kanehara, Masashi; Ishikawa, Nobuhisa; Fujitaka, Kazunori; Haruta, Yoshinori; Murai, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Akihito; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a major inhibitor of the fibrinolytic system, may promote the development of asthma. To further investigate the significance of PAI-1 in the pathogenesis of asthma and determine the possibility that PAI-1 could be a therapeutic target for asthma, this study was conducted. First, PAI-1 levels in induced sputum (IS) from asthmatic subjects and healthy controls were measured. In asthmatic subjects, IS PAI-1 levels were elevated, compared with that of healthy controls, and were significantly higher in patients with long-duration asthma compared with short-duration asthma. PAI-1 levels were also found to correlate with IS transforming growth factor-β levels. Then, acute and chronic asthma models induced by ovalbumin were established in PAI-1-deficient mice and wild-type mice that received intra-airway administrations of small interfering RNA against PAI-1 (PAI-1-siRNA). We could demonstrate that eosinophilic airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness were reduced in an acute asthma model, and airway remodeling was suppressed in a chronic asthma model in both PAI-1-deficient mice and wild-type mice that received intra-airway administration of PAI-1-siRNA. These results indicate that PAI-1 is strongly involved in the pathogenesis of asthma, and intra-airway administration of PAI-1-siRNA may be able to become a new therapeutic approach for asthma.

  6. Asthma.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Karl-Christian

    2014-01-01

    'Asthma' is derived from the Greek root ασθμαινω, meaning 'gasp for breath'. The term originally did not define a disease, but was employed to describe respiratory symptoms of a variety of pulmonary conditions. Over the centuries, several models have been proposed to understand the pathophysiologic abnormalities of asthma. By the beginning of the 20th century, asthma was seen to be a unique illness characterized by 'spasmodic afflictions of the bronchial tubes'. Consistent with the nature of asthma as a complex disease, the models for asthma pathogenesis have become increasingly complex. Research has moved from antiquated ideas to a descriptive functional approach to one that relies on pathophysiology in cellular and molecular biology, immunology, microbiology and genetics/genomics. As more advanced technologies for measuring lung function were developed, the features of asthma were steadily unraveled and its pathophysiology clarified. Asthma was shown to be associated with transient increases in airway resistance, reductions in forced expiratory volumes and flows, hyperinflation of the lungs and increased work of breathing, as well as abnormalities in the distribution of ventilation, perfusion and arterial blood gases. Today, asthma is seen as a chronic inflammatory disease which is not yet fully understood in its pathophysiology; therefore, therapy is still on the path to becoming optimal. PMID:24925386

  7. Asthma.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Karl-Christian

    2014-01-01

    'Asthma' is derived from the Greek root ασθμαινω, meaning 'gasp for breath'. The term originally did not define a disease, but was employed to describe respiratory symptoms of a variety of pulmonary conditions. Over the centuries, several models have been proposed to understand the pathophysiologic abnormalities of asthma. By the beginning of the 20th century, asthma was seen to be a unique illness characterized by 'spasmodic afflictions of the bronchial tubes'. Consistent with the nature of asthma as a complex disease, the models for asthma pathogenesis have become increasingly complex. Research has moved from antiquated ideas to a descriptive functional approach to one that relies on pathophysiology in cellular and molecular biology, immunology, microbiology and genetics/genomics. As more advanced technologies for measuring lung function were developed, the features of asthma were steadily unraveled and its pathophysiology clarified. Asthma was shown to be associated with transient increases in airway resistance, reductions in forced expiratory volumes and flows, hyperinflation of the lungs and increased work of breathing, as well as abnormalities in the distribution of ventilation, perfusion and arterial blood gases. Today, asthma is seen as a chronic inflammatory disease which is not yet fully understood in its pathophysiology; therefore, therapy is still on the path to becoming optimal.

  8. A new era of targeting the ancient gatekeepers of the immune system: toll-like agonists in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma.

    PubMed

    Aryan, Zahra; Holgate, Stephen T; Radzioch, Danuta; Rezaei, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) belong to a large family of pattern recognition receptors known as the ancient 'gatekeepers' of the immune system. TLRs are located at the first line of defense against invading pathogens as well as aeroallergens, making them interesting targets to modulate the natural history of respiratory allergy. Agonists of TLRs have been widely employed in therapeutic or prophylactic preparations useful for asthma/allergic rhinitis (AR) patients. MPL® (a TLR4 agonist) and the CpG oligodeoxynucleotide of 1018 ISS, a TLR9 agonist, show strong immunogenicity effects that make them appropriate adjuvants for allergy vaccines. Targeting the TLRs can enhance the efficacy of specific allergen immunotherapy, currently the only available 'curative' treatment for respiratory allergies. In addition, intranasal administration of AZD8848 (a TLR7 agonist) and VTX-1463 (a TLR8 agonist) as stand-alone therapeutics have revealed efficacy in the relief of the symptoms of AR patients. No anaphylaxis has been so far reported with such compounds targeting TLRs, with the most common adverse effects being transient and local irritation (e.g. redness, swelling and pruritus). Many other compounds that target TLRs have been found to suppress airway inflammation, eosinophilia and airway hyper-responsiveness in various animal models of allergic inflammation. Indeed, in the future a wide variability of TLR agonists and even antagonists that exhibit anti-asthma/AR effects are likely to emerge.

  9. Acute and chronic exposure to Tyrophagus putrescentiae induces allergic pulmonary response in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Nuñez, Nailê Karine; dos Santos Dutra, Moisés; Barbosa, Gustavo Leivas; Morassutti, Alessandra Loureiro; de Souza, Rodrigo Godinho; Vargas, Mauro Henrique Moraes; Antunes, Géssica Luana; Silveira, Josiane Silva; da Silva, Guilherme Liberato; Pitrez, Paulo Márcio

    2016-01-01

    Background Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Tp) is a source of aeroallergen that causes allergic diseases. Objective To describe an acute and chronic murine model of allergic asthma with Tp extract with no systemic sensitization and no use of adjuvant. Methods Mites from dust sample were cultured and a raw extract was produced. Female BALB/c mice (6-8 weeks) were challenged intranasally with Tp extract or Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline, for 10 consecutive days (acute protocol) or for 6 weeks (chronic protocol). Twenty-four hours after the last intranasal challenge, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was performed for total and differential cells count, cytokine analysis, and eosinophil peroxidase activity. Lung tissue was also removed for histopathologic analysis. Results Tp extract has shown a significant increase in total cells count from BALF as well as an increase in absolute eosinophils count, eosinophil peroxidase activity, interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13 levels, in both acute and chronic protocols. Peribronchovascular infiltrate, goblet cells hyperplasia and collagen deposition were shown in the airways of acute and chronic Tp-exposed mice. Conclusion Our data suggest that the intranasal exposure to Tp extract, with no systemic sensitization and no use of adjuvants, induces a robust allergic inflammation in the lungs of mice, in both acute and chronic models. Our Tp extract seems to be a potent allergen extract which may be used in asthma model studies. PMID:26844220

  10. The Discovery of Potent, Selective, and Reversible Inhibitors of the House Dust Mite Peptidase Allergen Der p 1: An Innovative Approach to the Treatment of Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Blocking the bioactivity of allergens is conceptually attractive as a small-molecule therapy for allergic diseases but has not been attempted previously. Group 1 allergens of house dust mites (HDM) are meaningful targets in this quest because they are globally prevalent and clinically important triggers of allergic asthma. Group 1 HDM allergens are cysteine peptidases whose proteolytic activity triggers essential steps in the allergy cascade. Using the HDM allergen Der p 1 as an archetype for structure-based drug discovery, we have identified a series of novel, reversible inhibitors. Potency and selectivity were manipulated by optimizing drug interactions with enzyme binding pockets, while variation of terminal groups conferred the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic attributes required for inhaled delivery. Studies in animals challenged with the gamut of HDM allergens showed an attenuation of allergic responses by targeting just a single component, namely, Der p 1. Our findings suggest that these inhibitors may be used as novel therapies for allergic asthma. PMID:25365789

  11. Volatile Organic Compounds Enhance Allergic Airway Inflammation in an Experimental Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Bönisch, Ulrike; Böhme, Alexander; Kohajda, Tibor; Mögel, Iljana; Schütze, Nicole; von Bergen, Martin; Simon, Jan C.; Lehmann, Irina; Polte, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest an association between exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and adverse allergic and respiratory symptoms. However, whether VOCs exhibit a causal role as adjuvants in asthma development remains unclear. Methods To investigate the effect of VOC exposure on the development of allergic airway inflammation Balb/c mice were exposed to VOCs emitted by new polyvinylchloride (PVC) flooring, sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and characterized in acute and chronic murine asthma models. Furthermore, prevalent evaporated VOCs were analyzed and mice were exposed to selected single VOCs. Results Exposure of mice to PVC flooring increased eosinophilic lung inflammation and OVA-specific IgE serum levels compared to un-exposed control mice. The increased inflammation was associated with elevated levels of Th2-cytokines. Long-term exposure to PVC flooring exacerbated chronic airway inflammation. VOCs with the highest concentrations emitted by new PVC flooring were N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate (TXIB). Exposure to NMP or TXIB also increased the allergic immune response in OVA-sensitized mice. In vitro or in vivo exposure to NMP or TXIB reduced IL-12 production in maturing dendritic cells (DCs) and enhanced airway inflammation after adoptive DC transfer into Balb/c mice. At higher concentrations both VOCs induced oxidative stress demonstrated by increased isoprostane and glutathione-S-transferase-pi1 protein levels in the lung of non-sensitized mice. Treatment of PVC flooring-exposed mice with N-acetylcysteine prevented the VOC-induced increase of airway inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that exposure to VOCs may increase the allergic immune response by interfering with DC function and by inducing oxidative stress and has therefore to be considerate as risk factor for the development of allergic diseases. PMID:22802943

  12. Home and allergic characteristics of children with asthma in seven U.S. urban communities and design of an environmental intervention: the Inner-City Asthma Study.

    PubMed Central

    Crain, Ellen F; Walter, Michelle; O'Connor, George T; Mitchell, Herman; Gruchalla, Rebecca S; Kattan, Meyer; Malindzak, George S; Enright, Paul; Evans, Richard; Morgan, Wayne; Stout, James W

    2002-01-01

    Most published environmental remediation interventions have been directed at single allergens and have employed demanding strategies; few have been performed in the homes of inner-city children disproportionately burdened by asthma. Our objective was a) to describe the allergen sensitivities, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure, and home environmental characteristics of a national sample of inner-city children with moderate to severe asthma and b) to develop and implement a multifaceted, home-based comprehensive intervention to reduce home allergens and ETS, tailored to the specific sensitization and exposure profiles of those children. Allergen skin testing and a home evaluation were performed to determine the presence of ETS and factors known to be associated with increased indoor allergen levels. Based on published remediation techniques, a home environmental intervention, organized into modules, each addressing one of five specific allergen groups or ETS, was designed. Of 994 allergic children from seven U.S. urban communities, 937 successfully completed baseline interviews and home allergen surveys and were enrolled. More than 50% of children had positive skin tests to three or more allergen groups. Cockroaches were reported in 58% of homes, wall-to-wall carpeting in the child's bedroom in 55%, a smoker in 48%, mice or rats in 40%, and furry pets in 28%. More than 60% of enrolled families received four or more modules, and between 94% and 98% of all modules were completed. We conclude that most inner-city children with moderate to severe asthma are sensitized to multiple indoor allergens and that environmental factors known to be associated with asthma severity are commonly present in their homes. The intervention developed for the Inner-City Asthma Study employs accepted methods to address an array of allergens and ETS exposure while ensuring that the intervention is tailored to the specific sensitization profiles and home characteristics of these

  13. Bromelain Inhibits Allergic Sensitization and Murine Asthma via Modulation of Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Secor, Eric R; Szczepanek, Steven M; Castater, Christine A; Adami, Alexander J; Matson, Adam P; Rafti, Ektor T; Guernsey, Linda; Natarajan, Prabitha; McNamara, Jeffrey T; Schramm, Craig M; Thrall, Roger S; Silbart, Lawrence K

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of atopic conditions has increased in industrialized countries. Persisting symptoms and concern for drug side-effects lead patients toward adjunctive treatments such as phytotherapy. Previously, we have shown that Bromelain (sBr), a mixture of cysteine proteases from pineapple, Ananas comosus, inhibits ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine model of allergic airway disease (AAD). However, sBr's effect on development of AAD when treatment is administered throughout OVA-alum sensitization was unknown and is the aim of the present study. C57BL/6J mice were sensitized with OVA/alum and challenged with 7 days OVA aerosol. sBr 6 mg/kg/0.5 ml or PBS vehicle were administered throughout sensitization. Lung, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), spleen, and lymph nodes were processed for flow cytometry and OVA-specific IgE was determined via ELISA. sBr treatment throughout OVA-alum sensitization significantly reduced the development of AAD (BAL eosinophils and lymphocytes). OVA-specific IgE and OVA TET(+) cells were decreased. sBr reduced CD11c(+) dendritic cell subsets, and in vitro treatment of DCs significantly reduced CD44, a key receptor in both cell trafficking and activation. sBr was shown to reduce allergic sensitization and the generation of AAD upon antigen challenge. These results provide additional insight into sBr's anti-inflammatory and antiallergic properties and rationale for translation into the clinical arena.

  14. High-Fat and Low-Carbohydrate Diets Are Associated with Allergic Rhinitis But Not Asthma or Atopic Dermatitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Young; Sim, Songyong; Park, Bumjung; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Choi, Hyo Geun

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have suggested that nutritional intake is related to allergic diseases. Although conflicting results exist, fat intake is often associated with allergic diseases. We investigated the relationship between allergic diseases and nutritional intake after adjusting for various demographic and socioeconomic factors in a large, representative sample of Korean children. Methods A total of 3,040 participants, aged 4 to 13 years old, were enrolled in the present study from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), 2010–2012. Nutritional intake data, including total calories, protein, fat, carbohydrate, vitamin A, vitamin C, thiamine, riboflavin, and niacin, were retrieved from the survey using the complete 24-hour recall method. The associations between each nutritional factor and allergic rhinitis/asthma/atopic dermatitis were analyzed using simple and multiple logistic regression analyses with complex sampling. Age, sex, body mass index (BMI), number of household members, income level, and region of residence were adjusted for as covariates. Results Of the participants, 22.1%, 6.0%, and 15.5% suffered from allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis, respectively. Allergic rhinitis was significantly correlated with high-fat and low-carbohydrate diets. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) was 1.25 (95% CIs = 1.06–1.46, P = 0.007) for fat intake, denoting a 10% increase. Carbohydrate intake (10% increase) was negatively related to allergic rhinitis with an AOR of 0.84 (95% CIs = 0.74–0.95, P = 0.004). No other significant relationships were found between the retrieved nutritional factors and either asthma or atopic dermatitis. Conclusion Allergic rhinitis was related to high-fat and low-carbohydrate diets. Although the underlying mechanisms and causal relationships remain elusive, the present study provides reliable evidence regarding the associations between nutritional factors and allergic rhinitis by considering

  15. Prevalence of asthma and other allergic conditions in Colombia 2009–2010: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While it is suggested that the prevalence of asthma in developed countries may have stabilized, this is not clear in currently developing countries. Current available information for both adults and children simultaneously on the burden and impact of allergic conditions in Colombia and in many Latin American countries is limited. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence for asthma, allergic rhinitis (AR), atopic eczema (AE), and atopy in six colombian cities; to quantify costs to the patient and her/his family; and to determine levels of Immunoglobulin E (IgE) in asthmatic and healthy subjects. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional, population-based study in six cities during the academic year 2009–2010. We used a school-based design for subjects between 5–17 years old. We carried out a community-based strategy for subjects between 1–4 years old and adults between 18–59 years old. Serum samples for total and antigen-specific (IgE) levels were collected using a population-based, nested, case–control design. Results We obtained information on 5978 subjects. The largest sample of subjects was collected in Bogotá (2392). The current prevalence of asthma symptoms was 12% (95% CI, 10.5-13.7), with 43% (95% CI, 36.3-49.2) reporting having required an emergency department visit or hospitalization in the past 12 months. Physician diagnosed asthma was 7% (95% CI, 6.1-8.0). The current prevalence of AR symptoms was 32% (95% CI, 29.5-33.9), and of AE symptoms was 14% (95% CI, 12.5-15.3). We collected blood samples from 855 subjects; 60.2% of asthmatics and 40.6% of controls could be classified as atopic. Conclusions In Colombia, symptom prevalence for asthma, AR and AE, as well as levels of atopy, are substantial. Specifically for asthma, symptom severity and absence from work or study due to symptoms are important. These primary care sensitive conditions remain an unmet public health burden in developing countries such as

  16. Economic analysis of temperature-controlled laminar airflow (TLA) for the treatment of patients with severe persistent allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Brazier, Peter; Schauer, Uwe; Hamelmann, Eckard; Holmes, Steve; Pritchard, Clive; Warner, John O

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic asthma is a significant burden for individual sufferers, adversely impacting their quality of working and social life, as well as being a major cost to the National Health Service (NHS). Temperature-controlled laminar airflow (TLA) therapy provides asthma patients at BTS/SIGN step 4/5 an add-on treatment option that is non-invasive and has been shown in clinical studies to improve quality of life for patients with poorly controlled allergic asthma. The objective of this study was to quantify the cost-effectiveness of TLA (Airsonett AB) technology as an add-on to standard asthma management drug therapy in the UK. Methods The main performance measure of interest is the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) for patients using TLA in addition to usual care versus usual care alone. The incremental cost of TLA use is based on an observational clinical study monitoring the incidence of exacerbations with treatment valued using NHS cost data. The clinical effectiveness, used to derive the incremental QALY data, is based on a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial comprising participants with an equivalent asthma condition. Results For a clinical cohort of asthma patients as a whole, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) is £8998 per QALY gained, that is, within the £20 000/QALY cost-effectiveness benchmark used by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). Sensitivity analysis indicates that ICER values range from £18 883/QALY for the least severe patients through to TLA being dominant, that is, cost saving as well as improving quality of life, for individuals with the most severe and poorly controlled asthma. Conclusions Based on our results, Airsonett TLA is a cost-effective addition to treatment options for stage 4/5 patients. For high-risk individuals with more severe and less well controlled asthma, the use of TLA therapy to reduce incidence of hospitalisation would be a cost

  17. Epithelial barrier function: at the frontline of asthma immunology and allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Georas, Steve N.; Rezaee, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells form a barrier to the outside world, and are at the frontline of mucosal immunity. Epithelial apical junctional complexes are multi-protein subunits that promote cell-cell adhesion and barrier integrity. Recent studies in the skin and GI tract suggest that disruption of cell-cell junctions is required to initiate epithelial immune responses, but how this applies to mucosal immunity in the lung is not clear. Increasing evidence indicates that defective epithelial barrier function is a feature of airway inflammation in asthma. One challenge in this area is that barrier function and junctional integrity are difficult to study in the intact lung, but innovative approaches should provide new knowledge in this area in the near future. In this article, we review the structure and function of epithelial apical junctional complexes, emphasizing how regulation of the epithelial barrier impacts innate and adaptive immunity. We discuss why defective epithelial barrier function may be linked to Th2 polarization in asthma, and propose a rheostat model of barrier dysfunction that implicates the size of inhaled allergen particles as an important factor influencing adaptive immunity. PMID:25085341

  18. CD39/CD73 and the imbalance of Th17 cells and regulatory T cells in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Tang, Hua-Ping; Shi, Guo-Chao; Wan, Huan-Ying; Tang, Wei; Hou, Xiao-Xia; Pan, Li-Na; Shi, Bao-Yu; Tao, Lian-Qin

    2013-11-01

    In the immune system, CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain self‑tolerance and Th17 cells mediate inflammatory responses. CD39 is expressed on the surface of a subset of naturally occurring human Tregs that are important in constraining pathogenic Th17 cells. Additional studies have shown that Tregs differentiate into interleukin‑17 (IL‑17)+Foxp3+ T cells. Our previous study indicated an imbalance of Th17 and Tregs in allergic asthma; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), CD39 and CD73 mRNA levels in CD4+ T cells were investigated. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the proportion of IL‑17+Foxp3+ T cells, and CD39 and CD73 expressed by CD4+ T cells and Tregs in the peripheral blood of the subjects. The results of the present study demonstrated an increased frequency of CD4+Foxp3+IL‑17+ T cells in moderate to severe asthma. A deficiency in CD39 expressed on the surface of CD4+ T cells and Tregs was observed in asthma patients. The expression of CD39 and CD73 on the surface of CD4+ T cells and Tregs was negatively correlated with the number of Th17 cells. These results indicated that the plasticity of Tregs transforming to IL‑17+Foxp3+CD4+ T cells, the reduced frequency of CD39+ Tregs and less effective suppression of IL‑17 production by residual CD39+ Tregs leads to an imbalance of Th17 and Tregs in asthma. Therefore, enhanced CD39 activity is hypothesized to prevent the progression of asthma.

  19. Endotypes of allergic diseases and asthma: An important step in building blocks for the future of precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Agache, Ioana; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2016-07-01

    Discoveries from basic science research in the last decade have brought significant progress in knowledge of pathophysiologic processes of allergic diseases, with a compelling impact on understanding of the natural history, risk prediction, treatment selection or mechanism-specific prevention strategies. The view of the pathophysiology of allergic diseases developed from a mechanistic approach, with a focus on symptoms and organ function, to the recognition of a complex network of immunological pathways. Several subtypes of inflammation and complex immune-regulatory networks and the reasons for their failure are now described, that open the way for the development of new diagnostic tools and innovative targeted-treatments. An endotype is a subtype of a disease condition, which is defined by a distinct pathophysiological mechanism, whereas a disease phenotype defines any observable characteristic of a disease without any implication of a mechanism. Another key word linked to disease endotyping is biomarker that is measured and evaluated to examine any biological or pathogenic processes, including response to a therapeutic intervention. These three keywords will be discussed more and more in the future with the upcoming efforts to revolutionize patient care in the direction of precision medicine and precision health. The understanding of disease endotypes based on pathophysiological principles and their validation across clinically meaningful outcomes in asthma, allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis, atopic dermatitis and food allergy will be crucial for the success of precision medicine as a new approach to patient management.

  20. MHC Class II-Restricted Presentation of the Major House Dust Mite Allergen Der p 1 Is GILT-Dependent: Implications for Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    West, Laura Ciaccia; Grotzke, Jeff E.; Cresswell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) is known to reduce disulfide bonds present in proteins internalized by antigen presenting cells, facilitating optimal processing and presentation of peptides on Major Histocompatibility Complex class II molecules, as well as the subsequent activation of CD4-positive T lymphocytes. Here, we show that GILT is required for class II-restricted processing and presentation of immunodominant epitopes from the major house dust mite allergen Der p 1. In the absence of GILT, CD4-positive T cell responses to Der p 1 are significantly reduced, resulting in mitigated allergic airway inflammation in response to Der p 1 and house dust mite extracts in a murine model of asthma. PMID:23326313

  1. Elm tree (Ulmus parvifolia) bark bioprocessed with Mycelia of Shiitake (Lentinus edodes) mushrooms in liquid Culture: Composition and mechanism of protection against allergic asthma in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study investigated the antiasthma effect of a bioprocessed Ulmus parvifolia bark extract (BPUBE) from Lentinus edodes liquid mycelia culture against allergic asthma biomarkers in U266B1 leukemia cells and OVA-sensitized/challenged mice. BPUBE suppressed total IgE release from U266B1 cel...

  2. Rosae Multiflorae Fructus Hot Water Extract Inhibits a Murine Allergic Asthma Via the Suppression of Th2 Cytokine Production and Histamine Release from Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Chang Ho; Bui, Thi Tho; Piao, Chun Hua; Shin, Hee Soon; Shon, Dong-Hwa; Han, Eui-Hyeog; Kim, Hyoung Tae; Chai, Ok Hee

    2016-09-01

    Mast cell-mediated anaphylactic reactions are involved in many allergic diseases, including asthma and allergic rhinitis. In Korea, where it has been used as a traditional medicine, Rosae Multiflorae fructus (RMF) is known to have potent antioxidative, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities and to have no obvious acute toxicity. However, its specific effect on asthma is still unknown. In this study, we evaluated whether or not RMF hot water extracts (RMFW) could inhibit ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma and evaluated compound 48/80-induced mast cell activation to elucidate the mechanisms of asthma inhibition by RMFW. Oral administration of RMFW decreased the number of eosinophils and lymphocytes in the lungs of mice challenged by OVA and downregulated histological changes such as eosinophil infiltration, mucus accumulation, goblet cell hyperplasia, and collagen fiber deposits. In addition, RMFW significantly reduced T helper 2 cytokines, TNF-α, IL-4, and IL-6 levels in the BAL fluid of mice challenged by OVA. Moreover, RMFW suppressed compound 48/80-induced rat peritoneal mast cell degranulation and inhibited histamine release from mast cells induced by compound 48/80 in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that RMFW may act as an antiallergic agent by inhibitingTh2 cytokine production from Th2 cells and histamine release from mast cells, and could be used as a therapy for patients with Th2-mediated or mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. PMID:27574849

  3. Association between reduced copy-number at T-cell receptor gamma (TCRgamma) and childhood allergic asthma: A possible role for somatic mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kyle M; Bracken, Michael B; Murk, William K; Hoh, Josephine; Dewan, Andrew T

    2010-08-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the lungs which affects more than 6.5 million American children. A family-based genome-wide association study of copy-number variation identified an association between decreased copy-number at TCRgamma and childhood allergic asthma. TCRgamma encodes the T-cell receptor gamma glycoprotein, a cell-surface protein found on T-cells and involved in cell-mediated immunity. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we sought to determine if copy-number variation at TCRalpha, TCRbeta or TCRgamma was associated with childhood allergic asthma in an independent cohort of 94 cases and 455 controls using DNA from buccal swabs. Copy-number variation at these loci is well-known, but appears to be dominated by somatic mutations. Genotyping results indicated that copy-number variants at these genes are largely somatic mutations, as inheritance did not show Mendelian consistency. In these mosaic cell populations, copy-number was significantly reduced among asthmatic children at TCRgamma (p=0.0199), but was not associated at TCRalpha or TCRbeta (p=0.7972 and 0.8585, respectively). These findings support the association between reduced copy-number at TCRgamma and childhood allergic asthma. Further work is needed to resolve whether reduced copy-number at TCRgamma predisposes individuals to asthma, or whether deletion of this gene is a somatic response to the disease. PMID:20553737

  4. Divergent effects of urban particulate air pollution on allergic airway responses in experimental asthma: a comparison of field exposure studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increases in ambient particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm (PM2.5) are associated with asthma morbidity and mortality. The overall objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that PM2.5 derived from two distinct urban U.S. communities would induce variable responses to aggravate airway symptoms during experimental asthma. Methods We used a mobile laboratory to conduct community-based inhalation exposures to laboratory rats with ovalbumin-induced allergic airways disease. In Grand Rapids exposures were conducted within 60 m of a major roadway, whereas the Detroit was located in an industrial area more than 400 m from roadways. Immediately after nasal allergen challenge, Brown Norway rats were exposed by whole body inhalation to either concentrated air particles (CAPs) or filtered air for 8 h (7:00 AM - 3:00 PM). Both ambient and concentrated PM2.5 was assessed for mass, size fractionation, and major component analyses, and trace element content. Sixteen hours after exposures, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung lobes were collected and evaluated for airway inflammatory and mucus responses. Results Similar CAPs mass concentrations were generated in Detroit (542 μg/m3) and Grand Rapids (519 μg/m3). Exposure to CAPs at either site had no effects in lungs of non-allergic rats. In contrast, asthmatic rats had 200% increases in airway mucus and had more BALF neutrophils (250% increase), eosinophils (90%), and total protein (300%) compared to controls. Exposure to Detroit CAPs enhanced all allergic inflammatory endpoints by 30-100%, whereas inhalation of Grand Rapids CAPs suppressed all allergic responses by 50%. Detroit CAPs were characterized by high sulfate, smaller sized particles and were derived from local combustion sources. Conversely Grand Rapids CAPs were derived primarily from motor vehicle sources. Conclusions Despite inhalation exposure to the same mass concentration of urban PM2.5, disparate health

  5. Noninvasive Recognition and Biomarkers of Early Allergic Asthma in Cats Using Multivariate Statistical Analysis of NMR Spectra of Exhaled Breath Condensate

    PubMed Central

    Fulcher, Yan G.; Fotso, Martial; Chang, Chee-Hoon; Rindt, Hans; Reinero, Carol R.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is prevalent in children and cats, and needs means of noninvasive diagnosis. We sought to distinguish noninvasively the differences in 53 cats before and soon after induction of allergic asthma, using NMR spectra of exhaled breath condensate (EBC). Statistical pattern recognition was improved considerably by preprocessing the spectra with probabilistic quotient normalization and glog transformation. Classification of the 106 preprocessed spectra by principal component analysis and partial least squares with discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) appears to be impaired by variances unrelated to eosinophilic asthma. By filtering out confounding variances, orthogonal signal correction (OSC) PLS-DA greatly improved the separation of the healthy and early asthmatic states, attaining 94% specificity and 94% sensitivity in predictions. OSC enhancement of multi-level PLS-DA boosted the specificity of the prediction to 100%. OSC-PLS-DA of the normalized spectra suggest the most promising biomarkers of allergic asthma in cats to include increased acetone, metabolite(s) with overlapped NMR peaks near 5.8 ppm, and a hydroxyphenyl-containing metabolite, as well as decreased phthalate. Acetone is elevated in the EBC of 74% of the cats with early asthma. The noninvasive detection of early experimental asthma, biomarkers in EBC, and metabolic perturbation invite further investigation of the diagnostic potential in humans. PMID:27764146

  6. DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC RESPONSES TO AN EXTRACT OF PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM IN BAL/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor mold has been associated with the development of allergic asthma. Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. Our hypothesis is that soluble components of ...

  7. DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC RESPONSES TO AN EXTRACT OF PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM IN BALB/MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor mold has been associated with the development of allergic asthma. Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. Our hypothesis is that soluble components of ...

  8. Occupational Medicine Model and Asthma Military Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Stuart M

    2015-11-01

    Medical evidence hints that asymptomatic recruits with a history of childhood asthma, quiescent since their 13th birthday, are still at risk for adverse changes in their clinical status following unfavorable environmental exposures during military deployment or combat. Asthmatic persons, claiming none or few symptoms, may still manifest airflow obstruction and display biomarkers of airway inflammation even when they are relatively asymptomatic and experience few if any respiratory complaints. The occupational medicine model offers a credible foundation for acknowledging the importance of personal susceptibility in the pathogenesis of military-associated asthma. It is appropriate to re-explore the current military standard for recruits with asymptomatic childhood asthma (≥12 months) not prescribed antiasthma medications. Raising the acceptance age for these recruits may be a consideration. Unfortunately, there is no effectual screening test that recognizes such susceptible soldiers at risk for future asthma attacks. Nevertheless, there is general support for evidence-based, scientifically valid medical screening that judges fitness for military service. Screening tests comprising asthma biomarkers and genetic indices may better verify vulnerable soldiers destined to suffer future asthma reactivation.

  9. Does traffic exhaust contribute to the development of asthma and allergic sensitization in children: findings from recent cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the evidence from recent prospective studies that long-term traffic pollution could contribute to the development of asthma-like symptoms and allergic sensitization in children. We have reviewed cohort studies published since 2002 and found in PubMed in Oct 2008. In all, 13 papers based on data from 9 cohorts have evaluated the relationship between traffic exposure and respiratory health. All surveys reported associations with at least some of the studied respiratory symptoms. The outcome varied, however, according to the age of the child. Nevertheless, the consistency in the results indicates that traffic exhaust contributes to the development of respiratory symptoms in healthy children. Potential effects of traffic exhaust on the development of allergic sensitization were only assessed in the four European birth cohorts. Long-term exposure to outdoor air pollutants had no association with sensitization in ten-year-old schoolchildren in Norway. In contrast, German, Dutch and Swedish preschool children had an increased risk of sensitization related to traffic exhaust despite fairly similar levels of outdoor air pollution as in Norway. Traffic-related effects on sensitization could be restricted to individuals with a specific genetic polymorphism. Assessment of gene-environment interactions on sensitization has so far only been carried out in a subgroup of the Swedish birth cohort. Further genetic association studies are required and may identify individuals vulnerable to adverse effects from traffic-related pollutants. Future studies should also evaluate effects of traffic exhaust on the development and long term outcome of different phenotypes of asthma and wheezing symptoms. PMID:19371435

  10. Association of allergic rhinitis or asthma with pollen and chemical pollutants in Szeged, Hungary, 1999-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makra, László; Matyasovszky, István; Bálint, Beatrix; Csépe, Zoltán

    2014-07-01

    The effect of biological (pollen) and chemical air pollutants on respiratory hospital admissions for the Szeged region in Southern Hungary is analysed. A 9-year (1999-2007) database includes—besides daily number of respiratory hospital admissions—daily mean concentrations of CO, PM10, NO, NO2, O3 and SO2. Two pollen variables ( Ambrosia and total pollen excluding Ambrosia) are also included. The analysis was performed for patients with chronic respiratory complaints (allergic rhinitis or asthma bronchiale) for two age categories (adults and the elderly) of males and females. Factor analysis was performed to clarify the relative importance of the pollutant variables affecting respiratory complaints. Using selected low and high quantiles corresponding to probability distributions of respiratory hospital admissions, averages of two data sets of each air pollutant variable were evaluated. Elements of these data sets were chosen according to whether actual daily patient numbers were below or above their quantile value. A nonparametric regression technique was applied to discriminate between extreme and non-extreme numbers of respiratory admissions using pollen and chemical pollutants as explanatory variables. The strongest correlations between extreme patient numbers and pollutants can be observed during the pollen season of Ambrosia, while the pollen-free period exhibits the weakest relationships. The elderly group with asthma bronchiale is characterised by lower correlations between extreme patient numbers and pollutants compared to adults and allergic rhinitis, respectively. The ratio of the number of correct decisions on the exceedance of a quantile resulted in similar conclusions as those obtained by using multiple correlations.

  11. Association of allergic rhinitis or asthma with pollen and chemical pollutants in Szeged, Hungary, 1999-2007.

    PubMed

    Makra, László; Matyasovszky, István; Bálint, Beatrix; Csépe, Zoltán

    2014-07-01

    The effect of biological (pollen) and chemical air pollutants on respiratory hospital admissions for the Szeged region in Southern Hungary is analysed. A 9-year (1999-2007) database includes--besides daily number of respiratory hospital admissions--daily mean concentrations of CO, PM10, NO, NO2, O3 and SO2. Two pollen variables (Ambrosia and total pollen excluding Ambrosia) are also included. The analysis was performed for patients with chronic respiratory complaints (allergic rhinitis or asthma bronchiale) for two age categories (adults and the elderly) of males and females. Factor analysis was performed to clarify the relative importance of the pollutant variables affecting respiratory complaints. Using selected low and high quantiles corresponding to probability distributions of respiratory hospital admissions, averages of two data sets of each air pollutant variable were evaluated. Elements of these data sets were chosen according to whether actual daily patient numbers were below or above their quantile value. A nonparametric regression technique was applied to discriminate between extreme and non-extreme numbers of respiratory admissions using pollen and chemical pollutants as explanatory variables. The strongest correlations between extreme patient numbers and pollutants can be observed during the pollen season of Ambrosia, while the pollen-free period exhibits the weakest relationships. The elderly group with asthma bronchiale is characterised by lower correlations between extreme patient numbers and pollutants compared to adults and allergic rhinitis, respectively. The ratio of the number of correct decisions on the exceedance of a quantile resulted in similar conclusions as those obtained by using multiple correlations.

  12. Ligustrazine attenuates inflammation and the associated chemokines and receptors in ovalbumine-induced mouse asthma model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ying; Liu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Hongying; Du, Xin; Luo, Qingli; Sun, Jing; Liu, Feng; Li, Mihui; Xu, Fei; Wei, Kai; Dong, Jingcheng

    2016-09-01

    Ligustrazine which is isolated from Chinese herb ligusticum chuanxiong hort, has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for asthma treatment. In this study, we aim to observe the effect of ligustrazine on inflammation and the associated chemokines and receptors in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced mouse asthma model. Our data demonstrates that ligustrazine suppresses airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and lung inflammation in OVA-induced mouse asthma model. Ligustrazine also induces inhibition of inflammatory cells including neutrophils, lymphocytes and eosinophils. In addition, ligustrazine significantly reduces IL-4, IL-5, IL-17A, CCL3, CCL19 and CCL21 level in BALF of asthma mice. Furthermore, ligustrazine induces down-regulation of CCL19 receptor CCR7, STAT3 and p38 MAPK protein expression. Collectively, these results suggest that ligustrazine is effective in attenuation of allergic airway inflammatory changes and related chemokines and receptors in OVA-induced asthma model, and this action might be associated with inhibition of STAT3 and p38 MAPK pathway, which indicates that ligustrazine may be used as a potential therapeutic method to treat asthma. PMID:27438894

  13. Systemic administration of antigen-pulsed dendritic cells induces experimental allergic asthma in mice upon aerosol antigen rechallenge.

    PubMed

    Graffi, Sebastian J; Dekan, Gerhard; Stingl, Georg; Epstein, Michelle M

    2002-05-01

    Antigen-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) have been used extensively as cellular vaccines to induce a myriad of protective immune responses. Adoptive transfer of antigen-pulsed DCs is especially effective at generating Th1 and CD8 immune responses. However, recently this strategy has been shown to induce Th2 cells when DCs are administered locally into the respiratory tract. We sought to address whether systemic rather than local antigen-pulsed DC administration could induce Th2 experimental allergic asthma. We found that OVA-pulsed splenic DCs injected intraperitoneally induced polarized Th2 allergic lung disease upon secondary OVA aerosol challenge. Disease was characterized by eosinophilic lung inflammation, excess mucus production, airway hyperresponsiveness, and OVA-specific IgG1 and IgE. In addition, unusual pathology characterized by macrophage alveolitis and multinucleated giant cells was observed. These data show that systemic administration of antigen-pulsed DCs and subsequent aeroantigen challenge induces Th2 immunity. These findings have important implications for the development of DC-based vaccines.

  14. Effects of provinol and its combinations with clinically used antiasthmatics on airway defense mechanisms in experimental allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Kazimierová, I; Jošková, M; Pecháňová, O; Šutovská, M; Fraňová, S

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies show that provinol, a polyphenolic compound, has anti-inflammatory activity during allergic inflammation. In the present study we investigated the effects of provinol and its combinations with clinically used antiasthmatics: budesonide or theophylline on airway defense mechanisms during experimental allergic asthma. Separate groups of guinea pigs were treated during the course of 21-day ovalbumin sensitization with provinol (20 mg/kg/day, p.o.), or budesonide (1 mM by inhalation), or theophylline (10 mg/kg/day, i.p.), and with a half-dose combination of provinol+budesonide or provinol+theophylline. Airways defense mechanisms: cough reflex and specific airway resistance (sRaw) were evaluated in vivo. Tracheal smooth muscle reactivity and mucociliary clearance were examined in vitro. The findings were that provinol caused significant decreases in sRaw and in tracheal smooth muscle contractility, a suppression of cough reflex, and positively modulated ciliary beat frequency. The bronchodilatory and antitussive effects of provinol were comparable with those of budesonide and theophylline. Provinol given as add-on treatment significantly potentiated the effects of budesonide or theophylline, although the doses of each were halved. We conclude that provinol not only has bronchodilatory and antitussive effects, but also potentiates similar effects exerted by budesonide and theophylline.

  15. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... that you have asthma. Your doctor will diagnose asthma based on lung function tests, your medical history, and a physical exam. You may also have allergy tests. When your asthma symptoms become worse than usual, it's called an ...

  16. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > Asthma Print A A A ... it can take several days. continue Who Gets Asthma? No one really knows why one person's airways ...

  17. Allergies, asthma, and molds

    MedlinePlus

    Reactive airway - mold; Bronchial asthma - mold; Triggers - mold; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Mold is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to mold, you are ...

