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Sample records for allergic inflammatory response

  1. Oleanolic Acid Controls Allergic and Inflammatory Responses in Experimental Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Carmen; Martín, Rubén; Gallego-Muñoz, Patricia; Hernández, Marita; Nieto, María L.

    2014-01-01

    Pollen is the most common aeroallergen to cause seasonal conjunctivitis. The result of allergen exposure is a strong Th2-mediated response along with conjunctival mast cell degranulation and eosinophilic infiltration. Oleanolic acid (OA) is natural a triterpene that displays strong anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties being an active anti-allergic molecule on hypersensitivity reaction models. However, its effect on inflammatory ocular disorders including conjunctivits, has not yet been addressed. Hence, using a Ragweed pollen (RWP)-specific allergic conjunctivitis (EAC) mouse model we study here whether OA could modify responses associated to allergic processes. We found that OA treatment restricted mast cell degranulation and infiltration of eosinophils in conjunctival tissue and decreased allergen-specific Igs levels in EAC mice. Th2-type cytokines, secreted phospholipase A2 type-IIA (sPLA2-IIA), and chemokines levels were also significantly diminished in the conjunctiva and serum of OA-treated EAC mice. Moreover, OA treatment also suppressed RWP-specific T-cell proliferation. In vitro studies, on relevant cells of the allergic process, revealed that OA reduced the proliferative and migratory response, as well as the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators on EoL-1 eosinophils and RBL-2H3 mast cells exposed to allergic and/or crucial inflammatory stimuli such as RWP, sPLA2-IIA or eotaxin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the beneficial activity of OA in ocular allergic processes and may provide a new intervention strategy and potential therapy for allergic diseases. PMID:24699261

  2. Anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin on mast cell-mediated allergic responses in ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Hong; Jia, Jihui; He, Mingqiang

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin has commonly been used for the treatment of various allergic diseases. However, its precise anti-allergic rhinitis effect and mechanism remain unknown. In the present study, the effect of curcumin on allergic responses in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic rhinitis mouse was investigated. We explored the effect of curcumin on the release of allergic inflammatory mediators, such as histamine, OVA-specific IgE, and inflammatory cytokines. Also, we found that curcumin improved rhinitis symptoms, inhibited the histopathological changes of nasal mucosa, and decreased the serum levels of histamine, OVA-specific IgE and TNF-α in OVA-induced allergic rhinitis mice. In addition, curcumin suppressed the production of inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. Moreover, curcumin significantly inhibited PMA-induced p-ERK, p-p38, p-JNK, p-Iκ-Bα and NF-κB. These findings suggest that curcumin has an anti-allergic effect through modulating mast cell-mediated allergic responses in allergic rhinitis, at least partly by inhibiting MAPK/NF-κB pathway.

  3. Semaphorin 3A controls allergic and inflammatory responses in experimental allergic conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Junmi; Tanaka, Hideo; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Nomura, Eiichi; Ito, Norihiko; Nomura, Naoko; Yamane, Masayuki; Hida, Tomonobu; Goshima, Yoshio; Hatano, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    AIM To assess the efficacy of topical Semaphorin-3A (SEMA3A) in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis. METHODS Experimental allergic conjunctivitis (EAC) mice model induced by short ragweed pollen (SRW) in 4-week-old of BALB/c mice, mice were evaluated using haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, immunofluorescence and light microscope photographs. Early phase took the samples in 24h after instillation and late phase took the samples between 4 to 14d after the start of treatment. The study use of topical SEMA3A (10 U, 100 U, 1000 U) eye drops and subconjunctival injection of SEMA3A with same concentration. For comparison, five types of allergy eyedrops were quantified using clinical characteristics. RESULTS Clinical score of composite ocular symptoms of the mice treated with SEMA3A were significantly decreased both in the immediate phase and the late phase compared to those treated with commercial ophthalmic formulations and non-treatment mice. SEMA3A treatment attenuates infiltration of eosinophils entering into conjunctiva in EAC mice. The score of eosinophil infiltration in the conjunctiva of SEMA3A 1000 U-treated group were significantly lower than low-concentration of SEMA3A treated groups and non-treated group. SEMA3A treatment also suppressed T-cell proliferation in vitro and decreased serum total IgE levels in EAC mice. Moreover, Treatment of SEMA3A suppressed Th2-related cytokines (IL-5, IL-13 and IL-4) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-17 and TNF-α) release, but increased regulatory cytokine IL-10 concentration in the conjunctiva of EAC mice. CONCLUSIONS SEMA3A as a biological agent, showed the beneficial activity in ocular allergic processes with the less damage to the intraocular tissue. It is expected that SEMA3A may be contributed in patients with a more severe spectrum of refractory ocular allergic diseases including allergic conjunctivitis in the near future. PMID:25709899

  4. Effects of palmitoylethanolamide on the cutaneous allergic inflammatory response in Ascaris hypersensitive Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Cerrato, Santiago; Brazis, Pilar; Della Valle, Maria Federica; Miolo, Alda; Petrosino, Stefania; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Puigdemont, Anna

    2012-03-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is an endogenous lipid mediator with anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperalgesic properties. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of PEA on the cutaneous allergic inflammatory reaction induced by different immunological and non-immunological stimuli in hypersensitive dogs. Six spontaneously Ascaris hypersensitive Beagle dogs were challenged with intradermal injections of Ascaris suum extract, substance P and anti-canine IgE, before and after a single oral administration of PEA at doses of 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg. A significant reduction in wheal area induced by both antigen and anti-canine IgE challenge was observed after PEA administration. No significant differences were observed between the two higher doses studied, suggesting that the 10 mg/kg dose had exerted the maximum inhibitory effect. When blood levels of PEA were compared with the effects at different times, an evident correlation was obtained. However, the anti-inflammatory effects of PEA were more long-lasting than their plasma concentrations. The intradermal injection of substance P did not reveal any skin reaction (wheal or erythema formation) at any of the concentrations tested. In conclusion, PEA might constitute a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of allergic inflammatory skin diseases in companion animals.

  5. In vitro model for studying esophageal epithelial differentiation and allergic inflammatory responses identifies keratin involvement in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Kc, Kiran; Rothenberg, Marc E; Sherrill, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial differentiation is an essential physiological process that imparts mechanical strength and barrier function to squamous epithelia. Perturbation of this process can give rise to numerous human diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, in which antigenic stimuli can penetrate the weakened epithelial barrier to initiate the allergic inflammatory cascade. We recently described a simplified air-liquid interface (ALI) culture system that facilitates the study of differentiated squamous epithelia in vitro. Herein, we use RNA sequencing to define the genome-wide transcriptional changes that occur within the ALI system during epithelial differentiation and in response to allergic inflammation. We identified 2,191 and 781 genes that were significantly altered upon epithelial differentiation or dysregulated in the presence of interleukin 13 (IL-13), respectively. Notably, 286 genes that were modified by IL-13 in the ALI system overlapped with the gene signature present within the inflamed esophageal tissue from patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an allergic inflammatory disorder of the esophagus that is characterized by elevated IL-13 levels, altered epithelial differentiation, and pro-inflammatory gene expression. Pathway analysis of these overlapping genes indicated enrichment in keratin genes; for example, the gene encoding keratin 78, an uncharacterized type II keratin, was upregulated during epithelial differentiation (45-fold) yet downregulated in response to IL-13 and in inflamed esophageal tissue from patients. Thus, our findings delineate an in vitro experimental system that models epithelial differentiation that is dynamically regulated by IL-13. Using this system and analyses of patient tissues, we identify an altered expression profile of novel keratin differentiation markers in response to IL-13 and disease activity, substantiating the potential of this combined approach to identify relevant molecular processes that contribute to human allergic

  6. Effects of Swimming on the Inflammatory and Redox Response in a Model of Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, T R; Ávila, L C M; Fortkamp, B; Greiffo, F R; Bobinski, F; Mazzardo-Martins, L; Martins, D F; Duarte, M M M F; Dafre, A; Santos, A R S; Silva, M D; Souza, L F; Vieira, R P; Hizume-Kunzler, D C

    2015-06-01

    In this study we hypothesized that swimming during sensitization phase could result in a preventive effect in mice with allergic asthma. Swiss mice were divided into 4 groups: Control and Swimming (non-sensitized), OVA and OVA+Swimming (sensitized). The allergic inflammation was induced by 2 intraperitoneal injections and 4 aerosol challenges using ovalbumin. Swimming sessions were performed at high intensity over 3 weeks. 48 h after the last challenge mice were euthanized. Swimming decreased OVA-increased total IgE, IL-1, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6 levels, as well as the number of total cells, lymphocytes and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, (p<0.05). Simultaneously, swimming also increased IL-10 and glutathione levels in the Swimming and OVA+Swimming groups (p<0.05). The levels of glutathione peroxidase and catalase were increased only in the Swimming group when compared to all groups (p<0.05). 21 days of swimming resulted in an attenuation of pulmonary allergic inflammation followed by an increase of glutathione levels in the OVA group. Swimming only increased the levels of glutathione peroxidase and catalase in non-sensitized mice (p<0.05). These data suggest that the pulmonary anti-inflammatory effects produced by 3 weeks of high-intensity swimming in this model of OVA-induced asthma may be, at least partly, modulated by reduced oxidative stress and increased IL-10 production.

  7. Adjuvant effect of Asparagus racemosus Willd. derived saponins in antibody production, allergic response and pro-inflammatory cytokine modulation.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Nimisha; Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Pandey, Pallavi; Patel, Dinesh Kumar; Banerjee, Suchitra; Darokar, Mahendra Pandurang; Pal, Anirban

    2017-02-01

    The study manifests the immunoadjuvant potential of saponin rich fraction from Asparagus racemosus in terms of cellular and humoral immune response that can be exploited against microbial infections. Asparagus racemosus (AR) has been attributed as an adaptogen and rasayana in traditional medication systems for enhancing the host defence mechanism. Spectrophotometric and HPTLC analysis ensured the presence of saponins. The saponin rich fractions were tested for immunoadjuvant property in ovalbumin immunised mice for the humoral response, quantified in terms of prolonged antibody production upto a duration of 56days. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF) were estimated for the cellular immune response in LPS stimulated primary murine macrophages. The safety evaluation in terms of cytotoxicity and allergic response has also been evaluated through in-vitro (MTT) and in-vivo (IgE) respectively. ARS significantly inhibited the pro-inflammatory cytokines, in LPS stimulated murine macrophages with no intrinsic cytotoxicity. The significant increase in IgG production infers the utility of ARS for prolonged humoral response. Further, the antigen specific response of IL-12 at early stage and IgE titres also suggests the generation of cellular immune response and low allergic reaction respectively, as compared to conventional adjuvants. IL-6 and TNF fluctuations in LPS stimulated and non-stimulated macrophages along with IgG and IL-12 also confirmed the Th1/Th2 modulating effect of ARS. The study indicates potential effect of ARS as an adjuvant for the stimulation of cellular immune response in addition to generating a sustained adaptive response without any adverse effects paving way for further validation with pathogenic organisms.

  8. DIESEL PARTICLE INSTILLATION ENHANCES INFLAMMATORY AND NEUROTROPHIN RESPONSES IN THE LUNGS OF ALLERGIC BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) partially mediate many features of allergic airways disease including airways resistance and inflammation. Antibody blockade of NGF attenuates airways resistance associated with the allergen-specific airways responses in mice. ...

  9. [Study of cellular inflammatory response with bronchoalveolar lavage in allergic asthma, aspirin asthma and in extrinsic infiltrating alveolitis].

    PubMed

    Muiño, Juan C; Garnero, Roberto; Caillet Bois, Ricardo; Gregorio, María J; Ferrero, Mercedes; Romero-Piffiguer, Marta

    2002-01-01

    The asthmatic inflammatory responses present different type of cells involved in this process, such as: Lymphocytes and Eosinophils. In experienced hands the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is a well-tolerated and valuable tool for investigation of basic mechanisms in asthma and other immunological respiratory diseases. The purpose of this work was to study the different cells involved in asthmatic inflammatory responses in allergic and aspirin sensitivity patients and compared with Extrinsic Allergic Alveolitis patients (EAA) by BAL procedure. We studied 27 asthmatic patients. This group was divided by etiological conditions in: allergic asthmatic patients (a) (n: 19), (9 male and 10 female) demonstrated by reversible fall of FEV 1 (3) 20% and 2 or more positive skin test for common aeroallergens. The aspirin asthmatic patients (b) (n: 8) (5 male and 3 female) demonstrated by progressive challenge with aspirin and fall of FEV 1 (3) 20%. The third group with compatible symptoms and signs of EAA, demonstrated by lung biopsy, (n: 9) (8 male and 1 female) (c). We determined in all patients: Total IgE serum level by ELISA test. BAL was performed by standard procedure in all patients. The cells count were performed in BAL and were separated in Eosinophils, T lymphocytes defined by monoclonal anti CD 3 antibody, Lymphocytes CD 4 and CD 8 by monoclonal anti CD 4 and CD 8 antibodies respectively. The B lymphocytes defined by surface immunoglobulin isotypes IgG, IgM, IgA and IgE. The IgE level was in (a) 630 +/- 350 kU/L, in (b) it was 85 +/- 62 kU/L and in EAA (c) 55 +/- 23 kU/L, p < .0005. Eosinophil percentage in (a) was 25 +/- 13% of cells, in (b) was 28 +/- 15% of cells, NS, and 0 in (c), p < .0005. Lymphocytes T level was 43 +/- 15% of cells in (a), it was 32 +/- 15% of cells in (b) and it was 54 +/- 19% of cells in (c), NS. Lymphocytes CD 4 (+) level was 30 +/- 10% of cells in (a), it was 24 +/- 11% of cells in (b) and it was 8 +/- 6% of cells in (c), p < .005

  10. Effect of maternal exposure to ozone on reproductive outcome and immune, inflammatory, and allergic responses in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Sharkhuu, Tuya; Doerfler, Donald L; Copeland, Carey; Luebke, Robert W; Gilmour, M Ian

    2011-06-01

    There is growing concern that exposure to air pollutants during pregnancy affects health outcomes in the offspring due to alterations in the development of immune and other homeostatic processes. To assess the risks of maternal inhalation exposure to ozone (O(3)), timed pregnant BALB/c mice were exposed to different concentrations of O(3) (0, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 ppm) for 4 h/day for 10 days during gestation (GD9-GD18), and pulmonary inflammation and immune responses were assessed in the offspring at 6 weeks-of-age. Maternal O(3) exposure reduced the number of productive dams by 25% at the highest O(3) concentration (1.2 ppm) and decreased the rate of weight gain in the offspring. Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to bovine serum albumin were suppressed in the female offspring by maternal exposure to the two highest concentrations of O(3), whereas humoral immune responses to sheep red blood cells were not altered in either sex. Maternal exposure to 1.2 ppm O(3) increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of the offspring but did not affect the number of inflammatory cells or levels of total protein, IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-4 cytokines in BALF, or CD4(+), CD8(+), CD25(+), and TCRβ(+)CD1d(+) T-cells in the spleen. Offspring born from air-exposed dams sensitized early in life (postnatal day [PND] 3) to ovalbumin (OVA) antigen and then challenged as adults developed eosinophilia, elevated levels of LDH activity and total protein in BALF, and increased pulmonary responsiveness to methacholine, compared with animals sensitized at PND42. Maternal O(3) exposure in the 1.2 ppm O(3) group decreased BALF eosinophilia and serum OVA-specific IgE in the female offspring sensitized early in life but did not affect development of allergic airway inflammation by offspring sensitized late in life. In summary, maternal exposure to O(3) affected reproductive outcome and produced modest decreases in immune function and indicators of

  11. Suppression of inflammatory and allergic responses by pharmacologically potent fungus Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Neha; Katyal, Priya; Sharma, Anil K

    2014-01-01

    Acute inflammation is the result of a complex signal transduction pathway that protects and heals our body and is necessary for our good health and normal wellbeing. Whereas, chronic inflammation can be correlated well with the onset of a plethora of autoimmune disorders; rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus and polymyalgia, rheumatic and other diseases like asthma, inflammatory bowel diseases, cardiovascular disorders, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Also, it has been reported to be associated with the onset of various cancers. An effective anti-inflammatory drug should be able to inhibit the development of chronic inflammation without interfering in normal homeostasis. A number of herbal drugs have been identified in the past that can target inflammatory cytokines. Among these, Ganoderma lucidum: a powerful medicinal mushroom has been found to possess immune-modulating and immune-potentiating capabilities and has been characterized as a wonder herb. This review mainly focuses on the molecular mechanism of anti-inflammatory and antiallergic action of this mushroom and also sheds light on various patent studies related to its pharmacological action.

  12. Total glucosides of paeony inhibit the inflammatory responses of mice with allergic contact dermatitis by restoring the balanced secretion of pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun; Yuan, Jun; Wu, Hua-Xun; Chang, Yan; Wang, Qing-Tong; Wu, Yu-Jing; Zhou, Peng; Yang, Xiao-Dan; Yu, Jun; Wei, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the regulation exerted by the total glucosides of paeony (TGP) on the production of interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-10 and IL-17 in the serum and lymphocytes of mice with allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). ACD in mice was induced by the repeated application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) to their skins. The mice were orally administered TGP (35, 70, and 140mg/kg/d) and prednisone (Pre, 5mg/kg/d) from day 1 to day 7 after immunization. The inflammatory responses were evaluated by ear swelling and histological examination. Thymocyte proliferation was assayed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H tetrazolium bromide assay. The cytokine production in the serum and lymphocytes supernatant was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results indicated that the topical application of DNCB to the skin provoked obvious inflammatory responses. The oral administration of TGP (70 and 140mg/kg/d) and Pre (5mg/kg/d) significantly inhibited skin inflammation, decreased the thymus and spleen indices, and inhibited thymocyte proliferation in mice treated with DNCB. Further study indicated that TGP increased IL-4 and IL-10 production but decreased the production of IL-2 and IL-17 in the serum and lymphocyte supernatant. The correlation analysis suggested significantly positive correlations between IL-2 and IL-17 production and the severity of skin inflammation, whereas negative correlations were obtained for IL-4 and IL-10 production and skin inflammation. In summary, these results suggest that the therapeutic effects of TGP on ACD may result from its regulation of the imbalanced secretion of IL-2/IL-4 and IL-10/IL-17.

  13. The role of TRPV1 in the CD4+ T cell-mediated inflammatory response of allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hye Ran; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Ji Hye; Bae, Jun-Sang; Chung, Young-Jun; Chung, Phil-Sang; Raz, Eyal; Mo, Ji-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), which has been identified as a molecular target for the activation of sensory neurons by various painful stimuli, was reported to regulate the signaling and activation of CD4+ T cells. However, the role of TRPV1 in CD4+ T cell in allergic rhinitis remains poorly understood. In this study, TRPV1 expression was localized in CD4+ T cells. Both knockout and chemical inhibition of TRPV1 suppressed Th2/Th17 cytokine production in CD4 T cells and Jurkat T cells, respectively, and can suppress T cell receptor signaling pathways including NF-κB, MAP kinase, and NFAT. In TRPV1 knockout allergic rhinitis (AR) mice, eosinophil infiltration, Th2/Th17 cytokines in the nasal mucosa, and total and ova-specific IgE levels in serum decreased, compared with wild-type AR mice. The TRPV1 antagonists, BCTC or theobromine, showed similar inhibitory immunologic effects on AR mice models. In addition, the number of TRPV1+/CD4+ inflammatory cells increased in the nasal mucosa of patients with AR, compared with that of control subjects. Thus, TRPV1 activation on CD4+ T cells is involved in T cell receptor signaling, and it could be a novel therapeutic target in AR. PMID:26700618

  14. The role of TRPV1 in the CD4+ T cell-mediated inflammatory response of allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Samivel, Ramachandran; Kim, Dae Woo; Son, Hye Ran; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Ji Hye; Bae, Jun-Sang; Chung, Young-Jun; Chung, Phil-Sang; Raz, Eyal; Mo, Ji-Hun

    2016-01-05

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), which has been identified as a molecular target for the activation of sensory neurons by various painful stimuli, was reported to regulate the signaling and activation of CD4+ T cells. However, the role of TRPV1 in CD4+ T cell in allergic rhinitis remains poorly understood. In this study, TRPV1 expression was localized in CD4+ T cells. Both knockout and chemical inhibition of TRPV1 suppressed Th2/Th17 cytokine production in CD4 T cells and Jurkat T cells, respectively, and can suppress T cell receptor signaling pathways including NF-κB, MAP kinase, and NFAT. In TRPV1 knockout allergic rhinitis (AR) mice, eosinophil infiltration, Th2/Th17 cytokines in the nasal mucosa, and total and ova-specific IgE levels in serum decreased, compared with wild-type AR mice. The TRPV1 antagonists, BCTC or theobromine, showed similar inhibitory immunologic effects on AR mice models. In addition, the number of TRPV1+/CD4+ inflammatory cells increased in the nasal mucosa of patients with AR, compared with that of control subjects. Thus, TRPV1 activation on CD4+ T cells is involved in T cell receptor signaling, and it could be a novel therapeutic target in AR.

  15. Investigation of inflammatory and allergic responses to common mold species: results from in vitro experiments, from a mouse model of asthma and from a group of asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Muriel; Percier, Pauline; Prins, Sofie De; Huygen, Kris; Potemberg, Georges; Muraille, Eric; Romano, Marta; Michel, Olivier; Denis, Olivier

    2017-04-02

    Most studies on molds focus on A. alternata and A. fumigatus. Here we report on inflammatory and allergenic properties of more typical indoor species A. versicolor, P. chrysogenum, C. cladosporioïdes and C. sphaerospermum that were compared to A. alternata and A. fumigatus. In a mouse model, after intranasal instillation, A. alternaria, A. versicolor and C. sphaerospermum induced the early recruitment of neutrophils and the strong expression of inflammatory markers in the broncho-alveolar lavages fluids. A. fumigatus also induced the early accumulation of neutrophils but with lower levels of inflammatory markers. Chronic treatment induced variable response according to species: P. chrysogenum and A. fumigatus appeared strong pro-allergenic inducers compared to A. alternata and C. sphaerospermum while A. versicolor, and C. cladosporioides induced a mixed pro-allergenic/pro-inflammatory response. In mold-sensitized asthmatics, mold-specific Immunoglobulin E (IgE) were detected with an in-house dot-blot assay. A. fumigatus and A. alternata were the most frequent sensitizers. Altogether, P. chrysogenum, P. brevicompactum, C. sphaerospermum and C. cladosporïoides were the "major sensitizer" (defined as the strongest response against a single mold species) for almost 30% of the asthmatics. These results show that, not only A. alternata and A. fumigatus, but also indoor species have strong inflammatory and allergic properties and a harmful potency. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of inflammatory cell infiltration in feline allergic skin disease.

    PubMed

    Taglinger, K; Day, M J; Foster, A P

    2007-11-01

    Sixteen cats with allergic dermatitis and six control cats with no skin disease were examined. Lymphoid and histiocytic cells in skin sections were examined immunohistochemically and mast cells were identified by toluidine blue staining. The 16 allergic cats showed one or more of several features (alopecia, eosinophilic plaques or granulomas, papulocrusting lesions), and histopathological findings were diverse. In control cats there were no cells that expressed IgM or MAC387, a few that were immunolabelled for IgG, IgA or CD3, and moderate numbers of mast cells. In allergic cats, positively labelled inflammatory cells were generally more numerous in lesional than in non-lesional skin sections, and were particularly associated with the superficial dermis and perifollicular areas. There were low numbers of plasma cells expressing cytoplasmic immunoglobulin; moderate numbers of MHC II-, MAC387- and CD3-positive cells; and moderate to numerous mast cells. MHC class II expression was associated with inflammatory cells morphologically consistent with dermal dendritic cells and macrophages, and epidermal Langerhans cells. Dendritic cells expressing MHC class II were usually associated with an infiltrate of CD3 lymphocytes, suggesting that these cells participate in maintenance of the local immune response by presenting antigen to T lymphocytes. These findings confirm that feline allergic skin disease is characterized by infiltration of activated antigen-presenting cells and T lymphocytes in addition to increased numbers of dermal mast cells. This pattern mimics the dermal inflammation that occurs in the chronic phase of both canine and human atopic dermatitis.

  17. Dissecting the inflammatory twitch in allergically inflamed mice.

    PubMed

    Pothen, Joshua J; Poynter, Matthew E; Lundblad, Lennart K A; Bates, Jason H T

    2016-05-15

    We have previously advanced the hypothesis that the allergic inflammatory response in the lungs occurs as a self-limited sequence of events that begins with the onset of inflammation and then resolves back to baseline over a predetermined time course (Pothen JJ, Poynter ME, Bates JH. J Immunol 190: 3510-3516, 2013). In the present study we tested a key prediction of this hypothesis, which is that the instigation of the allergic inflammatory response should be accompanied by a later refractory period during which the response cannot be reinitiated. We challenged groups of ovalbumin-sensitized BALB/c mice for 3, 14, 21 and 31 consecutive days with aerosolized ovalbumin. We measured airways responsiveness as well as cell counts and cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after the final challenge in subgroups from each group. In other subgroups we performed the same measurements following rest periods and after a final single recall challenge with antigen. We determined that the refractory periods for GM-CSF, KC, and IL-5 are no longer than 10 days, while those for IFNγ and IL-10 are no longer than 28 days. The refractory periods for total leukocytes and neutrophils were no greater than 28 days, while that for eosinophils was more than 28 days. The refractory period for airways resistance was less than 17, while for lung elastance it was longer than 28 days. Our results thus demonstrate that the components of the allergic inflammatory response in the lung have finite refractory periods, with the refractory period of the entire response being in the order of a month.

  18. Dietary Enrichment with 20% Fish Oil Decreases Mucus Production and the Inflammatory Response in Mice with Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jean A.; Hartman, Jaye; Skinner, Monica M.; Schwindt, Adam R.; Fischer, Kay A.; Vorachek, William R.; Bobe, Gerd; Valentine, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma has increased in recent decades, which may be related to higher dietary intake of (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and lower intake of (n-3) PUFA, e.g., those contained in fish oil. The objective of this study was to determine if dietary PUFA enrichment decreases mucus production or the inflammatory response associated with ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic lung inflammation. Mice (n = 10/group) were fed control, 20% fish oil, or 20% corn oil enriched diets for a total of 12 weeks. At 8 and 10 weeks, mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of saline (10 control-fed mice) or OVA (30 remaining mice). Once at 10 weeks and on 3 consecutive days during week 12, mice were challenged by nebulizing with saline or OVA. Mice were euthanized 24 hours after the last challenge and blood was collected for plasma FA analysis. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected to determine cell composition and Th2-type cytokine (IL-4, IL-13) concentrations. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) + mucus-producing cells and CD45+ inflammatory cell infiltrates in lung tissue were quantified using morphometric analysis. Relative abundance of mRNA for mucin (Muc4, Muc5ac, and Muc5b) and Th2-type cytokine (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) genes were compared with ß-actin by qPCR. Supplementation with either corn oil or fish oil effectively altered plasma FA profiles towards more (n-6) FA or (n-3) FA, respectively (P < 0.0001). Sensitization and challenge with OVA increased the proportion of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils, and decreased the proportion of macrophages and concentrations of IL-13 in BAL fluid; increased the percentage of PAS+ mucus-producing cells and CD45+ inflammatory cell infiltrates in lung tissue; and increased gene expression of mucins (Muc4, Muc5ac, and Muc5b) and Th2-type cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) in lung tissue of control-fed mice. Dietary PUFA reversed the increase in PAS+ mucus-producing cells (P = 0.003). In addition, dietary

  19. Dietary Enrichment with 20% Fish Oil Decreases Mucus Production and the Inflammatory Response in Mice with Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Lung Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jean A; Hartman, Jaye; Skinner, Monica M; Schwindt, Adam R; Fischer, Kay A; Vorachek, William R; Bobe, Gerd; Valentine, Beth A

    The prevalence of asthma has increased in recent decades, which may be related to higher dietary intake of (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and lower intake of (n-3) PUFA, e.g., those contained in fish oil. The objective of this study was to determine if dietary PUFA enrichment decreases mucus production or the inflammatory response associated with ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic lung inflammation. Mice (n = 10/group) were fed control, 20% fish oil, or 20% corn oil enriched diets for a total of 12 weeks. At 8 and 10 weeks, mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of saline (10 control-fed mice) or OVA (30 remaining mice). Once at 10 weeks and on 3 consecutive days during week 12, mice were challenged by nebulizing with saline or OVA. Mice were euthanized 24 hours after the last challenge and blood was collected for plasma FA analysis. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected to determine cell composition and Th2-type cytokine (IL-4, IL-13) concentrations. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) + mucus-producing cells and CD45+ inflammatory cell infiltrates in lung tissue were quantified using morphometric analysis. Relative abundance of mRNA for mucin (Muc4, Muc5ac, and Muc5b) and Th2-type cytokine (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) genes were compared with ß-actin by qPCR. Supplementation with either corn oil or fish oil effectively altered plasma FA profiles towards more (n-6) FA or (n-3) FA, respectively (P < 0.0001). Sensitization and challenge with OVA increased the proportion of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils, and decreased the proportion of macrophages and concentrations of IL-13 in BAL fluid; increased the percentage of PAS+ mucus-producing cells and CD45+ inflammatory cell infiltrates in lung tissue; and increased gene expression of mucins (Muc4, Muc5ac, and Muc5b) and Th2-type cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) in lung tissue of control-fed mice. Dietary PUFA reversed the increase in PAS+ mucus-producing cells (P = 0.003). In addition, dietary

  20. The association between maternal psychological stress and inflammatory cytokines in allergic young children

    PubMed Central

    Koriyama, Chihaya; Yamamoto, Megumi; Anan, Ayumi; Shibata, Eiji; Kawamoto, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have shown that psychological stress is linked to asthma prevalence. Parental psychological stress may potentially influence inflammatory responses in their allergic children. The purpose of this study is to clarify the association between maternal psychological status and inflammatory response of allergic young children. Methods. The study subjects were 152 young allergic children (median age: 13 months) who had not shown any allergic symptoms in the past one month. mRNA expression levels of the inflammatory response genes IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-22 were quantified by qRT-PCR. Maternal psychological status was assessed by standardized questionnaires: the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) for depression and the Japanese Perceived Stress Scale (JPSS) for perceived stress. Results. A significant positive association was observed between maternal CES-D scores and IL-6 mRNA expression in the children with asthma. The JPSS scores were also positively associated with IL-8 mRNA expression in asthmatic children and IL-6 mRNA expression in children with allergic rhinitis. Similar trends were observed among children positive for house dust mite-specific IgE, but these associations were not significant. Conclusion. This study supports the hypothesis that maternal psychological stress affects the inflammatory response in their allergic children. PMID:26819847

  1. Differences in allergic inflammatory responses between urban PM2.5 and fine particle derived from desert-dust in murine lungs.

    PubMed

    He, Miao; Ichinose, Takamichi; Kobayashi, Makoto; Arashidani, Keiichi; Yoshida, Seiichi; Nishikawa, Masataka; Takano, Hirohisa; Sun, Guifan; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2016-04-15

    The biological and chemical natures of materials adsorbed onto fine particulate matter (PM2.5) vary by origin and passage routes. The exacerbating effects of the two samples-urban PM2.5 (U-PM2.5) collected during the hazy weather in a Chinese city and fine particles (ASD-PM2.5) collected during Asian sand dust (ASD) storm event days in Japan-on murine lung eosinophilia were compared to clarify the role of toxic materials in PM2.5. The amounts of β-glucan and mineral components were higher in ASD-PM2.5 than in U-PM2.5. On the other hand, organic chemicals, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were higher in U-PM2.5 than in ASD-PM2.5. When BALB/c mice were intratracheally instilled with U-PM2.5 and ASD-PM2.5 (total 0.4 mg/mouse) with or without ovalbumin (OVA), various biological effects were observed, including enhancement of eosinophil recruitment induced by OVA in the submucosa of the airway, goblet cell proliferation in the bronchial epithelium, synergic increase of OVA-induced eosinophil-relevant cytokines and a chemokine in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and increase of serum OVA-specific IgG1 and IgE. Data demonstrate that U-PM2.5 and ASD-PM2.5 induced allergic inflammatory changes and caused lung pathology. U-PM2.5 and ASD-PM2.5 increased F4/80(+) CD11b(+) cells, indicating that an influx of inflammatory and exudative macrophages in lung tissue had occurred. The ratio of CD206 positive F4/80(+) CD11b(+) cells (M2 macrophages) in lung tissue was higher in the OVA+ASD-PM2.5 treated mice than in the OVA+U-PM2.5 treated mice. These results suggest that the lung eosinophilia exacerbated by both PM2.5 is due to activation of a Th2-associated immune response along with induced M2 macrophages and the exacerbating effect is greater in microbial element (β-glucan)-rich ASD-PM2.5 than in organic chemical-rich U-PM2.5.

  2. Xanthii Fructus inhibits allergic response in the ovalbumin-sensitized mouse allergic rhinitis model

    PubMed Central

    Gwak, Nam-Gil; Kim, Eun-Young; Lee, Bina; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Im, Yong-Seok; Lee, Ka-Yeon; Jun-Kum, Chang; Kim, Ho-Seok; Cho, Hyun-Joo; Jung, Hyuk-Sang; Sohn, Youngjoo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Xanthii Fructus (XF) is widely used in traditional anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory Asian medicine. Allergic rhinitis is a common inflammatory disease characterized by markedly increased levels of anti-inflammatory factors and the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the nasal mucosa. We investigated the effects of XF in the allergen-induced rhinitis model. Materials and Methods: Following ovalbumin (OVA)/alum intraperitoneal injection on days 0, 7 and 14, the BALB/c mice (albino, laboratory-bred strain of the house mice) were challenged intranasally with OVA for 10 days a week after the last sensitization. The number of sneezes was recorded for 10 days; additionally, the levels of cytokines, histamine, immunoglobulin E (IgE) and OVA-specific serum IgE were estimated. Eosinophil infiltration, thickness of nasal mucosa and expression of caspase-1 were determined by immunohistochemistry. We also evaluated the effect of XF on the phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) and inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B-alpha (IκB-α) in human mast cell-1 (HMC-1), by Western blotting. Results: The administration of XF significantly decreased sneezing and the serum levels of histamine, IgE, OVA-specific IgE, and cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukine-1 beta (IL-1β), IL-5, IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). XF inhibited the changes in thickness of the nasal septum, influx of eosinophils and expression of capase-1. In addition, XF inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB in phorbol-myristate-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (A23187) stimulated HMC-1. Conclusion: This study suggests that XF acts a potent anti-allergic drug which alleviates the allergic responses in ovalbumin-sensitized mouse allergic rhinitis model. PMID:26664025

  3. Phenotypic characterization in situ of inflammatory cells in allergic and irritant contact dermatitis in man.

    PubMed Central

    Scheynius, A; Fischer, T; Forsum, U; Klareskog, L

    1984-01-01

    The cellular response in allergic and irritant contact dermatitis was analysed in situ with an immunohistochemical double staining technique. Allergic patch test reactions were elicited in 10 patients and irritant reactions in eight cases, using the Finn chamber technique. Skin biopsies were obtained 6-72 h after test applications. Frozen sections of 43 biopsies were investigated by simultaneous staining with rabbit anti-HLA-DR antibodies and various mouse monoclonal antibodies. The cell infiltrates were usually larger in the allergic than in the irritant reactions. However, the kinetics of the cell responses, the phenotypes of the inflammatory cells, their distribution and spatial relationships were similar. It thus appears that the applications of allergens or irritants to the skin generates a cell pattern that to a large extent reflects an immunological readiness for further immune reactions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:6362938

  4. Chemokines and their receptors in the allergic airway inflammatory process.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, Juan Raymundo; Teran, Luis Manuel

    2011-08-01

    The development of the allergic airway disease conveys several cell types, such as T-cells, eosinophils, mast cells, and dendritic cells, which act in a special and temporal synchronization. Cellular mobilization and its complex interactions are coordinated by a broad range of bioactive mediators known as chemokines. These molecules are an increasing family of small proteins with common structural motifs and play an important role in the recruitment and cell activation of both leukocytes and resident cells at the allergic inflammatory site via their receptors. Trafficking and recruitment of cell populations with specific chemokines receptors assure the presence of reactive allergen-specific T-cells in the lung, and therefore the establishment of an allergic inflammatory process. Different approaches directed against chemokines receptors have been developed during the last decades with promising therapeutic results in the treatment of asthma. In this review we explore the role of the chemokines and chemokine receptors in allergy and asthma and discuss their potential as targets for therapy.

  5. Evaluation of allergic response using dynamic thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, E.; Rok, T.; Tatoń, G.

    2015-03-01

    Skin dynamic termography supplemented by a mathematical model is presented as an objective and sensitive indicator of the skin prick test result. Termographic measurements were performed simultaneously with routine skin prick tests. The IR images were acquired every 70 s up to 910 s after skin prick. In the model histamine is treated as the principal mediator of the allergic reaction. Histamine produces vasolidation and the engorged vessels are responsible for an increase in skin temperature. The model parameters were determined by fitting the analytical solutions to the spatio-temporal distributions of the differences between measured and baseline temperatures. The model reproduces experimental data very well (coefficient of determination = 0.805÷0.995). The method offers a set of parameters to describe separately skin allergic reaction and skin reactivity. The release of histamine after allergen injection is the best indicator of allergic response. The diagnostic parameter better correlates with the standard evaluation of a skin prick test (correlation coefficient = 0.98) than the result of the thermographic planimetric method based on temperature and heated area determination (0.81). The high sensitivity of the method allows for determination of the allergic response in patients with the reduced skin reactivity.

  6. FoxO1 regulates allergic asthmatic inflammation through regulating polarization of the macrophage inflammatory phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Tae Jin; Reader, Brenda F.; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Yong Gyu; Park, Gye Young; Karpurapu, Manjula; Ballinger, Megan N.; Qian, Feng; Rusu, Luiza; Chung, Hae Young; Unterman, Terry G.; Croce, Carlo M.; Christman, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory monocyte and tissue macrophages influence the initiation, progression, and resolution of type 2 immune responses, and alveolar macrophages are the most prevalent immune-effector cells in the lung. While we were characterizing the M1- or M2-like macrophages in type 2 allergic inflammation, we discovered that FoxO1 is highly expressed in alternatively activated macrophages. Although several studies have been focused on the fundamental role of FoxOs in hematopoietic and immune cells, the exact role that FoxO1 plays in allergic asthmatic inflammation in activated macrophages has not been investigated. Growing evidences indicate that FoxO1 acts as an upstream regulator of IRF4 and could have a role in a specific inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Therefore, we hypothesized that IRF4 expression regulated by FoxO1 in alveolar macrophages is required for established type 2 immune mediates allergic lung inflammation. Our data indicate that targeted deletion of FoxO1 using FoxO1-selective inhibitor AS1842856 and genetic ablation of FoxO1 in macrophages significantly decreases IRF4 and various M2 macrophage-associated genes, suggesting a mechanism that involves FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in alveolar macrophages that works to polarize macrophages toward established type 2 immune responses. In response to the challenge of DRA (dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus) allergens, macrophage specific FoxO1 overexpression is associated with an accentuation of asthmatic lung inflammation, whereas pharmacologic inhibition of FoxO1 by AS1842856 attenuates the development of asthmatic lung inflammation. Thus, our study identifies a role for FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in the development of alternatively activated alveolar macrophages that contribute to type 2 allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27007158

  7. FoxO1 regulates allergic asthmatic inflammation through regulating polarization of the macrophage inflammatory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Tae Jin; Reader, Brenda F; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Yong Gyu; Park, Gye Young; Karpurapu, Manjula; Ballinger, Megan N; Qian, Feng; Rusu, Luiza; Chung, Hae Young; Unterman, Terry G; Croce, Carlo M; Christman, John W

    2016-04-05

    Inflammatory monocyte and tissue macrophages influence the initiation, progression, and resolution of type 2 immune responses, and alveolar macrophages are the most prevalent immune-effector cells in the lung. While we were characterizing the M1- or M2-like macrophages in type 2 allergic inflammation, we discovered that FoxO1 is highly expressed in alternatively activated macrophages. Although several studies have been focused on the fundamental role of FoxOs in hematopoietic and immune cells, the exact role that FoxO1 plays in allergic asthmatic inflammation in activated macrophages has not been investigated. Growing evidences indicate that FoxO1 acts as an upstream regulator of IRF4 and could have a role in a specific inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Therefore, we hypothesized that IRF4 expression regulated by FoxO1 in alveolar macrophages is required for established type 2 immune mediates allergic lung inflammation. Our data indicate that targeted deletion of FoxO1 using FoxO1-selective inhibitor AS1842856 and genetic ablation of FoxO1 in macrophages significantly decreases IRF4 and various M2 macrophage-associated genes, suggesting a mechanism that involves FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in alveolar macrophages that works to polarize macrophages toward established type 2 immune responses. In response to the challenge of DRA (dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus) allergens, macrophage specific FoxO1 overexpression is associated with an accentuation of asthmatic lung inflammation, whereas pharmacologic inhibition of FoxO1 by AS1842856 attenuates the development of asthmatic lung inflammation. Thus, our study identifies a role for FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in the development of alternatively activated alveolar macrophages that contribute to type 2 allergic airway inflammation.

  8. DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC ASTHMA RESPONSES TO PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    Indoor mold has been associated with development of allergic asthma. Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and its viable conidia can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. The hypothesis o...

  9. Anti-allergic inflammatory activities of compounds of amomi fructus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Gyu; Je, In-Gyu; Kim, Geum Jin; Choi, Hyukjae; Kim, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Kim Seung Ho

    2015-04-01

    Activity-guided isolation of compounds from the fruits of Amomum xanthioides resulted in the purification of fourteen phenolic compounds, 4-hydroxy-benzaldehyde (1), 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (2), 3,5-dimethoxy-4-methylbenzaldehyde (3), syringic aldehyde (4), benzoic acid (5), 3,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid (6), vanillic acid (7), 3-hydroxy-2-methoxybenzoic acid (8), o-vanillic acid (9), phenylacetic acid (10), tyrosol (11), pyrocatechol (12), 1,2,4,5-tetramethoxybenzene (13), and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethoxybiphenyl-4,4'-diol (14). To evaluate the anti-allergic inflammatory activities of these compounds, we examined the inhibitory effects of the isolates (1-14) on histamine release and on the expressions of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-ca and interleukin (IL)-6 genes by using human mast cells. Of the tested compounds, 9, 11, and 13 suppressed histamine release from mast cells, and all isolates attenuated the expressions of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-6 genes in human mast cells.

  10. The Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Acupuncture and Their Relevance to Allergic Rhinitis: A Narrative Review and Proposed Model

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, John L.; Cripps, Allan W.; Smith, Peter K.; Smith, Caroline A.; Xue, Charlie C.; Golianu, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Classical literature indicates that acupuncture has been used for millennia to treat numerous inflammatory conditions, including allergic rhinitis. Recent research has examined some of the mechanisms underpinning acupuncture's anti-inflammatory effects which include mediation by sympathetic and parasympathetic pathways. The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been reported to mediate the antioedema effects of acupuncture, but not antihyperalgesic actions during inflammation. Other reported anti-inflammatory effects of acupuncture include an antihistamine action and downregulation of proinflammatory cytokines (such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10), proinflammatory neuropeptides (such as SP, CGRP, and VIP), and neurotrophins (such as NGF and BDNF) which can enhance and prolong inflammatory response. Acupuncture has been reported to suppress the expression of COX-1, COX-2, and iNOS during experimentally induced inflammation. Downregulation of the expression and sensitivity of the transient receptor potential vallinoid 1 (TRPV1) after acupuncture has been reported. In summary, acupuncture may exert anti-inflammatory effects through a complex neuro-endocrino-immunological network of actions. Many of these generic anti-inflammatory effects of acupuncture are of direct relevance to allergic rhinitis; however, more research is needed to elucidate specifically how immune mechanisms might be modulated by acupuncture in allergic rhinitis, and to this end a proposed model is offered to guide further research. PMID:23476696

  11. The anti-inflammatory effects of acupuncture and their relevance to allergic rhinitis: a narrative review and proposed model.

    PubMed

    McDonald, John L; Cripps, Allan W; Smith, Peter K; Smith, Caroline A; Xue, Charlie C; Golianu, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Classical literature indicates that acupuncture has been used for millennia to treat numerous inflammatory conditions, including allergic rhinitis. Recent research has examined some of the mechanisms underpinning acupuncture's anti-inflammatory effects which include mediation by sympathetic and parasympathetic pathways. The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been reported to mediate the antioedema effects of acupuncture, but not antihyperalgesic actions during inflammation. Other reported anti-inflammatory effects of acupuncture include an antihistamine action and downregulation of proinflammatory cytokines (such as TNF- α , IL-1 β , IL-6, and IL-10), proinflammatory neuropeptides (such as SP, CGRP, and VIP), and neurotrophins (such as NGF and BDNF) which can enhance and prolong inflammatory response. Acupuncture has been reported to suppress the expression of COX-1, COX-2, and iNOS during experimentally induced inflammation. Downregulation of the expression and sensitivity of the transient receptor potential vallinoid 1 (TRPV1) after acupuncture has been reported. In summary, acupuncture may exert anti-inflammatory effects through a complex neuro-endocrino-immunological network of actions. Many of these generic anti-inflammatory effects of acupuncture are of direct relevance to allergic rhinitis; however, more research is needed to elucidate specifically how immune mechanisms might be modulated by acupuncture in allergic rhinitis, and to this end a proposed model is offered to guide further research.

  12. Inhibition of mammalian DNA polymerases and the suppression of inflammatory and allergic responses by tyrosol from used activated charcoal waste generated during sake production.

    PubMed

    Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Ogawa, Yoshiaki; Onodera, Takefumi; Kuriyama, Isoko; Sakamoto, Yuka; Nishikori, Shu; Kamisuki, Shinji; Sugawara, Fumio

    2014-08-06

    The components adsorbed onto activated charcoal following the fermentation process of the Japanese rice wine "sake" have been studied with the aim of identifying suitable applications for this industrial food waste product. The absorbed materials were effectively extracted from the charcoal, and inhibited the activity of several mammalian DNA polymerases (pols). Subsequent purification of the extract afforded tyrosol [4-(2-hydroxyethyl)phenol] as the active component, which selectively inhibited the activity of 11 mammalian pols with IC50 values in the range of 34.3-46.1 μM. In contrast, this compound did not influence the activities of plant or prokaryotic pols or any of the other DNA metabolic enzymes tested. Tyrosol suppressed both anti-inflammatory and antiallergic effects in vivo, including 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced inflammatory mouse ear edema, and immunoglobulin E-induced passive cutaneous anaphylactic reaction in mice. These results suggested that this byproduct formed during the sake-brewing process could be used as an anti-inflammatory and/or antiallergic agent.

  13. Fullerene nanomaterials inhibit the allergic response.

    PubMed

    Ryan, John J; Bateman, Henry R; Stover, Alex; Gomez, Greg; Norton, Sarah K; Zhao, Wei; Schwartz, Lawrence B; Lenk, Robert; Kepley, Christopher L

    2007-07-01

    Fullerenes are a class of novel carbon allotropes that may have practical applications in biotechnology and medicine. Human mast cells (MC) and peripheral blood basophils are critical cells involved in the initiation and propagation of several inflammatory conditions, mainly type I hypersensitivity. We report an unanticipated role of fullerenes as a negative regulator of allergic mediator release that suppresses Ag-driven type I hypersensitivity. Human MC and peripheral blood basophils exhibited a significant inhibition of IgE dependent mediator release when preincubated with C(60) fullerenes. Protein microarray demonstrated that inhibition of mediator release involves profound reductions in the activation of signaling molecules involved in mediator release and oxidative stress. Follow-up studies demonstrated that the tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk was dramatically inhibited in Ag-challenged cells first incubated with fullerenes. In addition, fullerene preincubation significantly inhibited IgE-induced elevation in cytoplasmic reactive oxygen species levels. Furthermore, fullerenes prevented the in vivo release of histamine and drop in core body temperature in vivo using a MC-dependent model of anaphylaxis. These findings identify a new biological function for fullerenes and may represent a novel way to control MC-dependent diseases including asthma, inflammatory arthritis, heart disease, and multiple sclerosis.

  14. Importins and exportins regulating allergic immune responses.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ankita; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2014-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of macromolecules is a well-controlled process involving importins and exportins. These karyopherins recognize and bind to receptor-mediated intracellular signals through specific signal sequences that are present on cargo proteins and transport into and out of the nucleus through nuclear pore complexes. Nuclear localization signals (NLS) present on cargo molecules to be imported while nuclear export signals (NES) on the molecules to be exported are recognized by importins and exportins, respectively. The classical NLS are found on many transcription factors and molecules that are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. In addition, several immune modulators, including corticosteroids and vitamin D, elicit their cellular responses by regulating the expression and activity of importin molecules. In this review article, we provide a comprehensive list of importin and exportin molecules and their specific cargo that shuttled between cytoplasm and the nucleus. We also critically review the role and regulation of specific importin and exportin involved in the transport of activated transcription factors in allergic diseases, the underlying molecular mechanisms, and the potential target sites for developing better therapeutic approaches.

  15. Emerging Antigens Involved in Allergic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Platts-Mills, Thomas A.E.; Commins, Scott P.

    2013-01-01

    New allergic diseases can “emerge” because of exposure to a novel antigen, because the immune responsiveness of the subject changes, or because of a change in the behavior of the population. Novel antigens have entered the environment as new pests in the home (e.g., Asian lady beetle or stink bugs), in the diet (e.g., prebiotics or wheat isolates), or because of the spread of a biting arthropod (e.g., ticks). Over the last few years, a significant new disease has been identified, which has changed the paradigm for food allergy. Bites of the tick, Amblyomma americanum, are capable of inducing IgE antibodies to galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose, which is associated with two novel forms of anaphylaxis. In a large area of the southeastern United States, the disease of delayed anaphylaxis to mammalian meat is now common. This disease challenges many previous rules about food allergy and provides a striking model of an emerging allergic disease. PMID:24095162

  16. Non-pulmonary allergic diseases and inflammatory bowel disease: a qualitative review.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, David S; Shum, Mili; Hsieh, Jennifer; Blonski, Wojciech; Greenwald, David A

    2014-08-28

    While the etiological underpinnings of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are highly complex, it has been noted that both clinical and pathophysiological similarities exist between IBD and both asthma and non-pulmonary allergic phenomena. In this review, several key points on common biomarkers, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations and nutritional and probiotic interventions for both IBD and non-pulmonary allergic diseases are discussed. Histamine and mast cell activity show common behaviors in both IBD and in certain allergic disorders. IgE also represents a key immunoglobulin involved in both IBD and in certain allergic pathologies, though these links require further study. Probiotics remain a critically important intervention for both IBD subtypes as well as multiple allergic phenomena. Linked clinical phenomena, especially sinonasal disease and IBD, are discussed. In addition, nutritional interventions remain an underutilized and promising therapy for modification of both allergic disorders and IBD. Recommending new mothers breastfeed their infants, and increasing the duration of breastfeeding may also help prevent both IBD and allergic diseases, but requires more investigation. While much remains to be discovered, it is clear that non-pulmonary allergic phenomena are connected to IBD in a myriad number of ways and that the discovery of common immunological pathways may usher in an era of vastly improved treatments for patients.

  17. Anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory effects of aqueous extract of Pogostemon cablin.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seok Cheol; Je, In-Gyu; Cui, Xun; Park, Hae Ran; Khang, Dongwoo; Park, Jeong-Suk; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Shin, Tae-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Allergic disease is caused by exposure to normally innocuous substances that activate mast cells. Mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation is closely related to a number of allergic disorders, such as anaphylaxis, allergic rhinitis, asthma and atopic dermatitis. The discovery of drugs for treating allergic disease is an interesting subject and important to human health. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti‑allergic and anti-inflammatory effects of the aqueous extract of Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth (AEPC) (a member of the Labiatae family) using mast cells, and also to determine its possible mechanisms of action. An intraperitoneal injection of compound 48/80 or a serial injection of immunoglobulin E and antigen was used to induce anaphylaxis in mice. We found that AEPC inhibited compound 48/80‑induced systemic and immunoglobulin E-mediated cutaneous anaphylaxis in a dose-dependent manner. The release of histamine from mast cells was reduced by AEPC, and this suppressive effect was associated with the regulation of calcium influx. In addition, AEPC attenuated the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-stimulated expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in mast cells. The inhibitory effects of AEPC on pro-inflammatory cytokines were dependent on the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). AEPC blocked the PMACI-induced translocation of NF-κB into the nucleus by hindering the degradation of IκBα and the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Our results thus indicate that AEPC inhibits mast cell‑mediated allergic inflammation by suppressing mast cell degranulation and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines caused by reduced intracellular calcium levels and the activation of NF-κB and p38 MAPK.

  18. Maternal Influences over Offspring Allergic Responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Asthma occurs as a result of complex interactions of environmental and genetic factors. Clinical studies and animal models of asthma indicate offspring of allergic mothers have increased risk of development of allergies. Environmental factors including stress-induced corticosterone and vitamin E isoforms during pregnancy regulate the risk for offspring development of allergy. In this review, we discuss mechanisms for the development of allergic disease early in life, environmental factors that may impact the development of risk for allergic disease early in life, and how the variation in global prevalence of asthma may be explained, at least in part, by some environmental components. PMID:25612797

  19. The sterile inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Rock, Kenneth L; Latz, Eicke; Ontiveros, Fernando; Kono, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    The acute inflammatory response is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it plays a key role in initial host defense, particularly against many infections. On the other hand, its aim is imprecise, and as a consequence, when it is drawn into battle, it can cause collateral damage in tissues. In situations where the inciting stimulus is sterile, the cost-benefit ratio may be high; because of this, sterile inflammation underlies the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. Although there have been major advances in our understanding of how microbes trigger inflammation, much less has been learned about this process in sterile situations. This review focuses on a subset of the many sterile stimuli that can induce inflammation-specifically dead cells and a variety of irritant particles, including crystals, minerals, and protein aggregates. Although this subset of stimuli is structurally very diverse and might appear to be unrelated, there is accumulating evidence that the innate immune system may recognize them in similar ways and stimulate the sterile inflammatory response via common pathways. Here we review established and emerging data about these responses.

  20. Allergic response to metabisulfite in lidocaine anesthetic solution.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J. R.; Maestrello, C. L.; Campbell, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    True allergies to local anesthetics are rare. It is common for practitioners to misdiagnose a serious adverse event to local anesthetics as an allergic reaction. The most likely causes for an allergic response are the preservative, antioxidant, or metabolites and not the anesthetic itself. This case report illustrates the need for practitioners to understand the many potential allergens in local anesthetics and to correctly diagnose patients that are truly allergic to the local anesthetic. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figures 4 and 5 PMID:11495401

  1. Innate Immune Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials During Allergic Airway Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipkowski, Kelly Anne

    disease would modulate the innate immune response to MWCNTs. We hypothesized that Th2 cytokines and the allergic asthmatic microenvironment would alter MWCNT-induced inflammasome activation and IL- 1beta secretion both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were differentiated into macrophages and exposed to MWCNTs and or recombinant Th2 cytokines, specifically IL-4 and/or IL-13. Exposure of THP-1 cells to MWCNTs alone caused dose-dependent secretion of IL-1beta, while co-exposure to IL-4 and/or IL-13 suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Further analysis determined that IL-4 and IL-13 were phosphorylating the protein signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) and subsequently inhibiting inflammasome activation and function through suppression of caspase-1, a cysteine protease responsible for cleavage of pro-IL-1beta into an active, secretable form. In vivo, wild-type C57BL6 mice were sensitized intranasally with HDM allergen and exposed to MWCNTs via oropharyngeal aspiration. Treatment with MWCNTs alone induced secretion of IL-1beta in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) one day post-exposure, while sensitization with HDM prior to MWCNT exposure suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of lung sections from exposed animals showed that HDM sensitization inhibited MWCNT-induced pro-casapse-1 protein expression, responsible for inflammasome activation, in the airway epithelium and macrophages. MWCNT exposure combined with HDM sensitization increased inflammatory cell infiltration and subsequent acute lung inflammation and chronic fibrosis. Analysis of the systemic effects of MWCNT exposure during allergic airway sensitization showed that MWCNTs and/or HDM allergen upregulated STAT3 mRNA expression in the lungs, liver, and spleen of exposed animals, and at the same induced mixed T helper (Th) responses in the different tissues. Collectively, these data suggest that the allergic microenvironment

  2. Immune response to sublingual immunotherapy in children allergic to mites.

    PubMed

    Barberi, S; Villa, M P; Pajno, G B; La Penna, F; Barreto, M; Cardelli, P; Amodeo, R; Tabacco, F; Caminiti, L; Ciprandi, G

    2011-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is characterized by Th2 polarized immune response. Specific immunotherapy modifies this arrangement restoring a physiologic Th1 profile. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is widely prescribed, but there is no early marker of response. The aim of this study is to investigate possible marker of SLIT effectiveness. Thirty children with mite allergy were studied: 15 were treated with drugs alone, 15 with SLIT and drugs on demand. The study lasted 2 years. Visual analogue scale (VAS) for symptoms and medication score were evaluated. Serum cytokines (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFN-gamma, MCP-1, and TNF-alpha) were assessed by ELISA before and after 1 and 2 year SLIT. SLIT-treated children obtained a significant improvement of symptoms and a reduction of drug use, whereas children treated with a drug alone did not obtained any change. IL-10 significantly increased, whereas Th2-dependent and pro-inflammatory cytokines significantly decreased. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that 2-year SLIT is capable of inducing immunologic hyporeactivity to mites.

  3. Cyclooxygenase-1 overexpression decreases Basal airway responsiveness but not allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Card, Jeffrey W; Carey, Michelle A; Bradbury, J Alyce; Graves, Joan P; Lih, Fred B; Moorman, Michael P; Morgan, Daniel L; DeGraff, Laura M; Zhao, Yun; Foley, Julie F; Zeldin, Darryl C

    2006-10-01

    Pharmacological inhibition or genetic disruption of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 or COX-2 exacerbates the inflammatory and functional responses of the lung to environmentally relevant stimuli. To further examine the contribution of COX-derived eicosanoids to basal lung function and to allergic lung inflammation, transgenic (Tr) mice were generated in which overexpression of human COX-1 was targeted to airway epithelium. Although no differences in basal respiratory or lung mechanical parameters were observed, COX-1 Tr mice had increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid PGE(2) content compared with wild-type littermates (23.0 +/- 3.6 vs 8.4 +/- 1.4 pg/ml; p < 0.05) and exhibited decreased airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine. In an OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation model, comparable up-regulation of COX-2 protein was observed in the lungs of allergic wild-type and COX-1 Tr mice. Furthermore, no genotype differences were observed in allergic mice in total cell number, eosinophil content (70 vs 76% of total cells, respectively), and inflammatory cytokine content of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, or in airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine (p > 0.05). To eliminate the presumed confounding effects of COX-2 up-regulation, COX-1 Tr mice were bred into a COX-2 null background. In these mice, the presence of the COX-1 transgene did not alter allergen-induced inflammation but significantly attenuated allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, coincident with reduced airway leukotriene levels. Collectively, these data indicate that COX-1 overexpression attenuates airway responsiveness under basal conditions but does not influence allergic airway inflammation.

  4. Hyperleukotrieneuria in patients with allergic and inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masami; Higashi, Noritaka; Ono, Emiko; Mita, Haruhisa; Akiyama, Kazuo

    2008-12-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs: leukotrienes C(4), D(4), and E(4)) have long been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma and several allergic diseases. LTE(4) has been identified as a major metabolite of LTC(4), and urinary LTE(4) (U-LTE(4)) is considered as the most reliable analytic parameter for monitoring the endogenous synthesis of CysLTs. From recent studies on the U-LTE(4) associated with adult stable asthma we identified four factors for hyperleukotrieneuria, namely, aspirin intolerance, eosinophilic nasal polyposis (ENP), vasculitis, and severe asthma. In ENP, there is prominent infiltration of eosinophils in the sinus and polyp tissues, which is linked to adult asthma and aspirin sensitivity, and ENP is the most important factor for the overproduction of CysLTs in asthmatics. We also demonstrated that anaphylaxis and eosinophilic pneumonia (EP) are associated with a marked increase in the U-LTE(4) concentration. Under these disease conditions, U-LTE(4) may be one of the candidate biomarkers. Moreover, the changes in U-LTE(4) concentrations may provide valuable information concerning therapeutic targets.

  5. Different GATA factors dictate CCR3 transcription in allergic inflammatory cells in a cell type-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Kong, Su-Kang; Kim, Byung Soo; Uhm, Tae Gi; Lee, Wonyong; Lee, Gap Ryol; Park, Choon-Sik; Lee, Chul-Hoon; Chung, Il Yup

    2013-06-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR3 is expressed in prominent allergic inflammatory cells, including eosinophils, mast cells, and Th2 cells. We previously identified a functional GATA element within exon 1 of the CCR3 gene that is responsible for GATA-1-mediated CCR3 transcription. Because allergic inflammatory cells exhibit distinct expression patterns of different GATA factors, we investigated whether different GATA factors dictate CCR3 transcription in a cell type-specific manner. GATA-2 was expressed in EoL-1 eosinophilic cells, GATA-1 and GATA-2 were expressed in HMC-1 mast cells, and GATA-3 was preferentially expressed in Jurkat cells. Unlike a wild-type CCR3 reporter, reporters lacking the functional GATA element were not active in any of the three cell types, implying the involvement of different GATA factors in CCR3 transcription. RNA interference assays showed that small interfering RNAs specific for different GATA factors reduced CCR3 reporter activity in a cell type-specific fashion. Consistent with these findings, chromatin immunoprecipitation and EMSA analyses demonstrated cell type-specific binding of GATA factors to the functional GATA site. More importantly, specific inhibition of the CCR3 reporter activity by different GATA small interfering RNAs was well preserved in respective cell types differentiated from cord blood; in particular, GATA-3 was entirely responsible for reporter activity in Th2 cells and replaced the role predominantly played by GATA-1 and GATA-2. These results highlight a mechanistic role of GATA factors in which cell type-specific expression is the primary determinant of transcription of the CCR3 gene in major allergic inflammatory cells.

  6. Immune allergic response in Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Elizabeth S; Pinto-Mariz, Fernanda; Bastos-Pinto, Sandra; Pontes, Adailton T; Prado, Evandro A; deAzevedo, Leonardo C

    2009-11-30

    Asperger's syndrome is a subgroup of autism characterized by social deficits without language delay, and high cognitive performance. The biological nature of autism is still unknown but there are controversial evidence associating an immune imbalance and autism. Clinical findings, including atopic family history, serum IgE levels as well as cutaneous tests showed that incidence of atopy was higher in the Asperger group compared to the healthy controls. These findings suggest that atopy is frequent in this subgroup of autism implying that allergic inflammation might be an important feature in Asperger syndrome.

  7. Mast Cells Limit the Exacerbation of Chronic Allergic Contact Dermatitis in Response to Repeated Allergen Exposure.

    PubMed

    Gimenez-Rivera, Vladimir-Andrey; Siebenhaar, Frank; Zimmermann, Carolin; Siiskonen, Hanna; Metz, Martin; Maurer, Marcus

    2016-12-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a chronic T cell-driven inflammatory skin disease that is caused by repeated exposure to contact allergens. Based on murine studies of acute contact hypersensitivity, mast cells (MCs) are believed to play a role in its pathogenesis. The role of MCs in chronic allergic contact dermatitis has not been investigated, in part because of the lack of murine models for chronic contact hypersensitivity. We developed and used a chronic contact hypersensitivity model in wild-type and MC-deficient mice and assessed skin inflammatory responses to identify and characterize the role of MCs in chronic allergic contact dermatitis. Ear swelling chronic contact hypersensitivity responses increased markedly, up to 4-fold, in MC-deficient Kit(W-sh/W-sh) (Sash) and MCPT5-Cre(+)iDTR(+) mice compared with wild-type mice. Local engraftment with MCs protected Sash mice from exacerbated ear swelling after repeated oxazolone challenge. Chronic contact hypersensitivity skin of Sash mice exhibited elevated levels of IFN-γ, IL-17α, and IL-23, as well as increased accumulation of Ag-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells. The CD8(+) T cell mitogen IL-15, which was increased in oxazolone-challenged skin of Sash mice during the accumulation of cutaneous TRM cells, was efficiently degraded by MCs in vitro. MCs protect from the exacerbated allergic skin inflammation induced by repeated allergen challenge, at least in part, via effects on CD8(+) TRM cells. MCs may notably influence the course of chronic allergic contact dermatitis. A better understanding of their role and the underlying mechanisms may lead to better approaches for the treatment of this common, disabling, and costly condition.

  8. Allergen-encoded signals that control allergic responses

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Hui-Ying; Landers, Cameron; Li, Evan; Porter, Paul; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose is to review the important recent advances made in how innate immune cells, microbes, and the environment contribute to the expression of allergic disease, emphasizing the allergen-related signals that drive allergic responses. Recent findings The last few years have seen crucial advances in how innate immune cells such as innate lymphoid cells group 2 and airway epithelial cells and related molecular pathways through organismal proteinases and innate immune cytokines, such as thymic stromal lymphopoietin, IL-25, and IL-33 contribute to allergy and asthma. Simultaneously with these advances, important progress has been made in our understanding of how the environment, and especially pathogenic organisms, such as bacteria, viruses, helminths, and especially fungi derived from the natural and built environments, either promote or inhibit allergic inflammation and disease. Of specific interest are how lipopolysaccharide mediates its antiallergic effect through the ubiquitin modifying factor A20 and the antiallergic activity of both helminths and protozoa. Summary Innate immune cells and molecular pathways, often activated by allergen-derived proteinases acting on airway epithelium and macrophages as well as additional unknown factors, are essential to the expression of allergic inflammation and disease. These findings suggest numerous future research opportunities and new opportunities for therapeutic intervention in allergic disease. PMID:26658015

  9. The role of heparanase in pulmonary cell recruitment in response to an allergic but not non-allergic stimulus.

    PubMed

    Morris, Abigail; Wang, Bo; Waern, Ida; Venkatasamy, Radhakrishnan; Page, Clive; Schmidt, Eric P; Wernersson, Sara; Li, Jin-Ping; Spina, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Heparanase is an endo-β-glucuronidase that specifically cleaves heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix. Expression of this enzyme is increased in several pathological conditions including inflammation. We have investigated the role of heparanase in pulmonary inflammation in the context of allergic and non-allergic pulmonary cell recruitment using heparanase knockout (Hpa-/-) mice as a model. Following local delivery of LPS or zymosan, no significant difference was found in the recruitment of neutrophils to the lung between Hpa-/- and wild type (WT) control. Similarly neutrophil recruitment was not inhibited in WT mice treated with a heparanase inhibitor. However, in allergic inflammatory models, Hpa-/- mice displayed a significantly reduced eosinophil (but not neutrophil) recruitment to the airways and this was also associated with a reduction in allergen-induced bronchial hyperresponsiveness, indicating that heparanase expression is associated with allergic reactions. This was further demonstrated by pharmacological treatment with a heparanase inhibitor in the WT allergic mice. Examination of lung specimens from patients with different severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) found increased heparanase expression. Thus, it is established that heparanase contributes to allergen-induced eosinophil recruitment to the lung and could provide a novel therapeutic target for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of asthma and other allergic diseases.

  10. Azelastine hydrochloride, a dual-acting anti-inflammatory ophthalmic solution, for treatment of allergic conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Patricia B; Crandall, Elizabeth; Sheppard, John D

    2010-01-01

    Over 50% of patients who seek treatment for allergies present with ocular symptoms. Our current ability to control ocular allergic symptoms is greater than ever before. Newer dual-acting topical eyedrops attack multiple facets of the allergic cascade. Azelastine has antihistaminic effects providing immediate relief, mast cell stabilization providing early-phase intervention, and inhibition of expression and activation of anti-inflammatory mediators which characterize the late phase of the immune reaction. The ophthalmic eyedrop formulation is approved for treatment of allergic conjunctivitis in adults and children aged over 3 years. In clinical trials comparing azelastine with other dual-acting eyedrops, such as levocabastine and olopatadine, azelastine was reported to be slightly less efficacious and to sting briefly upon administration. Even so, many patients experienced the full benefit of symptom relief, and preferred azelastine. As a broad-spectrum drug, azelastine offers many desirable properties for management of ocular allergies. Because it can often produce maximal effect with just twice-daily dosing, azelastine is a particularly good choice for the allergic population in whom minimizing exposure to topical products and preservatives is a key concern. PMID:20856595

  11. NEUROTROPHIN MEDIATION OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS RESPONSES TO INHALED DIESEL PARTICLES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) partially mediate many features of allergic airways disease including airway hyper-responsiveness. Diesel exhaust particulates (DEP) associated with the combustion of diesel fuel exacerbate many of these allergic airways respons...

  12. The beneficial properties of marine polysaccharides in alleviation of allergic responses.

    PubMed

    Vo, Thanh-Sang; Ngo, Dai-Hung; Kang, Kyong-Hwa; Jung, Won-Kyo; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Marine polysaccharides have been found as the principle component in cell wall structures of seaweeds or exoskeletons of crustaceans. Due to numerous pharmaceutical properties of marine polysaccharides such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, antitumor, antiobesity, antidiabetes, anticoagulant, antiviral, immunomodulatory, cardioprotective, and antihepatopathy activities, they have been applied in many fields of biomaterials, food, cosmetic, and pharmacology. Recently, several marine polysaccharides such alginate, porphyran, fucoidan, and chitin and its derivatives have been evidenced as downregulators of allergic responses due to enhancement of innate immune system, alteration of Th1/Th2 balance forward to Th1 cells, inhibition of IgE production, and suppression of mast cell degranulation. This contribution, therefore, focuses on antiallergic properties of marine polysaccharides and emphasizes their potential application as bioactive food ingredients as well as nutraceuticals for prevention of allergic disorders.

  13. Allergic Inflammation—Innately Homeostatic

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Laurence E.; Locksley, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Allergic inflammation is associated closely with parasite infection but also asthma and other common allergic diseases. Despite the engagement of similar immunologic pathways, parasitized individuals often show no outward manifestations of allergic disease. In this perspective, we present the thesis that allergic inflammatory responses play a primary role in regulating circadian and environmental inputs involved with tissue homeostasis and metabolic needs. Parasites feed into these pathways and thus engage allergic inflammation to sustain aspects of the parasitic life cycle. In response to parasite infection, an adaptive and regulated immune response is layered on the host effector response, but in the setting of allergy, the effector response remains unregulated, thus leading to the cardinal features of disease. Further understanding of the homeostatic pressures driving allergic inflammation holds promise to further our understanding of human health and the treatment of these common afflictions. PMID:25414367

  14. Anti-allergic Inflammatory Triterpenoids Isolated from the Spikes of Prunella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Choia, Hyun Gyu; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jeong Ah

    2016-01-01

    Twelve known triterpenoids (1-12) and two steroids (13 and 14) have been isolated from the spike of the plant Prunella vulgaris. Among them, 2α,3α,23-trihydroxyursa-12,20(30)-dien-28-oic acid (10) was isolated for the first time from this plant. All isolates were evaluated for their inhibitory effect on the gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), and release of histamine in human mast cells. β-Amyrin (5), 10, and euscaphic acid (12) showed suppression of histamine release with percentage inhibitions of 46.7, 57.9, and 54.2%, respectively. In addition, 5 and 10 showed strong inhibition of TNF-α and IL-6 in the test for pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that compounds 5 and 10 largely contribute to the anti-allergic inflammatory effect of P. vulgaris.

  15. DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC RESPONSES TO AN EXTRACT OF PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM IN BALB/MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor mold has been associated with the development of allergic asthma. Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. Our hypothesis is that soluble components of ...

  16. DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC RESPONSES TO AN EXTRACT OF PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM IN BAL/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor mold has been associated with the development of allergic asthma. Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. Our hypothesis is that soluble components of ...

  17. Microbial regulation of allergic responses to food

    PubMed Central

    Feehley, Taylor; Stefka, Andrew T.; Cao, Severine; Nagler, Cathryn R.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of food allergy in developed countries is rising at a rate that cannot be attributed to genetic variation alone. In this review we discuss the environmental factors that may contribute to the increasing prevalence of potentially fatal anaphylactic responses to food. Decreased exposure to enteric infections due to advances in vaccination and sanitation, along with the adoption of high-fat (Western) diets, antibiotic use, Caesarian birth, and formula feeding of infants, have all been implicated in altering the enteric microbiome away from its ancestral state. This collection of resident commensal microbes performs many important physiological functions and plays a central role in the development of the immune system. We hypothesize that alterations in the microbiome interfere with immune system maturation, resulting in impairment of IgA production, reduced abundance of regulatory T cells, and Th2-skewing of baseline immune responses which drive aberrant responses to innocuous (food) antigens. PMID:22941410

  18. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; Moraes de Carvalho, Katharinne Ingrid; Silva Mendes, Diego da; Melo, Christianne Bandeira; Martins, Marco Aurélio; Silva Dias, Celidarque da; Piuvezam, Márcia Regina; and others

    2013-11-15

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca{sup ++} influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. - Highlights: • Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Chondrodendron platyphyllum. • Curine inhibits eosinophil influx and activation and airway hyper-responsiveness. • Curine

  19. Syk Regulates Neutrophilic Airway Hyper-Responsiveness in a Chronic Mouse Model of Allergic Airways Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Juvet, Stephen; Scott, Jeremy A.; Chow, Chung-Wai

    2017-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by airways hyper-responsiveness (AHR), reversible airway obstruction, and airway inflammation and remodeling. We previously showed that Syk modulates methacholine-induced airways contractility in naïve mice and in mice with allergic airways inflammation. We hypothesize that Syk plays a role in the pathogenesis of AHR; this was evaluated in a chronic 8-week mouse model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic airways inflammation. Methods We used the Sykflox/flox//rosa26CreERT2 conditional Syk knock-out mice to assess the role of Syk prior to HDM exposure, and treated HDM-sensitized mice with the Syk inhibitor, GSK143, to evaluate its role in established allergic airways inflammation. Respiratory mechanics and methacholine (MCh)-responsiveness were assessed using the flexiVent® system. Lungs underwent bronchoalveolar lavage to isolate inflammatory cells or were frozen for determination of gene expression in tissues. Results MCh-induced AHR was observed following HDM sensitization in the Syk-intact (Sykflox/flox) and vehicle-treated BALB/c mice. MCh responsiveness was reduced to control levels in HDM-sensitized Sykdel/del mice and in BALB/c and Sykflox/flox mice treated with GSK143. Both Sykdel/del and GSK143-treated mice mounted appropriate immune responses to HDM, with HDM-specific IgE levels that were comparable to Sykflox/flox and vehicle-treated BALB/c mice. HDM-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage cell counts were attenuated in both Sykdel/del and GSK143-treated mice, due primarily to decreased neutrophil recruitment. Gene expression analysis of lung tissues revealed that HDM-induced expression of IL-17 and CXCL-1 was significantly attenuated in both Sykdel/del and GSK143-treated mice. Conclusion Syk inhibitors may play a role in the management of neutrophilic asthma. PMID:28107345

  20. Effect of endocannabinoids on IgE-mediated allergic response in RBL-2H3 cells.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae-Myung; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2013-09-01

    Recently, some endocannabinoids were reported to show anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic activities. In this respect, various arachidonoyl endocannabinoids were screened for the inhibition of allergic response in IgE-activated RBL-2H3 cells. Among arachidonoyl endocannabinoids with a low cytotoxicity, only NA-5HT remarkably inhibited the release of β-hexosaminidase (IC(50), 13.58 μM), a marker of degranulation, and tumor necrosis factor-α (IC(50), 12.52 μM), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, in IgE-activated RBL-2H3 cells. Additionally, NA-5HT markedly suppressed the formation of prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) with IC(50) value of 1.27 μM and leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) with IC(50) value of 1.20 μM, and slightly LTC4. When effect of NA-5HT on early stage of FcεRI cascade was investigated, it significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Syk, but not Lyn. Furthermore, NA-5HT suppressed phosphorylation of PLCγ1/2 and PKCδ, related to degranulation process, as well as phosphorylation of LAT, ERK1/2, p38, JNK, Gab2, PI3K and Akt, implicated in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Relative to its effect on the late stage, NA-5HT slightly reduced phosphorylation of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Additionally, NA-5HT significantly reduced the level of p40(phox), and partially inhibited the expression of p47(phox) and p67(phox). From these results, it is suggested that NA-5HT expresses anti-allergic action by suppressing the activation of Syk, LAT, p38, JNK, PI3K and Akt, as well as the expression of ERK1/2 and NADPH oxidase subunits. Further, a strong inhibition of PGD(2) or LTB(4) biosynthesis by NA-5HT may be an additional mechanism for its anti-allergic action. Such anti-allergic actions of NA-5HT may contribute to further information about its biological functions.

  1. Inflammatory Response in Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kanak, Mazhar A.; Kunnathodi, Faisal; Lawrence, Michael C.; Levy, Marlon F.

    2014-01-01

    Islet cell transplantation is a promising beta cell replacement therapy for patients with brittle type 1 diabetes as well as refractory chronic pancreatitis. Despite the vast advancements made in this field, challenges still remain in achieving high frequency and long-term successful transplant outcomes. Here we review recent advances in understanding the role of inflammation in islet transplantation and development of strategies to prevent damage to islets from inflammation. The inflammatory response associated with islets has been recognized as the primary cause of early damage to islets and graft loss after transplantation. Details on cell signaling pathways in islets triggered by cytokines and harmful inflammatory events during pancreas procurement, pancreas preservation, islet isolation, and islet infusion are presented. Robust control of pre- and peritransplant islet inflammation could improve posttransplant islet survival and in turn enhance the benefits of islet cell transplantation for patients who are insulin dependent. We discuss several potent anti-inflammatory strategies that show promise for improving islet engraftment. Further understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response will provide the basis for developing potent therapeutic strategies for enhancing the quality and success of islet transplantation. PMID:24883060

  2. Effect of ozone inhalation on the response to nasal challenge with antigen of allergic subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Bascom, R.; Naclerio, R.M.; Fitzgerald, T.K.; Kagey-Sobotka, A.; Proud, D. )

    1990-09-01

    The effect of oxidant inhalation on allergic illness is of interest because allergic patients often report increased respiratory symptoms during episodes of poor air quality, and epidemiologic studies demonstrate an association between increased levels of the air pollutant ozone and exacerbations of asthma. The purpose of this study was to characterize the upper respiratory response to ozone inhalation in asymptomatic, allergic subjects and to determine whether ozone pre-exposure increased the acute response to nasal challenge with antigen in these subjects. A group of 12 asymptomatic subjects with a history of allergic rhinitis were exposed in a randomized, cross-over design, at rest, on each of 2 days, separated by 2 wk, to 4 h of clean air or 0.5 ppm ozone in an environmental chamber. Following the exposure period, subjects underwent nasal challenge with four doses of antigen (1 to 1,000 PNU ragweed or grass). Symptoms were rated and nasal lavage performed after each dose. Measurement of histamine and albumin concentration and TAME-esterase activity and determination of cell counts and differentials were performed. Exposure to ozone caused significant increases in upper and lower respiratory symptoms, a mixed inflammatory cell influx with a sevenfold increase in naval lavage neutrophils, a 20-fold increase in eosinophils, and a tenfold increase in mononuclear cells, as well as an apparent sloughing of epithelial cells. There was a significant increase in nasal lavage albumin concentration on the ozone exposure day and a small increase in nasal lavage histamine concentration on both the ozone and clean air exposure days. TAME-esterase activity showed no significant increase overall, but increased at least twofold in 5 of 12 subjects.

  3. Effect of Persimmon Leaf Extract on Phthalic Anhydride-induced Allergic Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Ji Ye; Jeon, In Hwa; Cho, Jung-Keun; Park, Ji Min; Kim, Hyeon Soo; Kang, Hyun Ju; Kim, Hyung Soon; Jang, Seon Il

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-allergy activities of persimmon leaf extract (PLE) on a phthalic anhydride (PA)-induced allergic mouse model. A human leukemic mast cell line (HMC-1) was used to examine the inhibitory activity of PLE on the histamine release by human leukemic mast cells. PLE inhibited histamine release from HMC-1 cells in response to cross-linkage of high-affinity IgE receptor-α (FcεRIα). Additionally, a PA-induced allergic mouse model was used to investigate the effects of PLE in vivo. Mice were orally administrated with or without PLE of single dose (250 mg/kg/day) for 31 days. Oral intake of PLE significantly inhibited passive cutaneous reactions. Oral administration of PLE to PA-induced allergic mice also led to a striking suppression of the development of contact dermatitis, ear swelling and lymph node weight. In addition, PA-specific IL-4 production of draining lymph node cells was markedly diminished by PLE oral administration, but not IFN-γ. Furthermore, PLE treatment suppressed PA-induced thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (CCL17) and cutaneous T cell-attracting chemokine (CCL27) expressions in ear tissues. Based on these results, we suggest that PLE may have therapeutic potential as an effective material for management of irritant contact dermatitis or related inflammatory diseases. PMID:24471058

  4. Enhancement of Antigen-specific functional responses by neutrophils from allergic patients

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that neutrophils from healthy donors or from patients with inflammatory disorders can bind immunoglobulin (Ig) E proteins through binding to Mac-2/epsilon bp. Functional responses to allergens were assessed by measuring the respiratory burst and intracellular Ca2+ levels, and binding of allergens to neutrophils was assessed by flow cytometry analysis and fluorescence microscopy. In this article, we demonstrate that neutrophils sensitized to specific allergens (from allergic patients), but not from healthy donors, are sensitive to allergens of the same type as those that produce clinical allergic symptoms. The activation of neutrophils was analyzed by the induction of a respiratory burst that was detected with luminol- dependent chemiluminescence. Intracellular Ca2+ levels increased parallel to those of the inducing allergens. In addition, the specific binding of allergens on the cell surface was revealed by flow cytometry and allergen-FITC-labeled staining analyses. The present data suggest a restricted recognition of allergen by sensitive neutrophils, probably associated with the specific binding of the allergen to its corresponding IgE molecule, which is bound to the Mac-2/epsilon bp structure. These findings demonstrate a functional role of allergen- associated neutrophils during the allergic state. PMID:8676078

  5. Attenuated allergic responses to house dust mite antigen in feed-restricted rats.

    PubMed

    Dong, W; Kari, F W; Selgrade, M K; Gilmour, M I

    2000-12-01

    Caloric restriction has been shown to alter a broad range of immunological end points in both experimental animals and humans. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of short-term moderate feed restriction (25% reduction) on allergic immune responses in Brown Norway rats. After 3 weeks of acclimation to their feed regimens, rats were sensitized and 2 weeks later challenged with house dust mite (HDM) antigen via intratracheal instillation. Feed restriction resulted in lower levels of antigen-specific IgE in serum and reduced antigen specific lymphoproliferative activity in pulmonary lymph nodes. Feed restriction also attenuated pulmonary inflammation, as evidenced by lower levels of lactate dehydrogenase and total protein, decreased infiltration of neutrophils and eosinophils, and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[alpha] in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In addition, feed restriction decreased TNF-[alpha] secretion in serum and decreased mRNA expression of TNF-[alpha] and interleukin-6 in pulmonary lymph nodes. We conclude that feed restriction strongly dampened the allergic immune responses to HDM in rats and that this attenuation was associated with decreased expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  6. [Allergic responses to date palm and pecan pollen in Israel].

    PubMed

    Waisel, Y; Keynan, N; Gil, T; Tayar, D; Bezerano, A; Goldberg, A; Geller-Bernstein, C; Dolev, Z; Tamir, R; Levy, I

    1994-03-15

    Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) and pecan (Carya illinoensis) trees are commonly planted in Israel for fruit, for shade, or as ornamental plants. Pollen grains of both species are allergenic; however, the extent of exposure to such pollen and the incidence of allergic response have not been studied here. We therefore investigated skin-test responses to pollen extracts of 12 varieties of palm and 9 of pecan in 705 allergic patients living in 3 cities and 19 rural settlements. Sensitivity to the pollen extracts of both species was much higher among residents of rural than of urban communities. Moreover, there was a definite relationship between the abundance of these trees in a region and the incidence of skin responders to their pollen. Sensitivity was frequent in settlements rich in these 2 species, such as those with nearby commercial date or pecan plantations. In general, sensitivity to date pollen extracts was lower than to pecan. However, differences in skin responses to pollen extracts of various clones were substantiated. Air sampling revealed that pollen pollution decreased considerably with distance from the trees. At approximately 100 m from a source concentrations of airborne pollen were low. Since planting of male palm and pecan trees in population centers would increase pollen pollution, it should be avoided.

  7. Chickpea (Cicer arietinum) proteins induce allergic responses in nasobronchial allergic patients and BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Verma, Alok Kumar; Kumar, Sandeep; Tripathi, Anurag; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Das, Mukul; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2012-04-05

    Allergy to chickpea or Garbanzo bean (Cicer arietinum) has been reported in the Indian population. Little information is found regarding allergenic events involved in the chickpea allergy; therefore, chickpea allergenicity assessment was undertaken. In vivo and ex vivo studies were carried out using BALB/c mice. Chickpea skin prick test positive patients have been used to extend this study in humans. Identification of allergens was carried out by simulated gastric fluids assay for pepsin resistant polypeptides and validated by IgE western blotting using chickpea sensitive humans and sensitized mice sera. Our data have shown the occurrence of a systemic anaphylactic reaction resulting in reduced body temperature after challenge along with significantly increased levels of IgE, IgG1, MMCP-1, CCL-2 as well as histamine. Further, increased Th1/Th2 (mixed) cytokine response was observed in spleen cell culture supernatants. Jejunum, lungs and spleen showed prominent histopathological changes specific for allergic inflammation. Immunoblotting with pooled sera of either sensitized mice or human sera recognized seven similar IgE binding polypeptides that may be responsible for chickpea induced hypersensitivity reactions. This study has addressed the allergenic manifestations associated with chickpea consumption and identifies the proteins responsible for allergenicity which may prove useful in diagnosis and management of allergenicity of legumes especially chickpea.

  8. The Inhibitory Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation in IgE-Mediated Allergic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seon Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Kim, Cha Soon; Lee, In Kyung; Kim, Ji Young

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has different biological effects according to dose and dose rate. In particular, the biological effect of low-dose radiation is unclear. Low-dose whole-body gamma irradiation activates immune responses in several ways. However, the effects and mechanism of low-dose radiation on allergic responses remain poorly understood. Previously, we reported that low-dose ionizing radiation inhibits mediator release in IgE-mediated RBL-2H3 mast cell activation. In this study, to have any physiological relevance, we investigated whether low-dose radiation inhibits allergic responses in activated human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6) and LAD2 cells), mouse models of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and the late-phase cutaneous response. High-dose radiation induced cell death, but low-dose ionizing radiation of <0.5 Gy did not induce mast cell death. Low-dose ionizing radiation that did not induce cell death significantly suppressed mediator release from human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6) and LAD2 cells) that were activated by antigen-antibody reaction. To determine the inhibitory mechanism of mediator released by low-dose ionizing radiation, we examined the phosphorylation of intracellular signaling molecules such as Lyn, Syk, phospholipase Cγ, and protein kinase C, as well as the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). The phosphorylation of signaling molecules and [Ca2+]i following stimulation of FcεRI receptors was inhibited by low dose ionizing radiation. In agreement with its in vitro effect, ionizing radiation also significantly inhibited inflammatory cells infiltration, cytokine mRNA expression (TNF-α, IL-4, IL-13), and symptoms of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction and the late-phase cutaneous response in anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-sensitized mice. These results indicate that ionizing radiation inhibits both mast cell-mediated immediate- and delayed-type allergic reactions in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26317642

  9. A nematode immunomodulator suppresses grass pollen-specific allergic responses by controlling excessive Th2 inflammation.

    PubMed

    Daniłowicz-Luebert, Emilia; Steinfelder, Svenja; Kühl, Anja A; Drozdenko, Gennadiy; Lucius, Richard; Worm, Margitta; Hamelmann, Eckard; Hartmann, Susanne

    2013-03-01

    Helminth parasites modulate the immune system by complex mechanisms to ensure persistence in the host. Released immunomodulatory parasite components lead to a beneficial environment for the parasite by targeting different host cells and in parallel to a modulation of unrelated inflammatory responses in the host, such as allergy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the potent helminth immunomodulator, filarial cystatin, in a murine model of airway inflammation and hyperreactivity induced by a clinically relevant aeroallergen (timothy grass (Phleum pratense) pollen) and on the function of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from timothy grass pollen allergic patients. BALB/c mice were systemically sensitised with a recombinant major allergen of timothy grass pollen (rPhl p 5b) and then challenged with timothy grass pollen extract (GPE) via the airways. Filarial cystatin was applied i.p. during the sensitisation phase. Airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine challenges, inflammation of airways, inflammatory cell recruitment, cytokine production and lung histopathology were investigated. In a translational approach, PBMCs from allergic subjects and healthy controls were treated in vitro with cystatin prior to stimulation with GPE. Administration of filarial cystatin suppressed rPhl p 5b-induced allergen-specific Th2-responses and airway inflammation, inhibited local recruitment of eosinophils, reduced levels of allergen-specific IgE and down-regulated IL-5 and IL-13 in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Ex vivo restimulation with cystatin of spleen cells from cystatin-treated mice induced the production of IL-10, while cystatin inhibited allergen-specific IL-5 and IL-13 levels. Human PBMCs from timothy grass pollen allergic patients displayed a shift towards a Th1 response after treatment with cystatin. These results show that filarial cystatin ameliorates allergic inflammation and disease in a clinically relevant model of allergy. This data

  10. Recent Patents and Emerging Therapeutics in the Treatment of Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Gyan P.; Tamboli, Viral; Jwala, Jwala; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2011-01-01

    Ocular allergy is an inflammatory response of the conjunctival mucosa that also affects the cornea and eyelids. Allergic conjunctivitis includes seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (SAC), perennial allergic conjunctivitis (PAC), vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC), atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) and giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC). In general, allergic conditions involve mast cell degranulation that leads to release of inflammatory mediators and activation of enzymatic cascades generating pro-inflammatory mediators. In chronic ocular inflammatory disorders associated with mast cell activation such as VKC and AKC constant inflammatory response is observed due to predominance of inflammatory mediators such as eosinophils and Th2-generated cytokines. Antihistamines, mast-cell stabilizers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, corticosteroids and immunomodulatory agents are commonly indicated for the treatment of acute and chronic allergic conjunctivitis. In recent years newer drug molecules have been introduced in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis. This article reviews recent patents and emerging therapeutics in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:21171952

  11. Spiraeoside inhibits mast cells activation and IgE-mediated allergic responses by suppressing phospholipase C-γ-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Kuk; Seo, Young-Kyo; Park, Sehoon; Park, Soo-Ah; Lim, Seyoung; Lee, Susie; Kwon, Ohman; Seo, Jeong Kon; Choi, Ung-Kyu; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2015-06-01

    Mast cells are responsible for IgE-mediated allergic responses through the secretion of various inflammatory cytokines and mediators. Therefore, the pharmacological regulation of mast cell activation is an important goal in the development of novel anti-allergic drugs. In this study, we found that spiraeoside (SP) inhibits mast cell activation and allergic responses in vivo. SP dose-dependently inhibited the degranulation induced by IgE-antigen (Ag) stimulation in RBL-2H3 mast cells without cytotoxic effects. At the molecular level, SP reduced the Ag-induced phosphorylation and subsequent activation of phospholipase C-γ2 (PLC-γ2). Moreover, SP inhibited the phosphorylation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), linker for activation of T cells (LAT), and downstream MAPKs, such as ERK1/2, p38, and JNK, eventually attenuating expression of TNF-α and IL-4. Finally, we found that SP significantly inhibited IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in mice. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that SP suppresses IgE-mediated mast cell activation and allergic responses by inhibiting Lyn-induced PLC-γ2/MAPK signaling in mast cells.

  12. Anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory and anti-lipidperoxidant effects of Cassia occidentalis Linn.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, G; Latha, P G; Shine, V J; Anuja, G I; Suja, S R; Sini, S; Shyama, S; Pradeep, S; Shikha, P; Rajasekharan, S

    2010-05-01

    Cassia occidentalis Linn. mast cell degranulation at a dose of 250 mg/kg, showed dose dependent stabilizing activity towards human RBC, with is widely used in traditional medicine of India to treat a number of clinical conditions including allergy and inflammatory manifestations. In the present study anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of C. occidentalis whole plant ethanolic extract (CO) was investigated. Effects of CO on rat mast cell degranulation inhibition and human red blood cell (HRBC) membrane stabilization were studied in vitro following standard methods. The anti lipidperoxidant effects of CO were also studied in vitro. Effect of CO on carrageenan-induced mouse paw oedema inhibition was also assessed. CO significantly decreased maximum protection of 80.8% at 15 microg/ml. The extract also caused significant reduction in malondialdehyde (MDA) levels of murine hepatic microsomes at 100 microg/ml (56%) and significantly reduced carrageenan induced inflammation in mice at a dose of 250 mg/kg. Results of the present study indicated that CO inhibited mast cell degranulation, stabilized HRBC membrane thereby alleviating immediate hypersensitivity besides showing anti oxidant activity.

  13. AN EXTRACT OF PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM INDUCES DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC ASTHMA RESPONSES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. Our hypothesis is that soluble components of P. chrysogenum (PCE) can dose-dependently induce responses typ...

  14. Pharmacology and clinical efficacy of desloratadine as an anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, D K

    2001-03-01

    Desloratadine is a biologically active metabolite of the second-generation antihistamine loratadine. Desloratadine is a highly selective peripheral H1 receptor antagonist that is significantly more potent than loratadine. Results of in vitro and in vivo studies have suggested that desloratadine has anti-allergic effects that are unrelated to its ability to antagonise the effects of histamine. Desloratadine inhibits the expression of cell adhesion molecules, inhibits the generation and release of inflammatory mediators and cytokines, attenuates eosinophil chemotaxis, adhesion and superoxide generation. Studies in animals indicate that desloratadine does not cross the blood-brain barrier and therefore does not cause sedation and does not impair cognition or psychomotor performance. Desloratadine has an excellent overall safety profile. It has no effect on QRS and QTc intervals and does not cause arrhythmias. Desloratadine is not associated with any significant changes in gastrointestinal function. In clinical studies, oral desloratadine is rapidly absorbed and bioavailability is not affected by ingestion with food or grapefruit juice. The half-life of desloratadine in humans is 27 h; the linear kinetic profile is unaltered by race or gender. Desloratadine is not a substrate for P-glycoprotein or organic anion transport polypeptide and the drug does not appear to be metabolised to a significant extent by the cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 pathway. It therefore may be safely administered with ketoconazole, erythromycin, fluoxetine, or azithromycin. Clinically, desloratadine effectively controls both nasal and non-nasal symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR), including nasal congestion. Desloratadine also provides significant relief of SAR symptoms in patients with co-existing asthma and is effective in the treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria. Desloratadine improves quality of life and is well-tolerated.

  15. Dietary supplementation of omega-3 fatty acid-containing fish oil suppresses F2-isoprostanes but enhances inflammatory cytokine response in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huiyong; Liu, Wei; Goleniewska, Kasia; Porter, Ned A; Morrow, Jason D; Peebles, R Stokes

    2009-09-01

    Epidemiological and clinical evidence has suggested that increased dietary intake of fish oil containing omega-3 fatty acids including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may be associated with a reduced risk of asthma. However, interventional studies on these effects have been equivocal and controversial. Free radical oxidation products of lipids and cyclooxygenases-derived prostaglandins are believed to play an important role in asthma, and fish oil supplementation may modulate the levels of these critical lipid mediators. We employed a murine model of allergic inflammation produced by sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) to study the effects of fish oil supplementation on airway inflammation. Our studies demonstrated that omega-3 fatty acids were dose dependently incorporated into mouse lung tissue after dietary supplementation. We examined the oxidative stress status by measuring the levels of isoprostanes (IsoPs), the gold standard for oxidative stress in vivo. OVA challenge caused significant increase of F(2)-IsoPs in mouse lung, suggesting an elevated level of oxidative stress. Compared to the control group, fish oil supplementation led to a significant reduction of F(2)-IsoP (from arachidonic acid) with a concomitant increase of F(3)-IsoPs (from EPA) and F(4)-IsoPs (from DHA). Surprisingly, however, fish oil supplementation enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokine IL-5 and IL-13. Furthermore, fish oil supplementation suppressed the production of pulmonary protective PGE(2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) while the level of urinary metabolites of the PGE(2) was increased. Our data suggest that augmented lung inflammation after fish oil supplementation may be due to the reduction of PGE(2) production in the lung and these dichotomous results bring into question the role of fish oil supplementation in the treatment of asthma.

  16. Induction of Oral Tolerance with Transgenic Plants Expressing Antigens for Prevention/Treatment of Autoimmune, Allergic and Inflammatory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shengwu; Liao, Yu-Cai; Jevnikar, Anthony M

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence and incidence of autoimmune and allergic diseases have increased dramatically over the last several decades, especially in the developed world. The treatment of autoimmune and allergic diseases is typically with the use of non-specific immunosuppressive agents that compromise the integrity of the host immune system and therefore, increase the risk of infections. Antigenspecific immunotherapy by reinstating immunological tolerance towards self antigens without compromising immune functions is a much desired goal for the treatment of autoimmune and allergic diseases. Mucosal administration of antigen is a long-recognized method of inducing antigen-specific immune tolerance known as oral tolerance, which is viewed as having promising potential in the treatment of autoimmune and allergic diseases. Plant-based expression and delivery of recombinant antigens provide a promising new platform to induce oral tolerance, having considerable advantages including reduced cost and increased safety. Indeed, in recent years the use of tolerogenic plants for oral tolerance induction has attracted increasing attention, and considerable progress has been made. This review summarizes recent advances in using plants to deliver tolerogens for induction of oral tolerance in the treatment of autoimmune, allergic and inflammatory diseases.

  17. Sesamin attenuates mast cell-mediated allergic responses by suppressing the activation of p38 and nuclear factor-κB.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang Chang; Piao, Hong Mei; Zheng, Ming Yu; Lin, Zhen Hua; Li, Guangzhao; Yan, Guang Hai

    2016-01-01

    Establishing therapeutic agents for the treatment of allergic diseases is an important focus of human health research. Sesamin, a lignan in sesame oil, exhibits a diverse range of pharmacological properties. However, to the best of our knowledge, the effect of sesamin on mast cell‑mediated allergic responses has not yet been investigated. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of sesamin on mast cell‑mediated allergic responses and the underlying mechanisms by which it produces this effect. In rats, oral administration of sesamin inhibited passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Sesamin exposure attenuated immunoglobulin E‑induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells, which was indicated to be mediated by the modulation of intracellular calcium. In human mast cells, sesamin reduced the stimulatory effects of phorbol 12‑myristate 13‑acetate and calcium ionophore A23187 on the production and secretion of pro‑inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor‑α and interleukin‑6. The inhibitory effect of sesamin on pro‑inflammatory cytokine production was dependent on nuclear factor κ‑light‑chain‑enhancer of activated B cells (NF‑κB) and p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK). The present study demonstrates that sesamin inhibits mast cell‑derived inflammatory allergic reactions by blocking histamine release, and pro‑inflammatory cytokine production and secretion. In addition, the findings indicate that the effect of sesamin is mediated by its effect on p38 MAPK/NF‑κB signaling. Furthermore, the in vivo and in vitro anti‑allergic effects of sesamin reported in the present study suggest that it is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of inflammatory allergic diseases.

  18. Mas-related G protein coupled receptor-X2: A potential new target for modulating mast cell-mediated allergic and inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Hydar

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are tissue resident immune cells that are best known for their roles in allergic and inflammatory diseases. In addition to the high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI), MCs express numerous G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are the most common targets of drug therapy. Neurokinin 1 receptor (NK-1R) is expressed on MCs and contributes to IgE and non-IgE-mediated responses in mice. Although NK-1R antagonists are highly effective in modulating experimental allergic and inflammatory responses in mice they lack efficacy in humans. This article reviews recent findings that demonstrate that while neuropeptides (NPs) activate murine MCs via NK-1R and Mas related G protein coupled receptor B2 (MrgprB2), they activate human MCs via Mas-related G protein coupled receptor X2 (MRGPRX2). Interestingly, conventional NK-1R antagonists have off-target activity against mouse MrgprB2 but not human MRGPRX2. These findings suggest that the failure to translate studies with NK-1R antagonists from in vivo mouse studies to the clinic likely reflects their lack of effect on human MRGPRX2. A unique feature of MRGPRX2 that distinguishes it from other GPCRs is that it is activated by a diverse group of ligands that include; neuropeptides, cysteine proteases, antimicrobial peptides and cationic proteins released from activated eosinophils. Thus, the development of small molecule MRGPRX2-specific antagonists or neutralizing antibodies may provide new targets for the treatment of MC-mediated allergic and inflammatory diseases. PMID:28090599

  19. Mosla dianthera inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic reactions through the inhibition of histamine release and inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Hee; Kim, Sang-Hyun . E-mail: shkim72@knu.ac.kr; Eun, Jae-Soon; Shin, Tae-Yong . E-mail: tyshin@woosuk.ac.kr

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the aqueous extract of Mosla dianthera (Maxim.) (AEMD) on the mast cell-mediated allergy model and studied the possible mechanism of action. Mast cell-mediated allergic disease is involved in many diseases such as asthma, sinusitis and rheumatoid arthritis. The discovery of drugs for the treatment of allergic disease is an important subject in human health. AEMD inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic reactions in mice. AEMD decreased immunoglobulin E-mediated local allergic reactions, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. AEMD attenuated intracellular calcium level and release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80. Furthermore, AEMD attenuated the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated TNF-{alpha}, IL-8 and IL-6 secretion in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of AEMD on the pro-inflammatory cytokines was nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) dependent. AEMD decreased PMA and A23187-induced degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. Our findings provide evidence that AEMD inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and NF-{kappa}B in these effects.

  20. Sulforaphane-rich broccoli sprout extract attenuates nasal allergic response to diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Heber, David; Li, Zhaoping; Garcia-Lloret, Maria; Wong, Angela M; Lee, Tsz Ying Amy; Thames, Gail; Krak, Michael; Zhang, Yanjun; Nel, Andre

    2014-01-01

    The generation of oxidative stress by ambient air pollution particles contributes to the development of allergic sensitization and asthma, as demonstrated by intranasal challenge with well-characterized diesel exhaust particle (DEP) suspensions in humans. This effect is due to the presence of redox active organic chemicals in DEP, and can be suppressed by antioxidants and inducers of phase II enzymes in animals. In this communication, we determined whether the administration of a standardized broccoli sprout extract (BSE), which contains a reproducible amount of the sulforaphane (SFN) precursor, glucoraphanin, could be used to suppress the nasal inflammatory response in human subjects challenged with 300 μg of an aqueous DEP suspension (equivalent to daily PM exposure levels on a Los Angeles freeway). SFN is capable of inducing an antioxidant and phase II response via activation of the nuclear transcription factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2). Previous studies have shown that 70-90% SFN delivered by BSE is absorbed, metabolized, and excreted in humans. An initial intranasal challenge with DEP in 29 human subjects was used to characterize the magnitude of the inflammatory response. Following a 4 week washout, a BSE that delivers a reproducible and standardized dose of 100 μmol SFN in mango juice was administered daily for four days. The nasal DEP challenge was repeated and lavage fluid collected to perform white blood cell (WBC) counts. The average nasal WBC increased by 66% over the initial screening levels and by 85% over the control levels 24 hours after DEP exposure. However, total cell counts decreased by 54% when DEP challenge was preceded by daily BSE administration for 4 days (p < 0.001). Since the SFN dose in these studies is equivalent to the consumption of 100-200 g broccoli, our study demonstrates the potential preventive and therapeutic potential of broccoli or broccoli sprouts rich in glucoraphanin for reducing the impact of particulate

  1. The inflammatory response in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bosmann, Markus; Ward, Peter A

    2013-03-01

    The pathophysiology of sepsis and its accompanying systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and the events that lead to multiorgan failure and death are poorly understood. It is known that, in septic humans and rodents, the development of SIRS is associated with a loss of the redox balance, but SIRS can also develop in noninfectious states. In addition, a hyperinflammatory state develops, together with impaired innate immune functions of phagocytes, immunosuppression, and complement activation, collectively leading to septic shock and lethality. Here, we discuss recent insights into the signaling pathways in immune and phagocytic cells that underlie sepsis and SIRS and consider how these might be targeted for therapeutic interventions to reverse or attenuate pathways that lead to lethality during sepsis.

  2. Anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic effect of Agaricus blazei extract in bone marrow-derived mast cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Chae, Hee-Sung; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Lee, Hyeong-Kyu; Chin, Young-Won

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic effects of the chloroform-soluble extract of Agaricus blazei in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) were investigated. The chloroform-soluble extract inhibited IL-6 production in PMA plus A23187-stimulated BMMCs, and down-regulated the phosphorylation of Akt. In addition, this extract demonstrated inhibition of the degranulation of β-hexosaminidase and the production of IL-6, prostaglandin D(2) and leukotriene C(4) in PMA plus A23187-induced BMMCs. In conclusion, the chloroform-soluble extract of Agaricus blazei exerted anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic activities mediated by influencing IL-6, prostaglandin D(2), leukotriene C(4), and the phosphorylation of Akt.

  3. NEUROTROPHIN RECEPTOR BLOCKADE ATTENUATES DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICULATE MATTER (DEP) ENHANCEMENT OF ALLERGIC RESPONSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY:
    Recent investigations have linked neurotrophins including NGF, NT-3, and BDNF to allergic airways diseases. Antibody blockade of NGF attenuates airway resistance associated with allergic airway responses in mice. Mice administered an antibody against the low aff...