  18. Meteorological conditions, climate change, new emerging factors, and asthma and related allergic disorders. A statement of the World Allergy Organization.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Gennaro; Holgate, Stephen T; Pawankar, Ruby; Ledford, Dennis K; Cecchi, Lorenzo; Al-Ahmad, Mona; Al-Enezi, Fatma; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Ansotegui, Ignacio; Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E; Baker, David J; Bayram, Hasan; Bergmann, Karl Christian; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Buters, Jeroen T M; D'Amato, Maria; Dorsano, Sofia; Douwes, Jeroen; Finlay, Sarah Elise; Garrasi, Donata; Gómez, Maximiliano; Haahtela, Tari; Halwani, Rabih; Hassani, Youssouf; Mahboub, Basam; Marks, Guy; Michelozzi, Paola; Montagni, Marcello; Nunes, Carlos; Oh, Jay Jae-Won; Popov, Todor A; Portnoy, Jay; Ridolo, Erminia; Rosário, Nelson; Rottem, Menachem; Sánchez-Borges, Mario; Sibanda, Elopy; Sienra-Monge, Juan José; Vitale, Carolina; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of allergic airway diseases such as asthma and rhinitis has increased dramatically to epidemic proportions worldwide. Besides air pollution from industry derived emissions and motor vehicles, the rising trend can only be explained by gross changes in the environments where we live. The world economy has been transformed over the last 25 years with developing countries being at the core of these changes. Around the planet, in both developed and developing countries, environments are undergoing profound changes. Many of these changes are considered to have negative effects on respiratory health and to enhance the frequency and severity of respiratory diseases such as asthma in the general population. Increased concentrations of greenhouse gases, and especially carbon dioxide (CO2), in the atmosphere have already warmed the planet substantially, causing more severe and prolonged heat waves, variability in temperature, increased air pollution, forest fires, droughts, and floods - all of which can put the respiratory health of the public at risk. These changes in climate and air quality have a measurable impact not only on the morbidity but also the mortality of patients with asthma and other respiratory diseases. The massive increase in emissions of air pollutants due to economic and industrial growth in the last century has made air quality an environmental problem of the first order in a large number of regions of the world. A body of evidence suggests that major changes to our world are occurring and involve the atmosphere and its associated climate. These changes, including global warming induced by human activity, have an impact on the biosphere, biodiversity, and the human environment. Mitigating this huge health impact and reversing the effects of these changes are major challenges. This statement of the World Allergy Organization (WAO) raises the importance of this health hazard and highlights the facts on climate-related health impacts

  19. Meteorological conditions, climate change, new emerging factors, and asthma and related allergic disorders. A statement of the World Allergy Organization.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Gennaro; Holgate, Stephen T; Pawankar, Ruby; Ledford, Dennis K; Cecchi, Lorenzo; Al-Ahmad, Mona; Al-Enezi, Fatma; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Ansotegui, Ignacio; Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E; Baker, David J; Bayram, Hasan; Bergmann, Karl Christian; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Buters, Jeroen T M; D'Amato, Maria; Dorsano, Sofia; Douwes, Jeroen; Finlay, Sarah Elise; Garrasi, Donata; Gómez, Maximiliano; Haahtela, Tari; Halwani, Rabih; Hassani, Youssouf; Mahboub, Basam; Marks, Guy; Michelozzi, Paola; Montagni, Marcello; Nunes, Carlos; Oh, Jay Jae-Won; Popov, Todor A; Portnoy, Jay; Ridolo, Erminia; Rosário, Nelson; Rottem, Menachem; Sánchez-Borges, Mario; Sibanda, Elopy; Sienra-Monge, Juan José; Vitale, Carolina; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of allergic airway diseases such as asthma and rhinitis has increased dramatically to epidemic proportions worldwide. Besides air pollution from industry derived emissions and motor vehicles, the rising trend can only be explained by gross changes in the environments where we live. The world economy has been transformed over the last 25 years with developing countries being at the core of these changes. Around the planet, in both developed and developing countries, environments are undergoing profound changes. Many of these changes are considered to have negative effects on respiratory health and to enhance the frequency and severity of respiratory diseases such as asthma in the general population. Increased concentrations of greenhouse gases, and especially carbon dioxide (CO2), in the atmosphere have already warmed the planet substantially, causing more severe and prolonged heat waves, variability in temperature, increased air pollution, forest fires, droughts, and floods - all of which can put the respiratory health of the public at risk. These changes in climate and air quality have a measurable impact not only on the morbidity but also the mortality of patients with asthma and other respiratory diseases. The massive increase in emissions of air pollutants due to economic and industrial growth in the last century has made air quality an environmental problem of the first order in a large number of regions of the world. A body of evidence suggests that major changes to our world are occurring and involve the atmosphere and its associated climate. These changes, including global warming induced by human activity, have an impact on the biosphere, biodiversity, and the human environment. Mitigating this huge health impact and reversing the effects of these changes are major challenges. This statement of the World Allergy Organization (WAO) raises the importance of this health hazard and highlights the facts on climate-related health impacts

  20. Oral immunotherapy for allergic conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Waka; Fukuda, Ken; Harada, Yosuke; Yagita, Hideo; Fukushima, Atsuki

    2014-11-01

    Antigen-specific immunotherapy is expected to be a desirable treatment for allergic diseases. Currently, antigen-specific immunotherapy is performed by administering disease-causing antigens subcutaneously or sublingually. These approaches induce long-term remission in patients with allergic rhinitis or asthma. The oral route is an alternative to subcutaneous and sublingual routes, and can also induce long-term remission, a phenomenon known as "oral tolerance." The effectiveness of oral tolerance has been reported in the context of autoimmune diseases, food allergies, asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis in both human patients and animal models. However, few studies have examined its efficacy in animal models of allergic conjunctivitis. Previously, we showed that ovalbumin feeding suppressed ovalbumin-induced experimental allergic conjunctivitis, indicating the induction of oral tolerance is effective in treating experimental allergic conjunctivitis. In recent years, transgenic rice has been developed that can induce oral tolerance and reduce the severity of anaphylaxis. The major Japanese cedar pollen antigens in transgenic rice, Cryptomeria japonica 1 and C. japonica 2, were deconstructed by molecular shuffling, fragmentation, and changes in the oligomeric structure. Thus, transgenic rice may be an effective treatment for allergic conjunctivitis.

  1. Phosphodiesterase 4B is essential for TH2-cell function and development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Catherine Jin, S.-L.; Goya, Sho; Nakae, Susumu; Wang, Dan; Bruss, Matthew; Hou, Chiaoyin; Umetsu, Dale; Conti, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Background Cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling modulates functions of inflammatory cells involved in the pathogenesis of asthma, and type 4 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases (PDE4s) are essential components of this pathway. Induction of the PDE4 isoform PDE4B is necessary for Toll-like receptor signaling in monocytes and macrophages and is associated with T cell receptor/CD3 in T cells; however, its exact physiological function in the development of allergic asthma remains undefined. Objectives We investigated the role of PDE4B in the development of allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and TH2-driven inflammatory responses. Methods Wild-type and PDE4B−/− mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin and AHR measured in response to inhaled methacholine. Airway inflammation was characterized by analyzing leukocyte infiltration and cytokine accumulation in the airways. Ovalbumin-stimulated cell proliferation and TH2 cytokine production were determined in cultured bronchial lymph node cells. Results Mice deficient in PDE4B do not develop AHR. This protective effect was associated with a significant decrease in eosinophils recruitment to the lungs and decreased TH2 cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Defects in T-cell replication, TH2 cytokine production, and dendritic cell migration were evident in cells from the airway-draining lymph nodes. Conversely, accumulation of the TH1 cytokine IFN-γ was not affected in PDE4B−/− mice. Ablation of the orthologous PDE4 gene PDE4A has no impact on airway inflammation. Conclusion By relieving a cAMP-negative constraint, PDE4B plays an essential role in TH2-cell activation and dendritic cell recruitment during airway inflammation. These findings provide proof of concept that PDE4 inhibitors with PDE4B selectivity may have efficacy in asthma treatment. PMID:21047676

  2. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis and asthma in a sawmill worker: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Halpin, D M; Graneek, B J; Turner-Warwick, M; Newman Taylor, A J

    1994-03-01

    A 34 year old sawmill maintenance engineer developed a dry cough that was associated with widespread wheezes and crackles in his lungs. His symptoms worsened, with work related lethargy, fever, and breathlessness, and the loss of a stone in weight. At that time, while still at work, he had a neutrophil leucocytosis and increased concentration of gamma globulins. When seen subsequently some two months after stopping work, his chest radiograph and lung function tests were normal, but the cells recovered at bronchoalveolar lavage showed an increase in lymphocytes and mast cells, a pattern consistent with extrinsic allergic alveolitis. Serum precipitins were identified to extracts of sawdust, wood chips, and bark from the sawmill, and to eight species of mould grown from these samples. Specific IgG binding inhibition studies suggested that a common epitope present on Trichoderma koningii might be responsible for the cross reactivity of the patient's serum with the wood and fungal extracts. A diagnosis of wood associated extrinsic allergic alveolitis was made and since changing his job the patient has remained well. Wood associated allergic alveolitis has not previously been described in British sawmill workers, but has been reported in Sweden, with a prevalence of 5%-10% in exposed workers. A review of published data suggests extrinsic allergic alveolitis in wood workers is primarily caused by inhalation of the spores of contaminating fungi, but inhaled wood dust may exert a synergistic effect.

  3. Xanthii Fructus inhibits allergic response in the ovalbumin-sensitized mouse allergic rhinitis model

    PubMed Central

    Gwak, Nam-Gil; Kim, Eun-Young; Lee, Bina; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Im, Yong-Seok; Lee, Ka-Yeon; Jun-Kum, Chang; Kim, Ho-Seok; Cho, Hyun-Joo; Jung, Hyuk-Sang; Sohn, Youngjoo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Xanthii Fructus (XF) is widely used in traditional anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory Asian medicine. Allergic rhinitis is a common inflammatory disease characterized by markedly increased levels of anti-inflammatory factors and the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the nasal mucosa. We investigated the effects of XF in the allergen-induced rhinitis model. Materials and Methods: Following ovalbumin (OVA)/alum intraperitoneal injection on days 0, 7 and 14, the BALB/c mice (albino, laboratory-bred strain of the house mice) were challenged intranasally with OVA for 10 days a week after the last sensitization. The number of sneezes was recorded for 10 days; additionally, the levels of cytokines, histamine, immunoglobulin E (IgE) and OVA-specific serum IgE were estimated. Eosinophil infiltration, thickness of nasal mucosa and expression of caspase-1 were determined by immunohistochemistry. We also evaluated the effect of XF on the phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) and inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B-alpha (IκB-α) in human mast cell-1 (HMC-1), by Western blotting. Results: The administration of XF significantly decreased sneezing and the serum levels of histamine, IgE, OVA-specific IgE, and cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukine-1 beta (IL-1β), IL-5, IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). XF inhibited the changes in thickness of the nasal septum, influx of eosinophils and expression of capase-1. In addition, XF inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB in phorbol-myristate-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (A23187) stimulated HMC-1. Conclusion: This study suggests that XF acts a potent anti-allergic drug which alleviates the allergic responses in ovalbumin-sensitized mouse allergic rhinitis model. PMID:26664025

  4. SUSCEPTIBILITY FACTORS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF ALLERGIC LUNG DISEASE AND ASTHMA

    EPA Science Inventory


    Environmental Issue: More than 17 million people in the United States had asthma in 1998, which represents a doubling of the incidence in the previous 20 years. Since changes in the genetic makeup of the population take generations to occur, this increase must be related to ...

  5. Upregulation of Tim-3 on CD4(+) T cells is associated with Th1/Th2 imbalance in patients with allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fei; Wang, Fukun; An, Liyun; Wang, Xianling

    2015-01-01

    T cell Ig and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) is a negative regulator preferentially expressed on Th1 cells. Allergic asthma is a clinical syndrome well characterized by Th1/Th2 imbalance. To investigate the role of Tim-3 in the pathogenesis of asthma and its relationship with Th1/Th2 imbalance, a total of 40 patients with allergic asthma and 40 healthy controls were enrolled. Expression of Tim-3 and Th1/Th2 imbalance as well as the relationship between them was analyzed by flow cytometry and real-time PCR. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were cultured in vitro and anti-Tim-3 was used to block Tim-3 signaling; Th1/Th2 cytokines in the culture supernatant were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CD4(+) T cells and B cells were sorted and co-cultured in vitro, and anti-Tim-3 was used to block Tim-3 signaling; Total IgG/IgE in the culture supernatant was detected by ELISA. The mRNA level of T-bet and IFN-γ were significantly decreased in allergic asthma patients, while GATA-3 and IL-4 were significantly increased. Expression of Tim-3 on CD4(+) T cells was much higher in allergic asthma patients and it was negatively correlated with T-bet/GATA-3 ratio or IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio. Blocking of Tim-3 significantly increased Th1 cytokines (TNF-α and IFN-γ) and decreased Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) in the culture supernatant of PBMCs. Blocking of Tim-3 dramatically reduced the production of IgG and IgE in the co-culture supernatant of CD4(+) T cells and B cells. In conclusion, Tim-3 was up-regulated in allergic asthma patients and related with the Th1/Th2 imbalance. Blocking of Tim-3 may be of therapeutic benefit by enhancing the Th1 cytokines response, down-regulating the Th2 cytokines response, and reducing IgG/IgE production.

  6. Upregulation of Tim-3 on CD4(+) T cells is associated with Th1/Th2 imbalance in patients with allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fei; Wang, Fukun; An, Liyun; Wang, Xianling

    2015-01-01

    T cell Ig and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) is a negative regulator preferentially expressed on Th1 cells. Allergic asthma is a clinical syndrome well characterized by Th1/Th2 imbalance. To investigate the role of Tim-3 in the pathogenesis of asthma and its relationship with Th1/Th2 imbalance, a total of 40 patients with allergic asthma and 40 healthy controls were enrolled. Expression of Tim-3 and Th1/Th2 imbalance as well as the relationship between them was analyzed by flow cytometry and real-time PCR. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were cultured in vitro and anti-Tim-3 was used to block Tim-3 signaling; Th1/Th2 cytokines in the culture supernatant were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CD4(+) T cells and B cells were sorted and co-cultured in vitro, and anti-Tim-3 was used to block Tim-3 signaling; Total IgG/IgE in the culture supernatant was detected by ELISA. The mRNA level of T-bet and IFN-γ were significantly decreased in allergic asthma patients, while GATA-3 and IL-4 were significantly increased. Expression of Tim-3 on CD4(+) T cells was much higher in allergic asthma patients and it was negatively correlated with T-bet/GATA-3 ratio or IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio. Blocking of Tim-3 significantly increased Th1 cytokines (TNF-α and IFN-γ) and decreased Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) in the culture supernatant of PBMCs. Blocking of Tim-3 dramatically reduced the production of IgG and IgE in the co-culture supernatant of CD4(+) T cells and B cells. In conclusion, Tim-3 was up-regulated in allergic asthma patients and related with the Th1/Th2 imbalance. Blocking of Tim-3 may be of therapeutic benefit by enhancing the Th1 cytokines response, down-regulating the Th2 cytokines response, and reducing IgG/IgE production. PMID:26064278

  7. The impact of pharmacogenetics in the treatment of allergic disease and asthma.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bridgette L

    2011-01-01

    Personalized medicine includes the application of genomic information in predicting disease and therapeutic response to ultimately individualize patient care. Pharmacogenetics is key in achieving true personalized care. However, the clinical applicability of genetic testing to "everyday medicine" is yet to be realized. This paper will discuss areas in allergic/inflammatory disease that have been impacted by pharmacogenetic research and how this application may be brought from the "bench to the bedside." PMID:22073496

  8. [Some modern views of the role of the eosinophils in allergic reactions and bronchial asthma and a new method of detecting eosinophils in the bronchial secretion].

    PubMed

    Denchev, K; Lipcheva, N; Kis'ova, K

    1976-01-01

    A review of certain contemporary opinions of eosinophil function in allergic reactions and bronchial asthma is presented in this report. Phagocytosis and processing of the complexes antigenantibody, histamine inhibition and a histamine elimination elimination by a specific inhibitor, isolated from eosinophilis (EDI), stimulation of prostaglandines E release, which also inhibit histamine and have a bronchial dilataion effect. The new method is recommended for eosinophil detection in sputa based on the fluorescent principle as faster and more efficient.

  9. Relationship between omalizumab pharmacokinetics, IgE pharmacodynamics and symptoms in patients with severe persistent allergic (IgE-mediated) asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Philip J; Tannenbaum, Stacey; Gautier, Aurelie; Jimenez, Pablo

    2009-01-01

    AIMS Omalizumab, a subcutaneously administered anti-IgE antibody, is effective for moderate-to-severe persistent allergic asthma. The aims were to (i) describe the population pharmacodynamics of free IgE with a mechanism-based, nonlinear, omalizumab–IgE binding model; (ii) deduce a target-free IgE suppression level by correlation with clinical outcomes; and (iii) check the adequacy of current approved dosing tables and explore potential doses and regimens beyond. METHODS Concentration data (omalizumab, free and total IgE) were obtained from 1781 patients aged 12–79 years, in four sparsely sampled randomized, placebo-controlled studies and 152 subjects in a richly sampled single-dose study. NONMEM predictive performance across the range of bodyweights (39–150 kg) and baseline IgE (19–1055 IU ml−1) was checked by simulation. Predicted free IgE levels were correlated with time-averaged patient diary clinical outcomes. RESULTS The model accurately predicted observed omalizumab, free and total IgE concentrations. Free IgE concentrations correlated well with clinical signs and symptoms, allowing a target concentration of 14 ng ml−1, at the midpoint of 4-week clinical observation periods, to be set for determining the dose and regimen for omalizumab. CONCLUSIONS The omalizumab–IgE binding model is predictive for free IgE and demonstrates a nonlinear time-dependent relationship between free IgE suppression and clinical outcomes in asthma. Although currently approved dosing tables are close to optimal, it should be possible to treat patients with higher levels of baseline IgE if higher doses can be administered. PMID:19660004

  10. Correlation between the ratio of T-bet/GATA-3 and the levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ in patients with allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ji; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Huang, Bin; Wu, Song

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ratio of the transcription factors T-bet/GATA-3 in patients with allergic asthma. Forty-seven individuals with allergic asthma and 47 healthy control individuals provided 5 ml of anticoagulated peripheral venous blood. Lymphocytes in peripheral blood were isolated by Ficoll and treated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) at a final concentration of 100 mg/l for 48 h. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) levels were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the mRNA levels of both T-bet and GATA-3 were detected using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). IFN-γ levels in the lymphocytes of asthmatic patients were lower than those of the control group (P<0.05) and were positively correlated with the ratio of T-bet/GATA-3. By contrast, IL-4 levels were significantly higher in asthmatic patients than in the control group (P<0.01) and were negatively correlated with the ratio of T-bet/GATA-3. In conclusion, the ratio of T-bet/GATA-3 can be used as an objective indicator of immune imbalance in patients with allergic asthma.

  11. Factors associated with allergic rhinitis in children and adolescents from northern Mexico: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase IIIB.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Sandra N; Del Río-Navarro, Blanca E; Pietropaolo-Cienfuegos, Dino R; Escalante-Domínguez, Alberto J; García-Almaraz, Roberto G; Mérida-Palacio, Valente; Berber, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    The epidemiology of allergic diseases has not been studied extensively in Mexico. The present study, based on the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase IIIB survey, reports the prevalence of allergic rhinitis and the associated risk factors in the pediatric population in four cities in northern Mexico. Children (6-7 years old) and adolescents (13-14 years old) in public elementary and secondary schools were surveyed in 2002 and 2003. The subjects were chosen randomly from Ciudad Victoria, Mexicali, Monterrey, and Tijuana. The following categories were analyzed: occurrence of rhinitis symptoms (currently or in the last 12 months), rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms, a previous diagnosis of allergic rhinitis, and relevant environmental factors. Factors associated with rhinitis that were identified previously with the chi-squared test were analyzed using logistic regression. The number of valid questionnaires was 10,892 for schoolchildren and 12,299 for adolescents. In 6- to 7-year-old children, the following frequencies were determined: rhinitis (ever), 27.9%; current rhinitis, 24.2%; rhinoconjunctivitis, 9.2%; and diagnosis of allergic rhinitis, 5.5%. The corresponding frequencies in 13- to 14-year-old children were 33.3, 34.1, 18.4, and 3.8%. In both 6- to 7-year-old and 13- to 14-year-old children, all rhinitis items were associated with asthma symptoms, dermatitis symptoms, paracetamol consumption, and maternal smoking (odds ratio, >1; p < 0.05). The main risk factors associated with allergic rhinitis symptoms in children and adolescents from cities in northern Mexico were other allergic conditions, paracetamol consumption, and passive smoking.

  12. Cholesterol‐sensing liver X receptors stimulate Th2‐driven allergic eosinophilic asthma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Smet, Muriel; Van Hoecke, Lien; De Beuckelaer, Ans; Vander Beken, Seppe; Naessens, Thomas; Vergote, Karl; Willart, Monique; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Gustafsson, Jan‐Åke; Steffensen, Knut R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Liver X receptors (LXRs) are nuclear receptors that function as cholesterol sensors and regulate cholesterol homeostasis. High cholesterol has been recognized as a risk factor in asthma; however, the mechanism of this linkage is not known. Methods To explore the importance of cholesterol homeostasis for asthma, we investigated the contribution of LXR activity in an ovalbumin‐ and a house dust mite‐driven eosinophilic asthma mouse model. Results In both models, airway inflammation, airway hyper‐reactivity, and goblet cell hyperplasia were reduced in mice deficient for both LXRα and LXRβ isoforms (LXRα−/−β−/−) as compared to wild‐type mice. Inversely, treatment with the LXR agonist GW3965 showed increased eosinophilic airway inflammation. LXR activity contributed to airway inflammation through promotion of type 2 cytokine production as LXRα−/−β−/− mice showed strongly reduced protein levels of IL‐5 and IL‐13 in the lungs as well as reduced expression of these cytokines by CD4+ lung cells and lung‐draining lymph node cells. In line herewith, LXR activation resulted in increased type 2 cytokine production by the lung‐draining lymph node cells. Conclusions In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the cholesterol regulator LXR acts as a positive regulator of eosinophilic asthma in mice, contributing to airway inflammation through regulation of type 2 cytokine production. PMID:27621817

  13. Cholesterol‐sensing liver X receptors stimulate Th2‐driven allergic eosinophilic asthma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Smet, Muriel; Van Hoecke, Lien; De Beuckelaer, Ans; Vander Beken, Seppe; Naessens, Thomas; Vergote, Karl; Willart, Monique; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Gustafsson, Jan‐Åke; Steffensen, Knut R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Liver X receptors (LXRs) are nuclear receptors that function as cholesterol sensors and regulate cholesterol homeostasis. High cholesterol has been recognized as a risk factor in asthma; however, the mechanism of this linkage is not known. Methods To explore the importance of cholesterol homeostasis for asthma, we investigated the contribution of LXR activity in an ovalbumin‐ and a house dust mite‐driven eosinophilic asthma mouse model. Results In both models, airway inflammation, airway hyper‐reactivity, and goblet cell hyperplasia were reduced in mice deficient for both LXRα and LXRβ isoforms (LXRα−/−β−/−) as compared to wild‐type mice. Inversely, treatment with the LXR agonist GW3965 showed increased eosinophilic airway inflammation. LXR activity contributed to airway inflammation through promotion of type 2 cytokine production as LXRα−/−β−/− mice showed strongly reduced protein levels of IL‐5 and IL‐13 in the lungs as well as reduced expression of these cytokines by CD4+ lung cells and lung‐draining lymph node cells. In line herewith, LXR activation resulted in increased type 2 cytokine production by the lung‐draining lymph node cells. Conclusions In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the cholesterol regulator LXR acts as a positive regulator of eosinophilic asthma in mice, contributing to airway inflammation through regulation of type 2 cytokine production.

  14. Aquaporin-3 potentiates allergic airway inflammation in ovalbumin-induced murine asthma.

    PubMed

    Ikezoe, Kohei; Oga, Toru; Honda, Tetsuya; Hara-Chikuma, Mariko; Ma, Xiaojun; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Uno, Kazuko; Fuchikami, Jun-Ichi; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Handa, Tomohiro; Taguchi, Yoshio; Verkman, Alan S; Narumiya, Shuh; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of asthma. Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is a small transmembrane water/glycerol channel that may facilitate the membrane uptake of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here we report that AQP3 potentiates ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine asthma by mediating both chemokine production from alveolar macrophages and T cell trafficking. AQP3 deficient (AQP3(-/-)) mice exhibited significantly reduced airway inflammation compared to wild-type mice. Adoptive transfer experiments showed reduced airway eosinophilic inflammation in mice receiving OVA-sensitized splenocytes from AQP3(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice after OVA challenge, consistently with fewer CD4(+) T cells from AQP3(-/-) mice migrating to the lung than from wild-type mice. Additionally, in vivo and vitro experiments indicated that AQP3 induced the production of some chemokines such as CCL24 and CCL22 through regulating the amount of cellular H2O2 in M2 polarized alveolar macrophages. These results imply a critical role of AQP3 in asthma, and AQP3 may be a novel therapeutic target. PMID:27165276

  15. Aquaporin-3 potentiates allergic airway inflammation in ovalbumin-induced murine asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ikezoe, Kohei; Oga, Toru; Honda, Tetsuya; Hara-Chikuma, Mariko; Ma, Xiaojun; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Uno, Kazuko; Fuchikami, Jun-ichi; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Handa, Tomohiro; Taguchi, Yoshio; Verkman, Alan S.; Narumiya, Shuh; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of asthma. Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is a small transmembrane water/glycerol channel that may facilitate the membrane uptake of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here we report that AQP3 potentiates ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine asthma by mediating both chemokine production from alveolar macrophages and T cell trafficking. AQP3 deficient (AQP3−/−) mice exhibited significantly reduced airway inflammation compared to wild-type mice. Adoptive transfer experiments showed reduced airway eosinophilic inflammation in mice receiving OVA-sensitized splenocytes from AQP3−/− mice compared with wild-type mice after OVA challenge, consistently with fewer CD4+ T cells from AQP3−/− mice migrating to the lung than from wild-type mice. Additionally, in vivo and vitro experiments indicated that AQP3 induced the production of some chemokines such as CCL24 and CCL22 through regulating the amount of cellular H2O2 in M2 polarized alveolar macrophages. These results imply a critical role of AQP3 in asthma, and AQP3 may be a novel therapeutic target. PMID:27165276

  16. Genetic Deletion of β-Arrestin-2 and the Mitigation of Established Airway Hyperresponsiveness in a Murine Asthma Model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minyong; Hegde, Akhil; Choi, Yeon Ho; Theriot, Barbara S; Premont, Richard T; Chen, Wei; Walker, Julia K L

    2015-09-01

    β-Arrestin-2 (βarr2) is a ubiquitously expressed cytosolic protein that terminates G protein-coupled receptor signaling and transduces G protein-independent signaling. We previously showed that mice lacking βarr2 do not develop an asthma phenotype when sensitized to, and challenged with, allergens. The current study evaluates if an established asthma phenotype can be mitigated by deletion of βarr2 using an inducible Cre recombinase. We sensitized and challenged mice to ovalbumin (OVA) and demonstrated that on Day (d) 24 the allergic asthma phenotype was apparent in uninduced βarr2 and wild-type (WT) mice. In a second group of OVA-treated mice, tamoxifen was injected on d24 to d28 to activate Cre recombinase, and OVA aerosol challenge was continued through d44. The asthma phenotype was assessed using lung mechanics measurements, bronchoalveolar lavage cell analysis, and histological assessment of mucin and airway inflammation. Compared with their respective saline-treated controls, OVA-treated WT mice and mice expressing the inducible Cre recombinase displayed a significant asthma phenotype at d45. Whereas tamoxifen treatment had no significant effect on the asthma phenotype in WT mice, it inhibited βarr2 expression and caused a significant reduction in airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) in Cre-inducible mice. These findings suggest that βarr2 is actively required for perpetuation of the AHR component of the allergic asthma phenotype. Our finding that βarr2 participates in the perpetuation of AHR in an asthma model means that targeting βarr2 may provide immediate and potentially long-term relief from daily asthma symptoms due to AHR irrespective of inflammation.

  17. Allergic bronchial asthma due to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus hypersensitivity can be efficiently treated by inoculation of allergen-antibody complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Machiels, J J; Somville, M A; Lebrun, P M; Lebecque, S J; Jacquemin, M G; Saint-Remy, J M

    1990-01-01

    Antigen-antibody complexes were made from allergens of the common house dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt) and an excess of purified autologous specific antibodies. These complexes have been used to treat Dpt-hypersensitive patients who suffered from chronic bronchial asthma. Clinical symptoms and medication intake were followed by filling in diary cards. Peak expiratory flow, measured four times a day, was also followed. Intradermal skin tests and bronchial challenge tests were performed with allergen together with an evaluation of nonspecific bronchial reactivity. Specific IgE and IgG antibodies were assayed after separation from the bulk of serum immunoglobulins by immunoadsorption. The study was carried out over two years according to a double-blind protocol. Intradermal inoculation of antigen-antibody complexes resulted in a marked reduction of both clinical and medication scores. No systemic side-effects were observed and only mild wheal and flare reactions were noted at the injection site. The treatment showed a drastic reduction of specific skin and bronchial reactivities with only marginal effects on nonspecific bronchial reactivity. Concentrations of specific IgE antibodies decreased significantly during the first weeks of treatment and remained at these lower values throughout the study. Specific IgG antibodies actually decreased in the majority of treated patients. The total amount of allergen used in this study was less than 1% of the amount currently used for conventional hyposensitization with the same allergen. These findings show that antigen-antibody complex inoculation is an efficient and safe means of treating allergic bronchial asthma and that the mechanism of action is likely to differ from conventional hyposensitization. PMID:2318962

  18. A multi-hit endocrine model of intrinsic adult-onset asthma.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Craig S; Bowen, Richard L

    2008-04-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that adult-onset asthma is initiated by stress (anxiety and depression), obesity and menopause. Ironically, despite our understanding of the various stressors that promote chronic adult-onset asthma, most of which are known to elevate cortisol production via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, inhaled and systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay for the treatment of chronic asthma. This implicates other endocrine or cellular changes independent of cortisol synthesis in non-allergic adult-onset asthma. The mechanism by which corticosteroids are thought to modulate bronchial tone in relieving asthma is via corticosteroid-responsive genes that increase PGE(2) and cAMP production which promote muscle relaxation. Therefore, any physiological condition that suppresses intracellular PGE(2) and cAMP production would counter cortisol-induced muscle relaxation and potentially trigger non-allergic adult-onset asthma. Stress, obesity and menopause act on three interrelated endocrine pathways, the serotonergic, leptinergic and hypothalamic pathways, all of which operate through receptors to modulate cAMP and Ca(2+) metabolism in smooth muscle cells (SMCs). We propose that the level of SMC cAMP, as determined by overall signaling through corticosteroid receptors, leptin receptors and the GPCRs of the HPG and serotonergic pathways, will regulate bronchial tone (i.e. the 'Multi-Hit Endocrine Model of Adult-Onset Asthma'). Thus, decreases in HPG (menopause) and serotonergic (depression) signaling and increases in leptinergic (obesity) signaling relative to HPA signaling would decrease cellular SMC cAMP and promote muscle contraction. This model can explain the discrepant epidemiological data associating stress, obesity, depression and menopause with adult-onset asthma and is supported by basic and clinical data. Treatment of depressed or menopausal asthmatics with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or hormone replacement therapy

  19. Valuing the Economic Costs of Allergic Rhinitis, Acute Bronchitis, and Asthma from Exposure to Indoor Dampness and Mold in the US

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Two foundational methods for estimating the total economic burden of disease are cost of illness (COI) and willingness to pay (WTP). WTP measures the full cost to society, but WTP estimates are difficult to compute and rarely available. COI methods are more often used but less likely to reflect full costs. This paper attempts to estimate the full economic cost (2014$) of illnesses resulting from exposure to dampness and mold using COI methods and WTP where the data is available. A limited sensitivity analysis of alternative methods and assumptions demonstrates a wide potential range of estimates. In the final estimates, the total annual cost to society attributable to dampness and mold is estimated to be $3.7 (2.3–4.7) billion for allergic rhinitis, $1.9 (1.1–2.3) billion for acute bronchitis, $15.1 (9.4–20.6) billion for asthma morbidity, and $1.7 (0.4–4.5) billion for asthma mortality. The corresponding costs from all causes, not limited to dampness and mold, using the same approach would be $24.8 billion for allergic rhinitis, $13.5 billion for acute bronchitis, $94.5 billion for asthma morbidity, and $10.8 billion for asthma mortality. PMID:27313630

  20. Lifetime-Dependent Effects of Bisphenol A on Asthma Development in an Experimental Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Petzold, Susanne; Averbeck, Marco; Simon, Jan C.; Lehmann, Irina; Polte, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental factors are thought to contribute significantly to the increase of asthma prevalence in the last two decades. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a xenoestrogen commonly used in consumer products and the plastic industry. There is evidence and an ongoing discussion that endocrine disruptors like BPA may affect human health and also exert alterations on in the immune system. The aim of this study was to investigate age-dependent effects of BPA on the asthma risk using a murine model to explain the controversial results reported till date. Methods BALB/c mice were exposed to BPA via the drinking water for different time periods including pregnancy and breastfeeding. To induce an asthma phenotype, mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA), followed by an intrapulmonary allergen challenge. Results BPA exposure during pregnancy and breastfeeding had no significant effect on asthma development in the offspring. In contrast, lifelong exposure from birth until the last antigen challenge clearly increased eosinophilic inflammation in the lung, airway hyperreactivity and antigen-specific serum IgE levels in OVA-sensitized adult mice compared to mice without BPA exposure. Surprisingly, BPA intake during the sensitization period significantly reduced the development of allergic asthma. This effect was reversed in the presence of a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the impact of BPA on asthma risk is strongly age-dependent and ranges from asthma-promoting to asthma-reducing effects. This could explain the diversity of results from previous studies regarding the observed health impact of BPA. PMID:24950052

  1. Home Dampness Signs in Association with Asthma and Allergic Diseases in 4618 Preschool Children in Urumqi, China-The Influence of Ventilation/Cleaning Habits.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhijing; Zhao, Zhuohui; Xu, Huihui; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Tingting; Kan, Haidong; Norback, Dan

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing prevalence of childhood asthma and allergic diseases in mainland of China. Few studies investigated the indoor dampness, ventilation and cleaning habits and their interrelationship with childhood asthma and allergic diseases. A large-scale cross-sectional study was performed in preschool children in Urumqi, China. Questionnaire was used to collect information on children's health, home dampness and ventilation/cleaning (V/C) habits. Multiple logistic regressions were applied to analyze the associations between childhood asthma/allergic diseases and each sign of home dampness, dampness levels, each V/C habit and total V/C scores. The associations between dampness and health were further performed by strata analyses in two groups with low and high V/C scores. Totally 4618(81.7%) of 5650 children returned the questionnaire. Reports on home dampness were most common for water condensation on windows (20.8%) followed by damp beddings (18.0%). The most common ventilation measure was the use of exhaust fan in bathroom (59.3%), followed by daily home cleaning (48.3%), frequently putting beddings to sunshine (29.9%) and frequently opening windows in winter (8.4%). There were positive associations between the 6 signs of home dampness and children's health particularly the symptoms last 12 months. By comparing with the reference dampness level (dampness scored 0), both the low dampness (scored 1~2) level and the high dampness level (scored 3~6) showed significantly increasing associations with childhood symptoms. There were crude negative associations between V/C habits and childhood health but not significant adjusting for home dampness levels. The risks of home dampness on children's health were lower in the group with higher V/C score but the differences were not statistically significant. Home dampness is a potential risk factor for childhood asthma and allergic symptoms in preschool children in Urumqi, China. No significant effects were observed

  2. Endothelin-1 in exhaled breath condensate of allergic asthma patients with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Zietkowski, Ziemowit; Skiepko, Roman; Tomasiak, Maria M; Bodzenta-Lukaszyk, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Background Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is a highly prevalent condition, whose pathophysiology is not well understood. Endothelins are proinflammatory, profibrotic, broncho- and vasoconstrictive peptides which play an important role in the development of airway inflammation and remodeling in asthma. The aim of the study was to evaluate the changes in endothelin-1 levels in exhaled breath condensate following intensive exercise in asthmatic patients. Methods The study was conducted in a group of 19 asthmatic patients (11 with EIB, 8 without EIB) and 7 healthy volunteers. Changes induced by intensive exercise in the concentrations of endothelin-1 (ET-1) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) during 24 hours after an exercise challenge test were determined. Moreover, the possible correlations of these measurements with the results of other tests commonly associated with asthma and with the changes of airway inflammation after exercise were observed. Results In asthmatic patients with EIB a statistically significant increase in the concentration of ET-1 in EBC collected between 10 minutes and 6 hours after an exercise test was observed. The concentration of ET-1 had returned to its initial level 24 hours after exercise. No effects of the exercise test on changes in the concentrations of ET-1 in EBC in either asthmatic patients without EIB or healthy volunteers were observed. A statistically significant correlation between the maximum increase in ET-1 concentrations in EBC after exercise and either baseline FENO and the increase in FENO or BHR to histamine 24 hours after exercise in the groups of asthmatics with EIB was revealed. Conclusion The release of ET-1 from bronchial epithelium through the influence of many inflammatory cells essential in asthma and interactions with other cytokines, may play an important role in increase of airway inflammation which was observed after postexercise bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients. PMID:17973986

  3. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Month with a Google+ Hangout on Air for parents and caregivers to learn how to help control a child's asthma so that they can breathe ... parents build up their asthma team. Jose, his parents, a doctor and a nurse, ... forces to help Jose control his asthma. The video is recorded in Spanish ...

  4. Granzyme B, a novel mediator of allergic inflammation: its induction and release in blood basophils and human asthma.

    PubMed

    Tschopp, Cornelia M; Spiegl, Nicole; Didichenko, Svetlana; Lutmann, Werner; Julius, Peter; Virchow, J Christian; Hack, C Erik; Dahinden, Clemens A

    2006-10-01

    Histamine, leukotriene C4, IL-4, and IL-13 are major mediators of allergy and asthma. They are all formed by basophils and are released in particularly large quantities after stimulation with IL-3. Here we show that supernatants of activated mast cells or IL-3 qualitatively change the makeup of granules of human basophils by inducing de novo synthesis of granzyme B (GzmB), without induction of other granule proteins expressed by cytotoxic lymphocytes (granzyme A, perforin). This bioactivity of IL-3 is not shared by other cytokines known to regulate the function of basophils or lymphocytes. The IL-3 effect is restricted to basophil granulocytes as no constitutive or inducible expression of GzmB is detected in eosinophils or neutrophils. GzmB is induced within 6 to 24 hours, sorted into the granule compartment, and released by exocytosis upon IgE-dependent and -independent activation. In vitro, there is a close parallelism between GzmB, IL-13, and leukotriene C4 production. In vivo, granzyme B, but not the lymphoid granule marker granzyme A, is released 18 hours after allergen challenge of asthmatic patients in strong correlation with interleukin-13. Our study demonstrates an unexpected plasticity of the granule composition of mature basophils and suggests a role of granzyme B as a novel mediator of allergic diseases.

  5. [Comparative characterization of the microflora of the upper respiratory tract mucous membranes in bronchial asthma and allergic persistent rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Romanenko, E E; Baturo, A P; Ulisko, I N

    2005-01-01

    A total of 250 patients with diagnosed bronchial asthma (BA) were examined by microbiological methods. Among them--188 children and 62 adults. In 87 patients the microflora of nasal mucosa was studied, in 40--of pharynx only and in 123 patients--both the nasal and the pharynx. For comparative analysis earlier data obtained in 69 patients with persistent allergic rhinitis (PAR) were used. The cultures isolated from the nasal mucosa of BA patients were shown to number 18 genera and 42 species, while among those isolated from pharynx mucosa 20 genera and 40 species. Monocultures were isolated from the nasal mucosa only in 23% of the examined patients and from the pharynx mucosa--only in 1.42%. Associations with different numbers of components were isolated from nasal and pharynx mucosa (2 to 6, 2 to 8 respectively). Staphylococcus aureus was regarded as the main species of nasal biocenosis in BA and PAR, as well as pharynx biocenosis in BA. Besides, in BA other Staphylococcus species (schleiferi, caprae, capitis, hominis, etc.), reversely related to the main species, could be isolated from both mucous membranes. Similarities and differences in microflora of biocenoses in both nosological forms, confirming links between PAR and BA, are considered. PMID:15881942

  6. IgE cross-reactivity between Ascaris lumbricoides and mite allergens: possible influences on allergic sensitization and asthma.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, N; Caraballo, L

    2011-06-01

    Nematode infections such as Ascariasis are important health problems in underdeveloped countries, most of them located in the tropics where environmental conditions also promote the perennial co-exposure to high concentrations of domestic mite allergens. Allergic diseases are common, and most of patients with asthma exhibit a predominant and strong IgE sensitization to mites. It is unknown whether co-exposure to Ascaris lumbricoides and the domestic mites Blomia tropicalis and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus potentiates Th2 responses and IgE sensitization, thereby modifying the natural history of allergy. Recently, we obtained experimental evidence of a high cross-reactivity between the allergenic extracts of these invertebrates, involving well-known allergens such as tropomyosin and glutathione transferases. There is indirect evidence suggesting that the clinical impact of these findings may be important. In this review, we discuss the potential role of this cross-reactivity on several aspects of allergy in the tropics that have been a focus of a number of investigations, some of them with controversial results.