  4. METALS, PARTICLES AND IMPACT UPON PULMONARY ALLERGIC RESPONSES

    EPA Science Inventory


    The increase in allergic asthma over the past few decades has prompted investigations into whether air pollution may affect either the incidence or severity of allergic lung disease. Population studies have demonstrated that as air pollution rises, symptoms, medication use a...

  5. A small amount of tetrachloroethylene ingestion from drinking water accelerates antigen-stimulated allergic responses.

    PubMed

    Seo, Makoto; Yamagiwa, Takeo; Kobayashi, Ryo; Ikeda, Koji; Satoh, Masahiko; Inagaki, Naoki; Nagai, Hiroichi; Nagase, Hisamitsu

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we observed that tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE) increased histamine release and inflammatory mediator production from antigen-stimulated mast cells. In this study, we examined the enhancing effect of low concentrations of PCE in drinking water on antigen-stimulated allergic responses. After exposure of Wistar rats to PCE in drinking water for 2 or 4 weeks, we performed a passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reaction. PCE exposure for 4 weeks enhanced PCA reaction in a dose-dependent manner. In pathological studies, PCE exposure for 2 weeks exacerbated inflammation characterized by infiltration of lymphocytes and accumulation of mast cells around the vessel. Non-purified mast cells (NPMCs) from rats treated with 1mg/L PCE in drinking water for 2 weeks increased antigen-stimulated histamine release. Furthermore, the leukocytes of rats treated with PCE in drinking water for 4 weeks showed increased interleukin (IL)-4 expression. The mechanism of enhancing the PCA reaction is assumed to be that PCE increases IL-4 production and PCE causes T helper (Th) 1/Th2-type helper T-cell imbalance and increases histamine release from excessively accumulated mast cells. The results suggest that the intake of PCE in drinking water, even at a low concentration, leads to the initiation and acceleration of allergic diseases.

  6. CARMA1 is necessary for optimal T cell responses in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Ramadas, Ravisankar A; Roche, Marly I; Moon, James J; Ludwig, Thomas; Xavier, Ramnik J; Medoff, Benjamin D

    2011-12-15

    CARMA1 is a lymphocyte-specific scaffold protein necessary for T cell activation. Deletion of CARMA1 prevents the development of allergic airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma due to a defect in naive T cell activation. However, it is unknown if CARMA1 is important for effector and memory T cell responses after the initial establishment of inflammation, findings that would be more relevant to asthma therapies targeted to CARMA1. In the current study, we sought to elucidate the role of CARMA1 in T cells that have been previously activated. Using mice in which floxed CARMA1 exons can be selectively deleted in T cells by OX40-driven Cre recombinase (OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F)), we report that CD4(+) T cells from these mice have impaired T cell reactivation responses and NF-κB signaling in vitro. Furthermore, in an in vivo recall model of allergic airway inflammation that is dependent on memory T cell function, OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F) mice have attenuated eosinophilic airway inflammation, T cell activation, and Th2 cytokine production. Using MHC class II tetramers, we demonstrate that the development and maintenance of Ag-specific memory T cells is not affected in OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F) mice. In addition, adoptive transfer of Th2-polarized OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F) Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells into wild-type mice induces markedly less airway inflammation in response to Ag challenge than transfer of wild-type Th2 cells. These data demonstrate a novel role for CARMA1 in effector and memory T cell responses and suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting CARMA1 could help treat chronic inflammatory disorders such as asthma.

  7. Inhibition of Release of Vasoactive and Inflammatory Mediators in Airway and Vascular Tissues and Macrophages By a Chinese Herbal Medicine Formula for Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun Guang; Xue, Charlie Changli; Thien, Francis Chung Kong; Story, David Frederick

    2007-01-01

    Herbal therapies are being used increasingly for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible pharmacological actions and cellular targets of a Chinese herbal formula (RCM-101), which was previously shown to be effective in reducing seasonal allergic rhinitis symptoms in a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Rat and guinea pig isolated tissues (trachea and aorta) were used to study the effects of RCM-101 on responses to various mediators. Production of leukotriene B4 in porcine neutrophils and of prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide (NO) in Raw 264.7 cells were also measured. In rat and guinea pig tracheal preparations, RCM-101 inhibited contractile responses to compound 48/80 but not those to histamine (guinea pig preparations) or serotonin (rat preparations). Contractile responses of guinea pig tracheal preparations to carbachol and leukotriene C4, and relaxant responses to substance P and prostaglandin E2 were not affected by RCM-101. In rat aortic preparations, precontracted with phenylephrine, endothelium-dependent relaxant responses to acetylcholine and endothelium-independent relaxant responses to sodium nitroprusside were not affected by RCM-101. However, RCM-101 inhibited relaxations to l-arginine in endothelium-denuded rat aortic preparations, which had been pre-incubated with lipopolysaccharide. RCM-101 did not affect leukotriene B4 formation in isolated porcine neutrophils, induced by the calcium ionophore A23187; however, it inhibited prostaglandin E2 and NO production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophages (Raw 264.7 cells).The findings indicate that RCM-101 may have multiple inhibitory actions on the release and/or synthesis of inflammatory mediators involved in allergic rhinitis. PMID:17549238

  8. Nutritional modulation of the inflammatory bowel response.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Orestis; Varnalidis, Ioannis; Paraskevas, George; Botsios, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis represent distinct phenotypic forms of inflammatory bowel disease and continue to be a common cause of morbidity. The corticosteroids and the immunomodulatory drugs, which are the basis of treatment for the inflammatory bowel diseases, do not assure always satisfactory outcomes. Nutrition has been used in order to modify the inflammatory response of various chronic inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases, the intestinal microflora and the intestinal mucosal disorders play a crucial role. Also, the release of reactive oxygen species is a significant factor of initiation and preservation of the inflammatory reaction in these diseases. The advantages of the nutritional treatment derive from the sequestration of intraluminal agents which may promote the inflammatory bowel response or, alternatively, nutrition is able to modify the immune response, reducing the uncontrolled inflammatory reaction. Furthermore, nutrition can enhance the mucosal barrier function and consists a significant source of antioxidants. This review focuses on certain nutritional components that modulate the inflammatory response of the bowel and aims to present a rational thesis regarding the use of nutritional agents in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  9. OX40 blockade inhibits house dust mite driven allergic lung inflammation in mice and in vitro allergic responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Katie E; Dumont, Celine; Thompson, Clare L; Catley, Matthew C; Dixon, Kate L; Marshall, Diane

    2015-04-01

    The costimulatory receptor OX40 is expressed on activated T cells and regulates T-cell responses. Here, we show the efficacy and mechanism of action of an OX40 blocking antibody using the chronic house dust mite (HDM) mouse model of lung inflammation and in vitro HDM stimulation of cells from HDM allergic human donors. We have demonstrated that OX40 blockade leads to a reduction in the number of eosinophils and neutrophils in the lavage fluid and lung tissue of HDM sensitized mice. This was accompanied by a decrease in activated and memory CD4(+) T cells in the lungs and further analysis revealed that both the Th2 and Th17 populations were inhibited. Improved lung function and decreased HDM-specific antibody responses were also noted. Significantly, efficacy was observed even when anti-OX40 treatment was delayed until after inflammation was established. OX40 blockade also inhibited the release of the Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 from cells isolated from HDM allergic human donors. Altogether, our data provide evidence of a role of the OX40/OX40L pathway in ongoing allergic lung inflammation and support clinical studies of a blocking OX40 antibody in Th2 high severe asthma patients.

  10. Arctigenin, a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, inhibits type I-IV allergic inflammation and pro-inflammatory enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yun; Kim, Chang Jong

    2010-06-01

    We previously reported that arctigenin, a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan isolated from Forsythia koreana, exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and analgesic effects in animal models. In addition, arctigenin inhibited eosinophil peroxidase and activated myeloperoxidase in inflamed tissues. In this study, we tested the effects of arctigenin on type I-IV allergic inflammation and pro-inflammatory enzymes in vitro and in vivo. Arctigenin significantly inhibited the heterologous passive cutaneous anaphylaxis induced by ovalbumin in mice at 15 mg/kg, p.o., and compound 48/80-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells at 10 microM. Arctigenin (15 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly inhibited reversed cutaneous anaphylaxis. Further, arctigenin (15 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly inhibited the Arthus reaction to sheep's red blood cells, decreasing the hemolysis titer, the hemagglutination titer, and the plaque-forming cell number for SRBCs. In addition, arctigenin significantly inhibited delayed type hypersensitivity at 15 mg/kg, p.o. and the formation of rosette-forming cells at 45 mg/kg, p.o. Contact dermatitis induced by picrylchloride and dinitrofluorobenzene was significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited by surface treatment with arctigenin (0.3 mg/ear). Furthermore, arctigenin dose-dependently inhibited pro-inflammatory enzymes, such as cyclooxygenase-1 and 2, 5-lipoxygenase, phospholipase A2, and phosphodiesterase. Our results show that arctigenin significantly inhibited B- and T-cell mediated allergic inflammation as well as pro-inflammatory enzymes.

  11. Calpain activity and expression are increased in splenic inflammatory cells associated with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Shields, D C; Schaecher, K E; Goust, J M; Banik, N L

    1999-09-01

    Since calcium-activated neutral proteinase (calpain) activity and expression are significantly increased in activated glial/inflammatory cells in the central nervous system of animals with autoimmune demyelinating diseases, this enzyme may also play a role in peripheral organ systems in these diseases. In this study, the activity and expression of calpain and the endogenous inhibitor, calpastatin, were evaluated at transcriptional and translational levels in spleens of Lewis rats with acute experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) prior to the onset of clinical symptoms. Calpain activity and translational expression were increased by 475.5% and 44.3% respectively, on day 4 post-induction in adjuvant controls and animals with EAE. These levels remained elevated compared to normal controls on days 8 and 12. Calpastatin translational expression was similarly increased at these time points although transcriptional expression was not significantly altered at any time following induction of EAE. Likewise, transcriptional expression of mu-calpain was unchanged following induction, while small increases in m-calpain transcriptional expression were observed on days 2 and 8. Most calpain expression was observed in activated splenic macrophages at day 8 post-induction even though activated T cells were also calpain positive. In spinal cords of animals with EAE, calpain expression was significantly increased in rats with severe disease compared to those exhibiting only mild symptoms at day 12 post-induction. Thus, prior to symptomatic EAE, increased calpain activity and expression in peripheral lymphoid organs may play an important role in T cell migration and subsequent disease progression.

  12. Local Immune Responses in Children and Adults with Allergic and Nonallergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hana; Jang, Man-Young; Kim, Kyung Rae; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Cho, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis (AR) is the most common allergic disease but little is known about the difference of local immune responses in children and adults with AR. Objective To compare local immune responses between children and adults with AR and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR), and to investigate whether the association of local and systemic immune responses is different between the two age groups. Methods Fifty-one patients with chronic rhinitis were enrolled and grouped into children (N = 27, mean age 7.2 years) and adults (N = 24, mean age 29.9 years). Diagnosis of AR was based on symptoms, skin prick tests and serum specific IgEs. Nasal lavage (NAL) fluids were collected from all subjects and used to measure the levels of total IgE, specific IgEs to house dust mites (Dp and Df), and cytokines (TNF-α, IL-4, IL-10, IL-17A and IFN-γ). Flow cytometry was used to measure inflammatory cell types in NAL fluids. Results AR had significantly increased local levels of total IgE and specific IgEs to Dp and Df compared with NAR in both age groups (P < 0.05). Nasal eosinophils % (P = 0.01) was significantly increased only in children with AR. Local-systemic correlations of total IgE (r = 0.662, P = 0.000) and eosinophil % (r = 0.461, P = 0.015) between the peripheral blood and NAL fluids were found only in children. Moreover, children had correlations between total IgE and eosinophil % in the peripheral blood (r = 0.629, P = 0.001) and in NAL fluids (r = 0.373, P = 0.061). Conclusion Elevated local IgE is a common feature of AR in children and adults. Local measures in NAR showed naïve state of immune response which disagree with the hypothesis of local allergic rhinitis. Children showed intense local inflammation and close local-systemic interactions compared to adults supporting pediatric AR as a distinct feature. PMID:27281182

  13. Perilla frutescens leaf extract inhibits mite major allergen Der p 2-induced gene expression of pro-allergic and pro-inflammatory cytokines in human bronchial epithelial cell BEAS-2B.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jer-Yuh; Chen, Yi-Ching; Lin, Chun-Hsiang; Kao, Shao-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    Perilla frutescens has been used in traditional medicine for respiratory diseases due to its anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activity. This study aimed to investigate effects of Perilla frutescens leaf extract (PFE) on expression of pro-allergic and pro-inflammatory cytokines in airway epithelial cells exposed to mite major allergen Der p 2 (DP2) and the underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that PFE up to 100 µg/mL had no cytotoxic effect on human bronchial epithelial cell BEAS-2B. Further investigations revealed that PFE dose-dependently diminished mRNA expression of pro-allergic cytokine IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and GM-CSF, as well as pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 in BEAS-2B cells treated with DP2. In parallel to mRNA, the DP-2-elevated levels of the tested cytokines were decreased. Further investigation showed that DP2-indued phosphorylation of p38 MAPK (P38) and JNK, but not Erk1/2, was also suppressed by PFE. In addition, PFE elevated cytosolic IκBα level and decreased nuclear NF-κB level in DP2-stimulated BEAS-2B cells. Taken together, these findings revealed that PFE significantly diminished both mRNA expression and protein levels of pro-allergic and pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to DP2 through inhibition of P38/JNK and NK-κB activation. These findings suggest that PFE should be beneficial to alleviate both allergic and inflammatory responses on airway epithelium in response to aeroallergens.

  14. Immunization of proteins from Toxascaris leonina adult worm inhibits allergic specific Th2 response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun Hee; Park, Hye Kyung; Jeong, Hae Jin; Park, Sang Kyun; Lee, Sun Joo; Choi, Sun Hee; Cho, Min Kyoung; Ock, Mee Sun; Hong, Yeon-Chul; Yu, Hak Sun

    2008-10-01

    Recently, the influence of parasitic infections on the incidence of allergic diseases has become the focus of increased attention. In order to ascertain whether parasite-derived proteins could inhibit the allergic specific Th2 response, we applied excretory-secretory protein (Tl-ES) or total protein (Tl-TP) of the adult worm Toxascaris leonina to asthma model mice prior to or simultaneously with OVA challenge, after which we assessed the OVA-specific Th2 responses. The group subjected to immunization with Tl-ES and Tl-TP (immunized group) evidenced a thinning of the bronchial epithelial and muscle layer, a disruption and shedding of epithelial cells, a reduction in the number of goblet cells, and a reduction in mucus production as compared to the group treated with Tl-ES coupled with OVA challenge (challenge with OVA groups) and the OVA-induced asthma group. The administration of Tl-ES and Tl-TP, regardless of injection time, was shown to inhibit the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the airway, and in particular, macrophages, neutrophils, and lymphocytes were significantly reduced as the result of the parasite proteins. However, the total number of eosinophils was slightly reduced as the result of the administration of parasite proteins. Sensitization and OVA challenge was shown to accelerate the secretion of Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5) within the lung, but in the immunized groups, those levels were lower. The administration of Tl-TP and OVA challenge group also evidenced a significant reduction in IL-4 levels as compared to the OVA-challenged group. The concentrations of Th2 cytokines in the Tl-ES and OVA challenge group were more similar to those observed in the OVA-challenged group. The concentration of IL-10 and TGF-beta in the lung was decreased substantially in the OVA-only challenge group, but the Tl-TP immunized group exhibited significantly induced IL-10 cytokine. OVA-specific IgG2a, IgG1, and IgE levels in the immunized groups were significantly

  15. Immune response phenotype of allergic versus clinically tolerant pigs in a neonatal swine model of allergy.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Julie; Rupa, Prithy; Garvie, Sarah; Wilkie, Bruce

    2013-07-15

    The prevalence of childhood food allergy and the duration of these allergies, particularly those considered to be transient, like egg and milk allergy, are increasing. The identification of allergic individuals using minimally invasive, non-anaphylaxis-threatening methods is therefore of increasing importance. In this experiment, correlates were sought of an allergic immune response (IR) phenotype in pigs. Using pigs pre-treated with heat-killed bacteria or bacterial components before allergic sensitization with the egg white protein ovomucoid (Ovm), differences were determined in IR phenotype of pigs in the categories treated-allergic, treated-tolerant, control-allergic (CA) and control-tolerant. Phenotype was established by measuring immunoglobulin (Ig)-associated antibody activity (AbA), cytokine profiles and the proportion of blood T-regulatory cells (T-regs) and observing late-phase allergen-specific skin tests (ST). Although 100% of pigs became sensitized to Ovm, only 33% of pigs had clinical signs of allergy after oral challenge with egg white. Pigs without clinical signs were classified as clinically tolerant. Sixty-seven percent of allergic pigs had a positive, late-phase ST classified as very strong or strong, while 84% of clinically tolerant pigs did not have late-phase ST. Treated-allergic pigs and CA pigs had greater total antibody IgG (H+L), IgE and IgG1 AbA than clinically tolerant pigs. Cytokine profiles of allergic pigs and the proportion of circulating T-regs, did not differ significantly between allergic and clinically tolerant pigs. Therefore, measurement of allergen-specific IgG, IgG1 and/or IgE activity and evaluation of late-phase ID ST may be useful in identifying allergic IR phenotypes in swine models of food allergy, which may be extended toward human use.

  16. Effects of gasoline engine emissions on preexisting allergic airway responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Day, Kimberly C; Reed, Matthew D; McDonald, Jacob D; Seilkop, Steven K; Barrett, Edward G

    2008-10-01

    Gasoline-powered vehicle emissions contribute significantly to ambient air pollution. We hypothesized that exposure to gasoline engine emissions (GEE) may exacerbate preexisting allergic airway responses. Male BALB/c mice were sensitized by injection with ovalbumin (OVA) and then received a 10-min aerosolized OVA challenge. Parallel groups were sham-sensitized with saline. Mice were exposed 6 h/day to air (control, C) or GEE containing particulate matter (PM) at low (L), medium (M), or high (H) concentrations, or to the H level with PM removed by filtration (high-filtered, HF). Immediately after GEE exposure mice received another 10-min aerosol OVA challenge (pre-OVA protocol). In a second (post-OVA) protocol, mice were similarly sensitized but only challenged to OVA before air or GEE exposure. Measurements of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and blood collection were performed approximately 24 h after the last exposure. In both protocols, M, H, and HF GEE exposure significantly decreased BAL neutrophils from nonsensitized mice but had no significant effect on BAL cells from OVA-sensitized mice. In the pre-OVA protocol, GEE exposure increased OVA-specific IgG(1) but had no effect on BAL interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-13, or interferon (IFN)-gamma in OVA-sensitized mice. Nonsensitized GEE-exposed mice had increased OVA-specific IgG(2a), IgE, and IL-2, but decreased total IgE. In the post-OVA protocol, GEE exposure reduced BAL IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-gamma in nonsensitized mice but had no effect on sensitized mice. These results suggest acute exposure to the gas-vapor phase of GEE suppressed inflammatory cells and cytokines from nonsensitized mice but did not substantially exacerbate allergic responses.

  17. No Adjuvant Effect of Bacillus thuringiensis-Maize on Allergic Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dekan, Gerhard; Epstein, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) foods are evaluated carefully for their ability to induce allergic disease. However, few studies have tested the capacity of a GM food to act as an adjuvant, i.e. influencing allergic responses to other unrelated allergens at acute onset and in individuals with pre-existing allergy. We sought to evaluate the effect of short-term feeding of GM Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)-maize (MON810) on the initiation and relapse of allergic asthma in mice. BALB/c mice were provided a diet containing 33% GM or non-GM maize for up to 34 days either before ovalbumin (OVA)-induced experimental allergic asthma or disease relapse in mice with pre-existing allergy. We observed that GM-maize feeding did not affect OVA-induced eosinophilic airway and lung inflammation, mucus hypersecretion or OVA-specific antibody production at initiation or relapse of allergic asthma. There was no adjuvant effect upon GM-maize consumption on the onset or severity of allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic asthma. PMID:25084284

  18. [Apoptosis in allergic disease].

    PubMed

    Rojas Ramos, E; Martínez Jiménez, N E; Martínez Aguilar, N E; Garfias Becerra, J

    2000-01-01

    Apoptosis (cell programmed death) it is a mechanism that implicate a physiological suicide, to keep the cellular homeostasis in big amount of tissues. Fas (APO-1; CD95) system is one of the most important cellular responsible via to induce apoptosis on different tissues. Eosinophillia on peripheral blood and tissues are the main characteristics on allergic like asthma. Eosinophil apoptosis is upper regulated in those diseases by IL-5 y GM-CSF. Corticoids, teophyllin and some macrolids have been used like apoptosis inductors on eosinophills, these could be a novel mechanism to promote a better solution on inflammatory allergic diseases.

  19. Anti-inflammatory Potentials of Excretory/Secretory (ES) and Somatic Products of Marshallagia marshalli on Allergic Airway Inflammation in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    SHIRVAN, Sima PARANDE; BORJI, Hassan; MOVASSAGHI, Ahmadreza; KHAKZAD, Mohammadreza; FARZIN, Hamidreza; MALEKI, Mohsen; HAGHPARAST, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inverse relationship between helminths infection and immune-mediated diseases has inspired researchers to investigate therapeutic potential of helminths in allergic asthma. Helminth unique ability to induce immunoregulatory responses has already been documented in several experimental studies. This study was designed to investigate whether excretory/secretory (ES) and somatic products of Marshallagia marshalli modulate the development of ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in a mouse model. Methods: This study was carried out at the laboratories of Immunology and Parasitology of Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran during spring and summer 2015. Allergic airway inflammation was induced in mice by intraperitoneal (IP) injection with ovalbumin (OVA). The effects of ES and somatic products of M. marshalli were analyzed by inflammatory cell infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), pathological changes and IgE response. Results: Treatment with ES and somatic products of M. marshalli decreased cellular infiltration into BALF when they were administered during sensitization with allergen. Pathological changes were decreased in helminth-treated group, as demonstrated by reduced inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell hyperplasia, epithelial lesion and smooth muscle hypertrophy. However, no significant differences were observed in IgE serum levels, cytokines and eosinophil counts between different groups. Conclusion: This study provides new insights into anti-inflammatory effects of ES and somatic products of M. marshalli, during the development of non-eosinophilic model of asthma. Further study is necessary to characterize immunomodulatory molecules derived from M. marshalli as a candidate for the treatment of airway inflammation. PMID:28127363

  20. Suppression of allergic immune responses to house dust mite (HDM) in rats exposed to 2,3,7,8-TCDD.

    PubMed

    Luebke, R W; Copeland, C B; Daniels, M; Lambert, A L; Gilmour, M I

    2001-07-01

    Exposure to various xenobiotics, including oxidant gases, diesel exhaust, and certain pesticides, has been reported to exacerbate pulmonary allergic hypersensitivity responses. Increased lymphocyte proliferative responses to parasite antigens or increased antibody responses to sheep erythrocyte have also been reported in rats exposed to TCDD before infection or immunization. As a result, these studies were conducted to test the hypothesis that TCDD exposure exacerbates the allergic response to house dust mite antigen. Brown Norway rats were injected, ip, with 0, 1, 10, or 30 microg TCDD/kg 7 days before intratracheal (it) sensitization to semipurified house dust mite allergen (HDM). Fourteen days later, rats were challenged with HDM and immediate bronchospasm was measured. At this time point, plus 2 and 7 days later, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), HDM-specific IgE levels in serum, and HDM-driven cell proliferation in bronchial lymph nodes and spleen were evaluated. TCDD exposure decreased both immediate bronchoconstriction and specific IgE synthesis after the HDM challenge; 7 days later, HDM-specific IgE responses remained suppressed. Total serum IgE levels were similar in all groups. HDM challenge alone significantly increased cellular and biochemical indicators of lung injury, both of which were suppressed by TCDD exposure. The proliferative response of lymph node cells, but not of spleen cells, to HDM was also suppressed at the highest TCDD dose, although the splenic response to Concanavalin A was elevated. It appears that early events in the response to HDM are affected by TCDD exposure, since message for IL5 was dramatically reduced 2 days after sensitization, but not after challenge. We therefore conclude that TCDD exposure suppressed, rather than enhanced the development of allergic immune responses and the expression of immune-mediated lung disease.

  1. Characterisation of CD154+ T cells following ex vivo allergen stimulation illustrates distinct T cell responses to seasonal and perennial allergens in allergic and non-allergic individuals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Allergic sensitisation has been ascribed to a dysregulated relationship between allergen-specific Th1, Th2 and regulatory T cells. We sought to utilise our short-term CD154 detection method to further analyse the relationship between these T cell subsets and investigate differences between seasonal and perennial allergens. Using peripheral blood samples from grass-allergic, cat-allergic and healthy non-atopic subjects, we compared the frequencies and phenotype of CD154-positive T helper cells following stimulation with seasonal (grass) and perennial (cat dander) allergens. Results We identified a higher frequency of CD154+ T cells in grass-allergic individuals compared to healthy controls; this difference was not evident following stimulation with cat allergen. Activated Th1, Th2 and Tr1-like cells, that co-express IFNγ, IL4 and IL10, respectively, were identified in varying proportions in grass-allergic, cat-allergic and non-allergic individuals. We confirmed a close correlation between Th1, Th2 and Tr1-like cell frequency in non-allergic volunteers, such that the three parameters increased together to maintain a low Th2: Th1 ratio. This relationship was dysregulated in grass-allergic individuals with no correlation between the T cell subsets and a higher Th2: Th1 ratio. We confirmed previous reports of a late-differentiated T cell phenotype in response to seasonal allergens compared to early-differentiated T cell responses to perennial allergens. Conclusions The findings confirm our existing work illustrating an important balance between Th1, Th2 and Tr1-like responses to allergens in health, where Th2 responses are frequently observed, but balanced by Th1 and regulatory responses. We confirm previous tetramer-based reports of phenotypic differences in T cells responding to seasonal and perennial allergens. PMID:24188324

  2. In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-Allergic and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of eBV, a Newly Developed Derivative of Bee Venom, through Modulation of IRF3 Signaling Pathway in a Carrageenan-Induced Edema Model

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hwa-Jin; Lee, Jinho; Shin, Joon-Shik; Kim, Me-riong; Koh, Wonil; Kim, Min-Jeong; Lee, Jae-woong; Kim, Eun Jee; Lee, In-Hee; Kim, Won Kyung; Lee, Yoon Jae; Lee, Sang Kook

    2016-01-01

    Background Bee venom (BV), a type of toxin extracted from honeybees (Apis mellifera), has been empirically and widely used to treat inflammatory diseases throughout Asia. Essential BV (eBV) was developed by removing phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and histamine to lower occurrence of allergic reaction. This study investigated the anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory activities of eBV in vitro and in vivo and its underlying mechanism of action. Methods The anti-inflammatory potential of eBV was assessed in vivo using a carrageenan-induced paw edema model. To further investigate the mechanism by which eBV exerts anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory effects, compound 48/80-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells were studied in vitro. Results Release of β-hexosaminidase and histamine was increased by eBV in a dose-dependent manner, but these levels were lower in eBV compared to original BV at the same concentration. In addition, eBV suppressed compound 48/80-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in RBL-2H3 cells. eBV was also shown to suppress nitric oxide (NO) production by down-regulating mRNA expression and subsequent protein expression of inflammatory mediators in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells. Phosphorylation of activators and signal transducers of transcription 1/interferon regulatory factor 3 (STAT1/IRF3) was attenuated by eBV treatment. eBV significantly inhibited carrageenan-induced acute edema in vivo. Serum levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), TNF-α, and IL-1β were also down-regulated by eBV. Conclusions These results demonstrate that eBV inhibits allergic and inflammatory response by reducing inflammatory mediator production via regulation of the STAT1/IRF3 signaling pathway, suggesting that eBV is a feasible candidate for regulation of allergic-inflammatory response in complementary and alternative medicine. PMID:27930719

  3. Divergent effects of urban particulate air pollution on allergic airway responses in experimental asthma: a comparison of field exposure studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increases in ambient particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm (PM2.5) are associated with asthma morbidity and mortality. The overall objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that PM2.5 derived from two distinct urban U.S. communities would induce variable responses to aggravate airway symptoms during experimental asthma. Methods We used a mobile laboratory to conduct community-based inhalation exposures to laboratory rats with ovalbumin-induced allergic airways disease. In Grand Rapids exposures were conducted within 60 m of a major roadway, whereas the Detroit was located in an industrial area more than 400 m from roadways. Immediately after nasal allergen challenge, Brown Norway rats were exposed by whole body inhalation to either concentrated air particles (CAPs) or filtered air for 8 h (7:00 AM - 3:00 PM). Both ambient and concentrated PM2.5 was assessed for mass, size fractionation, and major component analyses, and trace element content. Sixteen hours after exposures, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung lobes were collected and evaluated for airway inflammatory and mucus responses. Results Similar CAPs mass concentrations were generated in Detroit (542 μg/m3) and Grand Rapids (519 μg/m3). Exposure to CAPs at either site had no effects in lungs of non-allergic rats. In contrast, asthmatic rats had 200% increases in airway mucus and had more BALF neutrophils (250% increase), eosinophils (90%), and total protein (300%) compared to controls. Exposure to Detroit CAPs enhanced all allergic inflammatory endpoints by 30-100%, whereas inhalation of Grand Rapids CAPs suppressed all allergic responses by 50%. Detroit CAPs were characterized by high sulfate, smaller sized particles and were derived from local combustion sources. Conversely Grand Rapids CAPs were derived primarily from motor vehicle sources. Conclusions Despite inhalation exposure to the same mass concentration of urban PM2.5, disparate health

  4. A novel microbe-based treatment that attenuates the inflammatory profile in a mouse model of allergic airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Bazett, Mark; Biala, Agnieszka; Huff, Ryan D.; Bosiljcic, Momir; Gunn, Hal; Kalyan, Shirin; Hirota, Jeremy A.

    2016-01-01

    There is an unmet need for effective new and innovative treatments for asthma. It is becoming increasingly evident that bacterial stimulation can have beneficial effects at attenuating allergic airway disease through immune modulation. Our aim was to test the ability of a novel inactivated microbe-derived therapeutic based on Klebsiella (KB) in a model of allergic airway disease in mice. BALB/c mice were exposed intranasally to house dust mite (HDM) for two weeks. Mice were treated prophylactically via subcutaneous route with either KB or placebo for one week prior to HDM exposure and throughout the two week exposure period. 24 hours after the last exposure, lungs were analysed for inflammatory cell infiltrate, gene expression, cytokine levels, goblet cell metaplasia, and serum was analysed for allergen-specific serum IgE levels. HDM exposed mice developed goblet cell hyperplasia, elevated allergen-specific serum IgE, airway eosinophilia, and a concomitant increase in TH2 cytokines including IL-4, IL-13 and IL-5. Treatment with KB attenuated HDM-mediated airway eosinophilia, total bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell numbers, BAL TH2 cytokine production, and goblet cell metaplasia. Our prophylactic intervention study illustrates the potential of subcutaneous treatment with bacterial derived biologics as a promising approach for allergic airway disease treatment. PMID:27734946

  5. Noninvasive assessment of localized inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Weng, Hong; Tang, Liping

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases are associated with the accumulation of activated inflammatory cells, particularly polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), which release reactive oxygen species (ROS) to eradicate foreign bodies and microorganisms. To assess the location and extent of localized inflammatory responses, L-012, a highly-sensitive chemiluminescence probe, was employed to non-invasively monitor the production of ROS. We find that L-012-associated chemiluminescence imaging can be used to identify and to quantify the extent of inflammatory responses. Furthermore, regardless of differences among animal models, there is a good linear relationship between chemiluminescence intensity and PMN numbers surrounding inflamed tissue. Depletion of PMN substantially diminished L-012-associated chemiluminescence in vivo. Finally, L-012-associated chemiluminescence imaging was found to be a powerful tool for assessing implant-mediated inflammatory responses by measuring chemiluminescent intensities at the implantation sites. These results support the use of L-012 for monitoring the kinetics of inflammatory responses in vivo via the detection and quantification of ROS production. PMID:22080048

  6. Factor XI deficiency enhances the pulmonary allergic response to house dust mite in mice independent of factor XII.

    PubMed

    Stroo, Ingrid; Yang, Jack; de Boer, J Daan; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Castellino, Francis J; Zeerleder, Sacha; van der Poll, Tom

    2017-02-01

    Asthma is associated with activation of coagulation in the airways. The coagulation system can be initiated via the extrinsic tissue factor-dependent pathway or via the intrinsic pathway, in which the central player factor XI (FXI) can be either activated via active factor XII (FXIIa) or via thrombin. We aimed to determine the role of the intrinsic coagulation system and its possible route of activation in allergic lung inflammation induced by the clinically relevant human allergen house dust mite (HDM). Wild-type (WT), FXI knockout (KO), and FXII KO mice were subjected to repeated exposure to HDM via the airways, and inflammatory responses were compared. FXI KO mice showed increased influx of eosinophils into lung tissue, accompanied by elevated local levels of the main eosinophil chemoattractant eotaxin. Although gross lung pathology and airway mucus production did not differ between groups, FXI KO mice displayed an impaired endothelial/epithelial barrier function, as reflected by elevated levels of total protein and IgM in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. FXI KO mice had a stronger systemic IgE response with an almost completely absent HDM-specific IgG1 response. The phenotype of FXII KO mice was, except for a higher HDM-specific IgG1 response, similar to that of WT mice. In conclusion, FXI attenuates part of the allergic response to repeated administration of HDM in the airways by a mechanism that is independent of activation via FXII.

  7. Soy Biodiesel Emissions Have Reduced Inflammatory Effects Compared to Diesel Emissions in Healthy and Allergic Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity of exhaust from combustion of petroleum diesel (BO), soy-based biodiesel (B100), or a 20% biodiesel/80% petrodiesel mix (B20) was compared in healthy and house dust mite (HDM)-allergic mice. Fuel emissions were diluted to target fine particulate matter (PM2.5) conrentrat...

  8. Selective, tight-binding inhibitors of integrin alpha4beta1 that inhibit allergic airway responses.

    PubMed

    Lin, K c; Ateeq, H S; Hsiung, S H; Chong, L T; Zimmerman, C N; Castro, A; Lee, W C; Hammond, C E; Kalkunte, S; Chen, L L; Pepinsky, R B; Leone, D R; Sprague, A G; Abraham, W M; Gill, A; Lobb, R R; Adams, S P

    1999-03-11

    Integrin alpha4beta1 mediates leukocyte recruitment, activation, mediator release, and apoptosis inhibition, and it plays a central role in inflammatory pathophysiology. High-affinity, selective inhibitors of alpha4beta1, based on the Leu-Asp-Val (LDV) sequence from the alternatively spliced connecting segment-1 (CS-1) peptide of cellular fibronectin, are described that employ a novel N-terminal peptide "cap" strategy. One inhibitor, BIO-1211, was approximately 10(6)-fold more potent than the starting peptide and exhibited tight-binding properties (koff = 1.4 x 10(-4) s-1, KD = 70 pM), a remarkable finding for a noncovalent, small-molecule inhibitor of a protein receptor. BIO-1211 was also 200-fold selective for the activated form of alpha4beta1, and it stimulated expression of ligand-induced epitopes on the integrin beta1 subunit, a property consistent with occupancy of the receptor's ligand-binding site. Pretreatment of allergic sheep with a 3-mg nebulized dose of BIO-1211 inhibited early and late airway responses following antigen challenge and prevented development of nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness to carbachol. These results show that highly selective and potent small-molecule antagonists can be identified to integrins with primary specificity for peptide domains other than Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD); they confirm the generality of integrins as small molecule targets; and they validate alpha4beta1 as a therapeutic target for asthma.

  9. Routes of allergic sensitization and myeloid cell IKKβ differentially regulate antibody responses and allergic airway inflammation in male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Bonnegarde-Bernard, Astrid; Jee, Junbae; Fial, Michael J; Steiner, Haley; DiBartola, Stephanie; Davis, Ian C; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Tomé, Daniel; Boyaka, Prosper N

    2014-01-01

    Gender influences the incidence and/or the severity of several diseases and evidence suggests a higher rate of allergy and asthma among women. Most experimental models of allergy use mice sensitized via the parenteral route despite the fact that the mucosal tissues of the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts are major sites of allergic sensitization and/or allergic responses. We analyzed allergen-specific Ab responses in mice sensitized either by gavage or intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin together with cholera toxin as adjuvant, as well as allergic inflammation and lung functions following subsequent nasal challenge with the allergen. Female mice sensitized intraperitoneally exhibited higher levels of serum IgE than their male counterparts. After nasal allergen challenge, these female mice expressed higher Th2 responses and associated inflammation in the lung than males. On the other hand, male and female mice sensitized orally developed the same levels of allergen-specific Ab responses and similar levels of lung inflammation after allergen challenge. Interestingly, the difference in allergen-specific Ab responses between male and female mice sensitized by the intraperitoneal route was abolished in IKKβΔMye mice, which lack IKKβ in myeloid cells. In summary, the oral or systemic route of allergic sensitization and IKKβ signaling in myeloid cells regulate how the gender influences allergen-specific responses and lung allergic inflammation.

  10. Endothelial Response to Glucocorticoids in Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zielińska, Karolina A.; Van Moortel, Laura; Opdenakker, Ghislain; De Bosscher, Karolien; Van den Steen, Philippe E.

    2016-01-01

    The endothelium plays a crucial role in inflammation. A balanced control of inflammation requires the action of glucocorticoids (GCs), steroidal hormones with potent cell-specific anti-inflammatory properties. Besides the classic anti-inflammatory effects of GCs on leukocytes, recent studies confirm that endothelial cells also represent an important target for GCs. GCs regulate different aspects of endothelial physiology including expression of adhesion molecules, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and maintenance of endothelial barrier integrity. However, the regulation of endothelial GC sensitivity remains incompletely understood. In this review, we specifically examine the endothelial response to GCs in various inflammatory diseases ranging from multiple sclerosis, stroke, sepsis, and vasculitis to atherosclerosis. Shedding more light on the cross talk between GCs and endothelium will help to improve existing therapeutic strategies and develop new therapies better tailored to the needs of patients. PMID:28018358

  11. Roles of histamine and its receptors in allergic and inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hua; He, Shao-Heng

    2005-01-01

    Mast cell has a long history of being recognized as an important mediator-secreting cell in allergic diseases, and has been discovered to be involved in IBD in last two decades. Histamine is a major mediator in allergic diseases, and has multiple effects that are mediated by specific surface receptors on target cells. Four types of histamine receptors have now been recognized pharmacologically and the first three are located in the gut. The ability of histamine receptor antagonists to inhibit mast cell degranulation suggests that they might be developed as a group of mast cell stabilizers. Recently, a series of experiments with dispersed colon mast cells suggested that there should be at least two pathways in man for mast cells to amplify their own activation-degranulation signals in an autocrine or paracrine manner. In a word, histamine is an important mediator in allergic diseases and IBD, its antagonists may be developed as a group of mast cell stabilizers to treat these diseases. PMID:15902718

  12. Cyclic nitroxide radicals attenuate inflammation and Hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Assayag, Miri; Goldstein, Sara; Samuni, Amram; Berkman, Neville

    2015-10-01

    The effects of stable cyclic nitroxide radicals have been extensively investigated both in vivo and in vitro demonstrating anti-inflammatory, radioprotective, anti-mutagenic, age-retardant, hypotensive, anti-cancer and anti-teratogenic activities. Yet, these stable radicals have not been evaluated in asthma and other airway inflammatory disorders. The present study investigated the effect of 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-N-oxyl (TPL) and 3-carbamoyl-proxyl (3-CP) in a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma. Both 3-CP and TPL were non-toxic when administered either orally (1% w/w nitroxide-containing chow) or via intraperitoneal (IP) injection (∼300 mg/kg). Feeding the mice orally demonstrated that 3-CP was more effective than TPL in reducing inflammatory cell recruitment into the airway and in suppressing airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) in OVA-challenged mice. To characterize the optimal time-window of intervention and mode of drug administration, 3-CP was given orally during allergen sensitization, during allergen challenge or during both sensitization and challenge stages, and via IP injection or intranasal instillation for 3 days during the challenge period. 3-CP given via all modes of delivery markedly inhibited OVA-induced airway inflammation, expression of cytokines, AHR and protein nitration of the lung tissue. Oral administration during the entire experiment was the most efficient delivery of 3-CP and was more effective than dexamethasone a potent corticosteroid used for asthma treatment. Under a similar administration regimen (IP injection before the OVA challenge), the effect of 3-CP was similar to that of dexamethasone and even greater on AHR and protein nitration. The protective effect of the nitroxides, which preferentially react with free radicals, in suppressing the increase of main asthmatic inflammatory markers substantiate the key role played by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the molecular mechanism of

  13. Innate and lymphocytic response of birch-allergic patients before and after sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Guida, Giuseppe; Boita, Monica; Scirelli, Tiziana; Bommarito, Luisa; Heffler, Enrico; Badiu, Iuliana; Bellone, Graziella; Mietta, Sabrina; Mistrello, Gianni; Rolla, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Functional imbalance in Th1/Th2 cell response toward allergens is a recognized hallmark of allergic patients and a major role of dendritic cells (DCs) in redirecting T-cell phenotypes after specific immunotherapy has been suggested. This study investigates the proliferative and cytokine responses of T cells cocultured with monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) after allergen stimulation in birch-allergic patients compared with controls and investigates whether sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) could change the DC-driven immune response. T cells were stimulated with the major birch pollen allergen (nBet v1) and MoDCs from eight birch-allergic patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis and eight nonallergic controls. Proliferation and cytokine production were measured before and after one course of SLIT with birch allergoid. Significantly lower levels of proinflammatory (IL-1beta, p = 0.027; IL-6, p = 0.030; TNF-alpha, p = 0.019) and Th1 (interferon gamma, p = 0.032; IL-12, p = 0.05) cytokines were measured in supernatants of T cells and MoDCs cultures from allergic patients compared with nonallergic controls. After SLIT, significant increase in IL-12 (p = 0.039), IL-1beta (p = 0.040), IL-6 (p = 0.041), TNF-α (p = 0.048), and IL-10 (p = 0.048) and significant decrease in IL-13 (p = 0.001) were observed. MoDCs/T-cell cocultures, pulsed with the specific allergen, produced lower quantities of proinflammatory and Th1 cytokines in allergic patients compared with healthy subjects, suggesting an allergen-specific impairment of natural immunity and Th1 immune response. A single course of SLIT was able to enhance allergen-specific innate immunity and to modify lymphocyte response, promoting Th1 and T-cell regulatory activity.

  14. Studies on bronchial hyperreactivity, allergic responsiveness, and asthma in rural and urban children of the highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Turner, K J; Dowse, G K; Stewart, G A; Alpers, M P

    1986-04-01

    The prevalence of asthma and allergic responsiveness in rural and urban children of the highlands of Papua New Guinea was studied. Bronchial provocation studies with histamine demonstrated significant bronchial hyperreactivity in 0.5% (1 in 195) rural and 1.7% (1 in 59) urban children, rates which were significantly lower than those observed in corresponding adult populations (7%). Urban children demonstrated a higher incidence of skin test reactivity toward Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Aspergillus fumigatus, and dog dander than did the rural children. However, there were no significant differences between these populations with regard to total serum IgE levels, the degree of parasitism as judged by stool examination, or allergic responses to Ascaris suum, plantain, and coffee bean husk. A more detailed study demonstrated age- and sex-related differences in total IgE and mite-specific RAST scores in the rural but not the urban population. These data suggest an active suppression of the capacity of children to mount an IgE response to environmental allergens such as the mite manifesting itself as low asthma prevalence. The data also indicate that, although the underlying defect of bronchial hyperreactivity in asthma may be genetically inherited, it is not revealed until the lung has received an allergen-induced inflammatory insult.

  15. Allergic responses and aryl hydrocarbon receptor novel pathway of mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Sibilano, Riccardo; Pucillo, Carlo E; Gri, Giorgia

    2015-01-01

    The activation of the transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is modulated by a wide variety of xenobiotics and ligands deriving from products of metabolism. The study of the contribution of AhR to allergic diseases has gained much interest in recent years. Here we discuss the role that environmental factors and metabolic products, particularly acting on AhR-expressing mast cells (MCs), could have in the development of local allergic/atopic response. Thus, this review will cover: a brief overview of the AhR mechanism of action in the immune system; a description of different AhR ligands and their effects to IgE-mediated MC activation in the allergic response, with particular attention to the role of IL-17; a discussion about the potential involvement of AhR in immune tolerance; and a conclusion on human diseases in which direct AhR activation of MC might have a major impact.

  16. Inhibition of release of inflammatory mediators in primary and cultured cells by a Chinese herbal medicine formula for allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Lenon, George B; Xue, Charlie CL; Story, David F; Thien, Frank CK; McPhee, Sarah; Li, Chun G

    2007-01-01

    Background We demonstrated that a Chinese herbal formula, which we refer to as RCM-101, developed from a traditional Chinese medicine formula, reduced nasal and non-nasal symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR). The present study in primary and cultured cells was undertaken to investigate the effects of RCM-101 on the production/release of inflammatory mediators known to be involved in SAR. Methods Compound 48/80-induced histamine release was studied in rat peritoneal mast cells. Production of leukotriene B4 induced by the calcium ionophore A23187 was studied in porcine neutrophils using an HPLC assay and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated prostaglandin E2 production was studied in murine macrophage (Raw 264.7) cells by immune-enzyme assay. Expression of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was determined in Raw 264.7 cells, using western blotting techniques. Results RCM-101 (1–100 μg/mL) produced concentration-dependent inhibition of compound 48/80-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated prostaglandin E2 release from Raw 264.7 cells. Over the range 1 – 10 μg/mL, it inhibited A23187-induced leukotriene B4 production in porcine neutrophils. In addition, RCM-101 (100 μg/mL) inhibited the expression of COX-2 protein but did not affect that of COX-1. Conclusion The findings indicate that RCM-101 inhibits the release and/or synthesis of histamine, leukotriene B4 and prostaglandin E2 in cultured cells. These interactions of RCM-101 with multiple inflammatory mediators are likely to be related to its ability to reduce symptoms of allergic rhinitis. PMID:17302969

  17. Immune responses to different patterns of exposure to ovalbumin in a mouse model of allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Mei-Jun; Fu, Qing-Ling; Jiang, Hong-Yan; Chen, Feng-Hong; Chen, Dong; Chen, De-Hua; Lin, Zhi-Bin; Xu, Rui

    2016-11-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) has been a significant healthcare burden on individuals and society. However, the detailed effect of different patterns of allergen exposure on the development of AR remains controversial. A mouse model of AR was established to address the complex relationships between allergen exposure and the development of AR. Allergic symptom, OVA-specific IgE in serum and nasal lavage fluid, allergic inflammation in nasal tissues were evaluated after intranasal sensitization and challenge of ovalbumin (OVA) in mice treated with two different doses of allergen for different sensitized durations. Exposure to different doses and sensitized durations of OVA were capable of inducing allergic nasal response. Repetitive OVA exposure in the sensitization phase induced the recruitment of eosinophils and goblet cell hyperplasia. The level of OVA-specific IgE in serum depended on OVA exposure and was mediated in a duration-related manner. In addition, mice treated with low-dose OVA for prolonged duration manifested the major features of human local allergic rhinitis. There were dose- and duration-related effects of allergen exposure on the development of AR. LAR was associated with repetitive exposure to low-dose allergen. Thus, allergen avoidance should be an important aim of AR management.

  18. Anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory properties of a potent histamine H1 receptor antagonist, desloratadine citrate disodium injection, and its anti-inflammatory mechanism on EA.hy926 endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jie, Qiong; Kodithuwakku, Nandani Darshika; Yuan, Xin; He, Guangwei; Chen, Meiling; Xu, Shuhong; Wu, Yulin

    2015-05-05

    The present study, demonstrates that, desloratadine citrate disodium injection (DLC) possesses antihistaminic, anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory properties and elucidates its molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory properties. In vitro antihistamine activity of DLC was determined in guinea pig isolated tissues. In vivo antihistamine effects were evaluated after following intravenous administration of DLC in mice with histamine- induced paw edema and in rats with increased capillary permeability. Anti-allergic effects were assessed through passive cutaneous anaphylactic (PCA) reactions in sensitized rodents and ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis in rats. Anti-inflammatory properties and molecular mechanisms of DLC were determined on histamine- and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced EA.hy926 endothelial cells. DLC exhibited significant and reversible inhibition of histamine-induced contractions of isolated guinea pig ileum with pA2 value of 8.88. Histamine-induced paw edema and increased capillary permeability were notably inhibited by DLC intravenous administration. In the model of PCA reactions, DLC showed significant activity in a dose-dependent nd potently inhibited both the early-phase and late-phase allergic reaction of ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis in rats. DLC alleviated the rhinitis symptoms and inhibited inflammatory cell infiltration, IL-4 and protein leakage in nasal lavage fluid (NLF). In EA.hy926 cells, DLC significantly inhibited the histamine- and LPS- induced IL-6 and IL-8 production and P-selectin and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression. Moreover, DLC reduced translocation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) to the nucleus in activated EA.hy926 cells. These results provide evidence that DLC possesses potent antihistaminic, anti-allergic and, anti-inflammatory properties via suppressing IL-6, IL-8, P-selectin and ICAM-1 expression.

  19. Placental immune response to apple allergen in allergic mothers.

    PubMed

    Abelius, Martina Sandberg; Enke, Uta; Varosi, Frauke; Hoyer, Heike; Schleussner, Ekkehard; Jenmalm, Maria C; Markert, Udo R

    2014-12-01

    The immunological milieu in the placenta may be crucial for priming the developing foetal immune system. Early imbalances may promote the establishment of immune-mediated diseases in later life, including allergies. The initial exposure to allergens seems to occur in utero, but little is known about allergen-induced placental cytokine and chemokine release. The release of several cytokines and chemokines from placenta tissue after exposure to mast cell degranulator compound 48/80 or apple allergen in placentas from allergic and healthy mothers was to be analysed. Four placentas from women with apple allergy and three controls were applied in a placental perfusion model with two separate cotyledons simultaneously perfused with and without apple allergen (Mal d 1). Two control placentas were perfused with compound 48/80. In outflow, histamine was quantified spectrophotofluorometrically, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF and IFN-γ by a cytometric multiplex bead array and IL-13 and CXCL10, CXCL11, CCL17 and CCL22 with an in-house multiplex Luminex assay. Compound 48/80 induced a rapid release of histamine, CXCL10, CXCL11, CCL17 and CCL22, but not of the other factors. Apple allergen induced a time-dependent release of IL-6 and TNF, but not of histamine, in placentas of women with apple allergy compared with the unstimulated cotyledon. CCL17 levels were slightly increased after allergen stimulation in control placentas. Allergens can induce placental cytokines and chemokines distinctly in allergic and healthy mothers. These mediators may affect the prenatal development of the immune system and modify the risk of diseases related to immune disorders in childhood such as allergies.

  20. In Vivo Anti-Inflammatory Effect of H1 Antihistamines in Allergic Rhinitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bocşan, Corina I.; Bujor, Adriana I.; Miron, Nicolae; Vesa, Ştefan C.; Deleanu, Diana; Buzoianu, Anca D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Allergic rhinitis is characterized by a chronic inflammation of nasal mucosa and represents a risk factor for asthma occurrence. H1 antihistamines reduce the symptoms of rhinitis, but some compounds may have anti-inflammatory properties. Aims: We evaluated the plasma level of some cytokines in patients with persistent allergic rhinitis (PAR) and their evolution after a 4-week treatment with H1 anti-histamines, as well as the risk of asthma after 1.5 years. Study Design: Randomized clinical trial. Methods: Eighty-five patients with PAR and 30 healthy volunteers were included in the study. The patients with PAR were randomly divided into 2 groups: 41 patients treated with 5 mg/day desloratadine and 44 patients under 5 mg/day levocetirizine for 4 weeks. The clinical and biological evaluations were performed before and after treatment and included rhinitis symptoms and total symptoms score, type of sensitization, and plasmatic levels of total IgE, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. Results: IL-8 and TNF-α were significantly increased in patients with PAR compared to healthy volunteers (5.85 vs 3.12, p<0.001 and 2.32 vs 1.06, p<0.001, respectively). Both H1 antihistamines reduce all symptoms of allergic rhinitis, including nasal congestion and the plasmatic level of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α, after 4 weeks of treatment. The reduction of cytokine levels was not influenced by patients’ age, sex, duration or severity of rhinitis, or type of sensitization. Levocetirizine has a superior effect compared to desloratadine in reducing the rhinitis symptoms and cytokines’ level. Twenty eight (32.9%) of the patients presented asthma symptoms after 1.5 years. The occurrence of asthma was influenced by house dust sensitization (OR-14.6; CI 95% 1.8–116.3; p=0.01), but baseline values of cytokines were not predictive factors for its appearance. Conclusion: Levocetirizine and desloratadine as a prolonged therapy reduce plasmatic levels of some pro-inflammatory

  1. Natural Products: Insights into Leishmaniasis Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Igor A.; Mazotto, Ana Maria; Cardoso, Verônica; Alves, Renan L.; Amaral, Ana Claudia F.; Silva, Jefferson Rocha de Andrade; Pinheiro, Anderson S.; Vermelho, Alane B.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease that affects several populations worldwide, against which there are no vaccines available and the chemotherapy is highly toxic. Depending on the species causing the infection, the disease is characterized by commitment of tissues, including the skin, mucous membranes, and internal organs. Despite the relevance of host inflammatory mediators on parasite burden control, Leishmania and host immune cells interaction may generate an exacerbated proinflammatory response that plays an important role in the development of leishmaniasis clinical manifestations. Plant-derived natural products have been recognized as bioactive agents with several properties, including anti-protozoal and anti-inflammatory activities. The present review focuses on the antileishmanial activity of plant-derived natural products that are able to modulate the inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo. The capability of crude extracts and some isolated substances in promoting an anti-inflammatory response during Leishmania infection may be used as part of an effective strategy to fight the disease. PMID:26538837

  2. EFFECTS OF PARTICLES FROM TWO GERMAN CITIES ON ALLERGIC RESPONSES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF PARTICLES FROM TWO GERMAN CITIES ON ALLERGIC RESPONSES IN MICE. S. H. Gavett, L. R. Bishop, N. Haykal-Coates, J. Heinrich*, and M. I. Gilmour. Experimental Toxicology Division, ORD/NHEERL, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, *GSF, Neuherberg, Germany.
    Chi...

  3. EFFECT OF SHORT TERM DIESEL EXHAUST EXPOSURE ON NASAL RESPONSES TO INFLUENZA IN ALLERGIC RHINITICS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Recently published data suggest that diesel exhaust (DE) has special impact on allergic inflammation, suppressing Th1 and augmenting Th2 responses to allergen via oxidant stress effects on airway cells. Exposures to particulate air pollutants including DE are also a...

  4. SUPPRESSION OF ALLERGIC IMMUNE RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE (HDM) IN RATS EXPOSED TO 2,3,7,8-TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Exposure to various xenobiotics, including oxidant gases, diesel exhaust and certain pesticides, has been reported to exacerbate pulmonary allergic hypersensitivity responses. Increased lymphocyte proliferative responses to parasite antigens or increased antibody r...

  5. NEUROTROPHINS OPERATE AT DIFFERENT LEVELS OF THE RESPIRATORY TRACT IN RESPONSES OF ALLERGIC MICE TO DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES (DEP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotrophins including NGF, NT-3, and BDNF are linked to allergic responses. Treatment with anti-p75 (pan-neurotrophin receptor) prevents the increase in airflow obstruction caused by exposure to DEP in ovalbumin (OVA)-allergic mice (Toxicol Sci 84(S1):91, 2005). Our present goa...

  6. Anti-Interleukin-1 Beta/Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha IgY Antibodies Reduce Pathological Allergic Responses in Guinea Pigs with Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Wei-Xu, Hu; Wen-Yun, Zhou; Xi-Ling, Zhu; Zhu, Wen; Li-Hua, Wu; Xiao-Mu, Wu; Hui-Ping, Wei; Wen-Ding, Wang; Dan, He; Qin, Xiang; Guo-Zhu, Hu

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether the combined blockade of IL-1β and TNF-α can alleviate the pathological allergic inflammatory reaction in the nasal mucosa and lung tissues in allergic rhinitis (AR) guinea pigs. Healthy guinea pigs treated with saline were used as the healthy controls. The AR guinea pigs were randomly divided into (1) the AR model group treated with intranasal saline; (2) the 0.1% nonspecific IgY treatment group; (3) the 0.1% anti-TNF-α IgY treatment group; (4) the 0.1% anti-IL-1β IgY treatment group; (5) the 0.1% combined anti-IL-1β and TNF-α IgY treatment group; and (6) the fluticasone propionate treatment group. The inflammatory cells were evaluated using Wright's staining. Histopathology was examined using hematoxylin-eosin staining. The results showed that the number of eosinophils was significantly decreased in the peripheral blood, nasal lavage fluid, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (P < 0.05), and eosinophil, neutrophil, and lymphocyte infiltration and edema were significantly reduced or absent in the nasal mucosa and lung tissues (P < 0.05) in the combined 0.1% anti-IL-1β- and TNF-α IgY-treated guinea pigs. The data suggest that topical blockade of IL-1β and TNF-α could reduce pathological allergic inflammation in the nasal mucosa and lung tissues in AR guinea pigs.

  7. CTAB-coated gold nanorods elicit allergic response through degranulation and cell death in human basophils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Ka Lun; Chen, Huanjun; Chen, Qiulan; Wang, Jianfang; Ho, Ho Pui; Wong, Chun Kwok; Kong, Siu Kai

    2012-07-01

    The effect of CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide)- or PEG (polyethylene glycol)-coated gold-nanorods (Au-NRs) on the non-IgE mediated allergic response was studied. We found that the CTAB-Au-NRs released more allergic mediators such as histamine and β-hexosaminidase from human basophil KU812, a common model for studying allergy, after 20 min incubation. Also, the CTAB-Au-NRs induced more apoptosis than the PEG-Au-NRs in KU812 24 h after treatment. These short- and long-term effects were not solely due to the CTAB residues in the supernatant desorbed from the Au-NRs.The effect of CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide)- or PEG (polyethylene glycol)-coated gold-nanorods (Au-NRs) on the non-IgE mediated allergic response was studied. We found that the CTAB-Au-NRs released more allergic mediators such as histamine and β-hexosaminidase from human basophil KU812, a common model for studying allergy, after 20 min incubation. Also, the CTAB-Au-NRs induced more apoptosis than the PEG-Au-NRs in KU812 24 h after treatment. These short- and long-term effects were not solely due to the CTAB residues in the supernatant desorbed from the Au-NRs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30435j

  8. Inflammatory monocytes hinder antiviral B cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Sammicheli, Stefano; Kuka, Mirela; Di Lucia, Pietro; de Oya, Nereida Jimenez; De Giovanni, Marco; Fioravanti, Jessica; Cristofani, Claudia; Maganuco, Carmela G.; Fallet, Benedict; Ganzer, Lucia; Sironi, Laura; Mainetti, Marta; Ostuni, Renato; Larimore, Kevin; Greenberg, Philip D.; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Guidotti, Luca G.; Iannacone, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are critical for protection against viral infections. However, several viruses, such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), avoid the induction of early protective antibody responses by poorly understood mechanisms. Here we analyzed the spatiotemporal dynamics of B cell activation to show that, upon subcutaneous infection, LCMV-specific B cells readily relocate to the interfollicular and T cell areas of the draining lymph node where they extensively interact with CD11b+Ly6Chi inflammatory monocytes. These myeloid cells were recruited to lymph nodes draining LCMV infection sites in a type I interferon-, CCR2-dependent fashion and they suppressed antiviral B cell responses by virtue of their ability to produce nitric oxide. Depletion of inflammatory monocytes, inhibition of their lymph node recruitment or impairment of their nitric oxide-producing ability enhanced LCMV-specific B cell survival and led to robust neutralizing antibody production. In conclusion, our results identify inflammatory monocytes as critical gatekeepers that prevent antiviral B cell responses and suggest that certain viruses take advantage of these cells to prolong their persistence within the host. PMID:27868108

  9. Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Margaret M.; Day, James H.

    1982-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is the result of an immediate hypersensitivity immune response of the nasal mucosa to one or more allergens. Clinical features may be indistinguishable from non-allergic rhinitis. Accurate diagnosis demands specialized laboratory investigations, meticulous history and careful physical examination. Management includes control of allergen and irritant exposures, pharmacotherapy and immunotherapy. Recent development of intranasal corticosteroid aerosols has significantly reduced morbidity. Modified allergens for immunotherapy show promise but require further study. PMID:21286562

  10. Allergic Non-Asthmatic Adults Have Regional Pulmonary Responses to Segmental Allergen Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Vanessa J.; Winkler, Tilo; Venegas, Jose G.; Kone, Mamary; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Afshar, Roshi; Cho, Josalyn L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Harris, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background Allergic non-asthmatic (ANA) adults experience upper airway symptoms of allergic disease such as rhinorrhea, congestion and sneezing without symptoms of asthma. The aim of this study was to utilize PET-CT functional imaging to determine whether allergen challenge elicits a pulmonary response in ANA subjects or whether their allergic disease is truly isolated to the upper airways. Methods In 6 ANA subjects, bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were performed at baseline and 24h after instillation of an allergen and a diluent in separate lung lobes. After instillation (10h), functional imaging was performed to quantify and compare regional perfusion, ventilation, fractional gas content (Fgas), and glucose uptake rate (Ki) between the baseline, diluent and allergen lobes. BAL cell counts were also compared. Results In ANA subjects, compared to the baseline and diluent lobes, perfusion and ventilation were significantly lower in the allergen lobe (median [inter-quartile range], baseline vs. diluent vs. allergen: Mean-normalized perfusion; 0.87 [0.85–0.97] vs. 0.90 [0.86–0.98] vs. 0.59 [0.55–0.67]; p<0.05. Mean-normalized ventilation 0.89 [0.88–0.98] vs. 0.95 [0.89–1.02] vs. 0.63 [0.52–0.67], p<0.05). In contrast, no significant differences were found in Fgas between baseline, diluent and allergen lobes or in Ki. Total cell counts, eosinophil and neutrophil cell counts (cells/ml BAL) were significantly greater in the allergen lobe compared to the baseline lobe (all P<0.05). Conclusions Despite having no clinical symptoms of a lower airway allergic response (cough and wheeze) allergic non-asthmatic subjects have a pulmonary response to allergen exposure which manifests as reduced ventilation and perfusion. PMID:26640951

  11. Therapeutic strategies for allergic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter J.

    1999-11-01

    Many drugs are now in development for the treatment of atopic diseases, including asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. These treatments are based on improvements in existing therapies or on a better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in atopic diseases. Although most attention has been focused on asthma, treatments that inhibit the atopic disease process would have application to all atopic diseases, as they often coincide. Most of the many new therapies in development are aimed at inhibiting components of the allergic inflammatory response, but in the future there are real possibilities for the development of preventative and even curative treatments.

  12. Chitin and Its Effects on Inflammatory and Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Elieh Ali Komi, Daniel; Sharma, Lokesh; Dela Cruz, Charles S

    2017-03-01

    Chitin, a potential allergy-promoting pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP), is a linear polymer composed of N-acetylglucosamine residues which are linked by β-(1,4)-glycosidic bonds. Mammalians are potential hosts for chitin-containing protozoa, fungi, arthropods, and nematodes; however, mammalians themselves do not synthetize chitin and thus it is considered as a potential target for recognition by mammalian immune system. Chitin is sensed primarily in the lungs or gut where it activates a variety of innate (eosinophils, macrophages) and adaptive immune cells (IL-4/IL-13 expressing T helper type-2 lymphocytes). Chitin induces cytokine production, leukocyte recruitment, and alternative macrophage activation. Intranasal or intraperitoneal administration of chitin (varying in size, degree of acetylation and purity) to mice has been applied as a routine approach to investigate chitin's priming effects on innate and adaptive immunity. Structural chitin present in microorganisms is actively degraded by host true chitinases, including acidic mammalian chitinases and chitotriosidase into smaller fragments that can be sensed by mammalian receptors such as FIBCD1, NKR-P1, and RegIIIc. Immune recognition of chitin also involves pattern recognition receptors, mainly via TLR-2 and Dectin-1, to activate immune cells to induce cytokine production and creation of an immune network that results in inflammatory and allergic responses. In this review, we will focus on various immunological aspects of the interaction between chitin and host immune system such as sensing, interactions with immune cells, chitinases as chitin degrading enzymes, and immunologic applications of chitin.

  13. Analyzing inflammatory response as excitable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yde, Pernille; Høgh Jensen, Mogens; Trusina, Ala

    2011-11-01

    The regulatory system of the transcription factor NF-κB plays a great role in many cell functions, including inflammatory response. Interestingly, the NF-κB system is known to up-regulate production of its own triggering signal—namely, inflammatory cytokines such as TNF, IL-1, and IL-6. In this paper we investigate a previously presented model of the NF-κB, which includes both spatial effects and the positive feedback from cytokines. The model exhibits the properties of an excitable medium and has the ability to propagate waves of high cytokine concentration. These waves represent an optimal way of sending an inflammatory signal through the tissue as they create a chemotactic signal able to recruit neutrophils to the site of infection. The simple model displays three qualitatively different states; low stimuli leads to no or very little response. Intermediate stimuli leads to reoccurring waves of high cytokine concentration. Finally, high stimuli leads to a sustained high cytokine concentration, a scenario which is toxic for the tissue cells and corresponds to chronic inflammation. Due to the few variables of the simple model, we are able to perform a phase-space analysis leading to a detailed understanding of the functional form of the model and its limitations. The spatial effects of the model contribute to the robustness of the cytokine wave formation and propagation.

  14. Differential Activation of Airway Eosinophils Induces IL-13 Mediated Allergic Th2 Pulmonary Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, EA; Doyle, AD; Colbert, DC; Zellner, KR; Protheroe, CA; LeSuer, WE; Lee, NA.; Lee, JJ

    2015-01-01

    Background Eosinophils are hallmark cells of allergic Th2 respiratory inflammation. However, the relative importance of eosinophil activation and the induction of effector functions such as the expression of IL-13 to allergic Th2 pulmonary disease remain to be defined. Methods Wild type or cytokine deficient (IL-13−/− or IL-4−/−) eosinophils treated with cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-4, IL-33) were adoptively transferred into eosinophil-deficient recipient mice subjected to allergen provocation using established models of respiratory inflammation. Allergen-induced pulmonary changes were assessed. Results In contrast to the transfer of untreated blood eosinophils to the lungs of recipient eosinophildeficient mice, which induced no immune/inflammatory changes either in the lung or lung draining lymph nodes (LDLNs), pretreatment of blood eosinophils with GM-CSF prior to transfer elicited trafficking of these eosinophils to LDLNs. In turn, these LDLN eosinophils elicited the accumulation of dendritic cells and CD4+ T cells to these same LDLNs without inducing pulmonary inflammation. However, exposure of eosinophils to GM-CSF, IL-4 and IL-33 prior to transfer induced not only immune events in the LDLN, but also allergen-mediated increases in airway Th2 cytokine/chemokine levels, the subsequent accumulation of CD4+ T cells as well as alternatively activated (M2) macrophages, and the induction of pulmonary histopathologies. Significantly, this allergic respiratory inflammation was dependent on eosinophil-derived IL-13 whereas IL-4 expression by eosinophils had no significant role. Conclusion The data demonstrate the differential activation of eosinophils as a function of cytokine exposure and suggest that eosinophil-specific IL-13 expression by activated cells is a necessary component of the subsequent allergic Th2 pulmonary pathologies. PMID:26009788

  15. Collective cell migration during inflammatory response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Wound scratch healing assays of endothelial cell monolayers is a simple model to study collective cell migration as a function of biological signals. A signal of particular interest is the immune response, which after initial wounding in vivo causes the release of various inflammatory factors such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α). TNF-α is an innate inflammatory cytokine that can induce cell growth, cell necrosis, and change cell morphology. We studied the effects of TNF-α on collective cell migration using the wound healing assays and measured several migration metrics, such as rate of scratch closure, velocities of leading edge and bulk cells, closure index, and velocity correlation functions between migrating cells. We observed that TNF-α alters all migratory metrics as a function of the size of the scratch and TNF-α content. The changes observed in migration correlate with actin reorganization upon TNF-α exposure.

  16. Overview on the pathomechanisms of allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Pawankar, Ruby; Mori, Sachiko; Ozu, Chika; Kimura, Satoko

    2011-10-01

    Allergic rhinitis a chronic inflammatory disease of the upper airways that has a major impact on the quality of life of patients and is a socio-economic burden. Understanding the underlying immune mechanisms is central to developing better and more targeted therapies. The inflammatory response in the nasal mucosa includes an immediate IgE-mediated mast cell response as well as a latephase response characterized by recruitment of eosinophils, basophils, and T cells expressing Th2 cytokines including interleukin (IL)-4, a switch factor for IgE synthesis, and IL-5, an eosinophil growth factor and on-going allergic inflammation. Recent advances have suggested new pathways like local synthesis of IgE, the IgE-IgE receptor mast cell cascade in on-going allergic inflammation and the epithelial expression of cytokines that regulate Th2 cytokine responses (i.e., thymic stromal lymphopoietin, IL-25, and IL-33). In this review, we briefly review the conventional pathways in the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis and then elaborate on the recent advances in the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis. An improved understanding of the immune mechanisms of allergic rhinitis can provide a better insight on novel therapeutic targets.

  17. Phenotypic comparison of allergic airway responses to house dust mite in three rat strains.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pramila; Daniels, Mary; Winsett, Darrell W; Richards, Judy; Doerfler, Donald; Hatch, Gary; Adler, Kenneth B; Gilmour, M Ian

    2003-04-01

    Brown Norway (BN) rats develop a robust response to antigens in the lung, characterized by a large increase in allergen-specific immune function and pulmonary eosinophilia. The objective of this study was to investigate alternative models by determining whether other rat strains could be sensitized to house dust mite (HDM) antigen and whether the allergic disease process could be worsened with repeated allergen exposure. In general, BN rats sensitized by either subcutaneous or intratracheal routes exhibited increased pulmonary allergy compared with Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Lewis (L) rats. Multiple intratracheal allergen exposures incrementally increased HDM-specific immune function in BN rats but progressively decreased eosinophil recruitment and markers of lung injury. SD rats had more moderate responses, whereas L rats were relatively unresponsive. Because BN rats developed stronger clinical hallmarks of allergic asthma under various immunization regimes compared with SD and L rats, we conclude that the BN is the most appropriate strain for studying allergic asthma-like responses in rats. Phenotypic differences in response to HDM were associated with differences in the Th1/Th2 cytokine balance and antioxidant capacity.

  18. The effect of ketotifen on inflammatory markers in allergic conjunctivitis: an open, uncontrolled study

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Andrea P; Urrets-Zavalia, Julio; Berra, Alejandro; Mariani, Ana Lía; Gallino, Norberto; Demel, Eduardo Gomez; Gagliardi, Julio; Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E; Urrets-Zavalia, Enrique; M Serra, Horacio

    2003-01-01

    Background The efficacy and safety of ketotifen eye drop treatment in allergic conjunctivitis (AC) management is perfectly known by several studies, but the mechanism of action at the biochemical levels is poorly understood so we decided to perform an open, uncontrolled study in order to investigate the effect of the topical administration of ketotifen fumarate 0.05% on biochemical markers of inflammation on conjunctival cells in patients with AC. Methods Nineteen patients with symptoms and signs of AC (itching, discharge, burning, redness, increase in the watery discharge, swelling and follicles) and with a history of allergy were prescribed with two daily instillation of one drop of eyewash ketotifen fumarate 0,05% in both eyes during thirty days. They were studied by measuring clinical and immunologic parameters. Results Ketotifen fumarate treatment significantly reduced the total symptoms and signs score for each patient as well as each symptoms and signs at all time points compared with day 0 (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.016, respectively). Although the percentage of HLA-DR+ epithelial cells diminished only in 58% of patients, the numbers of CD29+ and eotaxin+ epithelial cells dropped significantly in 68% and 73 % of them (p < 0.0062 and <0.0082, respectively) as a consequence of the treatment. In 9 out of 19 patients a simultaneous decrease in the percentage of epithelial cells positive for CD29 and eotaxin was observed. Conclusion Ketotifen besides the well-known effect in reducing signs and symptoms of AC significantly diminished production of eotaxin and expression of CD29 by epithelial cells in patients with seasonal AC. PMID:12515585

  19. B-1 cells temper endotoxemic inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Barbeiro, Denise Frediani; Barbeiro, Hermes Vieira; Faintuch, Joel; Ariga, Suely K Kubo; Mariano, Mario; Popi, Ana Flávia; de Souza, Heraldo Possolo; Velasco, Irineu Tadeu; Soriano, Francisco Garcia

    2011-03-01

    Sepsis syndrome is caused by inappropriate immune activation due to bacteria and bacterial components released during infection. This syndrome is the leading cause of death in intensive care units. Specialized B-lymphocytes located in the peritoneal and pleural cavities are known as B-1 cells. These cells produce IgM and IL-10, both of which are potent regulators of cell-mediated immunity. It has been suggested that B-1 cells modulate the systemic inflammatory response in sepsis. In this study, we conducted in vitro and in vivo experiments in order to investigate a putative role of B-1 cells in a murine model of LPS-induced sepsis. Macrophages and B-1 cells were studied in monocultures and in co-cultures. The B-1 cells produced the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in response to LPS. In the B-1 cell-macrophage co-cultures, production of proinflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-6 and nitrite) was lower than in the macrophage monocultures, whereas that of IL-10 was higher in the co-cultures. Co-culture of B-1 IL-10(-/-) cells and macrophages did not reduce the production of the proinflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-6 and nitrite). After LPS injection, the mortality rate was higher among Balb/Xid mice, which are B-1 cell deficient, than among wild-type mice (65.0% vs. 0.0%). The Balb/Xid mice also presented a proinflammatory profile of TNF-α, IL-6 and nitrite, as well as lower levels of IL-10. In the early phase of LPS stimulation, B-1 cells modulate the macrophage inflammatory response, and the main molecular pathway of that modulation is based on IL-10-mediated intracellular signaling.

  20. Laughter counteracts enhancement of plasma neurotrophin levels and allergic skin wheal responses by mobile phone-mediated stress.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Hajime

    2004-01-01

    Laughter caused by viewing a comic video (Rowan Atkinson's The Best Bits of Mr. Bean) reduced the plasma nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 levels, and allergic skin wheal responses in patients with atopic dermatitis, whereas viewing a nonhumorous video (weather information) failed to do so. In contrast, stress induced by writing mail on a mobile phone enhanced the plasma nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 levels, and allergic skin wheal responses. However, previewing the comic video counteracted mobile phone-mediated enhancement of plasma neurotrophins or allergic skin wheal responses, whereas previewing the weather information failed to do so. Taken together, these results suggest that, in patients with atopic dermatitis, writing mail on a mobile phone causes stress and enhances allergic responses with a concomitant increase in plasma neurotrophins that are counteracted by laughter. These results may be useful in the study of pathophysiology and treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  1. Bromelain exerts anti-inflammatory effects in an ovalbumin-induced murine model of allergic airway disease ☆

    PubMed Central

    Secor, Eric R.; Carson, William F.; Cloutier, Michelle M.; Guernsey, Linda A.; Schramm, Craig M.; Wu, Carol A.; Thrall, Roger S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Bromelain, a clinically used pineapple extract and natural product, has reported anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of bromelain treatment in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine model of allergic airway disease (AAD). Methods To establish AAD, mice were sensitized with intraperitoneal (i.p.) OVA/alum and challenged with daily OVA aerosols. Mice were treated i.p. with either saline, 2 or 6 mg/kg bromelain, twice daily for four consecutive days. Bronchoalveolar lavage leukocytes and cytokines, lung histology, airway hyperresponsiveness, and lymphocyte populations via flow cytometry were compared between groups. Results Bromelain treatment of AAD mice resulted in reduced total BAL leukocytes, eosinophils, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, CD4+/CD8+ T cell ratio, and IL-13. Conclusion Bromelain attenuated development of AAD while altering CD4+ to CD8+ T lymphocyte populations. The reduction in AAD outcomes suggests that bromelain may have similar effects in the treatment of human asthma and hypersensitivity disorders. PMID:16337164

  2. PDT-induced inflammatory and host responses.

    PubMed

    Firczuk, Małgorzata; Nowis, Dominika; Gołąb, Jakub

    2011-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used in the management of neoplastic and nonmalignant diseases. Its unique mechanisms of action include direct cytotoxic effects exerted towards tumor cells, destruction of tumor and peritumoral vasculature and induction of local acute inflammatory reaction. The latter develops in response to (1) damage to tumor and stromal cells that leads to the release of cell death-associated molecular patterns (CDAMs) or damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), (2) early vascular changes that include increased vascular permeability, vascular occlusion, and release of vasoactive and proinflammatory mediators, (3) activation of alternative pathway of complement leading to generation of potent chemotactic factors, and (4) induction of signaling cascades and transcription factors that trigger secretion of cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases, or adhesion molecules. The majority of studies indicate that induction of local inflammatory response contributes to the antitumor effects of PDT and facilitates development of systemic immunity. However, the degree of PDT-induced inflammation and its subsequent contribution to its antitumor efficacy depend on multiple parameters, such as chemical nature, concentration and subcellular localization of the photosensitizers, the spectral characteristics of the light source, light fluence and fluence rate, oxygenation level, and tumor type. Identification of detailed molecular mechanisms and development of therapeutic approaches modulating PDT-induced inflammation will be necessary to tailor this treatment to particular clinical conditions.

  3. Scorpion Venom and the Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Petricevich, Vera L.

    2010-01-01

    Scorpion venoms consist of a complex of several toxins that exhibit a wide range of biological properties and actions, as well as chemical compositions, toxicity, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics. These venoms are associated with high morbility and mortality, especially among children. Victims of envenoming by a scorpion suffer a variety of pathologies, involving mainly both sympathetic and parasympathetic stimulation as well as central manifestations such as irritability, hyperthermia, vomiting, profuse salivation, tremor, and convulsion. The clinical signs and symptoms observed in humans and experimental animals are related with an excessive systemic host inflammatory response to stings and stings, respectively. Although the pathophysiology of envenomation is complex and not yet fully understood, venom and immune responses are known to trigger the release of inflammatory mediators that are largely mediated by cytokines. In models of severe systemic inflammation produced by injection of high doses of venom or venoms products, the increase in production of proinflammatory cytokines significantly contributes to immunological imbalance, multiple organ dysfunction and death. The cytokines initiate a cascade of events that lead to illness behaviors such as fever, anorexia, and also physiological events in the host such as activation of vasodilatation, hypotension, and increased of vessel permeability. PMID:20300540

  4. Allergen-sensitization in vivo enhances mast cell-induced inflammatory responses and supports innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Eva; Quintanar, J Luis; Ramírez-Celis, Nora Alejandra; Quintanar-Stephano, Andrés

    2009-12-02

    Mast cells are immune cells that play a crucial role in inflammatory reactions related to allergic reactions and the defense against certain parasites and bacteria. In allergy, the binding of immunoglobulin E (IgE) to its high-affinity receptor (FcepsilonRI) sensitizes mast cells. Subsequent cross-linking of IgE-FcepsilonRI by multivalent antigen results in cellular activation and the release of proinflammatory mediators. Recent in vivo and in vitro experiments suggest that IgE not only acts as an allergen sensor, but also induces molecular and biological changes in mast cells. In the present study we examined whether allergen-sensitization in vivo could modify the magnitude of mast cells-induced inflammatory responses. Moreover, we studied changes in peritoneal mast cell number and histamine amount during and after sensitization. We provided evidence that sensitization, at the time of the maximum allergen-specific IgE-titer, increases the intensity of a local inflammatory process generated in a cutaneous anaphylactic reaction. Sensitization also supports innate immunity, improving survival and speeding up the resolution of an acute inflammatory reaction induced by polymicrobial sepsis, while decreasing the amount of histamine in peritoneal mast cells. In addition, our results showed that sensitization induces a late increase in the number and histamine amount of peritoneal mast cells. Thus, our findings clearly demonstrated that sensitization induces changes in mast cells which prepare the cell to induce more intense inflammatory responses. This entails an increased detrimental role in subsequent IgE-dependent allergic reactions and an improved protective function in innate defense against pathogens.

  5. Effects of dietary fish oil lipids on allergic and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, T H; Arm, J P; Horton, C E; Crea, A E; Mencia-Huerta, J M; Spur, B W

    1991-01-01

    Fish oil is rich in the polyunsaturated N-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acids (DCHA). EPA competes with arachidonic acid (AA) for metabolism by the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways. Selective metabolites derived from EPA have reduced biological activities as compared with the AA-derived counterparts. Dietary supplementation with EPA led to incorporation of EPA into membrane phospholipids, an inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase pathway activity, and a reduction of the elaboration of platelet-activating factor. Neutrophil chemotaxis and the capacity of these cells to adhere to endothelial cells are substantially attenuated. This suggests that EPA has anti-inflammatory potential. Clinical trials in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and bronchial asthma have shown beneficial effects. Whether the benefit obtained clinically is sufficient to replace or significantly reduce any clinical condition remains to be answered.

  6. Cockroach induces inflammatory responses through protease-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Wada, Kota; Matsuwaki, Yoshinori; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Kita, Hirohito

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to cockroaches is a major risk factor for asthma. Products from cockroaches may contain proteases and ligands for pattern recognition receptors. These molecules may activate airway inflammatory cells, such as eosinophils, that are involved in asthma. Among inner-city children, cockroach allergens play an especially important role in increasing asthma morbidity. The molecular mechanism for this association between cockroach exposure and asthma is not fully understood. Enzymatic activities from cockroaches activate inflammatory cells in the airways and may also exacerbate certain human airway diseases, such as asthma. We recently reported that cockroach extracts contain pepstatin A-sensitive proteases that activate PAR-2 and induce activation and degranulation of human eosinophils. This review focuses on the effects of cockroach on various inflammatory cells, including eosinophils, epithelial cells, fibroblasts, dendritic cells, and T cells, in allergic reactions.

  7. Effect of oral and intravenous heparin tetrasaccharide on allergic airway responses: critical role of N-sulfation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tahir; Smith, Gregory; Abraham, William M

    2013-04-01

    We have shown that inhaled heparin (hep) oligosaccharides attenuate allergic airway responses in sheep and that this anti-allergic activity resides in a tetrasaccharide sequence. Here we determined: (a) the anti-allergic activity of oral and intravenous hep-tetrasaccharide on allergic airway responses in the sheep model of asthma; and (b) the role of N-sulfation in mediating this anti-allergic activity. Ascaris suum-induced early (EAR) and Late (LAR) airway responses and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to carbachol were measured in allergic sheep without and after treatment with different doses of oral or intravenous hep-tetrasaccharide. At doses of 0.06 mg/kg, 0.125 mg/kg, and 0.25 mg/kg, oral hep-tetrasaccharide caused a dose-dependent inhibition of EAR and LAR. Post-antigen AHR was also inhibited dose dependently. The same doses of intravenous hep-tetrasaccharide yielded comparable inhibition of EAR, LAR and AHR, confirming that orally delivered hep-tetrasaccharide has good bioavailability. The protection by hep-tetrasaccharide on EAR and LAR was dependent on N-sulfation, as N-desulfated/N-acetylated tetrasaccharide had a markedly reduced effect. However, inhibition of the post-antigen AHR was independent of N-sulfation. These results demonstrate that orally administered hep-tetrasaccharide inhibits allergic airway responses in the sheep model of asthma. Hep-tetrasaccharide has good oral bioavailability and its anti-allergic activity is critically dependent on N-sulfation of the glucosamine ring.

  8. Lentiviral shRNA against KCa3.1 inhibits allergic response in allergic rhinitis and suppresses mast cell activity via PI3K/AKT signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hai; Zheng, Chunquan; Li, Jing; Yang, Chen; Hu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated potassium ion channel-3.1 (KCa3.1) plays a pivotal role in the potassium-calcium exchange involved in atopy. This study aimed to explore the impact of lentiviral-mediated shRNA silencing KCa3.1 on allergic response in a murine allergic rhinitis (AR) model. The BALB/c mice were divided into four groups: untreated AR group, negative control AR group, lentiviral KCa3.1-shRNA treated AR group and normal control group. Concentrations of ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE, histamine and leukotrienes C4 (LTC4) in serum, and IL-4, IL-9 and IL-17 in nasal lavage fluid (NLF) were analyzed. Goblet cells and mast cells were counted. KCa3.1 positive cells were counted after immunolabelling by immunofluorescence method. KCa3.1, Mucin 5AC (MUC5AC), and tryptase mRNA levels were determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, P815 cell line was used to explore the role and mechanism of lentiviral KCa3.1-shRNA on mast cells. The results showed that LV-KCa3.1-shRNA intervention effectively attenuated allergic responses in LV-KCa3.1-shRNA treated mice. LV-KCa3.1-shRNA intervention effectively suppressed KCa3.1 levels and phosphorylation of AKT in P815 cells, leading to the downregulation of tryptase, IL-6 and IL-8 levels. LV-KCa3.1-shRNA intervention effectively attenuated the allergic responses in AR and suppressed mast cell activity by inhibiting PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. PMID:26272420

  9. Transport induced inflammatory responses in horses.

    PubMed

    Wessely-Szponder, J; Bełkot, Z; Bobowiec, R; Kosior-Korzecka, U; Wójcik, M

    2015-01-01

    Deleterious response to road transport is an important problem in equine practice. It determines different physiological, immunological and metabolic changes which lead to increased susceptibility to several disorders such as pneumonia, diarrhea, colics, laminitis, injuries and rhabdomyolisis. The aim of our study was to look for possible relationships between transportation of female young and older horses over a long and short distance and an inflammatory state reflected by an increase of acute phase protein concentration, oxidative stress and muscle injury. The study was conducted on 24 cold-blooded female horses divided into four groups. Six fillies aged 6-18 months and six mares aged 10-12 years were transported over the distance of about 550 km, six fillies aged 6-18 months and six mares aged 10-12 years were transported over the distance of about 50 km. Plasma and serum were obtained from blood samples taken before transportation (T0), immediately after transportation (T1) and at an abattoir during slaughter (T2). In these samples fibrinogen, MDA, AST and CK were assessed. Fibrinogen increased in all studied groups especially in fillies after long distance transportation, where it reached 205±7.07 mg/dl before transportation, 625±35.35 mg/dl after transportation, and 790±14.14 mg/dl during slaughter. MDA concentrations rose after transportation and reached the maximal level during slaughter. CK activity was more elevated after short transportation in younger horses, whereas initial activity of AST was higher in older horses. We estimated that intensified responses from acute phase, oxidative stress and muscle injury parameters indicated an inflammatory state.

  10. Red meat allergic patients have a selective IgE response to the α-Gal glycan.

    PubMed

    Apostolovic, D; Tran, T A T; Sánchez-Vidaurre, S; Cirkovic Velickovic, T; Starkhammar, M; Hamsten, C; van Hage, M

    2015-11-01

    Galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) is a mammalian carbohydrate with significance in a novel type of food allergy. Patients with IgE against α-Gal report severe allergic symptoms 3-6 h after consumption of red meat. We investigated whether IgE from red meat allergic patients recognizes other mammalian glycans than α-Gal or glycans from the plant kingdom and insects of importance in allergy. We found that none of the 24 red meat allergic patients investigated had an IgE antibody response against the other abundant mammalian glycan N-glycolylneuraminic acid or against cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants from plant or venom sources (nCup a 1, nArt v 1, and MUXF3). Deglycosylation of an α-Gal-containing protein, bovine thyroglobulin, significantly reduced the IgE response. In conclusion, we show that red meat allergic patients have a selective IgE response to the α-Gal glycan found in red meat. Other common glycans reactive in allergic disease are not targets of red meat allergic patients' IgE.

  11. Respiratory syncytial virus predisposes mice to augmented allergic airway responses via IL-13-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, N W; Tekkanat, K K; Berlin, A; Hogaboam, C M; Miller, A; Evanoff, H; Lincoln, P; Maassab, H

    2001-07-15

    The development of severe childhood asthma may be influenced by several factors including environmental and infectious stimuli. The causal relationship between infectious viral responses, such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and severe asthma during early childhood is unclear. In these studies, the ability for an initial RSV infection to exacerbate and promote a more severe asthmatic-type response was investigated by combining established murine models of disease. We examined the ability of RSV to induce exacerbation of allergic disease over a relatively long period, leading to development of severe airway responses including airway inflammation and hyperreactivity. The preferential production of IL-13 during a primary RSV infection appears to play a critical role for the exacerbation of cockroach allergen-induced disease. The depletion of IL-13 during RSV infections inhibited the exacerbation and acceleration of severe allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity. This was indicated by decreases in airway hyperreactivity and changes in lung chemokine production. These data suggest that the airway responses during asthma can be greatly affected by a previous RSV infection, even when infection occurs before allergen sensitization. Overall, infection of the airways with RSV can induce an IL-13-dependent change in airway function and promotes an environment that contributes to the development of severe allergic asthmatic responses.

  12. Triclosan Induces Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin in Skin Promoting Th2 Allergic Responses.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Nikki B; Lukomska, Ewa; Long, Carrie M; Kashon, Michael L; Sharpnack, Douglas D; Nayak, Ajay P; Anderson, Katie L; Jean Meade, B; Anderson, Stacey E

    2015-09-01

    Triclosan is an antimicrobial chemical incorporated into many personal, medical and household products. Approximately, 75% of the U.S. population has detectable levels of triclosan in their urine, and although it is not typically considered a contact sensitizer, recent studies have begun to link triclosan exposure with augmented allergic disease. We examined the effects of dermal triclosan exposure on the skin and lymph nodes of mice and in a human skin model to identify mechanisms for augmenting allergic responses. Triclosan (0%-3%) was applied topically at 24-h intervals to the ear pinnae of OVA-sensitized BALB/c mice. Skin and draining lymph nodes were evaluated for cellular responses and cytokine expression over time. The effects of triclosan (0%-0.75%) on cytokine expression in a human skin tissue model were also examined. Exposure to triclosan increased the expression of TSLP, IL-1β, and TNF-α in the skin with concomitant decreases in IL-25, IL-33, and IL-1α. Similar changes in TSLP, IL1B, and IL33 expression occurred in human skin. Topical application of triclosan also increased draining lymph node cellularity consisting of activated CD86(+)GL-7(+) B cells, CD80(+)CD86(+) dendritic cells, GATA-3(+)OX-40(+)IL-4(+)IL-13(+) Th2 cells and IL-17 A(+) CD4 T cells. In vivo antibody blockade of TSLP reduced skin irritation, IL-1β expression, lymph node cellularity, and Th2 responses augmented by triclosan. Repeated dermal exposure to triclosan induces TSLP expression in skin tissue as a potential mechanism for augmenting allergic responses.

  13. Respiratory responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and their relationship to nonspecific airway reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, W.F.; Horstman, D.H.; Abdul-Salaam, S.; Raggio, L.J.; Green, J.A.

    1987-12-01

    Ozone exposure in man produces changes in respiratory function and symptoms. There is a large degree of unexplained intersubject variability in the magnitude of these responses. There is concern that individuals with chronic respiratory diseases may also be more responsive to ozone than normal individuals. The purpose of this study was to describe the responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and to compare these responses to those previously observed in normal individuals. A further purpose was to measure the association of baseline nonspecific airway reactivity with changes in lung function and respiratory symptoms following ozone exposure. A group of 26 nonasthmatic subjects with allergic rhinitis performed a bronchial inhalation challenge with histamine and subsequently underwent two hour exposures to both clean air and to 0.18 part per million ozone with alternating periods of rest and heavy exercise. The airway reactivity of this group of subjects was no greater than that of a comparable group of subjects without allergic rhinitis. The respiratory responses of these subjects to ozone exposure were similar to those previously reported for subjects without allergic rhinitis with the exception that the allergic rhinitis subjects appeared to have a modestly increased bronchoconstrictor response compared to normals. Furthermore, we observed no significant relationships between nonspecific airway reactivity and response to ozone as measured by changes in lung function or the induction of symptoms.

  14. Neutrophil recruitment by allergens contribute to allergic sensitization and allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hosoki, Koa; Boldogh, Istvan; Sur, Sanjiv

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To discuss the presence and role of neutrophils in asthma and allergic diseases, and outline importance of pollen and cat dander-induced innate neutrophil recruitment in induction of allergic sensitization and allergic inflammation. Recent findings Uncontrolled asthma is associated with elevated numbers of neutrophils, and levels of neutrophil-attracting chemokine IL-8 and IL-17 in BAL fluids. These parameters negatively correlate with lung function. Pollen allergens and cat dander recruit neutrophils to the airways in a TLR4, MD2 and CXCR2-dependent manner. Repeated recruitment of activated neutrophils by these allergens facilitates allergic sensitization and airway inflammation. Inhibition of neutrophil recruitment with CXCR2 inhibitor, disruption of TLR4, or siRNA against MD2 also inhibits allergic inflammation. The molecular mechanisms by which neutrophils shift the inflammatory response of the airways to inhaled allergens to an allergic phenotype is an area of active research. Summary Recent studies have revealed that neutrophil recruitment is important in development of allergic sensitization and inflammation. Inhibition of neutrophils recruitment may be strategy to control allergic inflammation. PMID:26694038

  15. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  16. Oral administration of Enterococcus faecalis FK-23 suppresses Th17 cell development and attenuates allergic airway responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bei; An, Jun; Shimada, Takashi; Liu, Shuang; Maeyama, Kazutaka

    2012-08-01

    Evidence is increasing that oral administration of probiotics can attenuate asthmatic responses both in murine models and clinical trials. T-helper 17 (Th17) cells, a subset of CD4+ T cells have been implicated as having an important role in the development of several allergic disorders, but the relationship between oral administration of probiotics and Th17 development has not been well studied. BALB/c mice were given lysed Enterococcus faecalis FK-23 (LFK) orally for 28 days. After sensitization by subcutaneous injection of ovalbumin (OVA) on Days 14 and 21 and 1% OVA inhalation on Days 25, 26 and 27, they were challenged with a 5% OVA aerosol on Day 28. Twenty-four hours later, airway resistance and accumulation of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were determined. Ιnterleukin (IL)-17-expressing CD4+ lymphocytes isolated from lung, spleen and lamina propria of the intestine were detected by flow cytometry. The expression of IL-6 and TGF-β mRNA was assessed by real-time PCR. Increases in airway hyperresponsiveness, and numbers of total leukocytes and mast cells in BALF induced by OVA challenge were significantly suppressed by oral administration of LFK. The increased percentage of IL-17-expressing CD4+ cells from lung, spleen and intestine in OVA-challenged mice was reduced following LFK treatment. We conclude that the oral administration of LFK suppresses the asthmatic response and that this is associated with attenuation of Th17 cell development.

  17. Anti-Inflammatory, Immunomodulatory, and Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibitory Activities of Ravan Napas, a Formulation of Uighur Traditional Medicine, in a Rat Model of Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Abdureyim, Sajida; Amat, Nurmuhammat; Umar, Anwar; Upur, Halmurat; Berke, Benedicte; Moore, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Ravan Napas (RN) is a traditional formula used to treat pulmonary symptoms and diseases such as coughing, breathing difficulty, and asthma in traditional Uighur medicine. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory, and immuno-modulatory activity of RN in a well-characterized animal model of allergic asthma. Rats were sensitized with intraperitoneal (ip) ovalbumin (OVA) and alum, and then challenged with OVA aerosols. The asthma model rats were treated with RN; saline- and dexamethasone- (DXM-) treated rats served as normal and model controls. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cellular differential and the concentrations of sICAM-1, IL-4, IL-5, TNF-α, INF-γ, and IgE in serum were measured. Lung sections underwent histological analysis. The immunohistochemistry S-P method was used to measure the expression of ICAM-1 and HO-1 in the lung. RN significantly reduced the number of inflammatory cells in BALF and lung tissues, decreased sICAM-1, IL-4, IL-5, TNF-α, and IgE in serum, and increased serum INF-γ. There was a marked suppression of ICAM-1 and HO-1 expression in the lung. Our results suggest that RN may have an anti-inflammatory and immuneregulatory effect on allergic bronchial asthma by modulating the balance between Th1/Th2 cytokines. PMID:20953388

  18. Impaired mast cell maturation and degranulation and attenuated allergic responses in Ndrg1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Sunaga, Kohei; Tanaka, Satoshi; Nakamura, Masanori; Arata, Satoru; Okuda, Tomohiko; Moon, Tae-Chul; Chang, Hyeun-Wook; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Kokame, Koichi; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Murakami, Makoto; Kudo, Ichiro

    2007-06-01

    We have previously reported that N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is an early inducible protein during the maturation of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) toward a connective tissue mast cell-like phenotype. To clarify the function of NDRG1 in mast cells and allergic responses, we herein analyzed mast cell-associated phenotypes of mice lacking the Ndrg1 gene. Allergic responses including IgE-mediated passive systemic and cutaneous anaphylactic reactions were markedly attenuated in Ndrg1-deficient mice as compared with those in wild-type mice. In Ndrg1-deficient mice, dermal and peritoneal mast cells were decreased in number and morphologically abnormal with impaired degranulating ability. Ex vivo, Ndrg1-deficient BMMCs cocultured with Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts in the presence of stem cell factor, a condition that facilitates the maturation of BMMCs toward a CTMC-like phenotype, displayed less exocytosis than replicate wild-type cells after the cross-linking of FcepsilonRI or stimulation with compound 48/80, even though the exocytotic response of IL-3-maintained, immature BMMCs from both genotypes was comparable. Unlike degranulation, the production of leukotriene and cytokines by cocultured BMMCs was unaffected by NDRG1 deficiency. Taken together, the altered phenotypes of Ndrg1-deficient mast cells both in vivo and ex vivo suggest that NDRG1 has roles in the terminal maturation and effector function (degranulation) of mast cells.

  19. The anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory effects of Benjakul extract (a Thai traditional medicine), its constituent plants and its some pure constituents using in vitro experiments.

    PubMed

    Makchuchit, Sunita; Rattarom, Ruchilak; Itharat, Arunporn

    2017-03-10

    Benjakul (BJK), a Thai traditional medicine preparation, has long been used for balanced health, controlled abnormal of element in the body, carminative, and relief of flatulence. It is composed of five plants: Piper interruptum Opiz., Piper longum L., Piper sarmentosum Roxb., Plumbago indica L., and Zingiber officinale Roscoe. The ethanolic extracts of BJK, its five individual plants, and pure constituents of BJK were investigated for their anti-allergic activity using immunoglobulin E (IgE)-sensitized β-hexosaminidase in the rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 (RBL-2H3) cells and anti-inflammatory activity using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the murine macrophage (RAW 264.7) cells. The ethanolic extracts of BJK showed anti-allergic activity (IC50=12.69μg/ml) and exhibited potent NO inhibitory effect (IC50=16.60μg/ml), but inactive on TNF-α release. Moreover, 6-shogaol and plumbagin, two pure compounds from BJK, showed higher anti-allergic activity than the ethanolic BJK extract with IC50 values of 0.28 and 4.03μg/ml, respectively. These compounds were significantly higher than chlorpheniramine (CPM), standard drug, with IC50 value of 17.98μg/ml. Determination of the anti-inflammatory activity by measuring the inhibition of NO production presented that plumbagin and 6-shogaol exhibited higher than crude BJK extract with IC50 values of 0.002 and 0.92μg/ml, respectively. In particular, plumbagin also showed higher anti-inflammatory than prednisolone, positive control, with IC50 value of 0.59μg/ml. 6-Shogaol also showed inhibitory effect on TNF-α release (IC50=9.16μg/ml). These preliminary results may provide some scientific support for the use of BJK for the anti-allergic treatment and inflammatory disorders through the inhibition of NO production.

  20. Inflammatory response to nano- and microstructured hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Mestres, Gemma; Espanol, Montserrat; Xia, Wei; Persson, Cecilia; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Ott, Marjam Karlsson

    2015-01-01

    The proliferation and activation of leukocytes upon contact with a biomaterial play a crucial role in the degree of inflammatory response, which may then determine the clinical failure or success of an implanted biomaterial. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether nano- and microstructured biomimetic hydroxyapatite substrates can influence the growth and activation of macrophage-like cells. Hydroxyapatite substrates with different crystal morphologies consisting of an entangled network of plate-like and needle-like crystals were evaluated. Macrophage proliferation was evaluated on the material surface (direct contact) and also in extracts i.e. media modified by the material (indirect contact). Additionally, the effect of supplementing the extracts with calcium ions and/or proteins was investigated. Macrophage activation on the substrates was evaluated by quantifying the release of reactive oxygen species and by morphological observations. The results showed that differences in the substrate's microstructure play a major role in the activation of macrophages as there was a higher release of reactive oxygen species after culturing the macrophages on plate-like crystals substrates compared to the almost non-existent release on needle-like substrates. However, the difference in macrophage proliferation was ascribed to different ionic exchanges and protein adsorption/retention from the substrates rather than to the texture of materials.

  1. Tyrosol Suppresses Allergic Inflammation by Inhibiting the Activation of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase in Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Je, In-Gyu; Kim, Duk-Sil; Kim, Sung-Wan; Lee, Soyoung; Lee, Hyun-Shik; Park, Eui Kyun; Khang, Dongwoo; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis, rhinitis, asthma, and anaphylaxis are attractive research areas. Tyrosol (2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethanol) is a polyphenolic compound with diverse biological activities. In this study, we investigated whether tyrosol has anti-allergic inflammatory effects. Ovalbumin-induced active systemic anaphylaxis and immunoglobulin E-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis models were used for the immediate-type allergic responses. Oral administration of tyrosol reduced the allergic symptoms of hypothermia and pigmentation in both animal models. Mast cells that secrete allergic mediators are key regulators on allergic inflammation. Tyrosol dose-dependently decreased mast cell degranulation and expression of inflammatory cytokines. Intracellular calcium levels and activation of inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK) regulate cytokine expression and degranulation. Tyrosol blocked calcium influx and phosphorylation of the IKK complex. To define the molecular target for tyrosol, various signaling proteins involved in mast cell activation such as Lyn, Syk, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and Akt were examined. Our results showed that PI3K could be a molecular target for tyrosol in mast cells. Taken together, these findings indicated that tyrosol has anti-allergic inflammatory effects by inhibiting the degranulation of mast cells and expression of inflammatory cytokines; these effects are mediated via PI3K. Therefore, we expect tyrosol become a potential therapeutic candidate for allergic inflammatory disorders.

  2. Modulation of the immune response by infection with Cryptosporidium spp. in children with allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Guangorena-Gómez, J O; Maravilla-Domínguez, A; García-Arenas, G; Cervantes-Flores, M; Meza-Velázquez, R; Rivera-Guillén, M; Acosta-Saavedra, L C; Goytia-Acevedo, R C

    2016-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that the allergic response can be ameliorated by the administration of pathogen derivatives that activate Toll-like receptors and induce a Th1-type immune response (IR). Cryptosporidium is a parasite that promotes an IR via Toll-like receptors and elicits the production of Th1-type cytokines, which limit cryptosporidiosis. The aim of this study was to investigate allergy-related immune markers in children naturally infected with Cryptosporidium. In a cross-sectional study, 49 children with or without clinical diagnosis of allergies, oocysts of Cryptosporidium spp. in the faeces were screened microscopically. We microscopically screened for leucocytes, examined T and B cells for allergy-related activation markers using flow cytometry and evaluated serum for total IgE using chemiluminescence. Children with allergies and Cryptosporidium in the faeces had significantly lower levels of total IgE, B cells, CD19(+) CD23(+) and CD19(+) CD124(+) cells as well as a greater percentage of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ(+) ) and IL-4(+) CD4(+) cells than children with allergies without Cryptosporidium. This is the first description of the modulation of the IR in children with allergic diseases in the setting of natural Cryptosporidium infection. Our findings suggest the involvement of CD4(+) cells producing IL-4 and IFN-γ in the IR to Cryptosporidium in naturally infected children.

  3. Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice selectively bred to produce high affinity (HA) or low affinity (LA) antibody responses.