  7. Allergic Mechanisms in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, Joshua B; Bryce, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Paralleling the overall trend in allergic diseases, Eosinophilic Esophagitis is rapidly increasing in incidence. It is associated with food antigen-triggered, eosinophil-predominant inflammation and the pathogenic mechanisms have many similarities to other chronic atopic diseases, such as eczema and allergic asthma. Studies in animal models and from patients over the last 15 years have suggested that allergic sensitization leads to food-specific IgE and T-helper lymphocyte type 2 cells, both of which appear to contribute to the pathogenesis along with basophils, mast cells, and antigen-presenting cells. This review will outline our current understandings of the allergic mechanisms that drive eosinophilic esophagitis, drawing from clinical and translational studies in humans as well as experimental animal models. PMID:24813516

  8. Periostin in allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Izuhara, Kenji; Arima, Kazuhiko; Ohta, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Shoichi; Inamitsu, Masako; Yamamoto, Ken-ichi

    2014-06-01

    Periostin, an extracellular matrix protein belonging to the fasciclin family, has been shown to play a critical role in the process of remodeling during tissue/organ development or repair. Periostin functions as a matricellular protein in cell activation by binding to their receptors on cell surface, thereby exerting its biological activities. After we found that periostin is a downstream molecule of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, signature cytokines of type 2 immune responses, we showed that periostin is a component of subepithelial fibrosis in bronchial asthma, the first formal proof that periostin is involved in allergic inflammation. Subsequently, a great deal of evidence has accumulated demonstrating the significance of periostin in allergic inflammation. It is of note that in skin tissues, periostin is critical for amplification and persistence of allergic inflammation by communicating between fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Furthermore, periostin has been applied to development of novel diagnostics or therapeutic agents for allergic diseases. Serum periostin can reflect local production of periostin in inflamed lesions induced by Th2-type immune responses and also can predict the efficacy of Th2 antagonists against bronchial asthma. Blocking the interaction between periostin and its receptor, αv integrin, or down-regulating the periostin expression shows improvement of periostin-induced inflammation in mouse models or in in vitro systems. It is hoped that diagnostics or therapeutic agents targeting periostin will be of practical use in the near future.

  9. Specific allergen immunotherapy attenuates allergic airway inflammation in a rat model of Alstonia scholaris pollen induced airway allergy.

    PubMed

    Datta, Ankur; Moitra, Saibal; Hazra, Iman; Mondal, Somnath; Das, Prasanta Kumar; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Chaudhuri, Suhnrita; Bhattacharya, Debanjan; Tripathi, Santanu Kumar; Chaudhuri, Swapna

    2016-01-01

    Pollen grains are well established to be an important cause of respiratory allergy. Current pharmacologic therapies for allergic asthma do not cure the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only treatment method which re-directs the immune system away from allergic response leading to a long lasting effect. The mechanism by which immunotherapy achieves this goal is an area of active research world-wide. The present experimental study was designed to develop an experimental model of allergic lung inflammation based on a relevant human allergen, Alstonia scholaris pollen, and to establish the immunological and cellular features of specific allergen immunotherapy using this same pollen extract. Our results revealed that Alstonia scholaris pollen sensitization and challenge causes eosinophilic airway inflammation with mucin hypersecretion. This is associated with increased total IgE, increased expression of FcɛRI on lung mast cells and increased levels of IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 as confirmed by ELISA, in-situ immunofluorescence and FACS assay. Allergen specific immunotherapy reduced airway inflammation and also decreased total IgE level, FcɛRI expression, IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 levels. It was further noted that the reduction of these levels was more by intra-nasal route than by intra-peritoneal route. Thus we present a novel animal model of Alstonia scholaris pollen allergic disease and specific allergen immunotherapy which will pave the way towards the development of better treatment modalities.

  10. Specific allergen immunotherapy attenuates allergic airway inflammation in a rat model of Alstonia scholaris pollen induced airway allergy.

    PubMed

    Datta, Ankur; Moitra, Saibal; Hazra, Iman; Mondal, Somnath; Das, Prasanta Kumar; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Chaudhuri, Suhnrita; Bhattacharya, Debanjan; Tripathi, Santanu Kumar; Chaudhuri, Swapna

    2016-01-01

    Pollen grains are well established to be an important cause of respiratory allergy. Current pharmacologic therapies for allergic asthma do not cure the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only treatment method which re-directs the immune system away from allergic response leading to a long lasting effect. The mechanism by which immunotherapy achieves this goal is an area of active research world-wide. The present experimental study was designed to develop an experimental model of allergic lung inflammation based on a relevant human allergen, Alstonia scholaris pollen, and to establish the immunological and cellular features of specific allergen immunotherapy using this same pollen extract. Our results revealed that Alstonia scholaris pollen sensitization and challenge causes eosinophilic airway inflammation with mucin hypersecretion. This is associated with increased total IgE, increased expression of FcɛRI on lung mast cells and increased levels of IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 as confirmed by ELISA, in-situ immunofluorescence and FACS assay. Allergen specific immunotherapy reduced airway inflammation and also decreased total IgE level, FcɛRI expression, IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 levels. It was further noted that the reduction of these levels was more by intra-nasal route than by intra-peritoneal route. Thus we present a novel animal model of Alstonia scholaris pollen allergic disease and specific allergen immunotherapy which will pave the way towards the development of better treatment modalities. PMID:26667977

  11. Behavioral consequences of illness: childhood asthma as a model.

    PubMed

    Creer, T L; Stein, R E; Rappaport, L; Lewis, C

    1992-11-01

    Several areas of research on childhood asthma are discussed within a transactional model of asthma. The model emphasizes the multidirectional influences that affect the severity of asthma and associated behavioral disability. The initial focus is on how the clinical presentation and morbidity of asthma are affected both by somatic predisposition and by interactions with multiple internal and external elements. Specific elements include emotional factors, neuroimmunology, temperament, and medication side effects. Second, the impact of asthma on the child, his or her family, and segments of the community are described, as are consequences of the disorder on quality of life. Third, there is a synopsis of preventative interventions for reducing the medical and behavioral impact of childhood asthma. The motif is that the interaction of medical and behavioral procedures can improve the management of asthma while consequences of the disorder are mollified. Finally, as examples of a transactional model of asthma, self-management programs for teaching children to become partners with their physicians in establishing and maintaining control over the disorder are described. A representative of self-management--the ACT (Asthma Care Training) program--is described, along with the impact such programs have on children, their families, and institutions. The conclusion emphasizes that asthma is a complicated and unpredictable disorder that puzzles physicians, behavioral scientists, and patients. Although new treatments may be over the horizon, controlling childhood asthma and its consequences currently rests on the cooperation and increased interaction of medical and behavioral scientists. PMID:1437411

  12. The Effects of Proresolution of Ellagic Acid in an Experimental Model of Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas Alves, Claudiney; Angeli, Giovanna Natalia; Favarin, Daniely Cornélio; Lemos de Andrade, Edinéia; Lazo Chica, Javier Emilio; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Roberto da Silva, Paulo; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a disease of airway inflammation characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilic inflammation, and hypersecretion of mucus. Ellagic acid, a compound derived from medicinal plants and fruits, has shown anti-inflammatory activity in several experimental disease models. We used the classical experimental model, in BALB/c mice, of sensibilization with ovalbumin to determine the effect of ellagic acid (10 mg/kg; oral route) in the resolution of allergic airways response. Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg; subcutaneous route) was used as a positive control. The control group consisted of nonimmunized mice that received challenge with ovalbumin. Ellagic acid and dexamethasone or vehicle (water) were administered before or after intranasal allergen challenge. Ellagic acid accelerated the resolution of airways inflammation by decreasing total leukocytes and eosinophils numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), the mucus production and lung inflammation in part by reducing IL-5 concentration, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) activity, and P-selectin expression, but not activator protein 1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways. In addition, ellagic acid enhanced alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of IgG-OVA-coated beads ex vivo, a new proresolving mechanism for the clearance of allergen from the airways. Together, these findings identify ellagic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for accelerating the resolution of allergic airways inflammation. PMID:24376308

  13. Safranal of Crocus sativus L. inhibits inducible nitric oxide synthase and attenuates asthma in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Syed Imran; Pattnaik, Bijay; Rayees, Sheikh; Kaul, Sanjana; Dhar, Manoj K

    2015-04-01

    The present study involves evaluation of antioxidant potential of Crocus sativus and its main constituents, safranal (SFN) and crocin (CRO), in bronchial epithelial cells, followed antiinflammatory potential of the active constituent safranal, in a murine model of asthma. To investigate the antioxidizing potential of Crocus sativus and its main constituents in bronchial epithelial cells, the stress was induced in these cells by a combination of different cytokines that resulted in an increase in nitric oxide production (NO), induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) levels, peroxynitrite ion generation, and cytochrome c release. Treatment with saffron and its constituents safranal and crocin resulted in a decrease of NO, iNOS levels, peroxynitrite ion generation, and prevented cytochrome c release. However, safranal significantly reduced oxidative stress in bronchial epithelial cells via iNOS reduction besides preventing apoptosis in these cells. In the murine model of asthma study, antiinflammatory role of safranal was characterized by increased airway hyper-responsiveness, airway cellular infiltration, and epithelial cell injury. Safranal pretreatment to these allergically inflamed mice lead to a significant decrease in airway hyper-responsiveness and airway cellular infiltration to the lungs. It also reduced iNOS production, bronchial epithelial cell apoptosis, and Th2 type cytokine production in the lungs.

  14. Asthma - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... children. It is a leading cause of missed school days and hospital visits for children. An allergic reaction ... how to let your child take medicine during school hours. (You may ... every day to prevent asthma symptoms. Your child should take ...

  15. Respiratory Allergic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Woloski, Jason Raymond; Heston, Skye; Escobedo Calderon, Sheyla Pamela

    2016-09-01

    Allergic asthma refers to a chronic reversible bronchoconstriction influenced by an allergic trigger, leading to symptoms of cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is a complex hypersensitivity reaction, often in patients with asthma or cystic fibrosis, occurring when bronchi become colonized by Aspergillus species. The clinical picture is dominated by asthma complicated by recurrent episodes of bronchial obstruction, fever, malaise, mucus production, and peripheral blood eosinophilia. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a syndrome associated with lung inflammation from the inhalation of airborne antigens, such as molds and dust. PMID:27545731

  16. Elm Tree (Ulmus parvifolia) Bark Bioprocessed with Mycelia of Shiitake (Lentinus edodes) Mushrooms in Liquid Culture: Composition and Mechanism of Protection against Allergic Asthma in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Phil; Lee, Sang Jong; Nam, Seok Hyun; Friedman, Mendel

    2016-02-01

    Mushrooms can break down complex plant materials into smaller, more digestible and bioactive compounds. The present study investigated the antiasthma effect of an Ulmus parvifolia bark extract bioprocessed in Lentinus edodes liquid mycelium culture (BPUBE) against allergic asthma in chicken egg ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized/challenged mice. BPUBE suppressed total IgE release from U266B1 cells in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxicity. Inhibitory activity of BPUBE against OVA-specific IgE secretion in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was observed in OVA-sensitized/challenged asthmatic mice. BPUBE also inhibited OVA-specific IgG and IgG1 secretion into serum from the allergic mice, suggesting the restoration of a Th2-biased immune reaction to a Th1/Th2-balanced status, as indicated by the Th1/Th2 as well as regulatory T cell (Treg) cytokine profile changes caused by BPUBE in serum or BALF. Inflammatory cell counts in BALF and lung histology showed that leukocytosis and eosinophilia induced by OVA-sensitization/challenge were inhibited by the oral administration of BPUBE. Amelioration of eosinophil infiltration near the trachea was associated with reduced eotaxin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) levels. Changes in proinflammatory mediator levels in BALF suggest that BPUBE decreased OVA-sensitization-induced elevation of leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2). The finding that asthma-associated biomarker levels of OVA-sensitized/challenged mice were much more inhibited with BPUBE treatment than NPUBE (not-bioprocessed Ulmus parvifolia extract) treatment suggested the production of new bioactive compounds by the mushroom mycelia that may be involved in enhancing the observed antiasthmatic properties. The possible relation of the composition determined by proximate analysis and GC/MS to observed bioactivity is discussed. The results suggest that the elm tree (Ulmus parvifolia) bark bioprocessed with mycelia of shiitake (Lentinus edodes

  17. ALIGNING MOUSE MODELS OF ASTHMA TO HUMAN ENDOTYPES OF DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rebecca A; Hodgkins, Samantha R; Dixon, Anne E; Poynter, Matthew E

    2014-01-01

    Substantial gains in understanding the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying asthma have been made using preclinical mouse models. However, because asthma is a complex, heterogeneous syndrome that is rarely due to a single allergen and that often presents in the absence of atopy, few of the promising therapeutics that demonstrated effectiveness in mouse models have translated into new treatments for patients. This has resulted in an urgent need to characterize Th2-low, noneosinophilic subsets of asthma, to study models that are resistant to conventional treatments such as corticosteroids, and to develop therapies targeting patients with severe disease. Classifying asthma based on underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, known as endotyping, offers a stratified approach for the development of new therapies for asthma. In preclinical research, new models of asthma are being utilized that more closely resemble the clinical features of different asthma endotypes, including the presence of IL-17 and a Th17 response, a biomarker of severe disease. These models utilize more physiologically relevant sensitizing agents, exacerbating factors, and allergens, as well as incorporate time points that better reflect the natural history and chronicity of clinical asthma. Importantly, some models better represent nonclassical asthma endotypes that facilitate the study of non-Th2 driven pathology and resemble the complex nature of clinical asthma, including corticosteroid resistance. Placing mouse asthma models into the context of human asthma endotypes will afford a more relevant approach to the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of disease that will afford the development of new therapies for those asthmatics that remain difficult to treat. PMID:24811131

  18. Epithelial EGF receptor signaling mediates airway hyperreactivity and remodeling in a mouse model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Le Cras, Timothy D; Acciani, Thomas H; Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Kramer, Elizabeth L; Pastura, Patricia A; Hardie, William D; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Sivaprasad, Umasundari; Ericksen, Mark; Gibson, Aaron M; Holtzman, Michael J; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Hershey, Gurjit K Khurana

    2011-03-01

    Increases in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have been associated with the severity of airway thickening in chronic asthmatic subjects, and EGFR signaling is induced by asthma-related cytokines and inflammation. The goal of this study was to determine the role of EGFR signaling in a chronic allergic model of asthma and specifically in epithelial cells, which are increasingly recognized as playing an important role in asthma. EGFR activation was assessed in mice treated with intranasal house dust mite (HDM) for 3 wk. EGFR signaling was inhibited in mice treated with HDM for 6 wk, by using either the drug erlotinib or a genetic approach that utilizes transgenic mice expressing a mutant dominant negative epidermal growth factor receptor in the lung epithelium (EGFR-M mice). Airway hyperreactivity (AHR) was assessed by use of a flexiVent system after increasing doses of nebulized methacholine. Airway smooth muscle (ASM) thickening was measured by morphometric analysis. Sensitization to HDM (IgG and IgE), inflammatory cells, and goblet cell changes were also assessed. Increased EGFR activation was detected in HDM-treated mice, including in bronchiolar epithelial cells. In mice exposed to HDM for 6 wk, AHR and ASM thickening were reduced after erlotinib treatment and in EGFR-M mice. Sensitization to HDM and inflammatory cell counts were similar in all groups, except neutrophil counts, which were lower in the EGFR-M mice. Goblet cell metaplasia with HDM treatment was reduced by erlotinib, but not in EGFR-M transgenic mice. This study demonstrates that EGFR signaling, especially in the airway epithelium, plays an important role in mediating AHR and remodeling in a chronic allergic asthma model.

  19. Guidance for a personal target value of F(E)NO in allergic asthma: case report and theoretical example.

    PubMed

    Högman, Marieann; Meriläinen, Pekka

    2013-03-01

    In clinically stable asthma the exhaled NO values (F(E)NO) are generally higher than in control subjects. Therefore, reference values are of limited importance in clinical practice. This is demonstrated in this case report, but it is also shown that NO parameters from non-linear modelling do have a clinical value. A subject with asthma was treated with inhaled corticosteroids for 1 week. The non-linear NO model was used to measure the response to treatment. The NO parameters from subjects with atopic rhinitis and asthma were fed into a computer program to generate theoretical F(E)NO₀.₀₅ values, i.e. target values. There was a dramatic decrease in F(E)NO₀.₀₅ due to treatment, from 82 to 34 ppb, but it remained higher than in healthy controls. This is due to the elevated diffusion rate of NO, unchanged by treatment. When the NO parameters are known, a personal best value of F(E)NO₀.₀₅ (fractional concentration of exhaled NO in the gas phase, 0.05 L/s) can be calculated, which can be the target value when only F(E)NO₀.₀₅ can be monitored. In conclusion, reference values for NO parameters are shown to be clinically useful. It is essential that every patient receives his/her target value of F(E)NO₀.₀₅, when only a single NO measurement is available. In our opinion, this is the reason why there are few successful studies of trying to target the NO value with inhaled corticosteroids.

  20. Allergies, asthma, and pollen

    MedlinePlus

    Reactive airway - pollen; Bronchial asthma - pollen; Triggers - pollen; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. It is important to know your triggers because avoiding them is your first step toward feeling better. ...

  1. Local Administration of Gold Nanoparticles Prevents Pivotal Pathological Changes in Murine Models of Atopic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Emiliano; Serra, Magda Fraguas; Dos Santos, Rafael Vital; Dos Santos, Cássio Eráclito Alves; Hickmann, Jandir; Cotias, Amanda Costa; Pão, Camila Ribeiro Rodrigues; Trindade, Suelen Gauna; Schimidt, Vanessa; Giacomelli, Cristian; Carvalho, Vinicius Frias; Rodrigues E Silva, Patricia Machado; Cordeiro, Renato Sérgio Balão; Martins, Marco Aurélio

    2015-06-01

    Although gold nanoparticles have been shown to exhibit a range of beneficial biological properties, including antiinflammatory and anti-oxidant effects, their putative impact on allergic asthma has not been addressed. In this study, we evaluated the potential of nasal-instilled gold nanoparticles to prevent allergen-induced asthma in distinct murine models of this disease. Swiss-Webster (outbred) and A/J (inbred) mice were sensitized with ovalbumin and then treated with intranasal injections of gold nanoparticles (6 and 60 μg/kg), 1 h before ovalbumin challenges. Lung function, leukocyte infiltration, mucus exacerbation, extracellular matrix deposition, cytokine generation and oxidative stress were evaluated 24 h after the last challenge. In both mice strains, gold nanoparticles clearly inhibited (70-100%) allergen-induced accumulation of inflammatory cells as well as the production of both pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species. In A/J mice, recognized as genetic asthma prone animals, instilled gold nanoparticles clearly prevented mucus production, peribronchiolar fibrosis and airway hyper-reactivity triggered by allergen provocation. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that gold nanoparticles prevented pivotal features of asthma, including airway hyper-reactivity, inflammation and lung remodelling. Such protective effects are accounted for by reduction in lung tissue generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, in a mechanism probably related to down-regulation in the levels of oxidative stress.

  2. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... exercise. It's a great way to keep the body and mind healthy, so if you get exercise-induced asthma ...

  3. A Systematic and Narrative Review of Acupuncture Point Application Therapies in the Treatment of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma during Dog Days

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Cai-Yu-Zhu; Liu, Ya-Fei; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Hong-Xing; Tu, Sheng-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture point application therapies, including San-Fu-Tie and San-Fu-Jiu, have been widely employed to treat diseases with attacks in winter during dog days in China. The therapies combine Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture points with the nature. However, the previous studies were reported to be unsystematic and incomplete. To develop a more comprehensive understanding of the effects of acupuncture point application therapies on allergic rhinitis and asthma, a systematic review of the literature up to 2015 was conducted. After filtering, eighteen randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving 1,785 subjects were included. This systematic and narrative review shows that acupuncture point application therapies have been extensively applied in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma with advantages of favorable treatment effect, convenient operation, receiving patients' good acceptability and compliance, and few side effects. Meanwhile, the study elaborated the operating process of San-Fu-Tie and San-Fu-Jiu in detail. The review may provide a reference for clinical application in future. However, the efficacy, safety, and mechanisms of San-Fu-Tie and San-Fu-Jiu in treating the above diseases need to be validated by more well-designed and fully powered RCTs in a larger population of patients. PMID:26543488

  4. In vitro suppression of lymphocyte activation in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis and pollen-related asthma by cetirizine or azelastine in combination with ginkgolide B or astaxanthin.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Fadia F; Haines, D; Al-Awadhi, R; Arifhodzic, N; Abal, A; Azeamouzi, C; Al-Sharah, S; Tosaki, A

    2012-06-01

    Novel strategies are evaluated for management of allergic rhinitis and asthma in patients co-afflicted with both disorders. It is hypothesized that the platelet activating factor receptor antagonist ginkgolide B (GB) and the carotenoid antioxidant astaxanthin (ASX) interact with antihistamines cetirizine dihydrochloride (CTZ) and azelastine (AZE) to potentiate their ability to downregulate potentially pathological immune activation. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from asthmatics and healthy subjects, cultured 24 hours with 50 μg/ml phytohemaglutinin (PHA) or PHA plus each drug are analyzed by flow cytometry for expression of CD25+ or HLA-DR+ by CD3+ (T cells). Results are reported as stimulation indices for CD3+CD25+ (SICD3+CD25+) and CD3+HLA-DR+ (SICD3+HLADR+) cells in cultures treated with PHA alone, versus cultures treated with both PHA and drugs. Optimal suppression of activated cells was observed in cultures stimulated with ASX 10-6 M + CTZ 10-6 M (SICD3+CD25+, p = 0.016; SICD3+HLADR, p = 0.012); ASX 10-6 M + AZE 10-6 M (SICD3+CD25+, p = 0.012; SICD3+HLADR, p = 0.015); GB 10-6 M + CTZ 10-6 M (SICD3+CD25+, p = 0.024, SICD3+HLADR+, p = 0.019). Results demonstrate improved activity of antihistamines by 2 phytochemicals, suggesting dosing strategies for animal trials of ASX- or GB-augmented formulations for seasonal allergic rhinitis and asthma. PMID:22849842

  5. A Systematic and Narrative Review of Acupuncture Point Application Therapies in the Treatment of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma during Dog Days.

    PubMed

    Wen, Cai-Yu-Zhu; Liu, Ya-Fei; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Hong-Xing; Tu, Sheng-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture point application therapies, including San-Fu-Tie and San-Fu-Jiu, have been widely employed to treat diseases with attacks in winter during dog days in China. The therapies combine Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture points with the nature. However, the previous studies were reported to be unsystematic and incomplete. To develop a more comprehensive understanding of the effects of acupuncture point application therapies on allergic rhinitis and asthma, a systematic review of the literature up to 2015 was conducted. After filtering, eighteen randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving 1,785 subjects were included. This systematic and narrative review shows that acupuncture point application therapies have been extensively applied in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma with advantages of favorable treatment effect, convenient operation, receiving patients' good acceptability and compliance, and few side effects. Meanwhile, the study elaborated the operating process of San-Fu-Tie and San-Fu-Jiu in detail. The review may provide a reference for clinical application in future. However, the efficacy, safety, and mechanisms of San-Fu-Tie and San-Fu-Jiu in treating the above diseases need to be validated by more well-designed and fully powered RCTs in a larger population of patients. PMID:26543488

  6. Cage enrichment with paper tissue, but not plastic tunnels, increases variability in mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Pasalic, I; Bosnjak, B; Tkalcevic, V Ivetic; Jaran, D Seveljevic; Javorscak, Z; Markovic, D; Hrvacic, B

    2011-04-01

    Environmental enrichment, besides having a great impact on animal welfare, can also be a potential variable in experimental research. Thus, we investigated whether enrichment of cages with paper tissues or plastic tunnels affects scientific outcome in the well-described mouse model of allergic asthma. BALB/cJ mice were introduced to paper tissues as nesting material, transparent plastic tunnels serving as shelters or kept in non-enriched cages. Afterwards, mice were sensitized to chicken egg ovalbumin (OVA) precipitated in aluminium sulphate and then intranasally challenged with OVA to induce allergic lung inflammation. Mice housed in cages enriched with paper tissues, but not with plastic tunnels, had increased total cell number, eosinophil number and IL-13 concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in comparison with the non-enriched control group. These results indicate that the effect of environmental enrichment on mice asthma models depends on the type of enrichment used. Therefore, it is important to consider the potential effects of any environmental enrichment on animal welfare and more importantly, on research results in order to standardize and obtain more accurate data from rodent studies.

  7. Indoor mildew odour in old housing was associated with adult allergic symptoms, asthma, chronic bronchitis, vision, sleep and self-rated health: USA NHANES, 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy

    2015-09-01

    A recent systematic review and meta-analysis has shown the effect of indoor mildew odour on allergic rhinitis risk, but its relation to other common chronic health outcomes in adults has not been investigated. Therefore, it was aimed to examine the relationship of indoor mildew odour and common health outcomes in adults in a national and population-based setting. Data was retrieved from the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 2005-2006, including the available information on demographics, housing characteristics, self-reported health conditions and urinary concentrations of environmental chemicals. T test, chi-squared test and survey-weighted logistic regression modelling were performed. Of all American adults (n = 4979), 744 (15.1%) reported indoor mildew odour or musty smell in their households. People who reported indoor mildew odour or musty smell also reported poorer self-rated health, sleep complaints, chronic bronchitis, asthma attack, itchy rash, sneezing and poor vision. In addition, people who reported indoor mildew odour or musty smell also tended to reside in older housing that were built 20 years earlier. However, there were no significant statistical associations found between indoor mildew odour or musty smell and urinary concentrations of environmental chemicals, which was also found to be associated with old housing. People who lived in older housing with indoor mildew odour or musty smell tended to have chronic health problems. To protect occupants in old housing from chronic illnesses associated with indoor mildew odour, elimination of the odour sources should be explored in future research and therefore public health and housing programs. Graphical abstract Pathway from old housing to musty smell, environmental chemicals and then health outcomes. PMID:25971810

  8. Nasal Levels of Antimicrobial Peptides in Allergic Asthma Patients and Healthy Controls: Differences and Effect of a Short 1,25(OH)2 Vitamin D3 Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Thijs, Willemien; Janssen, Kirsten; van Schadewijk, Annemarie M.; Papapoulos, Socrates E.; le Cessie, Saskia; Middeldorp, Saskia; Melissant, Christian F.; Rabe, Klaus F.; Hiemstra, Pieter S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Allergy is often accompanied by infections and lower levels of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Vitamin D has been shown to increase expression of selected AMPs. In this study we investigated whether antimicrobial peptide levels in nasal secretions of allergic asthma patients are lower than in healthy controls, and whether administration of the active form of vitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3) affects these antimicrobial peptide levels. Methods The levels of antimicrobial peptides in nasal secretions were compared between 19 allergic asthma patients and 23 healthy controls. The effect of seven days daily oral treatment with 2 μg 1,25(OH)2D3 on antimicrobial peptides in nasal secretions was assessed in a placebo-controlled cross-over clinical study. Results Levels of neutrophil α-defensins (human neutrophil peptides 1–3; HNP1-3) and lipocalin 2 (LCN2; also known as NGAL) were significantly lower in asthmatics, but no differences in LL-37 and SLPI were detected. Treatment with a short-term 1,25(OH)2D3 caused a small increase in HNP1-3, but not when the asthma and control groups were analyzed separately. LL-37, LCN2 and SLPI did not change after treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3. Conclusion Levels of the antimicrobial peptides HNP1-3 and LCN2 are lower in nasal secretions in asthmatics and are not substantially affected by a short-term treatment with active vitamin D. PMID:26545199

  9. Neurturin influences inflammatory responses and airway remodeling in different mouse asthma models.

    PubMed

    Mauffray, Marion; Domingues, Olivia; Hentges, François; Zimmer, Jacques; Hanau, Daniel; Michel, Tatiana

    2015-02-15

    Neurturin (NTN) was previously described for its neuronal activities, but recently, we have shown that this factor is also involved in asthma physiopathology. However, the underlying mechanisms of NTN are unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate NTN involvement in acute bronchial Th2 responses, to analyze its interaction with airway structural cells, and to study its implication in remodeling during acute and chronic bronchial inflammation in C57BL/6 mice. We analyzed the features of allergic airway inflammation in wild-type and NTN(-/-) mice after sensitization with two different allergens, OVA and house dust mite. We showed that NTN(-/-) dendritic cells and T cells had a stronger tendency to activate the Th2 pathway in vitro than similar wild-type cells. Furthermore, NTN(-/-) mice had significantly increased markers of airway remodeling like collagen deposition. NTN(-/-) lung tissues showed higher levels of neutrophils, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, matrix metalloproteinase 9, TNF-α, and IL-6. Finally, NTN had the capacity to decrease IL-6 and TNF-α production by immune and epithelial cells, showing a direct anti-inflammatory activity on these cells. Our findings support the hypothesis that NTN could modulate the allergic inflammation in different mouse asthma models. PMID:25595789

  10. Asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Calverley, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is now recognised to be a major cause of morbidity and even mortality in people of all ages. Two important ideas have changed our approach to asthma management. The first is understanding that asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder which needs regular treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs such as inhaled corticosteroids to prevent further attacks. The second development is the availability of prescribable peak flow meters, which allows both confident diagnosis and early prediction of relapse. Asthma management guidelines provide a logical treatment framework for most patients, but a few difficult cases still consume large amounts of medical time. The commonest problem is one of compliance with treatment which may respond to patient education, although this is not universally so. Other problems include misdiagnosis, acid reflux and, rarely, true corticosteroid-resistant asthma. Several potentially important new treatments have been developed. These include longer acting anticholinergic drugs, drugs with bronchodilator and some anti-inflammatory properties which antagonise or inhibit the production of leukotrienes, sub-types of phosphodiesterase inhibitor with anti-inflammatory properties and immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclosporin. Ultimately these new treatments must be rigorously tested and integrated into a care plan that remains centred on patient education. PMID:8746278

  11. A novel microbe-based treatment that attenuates the inflammatory profile in a mouse model of allergic airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Bazett, Mark; Biala, Agnieszka; Huff, Ryan D.; Bosiljcic, Momir; Gunn, Hal; Kalyan, Shirin; Hirota, Jeremy A.

    2016-01-01

    There is an unmet need for effective new and innovative treatments for asthma. It is becoming increasingly evident that bacterial stimulation can have beneficial effects at attenuating allergic airway disease through immune modulation. Our aim was to test the ability of a novel inactivated microbe-derived therapeutic based on Klebsiella (KB) in a model of allergic airway disease in mice. BALB/c mice were exposed intranasally to house dust mite (HDM) for two weeks. Mice were treated prophylactically via subcutaneous route with either KB or placebo for one week prior to HDM exposure and throughout the two week exposure period. 24 hours after the last exposure, lungs were analysed for inflammatory cell infiltrate, gene expression, cytokine levels, goblet cell metaplasia, and serum was analysed for allergen-specific serum IgE levels. HDM exposed mice developed goblet cell hyperplasia, elevated allergen-specific serum IgE, airway eosinophilia, and a concomitant increase in TH2 cytokines including IL-4, IL-13 and IL-5. Treatment with KB attenuated HDM-mediated airway eosinophilia, total bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell numbers, BAL TH2 cytokine production, and goblet cell metaplasia. Our prophylactic intervention study illustrates the potential of subcutaneous treatment with bacterial derived biologics as a promising approach for allergic airway disease treatment. PMID:27734946

  12. Allergic disease as an association of steroid sulphatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sakura, N; Nishimura, S; Matsumoto, T; Ohsaki, M; Ogata, T

    1997-11-01

    Ten of 31 patients with steroid sulphatase (STS) deficiency were found to have an allergic disease (bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, or atopic dermatitis). STS deficiency may predispose patients to allergic disease.

  13. Recognizing asthma mimics and asthma complications.

    PubMed

    Amundson, Dennis; Seda, Gilbert; Daheshia, Massoud

    2011-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways characterized by airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperreactivity, and underlying inflammation. Two common reasons asthmatics fail standard therapy are incorrect diagnosis and failure to recognize underlying contributing factors. A correct diagnosis of asthma is of great importance to military practitioners since misdiagnosis or uncontrolled asthma affects an individual's operational readiness or determines whether one can receive a medical waiver to enlist in military service. This article presents four cases of patients with dyspnea that have conditions which mimic asthma or complicate asthma management: vocal cord dysfunction misdiagnosed as asthma, respiratory bronchiolitis interstitial lung disease mistaken as asthma, difficult-to-control asthma because of bronchiectasis and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and difficult and fatal asthma. Asthma is contrasted to other respiratory disorders, and an outlined approach to asthma diagnosis and management is presented using the Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines.

  14. Development of an International School Nurse Asthma Care Coordination Model

    PubMed Central

    Garwick, Ann W.; Svavarsdóttir, Erla Kolbrun; Seppelt, Ann M.; Looman, Wendy S.; Anderson, Lori S.; Örlygsdóttir, Brynja

    2015-01-01

    Aim To identify and compare how school nurses in Reykjavik, Iceland and St. Paul, Minnesota coordinated care for youth with asthma (ages 10–18) and to develop an asthma school nurse care coordination model. Background Little is known about how school nurses coordinate care for youth with asthma in different countries. Design A qualitative descriptive study design using focus group data. Methods Six focus groups with 32 school nurses were conducted in Reykjavik (n=17) and St. Paul (n=15) using the same protocol between September 2008 – January 2009. Descriptive content analytic and constant comparison strategies were used to categorize and compare how school nurses coordinated care, which resulted in the development of an International School Nurse Asthma Care Coordination Model. Findings Participants in both countries spontaneously described a similar asthma care coordination process that involved information gathering, assessing risk for asthma episodes, prioritizing health care needs and anticipating and planning for student needs at the individual and school levels. This process informed how they individualized symptom management, case management and/or asthma education. School nurses played a pivotal part in collaborating with families, school and health care professionals to ensure quality care for youth with asthma. Conclusions Results indicate a high level of complexity in school nurses’ approaches to asthma care coordination that were responsive to the diverse and changing needs of students in school settings. The conceptual model derived provides a framework for investigators to use in examining the asthma care coordination process of school nurses in other geographic locations. PMID:25223389

  15. Antigens and allergic asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.E.; Swanson, M.C.

    1987-06-01

    There are few reliable epidemiologic data on the overall frequency and importance of allergy. We describe a practical method for quantifying the concentration of both amorphous and morphologically defined antigens in the air. A high volume air sampler is used to collect airborne particles and has a facility to separate samples into different particle sizes. Samples are tested for allergenic activity by radioallergosorbent test inhibition assay. Preliminary findings from studies of community wide, amorphous and common household allergens are reported.

  16. INDOOR MOLDS AND ALLERGIC POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Damp/moldy environments have been associated with asthma exacerbation, but mold¿s role in allergic asthma induction is less clear. Recently, 5 molds were statistically associated with water-damaged asthmatic homes in the Cleveland area. The asthma exacerbation...

  17. Overexpression of Dimethylarginine Dimethylaminohydrolase 1 Attenuates Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kinker, Kayla G.; Gibson, Aaron M.; Bass, Stacey A.; Day, Brandy P.; Deng, Jingyuan; Medvedovic, Mario; Figueroa, Julio A. Landero; Hershey, Gurjit K. Khurana; Chen, Weiguo

    2014-01-01

    Levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, are increased in lung, sputum, exhaled breath condensate and plasma samples from asthma patients. ADMA is metabolized primarily by dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 1 (DDAH1) and DDAH2. We determined the effect of DDAH1 overexpression on development of allergic inflammation in a mouse model of asthma. The expression of DDAH1 and DDAH2 in mouse lungs was determined by RT-quantitative PCR (qPCR). ADMA levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum samples were determined by mass spectrometry. Wild type and DDAH1-transgenic mice were intratracheally challenged with PBS or house dust mite (HDM). Airway inflammation was assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) total and differential cell counts. The levels of IgE and IgG1 in BALF and serum samples were determined by ELISA. Gene expression in lungs was determined by RNA-Seq and RT-qPCR. Our data showed that the expression of DDAH1 and DDAH2 was decreased in the lungs of mice following HDM exposure, which correlated with increased ADMA levels in BALF and serum. Transgenic overexpression of DDAH1 resulted in decreased BAL total cell and eosinophil numbers following HDM exposure. Total IgE levels in BALF and serum were decreased in HDM-exposed DDAH1-transgenic mice compared to HDM-exposed wild type mice. RNA-Seq results showed downregulation of genes in the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) signaling pathway in PBS-treated DDAH1-transgenic mice versus PBS-treated wild type mice and downregulation of genes in IL-13/FOXA2 signaling pathway in HDM-treated DDAH1-transgenic mice versus HDM-treated wild type mice. Our findings suggest that decreased expression of DDAH1 and DDAH2 in the lungs may contribute to allergic asthma and overexpression of DDAH1 attenuates allergen-induced airway inflammation through modulation of Th2 responses. PMID:24465497

  18. Therapeutic effect of Broussonetia papyrifera and Lonicera japonica in ovalbumin-induced murine asthma model.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Kwon, Jung-Taek; Shin, Ji-Young; Kim, Ji-Eun; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Lee, Somin; Park, Sung-Jin; Chang, Seung-Hee; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Vibin, M; Han, Kiwon; Son, Kun-Ho; Kwak, Wie-Jong; Chae, Chanhee; Bang, Sung-Hye; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2013-11-01

    Broussonetia papyrifera (L.) Vent. and Lonicera japonica Thunb. have been used in recent medicinal research for their antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study investigated the therapeutic efficacy of B. papyrifera and L. japonica ethanolic extracts in a murine model of ovalbumin-induced asthma, in which intra-peritoneal (IP) injections and aerosol ovalbumin delivery were used to induce allergic asthma. Bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), serum samples, lungs and livers were collected from the experimental groups. In the groups treated with B. papyrifera and L. japonica extracts, CD3, CD4, serum IgE and IL-4 levels; activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9; and eotaxin levels in the BALF significantly decreased to near normal levels. Results of a histopathological analysis showed that the level of inflammation and mucous secretions reduced in the treated groups compared to the corresponding levels in the other groups. Moreover, results of a serum enzymatic analysis showed the non-toxic nature of the extracts in the B. papyrifera and L. japonica treated groups. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that the B. papyrifera and L. japonica extracts may be very effective against asthma and inflammation related diseases. PMID:24427953

  19. Genetic and environmental factors associated with asthma.

    PubMed

    Bener, A; Abdulrazzaq, Y M; Al-Mutawwa, J; Debuse, P

    1996-06-01

    We investigate the familial and environmental risk factors associated with asthma among United Arab Emirates schoolchildren aged 6-14 years. A cross-sectional study of 850 schoolchildren living in both urban and rural areas (average age 9.36 +/- 2.11 years; 46.8% boys, 53.2% girls) was conducted using self-administered questionnaires between October 1992 and May 1993. The population sample had a high prevalence rate of diagnosed asthma (13.6%) and allergic rhinitis (22.9%). The frequency of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema among parents and siblings reflected the same pattern as that seen in the children. Environmental risk factors associated with asthma were pets, medicine, plants, dust storm, physical exercise, humidity, and perfume. All other factors, such as foods, climate, and parental smoking, showed no apparent relation to the development of asthma. The logistic regression analysis showed that parental asthma, plants, perfume, dust storm, humidity, and pets were the only significant predictors after adjusting for sex and other confounding covariates in the model. In conclusion, risk factors for asthma identified by our study are similar to those found in other community-based studies. Consistencies and discrepancies between our findings and those from other studies with respect to asthma risk factors support the hypothesis that asthma is a multifactorial disease related to both familial and environmental influences.

  20. Birth cohorts in asthma and allergic diseases: report of a NIAID/NHLBI/MeDALL joint workshop.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Jean; Gern, James E; Martinez, Fernando D; Anto, Josep M; Johnson, Christine C; Holt, Patrick G; Lemanske, Robert F; Le Souëf, Peter N; Tepper, Robert S; von Mutius, Erika R M; Arshad, S Hasan; Bacharier, Leonard B; Becker, Allan; Belanger, Kathleen; Bergström, Anna; Bernstein, David I; Cabana, Michael D; Carroll, Kecia N; Castro, Mario; Cooper, Philip J; Gillman, Matthew W; Gold, Diane R; Henderson, John; Heinrich, Joachim; Hong, Soo-Jong; Jackson, Daniel J; Keil, Thomas; Kozyrskyj, Anita L; Lødrup Carlsen, Karin C; Miller, Rachel L; Momas, Isabelle; Morgan, Wayne J; Noel, Patricia; Ownby, Dennis R; Pinart, Mariona; Ryan, Patrick H; Schwaninger, Julie M; Sears, Malcolm R; Simpson, Angela; Smit, Henriette A; Stern, Debra A; Subbarao, Padmaja; Valenta, Rudolf; Wang, Xiaobin; Weiss, Scott T; Wood, Robert; Wright, Anne L; Wright, Rosalind J; Togias, Alkis; Gergen, Peter J

    2014-06-01

    Population-based birth cohorts on asthma and allergies increasingly provide new insights into the development and natural history of the diseases. More than 130 birth cohorts focusing on asthma and allergy have been initiated in the last 30 years. A National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Mechanisms of the Development of Allergy (MeDALL; Framework Programme 7 of the European Commission) joint workshop was held in Bethesda, Maryland, on September 11-12, 2012, with 3 objectives: (1) documenting the knowledge that asthma/allergy birth cohorts have provided, (2) identifying the knowledge gaps and inconsistencies, and (3) developing strategies for moving forward, including potential new study designs and the harmonization of existing asthma birth cohort data. The meeting was organized around the presentations of 5 distinct workgroups: (1) clinical phenotypes, (2) risk factors, (3) immune development of asthma and allergy, (4) pulmonary development, and (5) harmonization of existing birth cohorts. This article presents the workgroup reports and provides Web links (AsthmaBirthCohorts.niaid.nih.gov or www.medall-fp7.eu), where the reader will find tables describing the characteristics of the birth cohorts included in this report, the type of data collected at differing ages, and a selected bibliography provided by the participating birth cohorts.

  1. Birth cohorts in asthma and allergic diseases: Report of a NIAID, NHLBI, MeDALL joint workshop

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, J; Gern, JE; Martinez, FD; Anto, JM; Johnson, CC; Holt, PG; Lemanske, RF; Le Souef, PN; Tepper, R; von Mutius, ERM; Arshad, SH; Bacharier, LB; Becker, A; Belanger, K; Bergstrom, A; Bernstein, D; Cabana, MD; Carroll, KN; Castro, M; Cooper, PJ; Gillman, MW; Gold, DR; Henderson, J; Heinrich, J; S-J, Hong; Jackson, DJ; Keil, T; Kozyrskyj, AL; Lodrup-Carlsen, K; Miller, RL; Momas, I; Morgan, WJ; Noel, P; Ownby, DR; Pinart, M; Ryan, P; Schwaninger, JM; Sears, MR; Simpson, A; Smit, HA; Stern, D; Subbarao, P; Valenta, R; Wang, X; Weiss, ST; Wood, R; Wright, AL; Wright, RJ; Togias, A; Gergen, PJ

    2014-01-01

    Population-based birth cohorts on asthma and allergies increasingly provide new insights into the development and natural history of the diseases. Over 130 birth cohorts focusing on asthma and allergy have been initiated in the last 30 years. A NIAID (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases), NHLBI (National Heart Lung and Blood Institute), MeDALL (Mechanisms of the Development of Allergy, Framework Programme 7 of the European Commission) joint workshop was held in Bethesda, MD, USA September 11–12, 2012 with 3 objectives (1) documenting the knowledge that asthma/allergy birth cohorts have provided, (2) identifying the knowledge gaps and inconsistencies and (3) developing strategies for moving forward, including potential new study designs and the harmonization of existing asthma birth cohort data. The meeting was organized around the presentations of 5 distinct workgroups: (1) clinical phenotypes, (2) risk factors, (3) immune development of asthma and allergy, (4) pulmonary development and (5) harmonization of existing birth cohorts. This manuscript presents the workgroup reports and provides web links (AsthmaBirthCohorts.niaid.nih.gov or www.medall-fp7.eu) where the reader will find tables describing the characteristics of the birth cohorts included in this report, type of data collected at differing ages, and a selected bibliography provided by the participating birth cohorts. PMID:24636091

  2. Overweight/Obesity and Respiratory and Allergic Disease in Children: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) Phase Two

    PubMed Central

    Weinmayr, Gudrun; Forastiere, Francesco; Büchele, Gisela; Jaensch, Andrea; Strachan, David P.; Nagel, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity and asthma are increasing worldwide. A possible link between the two conditions has been postulated. Methods Cross-sectional studies of stratified random samples of 8–12-year-old children (n = 10 652) (16 centres in affluent and 8 centres in non-affluent countries) used the standardized methodology of ISAAC Phase Two. Respiratory and allergic symptoms were ascertained by parental questionnaires. Tests for allergic disease were performed. Height and weight were measured, and overweight and obesity were defined according to international definitions. Prevalence rates and prevalence odds ratios were calculated. Results Overweight (odds ratio = 1.14, 95%-confidence interval: 0.98; 1.33) and obesity (odds ratio = 1.67, 95%-confidence interval: 1.25; 2.21) were related to wheeze. The relationship was stronger in affluent than in non-affluent centres. Similar results were found for cough and phlegm, rhinitis and eczema but the associations were mostly driven by children with wheeze. There was a clear association of overweight and obesity with airways obstruction (change in FEV1/FVC, −0.90, 95%-confidence interval: −1.33%; −0.47%, for overweight and −2.46%, 95%-confidence interval: −3.84%; −1.07%, for obesity) whereas the results for the other objective markers, including atopy, were null. Conclusions Our data from a large international child population confirm that there is a strong relation of body mass index with wheeze especially in affluent countries. Moreover, body mass index is associated with an objective marker of airways obstruction (FEV1/FVC) but no other objective markers of respiratory and allergic disorders. PMID:25474308

  3. Impact of omalizumab on treatment of severe allergic asthma in UK clinical practice: a UK multicentre observational study (the APEX II study)

    PubMed Central

    Niven, Robert M; Saralaya, Dinesh; Chaudhuri, Rekha; Masoli, Matthew; Clifton, Ian; Mansur, Adel H; Hacking, Victoria; McLain-Smith, Susan; Menzies-Gow, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the impact of omalizumab on asthma management in patients treated as part of normal clinical practice in the UK National Health Service (NHS). Design A non-interventional, mixed methodology study, combining retrospective and prospective data collection for 12 months pre-omalizumab and post-omalizumab initiation, respectively. Setting Data were collected in 22 UK NHS centres, including specialist centres and district general hospitals in the UK. Participants 258 adult patients (aged ≥16 years; 65% women) with severe persistent allergic asthma treated with omalizumab were recruited, of whom 218 (84.5%) completed the study. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome measure was change in mean daily dose of oral corticosteroids (OCS) between the 12-month pre-omalizumab and post-omalizumab initiation periods. A priori secondary outcome measures included response to treatment, changes in OCS dosing, asthma exacerbations, lung function, employment/education, patient-reported outcomes and hospital resource utilisation. Results The response rate to omalizumab at 16 weeks was 82.4%. Comparing pre-omalizumab and post-omalizumab periods, the mean (95% CIs) daily dose of OCS decreased by 1.61 (−2.41 to −0.80) mg/patient/day (p<0.001) and hospital exacerbations decreased by 0.97 (−1.19 to −0.75) exacerbations/patient (p<0.001). Compared with baseline, lung function, assessed by percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s, improved by 4.5 (2.7 to 6.3)% at 16 weeks (p<0.001; maintained at 12 months) and patient quality of life (Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire) improved by 1.38 (1.18 to 1.58) points at 16 weeks (p<0.001, maintained at 12 months). 21/162 patients with complete employment data gained employment and 6 patients lost employment in the 12-month post-omalizumab period. The mean number of A&E visits, inpatient hospitalisations, outpatient visits (excluding for omalizumab) and number of bed days

  4. Comparison of the Allergic Responses Induced by PeniciIlium chrysogenum and House Dust Mite Extracts in a Mouse Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    A report by the Institute of Medicine suggested that more research is needed to better understand mold effects on allergic disease, particularly asthma development. We compared the ability of the fungal Penicillium chrysogenum (PCE) and house dust mite (HDM) extracts to induce al...

  5. Predicting asthma control: the role of psychological triggers.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Thomas; Bobb, Carol; Griffiths, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Asthma triggers have been linked to adverse health outcomes in asthma, but little is known about their association with asthma control. Because trigger avoidance is an integral part of successful asthma management, psychological triggers in particular may be associated with suboptimal asthma control, given the difficulty of controlling them. We examined cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of perceived asthma triggers with self-report of asthma control impairment, symptoms, and spirometric lung function (forced expiratory volume in the 1st second, [FEV1]) in 179 adult primary care asthma patients. Perceived asthma triggers explained up to 42.5% of the variance in asthma control and symptoms, but not in FEV1 alone. Allergic triggers explained up to 12.1% of the asthma control and symptom variance, three nonallergic trigger types, air pollution/irritants, physical activity, and infection, explained up to 26.2% over and above allergic triggers, and psychological triggers up to 9.5% over and above all other triggers. Psychological triggers alone explained up to 33.9% of the variance and were the only trigger class that was consistently significant in all final multiple regression models predicting control and symptoms. Psychological triggers also predicted lower asthma control 3-6 months later, although controlling for initial asthma control eliminated this association. In free reports of individually relevant triggers, only psychological triggers were associated with suboptimal asthma control. Trigger factors are important predictors of self-reported asthma control and symptoms but not actual lung function. Particular attention should be directed to psychological triggers as indicators of patients' perceptions of suboptimal asthma control.

  6. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  7. No Adjuvant Effect of Bacillus thuringiensis-Maize on Allergic Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dekan, Gerhard; Epstein, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) foods are evaluated carefully for their ability to induce allergic disease. However, few studies have tested the capacity of a GM food to act as an adjuvant, i.e. influencing allergic responses to other unrelated allergens at acute onset and in individuals with pre-existing allergy. We sought to evaluate the effect of short-term feeding of GM Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)-maize (MON810) on the initiation and relapse of allergic asthma in mice. BALB/c mice were provided a diet containing 33% GM or non-GM maize for up to 34 days either before ovalbumin (OVA)-induced experimental allergic asthma or disease relapse in mice with pre-existing allergy. We observed that GM-maize feeding did not affect OVA-induced eosinophilic airway and lung inflammation, mucus hypersecretion or OVA-specific antibody production at initiation or relapse of allergic asthma. There was no adjuvant effect upon GM-maize consumption on the onset or severity of allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic asthma. PMID:25084284

  8. Anti-allergic effects of Lycopus lucidus on mast cell-mediated allergy model

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Tae-Yong . E-mail: tyshin@woosuk.ac.kr; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Suk, Kyoungho; Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Kim, InKyeom; Lee, Maan-Gee; Jun, Chang-Duk; Kim, Sang-Yong; Lim, Jong-Pil; Eun, Jae-Soon; Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2005-12-15

    The current study characterizes the mechanism by which the aqueous extract of Lycopus lucidus Turcz. (Labiatae) (LAE) decreases mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction. The immediate-type allergic reaction is involved in many allergic diseases such as asthma and allergic rhinitis. LAE has been used as a traditional medicine in Korea and is known to have an anti-inflammatory effect. However, its specific mechanism of action is still unknown. LAE was anally administered to mice for high and fast absorption. LAE inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic reactions in mice. LAE decreased the local allergic reaction, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, activated by anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE antibody. LAE dose-dependently reduced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80 or anti-DNP IgE. Furthermore, LAE decreased the secretion of TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of LAE on the pro-inflammatory cytokine was p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) dependent. LAE attenuated PMA plus A23187-induced degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, and specifically blocked activation of p38 MAPK, but not that of c-jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Our findings provide evidence that LAE inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines, p38 MAPK, and NF-{kappa}B in these effects.

  9. Icariin attenuates glucocorticoid insensitivity mediated by repeated psychosocial stress on an ovalbumin-induced murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Li, Bei; Duan, Xiaohong; Xu, Changqing; Wu, Jinfeng; Liu, Baojun; Du, Yiji; Luo, Qingli; Jin, Hualiang; Gong, Weiyi; Dong, Jingcheng

    2014-04-01

    Evidence shows that psychosocial stress exacerbates asthma, but there is little intervention to alleviate negative effects of psychosocial stress on asthma. We investigated the role of icariin in anti-inflammation and anti-anxiety potential in a murine model combined psychosocial stress with allergic exposure. The results indicated that icariin administered remarkable increased activity in the center of the open field, reversed airway hyperresponsivenesss, reduced inflammatory cytokine infiltration to the lung and whole body and also in part recovered glucocorticoid responsiveness. Furthermore, our data also showed that icariin significantly inhibited increases of corticosterone and markedly increased glucocorticoid receptor mRNA and protein expression in the lungs of mice exposed to both stress and allergen. Collectively, we speculate that inducing glucocorticoid receptor modulation might be the potential mechanisms of icariin to facilitate corticosteroid responsiveness of cytokine production.

  10. Chinese herbal medicine formula Gu-Ben-Fang-Xiao-Tang attenuates airway inflammation by modulating Th17/Treg balance in an ovalbumin-induced murine asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Guiying; Tao, Baohong; Wang, Dongguo; Li, Yong; Wu, Jingyi; Yin, Genquan

    2016-01-01

    Gu-Ben-Fang-Xiao-Tang (GBFXT) is a traditional Chinese medicine formula consisting of 11 medicinal plants, which has been used in the treatment of asthma. The present study aimed to determine the protective effects and the underlying mechanisms of GBFXT on ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic inflammation in a mouse model of allergic asthma. A total of 50 mice were randomly assigned to the following five experimental groups: Normal, model, montelukast (2.6 mg/kg), 12 g/kg GBFXT and 36 g/kg GBFXT groups. Airway responsiveness was measured using the forced oscillation technique, while differential cell count in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured by Wright-Giemsa staining. Histological assessment was performed by hematoxylin and eosin staining, while BALF levels of Th17/Treg cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the proportions of Th17 and Treg cells were evaluated by flow cytometry. The results showed that GBFXT suppressed airway hyperresponsiveness during methacholine-induced constriction, reduced the percentage of leukocytes and eosinophils, and resulted in decreased absolute neutrophil infiltration in lung tissue. In addition, GBFXT treatment significantly decreased the IL-17A cytokine level and increased the IL-10 cytokine level in the BALF. Furthermore, GBFXT significantly suppressed Th17 cells and increased Treg cells in asthmatic mice. In conclusion, the current results demonstrated that GBFXT may effectively inhibit the progression of airway inflammation in allergic asthma, partially by modulating the Th17/Treg cell balance. PMID:27588063

  11. Immune response phenotype of allergic versus clinically tolerant pigs in a neonatal swine model of allergy.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Julie; Rupa, Prithy; Garvie, Sarah; Wilkie, Bruce

    2013-07-15

    The prevalence of childhood food allergy and the duration of these allergies, particularly those considered to be transient, like egg and milk allergy, are increasing. The identification of allergic individuals using minimally invasive, non-anaphylaxis-threatening methods is therefore of increasing importance. In this experiment, correlates were sought of an allergic immune response (IR) phenotype in pigs. Using pigs pre-treated with heat-killed bacteria or bacterial components before allergic sensitization with the egg white protein ovomucoid (Ovm), differences were determined in IR phenotype of pigs in the categories treated-allergic, treated-tolerant, control-allergic (CA) and control-tolerant. Phenotype was established by measuring immunoglobulin (Ig)-associated antibody activity (AbA), cytokine profiles and the proportion of blood T-regulatory cells (T-regs) and observing late-phase allergen-specific skin tests (ST). Although 100% of pigs became sensitized to Ovm, only 33% of pigs had clinical signs of allergy after oral challenge with egg white. Pigs without clinical signs were classified as clinically tolerant. Sixty-seven percent of allergic pigs had a positive, late-phase ST classified as very strong or strong, while 84% of clinically tolerant pigs did not have late-phase ST. Treated-allergic pigs and CA pigs had greater total antibody IgG (H+L), IgE and IgG1 AbA than clinically tolerant pigs. Cytokine profiles of allergic pigs and the proportion of circulating T-regs, did not differ significantly between allergic and clinically tolerant pigs. Therefore, measurement of allergen-specific IgG, IgG1 and/or IgE activity and evaluation of late-phase ID ST may be useful in identifying allergic IR phenotypes in swine models of food allergy, which may be extended toward human use.

  12. Management of Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Sausen, Verra O.; Marks, Katherine E.; Sausen, Kenneth P.; Self, Timothy H.

    2005-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is the most common chronic childhood disease. Reduced quality of life is frequently caused by this IgE-mediated disease, including sleep disturbance with subsequent decreased school performance. Asthma and exercise-induced bronchospasm are commonly seen concurrently with allergic rhinitis, and poorly controlled allergic rhinitis negatively affects asthma outcomes. Nonsedating antihistamines or intranasal azelastine are effective agents to manage allergic rhinitis, often in combination with oral decongestants. For moderate to severe persistent disease, intranasal corticosteroids are the most effiective agents. Some patients require concomitant intranasal corticosteroids and nonsedating antihistamines for optimal management. Other available agents include leukotriene receptor antagonists, intranasal cromolyn, intranasal ipratropium, specific immunotherapy, and anti-IgE therapy. PMID:23118635

  13. Co-administration of vaccination with DNA encoding T cell epitope on the Der p and BCG inhibited airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chi Hong; Ahn, Joong Hyun; Kim, Seung Joon; Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Young Kyoon; Kim, Kwan Hyoung; Moon, Hwa Sik; Song, Jeong Sup; Park, Sung Hak; Kwon, Soon Seog

    2006-01-01

    Therapeutic modalities of airway remodeling in asthma have proved to be unsuccessful regarding reversing the previously established chronic airway changes. Recently, the potential of plasmid DNA to inhibit the Th2 immune response has been demonstrated in animal models of asthma. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) immunization also induced immunomodulation, which appeared to be reliant on the properties of the interferon-gamma that was produced. Mice were immunized with house dust mite extract (HDM). At the 3 week point, we injected BCG subcutaneously into mice on three successive weeks. One week after the BCG injection, we immunized mice with the DNA plasmid encoding for murine T-cell epitope on Dermatophagoide pteronyssinus 2 thrice weekly. At 9 weeks after immunization, we measured airway responsiveness. Twenty four hours later, we performed bronchoalveolar lavage and histological examinations. Co-administration of DNA vaccination and BCG resulted in a partial suppression of the overproduction of goblet cells and the thickness of the peribronchial smooth muscle in ongoing allergic responses. In the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, the number of total cells and eosinophils was reduced, and regarding the change of cytokines, the concentration of IL-4 was also decreased, but interferon-gamma was increased in the co-administration group, opposed to the asthma group. These results suggest that co-administration of vaccination with the DNA encoding T-cell epitope and BCG are effective regarding ongoing allergic response and might constitute an ideal method for combating allergic disease in the future.

  14. The long-term administration of Orai 1 antagonist possesses antitussive, bronchodilatory and anti-inflammatory effects in experimental asthma model.

    PubMed

    Sutovská, Martina; Kocmálová, Michaela; Adamkov, Marian; Výbohová, Desanka; Mikolka, Pavol; Mokrá, Daniela; Hatok, Jozef; Antošová, Martina; Fraňová, Soňa

    2013-06-01

    The best-studied store-operated Ca2+ channels (SOCs), Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels, are activated by depleting endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pool and mediate Ca2+ influx vitally important for Ca2+ restoration and many cellular function. CRAC channels were identified on immune and airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Emerging evidence points to its involvement in allergic airways diseases. This article evaluated therapeutic potency of CRAC antagonist in experimental animal model of allergic asthma. Allergic asthma, induced by repetitive exposure of guinea pigs to ovalbumine, was followed by 14 days therapy by CRAC antagonist (3-fluoropyridine-4-carboxylic acid, FPCA). In vivo changes of specific airways resistance (sRaw) evaluated bronchodilatory effect of FPCA and salbutamol. The method of citric acid-induced cough reflex assessed antitussive activity of FPCA and codeine. The measurement of exhaled NO (ENO), expression of inducible NO-synthase (iNOS) by RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining of airways tissue verified anti-inflammatory effect of FPCA. Long-term administration of FPCA resulted in significant cough suppression and bronchodilation, both comparable to the effect of control drugs. FPCA significantly decreased ENO and iNOS expression, which together with immunohistochemical analysis validated its anti-inflammatory effect. Presented data confirmed CRAC channels as a promising target for treatment of respiratory diseases associated with allergic inflammation.

  15. Asthma self-management model: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Olivera, Carolina M X; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira; Bonizio, Roni C; de Menezes, Marcelo B; Ferraz, Erica; Cetlin, Andrea A; Valdevite, Laura M; Almeida, Gustavo A; Araujo, Ana S; Simoneti, Christian S; de Freitas, Amanda; Lizzi, Elisangela A; Borges, Marcos C; de Freitas, Osvaldo

    2016-10-01

    Information for patients provided by the pharmacist is reflected in adhesion to treatment, clinical results and patient quality of life. The objective of this study was to assess an asthma self-management model for rational medicine use. This was a randomized controlled trial with 60 asthmatic patients assigned to attend five modules presented by a pharmacist (intervention group) and 59 patients in the control group. Data collection was performed before and after this 4-month intervention and included an evaluation of asthma knowledge, lifestyle, inhaler techniques, adhesion to treatment, pulmonary function and quality of life. An economic viability analysis was also performed. The intervention group obtained an increase in asthma knowledge scores of 58.3-79.5% (P < 0.001). In this group, there was also an increase in the number of individuals who practiced physical exercise (36-43%), in the number of correct replies regarding the use of inhalers, in the percentage of adherent patients, and in quality of life scores for all domains. We concluded that this asthma self-management model was effective in improving the quality of life of asthma patients. PMID:27473571

  16. Sparse modeling of spatial environmental variables associated with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Timothy S.; Gangnon, Ronald E.; Page, C. David; Buckingham, William R.; Tandias, Aman; Cowan, Kelly J.; Tomasallo, Carrie D.; Arndt, Brian G.; Hanrahan, Lawrence P.; Guilbert, Theresa W.

    2014-01-01

    Geographically distributed environmental factors influence the burden of diseases such as asthma. Our objective was to identify sparse environmental variables associated with asthma diagnosis gathered from a large electronic health record (EHR) dataset while controlling for spatial variation. An EHR dataset from the University of Wisconsin’s Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics Departments was obtained for 199,220 patients aged 5–50 years over a three-year period. Each patient’s home address was geocoded to one of 3,456 geographic census block groups. Over one thousand block group variables were obtained from a commercial database. We developed a Sparse Spatial Environmental Analysis (SASEA). Using this method, the environmental variables were first dimensionally reduced with sparse principal component analysis. Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling was then used to identify block group variables associated with asthma from sparse principal components. The addresses of patients from the EHR dataset were distributed throughout the majority of Wisconsin’s geography. Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling captured spatial variation of asthma. Four sparse principal components identified via model selection consisted of food at home, dog ownership, household size, and disposable income variables. In rural areas, dog ownership and renter occupied housing units from significant sparse principal components were associated with asthma. Our main contribution is the incorporation of sparsity in spatial modeling. SASEA sequentially added sparse principal components to Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling. This method allowed association of geographically distributed environmental factors with asthma using EHR and environmental datasets. SASEA can be applied to other diseases with environmental risk factors. PMID:25533437

  17. Sparse modeling of spatial environmental variables associated with asthma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Timothy S; Gangnon, Ronald E; David Page, C; Buckingham, William R; Tandias, Aman; Cowan, Kelly J; Tomasallo, Carrie D; Arndt, Brian G; Hanrahan, Lawrence P; Guilbert, Theresa W

    2015-02-01

    Geographically distributed environmental factors influence the burden of diseases such as asthma. Our objective was to identify sparse environmental variables associated with asthma diagnosis gathered from a large electronic health record (EHR) dataset while controlling for spatial variation. An EHR dataset from the University of Wisconsin's Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics Departments was obtained for 199,220 patients aged 5-50years over a three-year period. Each patient's home address was geocoded to one of 3456 geographic census block groups. Over one thousand block group variables were obtained from a commercial database. We developed a Sparse Spatial Environmental Analysis (SASEA). Using this method, the environmental variables were first dimensionally reduced with sparse principal component analysis. Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling was then used to identify block group variables associated with asthma from sparse principal components. The addresses of patients from the EHR dataset were distributed throughout the majority of Wisconsin's geography. Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling captured spatial variation of asthma. Four sparse principal components identified via model selection consisted of food at home, dog ownership, household size, and disposable income variables. In rural areas, dog ownership and renter occupied housing units from significant sparse principal components were associated with asthma. Our main contribution is the incorporation of sparsity in spatial modeling. SASEA sequentially added sparse principal components to Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling. This method allowed association of geographically distributed environmental factors with asthma using EHR and environmental datasets. SASEA can be applied to other diseases with environmental risk factors.

  18. Sparse modeling of spatial environmental variables associated with asthma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Timothy S; Gangnon, Ronald E; David Page, C; Buckingham, William R; Tandias, Aman; Cowan, Kelly J; Tomasallo, Carrie D; Arndt, Brian G; Hanrahan, Lawrence P; Guilbert, Theresa W

    2015-02-01

    Geographically distributed environmental factors influence the burden of diseases such as asthma. Our objective was to identify sparse environmental variables associated with asthma diagnosis gathered from a large electronic health record (EHR) dataset while controlling for spatial variation. An EHR dataset from the University of Wisconsin's Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics Departments was obtained for 199,220 patients aged 5-50years over a three-year period. Each patient's home address was geocoded to one of 3456 geographic census block groups. Over one thousand block group variables were obtained from a commercial database. We developed a Sparse Spatial Environmental Analysis (SASEA). Using this method, the environmental variables were first dimensionally reduced with sparse principal component analysis. Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling was then used to identify block group variables associated with asthma from sparse principal components. The addresses of patients from the EHR dataset were distributed throughout the majority of Wisconsin's geography. Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling captured spatial variation of asthma. Four sparse principal components identified via model selection consisted of food at home, dog ownership, household size, and disposable income variables. In rural areas, dog ownership and renter occupied housing units from significant sparse principal components were associated with asthma. Our main contribution is the incorporation of sparsity in spatial modeling. SASEA sequentially added sparse principal components to Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling. This method allowed association of geographically distributed environmental factors with asthma using EHR and environmental datasets. SASEA can be applied to other diseases with environmental risk factors. PMID:25533437

  19. Anti-CD69 monoclonal antibody treatment inhibits airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-ying; Dai, Yu; Wang, Jiao-li; Yang, Xu-yan; Jiang, Xin-guo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Airway inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) are principle pathological manifestations of asthma. Cluster of differentiation 69 (CD69) is a well-known co-stimulatory factor associated with the activation, proliferation as well as apoptosis of immune cells. This study aims to examine the effect of anti-CD69 monoclonal antibody (mAb) on the pathophysiology of a mouse model of asthma. Methods: A murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic airway inflammation was used in this study. Briefly, mice were injected with 20 μg chicken OVA intraperitoneally on Days 0 and 14, followed by aerosol provocation with 1% (0.01 g/ml) OVA on Days 24, 25, and 26. Anti-CD69 mAb or isotype IgG was injected intraperitoneally after OVA challenge; dexamethasone (DXM) was administrated either before or after OVA challenge. AHR, mucus production, and eosinophil infiltration in the peribronchial area were examined. The levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were also assayed as indices of airway inflammation on Day 28 following OVA injection. Results: Pretreatment with DXM together with anti-CD69 mAb treatment after OVA provocation completely inhibited AHR, eosinophil infiltration and mucus overproduction, and significantly reduced BALF IL-5. However, treatment with DXM alone after OVA challenge only partially inhibited AHR, eosinophil infiltration and mucus overproduction, and did not diminish BALF IL-5. Treatment with either DXM or anti-CD69 mAb did not alter the concentration of BALF GM-CSF. Conclusions: Anti-CD69 mAb treatment inhibits established airway inflammation as effectively as DXM pretreatment. This study provides a potential alternative therapeutic opportunity for the clinical management of asthma and its exacerbation. PMID:26160720

  20. In vivo models of occupational asthma due to low molecular weight chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, J P; Taylor, A J Newman

    1995-01-01

    The aim was to review the development of in vivo models of asthma due to low molecular weight chemicals, in particular, those aspects that may be important to the understanding of occupational asthma in humans. PMID:7663640

  1. Anti-allergic effects of So-Cheong-Ryong-Tang in ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis model.

    PubMed

    Ku, Jin Mo; Hong, Se Hyang; Kim, Soon Re; Choi, Han-Seok; Seo, Hye Sook; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Ko, Seong-Gyu; Shin, Yong Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is an allergic inflammation of the nasal airways. The Korean herbal medicine, So-Cheong-Ryong-Tang (SCRT) has been typically used for the treatment of AR for hundreds of years. In the present study, we investigated whether SCRT suppresses the progression of AR in animal model. AR was induced by ovalbumin (OVA). Treatment with SCRT was assessed to study the effect of SCRT on AR in mice. Histological analysis, multiplex cytokine assay, blood analysis, cell viability assay, RT-PCR and Elisa assay were performed to verify inhibitory effect of SCRT on AR. SCRT reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells into nasal cavity. SCRT reduced infiltration of mast cells into nasal mucosa. SCRT reduced the levels of cytokines (IL-4 and LIF) in the serum. SCRT reduced the levels of leukocytes in the blood. SCRT decreased cell viability of HMC-1 cells and splenocyte. SCRT suppressed IL-4 level in HMC-1 cells and splenocyte cells in a dose-dependent manner. SCRT suppressed IL-6 level and TNF-α level in splenocyte. SCRT suppresses the progression of AR induced by OVA. SCRT might be a useful drug for the treatment of AR.

  2. The Treatment of Allergic Respiratory Disease During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Namazy, Jai; Schatz, M

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy may be complicated by new-onset or preexisting asthma and allergic rhinitis.This article reviews the recognition and management of asthma and allergic rhinitis during pregnancy, paying close attention to the general principles of allergy and use of asthma medication during pregnancy. Both allergic rhinitis and asthma can adversely affect both maternal quality of life and, in the case of maternal asthma, perinatal outcomes. Optimal management is thus important for both mother and baby. This article reviews the safety of asthma and allergy medications commonly used during pregnancy.

  3. Toxoplasma gondii infection induces suppression in a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Fenoy, Ignacio M; Chiurazzi, Romina; Sánchez, Vanesa R; Argenziano, Mariana A; Soto, Ariadna; Picchio, Mariano S; Martin, Valentina; Goldman, Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    Allergic asthma is an inflammatory disorder characterized by infiltration of the airway wall with inflammatory cells driven mostly by activation of Th2-lymphocytes, eosinophils and mast cells. There is a link between increased allergy and a reduction of some infections in Western countries. Epidemiological data also show that respiratory allergy is less frequent in people exposed to orofecal and foodborne microbes such as Toxoplasma gondii. We previously showed that both acute and chronic parasite T. gondii infection substantially blocked development of airway inflammation in adult BALB/c mice. Based on the high levels of IFN-γ along with the reduction of Th2 phenotype, we hypothesized that the protective effect might be related to the strong Th1 immune response elicited against the parasite. However, other mechanisms could also be implicated. The possibility that regulatory T cells inhibit allergic diseases has received growing support from both animal and human studies. Here we investigated the cellular mechanisms involved in T. gondii induced protection against allergy. Our results show for the first time that thoracic lymph node cells from mice sensitized during chronic T. gondii infection have suppressor activity. Suppression was detected both in vitro, on allergen specific T cell proliferation and in vivo, on allergic lung inflammation after adoptive transference from infected/sensitized mice to previously sensitized animals. This ability was found to be contact-independent and correlated with high levels of TGF-β and CD4(+)FoxP3(+) cells. PMID:22952678

  4. Estrogen effects in allergy and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Bonds, Rana S.; Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Asthma prevalence and severity are greater in women than in men, and mounting evidence suggests this is in part related to female steroid sex hormones. Of these, estrogen has been the subject of much study. This review highlights recent research exploring the effects of estrogen in allergic disease. Recent findings Estrogen receptors are found on numerous immunoregulatory cells and estrogen’s actions skew immune responses toward allergy. It may act directly to create deleterious effects in asthma, or indirectly via modulation of various pathways including secretory leukoprotease inhibitor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ion channel and nitric oxide production to exert effects on lung mechanics and inflammation. Not only do endogenous estrogens appear to play a role, but environmental estrogens have also been implicated. Environmental estrogens (xenoestrogens) including bisphenol A and phthalates enhance allergic sensitization in animal models and may enhance development of atopic disorders like asthma in humans. Summary Estrogen’s role in allergic disease remains complex. As allergic diseases continue to increase in prevalence and affect women disproportionately, gaining a fuller understanding of its effects in these disorders will be essential. Of particular importance may be effects of xenoestrogens on allergic disease. PMID:23090385

  5. Risk factors and immunological pathways for asthma and other allergic diseases in children: background and methodology of a longitudinal study in a large urban center in Northeastern Brazil (Salvador-SCAALA study)

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Mauricio L; Cunha, Sergio S; Alcântara-Neves, Neuza; Carvalho, Lain P; Cruz, Álvaro A; Stein, Renato T; Genser, Bernd; Cooper, Philip J; Rodrigues, Laura C

    2006-01-01

    Background The prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases has increased in industrialised countries, and it is known that rates vary according whether the area is urban or rural and to socio-economic status. Surveys conducted in some urban settings in Latin America found high prevalence rates, only exceeded by the rates observed in industrialised English-speaking countries. It is likely that the marked changes in the environment, life style and living conditions in Latin America are responsible for these observations. The understanding of the epidemiological and immunological changes that underlie the increase in asthma and allergic diseases in Latin America aimed by SCAALA studies in Brazil and Ecuador will be crucial for the identification of novel preventive interventions. Methods/Design The Salvador-SCAALA project described here is a longitudinal study involving children aged 4–11 years living in the city of Salvador, Northeastern Brazil. Data on asthma and allergic diseases (rhinitis and eczema) and potential risk factors will be collected in successive surveys using standardised questionnaire. This will be completed with data on dust collection (to dust mite and endotoxin), skin test to most common allergens, stool examinations to helminth and parasites, blood samples (to infection, total and specific IgE, and immunological makers), formaldehyde, physical inspection to diagnoses of eczema, and anthropometric measures. Data on earlier exposures when these children were 0–3 years old are available from a different project. Discussion It is expected that knowledge generated may help identify public health interventions that may enable countries in LA to enjoy the benefits of a "modern" lifestyle while avoiding – or minimising – increases in morbidity caused by asthma and allergies. PMID:16796729

  6. Asthma and coagulation.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J Daan; Majoor, Christof J; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Bel, Elisabeth H D; van der Poll, Tom

    2012-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway disease characterized by paroxysmal airflow obstruction evoked by irritative stimuli on a background of allergic lung inflammation. Currently, there is no cure for asthma, only symptomatic treatment. In recent years, our understanding of the involvement of coagulation and anticoagulant pathways, the fibrinolytic system, and platelets in the pathophysiology of asthma has increased considerably. Asthma is associated with a procoagulant state in the bronchoalveolar space, further aggravated by impaired local activities of the anticoagulant protein C system and fibrinolysis. Protease-activated receptors have been implicated as the molecular link between coagulation and allergic inflammation in asthma. This review summarizes current knowledge of the impact of the disturbed hemostatic balance in the lungs on asthma severity and manifestations and identifies new possible targets for asthma treatment.

  7. Asthma and coagulation.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J Daan; Majoor, Christof J; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Bel, Elisabeth H D; van der Poll, Tom

    2012-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway disease characterized by paroxysmal airflow obstruction evoked by irritative stimuli on a background of allergic lung inflammation. Currently, there is no cure for asthma, only symptomatic treatment. In recent years, our understanding of the involvement of coagulation and anticoagulant pathways, the fibrinolytic system, and platelets in the pathophysiology of asthma has increased considerably. Asthma is associated with a procoagulant state in the bronchoalveolar space, further aggravated by impaired local activities of the anticoagulant protein C system and fibrinolysis. Protease-activated receptors have been implicated as the molecular link between coagulation and allergic inflammation in asthma. This review summarizes current knowledge of the impact of the disturbed hemostatic balance in the lungs on asthma severity and manifestations and identifies new possible targets for asthma treatment. PMID:22262775

  8. Asthma Action Plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cold or warm water used with detergent and bleach can also be effective. • Wash the sheets and ... hot water or cooler water with detergent and bleach. Ë Cockroaches Many people with asthma are allergic ...

  9. Models of asthma: density-equalizing mapping and output benchmarking

    PubMed Central

    Börger, Julia-Annik; Neye, Niko; Scutaru, Cristian; Kreiter, Carolin; Puk, Clemens; Fischer, Tanja C; Groneberg-Kloft, Beatrix

    2008-01-01

    Despite the large amount of experimental studies already conducted on bronchial asthma, further insights into the molecular basics of the disease are required to establish new therapeutic approaches. As a basis for this research different animal models of asthma have been developed in the past years. However, precise bibliometric data on the use of different models do not exist so far. Therefore the present study was conducted to establish a data base of the existing experimental approaches. Density-equalizing algorithms were used and data was retrieved from a Thomson Institute for Scientific Information database. During the period from 1900 to 2006 a number of 3489 filed items were connected to animal models of asthma, the first being published in the year 1968. The studies were published by 52 countries with the US, Japan and the UK being the most productive suppliers, participating in 55.8% of all published items. Analyzing the average citation per item as an indicator for research quality Switzerland ranked first (30.54/item) and New Zealand ranked second for countries with more than 10 published studies. The 10 most productive journals included 4 with a main focus allergy and immunology and 4 with a main focus on the respiratory system. Two journals focussed on pharmacology or pharmacy. In all assigned subject categories examined for a relation to animal models of asthma, immunology ranked first. Assessing numbers of published items in relation to animal species it was found that mice were the preferred species followed by guinea pigs. In summary it can be concluded from density-equalizing calculations that the use of animal models of asthma is restricted to a relatively small number of countries. There are also differences in the use of species. These differences are based on variations in the research focus as assessed by subject category analysis. PMID:18315838

  10. Occupational asthma: a case of Baker's asthma.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Thomas R; Sheffer, Albert L

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most prominent respiratory diseases worldwide. It is defined by airflow limitation and/or airway hyperresponsiveness and can be exacerbated by a number of environmental allergens. When allergic asthma exacerbations are attributed to stimuli in a particular work environment, then occupational asthma must be considered. Incidence estimates vary, but in 1999 the Surveillance of Work-Related and Occupational Respiratory Disease in the United Kingdom estimated 4293 incident cases of occupational respiratory disease, an increase of 1427 cases over the previous year. Occupational asthma represented 26% of these cases. Baker's asthma is one of the most frequently reported types of occupational asthma in several countries. Diagniostic steps include thorough history, careful exam, and demonstration of functional reversible airflow obstruction. Treatment modalities used for occupational asthma are similar to those used in the management of other forms of asthma, with particular attention to reducing the level of exposure to the inciting allergen.

  11. Advances in mechanisms of asthma, allergy, and immunology in 2010.

    PubMed

    Broide, David H; Finkelman, Fred; Bochner, Bruce S; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2011-03-01

    2010 was marked by rapid progress in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation and asthma. Studies published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology described advances in our knowledge of cells associated with allergic inflammation (mast cells, eosinophils, dendritic cells, and T cells), as well as IgE, cytokines, receptors, signaling molecules, and pathways. Studies used animal models, as well as human cells and tissues, to advance our understanding of mechanisms of asthma, eosinophilic esophagitis, food allergy, anaphylaxis and immediate hypersensitivity, mast cells and their disorders, atopic dermatitis, nasal polyposis, and hypereosinophilic syndromes. Additional studies provided novel information about the induction and regulation of allergic inflammation and the genetic contribution to allergic inflammation. Critical features of these studies and their potential effects on human atopic disorders are summarized here.