    PubMed Central

    Devey, M E; Major, P J; Bleasdale-Barr, K M; Holland, G P; Dal Canto, M C; Paterson, P Y

    1990-01-01

    Induction of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice genetically selected to produce either high affinity (HA) or low affinity (LA) antibody responses has revealed significant differences in disease susceptibility between the two lines. HA mice were highly susceptible to EAE following subcutaneous sensitization to mouse central nervous system (CNS) tissue emulsified in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). Furthermore, of HA mice surviving acute EAE, up to 93% subsequently developed chronic relapsing disease (CREAE) characterized by variable demyelinating inflammatory changes within the spinal cord. In contrast, LA mice, despite having a major histocompatability complex (MHC) haplotype associated with susceptibility to EAE, were highly resistant to the disease and showed no signs of CREAE when observed for up to 100 days post-sensitization. Antibodies to myelin basic protein (MBP) were detected in both lines but rising titres of high functional affinity antibodies were only seen in HA mice. These HA and LA lines of mice provide a new approach to the study of EAE and, in particular, the role of antibody and antibody affinity in the chronic relapsing form of the disease. Images Figure 2 PMID:2335373

  4. Enhancement of allergic responses in vivo and in vitro by butylated hydroxytoluene

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaki, Kouya; Taneda, Shinji; Yanagisawa, Rie; Inoue, Ken-ichiro; Takano, Hirohisa; Yoshino, Shin

    2007-09-01

    The effect of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), which is used widely as an antioxidant, on IgE-dependent allergic responses in vivo and in vitro was investigated. For in vivo study, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) was elicited in rats by i.d. injection of anti-DNP IgE and 48 h later by i.v. injection of DNP-HSA. BHT was i.p. given immediately after anti-DNP IgE injection. For in vitro studies, the rat mast cell line RBL2H3 sensitized with monoclonal anti-dinitrophenol (DNP) IgE was challenged with the multivalent antigen DNP-human serum albumin (DNP-HSA) in the presence or absence of BHT. {beta}-Hexosaminidase and histamine released from RBL2H3 cells, as indicators of degranulation of the cells, the concentration of intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, the level of phosphorylated-Akt, and global tyrosine phosphorylation as indicators of mast cell activation, were measured. The results showed that BHT given to anti-DNP IgE-sensitized rats augmented DNP-specific PCA in a dose-dependent manner. In the presence of BHT, IgE-induced releases of {beta}-hexosaminidase and histamine from RBL2H3 cells were increased. BHT also further elevated IgE-mediated increased concentrations of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} and the levels of phosphorylated-Akt, but did not affect global tyrosine phosphorylation, in RBL2H3 cells. Moreover, the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 inhibited IgE-dependent degranulation and its enhancement by BHT. These findings indicate that BHT may upregulate PCA by enhancing mast cell degranulation associated with enhancements of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration and PI3K activation, suggesting that BHT might affect allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis and asthma.

  5. Psychological stress affects response to sublingual immunotherapy in asthmatic children allergic to house dust mite.

    PubMed

    Ippoliti, Flora; De Santis, Wladimiro; Volterrani, Anna; Canitano, Nicoletta; Frattolillo, Daniele; Lucarelli, Sandra; Frediani, Simone; Frediani, Tullio

    2006-08-01

    While the clinical and immunologic efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in allergic diseases has been extensively demonstrated, some patients display a poor clinical response. Psychological stress has been shown to play a role in atopy and also to affect response to immunomodulating therapies such as vaccination with microbial antigens. This study addresses the possibility of response to SLIT being affected by psychological stress. Forty children with mild asthma caused by allergy to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and farinae were subjected to SLIT and then divided after 6 months into two groups based on the results of the stress integrated measure (SIM) test: group 1 (24 stressed patients, mean SIM value of 60.1) and group 2 (16 non-stressed patients, mean SIM value of 7.6). There was also a higher prevalence of psychosocial stressing factors (divorced/absent parents, low income households, non-working parents) among stressed patients. The symptom score, peak expiratory flow (PEF), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) and serum eosinophie cationic protein (ECP) concentration were evaluated at both times. The serum concentration of neuroendocrine parameters [prolactin, cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)] was also measured after 6 months of therapy. While all the clinical parameters and ECP concentration improved after SLIT, symptom score, PEF and ECP showed a significantly greater improvement in non-stressed patients. The concentration of neuroendocrine parameters was significantly increased in stressed patients. Our findings show that psychological stress can affect response to SLIT also in allergic subjects and are consistent with data recently reported showing a correlation between stress and poor response to antimicrobial vaccines. Our data also suggest that stress evaluation may become a useful prognostic factor in immunotherapy.

  6. Functional Roles of Syk in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Young-Su; Son, Young-Jin; Ryou, Chongsuk; Sung, Gi-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a series of complex biological responses to protect the host from pathogen invasion. Chronic inflammation is considered a major cause of diseases, such as various types of inflammatory/autoimmune diseases and cancers. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) was initially found to be highly expressed in hematopoietic cells and has been known to play crucial roles in adaptive immune responses. However, recent studies have reported that Syk is also involved in other biological functions, especially in innate immune responses. Although Syk has been extensively studied in adaptive immune responses, numerous studies have recently presented evidence that Syk has critical functions in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses and is closely related to innate immune response. This review describes the characteristics of Syk-mediated signaling pathways, summarizes the recent findings supporting the crucial roles of Syk in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses and diseases, and discusses Syk-targeted drug development for the therapy of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25045209

  7. Cellular and molecular regulation of innate inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-01-01

    Innate sensing of pathogens by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) plays essential roles in the innate discrimination between self and non-self components, leading to the generation of innate immune defense and inflammatory responses. The initiation, activation and resolution of innate inflammatory response are mediated by a complex network of interactions among the numerous cellular and molecular components of immune and non-immune system. While a controlled and beneficial innate inflammatory response is critical for the elimination of pathogens and maintenance of tissue homeostasis, dysregulated or sustained inflammation leads to pathological conditions such as chronic infection, inflammatory autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss some of the recent advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the establishment and regulation of innate immunity and inflammatory responses. PMID:27818489

  8. Transfer of allergic airway responses with serum and lymphocytes from rats sensitized to dust mite.

    PubMed

    Lambert, A L; Winsett, D W; Costa, D L; Selgrade, M K; Gilmour, M I

    1998-06-01

    House dust mite (HDM) antigen is one of the most common allergens associated with extrinsic asthma. In a model of allergic lung disease, Brown Norway (BN) rats sensitized to HDM with alum and Bordetella pertussis adjuvants produce high levels of IgE antibody and experience bronchoconstriction, increased airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to acetylcholine (ACh), and pulmonary inflammation after antigen challenge. The purpose of this study was to determine whether these asthmatic symptoms could be transferred from sensitized animals to naive recipients via humoral or cellular factors. Syngeneic recipient rats were injected (intraperitoneally with 4 x 10(7) cells (precultured overnight with either HDM or bovine serum albumin [BSA]) from lymph nodes of sensitized or control rats, respectively. Other groups received a tail-vein injection of serum from either HDM-sensitized or control rats. Antigen challenge in rats injected with sensitized cells caused increases in pulmonary inflammation and in AHR, but no changes in immediate bronchoconstriction as compared with control recipients. Antigen challenge in serum recipients resulted in immediate bronchoconstriction but had no effect on AHR or on pulmonary inflammation. These data show that immune-mediated lung inflammation and AHR are promoted by antigen-specific lymphocytes, whereas immediate allergic responses are caused by serum factors.

  9. The Role of Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP) in Allergic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Steven F.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The importance of the epithelium in initiating and controlling immune responses is becoming more appreciated. For example, allergens contact first occurs at mucosal sites in exposed to the external environment such as the skin, airways and gastrointestinal tract. This exposure leads to the production of a variety of cytokines and chemokines that are involved in driving allergic inflammatory responses. One such product is thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). Recent studies, in both humans and mouse models, have implicated TSLP in the development and progression of atopy and atopic diseases. This review will discuss this work and place TSLP in the inflammatory cascade that leads to allergic disease. PMID:21109412

  10. Airway Fibrinogenolysis and the Initiation of Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Millien, Valentine Ongeri; Lu, Wen; Mak, Garbo; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Knight, J. Morgan; Porter, Paul; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2014-01-01

    The past 15 years of allergic disease research have produced extraordinary improvements in our understanding of the pathogenesis of airway allergic diseases such as asthma. Whereas it was previously viewed as largely an immunoglobulin E-mediated process, the gradual recognition that T cells, especially Type 2 T helper (Th2) cells and Th17 cells, play a major role in asthma and related afflictions has inspired clinical trials targeting cytokine-based inflammatory pathways that show great promise. What has yet to be clarified about the pathogenesis of allergic inflammatory disorders, however, are the fundamental initiating factors, both exogenous and endogenous, that drive and sustain B- and T-cell responses that underlie the expression of chronic disease. Here we review how proteinases derived from diverse sources drive allergic responses. A central discovery supporting the proteinase hypothesis of allergic disease pathophysiology is the role played by airway fibrinogen, which in part appears to serve as a sensor of unregulated proteinase activity and which, when cleaved, both participates in a novel allergic signaling pathway through Toll-like receptor 4 and forms fibrin clots that contribute to airway obstruction. Unresolved at present is the ultimate source of airway allergenic proteinases. From among many potential candidates, perhaps the most intriguing is the possibility such enzymes derive from airway fungi. Together, these new findings expand both our knowledge of allergic disease pathophysiology and options for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25525732

  11. Role of Interleukin-17A on the Chemotactic Responses to CCL7 in a Murine Allergic Rhinitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Lian; Han, Doo Hee; Kim, Dong-Young; Lee, Chul Hee; Rhee, Chae-Seo

    2017-01-01

    Background The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-17A is associated with eosinophil infiltration into the nasal mucosa in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis. Chemotaxis of eosinophils is mediated primarily through C-C chemokine receptor type 3 (CCR3). However, the mechanism underlying the IL-17A-mediated enhancement of eosinophil recruitment via chemoattractants/chemokines remains unknown. Objectives In this study, we assessed the contribution of IL-17A to eosinophil-related inflammation via the CCL7/CCR3 pathway in experimental allergic rhinitis. Methods IL-17A knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) BALB/c mice were injected intraperitoneally and challenged intranasally with OVA to induce allergic rhinitis. Various parameters of the allergic response were evaluated, and mRNA and protein levels of CCL7 and CCR3 in nasal tissue and serum were compared between the two groups. The chemotactic response to CCL7 with or without IL-17A in bone marrow-derived eosinophils (bmEos) from BALB/c mice was measured. Results In the allergic rhinitis model, IL-17A deficiency significantly decreased nasal symptoms, serum IgE levels, and eosinophil recruitment to the nasal mucosa. CCL7 and CCR3 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in the nasal mucosa of IL-17A KO mice compared with the WT mice. BmEos showed a significantly increased chemotactic response to -low concentration of CCL7 in the presence of IL-17A compared with its absence. Conclusion The suppression of nasal inflammation due of IL-17A deficiency in allergic rhinitis is partly responsible for the regulation of CCL7 secretion and eosinophil infiltration, which may be regulated via the CCL7/CCR3 pathway. PMID:28046055

  12. Allergic rhinitis

    MedlinePlus

    Hay fever; Nasal allergies; Seasonal allergy; Seasonal allergic rhinitis; Allergies - allergic rhinitis; Allergy - allergic rhinitis ... an allergen that also trigger symptoms. ALLERGY SHOTS Allergy shots ... are sometimes recommended if you cannot avoid the ...

  13. Recent developments in the role of reactive oxygen species in allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jingjing; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Allergic asthma has a global prevalence, morbidity, and mortality. Many environmental factors, such as pollutants and allergens, are highly relevant to allergic asthma. The most important pathological symptom of allergic asthma is airway inflammation. Accordingly, the unique role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) had been identified as a main reason for this respiratory inflammation. Many studies have shown that inhalation of different allergens can promote ROS generation. Recent studies have demonstrated that several pro-inflammatory mediators are responsible for the development of allergic asthma. Among these mediators, endogenous or exogenous ROS are responsible for the airway inflammation of allergic asthma. Furthermore, several inflammatory cells induce ROS and allergic asthma development. Airway inflammation, airway hyper-responsiveness, tissue injury, and remodeling can be induced by excessive ROS production in animal models. Based on investigations of allergic asthma and ROS formation mechanisms, we have identified several novel anti-inflammatory therapeutic treatments. This review describes the recent data linking ROS to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. PMID:28203435

  14. Mediator profiles in tears during the conjunctival response induced by allergic reaction in the nasal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The allergic reaction occurring primarily in the nasal mucosa can induce a secondary conjunctival response of an immediate (SICR), late (SLCR), or delayed (SDYCR) type in some patients with allergic conjunctivitis (AC). Objectives To investigate the concentration changes of histamine, tryptase, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN), leukotrienes (LTB 4, LTC4, LTE4), myeloperoxidase (MPO), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and interleukins (IL-2, IL-4, IL-5) in tears during the SICR, SLCR, and SDYCR. Methods In 32 patients with AC, 11 SICR (p<0.01), 13 SLCR (p<0.001), and eight SDYCR (p<0.01) to nasal challenges with allergens (NPTs), the NPTs and 32 control tests with PBS were repeated and supplemented with the determination of these factors in tears. Results The SICRs were associated with significant concentration changes in tears (p<0.05) of histamine, tryptase, ECP, LTC4, and IL-4. The SLCRs were accompanied by significant changes in concentrations of histamine, ECP, LTB4, LTC4, MPO, IL-4, and IL-5. The SDYCRs were associated with significant concentration changes in tears (p<0.05) of LTB4, MPO, IFN-γ, and IL-2. No significant changes in these factors were recorded in tears during the 32 PBS controls (p>0.1) or in the ten control patients (p>0.1). Conclusions These results provide evidence for causal involvement of nasal allergy in some patients with AC, inducing secondary conjunctival response of immediate (SICR), late SLCR, or delayed SDYCR type, associated with different mediator, cytokine, and cellular profiles in the tears, suggesting involvement of different hypersensitivity mechanisms. These results also emphasize the diagnostic value of nasal allergen challenge combined with monitoring of the conjunctival response in some patients with AC. PMID:23869165

  15. Response to Nonallergenic Irritants in Children With Allergic and Nonallergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Ji Hyeon; Cho, Eunhae; Kim, Mi Ae; Lee, Seung Won; Kang, Yu Sun; Sheen, Youn Ho; Jee, Hye Mi; Jung, Young-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Nonallergenic irritants can aggravate the symptoms of rhinitis. We investigated the clinical responses of children with allergic rhinitis (AR) and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) to nonallergenic irritants, and identified factors associated with these responses. Methods Children with chronic rhinitis (n=208) were classified as having AR or NAR based on the presence of aeroallergen-specific IgE. Healthy controls (n=24) were recruited for comparison. The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines were used to classify patients, and their irritant score (0-21 points) and current symptom score (5-35 points) were measured. Subjects with irritant scores ≥3 and <3 were classified as having irritant and nonirritant rhinitis, respectively. Results The mean age of enrolled subjects was 6.8 years (range: 1.8-16.0 years). The AR and NAR groups had similar irritant scores (P=0.394) and proportions of subjects with irritant scores ≥3 (P=0.105). Irritant score correlated positively with symptom score (P=0.005), and the proportion of subjects with irritant scores ≥3 was greater in children with moderate-severe rhinitis than in those with mild rhinitis (P=0.046). Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the presence of atopic eczema increased the risk for sensitivity to a nonallergenic irritant (aOR=2.928, 95% CI 1.567-5.473, P=0.001). Conclusions Response to a nonallergenic irritant was useful for gauging the severity of rhinitis, but not for differentiating AR from NAR. AR and NAR patients with atopic eczema may increase nasal sensitivity to nonallergenic irritants. PMID:27126728

  16. Inhibitory effect of fermented Arctium lappa fruit extract on the IgE-mediated allergic response in RBL‑2H3 cells.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae-Myung; Yang, Ju Hye; Yang, Hye Jin; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2016-02-01

    Arctium lappa fruit has been used in traditional medicine, and it is known to exert beneficial effects, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects. However, the effects of the Arctium lappa fruit on the allergic response remain unknown. In this study, we evaluated the anti-allergic effects of Arctium lappa fruit extract (AFE) and its fermented form (F-AFE) using immunoglobulin E (IgE)-activated RBL‑2H3 cells. To investigate the anti-allergic effects of AFE or F-AFE, we examined the release of β-hexosaminidase, a key biomarker of degranulation during an allergic reaction, and the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the cells treated with or without the above-mentioned extracts. AFE weakly inhibited the release of β-hexosaminidase, whereas F-AFE significantly suppressed the release of β-hexosaminidase in a dose-dependent manner. Consistently, F-AFE suppressed the production of TNF-α and PGE2 in a dose-dependent manner. F-AFE exerted an inhibitory effect on the production of β-hexosaminidase, TNF-α and PGE2 with an IC50 value of 30.73, 46.96 and 36.27 µg/ml, respectively. Furthermore, F-AFE inhibited the phosphorylation of Lyn, Fyn and Syk, which are involved in the FcεRI signaling pathway, that of phosphoinositide phospholipase C (PLC)γ1/2 and protein kinase C (PKC)δ, which are associated with the degranulation process, as well as that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK), p38 and Akt, which are associated with cytokine expression. In the late phase, F-AFE partially suppressed the phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), but not the expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2. To compare and identify the major components of the two extracts, we used high-performance liquid chromatography. The levels of arctigenin, one of the major compounds, were elevated 6-fold in F-AFE compared with AFE, whereas the

  17. Allergic conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    Conjunctivitis - allergic seasonal/perennial; Atopic keratoconjunctivitis; Pink eye - allergic ... bumps on the inside of the eyelids (papillary conjunctivitis) Positive skin test for suspected allergens on allergy ...

  18. Allergic airway disease in mice alters T and B cell responses during an acute respiratory poxvirus infection.

    PubMed

    Walline, Crystal C; Sehra, Sarita; Fisher, Amanda J; Guindon, Lynette M; Kratzke, Ian M; Montgomery, Jessica B; Lipking, Kelsey P; Glosson, Nicole L; Benson, Heather L; Sandusky, George E; Wilkes, David S; Brutkiewicz, Randy R; Kaplan, Mark H; Blum, Janice S

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary viral infections can exacerbate or trigger the development of allergic airway diseases via multiple mechanisms depending upon the infectious agent. Respiratory vaccinia virus transmission is well established, yet the effects of allergic airway disease on the host response to intra-pulmonary vaccinia virus infection remain poorly defined. As shown here BALB/c mice with preexisting airway disease infected with vaccinia virus developed more severe pulmonary inflammation, higher lung virus titers and greater weight loss compared with mice inoculated with virus alone. This enhanced viremia was observed despite increased pulmonary recruitment of CD8(+) T effectors, greater IFNγ production in the lung, and high serum levels of anti-viral antibodies. Notably, flow cytometric analyses of lung CD8(+) T cells revealed a shift in the hierarchy of immunodominant viral epitopes in virus inoculated mice with allergic airway disease compared to mice treated with virus only. Pulmonary IL-10 production by T cells and antigen presenting cells was detected following virus inoculation of animals and increased dramatically in allergic mice exposed to virus. IL-10 modulation of host responses to this respiratory virus infection was greatly influenced by the localized pulmonary microenvironment. Thus, blocking IL-10 signaling in virus-infected mice with allergic airway disease enhanced pulmonary CD4(+) T cell production of IFNγ and increased serum anti-viral IgG1 levels. In contrast, pulmonary IFNγ and virus-specific IgG1 levels were reduced in vaccinia virus-treated mice with IL-10 receptor blockade. These observations demonstrate that pre-existing allergic lung disease alters the quality and magnitude of immune responses to respiratory poxviruses through an IL-10-dependent mechanism.

  19. Periostin facilitates eosinophil tissue infiltration in allergic lung and esophageal responses.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C; Mingler, M K; McBride, M; Putnam, P E; Collins, M H; Chang, G; Stringer, K; Abonia, J P; Molkentin, J D; Rothenberg, M E

    2008-07-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein that has been primarily studied in the context of the heart, where it has been shown to promote cardiac repair and remodeling. In this study, we focused on the role of periostin in an allergic eosinophilic inflammatory disease (eosinophilic esophagitis (EE)) known to involve extensive tissue remodeling. Periostin was indeed markedly overexpressed (35-fold) in the esophagus of EE patients, particularly in the papillae, compared with control individuals. Periostin expression was downstream from transforming growth factor-beta and interleukin-13, as these cytokines were elevated in EE esophageal samples and markedly induced periostin production by primary esophageal fibroblasts (107- and 295-fold, respectively, at 10 ng ml(-1)). A functional role for periostin in eliciting esophageal eosinophilia was demonstrated, as periostin-null mice had a specific defect in allergen-induced eosinophil recruitment to the lungs and esophagus (66 and 72% decrease, respectively). Mechanistic analyses revealed that periostin increased (5.8-fold) eosinophil adhesion to fibronectin. As such, these findings extend the involvement of periostin to esophagitis and uncover a novel role for periostin in directly regulating leukocyte (eosinophil) accumulation in T helper type 2-associated mucosal inflammation in both mice and humans.

  20. EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST ON PULMONARY RESPONSES DURING ALLERGIC SENSITIZATION TO AEROSOLIZED OVALBUMIN IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Diesel Exhaust on Pulmonary Responses During Allergic Sensitization to Aerosolized Ovalbumin in BALB/c Mice. P. Singh1, M.J. Daniels1, D. Andrews1, E. Boykin1, W. P. Linak2 and M.I. Gilmour1. 1USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC. 2 USEPA, ORD, NRMRL, RTP, NC.

    Inhala...

  1. EFFECTS OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION (UVR) ON THE RESPIRATORY ALLERGIC RESPONSES OF BALB/C MICE TO A FUNGAL ALLERGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION (UVR) ON THE RESPIRATORY ALLERGIC RESPONSES OF BALB/C MICE TO A FUNGAL ALLERGEN. M D W Ward, D M Sailstad, D L Andrews, E H Boykin, and MJ K Selgrade. National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Developmen...

  2. A surprising role for uric acid: the inflammatory malaria response.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Delgado, Julio; Ty, Maureen; Orengo, Jamie M; van de Hoef, Diana; Rodriguez, Ana

    2014-02-01

    Malaria, which is caused by Plasmodium parasite erythrocyte infection, is a highly inflammatory disease with characteristic periodic fevers caused by the synchronous rupture of infected erythrocytes to release daughter parasites. Despite the importance of inflammation in the pathology and mortality induced by malaria, the parasite-derived factors inducing the inflammatory response are still not well characterized. Uric acid is emerging as a central inflammatory molecule in malaria. Not only is uric acid found in the precipitated form in infected erythrocytes, but high concentrations of hypoxanthine, a precursor for uric acid, also accumulate in infected erythrocytes. Both are released upon infected erythrocyte rupture into the circulation where hypoxanthine would be converted into uric acid and precipitated uric acid would encounter immune cells. Uric acid is an important contributor to inflammatory cytokine secretion, dendritic cell and T cell responses induced by Plasmodium, suggesting uric acid as a novel molecular target for anti-inflammatory therapies in malaria.

  3. Allergic manifestations and cutaneous histamine responses in patients with McCune Albright syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background McCune Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare disorder characterized by precocious puberty, café-au-lait spots, and fibrous dysplasia. Its cause is an activating mutation in the GNAS gene, encoding a subunit of the stimulatory G protein, Gsalpha (Gsα). The action of any mediator that signals via Gsα and cyclic AMP can be up regulated in MAS. We had observed gastritis, gastroesophageal reflux, and anaphylaxis in McCune Albright patients. Objective As histamine is known to signal via histamine 1 (H1) and histamine 2 (H2) receptors, which couple with stimulatory G proteins, we attempted to mechanistically link histamine responsiveness to the activating GNAS mutation. We hypothesized that responsiveness to histamine skin testing would differ between MAS patients and healthy controls. Patients and methods After obtaining informed consent, we performed a systematic review of histamine responsiveness and allergic manifestations in 11 MAS patients and 11 sex-matched, Tanner-stage matched controls. We performed skin prick testing, quantifying the orthogonal diameters of wheals and erythema. We also quantitated G protein mRNA expression. Results The peak wheal and flare responses to histamine were significantly higher in MAS patients compared to controls. Conclusions This study suggests that MAS patients may be at risk for exaggerated histamine responsiveness compared to unaffected controls. PMID:23663565

  4. Parkinson’s disease and enhanced inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovska, Iva; Wagner, Brandon M

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the first and second most prevalent motor and neurodegenerative disease, respectively. The clinical symptoms of PD result from a loss of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. However, the molecular cause of DA neuron loss remains elusive. Mounting evidence implicates enhanced inflammatory response in the development and progression of PD pathology. This review examines current research connecting PD and inflammatory response. PMID:25769314

  5. Wogonin Induces Eosinophil Apoptosis and Attenuates Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dorward, David A.; Sharma, Sidharth; Rennie, Jillian; Felton, Jennifer M.; Alessandri, Ana L.; Duffin, Rodger; Schwarze, Jurgen; Haslett, Christopher; Rossi, Adriano G.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Eosinophils are key effector cells in allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, eczema, and asthma. Their tissue presence is regulated by both recruitment and increased longevity at inflamed sites. Objectives: To investigate the ability of the flavone wogonin to induce eosinophil apoptosis in vitro and attenuate eosinophil-dominant allergic inflammation in vivo in mice. Methods: Human and mouse eosinophil apoptosis in response to wogonin was investigated by cellular morphology, flow cytometry, mitochondrial membrane permeability, and pharmacological caspase inhibition. Allergic lung inflammation was modeled in mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue were examined for inflammation, mucus production, and inflammatory mediator production. Airway hyperresponsiveness to aerosolized methacholine was measured. Measurements and Main Results: Wogonin induced time- and concentration-dependent human and mouse eosinophil apoptosis in vitro. Wogonin-induced eosinophil apoptosis occurred with activation of caspase-3 and was inhibited by pharmacological caspase inhibition. Wogonin administration attenuated allergic airway inflammation in vivo with reductions in BAL and interstitial eosinophil numbers, increased eosinophil apoptosis, reduced airway mucus production, and attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness. This wogonin-induced reduction in allergic airway inflammation was prevented by concurrent caspase inhibition in vivo. Conclusions: Wogonin induces eosinophil apoptosis and attenuates allergic airway inflammation, suggesting that it has therapeutic potential for the treatment of allergic inflammation in humans. PMID:25629436

  6. Allergic Responses Induced by the Immunomodulatory Effects of Nanomaterials upon Skin Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Yasuo; Kuroda, Etsushi; Hirai, Toshiro; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Ishii, Ken J.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, a vast array of nanomaterials has been created through the development of nanotechnology. With the increasing application of these nanomaterials in various fields, such as foods, cosmetics, and medicines, there has been concern about their safety, that is, nanotoxicity. Therefore, there is an urgent need to collect information about the biological effects of nanomaterials so that we can exploit their potential benefits and design safer nanomaterials, while avoiding nanotoxicity as a result of inhalation or skin exposure. In particular, the immunomodulating effect of nanomaterials is one of most interesting aspects of nanotoxicity. However, the immunomodulating effects of nanomaterials through skin exposure have not been adequately discussed compared with the effects of inhalation exposure, because skin penetration by nanomaterials is thought to be extremely low under normal conditions. On the other hand, the immunomodulatory effects of nanomaterials via skin may cause severe problems for people with impaired skin barrier function, because some nanomaterials could penetrate the deep layers of their allergic or damaged skin. In addition, some studies, including ours, have shown that nanomaterials could exhibit significant immunomodulating effects even if they do not penetrate the skin. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the allergic responses induced by nanomaterials upon skin exposure. First, we discuss nanomaterial penetration of the intact or impaired skin barrier. Next, we describe the immunomodulating effects of nanomaterials, focusing on the sensitization potential of nanomaterials and the effects of co-exposure of nanomaterials with substances such as chemical sensitizers or allergens, on the onset of allergy, following skin exposure. Finally, we discuss the potential mechanisms underlying the immunomodulating effects of nanomaterials by describing the involvement of the protein corona in the interaction of

  7. CROSS REACTIVITY IN ALLERGIC ASTHMA-LIKE RESPONSES BETWEEN MOLD AND HOUSE DUST MITE IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molds are ubiquitous in the environment and exposures to molds contribute to various human diseases including allergic asthma. Some mold allergens have been implicated as the causal agent for allergic asthma. Western blot analysis demonstrated IgE-binding cross-reactivity among m...

  8. Inflammatory response to trauma: Implications for coagulation and resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Albert; Pittet, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of this review Recent studies have changed our understanding of the timing and interactions of the inflammatory processes and coagulation cascade following severe trauma. This review highlights this information and correlates its impact on the current clinical approach for fluid resuscitation and treatment of coagulopathy for trauma patients. Recent findings Severe trauma is associated with a failure of multiple biologic emergency response systems that includes imbalanced inflammatory response, acute coagulopathy of trauma (ACOT), and endovascular glycocalyx degradation with microcirculatory compromise. These abnormalities are all inter-linked and related. Recent observations show that after severe trauma: 1) pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses are concomitant, not sequential and 2) resolution of the inflammatory response is an active process, not a passive one. Understanding these interrelated processes is considered extremely important for the development of future therapies for severe trauma in humans. Summary Traumatic injuries continue to be a significant cause of mortality worldwide. Recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of end-organ failure, and modulation of the inflammatory response has important clinical implications regarding fluid resuscitation and treatment of coagulopathy. PMID:24419158

  9. Exposure to triclosan augments the allergic response to ovalbumin in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stacey E; Franko, Jennifer; Kashon, Michael L; Anderson, Katie L; Hubbs, Ann F; Lukomska, Ewa; Meade, B Jean

    2013-03-01

    During the last decade, there has been a remarkable and unexplained increase in the prevalence of asthma. These studies were conducted to investigate the role of dermal exposure to triclosan, an endocrine-disrupting compound, on the hypersensitivity response to ovalbumin (OVA) in a murine model of asthma. Triclosan has had widespread use in the general population as an antibacterial and antifungal agent and is commonly found in consumer products such as soaps, deodorants, toothpastes, shaving creams, mouthwashes, and cleaning supplies. For these studies, BALB/c mice were exposed dermally to concentrations of triclosan ranging from 0.75 to 3% (0.375-1.5mg/mouse/day) for 28 consecutive days. Concordantly, mice were ip injected with OVA (0.9 µg) and aluminum hydroxide (0.5mg) on days 1 and 10 and challenged with OVA (125 µg) by pharyngeal aspiration on days 19 and 27. Compared with the animals exposed to OVA alone, increased spleen weights, OVA-specific IgE, interleukin-13 cytokine levels, and numbers of lung eosinophils were demonstrated when mice were coexposed to OVA and triclosan. Statistically significant increases in OVA-specific and nonspecific airway hyperreactivity were observed for all triclosan coexposed groups compared with the vehicle and OVA controls. In these studies, exposure to triclosan alone was not demonstrated to be allergenic; however, coexposure with a known allergen resulted in enhancement of the hypersensitivity response to that allergen, suggesting that triclosan exposure may augment the allergic responses to other environmental allergens.

  10. CD8α¯ DC is the major DC subset which mediates inhibition of allergic responses by Schistosoma infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, J-Y; Lu, P; Hu, L-Z; Shen, Y-J; Zhu, Y-J; Ren, J-L; Ji, W-H; Zhang, X-Z; Wu, Z-Q; Yang, X-Z; Yang, J; Li, L-Y; Yang, X; Liu, P-M

    2014-12-01

    Our and others' previous studies have shown that Schistosoma japonicum (SJ) infection can inhibit allergic reactions. We recently reported that DCs played an important role in SJ infection-mediated inhibition of allergy, which was associated with enhanced IL-10 and T regulatory cell responses. Here, we further compared the role of CD8α(+) DC and CD8α(-) DC subsets for the inhibitory effect. We sorted CD8α(+) DC (SJCD8α(+) DC) and CD8α(-) DC (SJCD8α(-) DC) from SJ-infected mice and tested their ability to modulate allergic responses in vivo. The data showed that the adoptive transfer of SJCD8α(-) DC was much more efficient than SJCD8α(+) DC for the suppression of allergic airway eosinophilia, mucus overproduction, antigen-specific IgE responses, and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5). More importantly, we found that the transfer of SJCD8α(-) DC, but not SJCD8α(+) DC, significantly increased IL-10 and TGF-β production following OVA exposure. As control, the transfer of DC subsets from naïve mice had no significant effect on allergic inflammation. In addition, SJCD8α-DC expressed significantly higher IL-10 but lower IL-12, CD80 and CD86 than SJCD8α(+) DC, fitting a tolerogenic phenotype. The results suggest that CD8α(-) DC is the predominant DC subset which is involved in the parasitic infection-mediated inhibition of allergic inflammation and possibly through enhancing immunomodulatory cytokine (IL-10 and TGF-β) production.

  11. Carvacrol attenuates mechanical hypernociception and inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Adriana G; Xavier, Maria A; de Santana, Marília T; Camargo, Enilton A; Santos, Cliomar A; Brito, Fabíola A; Barreto, Emiliano O; Cavalcanti, Sócrates C H; Antoniolli, Angelo R; Oliveira, Rita C M; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2012-03-01

    Carvacrol is a phenolic monoterpene present in the essential oil of the family Lamiaceae, as in the genera Origanum and Thymus. We previously reported that carvacrol is effective as an analgesic compound in various nociceptive models, probably by inhibition of peripheral mediators that could be related with its strong antioxidant effect observed in vitro. In this study, the anti-hypernociceptive activity of carvacrol was tested in mice through models of mechanical hypernociception induced by carrageenan, and the involvement of important mediators of its signaling cascade, as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), and dopamine, were assessed. We also investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of carvacrol on the model of carrageenan-induced pleurisy and mouse paw edema, and the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitrite production in murine macrophages was observed. Systemic pretreatment with carvacrol (50 or 100 mg/kg; i.p.) inhibited the development of mechanical hypernociception and edema induced by carrageenan and TNF-α; however, no effect was observed on hypernociception induced by PGE(2) and dopamine. Besides this, carvacrol significantly decreased TNF-α levels in pleural lavage and suppressed the recruitment of leukocytes without altering the morphological profile of these cells. Carvacrol (1, 10, and 100 μg/mL) also significantly reduced (p < 0.001) the LPS-induced nitrite production in vitro and did not produce citotoxicity in the murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro. The spontaneous locomotor activity of mice was not affected by carvacrol. This study adds information about the beneficial effects of carvacrol on mechanical hypernociception and inflammation. It also indicates that this monoterpene might be potentially interesting in the development of novel tools for management and/or treatment of painful conditions, including those related to inflammatory and prooxidant states.

  12. Translation Control: A Multifaceted Regulator of Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, Barsanjit; Li, Xiaoxia; Barik, Sailen

    2010-01-01

    A robust innate immune response is essential to the protection of all vertebrates from infection, but it often comes with the price tag of acute inflammation. If unchecked, a runaway inflammatory response can cause significant tissue damage, resulting in myriad disorders, such as dermatitis, toxicshock, cardiovascular disease, acute pelvic and arthritic inflammatory diseases, and various infections. To prevent such pathologies, cells have evolved mechanisms to rapidly and specifically shut off these beneficial inflammatory activities before they become detrimental. Our review of recent literature, including our own work, reveals that the most dominant and common mechanism is translational silencing, in which specific regulatory proteins or complexes are recruited to cis-acting RNA structures in the untranslated regions of single or multiple mRNAs that code for the inflammatory protein(s). Enhancement of the silencing function may constitute a novel pharmacological approach to prevent immunity-related inflammation. PMID:20304832

  13. Dietary polyphenols in the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Holvoet, S; Mercenier, A

    2011-10-01

    Allergic disorders encompass skin, food and respiratory allergies. Sensitization to a normally harmless allergen results in the immune system being biased to a predominant T-helper type 2 response. Re-exposure to the same allergen leads to a robust secretion of allergy-related mediators that eventually triggers symptoms. Our understanding of these disorders has enabled the search of therapeutic approaches that can either modulate the sensitization process or impact on allergic mediators, thus helping manage allergic symptoms. Polyphenols are one such class of compounds that are found in foods and plant sources and have been investigated for their anti-allergic effect in different disease models and in human clinical trials. Their anti-inflammatory profile is known to impact on the recruitment of immune cells to the skin and in preventing the development of secondary infections following disruption of the skin barrier. The interaction of polyphenols with proteins can modulate the process of allergic sensitization and their direct effect on allergic effector cells such as mast cells inhibit mediator release, resulting in the alleviation of symptoms. In addition, their endogenous anti-oxidant ability limits the extent of cellular injury from free radicals during the allergic insult. Overall, polyphenols hold promise as anti-allergy agents capable of influencing multiple biological pathways and immune cell functions in the allergic immune response and deserve further investigation. The objective of the current review is to summarize the key findings and progress made in studying polyphenols as anti-allergic ingredients. Special emphasis is placed in this review to highlight key physiological, cellular and signalling pathways implicated in the mechanism of action of different polyphenols in the context of allergic disorders and their manifestations.

  14. Th2 Allergic Immune Response to Inhaled Fungal Antigens is Modulated By TLR-4-Independent Bacterial Products

    PubMed Central

    Allard, Jenna B.; Rinaldi, Lisa; Wargo, Matt; Allen, Gilman; Akira, Shizuo; Uematsu, Satoshi; Poynter, Matthew E.; Hogan, Deborah A.; Rincon, Mercedes; Whittaker, Laurie A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Allergic airway disease is characterized by eosinophilic inflammation, mucus hypersecretion and increased airway resistance. Fungal antigens are ubiquitous within the environment and are well know triggers of allergic disease. Bacterial products are also frequently encountered within the environment and may alter the immune response to certain antigens. The consequence of simultaneous exposure to bacterial and fungal products on the lung adaptive immune response has not been explored. Here we show that oropharyngeal aspiration of fungal lysates (Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus) promotes airway eosinophilia, secretion of Th2 cytokines and mucus cell metaplasia. In contrast, oropharyngeal exposure to bacterial lysates (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) promotes airway inflammation characterized by neutrophils, Th1 cytokine secretion and no mucus production. More importantly, administration of bacterial lysates together with fungal lysates deviates the adaptive immune response to a Th1 type associated with neutrophilia and diminished mucus production. The immunomodulatory effect that bacterial lysates have on the response to fungi is TLR4-independent but MyD88 dependent. Thus, different types of microbial products within the airway can alter the host's adaptive immune response, and potentially impact the development of allergic airway disease to environmental fungal antigens. PMID:19224641

  15. Mast Cells and Influenza A Virus: Association with Allergic Responses and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Amy C.; Temple, Rachel M.; Obar, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a widespread infectious agent commonly found in mammalian and avian species. In humans, IAV is a respiratory pathogen that causes seasonal infections associated with significant morbidity in young and elderly populations, and has a large economic impact. Moreover, IAV has the potential to cause both zoonotic spillover infection and global pandemics, which have significantly greater morbidity and mortality across all ages. The pathology associated with these pandemic and spillover infections appear to be the result of an excessive inflammatory response leading to severe lung damage, which likely predisposes the lungs for secondary bacterial infections. The lung is protected from pathogens by alveolar epithelial cells, endothelial cells, tissue resident alveolar macrophages, dendritic cells, and mast cells. The importance of mast cells during bacterial and parasitic infections has been extensively studied; yet, the role of these hematopoietic cells during viral infections is only beginning to emerge. Recently, it has been shown that mast cells can be directly activated in response to IAV, releasing mediators such histamine, proteases, leukotrienes, inflammatory cytokines, and antiviral chemokines, which participate in the excessive inflammatory and pathological response observed during IAV infections. In this review, we will examine the relationship between mast cells and IAV, and discuss the role of mast cells as a potential drug target during highly pathological IAV infections. Finally, we proposed an emerging role for mast cells in other viral infections associated with significant host pathology. PMID:26042121

  16. Vagus nerve stimulation attenuates the systemic inflammatory response to endotoxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovikova, Lyudmila V.; Ivanova, Svetlana; Zhang, Minghuang; Yang, Huan; Botchkina, Galina I.; Watkins, Linda R.; Wang, Haichao; Abumrad, Naji; Eaton, John W.; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2000-05-01

    Vertebrates achieve internal homeostasis during infection or injury by balancing the activities of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide), produced by all gram-negative bacteria, activates macrophages to release cytokines that are potentially lethal. The central nervous system regulates systemic inflammatory responses to endotoxin through humoral mechanisms. Activation of afferent vagus nerve fibres by endotoxin or cytokines stimulates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal anti-inflammatory responses. However, comparatively little is known about the role of efferent vagus nerve signalling in modulating inflammation. Here, we describe a previously unrecognized, parasympathetic anti-inflammatory pathway by which the brain modulates systemic inflammatory responses to endotoxin. Acetylcholine, the principle vagal neurotransmitter, significantly attenuated the release of cytokines (tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-18), but not the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human macrophage cultures. Direct electrical stimulation of the peripheral vagus nerve in vivo during lethal endotoxaemia in rats inhibited TNF synthesis in liver, attenuated peak serum TNF amounts, and prevented the development of shock.

  17. B cell activating factor (BAFF) selects IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells during inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qilin; Wang, Zhiding; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhu, Gaizhi; Yu, Dandan; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Hou, Chunmei; Wang, Tianxiao; Ma, Yuanfang; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan; Xiao, He; Wang, Renxi

    2017-05-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) regulates B cell maturation, survival, function, and plays a critical pathogenic role in autoimmune diseases. It remains unclear how BAFF affects IL-10(-)B cells versus regulatory B cells (Bregs) in inflammatory responses. In this study, we found that IL-10-expressing Bregs decreased in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. On blockade of the effects of BAFF with TACI-IgG, IL-10(+) Bregs were upregulated in MRL/lpr and EAE mice. In addition, BAFF expanded IL-10(+)B cells over IL-10(-)B cells under noninflammatory conditions in vitro, whereas it expanded IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells during inflammatory responses, such as stimulation with autoantigen and LPS. Finally, the selection of IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells by BAFF was dependent on BAFF receptors (BAFFR, TACI, and BCMA) that were upregulated by inflammatory responses. This study suggests that BAFF selects IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+) regulatory B cells via BAFF receptors in inflammatory responses.

  18. Diesel Exhaust Exposure and Nasal Response to Attenuated Influenza in Normal and Allergic Volunteers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Diesel exhaust enhances allergic inflammation, and pollutants are associated with heightened susceptibility to viral respiratory infections. The effects of combined diesel and virus exposure in humans are unknown. Objective: Test whether acute exposure to diesel modif...

  19. Fibrin(ogen) mediates acute inflammatory responses to biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Although "biocompatible" polymeric elastomers are generally nontoxic, nonimmunogenic, and chemically inert, implants made of these materials may trigger acute and chronic inflammatory responses. Early interactions between implants and inflammatory cells are probably mediated by a layer of host proteins on the material surface. To evaluate the importance of this protein layer, we studied acute inflammatory responses of mice to samples of polyester terephthalate film (PET) that were implanted intraperitoneally for short periods. Material preincubated with albumin is "passivated," accumulating very few adherent neutrophils or macrophages, whereas uncoated or plasma- coated PET attracts large numbers of phagocytes. Neither IgG adsorption nor surface complement activation is necessary for this acute inflammation; phagocyte accumulation on uncoated implants is normal in hypogammaglobulinemic mice and in severely hypocomplementemic mice. Rather, spontaneous adsorption of fibrinogen appears to be critical: (a) PET coated with serum or hypofibrinogenemic plasma attracts as few phagocytes as does albumin-coated material; (b) in contrast, PET preincubated with serum or hypofibrinogenemic plasma containing physiologic amounts of fibrinogen elicits "normal" phagocyte recruitment; (c) most importantly, hypofibrinogenemic mice do not mount an inflammatory response to implanted PET unless the material is coated with fibrinogen or the animals are injected with fibrinogen before implantation. Thus, spontaneous adsorption of fibrinogen appears to initiate the acute inflammatory response to an implanted polymer, suggesting an interesting nexus between two major iatrogenic effects of biomaterials: clotting and inflammation. PMID:8245787

  20. Respiratory responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and their relationship to nonspecific airway reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, W.F.; Horstman, D.H.; Abdul-Salaam, S.; Raggio, L.J.; Green, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Ozone exposure in man produces changes in respiratory function and symptoms. There is a large degree of unexplained intersubject variability in the magnitude of these responses. There is concern that individuals with chronic respiratory diseases may also be more responsive to ozone than normal individuals. The purpose of this study was to describe the responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and to compare these responses to those previously observed in normal individuals. A further purpose was to measure the association between baseline nonspecific airway reactivity and changes in lung function and respiratory symptoms following ozone exposure.

  1. Saturated fatty acids trigger TLR4-mediated inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Rocha, D M; Caldas, A P; Oliveira, L L; Bressan, J; Hermsdorff, H H

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) mediate infection-induced inflammation and sterile inflammation by endogenous molecules. Among the TLR family, TLR4 is the best understood. However, while its downstream signaling pathways have been well defined, not all ligands of TLR4 are currently known. Current evidence suggests that saturated fatty acids (SFA) act as non-microbial TLR4 agonists, and trigger its inflammatory response. Thus, our present review provides a new perspective on the potential mechanism by which SFAs could modulate TLR4-induced inflammatory responses: (1) SFAs can be recognized by CD14-TLR4-MD2 complex and trigger inflammatory pathways, similar to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). (2) SFAs lead to modification of gut microbiota with an overproduction of LPS after a high-fat intake, enhancing this natural TLR4 ligand. (3) In addition, this metabolic endotoxemia leads to an oxidative stress thereby producing atherogenic lipids - oxLDL and oxidized phospholipids - which trigger CD36-TLR4-TLR6 inflammatory response. (4) Also, the high SFA consumption increases the lipemia and the mmLDL and oxLDL formation through oxidative modifications of LDL. The mmLDL, unlike oxLDL, is involved in activation of the CD14-TLR4-MD2 inflammatory pathway. Those molecules can induce TLR4 inflammatory response by MyD88-dependent and/or MyD88-independent pathways that, in turn, promotes the expression of proinflammatory transcript factors such as factor nuclear kappa B (NF-κB), which plays a crucial role in the induction of inflammatory mediators (cytokines, chemokines, or costimulatory molecules) implicated in the development and progression of many chronic diseases.

  2. Supression of inflammatory responses by labdane-type diterpenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Giron, Natalia; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Lopez-Fontal, Raquel; Bosca, Lisardo; Hortelano, Sonsoles Heras, Beatriz de las

    2008-04-15

    A series of 11 labdane-type diterpenoids (1-11) with various patterns of substitution were tested for potential anti-inflammatory activity. Of these compounds, 4 and 11 were selected to evaluate their influence on targets relevant to the regulation of the inflammatory response. These diterpenoids reduced the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages, with IC50 in the range 1-10 {mu}M. Inhibition of these inflammatory mediators was related to inhibition of the expression of nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) at the transcriptional level, as determined by western-blot and RT-PCR. Examination of the effects of these diterpenoids on nuclear factor {kappa}B signaling showed that both compounds inhibit the phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and I{kappa}B{beta}, preventing their degradation and the nuclear translocation of the NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit. Inhibition of IKK activity was also observed. These derivatives displayed significant anti-inflammatory activity in vivo, suppressing mouse ear edema induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and inhibiting myeloperoxidase activity, an index of neutrophil infiltration. The anti-inflammatory effects of these labdane diterpenoids, together with their low cell toxicity, suggest potential therapeutic applications in the regulation of the inflammatory response.

  3. Topical levamisole hydrochloride therapy attenuates experimental murine allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heyao; Zhang, Jiali; Gao, Chunsheng; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Chen; Zheng, Wenjie

    2007-12-22

    Allergic rhinitis is one of the most common chronic diseases. There are a number of effective therapeutic options for allergic rhinitis patients, such as intranasal corticosteroids. How to avoid the adverse effects of these traditional medicines has come to public attention and started the search for effective and safe medicine. We used BALB/c mice with experimental allergic rhinitis, and determined that levamisole delivered locally (intranasal, i.n.) could attenuate early-phase inflammatory response, decrease histamine, suppress edema and eosinophil infiltration, and diminish the ovalbumin-specific serum IgE level. Detailed analysis of cytokine gene expression showed that levamisole can decrease IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 mRNA and increase IL-12, IL-18 and IFN-gamma mRNA. Levamisole showed analogous effects of down-regulating Th2 cytokines with budesonide and distinct up-regulating effects on Th1 cytokines gene expression. Our findings offer potential options for allergic rhinitis therapy.

  4. Exposure to Triclosan Augments the Allergic Response to Ovalbumin in a Mouse Model of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacey E.; Franko, Jennifer; Kashon, Michael L.; Anderson, Katie L.; Hubbs, Ann F.; Lukomska, Ewa; Meade, B. Jean

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, there has been a remarkable and unexplained increase in the prevalence of asthma. These studies were conducted to investigate the role of dermal exposure to triclosan, an endocrine-disrupting compound, on the hypersensitivity response to ovalbumin (OVA) in a murine model of asthma. Triclosan has had widespread use in the general population as an antibacterial and antifungal agent and is commonly found in consumer products such as soaps, deodorants, toothpastes, shaving creams, mouthwashes, and cleaning supplies. For these studies, BALB/c mice were exposed dermally to concentrations of triclosan ranging from 0.75 to 3% (0.375–1.5 mg/mouse/day) for 28 consecutive days. Concordantly, mice were ip injected with OVA (0.9 μg) and aluminum hydroxide (0.5 mg) on days 1 and 10 and challenged with OVA (125 μg) by pharyngeal aspiration on days 19 and 27. Compared with the animals exposed to OVA alone, increased spleen weights, OVA-specific IgE, interleukin-13 cytokine levels, and numbers of lung eosinophils were demonstrated when mice were coexposed to OVA and triclosan. Statistically significant increases in OVA-specific and nonspecific airway hyperreactivity were observed for all triclosan coexposed groups compared with the vehicle and OVA controls. In these studies, exposure to triclosan alone was not demonstrated to be allergenic; however, coexposure with a known allergen resulted in enhancement of the hypersensitivity response to that allergen, suggesting that triclosan exposure may augment the allergic responses to other environmental allergens. PMID:23192912

  5. Allergic Rhinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... out what I'm allergic to?Is my allergy seasonal?I am allergic to _____. Am I at risk for any other allergies?What changes can I make at home to ... org editorial staff Tags: allergen, allergic rhinitis, allergies, allergy, ... ragweed, seasonal rhinitis Family Health, Kids and Teens, Men, Seniors, ...

  6. The immune and inflammatory response to orf virus.

    PubMed

    Haig, D M; McInnes, C; Deane, D; Reid, H; Mercer, A

    1997-06-01

    Orf virus is a zoonotic, epitheliotropic DNA parapox virus that principally infects sheep and goats. The fact that the virus can repeatedly reinfect sheep has provoked an interest in the underlying cellular, virological and molecular mechanisms for its apparent escape from the host protective immune response. The local immune and inflammatory response in skin and the cell phenotype and cytokine response in lymph analysed around a single lymph node are characteristic of an anti-viral response. An unusual feature is the dense accumulation of MHC Class II+ dendritic cells in the skin lesion. The function of these cells is not known. Orf virus virulence genes and activities have been identified that may interfere with the development of the host protective immune and inflammatory response.

  7. Synergistic effects of anethole and ibuprofen in acute inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski-Rebecca, Edirlene S; Rocha, Bruno A; Wiirzler, Luiz A M; Cuman, Roberto K N; Velazquez-Martinez, Carlos A; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar A

    2015-12-05

    This study assessed the effect of the combination of anethole and ibuprofen in comparison with monotherapy by either drug alone, using two in vivo inflammatory models, namely the pleurisy and paw edema in rats. We also measured the levels of the TNF protein in plasma, and the ability of anethole to inhibit, in vitro, the activity of the cyclooxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2 enzymes. The test drugs (anethole; ibuprofen; anethole + ibuprofen), at different doses, were administered once (p.o.) 60 min before the induction of the inflammatory response. The association of anethole + ibuprofen inhibited the development of the inflammatory response in both models used. This effect can be partially explained by the inhibitory action on the production of TNF and of COX isoforms. The isobologram analysis evidenced a synergistic effect between ibuprofen and anethole, because the combination of drugs showed a higher inhibitory potential than either drug alone.

  8. Allergic Host Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Noah W.; Rosenstein, Rachel K.

    2012-01-01

    Allergies are generally thought to be a detrimental outcome of a mistargeted immune response that evolved to provide immunity to macro-parasites. Here we present arguments to suggest that allergic immunity plays an important role in host defense against noxious environmental substances, including venoms, hematophagous fluids, environmental xenobiotics and irritants. We argue that appropriately targeted allergic reactions are beneficial, although they can become detrimental when excessive. Furthermore, we suggest that allergic hypersensitivity evolved to elicit anticipatory responses and to promote avoidance of suboptimal environments. PMID:22538607

  9. Adelmidrol increases the endogenous concentrations of palmitoylethanolamide in canine keratinocytes and down-regulates an inflammatory reaction in an in vitro model of contact allergic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Petrosino, S; Puigdemont, A; Della Valle, M F; Fusco, M; Verde, R; Allarà, M; Aveta, T; Orlando, P; Di Marzo, V

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate potential new target(s)/mechanism(s) for the palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) analogue, adelmidrol, and its role in an in vitro model of contact allergic dermatitis. Freshly isolated canine keratinocytes, human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells and human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells, wild-type or transfected with cDNA encoding for N-acylethanolamine-hydrolysing acid amidase (NAAA), were treated with adelmidrol or azelaic acid, and the concentrations of endocannabinoids (anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol) and related mediators (PEA and oleoylethanolamide) were measured. The mRNA expression of PEA catabolic enzymes (NAAA and fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH), and biosynthetic enzymes (N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D, NAPE-PLD) and glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase 1, was also measured. Brain or HEK-293 cell membrane fractions were used to assess the ability of adelmidrol to inhibit FAAH and NAAA activity, respectively. HaCaT cells were stimulated with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid and the release of the pro-inflammatory chemokine, monocyte chemotactic protein-2 (MCP-2), was measured in the presence of adelmidrol. Adelmidrol increased PEA concentrations in canine keratinocytes and in the other cellular systems studied. It did not inhibit the activity of PEA catabolic enzymes, although it reduced their mRNA expression in some cell types. Adelmidrol modulated the expression of PEA biosynthetic enzyme, NAPE-PLD, in HaCaT cells, and inhibited the release of the pro-inflammatory chemokine MCP-2 from stimulated HaCaT cells. This study demonstrates for the first time an 'entourage effect' of adelmidrol on PEA concentrations in keratinocytes and suggests that this effect might mediate, at least in part, the anti-inflammatory effects of this compound in veterinary practice.

  10. Adoptive transfer of dendritic cells isolated from helminth-infected mice enhanced T regulatory cell responses in airway allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, J-Y; Li, L-Y; Yang, X-Z; Li, J; Zhong, G; Wang, J; Li, L-J; Ji, B; Wu, Z-Q; Liu, H; Yang, X; Liu, P-M

    2011-10-01

    Our and others' previous studies have shown that Schistosoma japonicum (SJ) infection can inhibit allergic reactions. Moreover, we found that adoptive transfer of dendritic cells (DCs) from inhibited mice showed a similar inhibitory effect on allergy, suggesting a critical role of DCs in SJ-infected mediated inhibition of allergy. In this study, we further examined the mechanism by which DCs contribute to inhibition of allergy. Our results showed that DCs from SJ-infected mice (SJDCs) produced significantly higher levels of IL-10 compared to those from naive control mice (NDCs). Adoptive transfer of SJDCs, unlike NDCs, significantly increased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells and CD4+CD25+IL-10+ T cells regulatory T-cell responses in vivo. This was correlated with significantly reduced production of IL-4 and IL-5 by CD4+ T cells, eotaxin in lung tissues and reduced airway allergic inflammation in the SJDC recipients following allergen sensitization and challenge. These data suggest that helminth infection may induce tolerogenic DCs that can inhibit the development of airway allergic inflammation through enhancing T regulatory cell responses.

  11. Extracellular Cyclophilins Contribute to the Regulation of Inflammatory Responses1

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Kamalpreet; Gwinn, William M.; Bower, Molly A.; Watson, Alan; Okwumabua, Ifeanyi; MacDonald, H. Robson; Bukrinsky, Michael I.; Constant, Stephanie L.

    2010-01-01

    The main regulators of leukocyte trafficking during inflammatory responses are chemokines. However, another class of recently identified chemotactic agents is extracellular cyclophilins, the proteins mostly known as receptors for the immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporine A. Cyclophilins can induce leukocyte chemotaxis in vitro and have been detected at elevated levels in inflamed tissues, suggesting that they might contribute to inflammatory responses. We recently identified CD147 as the main signaling receptor for cyclophilin A. In the current study we examined the contribution of cyclophilin-CD147 interactions to inflammatory responses in vivo using a mouse model of acute lung injury. Blocking cyclophilin-CD147 interactions by targeting CD147 (using anti-CD147 Ab) or cyclophilin (using nonimmunosuppressive cyclosporine A analog) reduced tissue neutrophilia by up to 50%, with a concurrent decrease in tissue pathology. These findings are the first to demonstrate the significant contribution of cyclophilins to inflammatory responses and provide a potentially novel approach for reducing inflammation-mediated diseases. PMID:15972687

  12. The Pathogenesis of ACLF: The Inflammatory Response and Immune Function.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Although systemic inflammation is a hallmark of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF), its role in the development of this syndrome is poorly understood. Here the author first summarizes the general principles of the inflammatory response. Inflammation can be triggered by exogenous or endogenous inducers. Important exogenous inducers include bacterial products such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and virulence factors. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns elicit inflammation through structural feature recognition (using innate pattern-recognition receptors [PRRs]), whereas virulence factors generally trigger inflammation via functional feature recognition. Endogenous inducers are called danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and include molecules released by necrotic cells and products of extracellular matrix breakdown. Danger-associated molecular patterns use different PRRs. The purpose of the inflammatory response may differ according to the type of stimulus: The aim of infection-induced inflammation is to decrease pathogen burden, whereas the DAMP-induced inflammation aims to promote tissue repair. An excessive inflammatory response can induce collateral tissue damage (a process called immunopathology). However immunopathology may not be the only mechanism of tissue damage; for example, organ failure can develop because of failed disease tolerance. In this review, the author also discusses how general principles of the inflammatory response can help us to understand the development of ACLF in different contexts: bacterial infection, severe alcoholic hepatitis, and cases in which there is no identifiable trigger.

  13. COMPARTMENTALIZATION OF THE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO INHALED GRAIN DUST

    EPA Science Inventory


    Interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and the secreted form of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (sIL-1RA) are involved in the inflammatory response to inhaled grain dust. Previously, we found considerable production of these cytokines in the lower...

  14. Immune Responses to Intestinal Microbes in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jonathan J

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are characterized by chronic, T-cell-mediated inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract that can cause significant, lifelong morbidity. Data from both human and animal studies indicate that IBDs are likely caused by dysregulated immune responses to resident intestinal microbes. Certain products from mycobacteria, fungi, and Clostridia stimulate increased effector T cell responses during intestinal inflammation, whereas other bacterial products from Clostridia and Bacteroides promote anti-inflammatory regulatory T cell responses. Antibody responses to bacterial and fungal components may help predict the severity of IBDs. While most currently approved treatments for IBDs generally suppress the patient's immune system, our growing understanding of microbial influences in IBDs will likely lead to the development of new diagnostic tools and therapies that target the intestinal microbiota.

  15. Anti-allergic properties of Mangifera indica L. extract (Vimang) and contribution of its glucosylxanthone mangiferin.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Dagmar García; Balmaseda, Ivones Hernández; León, Alina Alvarez; Hernández, Belkis Cancio; Montiel, Lucía Márquez; Garrido, Gabino Garrido; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Hernández, René Delgado

    2006-03-01

    Vimang is the brand name of formulations containing an extract of Mangifera indica L., ethnopharmacologically used in Cuba for the treatment of some immunopathological disorders, including bronchial asthma, atopic dermatitis and other allergic diseases. However, the effects of Vimang on allergic response have not been reported until now. In this study, the effects of Vimang and mangiferin, a C-glucosylxanthone isolated from the extract, on different parameters of allergic response are reported. Vimang and mangiferin showed a significant dose-dependent inhibition of IgE production in mice and anaphylaxis reaction in rats, histamine-induced vascular permeability and the histamine release induced by compound 48/80 from rat mast cells, and of lymphocyte proliferative response as evidence of the reduction of the amount of B and T lymphocytes able to contribute to allergic response. In these experiments, ketotifen, promethazine and disodium cromoglicate were used as reference drugs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Vimang had an effect on an in-vivo model of inflammatory allergy mediated by mast cells. These results constitute the first report of the anti-allergic properties of Vimang on allergic models, as well as suggesting that this natural extract could be successfully used in the treatment of allergic disorders. Mangiferin, the major compound of Vimang, contributes to the anti-allergic effects of the extract.

  16. [Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and endothelial cell injury].

    PubMed

    Gando, Satoshi

    2004-12-01

    During recent years, evidences have been accumulated demonstrating bidirectional crosstalk between coagulation and inflammation. This review outlines the influences that coagulation and inflammation exert on each other to the endothelium and how these systems induce systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Then we discussed the implications of leucocyte-endothelial activation to endothelial cell injury followed by multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in patients with sustained SIRS. Last we demonstrated an important role of inflammatory circulation disturbance induced by endothelial cell injury for the pathogenesis of MODS in SIRS and sepsis.

  17. Colchicine-responsive protracted gouty arthritis with systemic inflammatory reactions.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Fumiaki; Migita, Kiyoshi; Haramura, Tomoko; Sumiyoshi, Remi; Kawakami, Atsushi; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2014-05-01

    Acute gouty arthritis is a severe but self-limiting arthritis caused by inflammatory responses to urate crystals. Oral colchicines are effective for initial stages or prophylaxis, but generally, colchicines are ineffective for established gouty arthritis. We describe an unusual case of gouty arthritis with systemic inflammatory reactions, including high fever and polymyalgia. Refractory polyarthritis and high fever were eradicated by colchicine treatment. Genetic analysis revealed a heterozygous mutation in exon 2 of the MEFV gene (E148Q). This case underscores the possibility that MEFV gene mutations may modify the phenotype of gouty arthritis.

  18. Effects of leukotriene D4 nasal challenge on bronchial responsiveness and inflammation in asthmatic patients with allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zheng; Xie, Yanqing; Guan, Weijie; Gao, Yi; Huang, Rongquan; Xia, Shu; Jian, Wenhua; Liang, Zhiyu

    2017-01-01

    Background In asthmatic patients with allergic rhinitis (AR), increased cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) production in the secretion of nasal mucosa has been associated with greater bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) after nasal allergen challenge. However, the role of CysLTs in eliciting BHR after nasal allergen challenge has not been evaluated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of LTD4 nasal challenge on BHR and inflammation in asthmatic patients with AR. Methods In this self-controlled study, fifteen eligible consecutively recruited subjects underwent methacholine (Mch) bronchial provocation test before and 30 minutes after LTD4 nasal provocation test. The cumulative concentration of LTD4 inducing a 60% increase in nasal airway resistance (PC60NAR) was calculated. The mean values of cumulative doses inducing a 20% decrease in forced expiratory flow in one second (PD20FEV1) for Mch before and after nasal challenge were compared. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), differential inflammatory cell counts in nasal lavage and induced sputum before and after nasal challenge were compared. Results House dust mites were the major allergens accounting for 10/15 (66.7%) of asthmatic patients with AR. The PC60NAR for LT was (8.39±3.48)×10−3 mg·mL−1. The PD20FEV1 before and after nasal challenge was 3.05±3.81 and 2.70±3.81 µmol, respectively (P=0.45). The percentages of eosinophils were (38.36±23.14)% and (45.70±24.86)% in nasal lavage, and (17.51±11.05)% and (24.29±16.52)% in induced sputum before and 24 hours after nasal challenge. The neutrophil counts were (60.64±23.14)% and (53.30±24.46)% in nasal lavage, and (53.83±23.27)% and (56.19±22.28)% in induced sputum before and 24 hours after nasal challenge. The values of FeNO were 40 [35] and 43 [30] ppb before and 24 hours after nasal challenge. No severe adverse effects were reported during the tests. Conclusions Although most asthmatic patients with AR were sensitive to LTD4 nasal

  19. Purinergic signaling in inflammatory cells: P2 receptor expression, functional effects, and modulation of inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Fenila; Pérez Novo, Claudina; Bachert, Claus; Van Crombruggen, Koen

    2013-09-01

    Extracellular ATP and related nucleotides promote a wide range of pathophysiological responses via activation of cell surface purinergic P2 receptors. Almost every cell type expresses P2 receptors and/or exhibit regulated release of ATP. In this review, we focus on the purinergic receptor distribution in inflammatory cells and their implication in diverse immune responses by providing an overview of the current knowledge in the literature related to purinergic signaling in neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, lymphocytes, eosinophils, and mast cells. The pathophysiological role of purinergic signaling in these cells include among others calcium mobilization, actin polymerization, chemotaxis, release of mediators, cell maturation, cytotoxicity, and cell death. We finally discuss the therapeutic potential of P2 receptor subtype selective drugs in inflammatory conditions.

  20. Platelets protect lung from injury induced by systemic inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shuhua; Wang, Yabo; An, Qi; Chen, Hao; Zhao, Junfei; Zhang, Jie; Meng, Wentong; Du, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory responses can severely injure lungs, prompting efforts to explore how to attenuate such injury. Here we explored whether platelets can help attenuate lung injury in mice resulting from extracorporeal circulation (ECC)-induced systemic inflammatory responses. Mice were subjected to ECC for 30 min, then treated with phosphate-buffered saline, platelets, the GPIIb/IIIa inhibitor Tirofiban, or the combination of platelets and Tirofiban. Blood and lung tissues were harvested 60 min later, and lung injury and inflammatory status were assessed. As expected, ECC caused systemic inflammation and pulmonary dysfunction, and platelet transfusion resulted in significantly milder lung injury and higher lung function. It also led to greater numbers of circulating platelet-leukocyte aggregates and greater platelet accumulation in the lung. Platelet transfusion was associated with higher production of transforming growth factor-β and as well as lower levels of tumour necrosis factor-α and neutrophil elastase in plasma and lung. None of these platelet effects was observed in the presence of Tirofiban. Our results suggest that, at least under certain conditions, platelets can protect lung from injury induced by systemic inflammatory responses. PMID:28155889

  1. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  2. Glutathione S-Transferases M1 and P1 Prevent Aggravation of Allergic Responses by Secondhand Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, Frank D.; Li, Yu-Fen; Gong, Henry; Diaz-Sanchez, David

    2006-01-01

    Rationale: Secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS) and traffic-related air pollutants are associated with asthma and allergy. Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) and SHS can interact with allergens in exacerbating allergic airway diseases through generation of reactive oxygen species. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) metabolize reactive oxygen species and detoxify electrophilic xenobiotics present in SHS and DEPs. Objectives: We tested the hypotheses that functional GSTM1-null genotype and GSTP1 codon 105 variants (Ile105 and Val105) are determinants of allergic responses to SHS, and that responses to SHS and DEPs are correlated. Methods and Measurements: In a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial, 19 ragweed allergen–sensitive subjects who had previously participated in a DEP trial were challenged intranasally with allergen after having been exposed to either clean air or SHS at separate visits. Nasal allergen–specific IgE, histamine, IL-4, and IFN-γ levels were measured before and after allergen challenge. Main Results: Individuals with GSTM1-null or GSTP1 Ile105 genotypes showed larger nasal responses to allergens with SHS compared with clean air. GSTM1-null subjects had a larger increase in IgE than GSTM1-present subjects (median, 173.3 vs. 46.7 U/ml; p = 0.03), and the Ile105 GSTP1 genotype subjects had increased histamine (median, 10.2 vs. 4.6 nM; p = 0.01) after SHS plus allergen challenge. Responses to SHS and DEPs were correlated. Enhancement of IgE and histamine was greatest in the subjects with both the GSTM1-null and GSTP1 Ile/Ile genotypes. Conclusions: GSTM1 and GSTP1 are important cytoprotective factors that reduce SHS and DEP exacerbation of allergic responses. PMID:17023730

  3. The relationship of serum vitamins A, D, E and LL-37 levels with allergic status, tonsillar virus detection and immune response

    PubMed Central

    Elenius, Varpu; Palomares, Oscar; Waris, Matti; Turunen, Riitta; Puhakka, Tuomo; Rückert, Beate; Vuorinen, Tytti; Allander, Tobias; Vahlberg, Tero; Akdis, Mübeccel; Camargo, Carlos A.; Akdis, Cezmi A.; Jartti, Tuomas

    2017-01-01

    Background Tonsils have an active role in immune defence and inducing and maintaining tolerance to allergens. Vitamins A, D, and E, and antimicrobial peptide LL-37 may have immunomodulatory effects. We studied how their serum levels were associated with allergy status, intratonsillar/nasopharyngeal virus detection and intratonsillar expression of T cell- and innate immune response-specific cytokines, transcription factors and type I/II/III interferons in patients undergoing tonsillectomy. Methods 110 elective tonsillectomy patients participated. Serum levels of vitamins A, 25(OH)D, and E, LL-37 and allergen-specific IgE as well as nasopharyngeal/intratonsillar respiratory viruses were analyzed. The mRNA expression of IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, IL-28, IL-29, IL-37, TGF-β, FOXP3, GATA3, RORC2 and Tbet in tonsils were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Results The median age of the patients was 16 years (range 3–60), 28% of subjects had atopy, and 57% carried ≥1 respiratory virus in nasopharynx. Detection of viruses decreased by age. Higher vitamin A levels showed borderline significance with less viral detection (P = 0.056). Higher 25(OH)D was associated with less allergic rhinitis and atopy (P < 0.05) and higher vitamin E with less self-reported allergy (P < 0.05). In gene expression analyses, 25(OH)D was associated with higher IL-37, vitamin A with higher IFN-γ and vitamin E with less IL-28 (P < 0.05). LL-37 was associated with less FOXP3, RORC2 and IL-17 in tonsils (P < 0.05). Conclusions Vitamin D and E levels were associated with less allergic disorders. Vitamin A was linked to antiviral and vitamin D with anti-inflammatory activity. LL-37 and was linked to T regulatory cell effects. PMID:28235040

  4. Combination treatment of low-fluence Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and oral tranexamic acid for post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation due to allergic contact dermatitis to henna hair dye.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Bok; Park, Sae Mi; Kim, Jin-Wou; Yu, Dong Soo

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old female presented with facial hyperpigmentation. She had dyed her hair monthly with pure henna powder for the past seven months. After patch tests, the patient was diagnosed as post-inflammatory hyperpigmentastion due to allergic contact dermatitis to pure henna that has rarely been reported. The patient underwent Q-switched Nd:YAG laser treatment and was treated with oral tranexamic acid for 10 weeks. The hyperpigmentation on her forehead demonstrated substantial improvement.

  5. Arterial stiffness and inflammatory response to psychophysiological stress.

    PubMed

    Ellins, Elizabeth; Halcox, Julian; Donald, Ann; Field, Bryony; Brydon, Lena; Deanfield, John; Steptoe, Andrew

    2008-08-01

    The processes through which psychological stress influences cardiovascular disease are poorly understood, but may involve activation of hemodynamic, neuroendocrine and inflammatory responses. We assessed the relationship between carotid arterial stiffness and inflammatory responses to acute psychophysiologic stress. Participants were 155 healthy men and women aged 55.3, SD 2.7 years. Blood samples for the assessment of plasma fibrinogen, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha and interleukin (IL) 6 were drawn at baseline, immediately following standardized behavioral tasks, and 45 min later. Carotid artery stiffness was measured ultrasonically three years later, and blood pressure and heart rate responses were recorded. The tasks induced substantial increases in blood pressure and heart rate, together with increased fibrinogen, TNFalpha and IL-6 concentration. Carotid stiffness was positively associated with body mass, waist/hip ratio, blood pressure, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and C-reactive protein, and inversely with high density lipoprotein and grade of employment. Baseline levels of inflammatory variables were not related to carotid artery stiffness. But carotid stiffness was greater in participants with larger fibrinogen (p=0.037) and TNFalpha (p=0.036) responses to psychophysiological stress. These effects were independent of age, gender, grade of employment, smoking, body mass, waist/hip ratio, systolic and diastolic pressure, high and low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and C-reactive protein. There were no associations between carotid stiffness and stress responses in IL-6, blood pressure, or heart rate. We conclude that individual differences in inflammatory responses to psychophysiological stress are independently related to structural changes in artery walls that reflect increased cardiovascular disease risk.

  6. Lysophosphatidylcholine plays critical role in allergic airway disease manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Preeti; Gaur, Shailendera Nath; Arora, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 (sPLA2), pivotal for allergic and inflammatory response, hydrolyses phosphatidylcholine (PC) to lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). In present study, the role of LPC in allergic airway disease manifestation was studied using mouse model. Balb/c mice were immunized using cockroach extract (CE) and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2 inhibitor. Airway hyperresponse (AHR), lung-histology, total and differential leukocyte count (TLC&DLC), Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured. Exogenous LPC was given to the mice with or without CE sensitization, to demonstrate its role in allergic airway disease manifestation. Anti-CD1d antibody was given to study the involvement of natural killer T (NKT) cells in LPC induced response. AHR, lung-inflammation, TLC, DLC, Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels were increased on CE challenge. sPLA2 activity and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2-inhibitor, which decreased AHR, and inflammatory parameters. Exogenous LPC with or without CE sensitization increased above parameters. CE challenge or LPC exposure increased LY49C+TCRβ+ NKT cells in BALF and spleen, which was reduced by anti-CD1d antibody, accompanied with reduction in AHR and allergic airway inflammation parameters. Conclusively, LPC induces allergic airway disease manifestation and it does so probably via CD1d-restricted LY49C+TCRβ+ NKT cells. PMID:27282246

  7. Oncostatin M in the anti-inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, A; Wallace, P

    2001-01-01

    Oncostatin M (OM) is a pleiotropic cytokine of the interleukin 6 family, whose in vivo properties and physiological function remain in dispute and poorly defined. These in vivo studies strongly suggest that OM is anabolic, promoting wound healing and bone formation, and anti-inflammatory. In models of inflammation OM is produced late in the cytokine response and protects from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced toxicities, promoting the re-establishment of homoeostasis by cooperating with proinflammatory cytokines and acute phase molecules to alter and attenuate the inflammatory response. Administration of OM inhibited bacterial LPS-induced production of tumour necrosis factor α and septic lethality in a dose dependent manner. Consistent with these findings, in animal models of chronic inflammatory disease OM potently suppressed inflammation and tissue destruction in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. T cell function and antibody production were not impaired by OM treatment. Taken together, these data indicate that the activities of this cytokine in vivo are anti-inflammatory without concordant immunosuppression.

 PMID:11890661

  8. Exposure to particulate hexavalent chromium exacerbates allergic asthma pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Brent C.; Constant, Stephanie L.; Patierno, Steven R.; Jurjus, Rosalyn A.; Ceryak, Susan M.

    2012-02-15

    Airborne hexavalent chromate, Cr(VI), has been identified by the Environmental Protection Agency as a possible health threat in urban areas, due to the carcinogenic potential of some of its forms. Particulate chromates are produced in many different industrial settings, with high levels of aerosolized forms historically documented. Along with an increased risk of lung cancer, a high incidence of allergic asthma has been reported in workers exposed to certain inhaled particulate Cr(VI) compounds. However, a direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma has not been established. We recently showed that inhaled particulate Cr(VI) induces an innate neutrophilic inflammatory response in BALB/c mice. In the current studies we investigated how the inflammation induced by inhaled particulate Cr(VI) might alter the pathology of an allergic asthmatic response. We used a well-established mouse model of allergic asthma. Groups of ovalbumin protein (OVA)-primed mice were challenged either with OVA alone, or with a combination of OVA and particulate zinc chromate, and various parameters associated with asthmatic responses were measured. Co-exposure to particulate Cr(VI) and OVA mediated a mixed form of asthma in which both eosinophils and neutrophils are present in airways, tissue pathology is markedly exacerbated, and airway hyperresponsiveness is significantly increased. Taken together these findings suggest that inhalation of particulate forms of Cr(VI) may augment the severity of ongoing allergic asthma, as well as alter its phenotype. Such findings may have implications for asthmatics in settings in which airborne particulate Cr(VI) compounds are present at high levels. -- Highlights: ► Allergic asthma correlated with exposure to certain inhaled particulate chromates. ► Direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma not established. ► Cr exacerbated pathology and airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-challenged mouse. ► Particulate Cr

  9. Benfotiamine Attenuates Inflammatory Response in LPS Stimulated BV-2 Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Bozic, Iva; Savic, Danijela; Laketa, Danijela; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Milenkovic, Ivan; Pekovic, Sanja; Nedeljkovic, Nadezda; Lavrnja, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Microglial cells are resident immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS), recognized as key elements in the regulation of neural homeostasis and the response to injury and repair. As excessive activation of microglia may lead to neurodegeneration, therapeutic strategies targeting its inhibition were shown to improve treatment of most neurodegenerative diseases. Benfotiamine is a synthetic vitamin B1 (thiamine) derivate exerting potentially anti-inflammatory effects. Despite the encouraging results regarding benfotiamine potential to alleviate diabetic microangiopathy, neuropathy and other oxidative stress-induced pathological conditions, its activities and cellular mechanisms during microglial activation have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory effects of benfotiamine were investigated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine BV-2 microglia. We determined that benfotiamine remodels activated microglia to acquire the shape that is characteristic of non-stimulated BV-2 cells. In addition, benfotiamine significantly decreased production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO; cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70), tumor necrosis factor alpha α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), whereas it increased anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 (IL-10) production in LPS stimulated BV-2 microglia. Moreover, benfotiamine suppressed the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and protein kinase B Akt/PKB. Treatment with specific inhibitors revealed that benfotiamine-mediated suppression of NO production was via JNK1/2 and Akt pathway, while the cytokine suppression includes ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and Akt pathways. Finally, the potentially protective effect is mediated by the suppression of translocation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) in the nucleus. Therefore, benfotiamine may

  10. Th2 and eosinophil responses suppress inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhu; Andreev, Darja; Oeser, Katharina; Krljanac, Branislav; Hueber, Axel; Kleyer, Arnd; Voehringer, David; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Th2–eosinophil immune responses are well known for mediating host defence against helminths. Herein we describe a function of Th2–eosinophil responses in counteracting the development of arthritis. In two independent models of arthritis, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection leads to Th2 and eosinophil accumulation in the joints associated with robust inhibition of arthritis and protection from bone loss. Mechanistically, this protective effect is dependent on IL-4/IL-13-induced STAT6 pathway. Furthermore, we show that eosinophils play a central role in the modulation of arthritis probably through the increase of anti-inflammatory macrophages into arthritic joints. The presence of these pathways in human disease is confirmed by detection of GATA3-positive cells and eosinophils in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that eosinophils and helminth-induced activation of the Th2 pathway axis effectively mitigate the course of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27273006

  11. Takes your breath away--the immunology of allergic alveolitis.

    PubMed

    McSharry, C; Anderson, K; Bourke, S J; Boyd, G

    2002-04-01

    Extrinsic allergic alveolitis (synonym: hypersensitivity pneumonitis) is caused by inhaling antigenic aerosols which induce hypersensitivity responses in susceptible individuals. It is an interstitial inflammatory disease affecting the distal, gas-exchanging parts of the lung, in contrast to allergic asthma where the inflammation is more proximal, affecting the conducting airways. The aims of this review are to describe current concepts of the immunology of this model of lung inflammation, to describe some of the constitutional and environmental characteristics which affect disease susceptibility and development, and to describe topics for prospective study.

  12. Key Mediators in the Immunopathogenesis of Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sannette; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is described as a chronic inflammatory disorder of the conducting airways. It is characterized by reversible airway obstruction, eosinophil and Th2 infiltration, airway hyper-responsiveness and airway remodeling. Our findings to date have largely been dependent on work done using animal models, which have been instrumental in broadening our understanding of the mechanism of the disease. However, using animals to model a uniquely human disease is not without its drawbacks. This review aims to examine some of the key mediators and cells of allergic asthma learned from animal models and shed some light on emerging mediators in the pathogenesis allergic airway inflammation in acute and chronic asthma. PMID:24933589

  13. Associations between periodontitis and systemic inflammatory diseases: response to treatment.

    PubMed

    El-Shinnawi, Una; Soory, Mena

    2013-09-01

    There is a significant prevalence of subjects with periodontitis presenting with other inflammatory conditions such as coronary heart disease, insulin resistance and arthritis. This pattern of disease presentation underscores the importance of inflammatory loading from chronic diseases, in driving their pathogeneses in a multidirectional manner. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and other agents play an important role in this process; for example, a single nucleotide polymorphism of the TNF-α gene is associated with significant periodontal attachment loss in patients with coronary heart disease. Changes in gene expression associated with inflammation and lipid metabolism in response to oral infection with the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) have been demonstrated in mouse models, independent of the demonstration of atherosclerotic lesions. Insulin resistance is considered to be a chronic low-grade inflammatory condition, associated with altered glucose tolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, central obesity and coronary heart disease. It is accompanied by elevated levels of IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α also relevant to the progression of periodontitis. There is evidence that uncontrolled periodontal disease contributes to maintenance of systemic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with increased risk of periodontitis in subjects with RA. The periodontal pathogen Pg is significant in contributing to citrullination of proteins resulting in immune dysregulation and autoimmune responses, seen in RA. However, they are both multifactorial chronic diseases with complex etiopathogeneses that affect their presentation. Consistent but weak associations are seen for surrogate markers of periodontitis such as tooth loss, with multiple systemic conditions. Effective treatment of periodontitis would be important in reducing systemic inflammatory loading from chronic local inflammation and in achieving systemic health. Lack of a consistent cause and effect relationship

  14. Citrate modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced monocyte inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, M J; McDonough, K L; Pituch, J J; Christopherson, P L; Cornell, T T; Selewski, D T; Shanley, T P; Blatt, N B

    2015-01-01

    Citrate, a central component of cellular metabolism, is a widely used anti-coagulant due to its ability to chelate calcium. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-citrate lyase, which metabolizes citrate, has been shown to be essential for inflammation, but the ability of exogenous citrate to impact inflammatory signalling cascades remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that citrate would modulate inflammatory responses as both a cellular metabolite and calcium chelator, and tested this hypothesis by determining how clinically relevant levels of citrate modulate monocyte proinflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a human acute monocytic leukaemia cell line (THP-1). In normal medium (0·4 mM calcium), citrate inhibited LPS-induced tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-8 transcripts, whereas in medium supplemented with calcium (1·4 mM), TNF-α and IL-8 levels increased and appeared independent of calcium chelation. Using an IL-8–luciferase plasmid construct, the same increased response was observed in the activation of the IL-8 promoter region, suggesting transcriptional regulation. Tricarballylic acid, an inhibitor of ATP-citrate lyase, blocked the ability of citrate to augment TNF-α, linking citrate's augmentation effect with its metabolism by ATP-citrate lyase. In the presence of citrate, increased histone acetylation was observed in the TNF-α and IL-8 promoter regions of THP-1 cells. We observed that citrate can both augment and inhibit proinflammatory cytokine production via modulation of inflammatory gene transactivation. These findings suggest that citrate anti-coagulation may alter immune function through complex interactions with the inflammatory response. PMID:25619261

  15. Post-mating inflammatory responses of the uterus.

    PubMed

    Katila, T

    2012-08-01

    This review attempts to summarize the current knowledge on uterine inflammatory response after mating in horses, pigs and cattle. Post-mating endometritis has been extensively studied in horses as it has been considered to cause infertility. The inflammation is known to occur also in cattle, but it has not been investigated to a similar extent. There are a number of publications about mechanisms of post-mating uterine inflammation in pigs, which seem to resemble those in horses. The major focus of this review is the horse, but relevant literature is presented also on swine and cattle. Spermatozoa, seminal plasma and semen extenders play roles in the induction of inflammation. In addition, sperm numbers, concentration and viability, as well as the site of semen deposition may modulate the inflammatory response. Cytokines, polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) and mononuclear cells represent the uterine inflammatory response to mating. Inflammation is the first line of defence against invasion and eliminates excess spermatozoa and bacteria. Semen deposition elicits a massive PMN invasion, followed by phagocytosis of sperm aided by the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. Exposure of the female genital tract to semen is important also for endometrial receptivity and pre-implantation embryo development. Seminal plasma (SP) and inflammation elicit transient immune tolerance to antigens present in semen. SP contains immune-regulatory molecules that activate and control immune responses to antigens by stimulating expression of cytokines and growth factors and by initiating tissue remodelling. SP also regulates ovarian function. Effective elimination of excess sperm and inflammatory by-products and subsequent rapid return of the endometrium to the normal state is a prerequisite for pregnancy. Uterine backflow, driven by myometrial contractions and requiring a patent cervix, is an important physical tool in uterine drainage.

  16. The role of Peroxiredoxin 4 in inflammatory response and aging

    PubMed Central

    Klichko, Vladimir I.; Orr, William C.; Radyuk, Svetlana N.

    2015-01-01

    In prior studies, we determined that moderate overexpression of the Drosophila endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized peroxiredoxin (Prx), dPrx4, reduced oxidative damage and conferred beneficial effects on lifespan, while high level expression increased the incidence of tissue-specific apoptosis and dramatically shortened longevity. The detrimental pro-apoptotic and life-shortening effects were attributed to aberrant localization of dPrx4 and the apparent ER stress elicited by dPrx4 overexpression. In addition, activation of both the NF-κB- and JAK/STAT- mediated stress responses was detected, although it wasn’t clear whether these served as functional alarm signals. Here we extend these findings to show that activation of the NF-κB -dependent immunity-related/inflammatory genes, associated with lifespan shortening effects, is dependent on the activity of a Drosophila NF-κB ortholog, Relish. In the absence of Relish, the pro-inflammatory effects typically elicited by dPrx4 overexpression were not detected. The absence of Relish not only prevented hyperactivation of the immunity-related genes but also significantly rescued the severe shortening of lifespan normally observed in dPrx4 over-expressors. Overactivation of the immune/inflammatory responses was also lessened by JAK/STAT signaling. In addition we found that cellular immune/pro-inflammatory responses provoked by the oxidant paraquat but not bacteria are mediated via dPrx4 activity in the ER, as up-regulation of the immune-related genes was eliminated in flies underexpressing dPrx4 whereas immune responses triggered by bacteria were unaffected. Finally, efforts to reveal critical tissues where dPrx4 modulates longevity showed that broad targeting of dPrx4 to neuronal tissue had strong beneficial effects, while targeting expression to the fat body had deleterious effects. PMID:26689888

  17. Blockade of Glutamine Synthetase Enhances Inflammatory Response in Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Erika M.; Menga, Alessio; Lebrun, Aurore; Hooper, Douglas C.; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Microglial cells are brain-resident macrophages engaged in surveillance and maintained in a constant state of relative inactivity. However, their involvement in autoimmune diseases indicates that in pathological conditions microglia gain an inflammatory phenotype. The mechanisms underlying this change in the microglial phenotype are still unclear. Since metabolism is an important modulator of immune cell function, we focused our attention on glutamine synthetase (GS), a modulator of the response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation in other cell types, which is expressed by microglia. Results: GS inhibition enhances release of inflammatory mediators of LPS-activated microglia in vitro, leading to perturbation of the redox balance and decreased viability of cocultured neurons. GS inhibition also decreases insulin-mediated glucose uptake in microglia. In vivo, microglia-specific GS ablation enhances expression of inflammatory markers upon LPS treatment. In the spinal cords from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), GS expression levels and glutamine/glutamate ratios are reduced. Innovation: Recently, metabolism has been highlighted as mediator of immune cell function through the discovery of mechanisms that (behind these metabolic changes) modulate the inflammatory response. The present study shows for the first time a metabolic mechanism mediating microglial response to a proinflammatory stimulus, pointing to GS activity as a master modulator of immune cell function and thus unraveling a potential therapeutic target. Conclusions: Our study highlights a new role of GS in modulating immune response in microglia, providing insights into the pathogenic mechanisms associated with inflammation and new strategies of therapeutic intervention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 351–363. PMID:27758118

  18. Innate immune inflammatory response in the acutely ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Angelidis, Christos; Bouras, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Gerckens, Ulrich; Cleman, Michael W; Giannopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    The "holy grail" of modern interventional cardiology is the salvage of viable myocardial tissue in the distribution of an acutely occluded coronary artery. Thrombolysis and percutaneous coronary interventions, provided they can be delivered on time, can interrupt the occlusion and save tissue. At the same time restoring the patency of the coronary vessels and providing the ischemic myocardium with blood can cause additional tissue damage. A key element of ischemic and reperfusion injury and major determinant of the evolution of damage in the injured myocardium is the inflammatory response. The innate immune system initiates and directs this response which is a prerequisite for subsequent healing. The complement cascade is set in motion following the release of subcellular membrane constituents. Endogenous 'danger' signals known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from ischemic and dying cells alert the innate immune system and activate several signal transduction pathways through interactions with the highly conserved Toll like receptors (TLRs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation directly induces pro-inflammatory cascades and triggers formation of the inflammasome. The challenge lies into designing strategies that specifically block the inflammatory cascades responsible for tissue damage without affecting those concerned with tissue healing.

  19. Asthma: the interplay between viral infections and allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Regina K; Gill, Michelle A

    2015-02-01

    Respiratory viruses and allergens synergistically contribute to disease pathogenesis in asthma. Potential mechanisms underlying this clinically relevant association are the subject of intense investigation. This review summarizes current knowledge and recent advances in this area, with an emphasis on potential mechanisms involving immunoglobulin E, type I interferon antiviral responses, epithelial factors, and the role of dendritic cells and other antigen-presenting cells in linking viral and allergic inflammatory responses relevant to asthmatic disease.

  20. A new, rapid in vivo method to evaluate allergic responses through distinctive distribution of a fluorescent-labeled immune complex: Potential to investigate anti-allergic effects of compounds administered either systemically or topically to the skin.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Kouya; Yoshino, Shin

    2016-01-01

    We herein established a new method to evaluate allergic responses in mice rapidly and easily with ethical improvement by reducing the number of animals used. A single intravenous injection of a mixture of anti-OVA monoclonal IgE and fluorescein-ovalbumin (FITC-OVA) induced the distinctive spotted distribution of FITC-OVA in skin, named "ASDIS (Anaphylaxis-dependent Spotted Distribution of a fluorescent-labeled Immune complex in Skin)", and this was easily detected by in vivo imaging. The parallel induction of hypothermia, scratching, serum histamine increases, and ASDIS as well as the inhibition of ASDIS by either the systemic administration of a histamine H1 receptor antagonist or mast cell-depleting antibody suggested that our method, which only required 15 min, induced these allergic responses including ASDIS. Relatively mild but significant ASDIS was induced also in mice with passive systemic anaphylaxis by the method, requiring 2 separate days. The painting of anti-histamines on the skin markedly reduced ASDIS in the painted area only, suggesting the potential of this model to simultaneously compare the anti-allergic effects of several candidate compounds with control drugs in the same mice. ASDIS was suggested to originate from extravasated FITC-OVA/OE-1 immune complexes from blood to skin tissues other than mast cells. Our new method has the advantages of rapidity, easy method, and lower animal numbers to evaluate anti-allergic compounds as well as the characteristics of the used antibody, antigen, labeling molecules, additives, and other formulations. Our model for inducing ASDIS may contribute to the development of anti-allergic drugs, especially those intended for application to the skin.

  1. Allergic contact dermatitis in children.

    PubMed

    Fontana, E; Belloni Fortina, A

    2014-12-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease (delayed type hypersensitivity reaction) that accounts for up to 20% of all childhood dermatitis. Allergic contact dermatitis represents a clinical manifestation of contact sensitization and usually occurs at skin sites that have come into contact with the allergen. The clinical features of allergic contact dermatitis are itchy eczematous lesions. Prevalence of contact sensitization varies between 27% and 96% of children with suspected contact dermatitis. The relationship between contact sensitization and atopic dermatitis has been widely discussed but only conflicting data have been reported. Epicutaneous patch testing is the gold standard for the diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis. The most common allergens detected in children are: metals, topical medicaments, fragrances, and preservatives. The first line management of allergic contact dermatitis in children is to avoid the offending allergens identified with the patch test and a topical corticosteroid therapy.

  2. Inhibitory Effect of Loranthus parasiticus on IgE-Mediated Allergic Responses in RBL-2H3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ju-Hye; Kim, Young Soo

    2016-01-01

    The mistletoe Loranthus parasiticus has been used as a compound for traditional medicine in Northeast Asia for a long time and is known to possess neuroprotective action. Nonetheless, the effect of Loranthus parasiticus on allergic responses remains unknown. In the present study, we evaluated whether the water extract of Loranthus parasiticus (LPE) could inhibit IgE-mediated allergic responses in RBL-2H3 cells. LPE inhibited the release of β-hexosaminidase (IC50, 184.5 μg/mL) and the formation of tumor necrosis factor-α (IC50, 84.27 μg/mL), interleukin-4 (IC50, 93.43 μg/mL), prostaglandin E2 (IC50, 84.10 μg/mL), prostaglandin D2, and leukotriene C4 (IC50, 43.27 μg/mL) in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, LPE inhibited phosphorylation of Syk, PLCγ1/2, PKCδ, ERK, JNK, p38, and Akt. In the late phase, LPE decreased 5-lipoxygenase phosphorylation and COX-2 expression but not cPLA2 phosphorylation. Additionally, LPE included total phenolic compounds (10.72 mg/g dry weight) and total flavonoids (56.20 mg/g dry weight). These results suggest that the phenolic compounds or flavonoids contained in LPE may be associated with antiallergic activity. The phenolic compounds and flavonoids in LPE are antiallergic phytochemicals capable of inhibiting the activation of the FcεRI signaling cascade in mast cells. Such effects may provide further information for the development of a phytomedicine for allergic diseases. PMID:27761061

  3. Patients with oral allergic syndrome to apple have intense proliferative response to BET V 1.

    PubMed

    Ciprandi, G; Fenoglio, G; Kalli, F; De Amici, M; Leonardi, S; Miraglia Del Giudice, M; Salpietro, C; La Rosa, M; Caimmi, S; Marseglia, G L

    2012-01-01

    Patients with pollen allergy may frequently present an additional food-related allergy (Oral Allergic Syndrome, OAS), as consequence of cross-reactivity between pollen allergens (mainly birch, hazelnut, alder, mugwort) and vegetable allergens. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect on Bet v 1-induced T cell proliferation exerted by the presence of OAS in birch patients. Fourteen allergic patients were evaluated (6 males, mean age 35.8 years). All of them were monosensitized to birch and suffered from allergic rhinitis: 4 had also OAS to apple. Proliferation of peripheral mononuclear cells was evaluated using Bet v 1 and non-specific stimuli. OAS had higher proliferation than non-OAS patients. In addition, there were significant relationships between immunological and clinical parameters in OAS patients. This study evidences that OAS characterizes a more severe form of birch allergy: as OAS patients had higher SI, circulating eosinophils, and IgE levels. Thus, this study confirms the previous report and underlines the relevance of measuring recombinant birch allergen as higher values may suggest a reliable prediction of OAS.

  4. Allergic enteritis in children

    PubMed Central

    Czerwionka-Szaflarska, Mieczysława; Gawryjołek, Julia

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal form of food allergy is very common in children. The most frequently observed types are allergic proctitis and proctocolitis. In most cases the symptoms subside within the first 2 months of life. The babies seem healthy, and the only abnormality is a small amount of blood in stool. Symptoms can also include small intestine inflammation and colitis. Patients may present with irritability, abdominal pain, flatulence, colic, postprandial vomiting, chronic diarrhoea, and hindered physical development. The diagnosis of allergic enteritis is based on the clinical examination and the results of additional tests including an endoscopy of the lower digestive tract with histopathological assessment. Cow’s milk proteins are the most common nutrition proteins responsible for the development of the symptoms of allergic enteritis. The most essential method of treating allergic enteritis is the elimination diet. The symptoms should subside within 1–2 weeks from the beginning of the diet. PMID:28337229

  5. Pathophysiological role of the acute inflammatory response during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cover, Cathleen; Liu Jie; Farhood, Anwar; Malle, Ernst; Waalkes, Michael P.; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut . E-mail: jaeschke@email.arizona.edu

    2006-10-01

    Neutrophils are recruited into the liver after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose but the pathophysiological relevance of this acute inflammatory response remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the time course of liver injury, hepatic neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory gene mRNA expression for up to 24 h after treatment with 300 mg/kg AAP in C3Heb/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice. Although there was no relevant difference in liver injury (assessed by the increase of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and the areas of necrosis), the number of neutrophils and the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-1{beta} and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) was higher in C3Heb/FeJ than in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory genes interleukin-10 and heme oxygenase-1 was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Despite substantial hepatic neutrophil accumulation, none of the liver sections from both strains stained positive for hypochlorite-modified proteins, a specific marker for a neutrophil-induced oxidant stress. In addition, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium chloride or apocynin or the anti-neutrophil antibody Gr-1 did not protect against AAP hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, although intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was previously shown to be important for neutrophil extravasation and tissue injury in several models, ICAM-1-deficient mice were not protected against AAP-mediated liver injury. Together, these data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils aggravate liver injury induced by AAP overdose.

  6. The Inflammatory Response in Psoriasis: a Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yaxiong; Chang, Christopher; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-06-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by an excessively aberrant hyperproliferation of keratinocytes. The pathogenesis of psoriasis is complex and the exact mechanism remains elusive. However, psoriasis is thought to result from a combination of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental influences. Recent studies have identified that epigenetic factors including dysregulated DNA methylation levels, abnormal histone modification and microRNAs expressions are involved in the development of psoriasis. The interplay of immune cells and cytokines is another critical factor in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. These factors or pathways include Th1/Th2 homeostasis, the Th17/Treg balance and the IL-23/Th17 axis. Th17 is believed particularly important in psoriasis due to its pro-inflammatory effects and its involvement in an integrated inflammatory loop with dendritic cells and keratinocytes, contributing to an overproduction of antimicrobial peptides, inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines that leads to amplification of the immune response. In addition, other pathways and signaling molecules have been found to be involved, including Th9, Th22, regulatory T cells, γδ T cells, CD8(+) T cells, and their related cytokines. Understanding the pathogenesis of psoriasis will allow us to develop increasingly efficient targeted treatment by blocking relevant inflammatory signaling pathways and molecules. There is no cure for psoriasis at the present time, and much of the treatment involves managing the symptoms. The biologics, while lacking the adverse effects associated with some of the traditional medications such as corticosteroids and methotrexate, have their own set of side effects, which may include reactivation of latent infections. Significant challenges remain in developing safe and efficacious novel targeted therapies that depend on a better understanding of the immunological dysfunction in psoriasis.

  7. Effects of Psoraleae fructus and its major component psoralen on Th2 response in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hualiang; Wang, Limin; Xu, Changqing; Li, Bei; Luo, Qingli; Wu, Jinfeng; Lv, Yubao; Wang, Genfa; Dong, Jingcheng

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed to evaluate the effects of Psoraleae fructus (PF) on Th2 responses in a rat model of asthma in vivo and psoralen, a major constituent in PF, on Th2 responses in vitro. A rat model of asthma was established by sensitization and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA). Airway hyperresponsiveness was detected by direct airway resistance analysis. Lung tissues were examined for cell infiltration and mucus hypersecretion. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was assessed for cytokine levels. In vitro study, Th2 cytokine production was evaluated in the culture supernatant of D10.G4.1 (D10 cells) followed by the determination of cell viability, meanwhile Th2 transcription factor GATA-3 expression in D10 cells was also determined. The oral administration of PF significantly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to aerosolized methacholine and decreased IL-4 and IL-13 levels in the BALF. Histological studies showed that PF markedly inhibited inflammatory infiltration and mucus secretion in the lung tissues. In vitro study, psoralen significantly suppressed Th2 cytokines of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 by ConA-stimulated D10 cells without inhibitory effect on cell viability. Furthermore, GATA-3 protein expression was also markedly reduced by psoralen. This study demonstrated that PF exhibited inhibitory effects on hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in a rat model of asthma, which was associated with the suppression of Th2 response. Psoralen, a major constituent of PF, has immunomodulatory properties on Th2 response in vitro, which indicated that psoralen might be a critical component of PF for its therapeutic effects.

  8. Role of moesin in HMGB1-stimulated severe inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Kwon, O K; Han, M-S; Lee, Y-M; Kim, S-W; Kim, K-M; Lee, T; Lee, S; Bae, J-S

    2015-08-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that arises when the body's response to infection causes systemic inflammation. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), as a late mediator of sepsis, enhances hyperpermeability, and it is therefore a therapeutic target. Despite extensive research into the underlying mechanisms of sepsis, the target molecules controlling vascular leakage remain largely unknown. Moesin is a cytoskeletal protein involved in cytoskeletal changes and paracellular gap formation. The objectives of this study were to determine the roles of moesin in HMGB1-mediated vascular hyperpermeability and inflammatory responses and to investigate the mechanisms of action underlying these responses. Using siRNA knockdown of moesin expression in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), moesin was found to be required in HMGB1-induced F-actin rearrangement, hyperpermeability, and inflammatory responses. The mechanisms involved in moesin phosphorylation were analysed by blocking the binding of the HMGB1 receptor (RAGE) and inhibiting the Rho and MAPK pathways. HMGB1-treated HUVECs exhibited an increase in Thr558 phosphorylation of moesin. Circulating levels of moesin were measured in patients admitted to the intensive care unit with sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock; these patients showed significantly higher levels of moesin than healthy controls, which was strongly correlated with disease severity. High blood moesin levels were also observed in cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis in mice. Administration of blocking moesin antibodies attenuated CLP-induced septic death. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that the HMGB1-RAGE-moesin axis can elicit severe inflammatory responses, suggesting it to be a potential target for the development of diagnostics and therapeutics for sepsis.

  9. Mitochondrial Respiration Controls Lysosomal Function during Inflammatory T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2015-09-01

    The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4(+) T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation, and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward proinflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD(+) levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases.

  10. RELATIVE POTENCY OF MOLD AND HOUSE DUST MITE EXTRACTS IN INDUCING ALLERGIC RESPONSES IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Mold has been associated with the exacerbation of allergic asthma. However, its role in induction of allergic asthma is not clear. Using a previously developed mouse model for allergic asthma, we compared potencies of two fungal extracts (Metarhizium anisop...

  11. Neuroendocrine Inflammatory Responses in Overweight/Obese Infants.

    PubMed

    Camargos, Ana Cristina Resende; Mendonça, Vanessa Amaral; Andrade, Camila Alves de; Oliveira, Katherine Simone Caires; Tossige-Gomes, Rosalina; Rocha-Vieira, Etel; Neves, Camila Danielle Cunha; Vieira, Érica Leandro Marciano; Leite, Hércules Ribeiro; Oliveira, Murilo Xavier; Júnior, Antônio Lúcio Teixeira; Coimbra, Cândido Celso; Lacerda, Ana Cristina Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is related to a cascade of neuroendocrine inflammatory changes. However, there remains a gap in the current literature regarding the possible occurrence of these changes in overweight/obese infants. The objective of this study was to evaluate adipokines, cortisol, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and redox status in overweight/obese infants versus normal-weight peers. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 50 infants (25 in the overweight/obese group and 25 in the normal-weight group) between 6 and 24 months. Plasma levels of leptin, adiponectin, resistin, soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors, chemokines, BDNF, serum cortisol and redox status were measured. Unpaired Student's t-test was used to analyze the results and a probability of p<0.05 was acceptable for rejection of the null hypothesis. The Pearson correlation was used to verify the association between the biomarkers analyzed in each group. Plasma levels of leptin (p = 0.0001), adiponectin (p = 0.0007) and BDNF (p = 0.003), and serum cortisol (p = 0.048) were significantly higher in overweight/obese infants than normal-weight infants. In contrast, the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) (p = 0.004), and catalase (p = 0.045) and superoxide dismutase activity (p = 0.02) were lower in overweight/obese infants than normal-weight peers. All the results together indicate neuroendocrine inflammatory response changes in overweight/obese infants between 6 and 24 months. Although there is already an environment that predisposes for a subsequent pro-inflammatory response, neuroendocrine secretion changes that permit the control of the inflammatory process in this age interval can be observed.

  12. Neuroendocrine Inflammatory Responses in Overweight/Obese Infants

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Camila Alves; Oliveira, Katherine Simone Caires; Tossige-Gomes, Rosalina; Rocha-Vieira, Etel; Neves, Camila Danielle Cunha; Vieira, Érica Leandro Marciano; Leite, Hércules Ribeiro; Oliveira, Murilo Xavier; Júnior, Antônio Lúcio Teixeira; Coimbra, Cândido Celso

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is related to a cascade of neuroendocrine inflammatory changes. However, there remains a gap in the current literature regarding the possible occurrence of these changes in overweight/obese infants. The objective of this study was to evaluate adipokines, cortisol, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and redox status in overweight/obese infants versus normal-weight peers. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 50 infants (25 in the overweight/obese group and 25 in the normal-weight group) between 6 and 24 months. Plasma levels of leptin, adiponectin, resistin, soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors, chemokines, BDNF, serum cortisol and redox status were measured. Unpaired Student's t-test was used to analyze the results and a probability of p<0.05 was acceptable for rejection of the null hypothesis. The Pearson correlation was used to verify the association between the biomarkers analyzed in each group. Plasma levels of leptin (p = 0.0001), adiponectin (p = 0.0007) and BDNF (p = 0.003), and serum cortisol (p = 0.048) were significantly higher in overweight/obese infants than normal-weight infants. In contrast, the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) (p = 0.004), and catalase (p = 0.045) and superoxide dismutase activity (p = 0.02) were lower in overweight/obese infants than normal-weight peers. All the results together indicate neuroendocrine inflammatory response changes in overweight/obese infants between 6 and 24 months. Although there is already an environment that predisposes for a subsequent pro-inflammatory response, neuroendocrine secretion changes that permit the control of the inflammatory process in this age interval can be observed. PMID:27907172

  13. Targeting the inflammatory response in healing myocardial infarcts.

    PubMed

    Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2006-01-01

    Healing of myocardial infarcts depends on an inflammatory cascade that ultimately results in clearance of dead cells and matrix debris and formation of a scar. Myocardial necrosis activates complement, Nuclear Factor (NF)-kappaB and Toll-like Receptor (TLR)-dependent pathways, and generates free radicals, triggering an inflammatory response. Chemokines and cytokines are markedly induced in the infarct and mediate recruitment and activation of neutrophils and mononuclear cells. Extravasation of platelets and plasma proteins, such as fibrinogen and fibronectin, results in formation of a clot, consisting of platelets embedded in a mesh of crosslinked fibrin. This provisional matrix provides a scaffold for migration of cells into the infarct. Monocytes differentiate into macrophages and secrete fibrogenic and angiogenic growth factors inducing formation of granulation tissue, containing myofibroblasts and neovessels. Repression of proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine synthesis, mediated in part through Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-beta and Interleukin (IL)-10, is critical for resolution of the inflammatory infiltrate and transition to fibrous tissue deposition. Infarct myofibroblasts deposit extracellular matrix proteins and a collagen-based scar is formed. As the wound matures, fibroblasts undergo apoptosis and neovessels regress, resulting in formation of a scar with a low cellular content containing dense, cross-linked collagen. The pathologic and structural changes associated with infarct healing directly influence ventricular remodeling and affect prognosis in patients with myocardial infarction. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the post-infarction inflammatory response, and the spatial and temporal parameters of wound healing is necessary in order to identify specific molecular targets for therapeutic intervention.