  12. Mouse Model of Cat Allergic Rhinitis and Intranasal Liposome-Adjuvanted Refined Fel d 1 Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tasaniyananda, Natt; Chaisri, Urai; Tungtrongchitr, Anchalee; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Sookrung, Nitat

    2016-01-01

    Cats (Felis domesticus) are rich source of airborne allergens that prevailed in the environment and sensitized a number of people to allergy. In this study, a mouse model of allergic rhinitis caused by the cat allergens was developed for the first time and the model was used for testing therapeutic efficacy of a novel intranasal liposome-entrapped vaccines made of native Fel d 1 (major cat allergen) in comparison with the vaccine made of crude cat hair extract (cCE). BALB/c mice were sensitized with cCE mixed with alum intraperitoneally and intranasally. The allergic mice were treated with eight doses of either liposome (L)-entrapped native Fel d 1 (L-nFD1), L-cCE), or placebo on every alternate day. Vaccine efficacy evaluation was performed one day after provoking the treated mice with aerosolic cCE. All allergenized mice developed histological features of allergic rhinitis with rises of serum specific-IgE and Th2 cytokine gene expression. Serum IgE and intranasal mucus production of allergic mice reduced significantly after vaccination in comparison with the placebo mice. The vaccines also caused a shift of the Th2 response (reduction of Th2 cytokine expressions) towards the non-pathogenic responses: Th1 (down-regulation of the Th1 suppressive cytokine gene, IL-35) and Treg (up-regulation of IL-10 and TGF-β). In conclusions, a mouse model of allergic rhinitis to cat allergens was successfully developed. The intranasal, liposome-adjuvanted vaccines, especially the refined single allergen formulation, assuaged the allergic manifestations in the modeled mice. The prototype vaccine is worthwhile testing further for clinical use in the pet allergic patients. PMID:26954254

  13. Mouse Model of Cat Allergic Rhinitis and Intranasal Liposome-Adjuvanted Refined Fel d 1 Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Tasaniyananda, Natt; Chaisri, Urai; Tungtrongchitr, Anchalee; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Sookrung, Nitat

    2016-01-01

    Cats (Felis domesticus) are rich source of airborne allergens that prevailed in the environment and sensitized a number of people to allergy. In this study, a mouse model of allergic rhinitis caused by the cat allergens was developed for the first time and the model was used for testing therapeutic efficacy of a novel intranasal liposome-entrapped vaccines made of native Fel d 1 (major cat allergen) in comparison with the vaccine made of crude cat hair extract (cCE). BALB/c mice were sensitized with cCE mixed with alum intraperitoneally and intranasally. The allergic mice were treated with eight doses of either liposome (L)-entrapped native Fel d 1 (L-nFD1), L-cCE), or placebo on every alternate day. Vaccine efficacy evaluation was performed one day after provoking the treated mice with aerosolic cCE. All allergenized mice developed histological features of allergic rhinitis with rises of serum specific-IgE and Th2 cytokine gene expression. Serum IgE and intranasal mucus production of allergic mice reduced significantly after vaccination in comparison with the placebo mice. The vaccines also caused a shift of the Th2 response (reduction of Th2 cytokine expressions) towards the non-pathogenic responses: Th1 (down-regulation of the Th1 suppressive cytokine gene, IL-35) and Treg (up-regulation of IL-10 and TGF-β). In conclusions, a mouse model of allergic rhinitis to cat allergens was successfully developed. The intranasal, liposome-adjuvanted vaccines, especially the refined single allergen formulation, assuaged the allergic manifestations in the modeled mice. The prototype vaccine is worthwhile testing further for clinical use in the pet allergic patients. PMID:26954254

  14. Mouse Model of Cat Allergic Rhinitis and Intranasal Liposome-Adjuvanted Refined Fel d 1 Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tasaniyananda, Natt; Chaisri, Urai; Tungtrongchitr, Anchalee; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Sookrung, Nitat

    2016-01-01

    Cats (Felis domesticus) are rich source of airborne allergens that prevailed in the environment and sensitized a number of people to allergy. In this study, a mouse model of allergic rhinitis caused by the cat allergens was developed for the first time and the model was used for testing therapeutic efficacy of a novel intranasal liposome-entrapped vaccines made of native Fel d 1 (major cat allergen) in comparison with the vaccine made of crude cat hair extract (cCE). BALB/c mice were sensitized with cCE mixed with alum intraperitoneally and intranasally. The allergic mice were treated with eight doses of either liposome (L)-entrapped native Fel d 1 (L-nFD1), L-cCE), or placebo on every alternate day. Vaccine efficacy evaluation was performed one day after provoking the treated mice with aerosolic cCE. All allergenized mice developed histological features of allergic rhinitis with rises of serum specific-IgE and Th2 cytokine gene expression. Serum IgE and intranasal mucus production of allergic mice reduced significantly after vaccination in comparison with the placebo mice. The vaccines also caused a shift of the Th2 response (reduction of Th2 cytokine expressions) towards the non-pathogenic responses: Th1 (down-regulation of the Th1 suppressive cytokine gene, IL-35) and Treg (up-regulation of IL-10 and TGF-β). In conclusions, a mouse model of allergic rhinitis to cat allergens was successfully developed. The intranasal, liposome-adjuvanted vaccines, especially the refined single allergen formulation, assuaged the allergic manifestations in the modeled mice. The prototype vaccine is worthwhile testing further for clinical use in the pet allergic patients.

  15. Precision medicine in patients with allergic diseases: Airway diseases and atopic dermatitis-PRACTALL document of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

    PubMed

    Muraro, Antonella; Lemanske, Robert F; Hellings, Peter W; Akdis, Cezmi A; Bieber, Thomas; Casale, Thomas B; Jutel, Marek; Ong, Peck Y; Poulsen, Lars K; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Seys, Sven F; Agache, Ioana

    2016-05-01

    In this consensus document we summarize the current knowledge on major asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis endotypes under the auspices of the PRACTALL collaboration platform. PRACTALL is an initiative of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology aiming to harmonize the European and American approaches to best allergy practice and science. Precision medicine is of broad relevance for the management of asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis in the context of a better selection of treatment responders, risk prediction, and design of disease-modifying strategies. Progress has been made in profiling the type 2 immune response-driven asthma. The endotype driven approach for non-type 2 immune response asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis is lagging behind. Validation and qualification of biomarkers are needed to facilitate their translation into pathway-specific diagnostic tests. Wide consensus between academia, governmental regulators, and industry for further development and application of precision medicine in management of allergic diseases is of utmost importance. Improved knowledge of disease pathogenesis together with defining validated and qualified biomarkers are key approaches to precision medicine. PMID:27155030

  16. Precision medicine in patients with allergic diseases: Airway diseases and atopic dermatitis-PRACTALL document of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

    PubMed

    Muraro, Antonella; Lemanske, Robert F; Hellings, Peter W; Akdis, Cezmi A; Bieber, Thomas; Casale, Thomas B; Jutel, Marek; Ong, Peck Y; Poulsen, Lars K; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Seys, Sven F; Agache, Ioana

    2016-05-01

    In this consensus document we summarize the current knowledge on major asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis endotypes under the auspices of the PRACTALL collaboration platform. PRACTALL is an initiative of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology aiming to harmonize the European and American approaches to best allergy practice and science. Precision medicine is of broad relevance for the management of asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis in the context of a better selection of treatment responders, risk prediction, and design of disease-modifying strategies. Progress has been made in profiling the type 2 immune response-driven asthma. The endotype driven approach for non-type 2 immune response asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis is lagging behind. Validation and qualification of biomarkers are needed to facilitate their translation into pathway-specific diagnostic tests. Wide consensus between academia, governmental regulators, and industry for further development and application of precision medicine in management of allergic diseases is of utmost importance. Improved knowledge of disease pathogenesis together with defining validated and qualified biomarkers are key approaches to precision medicine.

  17. Applying the Social Ecological Model to Creating Asthma-Friendly Schools in Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuss, Henry J.; Hester, Laura L.; Perry, Mark A.; Stewart-Briley, Collette; Reagon, Valamar M.; Collins, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Background: In 2010, the Louisiana Asthma Management and Prevention Program (LAMP) implemented the Asthma-Friendly Schools Initiative in high-risk Louisiana populations. The social ecological model (SEM) was used as a framework for an asthma program implemented in 70 state K-12 public schools over 2 years. Methods: Activities included a needs…

  18. Inactivated Mycobacterium phlei inhalation ameliorates allergic asthma through modulating the balance of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T and Th17 cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Moyu; Luo, Zhixi; Lv, Shengqiu; Sun, Qixiang; Li, Chaoqian

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Th2 response is related to the aetiology of asthma, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. To address this point, the effect of nebulized inhalation of inactivated Mycobacterium phlei on modulation of asthmatic airway inflammation was investigated. Materials and Methods: 24 male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into three groups: control group (Group A), asthma model group (Group B), and the medicated asthma model group (Group C). Group B and C were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA). Group C was treated with aerosol M. phlei once daily before OVA challenge. Airway responsiveness in each group was assessed. All the animals were killed, and lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were harvested. Inflammatory response, proportion of Th17 and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells, and the levels of cytokines were analyzed in lung tissue. Results: The proportion of Th17 cells and expression level of IL17, IL23, and IL23R were increased, while Foxp3 expression was decreased in Group B. Inhaling inactivated M. phlei inhibited airway inflammation and improved airway hyper-responsiveness, as well as peak expiratory flow (PEF). In addition, it significantly increased Th17 proportion, Foxp3 level, and the proportion of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells in lung tissue in Group C. Conclusion: Inactivated M. phlei was administered by atomization that suppressed airway inflammation and airway hyper responsiveness partially via modulating the balance of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T and Th17 cells. PMID:27803782

  19. The combination of Bifidobacterium breve with non-digestible oligosaccharides suppresses airway inflammation in a murine model for chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Seil; Vos, Arjan P; Morgan, Mary E; Garssen, Johan; Georgiou, Niki A; Boon, Louis; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Folkerts, Gert

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a growing interest in the use of interventions that target the intestinal microbiota as a treatment approach for asthma. This study is aimed at exploring the therapeutic effects of long-term treatment with a combination of Bifidobacterium breve with non-digestible oligosaccharides on airway inflammation and remodeling. A murine ovalbumin-induced chronic asthma model was used. Pulmonary airway inflammation; mRNA expression of pattern recognition receptors, Th-specific cytokines and transcription factors in lung tissue; expression of Foxp3 in blood Th cells; in vitro T cell activation; mast cell degranulation; and airway remodeling were examined. The combination of B. breve with non-digestible oligosaccharides suppressed pulmonary airway inflammation; reduced T cell activation and mast cell degranulation; modulated expression of pattern recognition receptors, cytokines and transcription factors; and reduced airway remodeling. The treatment induced regulatory T cell responses, as shown by increased Il10 and Foxp3 transcription in lung tissue, and augmented Foxp3 protein expression in blood CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells. This specific combination of beneficial bacteria with non-digestible oligosaccharides has strong anti-inflammatory properties, possibly via the induction of a regulatory T cell response, resulting in reduced airway remodeling and, therefore, may be beneficial in the treatment of chronic inflammation in allergic asthma.

  20. Suhuang antitussive capsule at lower doses attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Lan-Hong; Wu, Yin-Fang; Lai, Tian-Wen; Wang, Hai-Sheng; Xiao, Hui; Che, Luan-Qing; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Suhuang antitussive capsule (Suhuang), a traditional Chinese medication, is found effective in treating chronic cough and cough variant asthma (CVA). This study aimed to determine the possible effects and underlying mechanisms of Suhuang on chronic ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation, and remodeling in mice. Mice were randomly assigned to six experimental groups: control, OVA model with or without Suhuang (low dose: 3.5 g/kg, middle dose: 7.0 g/kg, high dose: 14.0 g/kg), or dexamethasone (2.5 mg/kg). AHR, inflammatory cells, cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lung pathology, mucus production, and airway remodeling were examined. We found Suhuang treated at lower doses effectively inhibited OVA-induced AHR, airway inflammation, mucus production and collagen deposition around the airway. High dose of Suhuang reduced most of the inflammatory hallmarks while exerted inconsiderable effects on the number of macrophages in BALF and AHR. At all doses, Suhuang significantly reduced the levels of interlukin (IL) -13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, but had little effects on IL-4, IL-5, IL-17A and interferon (IFN)-γ. Thus, Suhuang administration alleviates the pathological changes of chronic asthma likely through inhibition of IL-13 and TGF-β1. Suhuang might be a promising therapy for patients with allergic asthma in the future. PMID:26861679

  1. Suhuang antitussive capsule at lower doses attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Lan-Hong; Wu, Yin-Fang; Lai, Tian-Wen; Wang, Hai-Sheng; Xiao, Hui; Che, Luan-Qing; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Suhuang antitussive capsule (Suhuang), a traditional Chinese medication, is found effective in treating chronic cough and cough variant asthma (CVA). This study aimed to determine the possible effects and underlying mechanisms of Suhuang on chronic ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation, and remodeling in mice. Mice were randomly assigned to six experimental groups: control, OVA model with or without Suhuang (low dose: 3.5 g/kg, middle dose: 7.0 g/kg, high dose: 14.0 g/kg), or dexamethasone (2.5 mg/kg). AHR, inflammatory cells, cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lung pathology, mucus production, and airway remodeling were examined. We found Suhuang treated at lower doses effectively inhibited OVA-induced AHR, airway inflammation, mucus production and collagen deposition around the airway. High dose of Suhuang reduced most of the inflammatory hallmarks while exerted inconsiderable effects on the number of macrophages in BALF and AHR. At all doses, Suhuang significantly reduced the levels of interlukin (IL) -13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, but had little effects on IL-4, IL-5, IL-17A and interferon (IFN)-γ. Thus, Suhuang administration alleviates the pathological changes of chronic asthma likely through inhibition of IL-13 and TGF-β1. Suhuang might be a promising therapy for patients with allergic asthma in the future. PMID:26861679

  2. Nonspecific airway reactivity in a mouse model of asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Collie, D.D.; Wilder, J.A.; Bice, D.E.

    1995-12-01

    Animal models are indispensable for studies requiring an intact immune system, especially for studying the pathogenic mechanisms in atopic diseases, regulation of IgE production, and related biologic effects. Mice are particularly suitable and have been used extensively for such studies because their immune system is well characterized. Further, large numbers of mutants or inbred strains of mice are available that express deficiencies of individual immunologic processes, inflammatory cells, or mediator systems. By comparing reactions in such mice with appropriate control animals, the unique roles of individual cells or mediators may be characterized more precisely in the pathogenesis of atopic respiratory diseases including asthma. However, given that asthma in humans is characterized by the presence of airway hyperresponsiveness to specific and nonspecific stimuli, it is important that animal models of this disease exhibit similar physiologic abnormalities. In the past, the size of the mouse has limited its versatility in this regard. However, recent studies indicate the feasibility of measuring pulmonary responses in living mice, thus facilitating the physiologic evaluation of putative mouse models of human asthma that have been well charcterized at the immunologic and patholigic level. Future work will provide details of the morphometry of the methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction and will further seek to determine the relationship between cigarette smoke exposure and the development of NS-AHR in the transgenic mouse model.

  3. Exhaled breath condensate pH and exhaled nitric oxide in allergic asthma and in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ojoo, J; Mulrennan, S; Kastelik, J; Morice, A; Redington, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: It has been proposed that the pH of airway lining fluid may regulate the fractional exhaled concentration of nitric oxide (FENO) in respiratory disease. Methods: FENO, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH, and EBC concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate (NO2/NO3) were compared in 12 subjects with stable asthma, 18 with stable cystic fibrosis (CF), and 15 healthy control subjects. Eight of the CF patients were studied on a separate occasion at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation. Results: FENO was significantly greater in asthmatic subjects than in control subjects (mean 35 v 9 ppb, p<0.001). EBC pH, however, was similar in the asthmatic and control groups (median 5.82 v 6.08, p = 0.23). Levels of NO2/NO3 were on average higher in EBC samples from asthmatic subjects, but the difference was not significant. In patients with stable CF both the FENO (mean 4 ppb, p<0.001) and EBC pH (median 5.77, p = 0.003) were lower than in the control group. Levels of EBC NO2/NO3 (median 29.9 µM; p = 0.002) in patients with stable CF, in contrast, were significantly higher than in control subjects. During CF exacerbations, EBC pH was further reduced (median 5.30, p = 0.017) but FENO and NO2/NO3 were unchanged. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate a dissociation between EBC pH and FENO in inflammatory airways disease. PMID:15618578

  4. Epigenetic Mechanisms in Asthma.

    PubMed

    DeVries, Avery; Vercelli, Donata

    2016-03-01

    Asthma and allergic diseases are among the most prevalent chronic noncommunicable diseases of childhood, but the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms are poorly understood. Because epigenetic mechanisms link gene regulation to environmental cues and developmental trajectories, their contribution to asthma and allergy pathogenesis is under active investigation. DNA methylation signatures associated with concurrent disease and with the development of asthma during childhood asthma have been identified, but their significance is not easily interpretable. On the other hand, the characterization of early epigenetic predictors of asthma points to a potential role of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating the inception of, and the susceptibility to, this disease. PMID:27027952

  5. [Asthma and diving].

    PubMed

    Wurzinger, G

    1999-01-01

    Until recently asthma was considered a contraindication for scuba diving due to possible "air trapping" and subsequent barotrauma. However, in view of the wide prevalence and heterogeneity of the illness this is no longer justified. There are, nevertheless, certain prerequisites for diving with asthma: a complete anamnesis and an analysis of the pulmonary function, an exact diagnosis of the trigger factors as well as of the bronchial hyperreactivity in order to correctly ascertain the asthma level. When scuba diving, asthmatics need to observe certain rules. Still, some types of asthma remain incompatible with diving. Among these are the pseudo-allergic, exercise-induced, and psychogenic-induced asthma as well as allergic bronchopulmonal aspergillosis. Asthma due to bronchial infections and GERD are considered relative contraindications.

  6. Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Asthma Model Occurs Independently of Secretion of β1 Integrins in Airway Wall and Focal Adhesions Proteins Down Regulation.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Santos, Mayra; Carbajal, Verónica; Tellez-Jiménez, Olivia; Martínez-Cordero, Erasmo; Ruiz, Victor; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Lascurain, Ricardo; Santibañez-Salgado, Alfredo; Bazan-Perkins, Blanca

    2016-10-01

    The extracellular domains of some membrane proteins can be shed from the cell. A similar phenomenon occurs with β1 integrins (α1β1 and α2β1) in guinea pig. The putative role of β1 integrin subunit alterations due to shedding in airway smooth muscle (ASM) in an allergic asthma model was evaluated. Guinea pigs were sensitized and challenged with antigen. Antigenic challenges induced bronchoobstruction and hyperresponsiveness at the third antigenic challenge. Immunohistochemistry and immunoelectronmicroscopy studies showed that the cytosolic and extracellular domains of the β1 integrin subunit shared the same distribution in airway structures in both groups. Various polypeptides with similar molecular weights were detected with both the cytosolic and extracellular β1 integrin subunit antibodies in isolated airway myocytes and the connective tissue that surrounds the ASM bundle. Flow cytometry and Western blot studies showed that the expression of cytosolic and extracellular β1 integrin subunit domains in ASM was similar between groups. An increment of ITGB1 mRNA in ASM was observed in the asthma model group. RACE-PCR of ITGB1 in ASM did not show splicing variants. The expression levels of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and paxillin diminished in the asthma model, but not talin. The levels of phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) at Thr(696) increased in asthma model. Our work suggests that β1 integrin is secreted in guinea pig airway wall. This secretion is not altered in asthma model; nevertheless, β1 integrin cytodomain assembly proteins in focal cell adhesions in which ILK and paxillin are involved are altered in asthma model. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2385-2396, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Blockade of CD49d (alpha4 integrin) on intrapulmonary but not circulating leukocytes inhibits airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, W R; Chi, E Y; Albert, R K; Chu, S J; Lamm, W J; Rochon, Y; Jonas, M; Christie, P E; Harlan, J M

    1997-01-01

    Immunized mice after inhalation of specific antigen have the following characteristic features of human asthma: airway eosinophilia, mucus and Th2 cytokine release, and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. A model of late-phase allergic pulmonary inflammation in ovalbumin-sensitized mice was used to address the role of the alpha4 integrin (CD49d) in mediating the airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Local, intrapulmonary blockade of CD49d by intranasal administration of CD49d mAb inhibited all signs of lung inflammation, IL-4 and IL-5 release, and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. In contrast, CD49d blockade on circulating leukocytes by intraperitoneal CD49d mAb treatment only prevented the airway eosinophilia. In this asthma model, a CD49d-positive intrapulmonary leukocyte distinct from the eosinophil is the key effector cell of allergen-induced pulmonary inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. PMID:9399955

  8. Prophylactic treatment of asthma by an ozone scavenger in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Haim; Reany, Ofer; Waisman, Dan; Keinan, Ehud

    2015-01-15

    Our hypothesis that inflammation in asthma involves production of ozone by white blood cells and that ozone could be an inflammatory mediator suggests that scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS), for example, electron-rich olefins, could serve for prophylactic treatment of asthma. Olefins could provide chemical protection against either exogenous or endogenous ozone and other ROS. BALB/c mice pretreated by inhalation of d-limonene before an ovalbumin challenge exhibited significant attenuation of the allergic asthma symptoms. Diminution of the inflammatory process was evident by reduced levels of aldehydes, reduced counts of neutrophils in the BAL fluid and by histological tests. A surprising systemic effect was observed by decreased levels of aldehydes in the spleen, suggesting that the examination of tissues and organs that are remote from the inflammation foci could provide valuable information on the distribution of the oxidative stress and may serve as guide for targeted treatment.

  9. Effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on a murine allergic airway inflammation model

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro Koike, Eiko; Yanagisawa, Rie; Hirano, Seishiro; Nishikawa, Masataka; Takano, Hirohisa

    2009-06-15

    The development of nanotechnology has increased the risk of exposure to types of particles other than combustion-derived particles in the environment, namely, industrial nanomaterials. On the other hand, patients with bronchial asthma are sensitive to inhaled substances including particulate matters. This study examined the effects of pulmonary exposure to a type of nano-sized carbon nanotube (multi-walled nanotubes: MWCNT) on allergic airway inflammation in vivo and their cellular mechanisms in vitro. In vivo, ICR mice were divided into 4 experimental groups. Vehicle, MWCNT (50 {mu}g/animal), ovalbumin (OVA), and OVA + MWCNT were repeatedly administered intratracheally. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cellularity, lung histology, levels of cytokines related to allergic inflammation in lung homogenates/BAL fluids (BALFs), and serum immunoglobulin levels were studied. Also, we evaluated the impact of MWCNT (0.1-1 {mu}g/ml) on the phenotype and function of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) in vitro. MWCNT aggravated allergen-induced airway inflammation characterized by the infiltration of eosinophils, neutrophils, and mononuclear cells in the lung, and an increase in the number of goblet cells in the bronchial epithelium. MWCNT with allergen amplified lung protein levels of Th cytokines and chemokines compared with allergen alone. MWCNT exhibited adjuvant activity for allergen-specific IgG{sub 1} and IgE. MWCNT significantly increased allergen (OVA)-specific syngeneic T-cell proliferation, particularly at a lower concentration in vitro. Taken together, MWCNT can exacerbate murine allergic airway inflammation, at least partly, via the promotion of a Th-dominant milieu. In addition, the exacerbation may be partly through the inappropriate activation of antigen-presenting cells including DC.

  10. Allergic fetal priming leads to developmental, behavioral and neurobiological changes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzer, J J; Careaga, M; Chang, C; Onore, C E; Ashwood, P

    2015-01-01

    The state of the mother's immune system during pregnancy has an important role in fetal development and disruptions in the balance of this system are associated with a range of neurologic, neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders. Epidemiological and clinical reports reveal various clues that suggest a possible association between developmental neuropsychiatric disorders and family history of immune system dysfunction. Over the past three decades, analogous increases have been reported in both the incidence of neurodevelopmental disorders and immune-related disorders, particularly allergy and asthma, raising the question of whether allergic asthma and characteristics of various neurodevelopmental disorders share common causal links. We used a mouse model of maternal allergic asthma to test this novel hypothesis that early fetal priming with an allergenic exposure during gestation produces behavioral deficits in offspring. Mothers were primed with an exposure to ovalbumin (OVA) before pregnancy, then exposed to either aerosolized OVA or vehicle during gestation. Both male and female mice born to mothers exposed to aerosolized OVA during gestation exhibited altered developmental trajectories in weight and length, decreased sociability and increased marble-burying behavior. Moreover, offspring of OVA-exposed mothers were observed to have increased serotonin transporter protein levels in the cortex. These data demonstrate that behavioral and neurobiological effects can be elicited following early fetal priming with maternal allergic asthma and provide support that maternal allergic asthma may, in some cases, be a contributing factor to neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:25849982

  11. Comparative Exposure to Soy Biodiesel Emissions in an Allergic Mouse Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    We assessed the immunological effects following inhalation of emissions from 100% Soy biodiesel (S100) or a 20% mix with conventional petrodiesel (S20), in a house dust mite (HDM) allergic Balb/cJ mouse model. Female mice (8/group) were exposed whole body (4 hr/d, 5 d/wk, 4wk) to...

  12. Administration of mycobacterial Ag85A and IL-17A fusion protein attenuates airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rong; Guo, Sheng; Wang, Mei-yi; Li, Yan-hua; Wu, Liang-Xia; Ma, Hui; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-yong; Zhang, Jian-hua

    2013-12-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17A contributes to the development of asthma, especially in severe asthma which has characteristic neutrophil infiltration in airways. However, IL-17A-blocking antibody could escalate T helper (Th) 2 cytokines, such as IL-13, IL-4 in murine models. We aimed at determining the effect of mycobacterial Ag85A and IL-17A fusion protein—Ag85A-IL-17A on airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma. IL-17A recombinant protein fused mycobacterial immunodominant antigen Ag85A was constructed, expressed and purified. The fusion protein was then administrated into BALB/c mice and its anti-inflammatory effects in the infiltration of inflammatory cells, Th2/Th17 cytokines in BALF, histopathological changes of lung tissues as well as chemokines in lung tissues were evaluated in the murine model of asthma. We found that administration of mycobacterial Ag85A and IL-17A fusion protein induced IL-17A specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G in sera and significantly decreased IL-17A and IL-6 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Ag85A-IL-17A vaccinated mice also showed marked reduction in the infiltration of inflammatory cells in peribronchiolar region and significant decrease in total cells, eosinophil cells and neutrophil cells in BALF. The increased levels of IL-13 and IL-4 in BALF of ovalbumin-sensitized mice were significantly reduced by the administration of Ag85A-IL-17A. Furthermore, CD3+CD4+IL-13+ splenocytes stimulated with OVA and CXCL1 mRNA, CCL2 mRNA and GATA-3 mRNA expressed in lung tissues were decreased markedly in Ag85A-IL-17A vaccinated group. Our results demonstrate remarkable antiallergic effects of Ag85A-IL-17A in a murine model of asthma and it may have protective effects on allergic asthma.

  13. Mouse Models Applied to the Research of Pharmacological Treatments in Asthma.

    PubMed

    Marqués-García, Fernando; Marcos-Vadillo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Models developed for the study of asthma mechanisms can be used to investigate new compounds with pharmacological activity against this disease. The increasing number of compounds requires a preclinical evaluation before starting the application in humans. Preclinical evaluation in animal models reduces the number of clinical trials positively impacting in the cost and in safety. In this chapter, three protocols for the study of drugs are shown: a model to investigate corticoids as a classical treatment of asthma; a protocol to test the effects of retinoic acid (RA) on asthma; and a mouse model to test new therapies in asthma as monoclonal antibodies. PMID:27300543

  14. Allergic rhinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic to, such as dust, animal dander, or pollen. Symptoms can also occur when you eat a ... article focuses on allergic rhinitis due to plant pollens. This type of allergic rhinitis is commonly called ...

  15. Protective Effects of Diallyl Sulfide on Ovalbumin-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation of Allergic Asthma Mice by MicroRNA-144, -34a, and -34b/c-Modulated Nrf2 Activation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng-Ying; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Weng, Chia-Jui; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2016-01-13

    Allergic airway disorder is characterized by an increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The induction of inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by an allergen was ameliorated by antioxidants in vivo. This study investigated the protective effects and underlying mechanism of diallyl sulfide (DAS) on ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma of BALB/c mice. The animals were intraperitoneally sensitized by inhaling OVA to induce chronic airway inflammation. By administering DAS, a decrease of the infiltrated inflammatory cell counts and the levels of IL-4 and IL-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as well as the OVA-specific immunoglobulin E levels in sera were observed. DAS also effectively inhibited OVA-induced inflammatory cell infiltration and mucus hypersecretion in lung tissue. Several OVA-induced inflammatory factors (ROS, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α, and NF-κB) were inhibited by DAS. In addition, DAS increased OVA inhalation-reduced levels of Nrf2 activation by regulating microRNA-144, -34a and -34b/c. Together, the pathogenesis of OVA-induced asthma is highly associated with oxidative stress, and DAS may be an effective supplement to alleviate this disease.

  16. Local Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Campo, Paloma; Salas, María; Blanca-López, Natalia; Rondón, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    This review focuses on local allergic rhinitis, a new phenotype of allergic rhinitis, commonly misdiagnosed as nonallergic rhinitis. It has gained attention over last decade and can affect patients from all countries, ethnic groups and ages, impairing their quality of life, and is frequently associated with conjunctivitis and asthma. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, the demonstration of a positive response to nasal allergen provocation test and/or the detection of nasal sIgE. A positive basophil activation test may support the diagnosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that allergen immunotherapy is an effective immune-modifying treatment, highlighting the importance of early diagnosis. PMID:27083105

  17. [Establishment of a rat chronic asthma model and its evaluation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Cheng; Zhang, Yan-Fen

    2010-06-01

    This study is to establish a rat chronic asthma model. Sensitive SD rats were selected through histamine challenge. The asthmatic groups were sensitized by ih and ip with OVA, aluminium hydroxide gel and inactivated bacillus pertussis on day 1 and 14. From day 21, acute asthmatic group was aerosolized 1% OVA for 1 week, chronic asthmatic group was aerosolized 0.1% OVA for 12 weeks. The control groups received saline as the substitution of OVA. Twenty four hours after the last provocation, physiological monitoring equipment was used to detect the pulmonary function, then the rats were sacrificed. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected to calculate the ratio of different inflammatory cells. ELISA was used to detect total IgE and OVA-specific IgE in serum. Microscopy was conducted to observe the histopathology of lung stained with haematoxylin and eosin staining. Collagen fibers were detected using Picric acid-Sirius red staining technique. The optical density at 610 nm of extractive from locus caeruleus was detected by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA). The results showed that the asthmatic characteristics were significantly developed in model groups, but not in control groups. Chronic asthmatic group had significantly higher indexes than acute asthmatic group, including the thickness of airway smooth muscle and bronchial basement membrane, and goblet cell hyperplasia, the area of collagen in airways, A610 of extractive from locus caeruleus, the concentration of total IgE and OVA-specific IgE in serum. However, inflammatory cell infiltrate in lungs and the percentage of eosinophils of white blood cells in BALF were lower in chronic asthmatic group than those in acute asthmatic group. Respiratory rate and respiratory flow showed no significant difference in both model groups. In conclusion, the rat chronic asthma model is established by the way in this study, which is comparable to the physiopathologic characteristics of human asthma.

  18. Effects of mometasone furoate on a rat allergic rhinitis model.

    PubMed

    Tsumuro, Tae; Ogawa, Masami; Minami, Kazuhisa; Takubo, Miho; Rahman, Ashequr; Fujii, Yoko; Kamei, Chiaki

    2005-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to clarify the effects of mometasone on nasal symptoms induced by repeated intranasal application of antigen in sensitized rats in comparison with that of chlorpheniramine. Rats received mometasone intranasally or chlorpheniramine orally 1 h before a topical antigen challenge for 7 days. Mometasone caused a decrease in the instances of nasal rubbing and an inhibition of this response was observed during the treatment period. Almost identical findings were observed with chlorpheniramine. This response was inhibited, even after the interruption of mometasone treatment, while such an effect was not observed with chlorpheniramine. On day 36, the changes in sensitivity to histamine were investigated. Unlike chlorpheniramine, hypersensitivity to histamine was significantly reduced in the mometasone-treated group. The passive cutaneous anaphylaxis titers were elevated and reached a maximum 8 days after the start of the topical antigen challenge. The passive cutaneous anaphylaxis titer in the mometasone-treated group was significantly lower than that in the control group. The results indicated that mometasone is effective in allergic rhinitis, not only during the period of application, but also after the interruption of application.

  19. CD11b+ and Sca-1+ Cells Exert the Main Beneficial Effects of Systemically Administered Bone Marrow-Derived Mononuclear Cells in a Murine Model of Mixed Th2/Th17 Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Fernanda F.; Borg, Zachary D.; Goodwin, Meagan; Coffey, Amy L.; Wagner, Darcy E.; Rocco, Patricia R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic administration of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMDMCs) or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) reduces inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in a murine model of Th2-mediated eosinophilic allergic airway inflammation. However, since BMDMCs are a heterogeneous population that includes MSCs, it is unclear whether the MSCs alone are responsible for the BMDMC effects. To determine which BMDMC population(s) is responsible for ameliorating AHR and lung inflammation in a model of mixed Th2-eosinophilic and Th17-neutrophilic allergic airway inflammation, reminiscent of severe clinical asthma, BMDMCs obtained from normal C57Bl/6 mice were serially depleted of CD45, CD34, CD11b, CD3, CD19, CD31, or Sca-1 positive cells. The different resulting cell populations were then assessed for ability to reduce lung inflammation and AHR in mixed Th2/Th17 allergic airway inflammation induced by mucosal sensitization to and challenge with Aspergillus hyphal extract (AHE) in syngeneic C56Bl/6 mice. BMDMCs depleted of either CD11b-positive (CD11b+) or Sca-1-positive (Sca-1+) cells were unable to ameliorate AHR or lung inflammation in this model. Depletion of the other cell types did not diminish the ameliorating effects of BMDMC administration. In conclusion, in the current model of allergic inflammation, CD11b+ cells (monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells) and Sca-1+ cells (MSCs) are responsible for the beneficial effects of BMDMCs. Significance This study shows that bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMDMCs) are as effective as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in ameliorating experimental asthma. It also demonstrates that not only MSCs present in the pool of BMDMCs are responsible for BMDMCs’ beneficial effects but also monocytes, which are the most important cell population to trigger these effects. All of this is in the setting of a clinically relevant model of severe allergic airways inflammation and thus

  20. Immunological characteristics and management considerations in obese patients with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ather, Jennifer L; Poynter, Matthew E; Dixon, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with severe, poorly controlled asthma that does not respond as well to therapy as asthma in leaner asthmatics. Important insights gained from animal models of obesity and asthma suggests that different forms of obesity may lead to different manifestations of airway disease: obesity is associated with both innate increased airway reactivity and altered responses to aeroallergen and pollutant challenges. In humans, at least two broad groups of obese asthmatics have been recognized: one that is likely unique to obesity and another that is likely lean allergic asthma much complicated by obesity. This article will discuss what we have learned about the immunological and pathophysiological basis of asthma in obesity from animal and human studies, and how this might guide therapy. PMID:25914932

  1. Therapeutic strategies for allergic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter J.

    1999-11-01

    Many drugs are now in development for the treatment of atopic diseases, including asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. These treatments are based on improvements in existing therapies or on a better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in atopic diseases. Although most attention has been focused on asthma, treatments that inhibit the atopic disease process would have application to all atopic diseases, as they often coincide. Most of the many new therapies in development are aimed at inhibiting components of the allergic inflammatory response, but in the future there are real possibilities for the development of preventative and even curative treatments.

  2. Home dampness, current allergic diseases, and respiratory infections among young adults

    PubMed Central

    Kilpelainen, M; Terho, E; Helenius, H; Koskenvuo, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The relation between home dampness and respiratory symptoms among adults is well confirmed, but data on specific allergic diseases and respiratory infections is more limited. Individual factors that may enhance susceptibility to the effects of home dampness are mainly unknown.
METHODS—The association between home dampness and current physician diagnosed asthma, allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, atopic dermatitis, common colds, and bacterial respiratory infections was studied in a questionnaire survey of 10 667 Finnish first year university students aged 18-25 years. The dampness categories analysed were visible mould and visible mould or damp stains or water damage during the last year. In multivariate analyses adjustment was made for parental education, active and passive smoking, type and place of residence, pets, and wall to wall carpets. The interaction effect of atopic heredity and dampness was investigated.
RESULTS—Visible mould or damp stains or water damage was reported by 15.0% of the respondents. In multivariate models there was a positive association between home dampness and current asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis, as well as common colds ⩾4 times per year and other respiratory infections, but not between home dampness and allergic conjunctivitis. The strongest association was found between exposure to visible mould and asthma (OR 2.21,95% CI 1.48 to 3.28) and common colds (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.87). The risk of current asthma in damp homes was highest among subjects with atopic heredity.
CONCLUSIONS—The risk of current asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis was higher in damp homes. Of the respiratory infections, the risk of common colds was most clearly increased.

 PMID:11359962

  3. The role of particulate matter in exacerbation of atopic asthma.

    PubMed

    Gavett, S H; Koren, H S

    2001-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that elevated levels of particulate matter (PM) can exacerbate existing asthma, while evidence that PM can promote the induction of asthma is limited. PM in ambient air has been associated with increased emergency room visits and medication use by asthmatics. Controlled human exposure studies of acid aerosols suggest increased responses among adolescent asthmatics. Increased ambient and indoor levels of bioaerosols (e.g., house dust mite, fungal spores, endotoxin) have been associated with exacerbation of asthma. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) studies focus on the effects of exposing humans and animal models to a combination of various PM samples (e.g., diesel exhaust particles, oil fly ash) and allergens (e.g., house dust mite, ovalbumin). These research efforts to understand the mechanisms by which PM exposure can promote allergic sensitization and exacerbate existing asthma concentrate on the role of transition metals. Exposure of animal models to combined PM and allergen promotes allergic sensitization and increases allergic inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. Exposure of healthy human volunteers to emission source PM samples promotes inflammation and increased indices of oxidant formation correlating with the quantity of transition metals in the samples. Results of these studies suggest that transition metals in ambient PM promote the formation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent lung injury, inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness leading to airflow limitation and symptoms of asthma.