  14. Toxocara canis and the allergic process

    PubMed Central

    Zaia, Mauricio Grecco; de Oliveira, Sandra Regina Pereira; de Castro, Cynthia Aparecida; Soares, Edson Garcia; Afonso, Ana; Monnazzi, Luis Gustavo S; Peitl, Oscar; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Anibal, Fernanda de Freitas

    2015-01-01

    The protective effect of infectious agents against allergic reactions has been thoroughly investigated. Current studies have demonstrated the ability of some helminths to modulate the immune response of infected hosts. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between Toxocara canis infection and the development of an allergic response in mice immunised with ovalbumin (OVA). We determined the total and differential blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells using BALB/c mice as a model. To this end, the levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-10 and anti-OVA-IgE were measured using an ELISA. The inflammatory process in the lungs was observed using histology slides stained with haematoxylin and eosin. The results showed an increase in the total number of leukocytes and eosinophils in the blood of infected and immunised animals at 18 days after infection. We observed a slight lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate in the portal space in all infected mice. Anti-OVA-IgE levels were detected in smaller proportions in the plasma of immunised and infected mice compared with mice that were only infected. Therefore, we concluded that T. canis potentiates inflammation in the lungs in response to OVA, although anti-OVA-IgE levels suggest a potential reduction of the inflammatory process through this mechanism. PMID:26517650

  15. Silencing nociceptor neurons reduces allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Sébastien; Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E.; Burkett, Patrick R.; Lee, Seungkyu; Cronin, Shane J.F.; Pascal, Maud A.; Laedermann, Cedric; Foster, Simmie L.; Tran, Johnathan V.; Lai, Nicole; Chiu, Isaac M.; Ghasemlou, Nader; DiBiase, Matthew; Roberson, David; Von Hehn, Christian; Agac, Busranour; Haworth, Oliver; Seki, Hiroyuki; Penninger, Josef M.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Bean, Bruce P.; Levy, Bruce D.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lung nociceptors initiate cough and bronchoconstriction. To elucidate if these fibers also contribute to allergic airway inflammation we stimulated lung nociceptors with capsaicin and observed increased neuropeptide release and immune cell infiltration. In contrast, ablating Nav1.8+ sensory neurons or silencing them with QX-314, a charged sodium channel inhibitor that enters via large pore ion channels to specifically block nociceptors, substantially reduced ovalbumin or house dust mite-induced airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We also discovered that IL-5, a cytokine produced by activated immune cells, acts directly on nociceptors to induce release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP then stimulates CD4+ and resident innate lymphoid type 2 cells, creating an inflammatory signaling loop that promotes allergic inflammation. Our results indicate that nociceptors amplify pathological adaptive immune responses and that silencing these neurons with QX-314 interrupts this neuro-immune interplay, revealing a potential new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:26119026

  16. Cell surface adrenergic receptor stimulation modifies the endothelial response to SIRS. Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tighe, D; Moss, R; Bennett, D

    1996-11-01

    The complex pathway seen in patients with the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) does not readily respond to mediator blockade. All such trials conducted in SIRS patients have shown no benefit in reducing mortality. We have shown experimentally that in sepsis, the administration of beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists reduces hepatic cellular injury, whereas administration of an alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist increases hepatic cellular injury. Inflammatory mediators can cause a dose-related reversible change in target endothelial cells (ECs). There is a substantial body of literature describing the anti-inflammatory effects of beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. They reduce both the increased permeability and the production of inflammatory mediators from ECs. Cellular transduction processes are involved when adrenergic receptor agonists modify either the anti-inflammatory or proinflammatory response to sepsis in ECs. Inflammatory mediators and alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonists stimulate their trimeric G protein-linked receptors to produce diacylglycerol (DAG) and increase the intracellular concentration of calcium. DAG is involved in the production of both inflammatory proteins and lipids. In addition, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is activated which is also involved in the production of inflammatory proteins and lipids. beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists activate their trimeric G protein-linked receptors to produce the stimulatory G protein (Gs). Gs stimulates adenyl cyclase to form cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and activate protein kinase A (PKA). PKA is involved in activating gene transcription agents to produce anti-inflammatory proteins such as interleukin-10. PKA also inhibits phospholipase C and MAPK. Although promising, the use of beta-adrenoceptor agonists or agonists that increase cellular cAMP to activate the cells' endogenous anti-inflammatory pathway requires further study.

  17. Experimental heatstroke in baboon: analysis of the systemic inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Bouchama, Abderrezak; Ollivier, Véronique; Roberts, George; Al Mohanna, Falah; de Prost, Dominique; Eldali, Abdelmoneim; Saussereau, Elodie; El-Sayed, Raafat; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2005-10-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the pattern of the inflammatory response to heatstroke in an experimental baboon model with a view to identifying potential target for therapeutic interventions. Blinded analysis of plasma collected from 12 juvenile baboons (Papio hamadryas) in heatstroke was used. Eight anesthetized animals were heat-stressed in an incubator at 44 degrees C to 47 degrees C until rectal temperature was 42.5 degrees C (moderate heatstroke; n = 4) or systolic arterial pressure fell to <90 mmHg (severe heatstroke; n = 4) and were allowed to recover at room temperature. Four sham-heated animals served as a control group. We performed sequential measurement of cytokines. The rectal temperature on completion of heat stress was 42.5 degrees C +/- 0.0 degrees C and 43.3 degrees C +/- 0.1 degrees C in moderate and severe heatstroke, respectively. Heat stress elicited early, simultaneous release of anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (IL-10, IL-1ra, sTNFr I and II, and IL-8). Circulating levels of IL-12p40 were significantly decreased, whereas TNFalpha, IL-1beta, and IL-4 were below the detection limit in all animals. No baboon survived severe heatstroke; there was neurological morbidity without mortality in moderate heatstroke. Nonsurvivors displayed significantly greater activity/alterations in inflammation markers than survivors. Sham-heated animals had no evidence of inflammation activation. These results show that heatstroke activates complex systemic inflammatory and regulatory responses associated with outcome. Further definition of this ambivalent response is needed before identification of target of successful modulation may become possible.

  18. The Transcriptome of the Fetal Inflammatory Response Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A.; Romero, Roberto; Tarca, Adi L.; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro.; Espinoza, Jimmy; Kim, Chong Jai; Kim, Jung-Sun; Edwin, Samuel S.; Gomez, Ricardo; Draghici, Sorin

    2012-01-01

    Problem The fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS) is considered the counterpart of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), but similarities in their regulatory mechanisms are unclear. This study characterizes the fetal mRNA transcriptome of peripheral leukocytes to identify key biological processes and pathways involved in FIRS. Method of Study Umbilical cord blood from preterm neonates with FIRS (funisitis, plasma IL-6>11 pg/ml; n=10) and neonates with no evidence of inflammation (n=10) was collected at birth. Results Microarray analysis of leukocyte RNA revealed differential expression of 541 unique genes, changes confirmed by qRT-PCR for 41 or of 44 genes tested. Similar to SIRS and sepsis, ontological and pathway analyses yielded significant enrichment of biological processes including antigen processing and presentation, immune response, and processes critical to cellular metabolism. Results are comparable with microarray studies of endotoxin challenge models and pediatric sepsis, identifying 25 genes across all studies. Conclusions This study is the first to profile genome-wide expression in FIRS, which demonstrates a substantial degree of similarity with SIRS despite differences in fetal and adult immune systems. PMID:20059468

  19. Increase of Frequency and Modulation of Phenotype of Regulatory T Cells by Atorvastatin Is Associated with Decreased Lung Inflammatory Cell Infiltration in a Murine Model of Acute Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Blanquiceth, Yurany; Rodríguez-Perea, Ana Lucia; Tabares Guevara, Jorge H; Correa, Luis Alfonso; Sánchez, María Dulfary; Ramírez-Pineda, José Robinson; Velilla, Paula Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role by controlling allergic inflammation of airways. Recently, it has been shown that statins have immunomodulatory properties, probably mediated by their effects on Tregs. Therefore, we evaluated the in vivo effect of atorvastatin (ATV) on Tregs and its association with the inflammatory process in a model of allergic asthma. BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and then challenged with intranasal OVA. ATV (40 mg/kg) was delivered by daily intraperitoneal injection for 7 or 15 days before each OVA challenge. ATV treatment for 7 days increased the frequency of Tregs in mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN) and the interleukin (IL)-10 in lungs. After 15 days of treatment, ATV increased the percentage of glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-related protein (GITR+) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1+) Tregs in the lung, without enhancing their suppressive activity, but also increased the percentage of conventional T cells expressing GITR+, PD1+, and OX-40 (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 4). Although no significant changes were observed in the number of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), OVA-specific immunoglobulin E in the serum, and type 2 helper (Th2) cytokines in the lungs, there was a significant decrease of peribronchial inflammation that negatively correlated with the Tregs in MLN and the concentration of IL-10 in the lung. These results suggest that ATV has an immunomodulatory role possibly mediated by their effects on Tregs, which could contribute to the control of inflammation during allergic asthma. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the contribution of Treg to immunomodulatory action of statins in the context of allergic asthma.

  20. Increase of Frequency and Modulation of Phenotype of Regulatory T Cells by Atorvastatin Is Associated with Decreased Lung Inflammatory Cell Infiltration in a Murine Model of Acute Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Blanquiceth, Yurany; Rodríguez-Perea, Ana Lucia; Tabares Guevara, Jorge H.; Correa, Luis Alfonso; Sánchez, María Dulfary; Ramírez-Pineda, José Robinson; Velilla, Paula Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role by controlling allergic inflammation of airways. Recently, it has been shown that statins have immunomodulatory properties, probably mediated by their effects on Tregs. Therefore, we evaluated the in vivo effect of atorvastatin (ATV) on Tregs and its association with the inflammatory process in a model of allergic asthma. BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and then challenged with intranasal OVA. ATV (40 mg/kg) was delivered by daily intraperitoneal injection for 7 or 15 days before each OVA challenge. ATV treatment for 7 days increased the frequency of Tregs in mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN) and the interleukin (IL)-10 in lungs. After 15 days of treatment, ATV increased the percentage of glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-related protein (GITR+) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1+) Tregs in the lung, without enhancing their suppressive activity, but also increased the percentage of conventional T cells expressing GITR+, PD1+, and OX-40 (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 4). Although no significant changes were observed in the number of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), OVA-specific immunoglobulin E in the serum, and type 2 helper (Th2) cytokines in the lungs, there was a significant decrease of peribronchial inflammation that negatively correlated with the Tregs in MLN and the concentration of IL-10 in the lung. These results suggest that ATV has an immunomodulatory role possibly mediated by their effects on Tregs, which could contribute to the control of inflammation during allergic asthma. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the contribution of Treg to immunomodulatory action of statins in the context of allergic asthma. PMID:28066430

  1. Systemic inflammatory response and neuromuscular involvement in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ching-Hua; Allen, Kezia; Oei, Felicia; Leoni, Emanuela; Kuhle, Jens; Tree, Timothy; Fratta, Pietro; Sharma, Nikhil; Sidle, Katie; Howard, Robin; Orrell, Richard; Fish, Mark; Greensmith, Linda; Pearce, Neil; Gallo, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the combined blood expression of neuromuscular and inflammatory biomarkers as predictors of disease progression and prognosis in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods: Logistic regression adjusted for markers of the systemic inflammatory state and principal component analysis were carried out on plasma levels of creatine kinase (CK), ferritin, and 11 cytokines measured in 95 patients with ALS and 88 healthy controls. Levels of circulating biomarkers were used to study survival by Cox regression analysis and correlated with disease progression and neurofilament light chain (NfL) levels available from a previous study. Cytokines expression was also tested in blood samples longitudinally collected for up to 4 years from 59 patients with ALS. Results: Significantly higher levels of CK, ferritin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)–α, and interleukin (IL)–1β, IL-2, IL-8, IL-12p70, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13 and lower levels of interferon (IFN)–γ were found in plasma samples from patients with ALS compared to controls. IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ were the most highly regulated markers when all explanatory variables were jointly analyzed. High ferritin and IL-2 levels were predictors of poor survival. IL-5 levels were positively correlated with CK, as was TNF-α with NfL. IL-6 was strongly associated with CRP levels and was the only marker showing increasing expression towards end-stage disease in the longitudinal analysis. Conclusions: Neuromuscular pathology in ALS involves the systemic regulation of inflammatory markers mostly active on T-cell immune responses. Disease stratification based on the prognostic value of circulating inflammatory markers could improve clinical trials design in ALS. PMID:27308305

  2. Scutellarein Reduces Inflammatory Responses by Inhibiting Src Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nak Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are plant pigments that have been demonstrated to exert various pharmacological effects including anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the molecular mechanisms in terms of exact target proteins of flavonoids are not fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of scutellarein (SCT), a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus, Clerodendrum phlomidis and Oroxylum indicum Vent that have been traditionally used to treat various inflammatory diseases in China and Brazil. For this purpose, a nitric oxide (NO) assay, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nuclear fractionation, immunoblot analysis, a kinase assay, and an overexpression strategy were employed. Scutellarein significantly inhibited NO production in a dose-dependent manner and reduced the mRNA expression levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, SCT also dampened nuclear factor (NF)-κB-driven expression of a luciferase reporter gene upon transfection of a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) construct into Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells; similarly, NF-κ B nuclear translocation was inhibited by SCT. Moreover, the phosphorylation levels of various upstream signaling enzymes involved in NF-κB activation were decreased by SCT treatment in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Finally, SCT strongly inhibited Src kinase activity and also inhibited the autophosphorylation of overexpressed Src. Therefore, our data suggest that SCT can block the inflammatory response by directly inhibiting Src kinase activity linked to NF-κB activation. PMID:26330757

  3. Ingestion of milk containing the Dp2 peptide, a dust mite allergen, protects mice from allergic airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Allergen-specific immunotherapy has been demonstrated to have potential for the treatment of allergic diseases. Transgenic animals are currently the best available bioreactors to produce recombinant proteins, which can be secreted in milk. It has not been clearly demonstrated whether milk from transgenic animals expressing recombinant allergens has immunomodulatory effects on allergic asthma. Methods We aimed to determine whether the oral administration of milk containing a mite allergen can down-regulate allergen-specific airway inflammation. Transgenic CD-1 mice that express a recombinant group 2 allergen from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp2) in their milk were generated using an embryonic gene-microinjection technique. Mouse pups were fed transgenic Dp2-containing milk or wild-type milk. Subsequently, these mice were sensitized and challenged with Dp2 to induce allergic airway inflammation. Results Upon sensitization and challenge, mice fed transgenic Dp2 milk had decreased T-helper 2 (Th2) and increased T-helper 1 (Th1) responses in the airway compared with mice fed wild-type milk. Moreover, pre-treatment with transgenic Dp2 milk attenuated airway inflammation and decreased airway hyper-responsiveness. Conclusions This study provides new evidence that oral administration of transgenic milk containing the Dp2 allergen down-regulated and moderately protected against allergic airway inflammation. Milk from transgenic animals expressing allergens may have potential use in the prevention of allergic asthma. PMID:23763898

  4. Allergic Conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... conjunctivitis is not contagious.Some common allergens include:Pollen fromtrees, grass and ragweedAnimal skin andsecretions such as ... symptoms. For example, if you are allergic to pollen or mold, stay indoors when pollen and mold ...

  5. Characterisation of the local inflammatory response in appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, M; Puri, P; Reen, D J

    1993-01-01

    In this study we have characterised the local inflammatory response in acute suppurative appendicitis (S), focal appendicitis (F), and normal appendices (C). Enumeration of lymphocyte subpopulations, cells expressing IL-2 receptor, natural killer (NK) cells, monocytes and plasma cell isotypes and subclasses infiltrating the lamina propria was carried out on all specimens using immunoperoxidase staining procedures. Total T cells were significantly increased in both acute suppurative appendicitis and focal appendicitis compared with controls (p < 0.001). Cells infiltrating the lamina propria expressed IL-2 receptor in all appendiceal specimens but were significantly increased in both acute and focal appendicitis (p < 0.01). IgG and IgA plasma cell isotypes were significantly increased in all S and F appendiceal specimens (p < 0.001). Monocyte and NK cell numbers, however, were only increased in acute suppurative appendiceal specimens. The increased lymphocyte and plasma cell isotypes seen in focal appendicitis occurred throughout the entire organ even through the inflammatory focus was confined to only three to seven serial sections. These results clearly show a differential pattern of cellular infiltration in focal appendicitis from that seen in acute suppurative appendicitis. The selective lymphocyte and plasma cell nature of the cellular infiltrate in the lamina propria of focal appendicitis may reflect the presence of a specific immune response to an as yet unidentified luminal antigen as a possible cause of appendicitis.

  6. Inflammatory and bone remodeling responses to the cytolethal distending toxins.

    PubMed

    Belibasakis, Georgios N; Bostanci, Nagihan

    2014-04-04

    The cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs) are a family of exotoxins produced by a wide range of Gram-negative bacteria. They are known for causing genotoxic stress to the cell, resulting in growth arrest and eventually apoptotic cell death. Nevertheless, there is evidence that CDTs can also perturb the innate immune responses, by regulating inflammatory cytokine production and molecular mediators of bone remodeling in various cell types. These cellular and molecular events may in turn have an effect in enhancing local inflammation in diseases where CDT-producing bacteria are involved, such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Haemophilus ducreyi, Campylobacter jejuni and Helicobacter hepaticus. One special example is the induction of pathological bone destruction in periodontitis. The opportunistic oral pathogen Aggregatibatcer actinoycemetemcomitans, which is involved in the aggressive form of the disease, can regulate the molecular mechanisms of bone remodeling in a manner that favors bone resorption, with the potential involvement of its CDT. The present review provides an overview of all known to-date inflammatory or bone remodeling responses of CDTs produced by various bacterial species, and discusses their potential contribution to the pathogenesis of the associated diseases.

  7. Inflammatory Response in Preterm and Very Preterm Newborns with Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Segura-Cervantes, Enrique; Mancilla-Ramírez, Javier; González-Canudas, Jorge; Alba, Erika; Santillán-Ballesteros, René; Morales-Barquet, Deneb; Sandoval-Plata, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    The response of the adaptive immune system is usually less intense in premature neonates than term neonates. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether immunological parameters vary between preterm (PT) neonates (≥32 weeks of gestational age) and very preterm (VPT) neonates (<32 weeks of gestational age). A cross-sectional study was designed to prospectively follow PT and VPT neonates at risk of developing sepsis. Plasma concentrations of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4, and IL-10 were detected using flow cytometry. C-reactive protein (C-RP) and the complex SC5b-9 were detected in the plasma using commercial kits. A total of 83 patients were included. The laboratory results and clinical histories showed that 26 patients had sepsis; 14 were VPT, and 12 were PT. The levels of C-RP, SC5b-9 (innate immune response mediators), and IL-10 or IL-4 (anti-inflammatory cytokines) were elevated during sepsis in both groups. IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6 (proinflammatory cytokines) were differentially elevated only in PT neonates. The VPT neonates with sepsis presented increases in C-RP, SC5b-9, and anti-inflammatory cytokines but not in proinflammatory cytokines, whereas PT neonates showed increases in all studied mediators of inflammation. PMID:27293317

  8. Renal inflammatory response to urinary tract infection in rat neonates.

    PubMed

    Zarepour, M; Moradpoor, H; Emamghorashi, F; Owji, S M; Roodaki, M; Khamoushi, M

    2015-09-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections. Maternal UTI is a risk factor for neonatal UTI. The aim of the present study was to determine the severity of renal inflammation in neonate rats born from mothers with induced UTI. Twelve pregnant rats (Sprague-Dawley) were included in study. The rats were divided into two groups (six rats in each group). In the first group, pyelonephritis was induced in the third trimester of pregnancy and the second group was used as a control group. After delivery, the neonates were divided into three groups based on days after birth (the 1 st, 3 rd and 7 th days after birth). In each group, two neonates of each mother were killed and a midline abdominal incision was made and both kidneys were aseptically removed. On the 7 th day, rat mothers were killed and their kidneys were removed. The preparations were evaluated with a bright field microscope for inflammatory response. Renal pathology showed inflammation in all UTI-induced mothers, but only two cases of neonates (2.1%) showed inflammation in the renal parenchyma. There was no relation between the positive renal culture and the pathological changes. We conclude that neonates with UTI born to UTI-induced mothers showed a lesser inflammatory response.

  9. DIFFERENTIAL ALLERGIC AND NEUROTROPHIN RESPONSES TO FUNGAL COMPONENT EXTRACTS IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metarhizium anisopliae mycelium (MYC), conidia (CON) and inducible protease (IND) extracts were combined to produce the antigen MACA to screen for allergenic potential. Involuntary aspiration (IA) exposure to MACA in BALB/c mice has caused immune, inflammatory and physiological ...

  10. So-Cheong-Ryong-Tang, a herbal medicine, modulates inflammatory cell infiltration and prevents airway remodeling via regulation of interleukin-17 and GM-CSF in allergic asthma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Woo; Lim, Chi-Yeon; Kim, Bu-Yeo; Cho, Su-In

    2014-01-01

    Background: So-Cheong-Ryong-Tang (SCRT), herbal medicine, has been used for the control of respiratory disease in East Asian countries. However, its therapeutic mechanisms, especially an inhibitory effect on inflammatory cell infiltration and airway remodeling in allergic asthma are unclear. Objective: The present study investigated the mechanism of antiasthmatic effects of SCRT in allergic asthma in mice. Materials and Methods: We investigated the influence of SCRT on levels of interleukin-17 (IL-17), granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-4, and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE in serum, and histopathological changes in allergen-induced asthma. Results: So-Cheong-Ryong-Tang decreased levels of IL-17 and GM-CSF in BALF. IL-4, a Th2-driven cytokine, was also decreased by SCRT, but IFN-γ, a Th1-driven cytokine, was not changed. Levels of OVA-specific IgE in serum were also decreased by SCRT. With SCRT treatment, histopathological findings showed reduced tendency of inflammatory cell infiltration, and prevention from airway remodeling such as epithelial hyperplasia. Conclusion: In this study, we firstly demonstrated that regulation of IL-17 and GM-CSF production may be one of the mechanism contributed to a reduction of inflammatory cell infiltration and prevention from airway remodeling. PMID:25298667

  11. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS): molecular pathophysiology and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Naoyuki; Hattori, Yuichi

    2006-07-01

    In recent years, extensive basic science research has led to a clear understanding of the molecular mechanisms contributing to the pathophysiology of sepsis. Sepsis is now defined as a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in which there is an identifiable focus of infection. SIRS can be also precipitated by non-infective events such as trauma, pancreatitis, and surgery. As a consequence of an overactive SIRS response, the function of various organ systems may be compromised, resulting in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and death. Production and activation of multiple proinflammatory genes are likely to play a key role in the pathogenesis of MODS development. This review article focuses on the molecular mechanisms and components involved in the pathogenesis of severe sepsis. This includes cellular targets of sepsis-inducing bacterial products and their signaling pathways with a major emphasis on transcription factors and new therapeutic approaches to severe sepsis.

  12. Reasons for prescribing second generation antihistamines to treat allergic rhinitis in real-life conditions and patient response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Second generation H1 antihistamines (H1A) are currently recommended as first choice medications for allergic rhinitis and rhinoconjunctivitis. However, little is known about what influences the choice of prescription of one second generation (H1A) as opposed to another in real-life conditions. Objective The aim of the study was to identify the main criteria determining the choice of a second generation H1A by allergy specialists in mainland France. Methods Consecutive patients suffering from allergic rhinitis or rhinoconjunctivitis were included and followed prospectively for 30 days from the prescription of a second generation H1A in monotherapy. Patients were asked to fill in auto-questionnaires at baseline, daily during the first 10 days of the new treatment, and at the end of follow-up. Data on efficacy, tolerance, safety, rate and type of response to treatment, as well as patient satisfaction were recorded and analyzed. Results 1,080 patients were included between March 2011 and October 2012, mostly suffering from moderate to severe rhinitis (82.0%). The most frequently cited reason for choosing a specific H1A was the expected efficacy (85.3%). The mean time to nasal and ocular recovery was 6 days and 78.2% of patients responded to treatment within this interval. The presence of conjunctivitis was significantly associated with a more rapid response. At the end of follow-up, the satisfaction rate was higher for patients who were switched from a previous treatment (87.5%), compared to those receiving their first treatment (78.8%). Conclusion and clinical relevance The main reason for choosing a specific second generation H1A was its expected efficacy. Concomitant conjunctivitis is associated with a more rapid response to treatment. Symptom recovery necessitates a mean of 6 days. PMID:24944561

  13. Antigen-Specific Induction of Osteopontin Contributes to the Chronification of Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Seier, Anne M.; Renkl, Andreas C.; Schulz, Guido; Uebele, Tanja; Sindrilaru, Anca; Iben, Sebastian; Liaw, Lucy; Kon, Shigeyuki; Uede, Toshimitsu; Weiss, Johannes M.

    2010-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a T cell-mediated immune response, which in its relapsing chronic form is of high socioeconomic impact. The phosphoglycoprotein osteopontin (OPN) has chemotactic and Th1 cytokine functions and in various models is essential for robust T cell-mediated immunity. Here we demonstrate that OPN is abundantly expressed by both effector T cells and keratinocytes in allergic contact dermatitis lesions. T cells from nickel-allergic donors secrete high levels of OPN following antigen-specific stimulation. OPN may substitute for missing IFN-γ secretion in T effector cells because low IFN-γ-producing T cell clones secrete high levels of OPN, and OPN down-modulates their interleukin-4 expression. Furthermore, interferon-γ from T effector cells augments OPN in allergic contact dermatitis by inducing OPN in keratinocytes, which in turn polarizes dendritic cells and attracts inflammatory cells. In the murine contact hypersensitivity (CHS) model for allergic contact dermatitis, OPN is strongly induced in antigen-specific proliferating T cells, and OPN null mice display a reduced chronic CHS inflammatory response due to a decreased influx of effector T cells. Importantly, because of its function for chronic allergic contact dermatitis, OPN may well be a therapeutic target, because anti-OPN antibody treatment in part suppresses established chronic CHS. PMID:20008129

  14. Impact of early life exposures to geohelminth infections on the development of vaccine immunity, allergic sensitization, and allergic inflammatory diseases in children living in tropical Ecuador: the ECUAVIDA birth cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Geohelminth infections are highly prevalent infectious diseases of childhood in many regions of the Tropics, and are associated with significant morbidity especially among pre-school and school-age children. There is growing concern that geohelminth infections, particularly exposures occurring during early life in utero through maternal infections or during infancy, may affect vaccine immunogenicity in populations among whom these infections are endemic. Further, the low prevalence of allergic disease in the rural Tropics has been attributed to the immune modulatory effects of these infections and there is concern that widespread use of anthelmintic treatment in high-risk groups may be associated with an increase in the prevalence of allergic diseases. Because the most widely used vaccines are administered during the first year of life and the antecedents of allergic disease are considered to occur in early childhood, the present study has been designed to investigate the impact of early exposures to geohelminths on the development of protective immunity to vaccines, allergic sensitization, and allergic disease. Methods/Design A cohort of 2,403 neonates followed up to 8 years of age. Primary exposures are infections with geohelminth parasites during the last trimester of pregnancy and the first 2 years of life. Primary study outcomes are the development of protective immunity to common childhood vaccines (i.e. rotavirus, Haemophilus influenzae type B, Hepatitis B, tetanus toxoid, and oral poliovirus type 3) during the first 5 years of life, the development of eczema by 3 years of age, the development of allergen skin test reactivity at 5 years of age, and the development of asthma at 5 and 8 years of age. Potential immunological mechanisms by which geohelminth infections may affect the study outcomes will be investigated also. Discussion The study will provide information on the potential effects of early exposures to geohelminths (during pregnancy and

  15. Tregs and allergic disease

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Douglas S.; Larché, Mark; Durham, Stephen R.

    2004-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma, rhinitis, and eczema are increasing in prevalence and affect up to 15% of populations in Westernized countries. The description of Tregs as T cells that prevent development of autoimmune disease led to considerable interest in whether these Tregs were also normally involved in prevention of sensitization to allergens and whether it might be possible to manipulate Tregs for the therapy of allergic disease. Current data suggest that Th2 responses to allergens are normally suppressed by both CD4+CD25+ Tregs and IL-10 Tregs. Furthermore, suppression by these subsets is decreased in allergic individuals. In animal models, Tregs could be induced by high- or low-dose inhaled antigen, and prior induction of such Tregs prevented subsequent development of allergen sensitization and airway inflammation in inhaled challenge models. For many years, allergen-injection immunotherapy has been used for the therapy of allergic disease, and this treatment may induce IL-10 Tregs, leading to both suppression of Th2 responses and a switch from IgE to IgG4 antibody production. Improvements in allergen immunotherapy, such as peptide therapy, and greater understanding of the biology of Tregs hold great promise for the treatment and prevention of allergic disease. PMID:15545986

  16. Allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Becker, Detlef

    2013-07-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a frequent inflammatory skin disease. The suspected diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms, a plausible contact to allergens and a suitable history of dermatitis. Differential diagnoses should be considered only after careful exclusion of any causal contact sensitization. Hence, careful diagnosis by patch testing is of great importance. Modifications of the standardized test procedure are the strip patch test and the repeated open application test. The interpretation of the SLS (sodium lauryl sulfate) patch test as well as testing with the patients' own products and working materials are potential sources of error. Accurate patch test reading is affected in particular by the experience and individual factors of the examiner. Therefore, a high degree of standardization and continuous quality control is necessary and may be supported by use of an online patch test reading course made available by the German Contact Dermatitis Research Group. A critical relevance assessment of allergic patch test reactions helps to avoid relapses and the consideration of differential diagnoses. Any allergic test reaction should be documented in an allergy ID card including the INCI name, if appropriate. The diagnostics of allergic contact dermatitis is endangered by a seriously reduced financing of patch testing by the German statutory health insurances. Restrictive regulations by the German Drug Law block the approval of new contact allergens for routine patch testing. Beside the consistent avoidance of allergen contact, temporary use of systemic and topical corticosteroids is the therapy of first choice.

  17. Beyond Hygiene: Commensal Microbiota and Allergic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Wook; Kim, Kwang Soon; Surh, Charles D

    2017-02-01

    Complex communities of microorganisms, termed commensal microbiota, inhabit mucosal surfaces and profoundly influence host physiology as well as occurrence of allergic diseases. Perturbing factors such as the mode of delivery, dietary fibers and antibiotics can influence allergic diseases by altering commensal microbiota in affected tissues as well as in intestine. Here, we review current findings on the relationship between commensal microbiota and allergic diseases, and discuss the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the regulation of allergic responses by commensal microbiota.

  18. Beyond Hygiene: Commensal Microbiota and Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung-Wook; Kim, Kwang Soon

    2017-01-01

    Complex communities of microorganisms, termed commensal microbiota, inhabit mucosal surfaces and profoundly influence host physiology as well as occurrence of allergic diseases. Perturbing factors such as the mode of delivery, dietary fibers and antibiotics can influence allergic diseases by altering commensal microbiota in affected tissues as well as in intestine. Here, we review current findings on the relationship between commensal microbiota and allergic diseases, and discuss the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the regulation of allergic responses by commensal microbiota. PMID:28261020

  19. Cardiovascular and inflammatory response to cholecystokinin during endotoxemic shock.

    PubMed

    Saia, Rafael Simone; Bertozi, Giuliana; Mestriner, Fabíola Leslie; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Queiróz Cunha, Fernando; Cárnio, Evelin Capellari

    2013-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) was first described as a gastrointestinal hormone, but its receptors have been located in cardiac and vascular tissues, as well as in immune cells. Our aims were to investigate the role of CCK on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hypotension and its ability to modulate previously reported inflammatory mediators, therefore affecting cardiovascular function. To conduct these experiments, rats had their jugular vein cannulated for drug administration, and also, the femoral artery cannulated for mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate records. Endotoxemia induced by LPS from Escherichia coli (1.5 mg/kg; i.v.) stimulated the release of CCK, a progressive drop in MAP, and increase in heart rate. Plasma tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 10 (IL-10), nitrate, vasopressin, and lactate levels were elevated in the endotoxemic rats. The pretreatment with proglumide (nonselective CCK antagonist; 30 mg/kg; i.p.) aggravated the hypotension and also increased plasma TNF-α and lactate levels. On the other hand, CCK (0.4 μg/kg; i.v.) administered before LPS significantly restored MAP, reduced aortic and hepatic inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) production, and elevated plasma vasopressin and IL-10 concentrations; it did not affect TNF-α. Physiological CCK concentration reduced nitrite and iNOS synthesis by peritoneal macrophages, possibly through a self-regulatory IL-10-dependent mechanism. Together, these data suggest a new role for the peptide CCK in modulating MAP, possibly controlling the inflammatory response, stimulating the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, and reducing vascular and macrophage iNOS-derived nitric oxide production. Based on these findings, CCK could be used as an adjuvant therapeutic agent to improve cardiovascular function.

  20. Comparison of cetirizine with astemizole in the treatment of perennial allergic rhinitis and study of the concomitant effect on histamine and allergen-induced wheal responses.

    PubMed

    Lobaton, P; Moreno, F; Coulie, P

    1990-11-01

    Thirty patients suffering from perennial allergic rhinitis took astemizole and cetirizine, 10 mg/d, under double-blind, crossover randomized conditions for 4 weeks. Four weeks washout separated the two periods. Nasal condition was improved, histamine and allergen-induced wheal responses were inhibited by both treatments with a slight advantage for cetirizine. Both treatments were well tolerated.

  1. Malassezia spp. overgrowth in allergic cats.

    PubMed

    Ordeix, Laura; Galeotti, Franca; Scarampella, Fabia; Dedola, Carla; Bardagí, Mar; Romano, Erica; Fondati, Alessandra

    2007-10-01

    A series of 18 allergic cats with multifocal Malassezia spp. overgrowth is reported: atopic dermatitis was diagnosed in 16, an adverse food reaction in another and one was euthanized 2 months after diagnosis of Malassezia overgrowth. All the cats were otherwise healthy and those tested (16 out of 18) for feline leukaemia or feline immunodeficiency virus infections were all negative. At dermatological examination, multifocal alopecia, erythema, crusting and greasy adherent brownish scales were variably distributed on all cats. Cytological examination revealed Malassezia spp. overgrowth with/without bacterial infection in facial skin (n = 11), ventral neck (n = 6), abdomen (n = 6), ear canal (n = 4), chin (n = 2), ear pinnae (n = 2), interdigital (n = 1) and claw folds skin (n = 1). Moreover, in two cats Malassezia pachydermatis was isolated in fungal cultures from lesional skin. Azoles therapy alone was prescribed in seven, azoles and antibacterial therapy in eight and azoles with both antibacterial and anti-inflammatory therapy in three of the cats. After 3-4 weeks of treatment, substantial reduction of pruritus and skin lesions was observed in all 11 cats treated with a combined therapy and in five of seven treated solely with azoles. Malassezia spp. overgrowth may represent a secondary cutaneous problem in allergic cats particularly in those presented for dermatological examination displaying greasy adherent brownish scales. The favourable response to treatment with antifungal treatments alone suggests that, as in dogs, Malassezia spp. may be partly responsible for both pruritus and cutaneous lesions in allergic cats.

  2. Local and systemic inflammatory responses to experimentally induced gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Leishman, Shaneen J; Seymour, Gregory J; Ford, Pauline J

    2013-01-01

    This study profiled the local and systemic inflammatory responses to experimentally induced gingivitis. Eight females participated in a 21-day experimental gingivitis model followed by a 14-day resolution phase. Bleeding on probing and plaque index scores were assessed before, during, and after resolution of gingival inflammation, and samples of saliva, GCF, and plasma were collected. Samples were assessed for biomarkers of inflammation using the BioPlex platform and ELISA. There were no significant changes in GCF levels of cytokines during the experimental phase; however, individual variability in cytokine profiles was noted. During resolution, mean GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α decreased and were significantly lower than baseline levels (P = 0.003, P = 0.025, and P = 0.007, resp.). Furthermore, changes in GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α during resolution correlated with changes in plaque index scores (r = 0.88, P = 0.004; r = 0.72, P = 0.042; r = 0.79, P = 0.019, resp.). Plasma levels of sICAM-1 increased significantly during the experimental phase (P = 0.002) and remained elevated and significantly higher than baseline levels during resolution (P < 0.001). These results support the concept that gingivitis adds to the systemic inflammatory burden of an individual.

  3. Ozone promotes regeneration by regulating the inflammatory response in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hao, Kenan; Li, Yanhao; Feng, Jianyu; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhang, Yiyue; Ma, Ning; Zeng, Qingle; Pang, Huajin; Wang, Chunyan; Xiao, Lijun; He, Xiaofeng

    2015-09-01

    Ozone is thought to advance wound healing by inhibiting inflammation, but the mechanism of this phenomenon has not been determined. Although the zebrafish is often used in regeneration experiments, there has been no report of zebrafish treated with ozonated water. We successfully established a zebrafish model of ozonated water treatment and demonstrate that ozonated water stimulates the regeneration of the zebrafish caudal fin, its mechanism, and time dependence. The growth rate of the caudal fin and the number of neutrophils migrating to the caudal fin wound after resection were higher in the experimental (ozonated) group than in the control group, preliminarily confirming that ozone-promoted regeneration is related to the stimulation of an early inflammatory response by ozone. Ozone modulated the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in two ways by regulating interleukin 10 (IL-10) expression. Therefore, ozone promotes tissue regeneration by regulating the inflammatory pathways. This effect of ozone in an experimental zebrafish model is demonstrated for the first time, confirming its promotion of wound healing and the mechanism of its effect in tissue regeneration. These results will open up new directions for ozone and regeneration research.

  4. Biomechanical changes in endothelial cells result from an inflammatory response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkus, Janina; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    During periods of infection and disease, the immune system induces the release of TNF-α, an inflammatory cytokine, from a variety of cell types, such as macrophages. TNF-α, while circulating in the vasculature, binds to the apical surface of endothelial cells and causes a wide range of biological and mechanical changes to the endothelium. While the biological changes have been widely studied, the biomechanical aspects have been largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the biomechanical changes of the endothelium as a function of TNF-α treatment. First, we studied the traction forces applied by the endothelium, an effect that is much less studied than others. Through the use of traction force microscopy, we found that TNF-α causes an increase in traction forces applied by the endothelial cells as compared to non-treated cells. Then, we investigated cell morphology, cell mechanics, migration, and cytoskeletal dynamics. We found that in addition to increasing applied traction forces, TNF-α causes an increase in cell area and aspect ratio on average, as well as a shift in the organization of F-actin filaments within the cell. Combining these findings together, our results show that an inflammatory response heavily impacts the morphology, cell mechanics, migration, cytoskeletal dynamics, and applied traction forces of endothelial cells.

  5. Regulation of inflammatory responses by IL-17F.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuexian O; Chang, Seon Hee; Park, Heon; Nurieva, Roza; Shah, Bhavin; Acero, Luis; Wang, Yi-Hong; Schluns, Kimberly S; Broaddus, Russell R; Zhu, Zhou; Dong, Chen

    2008-05-12

    Although interleukin (IL) 17 has been extensively characterized, the function of IL-17F, which has an expression pattern regulated similarly to IL-17, is poorly understood. We show that like IL-17, IL-17F regulates proinflammatory gene expression in vitro, and this requires IL-17 receptor A, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6, and Act1. In vivo, overexpression of IL-17F in lung epithelium led to infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages and mucus hyperplasia, similar to observations made in IL-17 transgenic mice. To further understand the function of IL-17F, we generated and analyzed mice deficient in IL-17F or IL-17. IL-17, but not IL-17F, was required for the initiation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Mice deficient in IL-17F, but not IL-17, had defective airway neutrophilia in response to allergen challenge. Moreover, in an asthma model, although IL-17 deficiency reduced T helper type 2 responses, IL-17F-deficient mice displayed enhanced type 2 cytokine production and eosinophil function. In addition, IL-17F deficiency resulted in reduced colitis caused by dextran sulfate sodium, whereas IL-17 knockout mice developed more severe disease. Our results thus demonstrate that IL-17F is an important regulator of inflammatory responses that seems to function differently than IL-17 in immune responses and diseases.

  6. Regulation of inflammatory responses by IL-17F

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuexian O.; Chang, Seon Hee; Park, Heon; Nurieva, Roza; Shah, Bhavin; Acero, Luis; Wang, Yi-Hong; Schluns, Kimberly S.; Broaddus, Russell R.; Zhu, Zhou; Dong, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Although interleukin (IL) 17 has been extensively characterized, the function of IL-17F, which has an expression pattern regulated similarly to IL-17, is poorly understood. We show that like IL-17, IL-17F regulates proinflammatory gene expression in vitro, and this requires IL-17 receptor A, tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor 6, and Act1. In vivo, overexpression of IL-17F in lung epithelium led to infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages and mucus hyperplasia, similar to observations made in IL-17 transgenic mice. To further understand the function of IL-17F, we generated and analyzed mice deficient in IL-17F or IL-17. IL-17, but not IL-17F, was required for the initiation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Mice deficient in IL-17F, but not IL-17, had defective airway neutrophilia in response to allergen challenge. Moreover, in an asthma model, although IL-17 deficiency reduced T helper type 2 responses, IL-17F–deficient mice displayed enhanced type 2 cytokine production and eosinophil function. In addition, IL-17F deficiency resulted in reduced colitis caused by dextran sulfate sodium, whereas IL-17 knockout mice developed more severe disease. Our results thus demonstrate that IL-17F is an important regulator of inflammatory responses that seems to function differently than IL-17 in immune responses and diseases. PMID:18411338

  7. Identification of Microcystis aeruginosa Peptides Responsible for Allergic Sensitization and Characterization of Functional Interactions between Cyanobacterial Toxins and Immunogenic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Geh, Esmond N.; Ghosh, Debajyoti; McKell, Melanie; de la Cruz, Armah A.; Stelma, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Background The cyanobacterium species Microcystis aeruginosa produces microcystin and an array of diverse metabolites believed responsible for their toxicity and/or immunogenicity. Previously, chronic rhinitis patients were demonstrated to elicit a specific IgE response to nontoxic strains of M. aeruginosa by skin-prick testing, indicating that cyanobacteria allergenicity resides in a non-toxin–producing component of the organism. Objectives We sought to identify and characterize M. aeruginosa peptide(s) responsible for allergic sensitization in susceptible individuals, and we investigated the functional interactions between cyanobacterial toxins and their coexpressed immunogenic peptides. Methods Sera from patients and extracts from M. aeruginosa toxic [MC(+)] and nontoxic [MC(–)] strains were used to test IgE-specific reactivity by direct and indirect ELISAs; 2D gel electrophoresis, followed by immunoblots and mass spectrometry (MS), was performed to identify the relevant sensitizing peptides. Cytotoxicity and mediator release assays were performed using the MC(+) and MC(–) lysates. Results We found specific IgE to be increased more in response to the MC(–) strain than the MC(+) strain. This response was inhibited by preincubation of MC(–) lysate with increasing concentrations of microcystin. MS revealed that phycocyanin and the core-membrane linker peptide are the responsible allergens, and MC(–) extracts containing these proteins induced β-hexosaminidase release in rat basophil leukemia cells. Conclusions Phycobiliprotein complexes in M. aeruginosa have been identified as the relevant sensitizing proteins. Our finding that allergenicity is inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by microcystin toxin suggests that further investigation is warranted to understand the interplay between immunogenicity and toxicity of cyanobacteria under diverse environmental conditions. Citation Geh EN, Ghosh D, McKell M, de la Cruz AA, Stelma G, Bernstein JA. 2015

  8. Allergic Responses Induced by a Fungal Biopesticide Metarhizium anisopliae and House Dust Mite Are Compared in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Marsha D. W.; Chung, Yong Joo; Copeland, Lisa B.; Doerfler, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    Biopesticides can be effective in controlling their target pest. However, research regarding allergenicity and asthma development is limited. We compared the ability of fungal biopesticide Metarhizium anisopliae (MACA) and house dust mite (HDM) extracts to induce allergic responses in BALB/c mice. The extracts were administered by intratracheal aspiration at doubling doses (2.5–80 μg protein) 4X over a four-week period. Three days after the last exposure, serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. The extracts' relative allergenicity was evaluated based on response robustness (lowest significant dose response compared to control (0 μg)). MACA induced a more robust serum total IgE response than HDM. However, in the antigen-specific IgE assay, a similar dose of both MACA and HDM was required to achieve the same response level. Our data suggest a threshold dose of MACA for allergy induction and that M. anisopliae may be similar to HDM in allergy induction potential. PMID:21785589

  9. Inflammatory response in the pig uterus induced by seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Bischof, R J; Lee, C S; Brandon, M R; Meeusen, E

    1994-03-01

    The immunological and physiological influence of seminal plasma on the local uterine environment was investigated by immunohistochemical and flow cytometrical studies on uterine tissues and lymph nodes taken from gilts after mating with a vasectomised boar and from control, unmated gilts. These studies revealed that mating with a vasectomised boar induces an acute transient inflammatory response in the endometrium resulting in marked changes in the presence and distribution of leukocytes and extensive proliferation of the endometrial glands. At the same time there was an increase in CD8L and sIg+ cells and an up-regulation of MHC class II and IL-2 receptor expression in the uterine lymph nodes of mated pigs. This would suggest that seminal plasma deposited in the uterus can activate cells in the local draining lymph nodes. Together, these results demonstrate in utero that pronounced immunological and physiological changes are induced in vivo by seminal plasma.

  10. Particulate oil shale inhalation and pulmonary inflammatory response in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.S.; Holland, L.M.; Halleck, M.S.; Martinez, E.; Saunders, G.

    1983-01-01

    This experiment detrimetal that long-term inhalation of shale dusts by rats elicits a limited inflammatory response in the lung less profound than that observed in animals exposed to equivalent levels of quartz alone. This observation suggests that organic and inorganic constituents of shale may provide a protective effect. The implications for fibrogenic disease are two-fold: (1) inhalation of oil shale dusts appeared to be less detriemtal than the inhalation of quartz along, and (2) there was no apparent synergistic action of quartz and the complex of organic materials present in shale. Animals exposed to shale dusts failed to develop any significant lung lesions, while all of the animals exposed to quartz developed granulomas and some frank fibrosis.

  11. IKKβ in intestinal epithelial cells regulates allergen-specific IgA and allergic inflammation at distant mucosal sites.

    PubMed

    Bonnegarde-Bernard, A; Jee, J; Fial, M J; Aeffner, F; Cormet-Boyaka, E; Davis, I C; Lin, M; Tomé, D; Karin, M; Sun, Y; Boyaka, P N

    2014-03-01

    Regulation of allergic responses by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) remains poorly understood. Using a model of oral allergen sensitization in the presence of cholera toxin as adjuvant and mice with cell-specific deletion of inhibitor-κB kinase (IKKβ) in IECs (IKKβ(ΔIEC)), we addressed the contribution of IECs to allergic sensitization to ingested antigens and allergic manifestations at distant mucosal site of the airways. Cholera toxin induced higher pro-inflammatory responses and altered the profile of the gut microbiota in IKKβ(ΔIEC) mice. Antigen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) responses were unaltered in IKKβ(ΔIEC) mice, but their IgA antibodies (Abs), T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 responses were enhanced. Upon nasal antigen challenge, these mice developed lower levels of allergic lung inflammation, which correlated with higher levels of IgA Abs in the airways. The IKKβ(ΔIEC) mice also recruited a higher number of gut-sensitized T cells in the airways after nasal antigen challenge and developed airway hyper-responsiveness, which were suppressed by treatment with anti-interleukin-17A. Fecal microbiota transplant during allergic sensitization reduced Th17 responses in IKKβ(ΔIEC) mice, but did not affect IgA Ab responses. In summary, we show that IKKβ in IECs shapes the gut microbiota and immune responses to ingested antigens and influences allergic responses in the airways via regulation of IgA Ab responses.

  12. Gut dysbiosis promotes M2 macrophage polarization and allergic airway inflammation via fungi-induced PGE₂.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Gi; Udayanga, Kankanam Gamage Sanath; Totsuka, Naoya; Weinberg, Jason B; Núñez, Gabriel; Shibuya, Akira

    2014-01-15

    Although imbalances in gut microbiota composition, or "dysbiosis," are associated with many diseases, the effects of gut dysbiosis on host systemic physiology are less well characterized. We report that gut dysbiosis induced by antibiotic (Abx) treatment promotes allergic airway inflammation by shifting macrophage polarization in the lung toward the alternatively activated M2 phenotype. Adoptive transfer of alveolar macrophages derived from Abx-treated mice was sufficient to increase allergic airway inflammation. Abx treatment resulted in the overgrowth of a commensal fungal Candida species in the gut and increased plasma concentrations of prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂), which induced M2 macrophage polarization in the lung. Suppression of PGE₂ synthesis by the cyclooxygenase inhibitors aspirin and celecoxib suppressed M2 macrophage polarization and decreased allergic airway inflammatory cell infiltration in Abx-treated mice. Thus, Abx treatment can cause overgrowth of particular fungal species in the gut and promote M2 macrophage activation at distant sites to influence systemic responses including allergic inflammation.

  13. Inflammatory Response to Burn Trauma: Nicotine Attenuates Proinflammatory Cytokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Papst, S.; Reimers, K.; Stukenborg-Colsman, C.; Steinstraesser, L.; Vogt, P. M.; Kraft, T.; Niederbichler, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The immune response to an inflammatory stimulus is balanced and orchestrated by stimulatory and inhibitory factors. After a thermal trauma, this balance is disturbed and an excessive immune reaction with increased production and release of proinflammatory cytokines results. The nicotine-stimulated anti-inflammatory reflex offsets this. The goal of this study was to verify that transdermal administration of nicotine downregulates proinflammatory cytokine release after burn trauma. Methods: A 30% total body surface area full-thickness rat burn model was used in Sprague Dawley rats (n = 35, male). The experimental animals were divided into a control group, a burn trauma group, a burn trauma group with additional nicotine treatment, and a sham + nicotine group with 5 experimental animals per group. The last 2 groups received a transdermal nicotine administration of 1.75 mg. The concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 beta, and interleukin 6 were determined in homogenates of hearts, livers, and spleens 12 or 24 hours after burn trauma. Results: Experimental burn trauma resulted in a significant increase in cytokine levels in hearts, livers, and spleens. Nicotine treatment led to a decrease of the effect of the burn trauma with significantly lower concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 beta, and interleukin 6 compared to the trauma group. Conclusions: This study confirms in a standardized burn model that stimulation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is involved in the regulation of effectory molecules of the immune response. Looking at the results of our study, further experiments designed to explore and evaluate the potency and mechanisms of the immunomodulating effects of this receptor system are warranted. PMID:25671045

  14. Coronavirus Infection in Ferrets: Antigen Distribution and Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Doria-Torra, G; Vidaña, B; Ramis, A; Amarilla, S P; Martínez, J

    2016-11-01

    Multisystemic granulomatous lesions are the most common finding in ferrets infected by ferret systemic coronavirus (FRSCV). To characterize the inflammatory response developed against this virus, lesions from 4 naturally infected ferrets were examined. Lesions were classified into the 4 known types of granulomas (granulomas without necrosis [G], granulomas with necrosis [G-N], granulomas with neutrophils [G-NL], and diffuse granulomatous inflammation [DG]). The cellular composition of the lesions was characterized on the basis of cellular morphology and immunohistochemistry using markers for T and B-lymphocytes, plasma cells, macrophages, and neutrophils. The extent and distribution of viral antigen expression was also assessed. In G lesions, macrophages were mainly located in the center of the granuloma, with a moderate number of T-lymphocytes scattered among the macrophages, plasma cells, and B-lymphocytes. G-N lesions exhibited a necrotic center surrounded by abundant macrophages, some T-lymphocytes, plasma cells, and a few B-lymphocytes. In G-NL lesions, there was a central area dominated by neutrophils with low numbers of macrophages, plasma cells, and lymphocytes. DG presented similar cell proportions, but distributed evenly throughout the lesions. FRSCV was expressed in G, G-NL, G-N, and DG, with decreasing numbers of immunoreactive cells. This study reveals the important role of macrophages in the inflammatory response of ferrets against the virus and the variable proportions of leukocytes among different types of lesions, indicating their variable age. The results also confirm the similarities of the disease in ferrets to feline infectious peritonitis.