  4. Genetics of Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Romina A.; Barnes, Kathleen C.

    2015-01-01

    The allergic diseases are complex phenotypes for which a strong genetic basis has been firmly established. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has been widely employed in the field of allergic disease, and to date significant associations have been published for nearly 100 asthma genes/loci, in addition to multiple genes/loci for AD, AR and IgE levels, for which the overwhelming number of candidates are novel and have given a new appreciation for the role of innate as well as adaptive immune-response genes in allergic disease. A major outcome of GWAS in allergic disease has been the formation of national and international collaborations leading to consortia meta-analyses, and an appreciation for the specificity of genetic associations to sub-phenotypes of allergic disease. Molecular genetics has undergone a technological revolution, leading to next generation sequencing (NGS) strategies that are increasingly employed to hone in on the causal variants associated with allergic diseases. Unmet needs in the field include the inclusion of ethnically and racially diverse cohorts, and strategies for managing ‘big data’ that is an outcome of technological advances such as sequencing. PMID:25459575

  5. [Pseudotumoral allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Otero González, I; Montero Martínez, C; Blanco Aparicio, M; Valiño López, P; Verea Hernando, H

    2000-06-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) develops as the result of a hypersensitivity reaction to fungi of the genus Aspergillus. Clinical and radiological presentation can be atypical, requiring a high degree of suspicion on the part of the physician who treats such patients. We report the cases of two patients with APBA in whom the form of presentation--with few asthma symptoms, images showing lobar atelectasia and hilar adenopathy--led to an initial suspicion of lung cancer. PMID:10932345

  6. Animal Models of Allergic Airways Disease: Where Are We and Where to Next?

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, David G.; Tully, Jane E.; Nolin, James D.; Jansen-Heininger, Yvonne M; Irvin, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    In a complex inflammatory airways disease such as asthma, abnormalities in a plethora of molecular and cellular pathways ultimately culminate in characteristic impairments in respiratory function. The ability to study disease pathophysiology in the setting of a functioning immune and respiratory system therefore makes mouse models an invaluable tool in translational research. Despite the vast understanding of inflammatory airways diseases gained from mouse models to date, concern over the validity of mouse models continues to grow. Therefore the aim of this review is two-fold; firstly, to evaluate mouse models of asthma in light of current clinical definitions, and secondly, to provide a framework by which mouse models can be continually refined so that they continue to stand at the forefront of translational science. Indeed, it is in viewing mouse models as a continual work in progress that we will be able to target our research to those patient populations in whom current therapies are insufficient. PMID:25043224

  7. Polyunsaturated lysophosphatidic acid as a potential asthma biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Steven J; Park, Gye Young; Christman, John W; Nyenhuis, Sharmilee; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a lipid mediator in biological fluids and tissues, is generated mainly by autotaxin that hydrolyzes lysophosphatidylcholine to LPA and choline. Total LPA levels are increased in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from asthmatic lung, and are strongly induced following subsegmental bronchoprovocation with allergen in subjects with allergic asthma. Polyunsaturated molecular species of LPA (C22:5 and C22:6) are selectively synthesized in the airways of asthma subjects following allergen challenge and in mouse models of allergic airway inflammation, having been identified and quantified by LC/MS/MS lipidomics. This review discusses current knowledge of LPA production in asthmatic lung and the potential utility of polyunsaturated LPA molecular species as novel biomarkers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and exhaled breath condensate of asthma subjects. PMID:26808693

  8. The role of heparanase in pulmonary cell recruitment in response to an allergic but not non-allergic stimulus.

    PubMed

    Morris, Abigail; Wang, Bo; Waern, Ida; Venkatasamy, Radhakrishnan; Page, Clive; Schmidt, Eric P; Wernersson, Sara; Li, Jin-Ping; Spina, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Heparanase is an endo-β-glucuronidase that specifically cleaves heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix. Expression of this enzyme is increased in several pathological conditions including inflammation. We have investigated the role of heparanase in pulmonary inflammation in the context of allergic and non-allergic pulmonary cell recruitment using heparanase knockout (Hpa-/-) mice as a model. Following local delivery of LPS or zymosan, no significant difference was found in the recruitment of neutrophils to the lung between Hpa-/- and wild type (WT) control. Similarly neutrophil recruitment was not inhibited in WT mice treated with a heparanase inhibitor. However, in allergic inflammatory models, Hpa-/- mice displayed a significantly reduced eosinophil (but not neutrophil) recruitment to the airways and this was also associated with a reduction in allergen-induced bronchial hyperresponsiveness, indicating that heparanase expression is associated with allergic reactions. This was further demonstrated by pharmacological treatment with a heparanase inhibitor in the WT allergic mice. Examination of lung specimens from patients with different severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) found increased heparanase expression. Thus, it is established that heparanase contributes to allergen-induced eosinophil recruitment to the lung and could provide a novel therapeutic target for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of asthma and other allergic diseases.

  9. Dual oxidase regulates neutrophil recruitment in allergic airways.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sandra; Linderholm, Angela; Franzi, Lisa; Kenyon, Nicholas; Grasberger, Helmut; Harper, Richart

    2013-12-01

    Enhanced reactive oxygen species production in allergic airways is well described and correlates with increased airway contractions, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell metaplasia, and mucus hypersecretion. There is also an abundance of interleukin-4/interleukin-13 (IL-4/IL-13)- or interleukin-5-secreting cells that are thought to be central to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. We postulated that the dual oxidases (DUOX1 and DUOX2), members of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase family that release hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the respiratory tract, are critical proteins in the pathogenesis of allergic airways. DUOX activity is regulated by cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-13, and DUOX-mediated H2O2 influences several important features of allergic asthma: mucin production, IL-8 secretion, and wound healing. The objective of this study was to establish the contribution of DUOXs to the development of allergic asthma in a murine model. To accomplish this goal, we utilized a DUOXA-deficient mouse model (Duoxa(-/-)) that lacked maturation factors for both DUOX1 and DUOX2. Our results are the first to demonstrate evidence of DUOX protein and DUOX functional activity in murine airway epithelium. We also demonstrate that DUOXA maturation factors are required for airway-specific H2O2 production and localization of DUOX to cilia of fully differentiated airway epithelial cells. We compared wild-type and Duoxa(-/-) mice in an ovalbumin exposure model to determine the role of DUOX in allergic asthma. In comparison to DUOX-intact mice, Duoxa(-/-) mice had reduced mucous cell metaplasia and lower levels of TH2 cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, increased airway resistance in response to methacholine was observed in Duoxa(+/+) mice, as expected, but was absent in Duoxa(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, Duoxa(-/-) mice had decreased influx of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue sections associated with a lower level of the

  10. The Microbiome and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yvonne J.

    2014-01-01

    That the subglottic airways are not sterile, as was once believed, but are populated by a distinct “bronchial microbiome,” is now accepted. Also accepted is the concept that asthma is associated with differences in the composition of this microbiome. What is not clear is whether the differences in microbial community composition themselves mediate pathologic changes in the airways or whether they reflect differences in systemic immune function driven by differences in the development of the gastrointestinal microbiome in early life, when the immune system is most malleable. Recognition of the probable existence of a “common mucosal immune system” allowed synthesis of these apparently opposing ideas into a single conceptual model. Gastrointestinal microbiome–driven differences in systemic immune function predispose to sensitization to allergens deposited on mucosal surfaces, whereas possibly similar, but not identical, differences in immune function predispose to less effective responses to microbial infection of the airways, resulting in persistence of the inflammation underlying the structural and functional abnormalities of asthma. In this model, allergic sensitization and asthma are thus seen as commonly overlapping but not necessarily coincident consequences of abnormalities in microbial colonization, development of immune function, and encounter with agents infecting the respiratory tract. PMID:24437406

  11. The role of CRAC channel in asthma.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manminder; Birrell, Mark A; Dekkak, Bilel; Reynolds, Sophie; Wong, Sissie; De Alba, Jorge; Raemdonck, Kristof; Hall, Simon; Simpson, Karen; Begg, Malcolm; Belvisi, Maria G; Singh, Dave

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is increasing globally and current treatments only manage a proportion of patients. There is an urgent need to develop new therapies. Lymphocytes are thought to play a central role in the pathophysiology of asthma through the production of inflammatory mediators. This is thought to be via the transcription factor NFAT which in turn can be activated through Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels. The aim of this work was to investigate the role of CRAC in clinical and pre-clinical models of allergic asthma. Initial data demonstrated that the NFAT pathway is increased in stimulated lymphocytes from asthmatics. To confirm a role for the channel we showed that a selective inhibitor, Synta 66, blocked mediator production from lymphocytes. Synta 66 inhibited CD2/3/28 induced IL-2, IL-7, IL-13 & IFNΥ in a concentration-dependent manner in healthy and severe asthma donors, with over 60% inhibition observed for all cytokines. NFAT pathway was also increased in a pre-clinical asthma model. In this model we have demonstrated that CRAC played a central role in the airway inflammation and late asthmatic response (LAR). In conclusion, our data provides evidence that suggests targeting CRAC channels could be of therapeutic benefit for asthma sufferers.

  12. The role of CRAC channel in asthma.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manminder; Birrell, Mark A; Dekkak, Bilel; Reynolds, Sophie; Wong, Sissie; De Alba, Jorge; Raemdonck, Kristof; Hall, Simon; Simpson, Karen; Begg, Malcolm; Belvisi, Maria G; Singh, Dave

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is increasing globally and current treatments only manage a proportion of patients. There is an urgent need to develop new therapies. Lymphocytes are thought to play a central role in the pathophysiology of asthma through the production of inflammatory mediators. This is thought to be via the transcription factor NFAT which in turn can be activated through Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels. The aim of this work was to investigate the role of CRAC in clinical and pre-clinical models of allergic asthma. Initial data demonstrated that the NFAT pathway is increased in stimulated lymphocytes from asthmatics. To confirm a role for the channel we showed that a selective inhibitor, Synta 66, blocked mediator production from lymphocytes. Synta 66 inhibited CD2/3/28 induced IL-2, IL-7, IL-13 & IFNΥ in a concentration-dependent manner in healthy and severe asthma donors, with over 60% inhibition observed for all cytokines. NFAT pathway was also increased in a pre-clinical asthma model. In this model we have demonstrated that CRAC played a central role in the airway inflammation and late asthmatic response (LAR). In conclusion, our data provides evidence that suggests targeting CRAC channels could be of therapeutic benefit for asthma sufferers. PMID:26344428

  13. Biology of diesel exhaust effects on allergic pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro; Takano, Hirohisa

    2011-03-01

    Although the adverse health effects of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) have been proposed and are being clarified, their facilitating effects on preexisting pathological conditions (pathological conditions) have not been fully identified. On the other hand, there exist hypersensitive subjects against particulate matters. In this review, we provide insights into the immunotoxicity of DEP as an aggravating factor in hypersusceptible subjects, especially those with allergic pulmonary diseases using our in vivo experimental model. In brief, we examined the effects of DEP on allergic asthma in vivo, and showed that repetitive pulmonary exposure to DEP has promoting effects on allergic airway inflammation, including adjuvanticity on Th2-milieu. Further, we propose a causal machinery regarding the adverse impacts, i.e., via inappropriate activation of antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells.

  14. Persistence of Serotonergic Enhancement of Airway Response in a Model of Childhood Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brian D.; Hyde, Dallas M.; Miller, Lisa A.; Wong, Emily M.

    2014-01-01

    The persistence of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and serotonergic enhancement of airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction induced by ozone (O3) plus allergen has not been evaluated. If this mechanism persists after a prolonged recovery, it would indicate that early-life exposure to O3 plus allergen induces functional changes predisposing allergic individuals to asthma-related symptoms throughout life, even in the absence of environmental insult. A persistent serotonergic mechanism in asthma exacerbations may offer a novel therapeutic target, widening treatment options for patients with asthma. The objective of this study was to determine if previously documented AHR and serotonin-enhanced ASM contraction in allergic monkeys exposed to O3 plus house dust mite allergen (HDMA) persist after prolonged recovery. Infant rhesus monkeys sensitized to HDMA were exposed to filtered air (FA) (n = 6) or HDMA plus O3 (n = 6) for 5 months. Monkeys were then housed in a FA environment for 30 months. At 3 years, airway responsiveness was assessed. Airway rings were then harvested, and ASM contraction was evaluated using electrical field stimulation with and without exogenous serotonin and serotonin-subtype receptor antagonists. Animals exposed to O3 plus HDMA exhibited persistent AHR. Serotonin exacerbated the ASM contraction in the exposure group but not in the FA group. Serotonin subtype receptors 2, 3, and 4 appear to drive the response. Our study shows that AHR and serotonin-dependent exacerbation of cholinergic-mediated ASM contraction induced by early-life exposure to O3 plus allergen persist for at least 2.5 years and may contribute to a persistent asthma phenotype. PMID:24484440

  15. Persistence of serotonergic enhancement of airway response in a model of childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian D; Hyde, Dallas M; Miller, Lisa A; Wong, Emily M; Schelegle, Edward S

    2014-07-01

    The persistence of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and serotonergic enhancement of airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction induced by ozone (O3) plus allergen has not been evaluated. If this mechanism persists after a prolonged recovery, it would indicate that early-life exposure to O3 plus allergen induces functional changes predisposing allergic individuals to asthma-related symptoms throughout life, even in the absence of environmental insult. A persistent serotonergic mechanism in asthma exacerbations may offer a novel therapeutic target, widening treatment options for patients with asthma. The objective of this study was to determine if previously documented AHR and serotonin-enhanced ASM contraction in allergic monkeys exposed to O3 plus house dust mite allergen (HDMA) persist after prolonged recovery. Infant rhesus monkeys sensitized to HDMA were exposed to filtered air (FA) (n = 6) or HDMA plus O3 (n = 6) for 5 months. Monkeys were then housed in a FA environment for 30 months. At 3 years, airway responsiveness was assessed. Airway rings were then harvested, and ASM contraction was evaluated using electrical field stimulation with and without exogenous serotonin and serotonin-subtype receptor antagonists. Animals exposed to O3 plus HDMA exhibited persistent AHR. Serotonin exacerbated the ASM contraction in the exposure group but not in the FA group. Serotonin subtype receptors 2, 3, and 4 appear to drive the response. Our study shows that AHR and serotonin-dependent exacerbation of cholinergic-mediated ASM contraction induced by early-life exposure to O3 plus allergen persist for at least 2.5 years and may contribute to a persistent asthma phenotype. PMID:24484440

  16. Endocrine disruptors found in food contaminants enhance allergic sensitization through an oxidative stress that promotes the development of allergic airway inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Takuma; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Wang, Linan; Murata, Mariko; Kuribayashi, Kagemasa

    2013-11-15

    In the past few decades, there has been a significant increase in incidence of allergic diseases. The hygiene hypothesis may provide some clues to explain this rising trend, but it may also be attributable to other environmental factors that exert a proallergic adjuvant effects. However, there is limited information on the risks of developing allergic asthma and related diseases through the ingestion of environmental chemicals found in food contaminants. In the present study, we have shown that oral administration of tributyltin, used as a model environmental chemical, induced oxidative-stress status in the bronchial lymph node, mesenteric lymph node and spleen, but not in the lung, where the initial step of allergic asthma pathogenesis takes place. Mice exposed to tributyltin exhibited heightened Th2 immunity to the allergen with more severe airway inflammation. Tributyltin also induced Treg cells apoptosis preferentially over non-Treg cells. All these effects of tributyltin exposure were canceled by the administration of glutathione monoethyl ester. Meanwhile, tributyltin did not affect airway inflammation of mice transferred with allergen-specific Th2 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that tributyltin exerts its pathological effect during the sensitization phase through oxidative stress that enhances the development of allergic diseases. The current study dissects the pathogenic role of oxidative stress induced by oral exposure to an environmental chemical during the sensitization phase of allergic airway inflammation and would be important for developing therapeutics for prevention of allergic diseases. - Highlights: • Oral exposure to TBT exacerbates airway inflammation. • TBT induces oxidative stress in secondary lymphoid organs, but not in the lung. • TBT preferentially induces regulatory T cell apoptosis over non-Treg cells. • TBT does not enhance pre-existing airway inflammation in sensitized mice. • Chemicals in food contaminants

  17. [Definition and clinic of the allergic rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Spielhaupter, Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    The allergic rhinitis is the most common immune disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 24% and one of the most common chronic diseases at all--with tendency to rise. It occurs in childhood and influences the patients' social life, school performance and labour productivity. Furthermore the allergic rhinitis is accompanied by a lot of comorbidities, including conjunctivitis, asthma bronchiale, food allergy, neurodermatitis and sinusitis. For example the risk for asthma is 3.2-fold higher for adults with allergic rhinitis than for healthy people. PMID:27120868

  18. Allergic reactions to foods by inhalation.

    PubMed

    James, John M; Crespo, Jesús Fernández

    2007-06-01

    Although allergic reactions to foods occur most commonly after ingestion, inhalation of foods can also be an underlying cause of these reactions. For example, published reports have highlighted the inhalation of allergens from fish, shellfish, seeds, soybeans, cereal grains, hen's egg, cow's milk, and many other foods in allergic reactions. Symptoms have typically included respiratory manifestations such as rhinoconjunctivitis, coughing, wheezing, dyspnea, and asthma. In some cases, anaphylaxis has been observed. In addition, there have been many investigations of occupational asthma following the inhalation of relevant food allergens. This report reviews the current literature focusing on allergic reactions to foods by inhalation.

  19. [Definition and clinic of the allergic rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Spielhaupter, Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    The allergic rhinitis is the most common immune disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 24% and one of the most common chronic diseases at all--with tendency to rise. It occurs in childhood and influences the patients' social life, school performance and labour productivity. Furthermore the allergic rhinitis is accompanied by a lot of comorbidities, including conjunctivitis, asthma bronchiale, food allergy, neurodermatitis and sinusitis. For example the risk for asthma is 3.2-fold higher for adults with allergic rhinitis than for healthy people.

  20. Allergic diseases among children: nutritional prevention and intervention.

    PubMed

    Hendaus, Mohamed A; Jomha, Fatima A; Ehlayel, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases comprise a genetically heterogeneous group of chronic, immunomediated diseases. It has been clearly reported that the prevalence of these diseases has been on the rise for the last few decades, but at different rates, in various areas of the world. This paper discusses the epidemiology of allergic diseases among children and their negative impact on affected patients, their families, and societies. These effects include the adverse effects on quality of life and economic costs. Medical interest has shifted from tertiary or secondary prevention to primary prevention of these chronic diseases among high-risk infants in early life. Being simple, practical, and cost-effective are mandatory features for any candidate methods delivering these strategies. Dietary therapy fits this model well, as it is simple, practical, and cost-effective, and involves diverse methods. The highest priority strategy is feeding these infants breast milk. For those who are not breast-fed, there should be a strategy to maintain beneficial gut flora that positively influences intestinal immunity. We review the current use of probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics, and safety and adverse effects. Other dietary modalities of possible potential in achieving this primary prevention, such as a Mediterranean diet, use of milk formula with modified (hydrolyzed) proteins, and the role of micronutrients, are also explored. Breast-feeding is effective in reducing the risk of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic eczema among children. In addition, breast milk constitutes a major source of support for gut microbe colonization, due to its bifidobacteria and galactooligosaccharide content. The literature lacks consensus in recommending the addition of probiotics to foods for prevention and treatment of allergic diseases, while prebiotics may prove to be effective in reducing atopy in healthy children. There is insufficient evidence to support soy formulas or amino acid formulas for

  1. Allergic diseases among children: nutritional prevention and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hendaus, Mohamed A; Jomha, Fatima A; Ehlayel, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases comprise a genetically heterogeneous group of chronic, immunomediated diseases. It has been clearly reported that the prevalence of these diseases has been on the rise for the last few decades, but at different rates, in various areas of the world. This paper discusses the epidemiology of allergic diseases among children and their negative impact on affected patients, their families, and societies. These effects include the adverse effects on quality of life and economic costs. Medical interest has shifted from tertiary or secondary prevention to primary prevention of these chronic diseases among high-risk infants in early life. Being simple, practical, and cost-effective are mandatory features for any candidate methods delivering these strategies. Dietary therapy fits this model well, as it is simple, practical, and cost-effective, and involves diverse methods. The highest priority strategy is feeding these infants breast milk. For those who are not breast-fed, there should be a strategy to maintain beneficial gut flora that positively influences intestinal immunity. We review the current use of probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics, and safety and adverse effects. Other dietary modalities of possible potential in achieving this primary prevention, such as a Mediterranean diet, use of milk formula with modified (hydrolyzed) proteins, and the role of micronutrients, are also explored. Breast-feeding is effective in reducing the risk of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic eczema among children. In addition, breast milk constitutes a major source of support for gut microbe colonization, due to its bifidobacteria and galactooligosaccharide content. The literature lacks consensus in recommending the addition of probiotics to foods for prevention and treatment of allergic diseases, while prebiotics may prove to be effective in reducing atopy in healthy children. There is insufficient evidence to support soy formulas or amino acid formulas for

  2. Allergic diseases among children: nutritional prevention and intervention.

    PubMed

    Hendaus, Mohamed A; Jomha, Fatima A; Ehlayel, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases comprise a genetically heterogeneous group of chronic, immunomediated diseases. It has been clearly reported that the prevalence of these diseases has been on the rise for the last few decades, but at different rates, in various areas of the world. This paper discusses the epidemiology of allergic diseases among children and their negative impact on affected patients, their families, and societies. These effects include the adverse effects on quality of life and economic costs. Medical interest has shifted from tertiary or secondary prevention to primary prevention of these chronic diseases among high-risk infants in early life. Being simple, practical, and cost-effective are mandatory features for any candidate methods delivering these strategies. Dietary therapy fits this model well, as it is simple, practical, and cost-effective, and involves diverse methods. The highest priority strategy is feeding these infants breast milk. For those who are not breast-fed, there should be a strategy to maintain beneficial gut flora that positively influences intestinal immunity. We review the current use of probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics, and safety and adverse effects. Other dietary modalities of possible potential in achieving this primary prevention, such as a Mediterranean diet, use of milk formula with modified (hydrolyzed) proteins, and the role of micronutrients, are also explored. Breast-feeding is effective in reducing the risk of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic eczema among children. In addition, breast milk constitutes a major source of support for gut microbe colonization, due to its bifidobacteria and galactooligosaccharide content. The literature lacks consensus in recommending the addition of probiotics to foods for prevention and treatment of allergic diseases, while prebiotics may prove to be effective in reducing atopy in healthy children. There is insufficient evidence to support soy formulas or amino acid formulas for

  3. ALLERGIC POTENTIAL OF INDOOR MOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many fungi have been associated with allergic lung disease, but few are well studied and even fewer allergens of fungal origin are well characterized. Exposure to damp moldy environments has been associated with the exacerbation of asthma, but the role of molds in the induction o...

  4. The increasing challenge of discovering asthma drugs.

    PubMed

    Mullane, Kevin

    2011-09-15

    The prevalence of asthma continues to rise. Current drugs provide symptomatic relief to some, but not all, patients. Despite the need for new therapeutics, and a huge research effort, only four novel agents from two classes of drugs - the antileukotrienes and an anti-IgE antibody - have been approved in the last 30 years. This review highlights three particular issues that contribute to the challenge of identifying new therapeutics. First is an over-reliance on animal models of allergy to define targets and expectations of efficacy that has met with poor translation to the clinical setting. While sensitivity to particular aeroallergens is one key risk factor for asthma, atopy and asthma are not synonymous, and while about half of adult asthmatics are atopic the incidence of allergic asthma is probably <50%. The second issue is a fundamental disconnect between the directions of basic research and clinical research. Basic research has developed a detailed, reductive, unifying mechanism of antigen-induced, T helper type 2 cell-mediated airway inflammation as the root cause of asthma. In contrast, clinical research has started to identify multiple asthma phenotypes with differing cellular components, mediators and sensitivities to asthma drugs, and probably varying underlying factors including susceptibility genes. Finally, different features of asthma - bronchoconstriction, symptoms, and exacerbations - respond diversely to treatment; effects that are not captured in animal models which do not develop asthma per se, but utilize unvalidated surrogate markers. Basic research needs to better integrate and utilize the clinical research findings to improve its relevance to drug discovery efforts. PMID:21745459

  5. Beneficial effect of annexin A1 in a model of experimental allergic conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Gimenes, Alexandre D; Andrade, Teresa Raquel M; Mello, Cláudia B; Ramos, Lisandra; Gil, Cristiane D; Oliani, Sonia M

    2015-05-01

    Annexin A1 (ANXA1), a 37 kDa glucocorticoid-regulated protein, is a potent anti-inflammatory mediator effective in terminating acute inflammatory response, and its role in allergic settings has been poorly studied. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the mechanism of action of ANXA1 in intraocular inflammation using a classical model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic conjunctivitis (AC). OVA-immunised Balb/c mice, wild-type (WT) and ANXA1-deficient (AnxA1(-/-)), were challenged with eye drops containing OVA on days 14-16 with a subset of WT animals pretreated intraperitoneally with the peptide Ac2-26 (N-terminal region of ANXA1) or dexamethasone (DEX). After 24 h of the last ocular challenge, WT mice treated with Ac2-26 and DEX had significantly reduced clinical signs of conjunctivitis (chemosis, conjunctival hyperaemia, lid oedema and tearing), plasma IgE levels, leukocyte (eosinophil and neutrophil) influx and mast cell degranulation in the conjunctiva compared to WT controls. These anti-inflammatory effects of DEX were associated with high endogenous levels of ANXA1 in the ocular tissues as detected by immunohistochemistry. Additionally, Ac2-26 administration was effective to reduce IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, eotaxin and RANTES in the eye and lymph nodes compared to untreated WT animals. The lack of ANXA1 produced an exacerbated allergic response as detected by the density of the inflammatory cell influx to the conjunctiva and the cytokine/chemokine release. These different effects observed for Ac2-26 were correlated with diminished level of activated ERK at 24 h in the ocular tissues compared to untreated OVA group. Our findings demonstrate the protective effect of ANXA1 during the inflammatory allergic response suggesting this protein as a potential target for new ocular inflammation therapies.

  6. Exposure to inhomogeneous static magnetic field beneficially affects allergic inflammation in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Csillag, Anikó; Kumar, Brahma V.; Szabó, Krisztina; Szilasi, Mária; Papp, Zsuzsa; Szilasi, Magdolna E.; Pázmándi, Kitti; Boldogh, István; Rajnavölgyi, Éva; Bácsi, Attila; László, János F.

    2014-01-01

    Previous observations suggest that static magnetic field (SMF)-exposure acts on living organisms partly through reactive oxygen species (ROS) reactions. In this study, we aimed to define the impact of SMF-exposure on ragweed pollen extract (RWPE)-induced allergic inflammation closely associated with oxidative stress. Inhomogeneous SMF was generated with an apparatus validated previously providing a peak-to-peak magnetic induction of the dominant SMF component 389 mT by 39 T m−1 lateral gradient in the in vivo and in vitro experiments, and 192 mT by 19 T m−1 in the human study at the 3 mm target distance. Effects of SMF-exposure were studied in a murine model of allergic inflammation and also in human provoked skin allergy. We found that even a single 30-min exposure of mice to SMF immediately following intranasal RWPE challenge significantly lowered the increase in the total antioxidant capacity of the airways and decreased allergic inflammation. Repeated (on 3 consecutive days) or prolonged (60 min) exposure to SMF after RWPE challenge decreased the severity of allergic responses more efficiently than a single 30-min treatment. SMF-exposure did not alter ROS production by RWPE under cell-free conditions, while diminished RWPE-induced increase in the ROS levels in A549 epithelial cells. Results of the human skin prick tests indicated that SMF-exposure had no significant direct effect on provoked mast cell degranulation. The observed beneficial effects of SMF are likely owing to the mobilization of cellular ROS-eliminating mechanisms rather than direct modulation of ROS production by pollen NAD(P)H oxidases. PMID:24647908

  7. Exposure to inhomogeneous static magnetic field beneficially affects allergic inflammation in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Csillag, Anikó; Kumar, Brahma V; Szabó, Krisztina; Szilasi, Mária; Papp, Zsuzsa; Szilasi, Magdolna E; Pázmándi, Kitti; Boldogh, István; Rajnavölgyi, Éva; Bácsi, Attila; László, János F

    2014-06-01

    Previous observations suggest that static magnetic field (SMF)-exposure acts on living organisms partly through reactive oxygen species (ROS) reactions. In this study, we aimed to define the impact of SMF-exposure on ragweed pollen extract (RWPE)-induced allergic inflammation closely associated with oxidative stress. Inhomogeneous SMF was generated with an apparatus validated previously providing a peak-to-peak magnetic induction of the dominant SMF component 389 mT by 39 T m(-1) lateral gradient in the in vivo and in vitro experiments, and 192 mT by 19 T m(-1) in the human study at the 3 mm target distance. Effects of SMF-exposure were studied in a murine model of allergic inflammation and also in human provoked skin allergy. We found that even a single 30-min exposure of mice to SMF immediately following intranasal RWPE challenge significantly lowered the increase in the total antioxidant capacity of the airways and decreased allergic inflammation. Repeated (on 3 consecutive days) or prolonged (60 min) exposure to SMF after RWPE challenge decreased the severity of allergic responses more efficiently than a single 30-min treatment. SMF-exposure did not alter ROS production by RWPE under cell-free conditions, while diminished RWPE-induced increase in the ROS levels in A549 epithelial cells. Results of the human skin prick tests indicated that SMF-exposure had no significant direct effect on provoked mast cell degranulation. The observed beneficial effects of SMF are likely owing to the mobilization of cellular ROS-eliminating mechanisms rather than direct modulation of ROS production by pollen NAD(P)H oxidases.

  8. Oleanolic acid acetate inhibits atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis in a murine model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jin Kyeong; Oh, Hyun-Mee; Lee, Soyoung; Park, Jin-Woo; Khang, Dongwoo; Lee, Seung Woong; Lee, Woo Song; Rho, Mun-Chual; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2013-05-15

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) are common allergic and inflammatory skin diseases caused by a combination of eczema, scratching, pruritus, and cutaneous sensitization with allergens. This paper examines whether oleanolic acid acetate (OAA) modulates AD and ACD symptoms by using an existing AD model based on the repeated local exposure of mite extract (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene to the ears of BALB/c mice. In addition, the paper uses a 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-sensitized local lymph node assay (LLNA) for the ACD model. The oral administration of OAA over a four-week period attenuated AD symptoms in terms of decreased skin lesions, epidermal thickness, the infiltration of immune cells (CD4{sup +} cells, eosinophils, and mast cells), and serum IgE, IgG2a, and histamine levels. The gene expression of Th1, Th2, Th17, and Th22 cytokines was reduced by OAA in the lymph node and ear tissue, and the LLNA verified that OAA suppressed ACD. The oral administration of OAA over a three-day period attenuated ACD symptoms in terms of ear thickness, lymphocyte proliferation, and serum IgG2a levels. The gene expression of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines was reduced by OAA in the thymus and ear tissue. Finally, to define the underlying mechanism, this paper uses a TNF-α/IFN-γ-activated human keratinocyte (HaCaT) model. OAA inhibited the expression of cytokines and chemokines through the downregulation of NF-κB and MAPKs in HaCaT cells. Taken together, the results indicate that OAA inhibited AD and ACD symptoms, suggesting that OAA may be effective in treating allergic skin disorders. - Highlights: • OAA reduced both acute and chronic AD symptoms. • OAA had a controlling effect on the immune reaction for ACD. • The effect of OAA on allergic skin disorders was comparable to the cyclosporine A. • OAA might be a candidate for the treatment of allergic skin disorders.

  9. Denervation of nasal mucosa induced by posterior nasal neurectomy suppresses nasal secretion, not hypersensitivity, in an allergic rhinitis rat model.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Hironobu; Kondo, Kenji; Toma-Hirano, Makiko; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Kikuta, Shu; Fujimoto, Chisato; Ueha, Rumi; Kagoya, Ryoji; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-09-01

    The posterior nasal nerve is the dominant source of the parasympathetic, sympathetic, and sensory fibers that innervate the nasal respiratory mucosa. Therefore, a posterior nasal neurectomy (PNN) is thought to induce denervation of the nasal mucosa and relieve the nasal symptoms of allergic rhinitis. However, the underlying mechanisms and therapeutic action of PNN remain unknown. To investigate the impact of PNN-induced denervation of the nasal mucosa on allergic rhinitis, we developed a rat model of PNN and examined the effects of PNN on allergic rhinitis in ovalbumin-sensitized rats. This rat model of PNN was characterized by the depletion of nerve fibers, choline acetyltransferase, and neuropeptides (eg, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and neuropeptide Y) in the nasal respiratory mucosa. These animals exhibited nasal gland and goblet cell hypertrophy in the septal mucosa and atrophy of the submucosal gland in the lateral nasal wall, as well as reduced nasal secretion due to deficient acetylcholine synthesis. In an ovalbumin-sensitized model of allergic rhinitis, PNN also induced the depletion of nerve fibers, choline acetyltransferase, and neuropeptides in the nasal mucosa and suppressed nasal secretion. However, PNN did not affect mucosal thickening, eosinophil and mast cell infiltration, interleukin-4 and interferon-γ mRNA expression, and allergic symptoms (ie, sneezing and nasal scratching). These results suggest that the peripheral nerves and corresponding neuropeptides regulate nasal secretion, but not hypersensitivity, in allergic rhinitis, and that allergic rhinitis-related mucosal reactions occur in a highly denervated mucosa after PNN. Posterior nasal neurectomy may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of hyperrhinorrhea, but not allergic rhinitis hypersensitivity. PMID:27322954

  10. Allergic Conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... water. This is called conjunctivitis, also known as “pink eye.” Causes & Risk Factors What causes allergic conjunctivitis? ... example, if you are allergic to pollen or mold, stay indoors when pollen and mold levels are ...

  11. Nitric oxide suppresses LPS-induced inflammation in a mouse asthma model by attenuating the interaction of IKK and Hsp90

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ming-Yung; Sun, Kuang-Hui; Chiang, Chien-Ping; Huang, Ching-Feng; Sun, Guang-Huan; Tsou, Yu-Chi; Liu, Huan-Yun

    2015-01-01

    A feature of allergic airway disease is the observed increase of nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled breath. Gram-negative bacterial infections have also been linked with asthma exacerbations. However, the role of NO in asthma exacerbations with gram-negative bacterial infections is still unclear. In this study, we examined the role of NO in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in an ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged mouse asthma model. To determine whether NO affected the LPS-induced response, a NO donor (S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, SNAP) or a selective inhibitor of NO synthase (1400W) was injected intraperitoneally into the mice before the LPS stimulation. Decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines were demonstrated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from mice treated with SNAP, whereas increased levels of cytokines were found in the 1400W-treated mice. To further explore the molecular mechanism of NO-mediated inhibition of proinflammatory responses in macrophages, RAW 264.7 cells were treated with 1400W or SNAP before LPS stimulation. LPS-induced inflammation in the cells was attenuated by the presence of NO. The LPS-induced IκB kinase (IKK) activation and the expression of IKK were reduced by NO through attenuation of the interaction between Hsp90 and IKK in the cells. The IKK decrease in the lung immunohistopathology was verified in SNAP-treated asthma mice, whereas IKK increased in the 1400W-treated group. We report for the first time that NO attenuates the interaction between Hsp90 and IKK, decreasing the stability of IKK and causing the down-regulation of the proinflammatory response. Furthermore, the results suggest that NO may repress LPS-stimulated innate immunity to promote pulmonary bacterial infection in asthma patients. PMID:25519430

  12. The Asthma Dialogues: A Model of Interactive Education for Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Robert; Fletcher, Jason; Mulvihill, Michael; Park, Heidi

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: A gap exists between asthma guidelines and actual care delivered. We developed an educational intervention using simulated physician-patient encounters as part of a project to improve asthma management by community-based primary care providers. We hypothesized that this type of skills-based interactive training would improve…

  13. Microbes and asthma: Opportunities for intervention.

    PubMed

    Smits, Hermelijn H; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Prazeres da Costa, Clarissa; Ege, Markus; Edwards, Michael; Garn, Holger; Howarth, Peter H; Jartti, Tuomas; de Jong, Esther C; Maizels, Rick M; Marsland, Ben J; McSorley, Henry J; Müller, Anne; Pfefferle, Petra I; Savelkoul, Huub; Schwarze, Jürgen; Unger, Wendy W J; von Mutius, Erika; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Taube, Christian

    2016-03-01

    The worldwide incidence and prevalence of asthma continues to increase. Asthma is now understood as an umbrella term for different phenotypes or endotypes, which arise through different pathophysiologic pathways. Understanding the many factors contributing to development of the disease is important for the identification of novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of certain asthma phenotypes. The hygiene hypothesis has been formulated to explain the increasing prevalence of allergic disease, including asthma. This hypothesis postulates that decreased exposure at a young age to certain infectious agents as a result of improved hygiene, increased antibiotic use and vaccination, and changes in lifestyle and dietary habits is associated with changes in the immune system, which predispose subjects to allergy. Many microbes, during their coevolution with human subjects, developed mechanisms to manipulate the human immune system and to increase their chances of survival. Improving models of asthma, as well as choosing adequate end points in clinical trials, will lead to a more complete understanding of the underlying mechanisms, thus providing an opportunity to devise primary and secondary interventions at the same time as identifying new molecular targets for treatment. This article reports the discussion and conclusion of a workshop under the auspices of the Netherlands Lung Foundation to extend our understanding of how modulation of the immune system by bacterial, parasitic, and viral infections might affect the development of asthma and to map out future lines of investigation. PMID:26947981

  14. DNA methyltransferase 1(DNMT1) induced the expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling3 (Socs3) in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Verma, M; Chattopadhyay, B D; Kumar, S; Kumar, K; Verma, D

    2014-07-01

    DNMT1 is the most important methyltransferase enzyme, involved in the regulation of gene expression and appropriate histone modification. It interact with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), SNF2 family member ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzyme, cyclin dependent kinases inhibitor, E2F1 transcription factor and HDACs to form a repressor complex known as HDAC complexes. The interaction of DNMT1 with numerous protein suppressors of promoters suggests that the enzyme is a crucial element of the transcription suppression complex. Since the mechanism behind over expression of Socs3 in Asthma is unclear, we study the Epigenetic mode of overexpression of Socs3 in terms of methylation/acetylation/inactivation of HDACs/activation of HATs enzymes in a mouse model of asthma. The results show that low expression of DNMT1 might indirectly induce the expression of Socs3 and HAT, and inhibit the expression of HDACs family. Furthermore knockdown of DNMT1 by siRNA induced expression of Socs3 while knock down of Socs3 by siRNA has no effect on DNMT1 expression. Our result suggests that the over expression of Socs3 is due to the inhibition of HDACs complex and hyperacetylation of histones molecule along with down regulation of DNMT1 gene. In depth study on DNMT1 might be useful for the development of therapeutic drug against asthma/allergic diseases.

  15. Review of family relational stress and pediatric asthma: the value of biopsychosocial systemic models.

    PubMed

    Wood, Beatrice L; Miller, Bruce D; Lehman, Heather K

    2015-06-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease in children. Despite dramatic advances in pharmacological treatments, asthma remains a leading public health problem, especially in socially disadvantaged minority populations. Some experts believe that this health gap is due to the failure to address the impact of stress on the disease. Asthma is a complex disease that is influenced by multilevel factors, but the nature of these factors and their interrelations are not well understood. This paper aims to integrate social, psychological, and biological literatures on relations between family/parental stress and pediatric asthma, and to illustrate the utility of multilevel systemic models for guiding treatment and stimulating future research. We used electronic database searches and conducted an integrated analysis of selected epidemiological, longitudinal, and empirical studies. Evidence is substantial for the effects of family/parental stress on asthma mediated by both disease management and psychobiological stress pathways. However, integrative models containing specific pathways are scarce. We present two multilevel models, with supporting data, as potential prototypes for other such models. We conclude that these multilevel systems models may be of substantial heuristic value in organizing investigations of, and clinical approaches to, the complex social-biological aspects of family stress in pediatric asthma. However, additional systemic models are needed, and the models presented herein could serve as prototypes for model development. PMID:25683472

  16. Review of family relational stress and pediatric asthma: the value of biopsychosocial systemic models.

    PubMed

    Wood, Beatrice L; Miller, Bruce D; Lehman, Heather K

    2015-06-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease in children. Despite dramatic advances in pharmacological treatments, asthma remains a leading public health problem, especially in socially disadvantaged minority populations. Some experts believe that this health gap is due to the failure to address the impact of stress on the disease. Asthma is a complex disease that is influenced by multilevel factors, but the nature of these factors and their interrelations are not well understood. This paper aims to integrate social, psychological, and biological literatures on relations between family/parental stress and pediatric asthma, and to illustrate the utility of multilevel systemic models for guiding treatment and stimulating future research. We used electronic database searches and conducted an integrated analysis of selected epidemiological, longitudinal, and empirical studies. Evidence is substantial for the effects of family/parental stress on asthma mediated by both disease management and psychobiological stress pathways. However, integrative models containing specific pathways are scarce. We present two multilevel models, with supporting data, as potential prototypes for other such models. We conclude that these multilevel systems models may be of substantial heuristic value in organizing investigations of, and clinical approaches to, the complex social-biological aspects of family stress in pediatric asthma. However, additional systemic models are needed, and the models presented herein could serve as prototypes for model development.

  17. Geospatial Modeling of Asthma Population in Relation to Air Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kethireddy, Swatantra R.; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Young, John H.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Alhamdan, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Current observations indicate that asthma is growing every year in the United States, specific reasons for this are not well understood. This study stems from an ongoing research effort to investigate the spatio-temporal behavior of asthma and its relatedness to air pollution. The association between environmental variables such as air quality and asthma related health issues over Mississippi State are investigated using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) tools and applications. Health data concerning asthma obtained from Mississippi State Department of Health (MSDH) for 9-year period of 2003-2011, and data of air pollutant concentrations (PM2.5) collected from USEPA web resources, and are analyzed geospatially to establish the impacts of air quality on human health specifically related to asthma. Disease mapping using geospatial techniques provides valuable insights into the spatial nature, variability, and association of asthma to air pollution. Asthma patient hospitalization data of Mississippi has been analyzed and mapped using quantitative Choropleth techniques in ArcGIS. Patients have been geocoded to their respective zip codes. Potential air pollutant sources of Interstate highways, Industries, and other land use data have been integrated in common geospatial platform to understand their adverse contribution on human health. Existing hospitals and emergency clinics are being injected into analysis to further understand their proximity and easy access to patient locations. At the current level of analysis and understanding, spatial distribution of Asthma is observed in the populations of Zip code regions in gulf coast, along the interstates of south, and in counties of Northeast Mississippi. It is also found that asthma is prevalent in most of the urban population. This GIS based project would be useful to make health risk assessment and provide information support to the administrators and decision makers for establishing satellite clinics in future.

  18. PULMONARY IMMUNITY TO RAGWEED IN A BEAGLE DOG MODEL OF ALLERGIC ASTHMA. (R826442)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  19. Exposure to allergen and diesel exhaust particles potentiates secondary allergen-specific memory responses promoting asthma susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Eric B.; Biagini Myers, Jocelyn M.; Acciani, Thomas H.; Ryan, Patrick H.; Sivaprasad, Umasundari; Ruff, Brandy; LeMasters, Grace K.; Bernstein, David I.; Lockey, James; LeCras, Timothy D.; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to traffic pollution particulate matter, predominantly diesel exhaust particles (DEP), increases risk for asthma and asthma exacerbation, however the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Objective To examine the impact of DEP exposure on the generation and persistence of allergen-specific memory T-cells in asthma and translate these findings by determining the impact of early DEP exposure on the prevalence of allergic asthma in children. Methods The impact of DEP on HDM-specific memory responses was determined using an asthma model. Data from children enrolled in the Cincinnati Childhood Allergy and Air Pollution Study (CCAAPS) birth cohort were analyzed to determine the impact of the DEP exposure on asthma outcomes. Results DEP co-exposure with HDM resulted in persistent Th2/Th17 CD127+ effector/memory cells in the lungs, spleen and lymph nodes of adult and neonatal mice. After 7 weeks of rest, a single exposure to HDM resulted in airway hyperresponsiveness and increased levels of Th2 cytokines in only mice that had been previously exposed to both HDM and DEP versus HDM alone. Based on these data, we examined whether DEP exposure was similarly associated increased asthma prevalence in children in the presence or absence of allergen exposure/sensitization in the CCAAPS birth cohort. Early life exposure to high DEP was associated with significantly increased asthma prevalence among allergic children, but not among non-allergic children. Conclusion These findings suggest that DEP exposure results in accumulation of allergen specific Th2/Th17 cells in the lungs, potentiating secondary allergen recall responses and promoting the development of allergic asthma. PMID:25748065

  20. In vivo nickel allergic contact dermatitis: human model for topical therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhai, H; Chang, Y C; Singh, M; Maibach, H I

    1999-04-01

    Techniques to determine efficacy of topical agents on allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) may benefit from refinement. The aim of this study was to develop an in vivo human model system for the bioengineering and visual quantification of the effect of topical agents on nickel ACD, and to correlate ACD parameters. 14 nickel patch-test-positive subjects were included in a placebo-controlled, double-blind study after a pre-screening procedure with a standard diagnostic patch test with nickel sulfate in 54 healthy human volunteers. 5% nickel sulfate in petrolatum in a Finn Chamber was applied on forearm skin for 48 h to create a standardized dermatitis. Thereafter, the dermatitis was treated with a model topical agent and a placebo control while recording endpoint parameters daily for 10 days. Resolution was quantified with 4 parameters: visual scoring (VS), transepidermal water loss (TEWL) (Tewameter), skin blood flow volume (BFV) (laser Doppler flowmeter), and skin color (a* value) (Colorimeter). The model agent reduced cutaneous allergic reactions, especially on day 8 to 10, in comparison with the placebo control. A highly significant linear relationship exists among all parameters, except between a* and BFV. This model may provide robust biometrics for determining the efficacy of topical therapeutics on experimentally induced ACD. PMID:10208508

  1. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M

    1995-01-01

    Many toxic compounds found in air emissions may induce bronchoconstriction. In the workplace, workers are exposed to these compounds, often in much higher concentrations. Some of these compounds act as sensitizers. Of these, some compounds induce asthma by producing specific IgE antibodies to the compound or its protein conjugate, while others induce asthma through yet unidentified immunologic mechanisms. Some compounds, when inhaled in high concentrations, act as irritants and produce bronchoconstriction probably by inducing acute airway inflammation. The latter condition is called Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome (RADS) or irritant-induced asthma. Occupational asthma is an excellent model to study the pathogenesis and the natural history of adult onset asthma because the responsible agent can be identified, complete avoidance is possible, and exposure can be measured or estimated. PMID:8549481

  2. Predicting asthma outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sears, Malcolm R

    2015-10-01

    This review addresses predictors of remission or persistence of wheezing and asthma from early childhood through adulthood. Early childhood wheezing is common, but predicting who will remit or have persistent childhood asthma remains difficult. By adding parental history of asthma and selected infant biomarkers to the history of recurrent wheezing, the Asthma Predictive Index and its subsequent modifications provide better predictions of persistence than simply the observation of recurrent wheeze. Sensitization, especially to multiple allergens, increases the likelihood of development of classic childhood asthma. Remission is more likely in male subjects and those with milder disease (less frequent and less severe symptoms), less atopic sensitization, a lesser degree of airway hyperresponsiveness, and no concomitant allergic disease. Conversely, persistence is linked strongly to allergic sensitization, greater frequency and severity of symptoms, abnormal lung function, and a greater degree of airway hyperresponsiveness. A genetic risk score might predict persistence more accurately than family history. Remission of established adult asthma is substantially less common than remission during childhood and adolescence. Loss of lung function can begin early in life and tracks through childhood and adolescence. Despite therapy which controls symptoms and exacerbations, the outcomes of asthma appear largely resistant to pharmacologic therapy.

  3. Forecasting peak asthma admissions in London: an application of quantile regression models.

    PubMed

    Soyiri, Ireneous N; Reidpath, Daniel D; Sarran, Christophe

    2013-07-01

    Asthma is a chronic condition of great public health concern globally. The associated morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation place an enormous burden on healthcare infrastructure and services. This study demonstrates a multistage quantile regression approach to predicting excess demand for health care services in the form of asthma daily admissions in London, using retrospective data from the Hospital Episode Statistics, weather and air quality. Trivariate quantile regression models (QRM) of asthma daily admissions were fitted to a 14-day range of lags of environmental factors, accounting for seasonality in a hold-in sample of the data. Representative lags were pooled to form multivariate predictive models, selected through a systematic backward stepwise reduction approach. Models were cross-validated using a hold-out sample of the data, and their respective root mean square error measures, sensitivity, specificity and predictive values compared. Two of the predictive models were able to detect extreme number of daily asthma admissions at sensitivity levels of 76 % and 62 %, as well as specificities of 66 % and 76 %. Their positive predictive values were slightly higher for the hold-out sample (29 % and 28 %) than for the hold-in model development sample (16 % and 18 %). QRMs can be used in multistage to select suitable variables to forecast extreme asthma events. The associations between asthma and environmental factors, including temperature, ozone and carbon monoxide can be exploited in predicting future events using QRMs.

  4. Forecasting peak asthma admissions in London: an application of quantile regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soyiri, Ireneous N.; Reidpath, Daniel D.; Sarran, Christophe

    2013-07-01

    Asthma is a chronic condition of great public health concern globally. The associated morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation place an enormous burden on healthcare infrastructure and services. This study demonstrates a multistage quantile regression approach to predicting excess demand for health care services in the form of asthma daily admissions in London, using retrospective data from the Hospital Episode Statistics, weather and air quality. Trivariate quantile regression models (QRM) of asthma daily admissions were fitted to a 14-day range of lags of environmental factors, accounting for seasonality in a hold-in sample of the data. Representative lags were pooled to form multivariate predictive models, selected through a systematic backward stepwise reduction approach. Models were cross-validated using a hold-out sample of the data, and their respective root mean square error measures, sensitivity, specificity and predictive values compared. Two of the predictive models were able to detect extreme number of daily asthma admissions at sensitivity levels of 76 % and 62 %, as well as specificities of 66 % and 76 %. Their positive predictive values were slightly higher for the hold-out sample (29 % and 28 %) than for the hold-in model development sample (16 % and 18 %). QRMs can be used in multistage to select suitable variables to forecast extreme asthma events. The associations between asthma and environmental factors, including temperature, ozone and carbon monoxide can be exploited in predicting future events using QRMs.

  5. Assistance model for patients with asthma in the primary care.

    PubMed

    Leal, Renata Cristina de Angelo Calsaverini; Braile, Domingo Marcolino; Souza, Dorotéia Rossi Silva; Batigália, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    To create a program structured for the control and prevention towards asthma worsening, it is necessary to settle down actions of regionalization, planning and management. Currently, the Ministerial orders allow each municipality district to cope their needs with local initiatives, based on the search of the health indicators with University partnerships. Taking into account this context, it is feasible the implantation of an effective model through organized demand of attendance flow and physical structure, besides the withdrawal of medications and professional training. To describe the modus operandi situation currently in the Primary Health Care Units regarding these patients' reception, diagnosis, and follow-up, as well as the current situation according to the professional profile and sector. To introduce an assistance model for reception, of these patients in these primary care units. This is a bibliographical review based on the specialized literature such as scientific papers selected through the search on the SciELO and Bireme databases, from Medline and Lilacs data sources. A Committee was set up by members from the Health and Service , the Medical School, and scientific societies for discussion and planning.

  6. The Effects of Maternal Exposure to Bisphenol A on Allergic Lung Inflammation into Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, B. Paige

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high–production volume chemical classified as an environmental estrogen and used primarily in the plastics industry. BPA’s increased usage correlates with rising BPA levels in people and a corresponding increase in the incidence of asthma. Due to limited studies, the contribution of maternal BPA exposure to allergic asthma pathogenesis is unclear. Using two established mouse models of allergic asthma, we examined whether developmental exposure to BPA alters hallmarks of allergic lung inflammation in adult offspring. Pregnant C57BL/6 dams were gavaged with 0, 0.5, 5, 50, or 500 μg BPA/kg/day from gestational day 6 until postnatal day 21. To induce allergic inflammation, adult offspring were mucosally sensitized with inhaled ovalbumin containing low-dose lipopolysaccharide or ip sensitized using ovalbumin with alum followed by ovalbumin aerosol challenge. In the mucosal sensitization model, female offspring that were maternally exposed to ≥ 50 μg BPA/kg/day displayed enhanced airway lymphocytic and lung inflammation, compared with offspring of control dams. Peritoneally sensitized, female offspring exposed to ≤ 50 μg BPA/kg/day presented dampened lung eosinophilia, compared with vehicle controls. Male offspring did not exhibit these differences in either sensitization model. Our data demonstrate that maternal exposure to BPA has subtle and qualitatively different effects on allergic inflammation, which are critically dependent upon route of allergen sensitization and sex. However, these subtle, yet persistent changes due to developmental exposure to BPA did not lead to significant differences in overall airway responsiveness, suggesting that early life exposure to BPA does not exacerbate allergic inflammation into adulthood. PMID:22821851

  7. Forecasting asthma-related hospital admissions in London using negative binomial models.

    PubMed

    Soyiri, Ireneous N; Reidpath, Daniel D; Sarran, Christophe

    2013-05-01

    Health forecasting can improve health service provision and individual patient outcomes. Environmental factors are known to impact chronic respiratory conditions such as asthma, but little is known about the extent to which these factors can be used for forecasting. Using weather, air quality and hospital asthma admissions, in London (2005-2006), two related negative binomial models were developed and compared with a naive seasonal model. In the first approach, predictive forecasting models were fitted with 7-day averages of each potential predictor, and then a subsequent multivariable model is constructed. In the second strategy, an exhaustive search of the best fitting models between possible combinations of lags (0-14 days) of all the environmental effects on asthma admission was conducted. Three models were considered: a base model (seasonal effects), contrasted with a 7-day average model and a selected lags model (weather and air quality effects). Season is the best predictor of asthma admissions. The 7-day average and seasonal models were trivial to implement. The selected lags model was computationally intensive, but of no real value over much more easily implemented models. Seasonal factors can predict daily hospital asthma admissions in London, and there is a little evidence that additional weather and air quality information would add to forecast accuracy.

  8. Anti-Allergic Effect of Oroxylin A from Oroxylum indicum Using in vivo and in vitro Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ae-Yeon; Kang, Saeromi; Park, Soo-Jin; Huang, Jin; Im, Dong-Soon

    2016-01-01

    Oroxylum indicum has long been used in Asian traditional medicine to prevent and treat respiratory diseases, diabetes, diarrhea and other conditions. Oroxylin A is a flavone that is present in Oroxylum indicum and in Scutellaria baicalensis. Because the root extracts of both plants have been shown to have anti-allergic effects, the authors investigated whether oroxylin A is likely to have beneficial effects on allergic asthma using female Balb/c mice and rat RBL-2H3 mast cells. Antigen-induced degranulation was measured in vitro by measuring β-hexosaminidase activity. A murine ovalbumin-induced allergic asthma model was used to test the in vivo efficacy of oroxylin A. Sensitization and challenge of ovalbumin induced allergic asthma responses, the accumulations of eosinophils and Th2 cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissues. Oroxylin A administration decreased numbers of inflammatory cells, especially eosinophils, and reduced the expression and secretion of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-13, in lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Histologic studies showed oroxylin A reduced inflammatory signs and mucin production in lungs. These findings provide evidence that oroxylin A has potential use as an anti-allergic therapeutic. PMID:27133260

  9. Asthma "of horses and men"--how can equine heaves help us better understand human asthma immunopathology and its functional consequences?

    PubMed

    Bullone, Michela; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Animal models have been studied to unravel etiological, immunopathological, and genetic attributes leading to asthma. However, while experiments in which the disease is artificially induced have helped discovering biological and molecular pathways leading to allergic airway inflammation, their contribution to the understanding of the causality of the disease has been more limited. Horses naturally suffer from an asthma-like condition called "heaves" which presents sticking similarities with human asthma. It is characterized by reversible airway obstruction, airway neutrophilic inflammation, and a predominant Th2 immune response. This model allows one to investigate the role of neutrophils in asthma, which remains contentious, the regulation of chronic neutrophilic inflammation, and their possible implication in pulmonary allergic responses. Furthermore, the pulmonary remodeling features in heaves closely resemble those of human asthma, which makes this model unique to investigate the kinetics, reversibility, as well as the physiological consequences of tissue remodeling. In conclusion, heaves and asthma share common clinical presentation and also important immunological and tissue remodeling features. This makes heaves an ideal model for the discovery of novel pathways implicated in the asthmatic inflammation and associated tissue remodeling.

  10. Evaluation of allergic lung inflammation by computed tomography in a rat model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jobse, B N; Johnson, J R; Farncombe, T H; Labiris, R; Walker, T D; Goncharova, S; Jordana, M

    2009-06-01

    The ability of micro-computed tomography (CT) to noninvasively evaluate allergic pulmonary inflammation in an experimental model was investigated. In addition, two image segmentation methods and the value of respiratory gating were investigated in the context of this model. Brown Norway rats were exposed to one of four doses of house dust mite (HDM) extract (0, 0.15, 15 or 150 microg) delivered intratracheally every 24 h for 10 days. CT scanning was performed at baseline and after several longitudinal HDM exposures. Both thoracic- and lung-segmentation methods yielded similar results when standardisation practices were employed. While tissue histology correlated well with CT images, cell counts from bronchoalveolar lavage depicted greater inflammation than did density measures from CT images. Evidence from representative CT slices and transaxial density distribution indicated that inflammation was primarily associated with major airways and extended into the periphery from these focal points. Respiratory gating demonstrated that images of the inspiratory state provided greater contrast of inflammatory processes. Lastly, decreases in tidal volumes indicated significant mechanical respiratory changes in animals exposed to both 15 and 150 microg. In summary, CT image segmentation can extract pertinent data on in vivo allergic airway/lung inflammation. Furthermore, respiratory gating provides additional contrast and insight into these quantification practices.

  11. Repeated allergen challenge as a new research model for studying allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    de Bruin-Weller, M S; Weller, F R; De Monchy, J G

    1999-02-01

    Repeated allergen challenge might be a more relevant model for studying symptomatic disease, because it gives more information on the patient's handling of chronic allergen exposure. Thus, this experimental model has more resemblance to the situation of natural allergen exposure, and the allergen load can be standardized. However, the response to repeated allergen challenge in individual patients can show a large variation, that is from a strongly enhanced response to complete diminution of the response. Successful allergen immunotherapy can change the response pattern of repeated allergen challenge in the skin into down-regulation of the late reaction. Chronic or repeated allergen exposure may result in an enhanced allergen-specific allergic response, involving allergen-specific T-cell activation. Different subsets of T cells can exert either activating or suppressive effects on inflammatory cells involved in subsequent allergic reactions. CD8+ T cells might exert suppressive effects, because they seem to be associated with a subsequent down-regulation of the late skin reaction after repeated allergen challenge (Fig. 4). Further studies are needed to compare the responses to repeated allergen challenge with the response to natural seasonal allergen exposure in the same patients and to explore possible underlying mechanisms using, for example, nasal biopsies.

  12. Nuclear factor-κB mediates the phenotype switching of airway smooth muscle cells in a murine asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chen; Zhang, Jian; Su, Meiping; Fan, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) phenotype modulation, characterized by reversible switching between contractile and proliferative phenotypes, is considered to contribute to airway proliferative diseases such as allergic asthma. Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) has been reported as a key regulator for the occurrence and development of asthma. However, little is known regarding its role in ASM cell phenotypic modulation. To elucidate the role of NF-κB in regulating ASM cells phenotypic modulation, we investigated the effects of NF-κB on ASM cells contractile marker protein expression, and its impact on proliferation and apoptosis. We found that chronic asthma increased the activation of NF-κB in the primary murine ASM cells with a concomitant marked decrease in the expression of contractile phenotypic marker protein including smooth muscle alpha-actin (α-SMA). Additionally, we used the normal ASM cells under different processing to build the phenotype switching when we found the activation of NF-κB. Meanwhile, the expression of α-SMA in asthma was significantly increased by the NF-κB blocker. NF-κB blocker also suppressed asthma mouse ASM cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis. These findings highlight a novel role for the NF-κB in murine ASM cell phenotypic modulation and provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention for asthma. PMID:26722396

  13. Nuclear factor-κB mediates the phenotype switching of airway smooth muscle cells in a murine asthma model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chen; Zhang, Jian; Su, Meiping; Fan, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) phenotype modulation, characterized by reversible switching between contractile and proliferative phenotypes, is considered to contribute to airway proliferative diseases such as allergic asthma. Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) has been reported as a key regulator for the occurrence and development of asthma. However, little is known regarding its role in ASM cell phenotypic modulation. To elucidate the role of NF-κB in regulating ASM cells phenotypic modulation, we investigated the effects of NF-κB on ASM cells contractile marker protein expression, and its impact on proliferation and apoptosis. We found that chronic asthma increased the activation of NF-κB in the primary murine ASM cells with a concomitant marked decrease in the expression of contractile phenotypic marker protein including smooth muscle alpha-actin (α-SMA). Additionally, we used the normal ASM cells under different processing to build the phenotype switching when we found the activation of NF-κB. Meanwhile, the expression of α-SMA in asthma was significantly increased by the NF-κB blocker. NF-κB blocker also suppressed asthma mouse ASM cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis. These findings highlight a novel role for the NF-κB in murine ASM cell phenotypic modulation and provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention for asthma.

  14. Prevention of asthma.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, H S; Frick, O L

    1981-11-01

    Infants born of allergic mothers but normal fathers, who had eczema and who were fed cows' milk, had a significantly greater incidence of asthma (P less than 0.001) than infants with a similar history but who were breast-fed. An analysis of all breast-fed infants in the study showed that they were less likely to develop asthma than those who were bottle-fed (P less than 0.06). There was a lower incidence of allergy in infants born of families with allergic mothers and normal fathers, than in families in which both parents were allergic (P less than 0.02). In skin tests of both breast or bottle-fed babies, the two most common allergens eliciting reactions were egg and cat dander. PMID:7333001

  15. Nasal disease and asthma.

    PubMed

    Marseglia, G L; Merli, P; Caimmi, D; Licari, A; Labó, E; Marseglia, A; Ciprandi, G; La Rosa, M

    2011-10-01

    The nose plays a primary role within the airways, working as a filter and air-conditioner, together with other important functions. Thus, it is not surprising that nasal diseases are associated with several other comorbidities, including both upper and lower airways, such as bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and asthma. Several studies have investigated the relationship existing between the upper and the lower airways and new insights are rising. Nevertheless, some uncertainties still remain, mainly because nasal disorders are quite heterogeneous, overlapping (i.e. rhinitis-rhinosinusitis-sinusitis, acute or chronic, allergic or non-allergic) and difficult to diagnose, so that, frequently, many studies don’t differentiate between the various conditions. For this reason, the purpose of this review is to systematically analyze present epidemiological, pathophysiological and clinical data on the relationship between nasal diseases and asthma, splitting up three main conditions: allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. PMID:22032779

  16. The effects of indoor environmental exposures on pediatric asthma: a discrete event simulation model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the United States, asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood across all socioeconomic classes and is the most frequent cause of hospitalization among children. Asthma exacerbations have been associated with exposure to residential indoor environmental stressors such as allergens and air pollutants as well as numerous additional factors. Simulation modeling is a valuable tool that can be used to evaluate interventions for complex multifactorial diseases such as asthma but in spite of its flexibility and applicability, modeling applications in either environmental exposures or asthma have been limited to date. Methods We designed a discrete event simulation model to study the effect of environmental factors on asthma exacerbations in school-age children living in low-income multi-family housing. Model outcomes include asthma symptoms, medication use, hospitalizations, and emergency room visits. Environmental factors were linked to percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%), which in turn was linked to risk equations for each outcome. Exposures affecting FEV1% included indoor and outdoor sources of NO2 and PM2.5, cockroach allergen, and dampness as a proxy for mold. Results Model design parameters and equations are described in detail. We evaluated the model by simulating 50,000 children over 10 years and showed that pollutant concentrations and health outcome rates are comparable to values reported in the literature. In an application example, we simulated what would happen if the kitchen and bathroom exhaust fans were improved for the entire cohort, and showed reductions in pollutant concentrations and healthcare utilization rates. Conclusions We describe the design and evaluation of a discrete event simulation model of pediatric asthma for children living in low-income multi-family housing. Our model simulates the effect of environmental factors (combustion pollutants and allergens), medication compliance, seasonality

  17. New therapies for allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Braido, Fulvio; Sclifò, Francesca; Ferrando, Matteo; Canonica, Giorgio Walter

    2014-04-01

    Because of its burden on patient's lives and its impact on asthma, allergic rhinitis must be treated properly with more effective and safer treatments. According to guidelines by Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA), the classification, pathogenesis, and treatment of allergic rhinitis are well defined. Currently, second-generation antihistamines and inhaled steroids are considered the cornerstone of first-line therapy. However, new formulations of available drugs (e.g., loratadine and rupatadine oral solution, ebastine fast-dissolving tablets, and the combination of intranasal fluticasone propionate and azelastine hydrochloride), recently discovered molecules (e.g., ciclesonide, bilastine, and phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors), immunologic targets (e.g., omalizumab), and unconventional treatments (e.g., homeopathic treatments) are currently under investigation and represent a new frontier in modern medicine and in allergic rhinitis management. The aim of this review is to provide an update on allergic rhinitis treatment, paying particular attention to clinical trials published within the past 20 months that assessed the efficacy and safety of new formulations of available drugs or new molecules.

  18. New therapies for allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Braido, Fulvio; Sclifò, Francesca; Ferrando, Matteo; Canonica, Giorgio Walter

    2014-04-01

    Because of its burden on patient's lives and its impact on asthma, allergic rhinitis must be treated properly with more effective and safer treatments. According to guidelines by Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA), the classification, pathogenesis, and treatment of allergic rhinitis are well defined. Currently, second-generation antihistamines and inhaled steroids are considered the cornerstone of first-line therapy. However, new formulations of available drugs (e.g., loratadine and rupatadine oral solution, ebastine fast-dissolving tablets, and the combination of intranasal fluticasone propionate and azelastine hydrochloride), recently discovered molecules (e.g., ciclesonide, bilastine, and phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors), immunologic targets (e.g., omalizumab), and unconventional treatments (e.g., homeopathic treatments) are currently under investigation and represent a new frontier in modern medicine and in allergic rhinitis management. The aim of this review is to provide an update on allergic rhinitis treatment, paying particular attention to clinical trials published within the past 20 months that assessed the efficacy and safety of new formulations of available drugs or new molecules. PMID:24504526

  19. Allergic diseases in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Demographic distribution of the population is progressively changing with the proportion of elderly persons increasing in most societies. This entails that there is a need to evaluate the impact of common diseases, such as asthma and other allergic conditions, in this age segment. Frailty, comorbidities and polymedication are some of the factors that condition management in geriatric patients. The objective of this review is to highlight the characteristics of allergic diseases in older age groups, from the influence of immunosenescence, to particular clinical implications and management issues, such as drug interactions or age-related side effects. PMID:22409889

  20. Pea seedling histaminase as a novel therapeutic approach to anaphylactic and inflammatory disorders. A plant histaminase in allergic asthma and ischemic shock.

    PubMed

    Masini, Emanuela; Bani, Danielle; Marzocca, Cosimo; Mateescu, Mircea Alexandru; Mannaioni, Pier Francesco; Federico, Rodolfo; Mondovì, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    Amine oxidases (AOs) are ubiquitous enzymes involved in the metabolism of biogenic amines. Copper AOs (Cu-AOs) catalyze the oxidative deamination of primary amine groups of several biogenic amines, such as putrescine, cadaverine, and histamine. In the present review, the effects of a plant amine oxidase (Cu-AO, histaminase, EC1.4.3.6) purified from pea seedlings in the modulation of IgE-mediated allergic reactions, and in the prevention of cardiac and splachnic postischemic reperfusion damage are reported. PMID:17619775

  1. Control of asthma triggers in indoor air with air cleaners: a modeling analysis

    PubMed Central

    Myatt, Theodore A; Minegishi, Taeko; Allen, Joseph G; MacIntosh, David L

    2008-01-01

    Background Reducing exposure to environmental agents indoors shown to increase asthma symptoms or lead to asthma exacerbations is an important component of a strategy to manage asthma for individuals. Numerous investigations have demonstrated that portable air cleaning devices can reduce concentrations of asthma triggers in indoor air; however, their benefits for breathing problems have not always been reproducible. The potential exposure benefits of whole house high efficiency in-duct air cleaners for sensitive subpopulations have yet to be evaluated. Methods We used an indoor air quality modeling system (CONTAM) developed by NIST to examine peak and time-integrated concentrations of common asthma triggers present in indoor air over a year as a function of natural ventilation, portable air cleaners, and forced air ventilation equipped with conventional and high efficiency filtration systems. Emission rates for asthma triggers were based on experimental studies published in the scientific literature. Results Forced air systems with high efficiency filtration were found to provide the best control of asthma triggers: 30–55% lower cat allergen levels, 90–99% lower risk of respiratory infection through the inhalation route of exposure, 90–98% lower environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) levels, and 50–75% lower fungal spore levels than the other ventilation/filtration systems considered. These results indicate that the use of high efficiency in-duct air cleaners provide an effective means of controlling allergen levels not only in a single room, like a portable air cleaner, but the whole house. Conclusion These findings are useful for evaluating potential benefits of high efficiency in-duct filtration systems for controlling exposure to asthma triggers indoors and for the design of trials of environmental interventions intended to evaluate their utility in practice. PMID:18684328

  2. Heteroscedastic CAR models for areally referenced temporal processes for analyzing California asthma hospitalization data

    PubMed Central

    Quick, Harrison; Carlin, Bradley P.; Banerjee, Sudipto

    2015-01-01

    Summary Often in regionally aggregated spatiotemporal models, a single variance parameter is used to capture variability in the spatial structure of the model, ignoring the impact that spatially-varying factors may have on the variability in the underlying process. We extend existing methodologies to allow for region-specific variance components in our analysis of monthly asthma hospitalization rates in California counties, introducing a heteroscedastic CAR model that can greatly improve the fit of our spatiotemporal process. After demonstrating the effectiveness of our new model via simulation, we reanalyze the asthma hospitalization data and note a number of important findings. PMID:26692587

  3. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Seung Hyun; Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja; Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min; Lee, Sang Eun

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation and AHR to methacholine. {yields} Induction of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} T cells and IL-10 along with suppression of splenocyte proliferation by C. sinensis-derived total protein. {yields} C. sinensis-derived total protein interferes with the expression of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naive T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical

  4. Human mesenchymal stem cells resolve airway inflammation, hyperreactivity, and histopathology in a mouse model of occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, Itziar; Cruz, Maria-Jesús; Moreno, Rafael; Morell, Ferran; Muñoz, Xavier; Aran, Josep M

    2014-10-01

    Occupational asthma (OA) is characterized by allergic airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, leading to progressive airway remodeling and a concomitant decline in lung function. The management of OA remains suboptimal in clinical practice. Thus, establishing effective therapies might overcome the natural history of the disease. We evaluated the ability of human adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs), either unmodified or engineered to secrete the IL-33 decoy receptor sST2, to attenuate the inflammatory and respiratory symptoms in a previously validated mouse model of OA to ammonium persulfate (AP). Twenty-four hours after a dermal AP sensitization and intranasal challenge regimen, the animals received intravenously 1 × 10(6) cells (either hASCs or hASCs overexpressing sST2) or saline and were analyzed at 1, 3, and 6 days after treatment. The infused hASCs induced an anti-inflammatory and restorative program upon reaching the AP-injured, asthmatic lungs, leading to early reduction of neutrophilic inflammation and total IgE production, preserved alveolar architecture with nearly absent lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates, negligible smooth muscle hyperplasia/hypertrophy in the peribronchiolar areas, and baseline airway hyperreactivity (AHR) to methacholine. Local sST2 overexpression barely increased the substantial efficacy displayed by unmodified hASCs. Thus, hASCs may represent a viable multiaction therapeutic capable to adequately respond to the AP-injured lung environment by resolving inflammation, tissue remodeling, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness typical of OA. PMID:24798370

  5. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Resolve Airway Inflammation, Hyperreactivity, and Histopathology in a Mouse Model of Occupational Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, Itziar; Moreno, Rafael; Morell, Ferran; Muñoz, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Occupational asthma (OA) is characterized by allergic airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, leading to progressive airway remodeling and a concomitant decline in lung function. The management of OA remains suboptimal in clinical practice. Thus, establishing effective therapies might overcome the natural history of the disease. We evaluated the ability of human adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs), either unmodified or engineered to secrete the IL-33 decoy receptor sST2, to attenuate the inflammatory and respiratory symptoms in a previously validated mouse model of OA to ammonium persulfate (AP). Twenty-four hours after a dermal AP sensitization and intranasal challenge regimen, the animals received intravenously 1×106 cells (either hASCs or hASCs overexpressing sST2) or saline and were analyzed at 1, 3, and 6 days after treatment. The infused hASCs induced an anti-inflammatory and restorative program upon reaching the AP-injured, asthmatic lungs, leading to early reduction of neutrophilic inflammation and total IgE production, preserved alveolar architecture with nearly absent lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates, negligible smooth muscle hyperplasia/hypertrophy in the peribronchiolar areas, and baseline airway hyperreactivity (AHR) to methacholine. Local sST2 overexpression barely increased the substantial efficacy displayed by unmodified hASCs. Thus, hASCs may represent a viable multiaction therapeutic capable to adequately respond to the AP-injured lung environment by resolving inflammation, tissue remodeling, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness typical of OA. PMID:24798370

  6. A simulation model of building intervention impacts on indoor environmental quality, pediatric asthma, and costs

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Maria Patricia; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Stout, Natasha Kay; Sandel, Megan; Levy, Jonathan Ian

    2013-01-01

    Background Although indoor environmental conditions can affect pediatric asthmatics, few studies have characterized the impact of building interventions on asthma-related outcomes. Simulation models can evaluate such complex systems but have not been applied in this context. Objective To evaluate the impacts of building interventions on indoor environmental quality and pediatric asthma healthcare utilization, and to conduct cost comparisons between intervention and healthcare costs, and energy savings. Methods We applied our previously developed discrete event simulation model (DEM) to simulate the effect of environmental factors, medication compliance, seasonality, and medical history on: 1) pollutant concentrations indoors, and 2) asthma outcomes in low-income multi-family housing. We estimated healthcare utilization and costs at baseline and subsequent to interventions, and then compared healthcare costs to energy savings and intervention costs. Results Interventions such as integrated pest management and repairing kitchen exhaust fans led to 7–12% reductions in serious asthma events with 1–3 year payback periods. Weatherization efforts targeted solely towards tightening a building envelope led to 20% more serious asthma events, but bundling with repairing kitchen exhaust fans and eliminating indoor sources (e.g. gas stoves or smokers) mitigated this impact. Conclusion Our pediatric asthma model provides a tool to prioritize individual and bundled building interventions based on their impact on health and cost, and highlighting the tradeoffs between weatherization, indoor air quality, and health. Our work bridges the gap between clinical and environmental health sciences by increasing physicians’ understanding of the impact that home environmental changes can have on their patients’ asthma. PMID:23910689

  7. Childhood Epilepsy and Asthma: A Test of an Extension of the Double ABCX Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Joan Kessner

    The Double ABCX Model of Family Adjustment and Adaptation, a model that predicts adaptation to chronic stressors on the family, was extended by dividing it into attitudes, coping, and adaptation of parents and child separately, and by including variables relevant to child adaptation to epilepsy or asthma. The extended model was tested on 246…

  8. Augmentation of arginase 1 expression by exposure to air pollution exacerbates the airways hyperresponsiveness in murine models of asthma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Arginase overexpression contributes to airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthma. Arginase expression is further augmented in cigarette smoking asthmatics, suggesting that it may be upregulated by environmental pollution. Thus, we hypothesize that arginase contributes to the exacerbation of respiratory symptoms following exposure to air pollution, and that pharmacologic inhibition of arginase would abrogate the pollution-induced AHR. Methods To investigate the role of arginase in the air pollution-induced exacerbation of airways responsiveness, we employed two murine models of allergic airways inflammation. Mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) and challenged with nebulized PBS (OVA/PBS) or OVA (OVA/OVA) for three consecutive days (sub-acute model) or 12 weeks (chronic model), which exhibit inflammatory cell influx and remodeling/AHR, respectively. Twenty-four hours after the final challenge, mice were exposed to concentrated ambient fine particles plus ozone (CAP+O3), or HEPA-filtered air (FA), for 4 hours. After the CAP+O3 exposures, mice underwent tracheal cannulation and were treated with an aerosolized arginase inhibitor (S-boronoethyl-L-cysteine; BEC) or vehicle, immediately before determination of respiratory function and methacholine-responsiveness using the flexiVent®. Lungs were then collected for comparison of arginase activity, protein expression, and immunohistochemical localization. Results Compared to FA, arginase activity was significantly augmented in the lungs of CAP+O3-exposed OVA/OVA mice in both the sub-acute and chronic models. Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining revealed that the increased activity was due to arginase 1 expression in the area surrounding the airways in both models. Arginase inhibition significantly reduced the CAP+O3-induced increase in AHR in both models. Conclusions This study demonstrates that arginase is upregulated following environmental exposures in murine models of asthma, and contributes

  9. Management of allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Solelhac, Geoffroy

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we review the current management of allergic rhinitis and new directions for future treatment. Currently, management includes pharmacotherapy, allergen avoidance and possibly immunotherapy. The simple washing of nasal cavities using isotonic saline provides a significant improvement and is useful, particularly in children. The most effective medication in persistent rhinitis used singly is topical corticosteroid, which decreases all symptoms, including ocular ones. Antihistamines reduce nasal itch, sneeze and rhinorrhea and can be used orally or topically. When intranasal antihistamine is used together with topical corticosteroid, the combination is more effective and acts more rapidly than either drug used alone. Alternative therapies, such as homeopathy, acupuncture and intranasal carbon dioxide, or devices such nasal air filters or intranasal cellulose, have produced some positive results in small trials but are not recommended by Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA). In the field of allergic immunotherapy, subcutaneous and sublingual routes are currently used, the former being perhaps more efficient and the latter safer. Sublingual tablets are now available. Their efficacy compared to standard routes needs to be evaluated. Efforts have been made to develop more effective and simpler immunotherapy by modifying allergens and developing alternative routes. Standard allergen avoidance procedures used alone do not provide positive results. A comprehensive, multi-trigger, multi-component approach is needed, including avoidance of pollutants such as cigarette smoke. PMID:25374672

  10. Exposure to house dust phthalates in relation to asthma and allergies in both children and adults.

    PubMed

    Ait Bamai, Yu; Shibata, Eiji; Saito, Ikue; Araki, Atsuko; Kanazawa, Ayako; Morimoto, Kanehisa; Nakayama, Kunio; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Takigawa, Tomoko; Yoshimura, Takesumi; Chikara, Hisao; Saijo, Yasuaki; Kishi, Reiko

    2014-07-01

    Although an association between exposure to phthalates in house dust and childhood asthma or allergies has been reported in recent years, there have been no reports of these associations focusing on both adults and children. We aimed to investigate the relationships between phthalate levels in Japanese dwellings and the prevalence of asthma and allergies in both children and adult inhabitants in a cross-sectional study. The levels of seven phthalates in floor dust and multi-surface dust in 156 single-family homes were measured. According to a self-reported questionnaire, the prevalence of bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, and atopic dermatitis in the 2 years preceding the study was 4.7%, 18.6%, 7.6%, and 10.3%, respectively. After evaluating the interaction effects of age and exposure categories with generalized liner mixed models, interaction effects were obtained for DiNP and bronchial asthma in adults (Pinteraction=0.028) and for DMP and allergic rhinitis in children (Pinteraction=0.015). Although not statistically significant, children had higher ORs of allergic rhinitis for DiNP, allergic conjunctivitis for DEHP, and atopic dermatitis for DiBP and BBzP than adults, and liner associations were observed (Ptrend<0.05). On the other hand, adults had a higher OR for atopic dermatitis and DEHP compared to children. No significant associations were found in phthalates levels collected from multi-surfaces. This study suggests that the levels of DMP, DEHP, DiBP, and BBzP in floor dust were associated with the prevalence of allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and atopic dermatitis in children, and children are more vulnerable to phthalate exposure via household floor dust than are adults. The results from this study were shown by cross-sectional nature of the analyses and elaborate assessments for metabolism of phthalates were not considered. Further studies are needed to advance our understanding of phthalate toxicity.

  11. The therapeutic efficacy of α-pinene in an experimental mouse model of allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sun-Young; Chung, Cha-kwon; Seo, Jun-Ho; Rah, So-Young; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, the therapeutic effect and underlying mechanism of α-pinene (α-PN) in the ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized allergic rhinitis (AR) model were investigated. Our results showed that pretreatment with α-PN caused a decrease in clinical symptoms, including a decrease in the number of nasal, eye, and ear rubs, and spleen weight in the OVA-sensitized mice. The level of interleukin (IL)-4 was decreased on the spleen tissue of α-PN treated mice. Pretreatment with α-PN significantly decreased levels of nasal immunoglobulin E. Protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 were decreased by the administration of α-PN in the nasal mucosa of the OVA-sensitized mice. The increased numbers of eosinophils and mast cells infiltrating the nasal mucosal tissue of mice with AR were decreased following oral administration of α-PN. Post-treatment with α-PN 1h after OVA challenge also resulted in a significant reduction of clinical symptoms and IgE levels. In addition, the expression and phosphorylation of receptor-interacting protein 2 (RIP2) and IκB kinase (IKK)-β and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and caspase-1 were all increased in the activated human mast cell line, HMC-1 cells, however, increased activations of RIP2, IKK-β, NF-κB, and caspase-1 were inhibited by treatment with α-PN. Taken together, we suggest that α-PN is a promising anti-allergic agent and may be useful in the clinical management of AR.

  12. Climate change and allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Bielory, Leonard; Lyons, Kevin; Goldberg, Robert

    2012-12-01

    Allergies are prevalent throughout the United States and impose a substantial quality of life and economic burden. The potential effect of climate change has an impact on allergic disorders through variability of aeroallergens, food allergens and insect-based allergic venoms. Data suggest allergies (ocular and nasal allergies, allergic asthma and sinusitis) have increased in the United States and that there are changes in allergies to stinging insect populations (vespids, apids and fire ants). The cause of this upward trend is unknown, but any climate change may induce augmentation of this trend; the subspecialty of allergy and immunology needs to be keenly aware of potential issues that are projected for the near and not so distant future.

  13. METALS, PARTICLES AND IMPACT UPON PULMONARY ALLERGIC RESPONSES

    EPA Science Inventory


    The increase in allergic asthma over the past few decades has prompted investigations into whether air pollution may affect either the incidence or severity of allergic lung disease. Population studies have demonstrated that as air pollution rises, symptoms, medication use a...

  14. Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... immune system identifies pollen as an invader or allergen. Your immune system overreacts by producing antibodies called ... IgE has specific "radar" for each type of allergen. That's why some people are only allergic to ...

  15. Update on the role of alternatively activated macrophages in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhilong; Zhu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Lung macrophages link innate and adaptive immune responses during allergic airway inflammatory responses. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) and interstitial macrophages are two different phenotypes that differentially exert immunological function under physiological and pathological conditions. Exposure to pathogen induces polarization of AM cells into classically activated macrophages (M1 cells) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2 cells). M1 cells dominantly express proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1 β and induce lung inflammation and tissue damage. M2 cells are further divided into M2a and M2c subsets. M2a cells dominantly produce allergic cytokines IL-4 and IL-13, but M2c cells dominantly produce anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. M2a and M2c cells are differently involved in initiation, inflammation resolution, and tissue remodeling in the different stages of asthma. Microenvironment dynamically influences polarization of AM cells. Cytokines, chemokines, and immune-regulatory cells interplay and affect the balance between the polarization of M1 and M2 cells, subsequently influencing disease progression. Thus, modulation of AM phenotypes through molecular intervention has therapeutic potential in the treatment of asthma and other allergic inflammatory diseases. This review updated recent advances in polarization and functional specialization of these macrophage subtypes with emphasis on modulation of polarization of M2 cells in asthma of human subjects and animal models. PMID:27350756

  16. Lung dendritic cells undergo maturation and polarization towards a T helper type 2-stimulating phenotype in a mouse model of asthma: Role of nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    QIN, QINGWU; WANG, ZHAN; PAN, PINHUA; CAO, ZU; XIA, QING; TAN, HONGYI; HU, CHENGPING

    2014-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and dendritic cells (DCs) have been hypothesized to modulate T cell responses in a mouse model of asthma. However, whether NGF plays a role in regulating the maturation and polarization of lung DCs remains unclear. In the present study, the effect of NGF inhibition on the maturation and phenotype of lung DCs was investigated in a mouse model of asthma. BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA), and subsequently received anti-NGF treatment. At 24 h following the last challenge, airway responsiveness and inflammation were examined. The concentrations of NGF, interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 were analyzed. In addition, maturation and CD103 expression in the lung DCs were investigated. Anti-NGF treatment was found to significantly reduce airway hyperreactivity and inflammation in asthmatic mice. In addition, a subdued T helper 2 (Th2) response was observed, characterized by the downregulation of IL-4 and the upregulation of IFN-γ. Furthermore, the expression of the DC surface molecules, CD80, CD86 and major histocompatibility complex class II, as well as the proportion of lung CD103+ DCs, decreased in the OVA-sensitized and challenged mice. The proportion of lung CD103+ DCs also exhibited a positive correlation with the levels of plasma NGF in the mice. These results may provide an explanation for the role of NGF in amplifying the Th2 response in allergic diseases. Therefore, NGF may promote the maturation and polarization towards a Th2-stimulating phenotype of activated DCs, contributing to an amplification of the Th2 response in asthma. PMID:25289030

  17. Evaluation of serum immunoglobulin E levels in bronchial asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sandeep, Thirunavukkarasu; Roopakala, Mysore Subrahmanyam; Silvia, Chickballapur Rayappa Wilma Delphine; Chandrashekara, Srikantaiah; Rao, Mohan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Immunoglobulin E and associated cellular responses are responsible for allergic airway diseases. A hypersensitivity reaction initiated by immunologic mechanisms, mediated by IgE antibodies occurs in allergic asthma Aim: To estimate and compare serum IgE levels in mild, moderate, and severe asthmatics and in normal subjects and to obtain a mathematical model describing the relationship between serum IgE levels and severity of asthma. Materials and Methods: A stratified sample of 60 patients within age group of 18-60 years and 31 male and 29 female asthmatic patients and 13 healthy controls within 18-60 years were included in this study and classified according to GINA classification. Serum IgE levels were estimated by using ELISA kit. Results: Mean IgE levels ranged from 151.95 IU/ml in normal subjects to 1045.32 IU/ml in severe asthmatics. The model developed was 27% efficient. Conclusion: Serum Immunoglobulin E levels were high in asthmatics as compared to normal subjects. On an average, the levels increased as the severity of asthma increased. However, there was no statistically significant correlation since the variability in each level of asthma was very large PMID:20931031

  18. Exercise-induced asthma. What family physicians should do.

    PubMed Central

    D'Urzo, A.

    1995-01-01

    Exercise-induced asthma is described as a transitory increase in airway resistance during or after vigorous exercise. Nearly 90% of patients with chronic asthma and 40% of allergic nonasthmatic patients have the condition. Family physicians should try to educate patients about their asthma and, barring contraindications, encourage them to participate in regular physical activity. PMID:8563507

  19. Immunotherapy in asthma.

    PubMed

    Warrington, Richard

    2010-09-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways in which many cells and cellular elements play a role. Chronic inflammation is associated with airway hyper-responsiveness that leads to recurrent episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness and coughing, as well as variable airflow obstruction within the lung. With time, such airflow obstruction may become permanent due to remodeling. It has been treated for more than 100 years by subcutaneous immunotherapy with allergen extracts but in recent years, other forms and types of immunotherapy have been introduced. Perhaps the most successful of these to date, is sublingual immunotherapy, which has attained significant usage in European countries but has yet to make inroads into clinical practice in North America. Other mechanisms to modify the inflammatory responses of asthma have included immunotherapy with recombinant allergens, the use of allergen peptides targeting antigen-specific T cells and the administration of Toll-like receptor agonists coupled to allergen proteins. As the inflammatory responses in asthma frequently involve IgE, a modified monoclonal antibody to IgE and interfering with its binding to the IgE receptor have gained acceptance for treating severe allergic asthma. Other monoclonal antibodies or recombinant receptor antagonists are being assessed for their ability to block other contributors to the inflammatory response. Finally, attempts have been made to generate autoantibody responses to cytokines implicated in asthma. Most of these therapies aim to modify or inhibit the so-called Th 2 immune response, which is implicated in many forms of asthma, or to inhibit cytokines involved in these responses. However, an added benefit of classical immunotherapy seems to be the ability to prevent the allergic progression to new sensitivities and new forms of allergic disease.

  20. The Microbiome in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yvonne J.; Boushey, Homer A.

    2014-01-01

    The application of recently developed sensitive, specific, culture-independent tools for identification of microbes is transforming concepts of microbial ecology, including concepts of the relationships between the vast, complex populations of microbes associated with ourselves and with states of health and disease. While most work initially focused on the community of microbes (microbiome) in the gastrointestinal tract and its relationships to gastrointestinal disease, interest has expanded to include study of the relationships of the microbiome of the airways to asthma and its phenotypes, and to the relationships between the gastrointestinal microbiome, development of immune function, and predisposition to development of allergic sensitization and asthma. We here provide our perspective on the findings of studies of differences in the airway microbiome in patients with asthma vs. healthy subjects, and of studies of relationships between environmental microbiota, gut microbiota, immune function, and the development of asthma, and additionally provide our perspective on how these findings suggest in broad outline a rationale for approaches involving directed manipulation of the gut and airway microbiome for treatment and prevention of allergic asthma. PMID:25567040

  1. Dietary Fiber Intake Regulates Intestinal Microflora and Inhibits Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Shi, Lei; Pang, Wenhui; Liu, Wenwen; Li, Jianfeng; Wang, Haibo; Shi, Guanggang

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, academic studies suggest that global growth of airway allergic disease has a close association with dietary changes including reduced consumption of fiber. Therefore, appropriate dietary fiber supplementation might be potential to prevent airway allergic disease (AAD). Objective We investigated whether dietary fiber intake suppressed the induction of AAD and tried to elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms. Methods The control mice and AAD model mice fed with 4% standard-fiber chow, while low-fiber group of mice fed with a 1.75% low-fiber chow. The two fiber-intervened groups including mice, apart from a standard-fiber diet, were also intragastric (i.g.) administrated daily with poorly fermentable cellulose or readily fermentable pectin (0.4% of daily body weight), respectively. All animals except normal mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) to induce airway allergic inflammation. Hallmarks of AAD were examined by histological analysis and ELISA. The variation in intestinal bacterial composition was assessed by qualitative analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) content in fecal samples using real-time PCR. Results Low-fiber diet aggravated inflammatory response in ovalbumin-induced allergic mice, whereas dietary fiber intake significantly suppressed the allergic responses, attenuated allergic symptoms of nasal rubbing and sneezing, decreased the pathology of eosinophil infiltration and goblet cell metaplasia in the nasal mucosa and lung, inhibited serum OVA-specific IgE levels, and lowered the levels of Th2 cytokines in NALF and BALF, but, increased Th1 (IFN-γ) cytokines. Additionally, dietary fiber intake also increased the proportion of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, and decreased Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Levels of probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, were upgraded significantly. Conclusion Long-term deficiency of dietary fiber intake increases the susceptibility to AAD, whereas proper

  2. The Chronic Care Model: A Collaborative Approach to Preventing and Treating Asthma in Infants and Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessel, Lois; Spain, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    The authors that a collaborative approach between parents and professionals is the best way to care for a young child with asthma. They use Ed Wagner's transdisciplinary 1998 Chronic Care Model as their preferred method for collaboration. More than 5 million children in the U.S. are currently affected by asthma, and a growing body of evidence…

  3. The Novel 10-Item Asthma Prediction Tool: External Validation in the German MAS Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Grabenhenrich, Linus B.; Reich, Andreas; Fischer, Felix; Zepp, Fred; Forster, Johannes; Schuster, Antje; Bauer, Carl-Peter; Bergmann, Renate L.; Bergmann, Karl E.; Wahn, Ulrich; Keil, Thomas; Lau, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Background A novel non-invasive asthma prediction tool from the Leicester Cohort, UK, forecasts asthma at age 8 years based on 10 predictors assessed in early childhood, including current respiratory symptoms, eczema, and parental history of asthma. Objective We aimed to externally validate the proposed asthma prediction method in a German birth cohort. Methods The MAS-90 study (Multicentre Allergy Study) recorded details on allergic diseases prospectively in about yearly follow-up assessments up to age 20 years in a cohort of 1,314 children born 1990. We replicated the scoring method from the Leicester cohort and assessed prediction, performance and discrimination. The primary outcome was defined as the combination of parent-reported wheeze and asthma drugs (both in last 12 months) at age 8. Sensitivity analyses assessed model performance for outcomes related to asthma up to age 20 years. Results For 140 children parents reported current wheeze or cough at age 3 years. Score distribution and frequencies of later asthma resembled the Leicester cohort: 9% vs. 16% (MAS-90 vs. Leicester) of children at low risk at 3 years had asthma at 8 years, at medium risk 45% vs. 48%. Performance of the asthma prediction tool in the MAS-90 cohort was similar (Brier score 0.22 vs. 0.23) and discrimination slightly better than in the original cohort (area under the curve, AUC 0.83 vs. 0.78). Prediction and discrimination were robust against changes of inclusion criteria, scoring and outcome definitions. The secondary outcome ‘physicians’ diagnosed asthma at 20 years' showed the highest discrimination (AUC 0.89). Conclusion The novel asthma prediction tool from the Leicester cohort, UK, performed well in another population, a German birth cohort, supporting its use and further development as a simple aid to predict asthma risk in clinical settings. PMID:25536057

  4. General anesthesia exposure in early life reduces the risk of allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ho-Chang; Yang, Ya-Ling; Ho, Shu-Chen; Guo, Mindy Ming-Huey; Jiang, Jyun-Hong; Huang, Ying-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract General anesthesia (GA) has been used for second line treatment strategy for status asthmaticus in pediatric patients. The association between GA in children and risk of followed-up allergic diseases is unclear. This study aims to assess the risk of allergic diseases after GA in children. We did a nationwide retrospective cohort study by analyzing data from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) in Taiwan. The subsequent risks for allergic diseases, including asthma (ICD-9: 493.X), allergic rhinitis (AR; ICD-9 CM code 477.X), and atopic dermatitis (AD; ICD-9-CM code 691.X), were compared between exposure to GA and none before 1 year of age throughout the follow-up period using the Cox proportional hazards model. Insurance claims data for 32,742 children younger than 1 year old from all insured children in the NHIRD. Of those, 2358 subjects were exposed to GA; 414 and 1944 children exposed to mask and intubation ventilation, respectively, served as the study cohort, whereas the remaining 30,384 children made up the comparison cohort. Children in the GA group were at a lower risk of developing asthma, AR and AD, with adjusted hazard ratios of 0.67 (0.62–0.72, 95%CI), 0.72 (0.68–0.77, 95%CI), 0.60 (0.56–0.64, 95%CI), respectively. Children who were exposed to GA in early life before 1 year of age had reduced risk of subsequently developing allergic diseases such as asthma, AD, and AR, when compared with general population. PMID:27428241

  5. A geranyl acetophenone targeting cysteinyl leukotriene synthesis prevents allergic airway inflammation in ovalbumin-sensitized mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Norazren; Jambari, Nuzul Nurahya; Zareen, Seema; Akhtar, Mohamad Nadeem; Shaari, Khozirah; Zamri-Saad, Mohamad; Tham, Chau Ling; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan; Lajis, Nordin Hj; Israf, Daud Ahmad

    2012-03-01

    Asthma is associated with increased pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. The current use of corticosteroids in the management of asthma has recently raised issues regarding safety and lack of responsiveness in 5–10% of asthmatic individuals. The aim of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of a non-steroidal small molecule that has cysteinyl leukotriene (cysLT) inhibitory activity, upon attenuation of allergic lung inflammation in an acute murine model. Mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and treated with several intraperitoneal doses (100, 20, 2 and 0.2 mg/kg) of 2,4,6,-trihydroxy-3-geranylacetophenone (tHGA). Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed, blood and lung samples were obtained and respiratory function was measured. OVA sensitization increased pulmonary inflammation and pulmonary allergic inflammation was significantly reduced at doses of 100, 20 and 2 mg/kg with no effect at the lowest dose of 0.2 mg/kg. The beneficial effects in the lung were associated with reduced eosinophilic infiltration and reduced secretion of Th2 cytokines and cysLTs. Peripheral blood reduction of total IgE was also a prominent feature. Treatment with tHGA significantly attenuated altered airway hyperresponsiveness as measured by the enhanced pause (Penh) response to incremental doses of methacholine. These data demonstrate that tHGA, a synthetic non-steroidal small molecule, can prevent acute allergic inflammation. This proof of concept opens further avenues of research and development of tHGA as an additional option to the current armamentarium of anti-asthma therapeutics. -- Highlights: ► Safer and effective anti-asthmatic drugs are in great demand. ► tHGA is a new 5-LO/cysLT inhibitor that inhibits allergic asthma in mice. ► tHGA is a natural compound that can be synthesized. ► Doses as low as 2 mg/kg alleviate lung pathology in experimental asthma. ► tHGA is a potential drug lead for the treatment of allergic asthma.

  6. Possible Immune Regulation of Natural Killer T Cells in a Murine Model of Metal Ion-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Kenichi; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Shigematsu, Hiroaki; Matsubara, Ryota; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Eguchi, Takanori; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nakasone, Yasunari; Sato, Koichiro; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    Metal often causes delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, which are possibly mediated by accumulating T cells in the inflamed skin, called irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. However, accumulating T cells during development of a metal allergy are poorly characterized because a suitable animal model is unavailable. We have previously established novel murine models of metal allergy and found accumulation of both metal-specific T cells and natural killer (NK) T cells in the inflamed skin. In our novel models of metal allergy, skin hypersensitivity responses were induced through repeated sensitizations by administration of metal chloride and lipopolysaccharide into the mouse groin followed by metal chloride challenge in the footpad. These models enabled us to investigate the precise mechanisms of the immune responses of metal allergy in the inflamed skin. In this review, we summarize the immune responses in several murine models of metal allergy and describe which antigen-specific responses occur in the inflamed skin during allergic contact dermatitis in terms of the T cell receptor. In addition, we consider the immune regulation of accumulated NK T cells in metal ion–induced allergic contact dermatitis. PMID:26771600

  7. Possible Immune Regulation of Natural Killer T Cells in a Murine Model of Metal Ion-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kenichi; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Shigematsu, Hiroaki; Matsubara, Ryota; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Eguchi, Takanori; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nakasone, Yasunari; Sato, Koichiro; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2016-01-12

    Metal often causes delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, which are possibly mediated by accumulating T cells in the inflamed skin, called irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. However, accumulating T cells during development of a metal allergy are poorly characterized because a suitable animal model is unavailable. We have previously established novel murine models of metal allergy and found accumulation of both metal-specific T cells and natural killer (NK) T cells in the inflamed skin. In our novel models of metal allergy, skin hypersensitivity responses were induced through repeated sensitizations by administration of metal chloride and lipopolysaccharide into the mouse groin followed by metal chloride challenge in the footpad. These models enabled us to investigate the precise mechanisms of the immune responses of metal allergy in the inflamed skin. In this review, we summarize the immune responses in several murine models of metal allergy and describe which antigen-specific responses occur in the inflamed skin during allergic contact dermatitis in terms of the T cell receptor. In addition, we consider the immune regulation of accumulated NK T cells in metal ion-induced allergic contact dermatitis.

  8. Prevalence and severity of symptoms of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema in 10- to 15-year-old schoolchildren in central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Li-Chi; Chen, Yu-Huan; Hsueh, Kai-Chung; Huang, Jing-Long

    2007-03-01

    The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire was distributed through 14 schools and was completed by 11,874 students out of which are parents of 4,167 children aged between 10 and 12 years old and 7,677 older children aged between 13 and 15 years in central Taiwan. The overall cumulative and 12-month prevalence of wheezing, rhinitis, and eczema were 7.4%, 43.0%, and 7.2%, respectively. It was shown that boys had significantly higher prevalence of wheezing and rhinitis (p < 0.001 and p = 0.001) when compared to girls in central Taiwan. The study also found that prevalence rates among younger children with symptoms of wheezing, rhinitis, and recurrent itchy rash in the past 12-month (8.2%, 44.4%, and 8.8%) were higher than that among older children (6.9%, 42.2%, and 6.3%, respectively). In conclusion, boys had significantly higher prevalence of wheezing and rhinitis than girls while younger children tend to have higher prevalence of the disorders than those that are older in age.

  9. Viral infections and the development of asthma in children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Viral aetiology, host susceptibility (in particular allergic predisposition and sensitization), and illness severity, timing and frequency all appear to contribute as synergistic factors to the risk of developing asthma. Experimental models have shown both innate and adaptive immune responses contribute to this risk with lung inflammatory cells showing marked differences in phenotype and function in young compared with older animals, and these differences are further enhanced following virus infection. Findings to date strongly suggest that the impact of infant and preschool viral infections on the maturing immune system and developing lung that subsequently result in an asthma phenotype occur during a critical susceptibility period, and in a genetically susceptible host. There are currently no therapeutic strategies that allow primary or secondary prevention of asthma following early life viral respiratory infections in high-risk children, thus a focus on understanding the mechanisms of progression from viral wheezing in infants and preschool children to asthma development are urgently needed. This review summarizes the data reporting the role of the two most common viruses, that is, respiratory syncytial virus and human rhinovirus, that result in asthma development, comparing risk factors for disease progression, and providing insight into strategies that might be adopted to prevent asthma development. PMID:25165549

  10. Viral infections and the development of asthma in children.

    PubMed

    Saglani, Sejal

    2013-08-01

    Viral aetiology, host susceptibility (in particular allergic predisposition and sensitization), and illness severity, timing and frequency all appear to contribute as synergistic factors to the risk of developing asthma. Experimental models have shown both innate and adaptive immune responses contribute to this risk with lung inflammatory cells showing marked differences in phenotype and function in young compared with older animals, and these differences are further enhanced following virus infection. Findings to date strongly suggest that the impact of infant and preschool viral infections on the maturing immune system and developing lung that subsequently result in an asthma phenotype occur during a critical susceptibility period, and in a genetically susceptible host. There are currently no therapeutic strategies that allow primary or secondary prevention of asthma following early life viral respiratory infections in high-risk children, thus a focus on understanding the mechanisms of progression from viral wheezing in infants and preschool children to asthma development are urgently needed. This review summarizes the data reporting the role of the two most common viruses, that is, respiratory syncytial virus and human rhinovirus, that result in asthma development, comparing risk factors for disease progression, and providing insight into strategies that might be adopted to prevent asthma development. PMID:25165549

  11. TRIMELLITIC ANHYDRIDE-INDUCED EOSINOPHILIA IN A MURINE MODEL OF OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRIMELLITIC ANHYDRIDE-INDUCED EOSINOPHILIA IN A MURINE MODEL OF OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA. J F Regal, ME Mohrman, E Boykin and D Sailstad. Dept. of Pharmacology, University of Minnesota, Duluth, MN, USA and NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.
    Trimellitic anhydride (TMA) is a small m...

  12. Modulation of the oscillatory mechanics of lung tissue and the oxidative stress response induced by arginase inhibition in a chronic allergic inflammation model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of the lung parenchyma in the pathophysiology of asthma has previously been demonstrated. Considering that nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and arginases compete for the same substrate, it is worthwhile to elucidate the effects of complex NOS-arginase dysfunction in the pathophysiology of asthma, particularly, related to distal lung tissue. We evaluated the effects of arginase and iNOS inhibition on distal lung mechanics and oxidative stress pathway activation in a model of chronic pulmonary allergic inflammation in guinea pigs. Methods Guinea pigs were exposed to repeated ovalbumin inhalations (twice a week for 4 weeks). The animals received 1400 W (an iNOS-specific inhibitor) for 4 days beginning at the last inhalation. Afterwards, the animals were anesthetized and exsanguinated; then, a slice of the distal lung was evaluated by oscillatory mechanics, and an arginase inhibitor (nor-NOHA) or vehicle was infused in a Krebs solution bath. Tissue resistance (Rt) and elastance (Et) were assessed before and after ovalbumin challenge (0.1%), and lung strips were submitted to histopathological studies. Results Ovalbumin-exposed animals presented an increase in the maximal Rt and Et responses after antigen challenge (p<0.001), in the number of iNOS positive cells (p<0.001) and in the expression of arginase 2, 8-isoprostane and NF-kB (p<0.001) in distal lung tissue. The 1400 W administration reduced all these responses (p<0.001) in alveolar septa. Ovalbumin-exposed animals that received nor-NOHA had a reduction of Rt, Et after antigen challenge, iNOS positive cells and 8-isoprostane and NF-kB (p<0.001) in lung tissue. The activity of arginase 2 was reduced only in the groups treated with nor-NOHA (p <0.05). There was a reduction of 8-isoprostane expression in OVA-NOR-W compared to OVA-NOR (p<0.001). Conclusions In this experimental model, increased arginase content and iNOS-positive cells were associated with the constriction of distal lung parenchyma

  13. Evidence of infectious asthma phenotype: Chlamydia-induced allergy and pathogen-specific IgE in a neonatal mouse model.

    PubMed

    Patel, Katir K; Webley, Wilmore C

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease whose etiology is poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that early-life respiratory infections with atypical bacteria may play an important role in the induction or exacerbation of chronic respiratory disease. The current study utilized a neonatal mouse ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization model of asthma to determine the course of early-life respiratory tract infection by Chlamydia. Neonatal (day 1) and adult (6 wks) BALB/c mice were infected intranasally with Chlamydia (MoPn) and 7 weeks later were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Allergic airway disease was characterized by examination of serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) cellularity, cytokine production and antibody response. The presence of Chlamydia was determined by PCR and culture. Ova-specific IgE was quantified by ELISA and Chlamydia-specific IgE was determined via Western blot analysis. Chlamydial infection in neonatal mice induced increased production of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, 5, 10, and 13) in both BAL and serum, while infected adult mice produced increased Th1 cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ). The BAL from infected neonates contained significantly elevated levels of eosinophils compared to infected adult mice. Although adult mice cleared the infection ∼30 days post infection (pi), neonates were still infected 66 days after initial infection. Chlamydia-specific IgE was detected in both the BAL and serum of neonatal mice beginning 28 days post infection, however, infected adult mice did not produce Chlamydia-specific IgE antibodies over the course of the study. When allergic airway was induced using Ova, infected neonatal mice increased their production of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 by >2 fold compared to uninfected controls and infected adult groups. Our findings demonstrate that early-life Chlamydia infection induces a Th2-dominant cytokine response in the airways of neonatal mice, leading to chronic infection. More significantly, early life respiratory

  14. The management of asthma in the phenotype and biomarker era: The proposal of a new diagnostic-therapeutic model.

    PubMed

    Blasi, Francesco; Bettoncelli, Germano; Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Centanni, Stefano; Crimi, Nunzio; DiMaria, Giuseppe; Gasparini, Stefano; Gentili, Gilberto; Girbino, Giuseppe; Mereu, Carlo; Minghetti, Paola; Nardini, Stefano; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Papi, Alberto; Pistolesi, Massimo; Rossi, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Treatment goals in asthma patients are the achievement of a good control of symptoms and the reduction of the risk of exacerbation. However, a "one-size-fits-all" therapeutic strategy is no longer appropriate to effectively pursue these goals, due to the heterogeneity of asthma. To make the treatment scenario even more complex, asthma patients often present comorbidities that may alter response to therapy. In addition, adherence to asthma treatment is poor. Given this complex and heterogeneous picture, the management of asthma is highly challenging. A clear diagnostic-therapeutic model of patients' care and the definition of the specific responsibilities of different healthcare providers appear necessary to improve clinical outcomes and better allocate healthcare resources. We present here a proposal for this model.

  15. Profiling of Differentially Expressed Genes Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization in an Equine Model of Chronic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Lefebvre-Lavoie, Josiane; Leclere, Mathilde; Lavoie-Lamoureux, Anouk; Chamberland, Annie; Laprise, Catherine; Lussier, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    asthma were identified. The findings of genes previously associated with asthma validate this equine model for gene expression studies. PMID:22235296

  16. Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Kakli, Hasan A; Riley, Timothy D

    2016-09-01

    Among the atopic disorders, allergic rhinitis is the most prevalent. Patients who suffer from allergic rhinitis sustain significant morbidity and loss of productivity. Cardinal symptoms include nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, sneezing, and nasal itching, although multiple related symptoms may occur. Causes should be ruled out with a thorough history and physical examination, with particular attention to red flag or atypical symptoms. Skin testing or serum sampling can confirm diagnosis and also guide therapy. Therapy is multimodal, tailored to a particular patient's symptom burden and quality of life. PMID:27545735

  17. Using the Health Belief Model to Understand School Nurse Asthma Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quaranta, Judith E.; Spencer, Gale A.

    2015-01-01

    Ten million children in the United States have asthma. Since children are in school about 6 hr a day, school nurses are positioned to intervene and influence asthma outcomes. A descriptive correlational study was designed to investigate performance of school nurses' asthma management behaviors in relationship to asthma knowledge, asthma attitude,…

  18. Chemical respiratory allergy and occupational asthma: what are the key areas of uncertainty?

    PubMed

    Isola, Daniel; Kimber, Ian; Sarlo, Katherine; Lalko, Jon; Sipes, I Glenn

    2008-04-01

    There is increasing concern about the association of respiratory disease with indoor air quality and environmental atmospheric pollution. Associated with this is the fact that in many countries there has been a significant increase in the prevalence of asthma. Against this background there is a need to address the toxicological, occupational and public health problems associated with the ability of some chemicals to cause allergic sensitization of the respiratory tract and occupational asthma. By definition allergic sensitization of the respiratory tract to chemicals is dependent upon the stimulation of an adaptive immune response that leads to development of respiratory allergy and/or asthma. Although IgE antibody is associated typically with respiratory sensitization to protein allergens, there is less certainty about the role played by antibodies of this type in chemical respiratory allergy and occupational asthma. There are currently no validated or widely accepted methods/models for the identification and characterization of chemicals that have the potential to induce allergic sensitization of the respiratory tract. These and other areas of uncertainty were debated during the course of and following a two day Workshop. The primary purpose of the Workshop was to consider the important clinical and toxicological issues associated with chemical respiratory allergy, and to identify key questions that need to be answered if real progress is to be made. PMID:18300327

  19. Intranasal curcumin attenuates airway remodeling in murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Subhashini; Dash, D; Singh, Rashmi

    2014-07-01

    Curcumin, phytochemical present in turmeric, rhizome of Curcuma longa, a known anti-inflammatory molecule with variety of pharmacological activities is found effective in murine model of chronic asthma characterized by structural alterations and airway remodeling. Here, we have investigated the effects of intranasal curcumin in chronic asthma where animals were exposed to allergen for longer time. In the present study Balb/c mice were sensitized by an intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA) and subsequently challenged with 2% OVA in aerosol twice a week for five consecutive weeks. Intranasal curcumin (5mg/kg) was administered from days 21 to 55, an hour before every nebulization and inflammatory cells recruitment, levels of IgE, EPO, IL-4 and IL-5 were found suppressed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Intranasal curcumin administration prevented accumulation of inflammatory cells to the airways, structural alterations and remodeling associated with chronic asthma like peribronchial and airway smooth muscle thickening, sloughing off of the epithelial lining and mucus secretion in ovalbumin induced murine model of chronic asthma.

  20. Seasonal Risk Factors for Asthma Exacerbations among Inner City Children

    PubMed Central

    Teach, Stephen J.; Gergen, Peter J.; Szefler, Stanley J.; Mitchell, Herman E.; Calatroni, Agustin; Wildfire, Jeremy; Bloomberg, Gordon; Kercsmar, Carolyn; Liu, Andrew H.; Makhija, Melanie; Matsui, Elizabeth; Morgan, Wayne; O'Connor, George; Busse, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exacerbations of asthma remain common even in children and adolescents despite optimal medical management. Identification of host risk factors for exacerbations is incomplete, particularly for seasonal episodes. Objective Define host risk factors for asthma exacerbations unique to their season of occurrence. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of patients aged 6-20 years who comprised the control groups of the Asthma Control Evaluation trial and the Inner City Anti-IgE Therapy for Asthma trial. Univariate and multivariate models were constructed to determine if patient demographic and historical factors, allergic sensitization, fractional exhaled nitric oxide, spirometric measurements, asthma control, and treatment requirements were associated with seasonal exacerbations. Results The analysis included 400 patients (54.5% male; 59.0% African American; median age 13 years). Exacerbations occurred in 37.5% of participants over the periods of observation and were most common in the fall (28.8% of participants). In univariate analysis, impaired pulmonary function was significantly associated with greater odds of exacerbations for all seasons, as was an exacerbation in the previous season for all seasons except spring. In multivariate analysis, exacerbation in the previous season was the strongest predictor in fall and winter while a higher requirement for inhaled corticosteroids was the strongest predictor in spring and summer. The multivariate models had the best predictive power for fall exacerbations (30.5% variance attributed). Conclusions Among a large cohort of inner city children with asthma, patient risk factors for exacerbations vary by season. Thus, individual patient information may be beneficial in strategies to prevent these seasonal events. Clinical Implications Inner city children remain at risk for asthma exacerbations despite appropriate therapy. Because their risk factors vary by season, strategies to prevent them may need to differ as

  1. Altered Regulation of Aquaporin Gene Expression in Allergen and IL-13-Induced Mouse Models of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Krane, Carissa M.; Deng, Bijia; Mutyam, Venkateshwar; McDonald, Casey A.; Pazdziorko, Stephen; Mason, Lawrence; Goldman, Samuel; Kasaian, Marion; Chaudhary, Divya; Williams, Cara; Ho, Melisa W.Y.

    2009-01-01

    IL-13 is known to affect many processes that contribute to an asthmatic phenotype, including inflammation, fibrosis, and mucus production. Members of the aquaporin (AQP) family of transmembrane water channels are targets of regulation in models of lung injury and inflammation. Therefore, we examined AQP mRNA and protein expression in allergen and IL-13-induced mouse models of asthma. Lungs from ovalbumin sensitized and ovalbumin challenged (OVA/OVA) and IL-13 treated mice showed airway thickening, increased mucus production, and pulmonary eosinophilia. Pulmonary function tests showed a significant increase in methacholine-induced airway hyperreactivity in OVA/OVA and IL-13-treated mice as compared with controls. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed differential regulation of AQPs in these two models. AQP1 and AQP4 mRNA expression was downregulated in the OVA/OVA model, but not in the IL-13 model. AQP5 mRNA was reduced in both models, whereas AQP3 was upregulated only in the IL-13 model. Western analysis showed that diminished expression of an apically localized aquaporin, (AQP5), and concomitant upregulation of a basolateral aquaporin (AQP3 or AQP4) are characteristic features of both inducible asthma models. These results demonstrate that aquaporins are common targets of gene expression in both allergen and IL-13 induced mouse models of asthma. PMID:19237298

  2. Combination therapy with relaxin and methylprednisolone augments the effects of either treatment alone in inhibiting subepithelial fibrosis in an experimental model of allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Royce, Simon G; Sedjahtera, Amelia; Samuel, Chrishan S; Tang, Mimi L K

    2013-01-01

    Although CSs (corticosteroids) demonstrate potent effects in the control of airway inflammation in asthma, many patients continue to experience symptoms and AHR (airway hyper-responsiveness) despite optimal treatment with these agents, probably due to progressive airway remodelling. Identifying novel therapies that can target airway remodelling and/or airway reactivity may improve symptom control in these patients. We have demonstrated previously that the anti-fibrotic hormone RLN (relaxin) can reverse airway remodelling (epithelial thickening and subepithelial fibrosis) and AHR in a murine model of AAD (allergic airways disease). In the present study, we compared the effects of RLN with a CS (methylprednisolone) on airway remodelling and AHR when administered independently or in combination in the mouse AAD model. Female mice at 6-8 weeks of age were sensitized and challenged to OVA (ovalbumin) over a 9-week period and treated with methylprednisolone, RLN, a combination of both treatments or vehicle controls. Methylprednisolone was administered intraperitoneally on the same day as nebulization for 6 weeks, whereas recombinant human RLN-2 was administered via subcutaneously implanted osmotic mini-pumps from weeks 9-11. RLN or methylprednisolone alone were both able to significantly decrease subepithelial thickness and total lung collagen deposition; whereas RLN but not methylprednisolone significantly decreased epithelial thickness and AHR. Additionally, combination therapy with CS and RLN more effectively reduced subepithelial collagen thickness than either therapy alone. These findings demonstrate that RLN can modulate a broader range of airway remodelling changes and AHR than methylprednisolone and the combination of both treatments offers enhanced control of subepithelial fibrosis. PMID:22817662

  3. Innate Immune Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials During Allergic Airway Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipkowski, Kelly Anne

    The field of nanotechnology is continually advancing, and increasing amounts of consumer goods are being produced using engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). The health risks of occupational and/or consumer exposure to ENMs are not completely understood, although significant research indicates that pulmonary exposure to nanomaterials induces toxic effects in the lungs of exposed animals. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are a specific category of ENMs and consist of sheets of graphene rolled into cylinders that are multiple layers thick in order to strengthen their rigidity. MWCNTs have a fiber-like shape, similar to that of asbestos, which allows for a high aspect ratio and makes them difficult to clear from the lung. Studies with rodent models have demonstrated that pulmonary exposure to ENMs, in particular MWCNTs, results in acute lung inflammation and the subsequent development of chronic fibrosis, suggesting a potential human health risk to individuals involved in the manufacturing of products utilizing these nanomaterials. Induction of IL-1beta secretion via activation of the inflammasome is a prime mechanism of MWCNT-induced inflammation. The inflammasome is a multi-protein scaffold found in a variety of cell types that forms in response to a variety of immune signals, including particulates. Sensitization with allergens, such as house dust mite (HDM), increases levels of the T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 in mice and in humans, and there is particular cause for concern in cases of MWCNT exposure in individuals with pre-existing allergic airway disease, such as asthma. MWCNT exposure exacerbates airway inflammation and fibrosis in animal models of pre-existing allergic asthma, suggesting that individuals suffering from asthma are more susceptible to the toxic pulmonary effects of MWCNT exposure. Asthma is an exceptionally prominent human disease, and therefore the goal of this research was to better understand how pre-existing allergic airway

  4. Using the Health Belief Model to Understand School Nurse Asthma Management.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Judith E; Spencer, Gale A

    2015-12-01

    Ten million children in the United States have asthma. Since children are in school about 6 hr a day, school nurses are positioned to intervene and influence asthma outcomes. A descriptive correlational study was designed to investigate performance of school nurses' asthma management behaviors in relationship to asthma knowledge, asthma attitude, asthma self-efficacy, and rating of importance of asthma management behaviors. Results indicated that asthma attitude, asthma self-efficacy, and rating of importance of asthma management behaviors were associated with performance of asthma management behaviors. The higher the rating of importance of asthma management behaviors, the more likely school nurses were to perform the behaviors (p < .05). Higher levels of asthma self-efficacy were associated with performance of asthma management behaviors, indicating the importance of strengthening school nurses' asthma self-efficacy in asthma management. By understanding factors influencing performance of asthma management behaviors by school nurses, interventions can be implemented to increase asthma management behaviors, leading to improved outcomes for students with asthma. PMID:26324467

  5. Dietary supplementation of omega-3 fatty acid-containing fish oil suppresses F2-isoprostanes but enhances inflammatory cytokine response in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huiyong; Liu, Wei; Goleniewska, Kasia; Porter, Ned A; Morrow, Jason D; Peebles, R Stokes

    2009-09-01

    Epidemiological and clinical evidence has suggested that increased dietary intake of fish oil containing omega-3 fatty acids including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may be associated with a reduced risk of asthma. However, interventional studies on these effects have been equivocal and controversial. Free radical oxidation products of lipids and cyclooxygenases-derived prostaglandins are believed to play an important role in asthma, and fish oil supplementation may modulate the levels of these critical lipid mediators. We employed a murine model of allergic inflammation produced by sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) to study the effects of fish oil supplementation on airway inflammation. Our studies demonstrated that omega-3 fatty acids were dose dependently incorporated into mouse lung tissue after dietary supplementation. We examined the oxidative stress status by measuring the levels of isoprostanes (IsoPs), the gold standard for oxidative stress in vivo. OVA challenge caused significant increase of F(2)-IsoPs in mouse lung, suggesting an elevated level of oxidative stress. Compared to the control group, fish oil supplementation led to a significant reduction of F(2)-IsoP (from arachidonic acid) with a concomitant increase of F(3)-IsoPs (from EPA) and F(4)-IsoPs (from DHA). Surprisingly, however, fish oil supplementation enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokine IL-5 and IL-13. Furthermore, fish oil supplementation suppressed the production of pulmonary protective PGE(2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) while the level of urinary metabolites of the PGE(2) was increased. Our data suggest that augmented lung inflammation after fish oil supplementation may be due to the reduction of PGE(2) production in the lung and these dichotomous results bring into question the role of fish oil supplementation in the treatment of asthma.

  6. Home asthma triggers: barriers to asthma control in Chicago Puerto Rican children.

    PubMed

    Martin, Molly A; Thomas, Ann Marie; Mosnaim, Giselle; Greve, Matthew; Swider, Susan M; Rothschild, Steven K

    2013-05-01

    We sought objectively to measure, summarize, and contextualize the asthma triggers found in the homes of urban high-risk Puerto Rican children and adolescents with asthma in Chicago. Data were from the baseline home assessments of Project CURA. Research assistants interviewed caregivers, conducted a home visual inspection, and collected saliva samples for cotinine analysis. A trigger behavior summary score was created. The housing inspected was old with multiple units and obvious structural deficiencies. Many allergic and irritant triggers were observed. Having a controller medicine or private insurance was associated with lower trigger behavior summary scores; caregiver depression, caregiver perceived stress, and child negative life events were associated with high trigger scores. The final multivariate model retained had a controller medicine, private insurance, and caregiver perceived stress. The data from this high-risk cohort identified modifiable areas where environmental interventions could reduce morbidity in Puerto Rican children and adolescents. PMID:23728047

  7. Home asthma triggers: barriers to asthma control in Chicago Puerto Rican children.

    PubMed

    Martin, Molly A; Thomas, Ann Marie; Mosnaim, Giselle; Greve, Matthew; Swider, Susan M; Rothschild, Steven K

    2013-05-01

    We sought objectively to measure, summarize, and contextualize the asthma triggers found in the homes of urban high-risk Puerto Rican children and adolescents with asthma in Chicago. Data were from the baseline home assessments of Project CURA. Research assistants interviewed caregivers, conducted a home visual inspection, and co