  15. Sphingolipids: A Potential Molecular Approach to Treat Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wai Y.; Bonder, Claudine S.

    2012-01-01

    Allergic inflammation is an immune response to foreign antigens, which begins within minutes of exposure to the allergen followed by a late phase leading to chronic inflammation. Prolonged allergic inflammation manifests in diseases such as urticaria and rhino-conjunctivitis, as well as chronic asthma and life-threatening anaphylaxis. The prevalence of allergic diseases is profound with 25% of the worldwide population affected and a rising trend across all ages, gender, and racial groups. The identification and avoidance of allergens can manage this disease, but this is not always possible with triggers being common foods, prevalent air-borne particles and only extremely low levels of allergen exposure required for sensitization. Patients who are sensitive to multiple allergens require prophylactic and symptomatic treatments. Current treatments are often suboptimal and associated with adverse effects, such as the interruption of cognition, sleep cycles, and endocrine homeostasis, all of which affect quality of life and are a financial burden to society. Clearly, a better therapeutic approach for allergic diseases is required. Herein, we review the current knowledge of allergic inflammation and discuss the role of sphingolipids as potential targets to regulate inflammatory development in vivo and in humans. We also discuss the benefits and risks of using sphingolipid inhibitors. PMID:23316248

  16. Local Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Campo, Paloma; Salas, María; Blanca-López, Natalia; Rondón, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    This review focuses on local allergic rhinitis, a new phenotype of allergic rhinitis, commonly misdiagnosed as nonallergic rhinitis. It has gained attention over last decade and can affect patients from all countries, ethnic groups and ages, impairing their quality of life, and is frequently associated with conjunctivitis and asthma. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, the demonstration of a positive response to nasal allergen provocation test and/or the detection of nasal sIgE. A positive basophil activation test may support the diagnosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that allergen immunotherapy is an effective immune-modifying treatment, highlighting the importance of early diagnosis.

  17. G-CSF treatment promotes apoptosis of autoreactive T cells to restrict the inflammatory cascade and accelerate recovery in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei

    2017-03-01

    G-CSF is a hematopoietic growth factor that regulates the proliferation, differentiation and survival of myeloid lineage cells, which has protective effects in autoimmune neuroinflammatory diseases such as EAE. Here we use EAE model treated by G-CSF to address the hypothesis that G-CSF inhibits the proliferative response of splenic T cells via the enhancement of apoptosis, and this priming effect of G-CSF depends on the cell cycle. Our results show that G-CSF administration reduced EAE frequency and severity of attacks. The inflammatory cells and demyelination areas were decreased in the CNS of G-CSF-treated mice. G-CSF treatment altered cytokine profiles in vivo to inhibit the productions of IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-2, TNF-α, IL-17 and NO, while the secretions of IL-4 and IL-10 were increased. Splenic T cells from G-CSF-treated mice showed significantly lower proliferative response to specific antigen MOG35-55 stimulation. G-CSF enhanced the percentage of a CD4(+)CD25(+) T cell subset in spleen T cells. Moreover, G-CSF promoted the G0/G1 to S phase transition of MOG35-55 autoreactive T cells inducing apoptosis and elevating Bax gene expression of apoptosis marker. These findings indicate that G-CSF treatment induces the apoptosis of MOG35-55 autoreactive T cells, which decreases the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and NO, suppresses the proliferation of autoreactive T cells and elevates a CD4(+)CD25(+) T cell subset to inhibit inflammatory infiltration and demyelination within CNS of EAE. The conclusions of G-CSF treatment in EAE mice suggest that G-CSF is clinically applicable and may be considered for future use in therapeutic measures for multiple sclerosis treatment.

  18. Sleep Disturbance and Older Adults' Inflammatory Responses to Acute Stress

    PubMed Central

    Heffner, Kathi L.; Ng, H. Mei; Suhr, Julie A.; France, Christopher R.; Marshall, Gailen D.; Pigeon, Wilfred R.; Moynihan, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Poor sleep diminishes mental and physical health. The objective of this study was to examine associations between sleep disturbance and interleukin-6 (IL-6) responses to acute mental stress in older adults. Design Observational study of community-dwelling, healthy older adults. Setting Participants completed the study in a clinical research laboratory of a mid-sized university. Participants Generally healthy, community-dwelling men and women 50 years of age and older. Measurements IL-6 and negative affect at rest and following a series of challenging cognitive tests; sleep quality; depressive symptoms; perceived stress; loneliness. Results Participants categorized as poor sleepers based on Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores had significantly larger IL-6 responses to the cognitive stressors compared to good sleepers. The association between poor sleep and heightened IL-6 response to acute stress was not explained by other psychosocial factors previously linked to immune dysregulation, including depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and loneliness. Conclusions Findings add to the growing evidence for poor sleep as an independent risk factor for poor mental and physical health. Older adults may be particularly vulnerable to effects of sleep disturbance due to significant age-related changes in both sleep and inflammatory regulation. PMID:22327621

  19. Allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common disorder that is strongly linked to asthma and conjunctivitis. It is usually a long-standing condition that often goes undetected in the primary-care setting. The classic symptoms of the disorder are nasal congestion, nasal itch, rhinorrhea and sneezing. A thorough history, physical examination and allergen skin testing are important for establishing the diagnosis of allergic rhinitis. Second-generation oral antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment. Allergen immunotherapy is an effective immune-modulating treatment that should be recommended if pharmacologic therapy for allergic rhinitis is not effective or is not tolerated. This article provides an overview of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and appropriate management of this disorder. PMID:22166009

  20. Infection with Syphacia obvelata (pinworm) induces protective Th2 immune responses and influences ovalbumin-induced allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Michels, Chesney; Goyal, Prem; Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie; Brombacher, Frank

    2006-10-01

    Infections with pinworms are common in rodent animal facilities. In this study, we show the consequence of an outbreak in a transgenic barrier facility of infection by Syphacia obvelata, a murine pinworm gastrointestinal nematode. Immune responses were defined in experimental infection studies with BALB/c mice. Infection with S. obvelata induced a transient Th2-type immune response with elevated interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-5, and IL-13 cytokine production and parasite-specific immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1). In contrast, BALB/c mice deficient in IL-13, IL-4/13, or the IL-4 receptor alpha chain showed chronic disease, with a >100-fold higher parasite burden, increased gamma interferon production, parasite-specific IgG2b, and a default Th2 response. Interestingly, infected IL-4-/- BALB/c mice showed only slightly elevated parasite burdens compared to the control mice, suggesting that IL-13 plays the dominant role in the control of S. obvelata. The influence that pinworm infection has on the allergic response to a dietary antigen was found to be important. Helminth-infected mice immunized against ovalbumin (Ova) elicited more severe anaphylactic shock with reduced Ova-specific IL-4 and IL-5 than did noninfected controls, demonstrating that S. obvelata infection is able to influence nonrelated laboratory experiments. The latter outcome highlights the importance of maintaining mice for use as experimental models under pinworm-free conditions.

  1. Development of chronic allergic responses by dampening Bcl6-mediated suppressor activity in memory T helper 2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Takashi; Hatano, Masahiko; Satake, Hisae; Ikari, Jun; Taniguchi, Toshibumi; Tsuruoka, Nobuhide; Watanabe-Takano, Haruko; Fujimura, Lisa; Sakamoto, Akemi; Hirata, Hirokuni; Sugiyama, Kumiya; Fukushima, Yasutsugu; Nakae, Susumu; Matsumoto, Kenji; Saito, Hirohisa; Fukuda, Takeshi; Kurasawa, Kazuhiro; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Tokuhisa, Takeshi; Arima, Masafumi

    2017-01-31

    Mice deficient in the transcriptional repressor B-cell CLL/lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) exhibit similar T helper 2 (TH2) immune responses as patients with allergic diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Bcl6-directed regulation of TH2 cytokine genes remain unclear. We identified multiple Bcl6/STAT binding sites (BSs) in TH2 cytokine gene loci. We found that Bcl6 is modestly associated with the BSs, and it had no significant effect on cytokine production in newly differentiated TH2 cells. Contrarily, in memory TH2 (mTH2) cells derived from adaptively transferred TH2 effectors, Bcl6 outcompeted STAT5 for binding to TH2 cytokine gene loci, particularly Interleukin4 (Il4) loci, and attenuated GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3) binding to highly conserved intron enhancer regions in mTH2 cells. Bcl6 suppressed cytokine production epigenetically in mTH2 cells to negatively tune histone acetylation at TH2 cytokine gene loci, including Il4 loci. In addition, IL-33, a pro-TH2 cytokine, diminished Bcl6's association with loci to which GATA3 recruitment was inversely augmented, resulting in altered IL-4, but not IL-5 and IL-13, production in mTH2 cells but no altered production in newly differentiated TH2 cells. Use of a murine asthma model that generates high levels of pro-TH2 cytokines, such as IL-33, suggested that the suppressive function of Bcl6 in mTH2 cells is abolished in severe asthma. These findings indicate a role of the interaction between TH2-promoting factors and Bcl6 in promoting appropriate IL-4 production in mTH2 cells and suggest that chronic allergic diseases involve the TH2-promoting factor-mediated functional breakdown of Bcl6, resulting in allergy exacerbation.

  2. B-Glucan exacerbates allergic asthma independent of fungal sensitization and promotes steroid-resistant TH2/TH17 responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    BackgroundAllergic sensitization to fungi has been associated with asthma severity. As a result, it has been largely assumed that the contribution of fungi to allergic disease is mediated through their potent antigenicity.ObjectiveWe sought to determine the mechanism by which fun...

  3. RELATIVE POTENCY OF FUNGAL EXTRACTS IN INDUCING ALLERGIC ASTHMA-LIKE RESPONSES IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor mold has been associated with the development of allergic asthma. However, relative potency of molds in the induction of allergic asthma is not clear. In this study, we tested the relative potency of fungal extracts (Metarizium anisophilae [MACA], Stachybotrys ...

  4. Notch ligand delta-like 4 regulates development and pathogenesis of allergic airway responses by modulating IL-2 production and Th2 immunity.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sihyug; Schaller, Matthew; Berlin, Aaron A; Lukacs, Nicholas W

    2010-11-15

    Activation of the canonical Notch pathways has been implicated in Th cell differentiation, but the role of specific Notch ligands in Th2-mediated allergic airway responses has not been completely elucidated. In this study, we show that delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4) was upregulated on dendritic cells in response to cockroach allergen. Blocking Dll4 in vivo during either the primary or secondary response enhanced allergen-induced pathogenic consequences including airway hyperresponsiveness and mucus production via increased Th2 cytokines. In vitro assays demonstrated that Dll4 regulates IL-2 in T cells from established Th2 responses as well as during primary stimulation. Notably, Dll4 blockade during the primary, but not the secondary, response increased IL-2 levels in lung and lymph node of allergic mice. The in vivo neutralization of Dll4 was associated with increased expansion and decreased apoptosis during the primary allergen sensitization. Moreover, Dll4-mediated Notch activation of T cells during primary stimulation in vitro increased apoptosis during the contraction/resting phase of the response, which could be rescued by exogenous IL-2. Consistent with the role for Dll4-mediated IL-2 regulation in overall T cell function, the frequency of IL-4-producing cells was also significantly altered by Dll4 both in vivo and in vitro. These data demonstrate a regulatory role of Dll4 both in initial Th2 differentiation and in Th2 cytokine production in established allergic responses.

  5. Update and clinical utility of alcaftadine ophthalmic solution 0.25% in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Chigbu, DeGaulle I; Coyne, Alissa M

    2015-01-01

    Allergic disorders of the ocular surface are primarily characterized as IgE- and/or T-lymphocyte-mediated disorders that affect the cornea, conjunctiva, and eyelid. Approximately 40% of individuals in the developed countries have allergic conjunctivitis, and as such, it is the most common form of ocular allergy. Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis is the most prevalent type of allergic conjunctivitis that impacts the quality of life of patients. This article reviews the pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, clinical efficacy, and safety of alcaftadine. Histamine and the pathological mechanism of ocular allergy will be briefly reviewed with the intent of providing a background for the detailed discussion on the clinical utility of alcaftadine in allergic conjunctivitis. The Medline PubMed, Elsevier Science Direct, and Google Scholar databases were used to search for evidence-based literature on histamine and immunopathological mechanism of allergic conjunctivitis, as well as on pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, and clinical efficacy of alcaftadine. The treatment and management goals of allergic conjunctivitis are to prevent or minimize the inflammatory cascade associated with allergic response in the early stages of the pathological mechanism. It is of note that activation of histamine receptors on immune and nonimmune cells are associated with allergen-induced inflammation of the conjunctiva and its associated ocular allergic manifestations, including itching, edema, hyperemia, and tearing. Alcaftadine is an efficacious multiple action antiallergic therapeutic agent with inverse agonist activity on H1, H2, and H4 receptors, as well as anti-inflammatory and mast cell stabilizing effects that could provide therapeutic benefits to patients with allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:26185412

  6. Sigma Receptor Ligand, (+)-Pentazocine, Suppresses Inflammatory Responses of Retinal Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Ha, Yonju; Liou, Gregory I.; Gonsalvez, Graydon B.; Smith, Sylvia B.; Bollinger, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of the σ 1 receptor (σR1) agonist, (+)-pentazocine, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)–induced inflammatory changes in retinal microglia cells. Methods. Retinal microglia cells were isolated from Sprague-Dawley rat pups. Cells were treated with LPS with or without (+)-pentazocine and with or without the σR1 antagonist BD1063. Morphologic changes were assayed. Cell viability was assessed by using MTT assay. Supernatant levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 10, (IL-10), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and nitric oxide (NO) were determined. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was assayed, and levels of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were analyzed by using Western blot. Results. The σR1 protein was expressed in retinal microglia. Incubation with LPS and/or (+)-pentazocine did not alter cell viability or σR1 protein levels. Incubation with LPS for 24 hours induced a marked change in microglial morphology and a significant increase in secreted levels of TNF-α, IL-10, MCP-1, and NO. Pretreatment with (+)-pentazocine inhibited the LPS-induced morphologic changes. Release of TNF-α, IL-10, MCP-1, and NO was reduced with (+)-pentazocine. Intracellular ROS formation was suppressed with (+)-pentazocine. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was reduced in the presence of (+)-pentazocine. The σR1 antagonist BD1063 blocked the (+)-pentazocine–mediated inhibition of LPS-induced morphologic changes. In addition, BD1063 treatment blocked (+)-pentazocine–mediated suppression of LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-10, MCP-1, NO, and intracellular ROS release. Conclusions. Treatment with (+)-pentazocine suppressed inflammatory responses of retinal microglia and inhibited LPS-induced activation of ERK/JNK MAPK. In neurodegenerative disease, (+)-pentazocine may exert neuroprotective effects through manipulation of microglia. PMID:24812552

  7. Effect of Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation on Early Inflammatory Responses during Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Na-Young; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Lim, Yunsook

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory response is considered the most important period that regulates the entire healing process. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a class of linoleic acid positional and geometric isomers, is well known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. We hypothesized that dietary CLA supplementation accelerates cutaneous wound healing by regulating antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. To investigate wound closure rates and inflammatory responses, we used a full-thickness excisional wound model after 2-week treatments with control, 0.5%, or 1% CLA-supplemented diet. Mice fed dietary CLA supplementation had reduced levels of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers. Moreover, the wound closure rate was improved significantly in mice fed a 1% CLA-supplemented diet during early stage of wound healing (inflammatory stage). We conclude that dietary CLA supplementation enhances the early stage of cutaneous wound healing as a result of modulating oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. PMID:20871865

  8. Maresin 1 Mitigates Inflammatory Response and Protects Mice from Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruidong; Wang, Yaxin; Ma, Zhijun; Ma, Muyuan; Wang, Di; Xie, Gengchen; Yin, Yuping

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis, frequently caused by infection of bacteria, is considered as an uncontrollable systematic inflammation response syndrome (SIRS). Maresin 1 (Mar1) is a new proresolving mediator with potent anti-inflammatory effect in several animal models. However, its effect in sepsis is still not investigated. To address this question, we developed sepsis model in BALB/c mice by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) with or without Mar1 treatment. Our data showed that Mar1 markedly improved survival rate and decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in CLP mice such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Furthermore, Mar1 reduced serum level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and enhanced the bacteria clearance in mice sepsis model. Moreover, Mar1 attenuated lung injury and decreased level of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), creatinine (Cre), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) in serum in mice after CLP surgery. Treatment with Mar1 inhibited activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κb) pathway. In conclusion, Mar1 exhibited protective effect in sepsis by reducing LPS, bacteria burden in serum, inhibiting inflammation response, and improving vital organ function. The possible mechanism is partly involved in inhibition of NF-κb activation. PMID:28042205

  9. Cerebral analgesic response to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Hodkinson, Duncan J; Khawaja, Nadine; OʼDaly, Owen; Thacker, Michael A; Zelaya, Fernando O; Wooldridge, Caroline L; Renton, Tara F; Williams, Steven C R; Howard, Matthew A

    2015-07-01

    Nonopioid agents, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), are the most commonly used class of analgesics. Increasing evidence suggests that cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition at both peripheral and central sites can contribute to the antihyperalgesic effects of NSAIDs, with the predominant clinical effect being mediated centrally. In this study, we examined the cerebral response to ibuprofen in presurgical and postsurgical states and looked at the analgesic interaction between surgical state and treatment. We used an established clinical pain model involving third molar extraction, and quantitative arterial spin labelling (ASL) imaging to measure changes in tonic/ongoing neural activity. Concurrent to the ASL scans, we presented visual analogue scales inside the scanner to evaluate the subjective experience of pain. This novel methodology was incorporated into a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled design, with an open method of drug administration. We found that independent of its antinociceptive action, ibuprofen has no effect on regional cerebral blood flow under pain-free conditions (presurgery). However, in the postsurgical state, we observed increased activation of top-down modulatory circuits, which was accompanied by decreases in the areas engaged because of ongoing pain. Our findings demonstrate that ibuprofen has a measurable analgesic response in the human brain, with the subjective effects of pain relief reflected in two distinct brain networks. The observed activation of descending modulatory circuits warrants further investigation, as this may provide new insights into the inhibitory mechanisms of analgesia that might be exploited to improve safety and efficacy in pain management.

  10. Oral administration of Lactobacillus paracasei L9 attenuates PM2.5-induced enhancement of airway hyperresponsiveness and allergic airway response in murine model of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Hao, Yanling; Guo, Huiyuan; Ren, Fazheng

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated allergy immunotherapy potential of Lactobacillus paracasei L9 to prevent or mitigate the particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) enhanced pre-existing asthma in mice. Firstly, we used a mouse model of asthma (a 21-day ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and challenge model) followed by PM2.5 exposure twice on the same day of the last challenge. PM2.5 was collected from the urban area of Beijing and underwent analysis for metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contents. The results showed that PM2.5 exposure enhanced airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and lead to a mixed Th2/ IL-17 response in asthmatic mice. Secondly, the PM2.5 exposed asthmatic mice were orally administered with L9 (4×107, 4×109 CFU/mouse, day) from the day of first sensitization to the endpoint, for 20 days, to investigate the potential mitigative effect of L9 on asthma. The results showed that L9 ameliorated PM2.5 exposure enhanced AHR with an approximate 50% decrease in total airway resistance response to methacholine (48 mg/ml). L9 also prevented the exacerbated eosinophil and neutrophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and decreased the serum level of total IgE and OVA-specific IgG1 by 0.44-fold and 0.3-fold, respectively. Additionally, cytokine production showed that L9 significantly decreased T-helper cell type 2 (Th2)–related cytokines (IL-4, -5, -13) and elevated levels of Th1 related IFN-γ in BALF. L9 also reduced the level of IL-17A and increased the level of TGF-β. Taken together, these results indicate that L9 may exert the anti-allergic benefit, possibly through rebalancing Th1/Th2 immune response and modulating IL-17 pro-inflammatory immune response. Thus, L9 is a promising candidate for preventing PM exposure enhanced pre-existing asthma. PMID:28199353

  11. Oral administration of Lactobacillus paracasei L9 attenuates PM2.5-induced enhancement of airway hyperresponsiveness and allergic airway response in murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xifan; Hui, Yan; Zhao, Liang; Hao, Yanling; Guo, Huiyuan; Ren, Fazheng

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated allergy immunotherapy potential of Lactobacillus paracasei L9 to prevent or mitigate the particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) enhanced pre-existing asthma in mice. Firstly, we used a mouse model of asthma (a 21-day ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and challenge model) followed by PM2.5 exposure twice on the same day of the last challenge. PM2.5 was collected from the urban area of Beijing and underwent analysis for metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contents. The results showed that PM2.5 exposure enhanced airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and lead to a mixed Th2/ IL-17 response in asthmatic mice. Secondly, the PM2.5 exposed asthmatic mice were orally administered with L9 (4×107, 4×109 CFU/mouse, day) from the day of first sensitization to the endpoint, for 20 days, to investigate the potential mitigative effect of L9 on asthma. The results showed that L9 ameliorated PM2.5 exposure enhanced AHR with an approximate 50% decrease in total airway resistance response to methacholine (48 mg/ml). L9 also prevented the exacerbated eosinophil and neutrophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and decreased the serum level of total IgE and OVA-specific IgG1 by 0.44-fold and 0.3-fold, respectively. Additionally, cytokine production showed that L9 significantly decreased T-helper cell type 2 (Th2)-related cytokines (IL-4, -5, -13) and elevated levels of Th1 related IFN-γ in BALF. L9 also reduced the level of IL-17A and increased the level of TGF-β. Taken together, these results indicate that L9 may exert the anti-allergic benefit, possibly through rebalancing Th1/Th2 immune response and modulating IL-17 pro-inflammatory immune response. Thus, L9 is a promising candidate for preventing PM exposure enhanced pre-existing asthma.

  12. Allergic vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage to blood vessels, primarily in the skin. Causes Hypersensitivity vasculitis is caused by an allergic reaction to ... affects people older than age 15. Often, the cause of the problem cannot be found even with ... vasculitis may look like necrotizing vasculitis , which can ...

  13. Japanese guidelines for allergic conjunctival diseases 2017.

    PubMed

    Takamura, Etsuko; Uchio, Eiichi; Ebihara, Nobuyuki; Ohno, Shigeaki; Ohashi, Yuichi; Okamoto, Shigeki; Kumagai, Naoki; Satake, Yoshiyuki; Shoji, Jun; Nakagawa, Yayoi; Namba, Kenichi; Fukagawa, Kazumi; Fukushima, Atsuki; Fujishima, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    The definition, classification, pathogenesis, test methods, clinical findings, criteria for diagnosis, and therapies of allergic conjunctival disease are summarized based on the Guidelines for Clinical Management of Allergic Conjunctival Disease (Second Edition) revised in 2010. Allergic conjunctival disease is defined as "a conjunctival inflammatory disease associated with a Type I allergy accompanied by some subjective or objective symptoms." Allergic conjunctival disease is classified into allergic conjunctivitis, atopic keratoconjunctivitis, vernal keratoconjunctivitis, and giant papillary conjunctivitis. Representative subjective symptoms include ocular itching, hyperemia, and lacrimation, whereas objective symptoms include conjunctival hyperemia, swelling, folliculosis, and papillae. Patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis, which is characterized by conjunctival proliferative changes called giant papilla accompanied by varying extents of corneal lesion, such as corneal erosion and shield ulcer, complain of foreign body sensation, ocular pain, and photophobia. In the diagnosis of allergic conjunctival diseases, it is required that type I allergic diathesis is present, along with subjective and objective symptoms accompanying allergic inflammation. The diagnosis is ensured by proving a type I allergic reaction in the conjunctiva. Given that the first-line drug for the treatment of allergic conjunctival disease is an antiallergic eye drop, a steroid eye drop will be selected in accordance with the severity. In the treatment of vernal keratoconjunctivitis, an immunosuppressive eye drop will be concomitantly used with the abovementioned drugs.

  14. Inhibitory effect of 1,2,4,5-tetramethoxybenzene on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation through suppression of IκB kinase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Je, In-Gyu; Choi, Hyun Gyu; Kim, Hui-Hun; Lee, Soyoung; Choi, Jin Kyeong; Kim, Sung-Wan; Kim, Duk-Sil; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Shin, Tae-Yong; Park, Pil-Hoon; Khang, Dongwoo; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    As the importance of allergic disorders such as atopic dermatitis and allergic asthma, research on potential drug candidates becomes more necessary. Mast cells play an important role as initiators of allergic responses through the release of histamine; therefore, they should be the target of pharmaceutical development for the management of allergic inflammation. In our previous study, anti-allergic effect of extracts of Amomum xanthioides was demonstrated. To further investigate improved candidates, 1,2,4,5-tetramethoxybenzene (TMB) was isolated from methanol extracts of A. xanthioides. TMB dose-dependently attenuated the degranulation of mast cells without cytotoxicity by inhibiting calcium influx. TMB decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-4 at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Increased expression of these cytokines was caused by translocation of nuclear factor-κB into the nucleus, and it was hindered by suppressing activation of IκB kinase complex. To confirm the effect of TMB in vivo, the ovalbumin (OVA)-induced active systemic anaphylaxis (ASA) and IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) models were used. In the ASA model, hypothermia was decreased by oral administration of TMB, which attenuated serum histamine, OVA-specific IgE, and IL-4 levels. Increased pigmentation of Evans blue was reduced by TMB in a dose-dependent manner in the PCA model. Our results suggest that TMB is a possible therapeutic candidate for allergic inflammatory diseases that acts through the inhibition of mast cell degranulation and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. - Highlights: • TMB reduced the degranulation of mast cells. • TMB inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. • TMB suppressed both active and passive anaphylaxis. • Anti-allergic inflammatory effects of TMB might be due to the blocking IKK complex. • TMB might be a candidate for the treatment of

  15. Local IgE in non-allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Campo, P; Rondón, C; Gould, H J; Barrionuevo, E; Gevaert, P; Blanca, M

    2015-05-01

    Local allergic rhinitis (LAR) is characterized by the presence of a nasal Th2 inflammatory response with local production of specific IgE antibodies and a positive response to a nasal allergen provocation test (NAPT) without evidence of systemic atopy. The prevalence has been shown to be up to 25% in subjects affected with rhinitis with persistence, comorbidity and evolution similar to allergic rhinitis. LAR is a consistent entity that does not evolve to allergic rhinitis with systemic atopy over time although patients have significant impairment in quality of life and increase in the severity of nasal symptoms over time. Lower airways can be also involved. The diagnosis of LAR is based mostly on demonstration of positive response to NAPT and/or local synthesis of specific IgE. Allergens involved include seasonal or perennial such as house dusts mites, pollens, animal epithelia, moulds (alternaria) and others. Basophils from peripheral blood may be activated by the involved allergens suggesting the spill over of locally synthesized specific IgE to the circulation. LAR patients will benefit from the same treatment as allergic patients using antihistamines, inhaled corticosteroids and IgE antagonists. Studies on immunotherapy are ongoing and will determine its efficacy in LAR in terms of symptoms improvement and evolution of the natural course of the disease.

  16. DISREGULATION OF INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES BY CHRONIC CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION

    PubMed Central

    Castanon-Cervantes, Oscar; Wu, Mingwei; Ehlen, J. Christopher; Paul, Ketema; Gamble, Karen L.; Johnson, Russell L.; Besing, Rachel C.; Menaker, Michael; Gewirtz, Andrew T.; Davidson, Alec J.

    2010-01-01

    Circadian rhythms modulate nearly every mammalian physiological process. Chronic disruption of circadian timing in shift work or during chronic jet lag in animal models leads to a higher risk of several pathologies. Many of these conditions in both shift workers and experimental models share the common risk factor of inflammation. Here we show that experimentally-induced circadian disruption altered innate immune responses. Endotoxemic shock induced by LPS was magnified leading to hypothermia and death after 4 consecutive weekly 6h phase-advances of the light-dark schedule, with 89% mortality compared with 21% in unshifted control mice. This may be due to a heightened release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to LPS treatment in shifted animals. Isolated peritoneal macrophages harvested from shifted mice exhibited a similarly heightened response to LPS in vitro, indicating that these cells are a target for jet lag. Sleep deprivation and stress are known to alter immune function and are potential mediators of the effects we describe. However polysomnographic recording in mice exposed to the shifting schedule revealed no sleep loss, and stress measures were not altered in shifted mice. In contrast, we observed altered or abolished rhythms in the expression of clock genes in the central clock, liver, thymus and peritoneal macrophages in mice after chronic jet lag. We conclude that circadian disruption, but not sleep loss or stress, are associated with jet lag-related disregulation of the innate immune system. Such immune changes might be a common mechanism for the myriad negative health effects of shift work. PMID:20944004

  17. Pro-inflammatory responses of RAW264.7 macrophages when treated with ultralow concentrations of silver, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Giovanni, Marcella; Yue, Junqi; Zhang, Lifeng; Xie, Jianping; Ong, Choon Nam; Leong, David Tai

    2015-10-30

    To cellular systems, nanoparticles are considered as foreign particles. Upon particles and cells contact, innate immune system responds by activating the inflammatory pathway. However, excessive inflammation had been linked to various diseases ranging from allergic responses to cancer. Common nanoparticles, namely silver, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide exist in the environment as well as in consumer products at ultralow level of 10(-6)-10(-3) μg mL(-1). However, so far the risks of such low NPs concentrations remain unexplored. Therefore, we attempted to screen the pro-inflammatory responses after ultralow concentration treatments of the three nanoparticles on RAW264.7 macrophages, which are a part of the immune system, at both cellular and gene levels. Even though cytotoxicity was only observed at nanoparticles concentrations as high as 10 μg mL(-1), through the level of NF-κB and upregulation of pro-inflammatory genes, we observed activation of the induction of genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines starting already at 10(-7) μg mL(-1). This calls for more thorough characterization of nanoparticles in the environment as well as in consumer products to ascertain the health and safety of the consumers and living systems in general.

  18. Early growth response 1 mediates the systemic and hepatic inflammatory response initiated by hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Prince, Jose M; Ming, Mei Jian; Levy, Ryan M; Liu, Shubing; Pinsky, David J; Vodovotz, Yoram; Billiar, Timothy R

    2007-02-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. The early growth response 1 (Egr-1) transcription factor is induced by a variety of cellular stresses, including hypoxia, and may function as a master switch to trigger the expression of numerous key inflammatory mediators. We hypothesized that HS would induce hepatic expression of Egr-1 and that Egr-1 upregulates the inflammatory response after HS. The Egr-1 mice and wild-type (WT) controls (n>or=5 for all groups) were subjected to HS alone or HS followed by resuscitation (HS/R). Other mice were subjected to a sham procedure which included general anesthesia and vessel cannulation but no shock (sham). After the HS, HS/R, or sham procedures, mice were euthanized for determination of serum concentrations of interleukin (IL) 6, IL-10, and alanine aminotransferase. Northern blot analysis was performed to evaluate Egr-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression. Liver whole cell lysates were evaluated for Egr-1 protein expression by Western blot analysis. Hepatic expression of IL-6, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and intracellular adhesion molecule 1 mRNA was determined by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The Egr-1 DNA binding was assessed using the electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Hemorrhagic shock results in a rapid and transient hepatic expression of Egr-1 mRNA in WT mice by 1 h, whereas protein and DNA binding activity was evident by 2.5 h. The Egr-1 mRNA expression diminished after 4 h of resuscitation, whereas Egr-1 protein expression and DNA binding activity persisted through resuscitation. The Egr-1 mice exhibited decreased levels of hepatic inflammatory mediators compared with WT controls with a decrease in hepatic mRNA levels of IL-6 by 42%, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor by 39%, and intracellular adhesion molecule 1 by 43%. Similarly, Egr-1 mice demonstrated a decreased systemic inflammatory response and hepatic injury after HS

  19. Immunomodulatory Effects of Different Lactic Acid Bacteria on Allergic Response and Its Relationship with In Vitro Properties

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Chunqing; Ma, Na; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Wang, Gang; Liu, Xiaoming; Tian, Fengwei; Chen, Pei; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Some studies reported that probiotic could relieve allergy-induced damage to the host, but how to get a useful probiotic is still a challenge. In this study, the protective effects of three lactic acid bacteria (La, Lp and Lc) were evaluated in a mouse model, and its relationship with the in vitro properties was analyzed. The in vitro results indicated that La with the capacity to inhibit IL-4 production could have a better anti-allergy effect in vivo than two others. However, the animal trials showed that all LAB strains could alleviate allergen-induced airway inflammation. Among them, LAB strain Lp had a better effect in inhibiting allergic response through a modulation of Th1/Th2 balance and an increase of regulatory T cells. This difference could be explained by that different LAB strains have a strain-specific effect on gut microbiota closely associated with host immune responses. Finally, this study did not only obtain an effective anti-allergy probiotic strain via animal study, but also indicate that probiotic-induced effect on intestinal microbiota should be considered as an important screening index, apart from its inherent characteristics. PMID:27764153

  20. Allergic Fungal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Correll, Daniel P; Luzi, Scott A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2015-12-01

    A 42 year old male presents with worsening pain and an increase in thick chronic drainage of the left sinus. Image studies show complete opacification of the left frontal sinus, left sphenoid sinus, and the left maxillary sinus. The patient was taken to the operating room and tissue for microscopic evaluation was obtained. The microscopic findings were classic for allergic fungal sinusitis: areas of alternating mucinous material and inflammatory cell debris and abundant Charcot-Leyden crystals. Cultures were performed and the patient began steroid therapy and desensitization therapy.

  1. Exposure to Aedes aegypti Bites Induces a Mixed-Type Allergic Response following Salivary Antigens Challenge in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Michele S.; Gomes, Eliane; Gueroni, Daniele I.; Ramos, Anderson D.; Mirotti, Luciana; Florsheim, Esther; Bizzarro, Bruna; Lino, Ciro N. R.; Maciel, Ceres; Lino-Dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana; Tavares-de-Lima, Wothan; Capurro, Margareth L.; Russo, Momtchilo

    2016-01-01

    Classical studies have shown that Aedes aegypti salivary secretion is responsible for the sensitization to mosquito bites and many of the components present in saliva are immunogenic and capable of inducing an intense immune response. Therefore, we have characterized a murine model of adjuvant-free systemic allergy induced by natural exposure to mosquito bites. BALB/c mice were sensitized by exposure to A. aegypti mosquito bites and intranasally challenged with phosphate-buffered saline only or the mosquito’s salivary gland extract (SGE). Blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung were collected and evaluated for cellularity, histopathological analyses, cytokines and antibody determination. Respiratory pattern was analyzed by Penh measurements and tracheal segments were obtained to study in vitro reactivity to methacholine. BAL recovered from sensitized mice following challenge with SGE showed an increased number of eosinophils and Th2 cytokines such as IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13. Peribronchoalveolar eosinophil infiltration, mucus and collagen were also observed in lung parenchyma of sensitized mice, suggesting the development of a typical Th2 response. However, the antibody profile in serum of these mice evidenced a mixed-type response with presence of both, IgG1/IgE (Th2-related) and IgG2a (Th1-related) isotypes. In addition, changes in breathing pattern and tracheal reactivity to methacholine were not found. Taken together, our results show that A. aegypti bites trigger an atypical allergic reaction, with some classical cellular and soluble Th2 components in the lung, but also systemic Th1 and Th2 antibody isotypes and no change in either the respiratory pattern or the trachea responsiveness to agonist. PMID:27203689

  2. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Tengku; McSharry, Charles; Boyd, Gavin

    2006-05-01

    Extrinsic allergic alveolitis (also known as hypersensitivity pneumonitis) is caused by repeated inhalation of mainly organic antigens by sensitized subjects. This induces a hypersensitivity response in the distal bronchioles and alveoli and subjects may present clinically with a variety of symptoms. The aims of this review are to describe the current concepts of the immunological response, the diverse clinical presentation of this disease, the relevant investigations and management, and areas for future studies.

  3. Role of Fiber Length on Phagocytosis & Inflammatory Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkevich, Leonid; Stark, Carahline; Champion, Julie

    2014-03-01

    Asbestos fibers have long been associated with lung cancer death. The inability of immune cells (e.g. macrophages) to effectively remove asbestos leads to chronic inflammation and disease. This study examines the role of fiber length on toxicity at the cellular level using model glass fibers. A major challenge is obtaining single diameter fibers but differing in length. Samples of 1 micron diameter fibers with different length distributions were prepared: short fibers (less than 15 microns) by aggressive crushing, and long fibers (longer than 15 microns) by successive sedimentation. Time-lapse video microscopy monitored the interaction of MH-S murine alveolar macrophages with the fibers: short fibers were easily internalized by the macrophages, but long fibers resisted internalization over many hours. Production of TNF- α (tumor necrosis factor alpha), a general inflammatory secreted cytokine, and Cox-2 (cyclo-oxygenase-2), an enzyme that produces radicals, each exhibited a dose-dependence that was greater for long than for short fibers. These results corroborate the importance of fiber length in both physical and biochemical cell response and support epidemiological observations of higher toxicity for longer fibers.

  4. Circulating Mitochondrial DAMPs Cause Inflammatory Responses to Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qin; Raoof, Mustafa; Chen, Yu; Sumi, Yuka; Sursal, Tolga; Junger, Wolfgang; Brohi, Karim; Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Hauser, Carl J.

    2009-01-01

    Injury causes a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) clinically much like sepsis 1. Microbial pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) activate innate immunocytes through pattern recognition receptors 2. Similarly, cellular injury can release endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that activate innate immunity 3. Mitochondria are evolutionary endosymbionts that were derived from bacteria 4 and so might bear bacterial molecular motifs. We show here that injury releases mitochondrial DAMPs (MTD) into the circulation with functionally important immune consequences. MTD include formyl peptides and mitochondrial DNA. These activate human neutrophils (PMN) through formyl peptide receptor-1 and TLR9 respectively. MTD promote PMN Ca2+ flux and phosphorylation of MAP kinases, thus leading to PMN migration and degranulation in vitro and in vivo. Circulating MTD can elicit neutrophil-mediated organ injury. Cellular disruption by trauma releases mitochondrial DAMPs with evolutionarily conserved similarities to bacterial PAMPs into the circulation. These can then signal through identical innate immune pathways to create a sepsis-like state. The release of such mitochondrial ‘enemies within’ by cellular injury is a key link between trauma, inflammation and SIRS. PMID:20203610

  5. Experimental obstructive cholestasis: the wound-like inflammatory liver response

    PubMed Central

    Aller, María-Angeles; Arias, Jorge-Luis; García-Domínguez, Jose; Arias, Jose-Ignacio; Durán, Manuel; Arias, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    Obstructive cholestasis causes hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the development of liver disease are multiple and linked. We propose grouping these mechanisms according to the three phenotypes mainly expressed in the interstitial space in order to integrate them. Experimental extrahepatic cholestasis is the model most frequently used to study obstructive cholestasis. The early liver interstitial alterations described in these experimental models would produce an ischemia/reperfusion phenotype with oxidative and nitrosative stress. Then, the hyperexpression of a leukocytic phenotype, in which Kupffer cells and neutrophils participate, would induce enzymatic stress. And finally, an angiogenic phenotype, responsible for peribiliary plexus development with sinusoidal arterialization, occurs. In addition, an intense cholangiocyte proliferation, which acquires neuroendocrine abilities, stands out. This histopathological finding is also associated with fibrosis. It is proposed that the sequence of these inflammatory phenotypes, perhaps with a trophic meaning, ultimately produces a benign tumoral biliary process – although it poses severe hepatocytic insufficiency. Moreover, the persistence of this benign tumor disease would induce a higher degree of dedifferentiation and autonomy and, therefore, its malign degeneration. PMID:19014418

  6. Virus Infections on Prion Diseased Mice Exacerbate Inflammatory Microglial Response

    PubMed Central

    Lins, Nara; Mourão, Luiz; Trévia, Nonata; Passos, Aline; Farias, José Augusto; Assunção, Jarila; Bento-Torres, João; Consentino Kronka Sosthenes, Marcia; Diniz, José Antonio Picanço; Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa

    2016-01-01

    We investigated possible interaction between an arbovirus infection and the ME7 induced mice prion disease. C57BL/6, females, 6-week-old, were submitted to a bilateral intrahippocampal injection of ME7 prion strain (ME7) or normal brain homogenate (NBH). After injections, animals were organized into two groups: NBH (n = 26) and ME7 (n = 29). At 15th week after injections (wpi), animals were challenged intranasally with a suspension of Piry arbovirus 0.001% or with NBH. Behavioral changes in ME7 animals appeared in burrowing activity at 14 wpi. Hyperactivity on open field test, errors on rod bridge, and time reduction in inverted screen were detected at 15th, 19th, and 20th wpi respectively. Burrowing was more sensitive to earlier hippocampus dysfunction. However, Piry-infection did not significantly affect the already ongoing burrowing decline in the ME7-treated mice. After behavioral tests, brains were processed for IBA1, protease-resistant form of PrP, and Piry virus antigens. Although virus infection in isolation did not change the number of microglia in CA1, virus infection in prion diseased mice (at 17th wpi) induced changes in number and morphology of microglia in a laminar-dependent way. We suggest that virus infection exacerbates microglial inflammatory response to a greater degree in prion-infected mice, and this is not necessarily correlated with hippocampal-dependent behavioral deficits. PMID:28003864

  7. Candida albicans-induced inflammatory response in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Künkel, W; Bulling, L; Fünfstück, C; Knöll, B; Vennewald, I; Hipler, U-C

    2004-06-01

    Candida albicans strains 3153a, ATCC 48867, CBS 2730, DSM 70014, and Vir 13 were cultivated and sterile C. albicans filtrates were produced. The interaction of soluble Candida factors of these infiltrates with human HaCaT keratinocytes was assayed in vitro. The following parameters were analyzed: cell proliferation, protein synthesis, nuclear matrix protein (NMP) 41 release, cytokine release (IL-1beta, soluble IL-2 receptor, IL-6, and IL-8), and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cell counts at 1, 12, and 24 h were significantly lower for C. albicans strains CBS 2730 and VIR 13 (P < 0.05). There was no significant change for the remaining strains. Neither the protein synthesis nor the NMP-41 release was significantly affected. IL-6 and IL-8 were stimulated by C. albicans filtrates to different amounts with higher levels in strains of low virulence. There was no effect on the other cytokines. The production of ROS by HaCaT keratinocytes was suppressed. The induction of an inflammatory keratinocyte response by soluble C. albicans factors may play a role among the host-yeast interactions.

  8. Anti-inflammatory effect of Taraxacum officinale leaves on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Yoon-Jeoung; Cha, Dong-Soo; Ko, Je-Sang; Park, Hyun-Jin; Choi, Hee-Don

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the efficacy and the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory effect of Taraxacum officinale leaves (TOLs), the effect of a methanol extract and its fractions recovered from TOLs on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced responses was studied in the mouse macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7. Cells were pretreated with various concentrations of the methanol extract and its fractions and subsequently incubated with LPS (1 microg/mL). The levels of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin (PG) E(2), and pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, and IL-6 were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Expressions of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases were analyzed using western blotting. The methanol extract and its fractions inhibited LPS-induced production of NO, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and PGE(2) in a dose-dependent manner. The chloroform fraction significantly suppressed production of NO, PGE(2), and two pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha and IL-1beta) in a dose-dependent manner with 50% inhibitory concentration values of 66.51, 90.96, 114.76, and 171.06 microg/mL, respectively. The ethyl acetate fraction also inhibited production of the inflammatory molecules. The chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions reduced LPS-induced expressions of iNOS and COX-2 and activation of MAP kinases in a dose-dependent manner. Among the fractions of the methanol extract, the chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions exhibited the most effective anti-inflammatory activities. These results show that the anti-inflammatory effects of TOLs are probably due to down-regulation of NO, PGE(2), and pro-inflammatory cytokines and reduced expressions of iNOS and COX-2 via inactivation of the MAP kinase signal pathway.

  9. Glycyrrhizin inhibits the manifestations of anti-inflammatory responses that appear in association with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS)-like reactions.

    PubMed

    Takei, Miwa; Kobayashi, Makiko; Herndon, David N; Pollard, Richard B; Suzuki, Fujio

    2006-09-01

    In association with the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), anti-inflammatory response syndrome is commonly manifested in patients with trauma, burn injury, and after major surgery. These patients are increasingly susceptible to infection with various pathogens due to the excessive release of anti-inflammatory cytokines from anti-inflammatory effector cells. Recently, CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) found in the sera of mice with pancreatitis was identified as an active molecule for SIRS-associated anti-inflammatory response manifestation. Also, the inhibitory activity of glycyrrhizin (GL) on CCL2 production was reported. Therefore, the effect of GL on SIRS-associated anti-inflammatory response manifestation was investigated in a murine SIRS model. Without any stimulation, splenic T cells from mice 5 days after SIRS induction produced cytokines associated with anti-inflammatory response manifestation. However, these cytokines were not produced by splenic T cells from SIRS mice previously treated with GL. In dual-chamber transwells, IL-4-producing cells were generated from normal T cells cultured with peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from SIRS mice. However, IL-4-producing cells were not generated from normal T cells in transwell cultures performed with PMN from GL-treated SIRS mice. CCL2 was produced by PMN from SIRS mice, while this chemokine was not demonstrated in cultures of PMN from SIRS mice treated with GL. These results indicate that GL has the capacity to suppress SIRS-associated anti-inflammatory response manifestation through the inhibition of CCL2 production by PMN.

  10. Helicobacter hepaticus Induces an Inflammatory Response in Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kleine, Moritz; Worbs, Tim; Schrem, Harald; Vondran, Florian W. R.; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Förster, Reinhold; Josenhans, Christine; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Bektas, Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter spp. on human liver cells, resulting in an inflammatory response with increased synthesis of inflammatory mediators and consecutive monocyte activation. PMID:24932686

  11. Endocannabinoids and inflammatory response in periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Burcu; Shi, Bin; Bantleon, Hans Peter; Moritz, Andreas; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui; Andrukhov, Oleh

    2014-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are associated with multiple regulatory functions in several tissues. The main endocannabinoids, anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), have been detected in the gingival crevicular fluid of periodontitis patients, but the association between periodontal disease or human periodontal ligament cells (hPdLCs) and endocannabinoids still remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of AEA and 2-AG on the proliferation/viability and cytokine/chemokine production of hPdLCs in the presence/absence of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (P. gingivalis LPS). The proliferation/viability of hPdLCs was measured using 3,4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT)-assay. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were examined at gene expression and protein level by real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. AEA and 2-AG did not reveal any significant effects on proliferation/viability of hPdLCs in the absence of P. gingivalis LPS. However, hPdLCs viability was significantly increased by 10-20 µM AEA in the presence of P. gingivalis LPS (1 µg/ml). In the absence of P. gingivalis LPS, AEA and 2-AG did not exhibit any significant effect on the expression of IL-8 and MCP-1 expression in hPdLCs, whereas IL-6 expression was slightly enhanced by 10 µM 2-AG and not affected by AEA. In P.gingivalis LPS stimulated hPdLCs, 10 µM AEA down-regulated gene-expression and protein production of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1. In contrast, 10 µM 2-AG had an opposite effect and induced a significant up-regulation of gene and protein expression of IL-6 and IL-8 (P<0.05) as well as gene-expression of MCP-1 in P. gingivalis LPS stimulated hPdLCs. Our data suggest that AEA appears to have an anti-inflammatory and immune suppressive effect on hPdLCs' host response to P.gingivalis LPS, whereas 2-AG appears to promote detrimental inflammatory processes. In conclusion, AEA and 2

  12. Correlations of nasal responses to leukotriene D4 and histamine nasal provocation with quality of life in allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zheng; Xie, Yanqing; Guan, Weijie; Gao, Yi; Xia, Shu; Shi, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Background The symptoms of allergic rhinitis (AR) greatly affect the quality of life (QoL) in the patients with AR. The correlations of nasal response to leukotriene D4 (LTD4) and histamine nasal provocation with health related QoL in AR are not clear. Objective To evaluate the correlations of nasal response to LTD4 and histamine nasal challenge with QoL in AR. Methods Patients randomly underwent LTD4 and histamine nasal challenge tests, completed the rhinoconjunctivitis quality of life questionnaire (RQoLQ), and rating the symptom severity score (total symptom score 4, TSS4) in the previous week. The correlations between nasal challenge tests induced nasal responses and QoL in RQoLQ were analyzed. Results A total of 25 eligible AR patients enrolled and finished both LTD4 and histamine nasal challenge and completed the questionnaire of RQoLQ. Histamine nasal challenge induced sneezing, increased nasal resistant were correlated with most of the dimensions (general, practical, nasal, eye problems, and quality of sleep, p < 0.05), while LTD4 nasal challenge induced sneeze, increased nasal resistant only correlated with nasal and ocular problems. On the contrary, the severity of the sneeze assessed by TSS4, was not correlated with QoL, while the severity of rhinorrhea, congestion, and nasal pruritus were correlated with nasal and practical problems, and nasal congestion was also correlated with ocular problems (r = 0.60, p = 0.01). Conclusion LTD4 and histamine nasal challenge induced nasal responses were correlated with different clinical symptoms severity and QoL, which can be used as a good diagnosis and evaluation methods for the management of AR. PMID:27803885

  13. Identification of Aspergillus (A. flavus and A. niger) Allergens and Heterogeneity of Allergic Patients' IgE Response.

    PubMed

    Vermani, Maansi; Vijayan, Vannan Kandi; Agarwal, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Aspergillus species (A. flavus and A. niger) are important sources of inhalant allergens. Current diagnostic modalities employ crude Aspergillus extracts which only indicate the source to which the patient has been sensitized, without identifying the number and type of allergens in crude extracts. We report a study on the identification of major and minor allergens of the two common airborne Aspergillus species and heterogeneity of patients' IgE response to them. Skin prick tests were performed on 300 patients of bronchial asthma and/or allergic rhinitis and 20 healthy volunteers. Allergen specific IgE in patients' sera was estimated by enzyme allergosorbent test (EAST). Immunoblots were performed to identify major/minor allergens of Aspergillus extracts and to study heterogeneity of patients'IgE response to them. Positive cutaneous responses were observed in 17% and 14.7% of patients with A. flavus and A. niger extracts, respectively. Corresponding EAST positivity was 69.2% and 68.7%. In immunoblots, 5 allergenic proteins were identified in A. niger extract, major allergens being 49, 55.4 and 81.5 kDa. Twelve proteins bound patients' IgE in A. flavus extract, three being major allergens (13.3, 34 and 37 kDa). The position and slopes of EAST binding and inhibition curves obtained with individual sera varied from patient to patient. The number and molecular weight of IgE-binding proteins in both the Aspergillus extracts varied among patients. These results gave evidence of heterogeneity of patients' IgE response to major/minor Aspergillus allergens. This approach will be helpful to identify disease eliciting molecules in the individual patients (component resolved diagnosis) and may improve allergen-specific immunotherapy.

  14. The Treatment of Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Samuel O.

    1964-01-01

    Allergic inflammation of the nasal mucous membranes, like other atopic disorders, occurs primarily as the result of an antigenantibody reaction between external allergens and circulating skin-sensitizing antibodies. In addition, the disease process is frequently complicated by bacterial or viral infection. Effective treatment of allergic rhinitis, therefore, consists of: (1) changing the patient's environment in order to remove the offending allergens, (2) removing the patient from his environment, (3) altering the patient's response to environmental allergens by means of hyposensitization injections, (4) suppressing the allergic reaction with drugs, and (5) eliminating bacterial infection. Usually more than one of these therapeutic measures is required for the individual patient. PMID:14175878

  15. IL-33-mediated innate response and adaptive immune cells contribute to maximum responses of protease allergen-induced allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kamijo, Seiji; Takeda, Haruna; Tokura, Tomoko; Suzuki, Mayu; Inui, Kyoko; Hara, Mutsuko; Matsuda, Hironori; Matsuda, Akira; Oboki, Keisuke; Ohno, Tatsukuni; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Sudo, Katsuko; Suto, Hajime; Ichikawa, Saori; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Takai, Toshiro

    2013-05-01

    How the innate and adaptive immune systems cooperate in the natural history of allergic diseases has been largely unknown. Plant-derived allergen, papain, and mite allergens, Der f 1 and Der p 1, belong to the same family of cysteine proteases. We examined the role of protease allergens in the induction of Ab production and airway inflammation after repeated intranasal administration without adjuvants and that in basophil/mast cell stimulation in vitro. Papain induced papain-specific IgE/IgG1 and lung eosinophilia. Der f 1 induced Der f 1-specific IgG1 and eosinophilia. Although papain-, Der f 1-, and Der p 1-stimulated basophils expressed allergy-inducing cytokines, including IL-4 in vitro, basophil-depleting Ab and mast cell deficiency did not suppress the papain-induced in vivo responses. Protease inhibitor-treated allergens and a catalytic site mutant did not induce the responses. These results indicate that protease activity is essential to Ab production and eosinophilia in vivo and basophil activation in vitro. IL-33-deficient mice lacked eosinophilia and had reduced papain-specific IgE/IgG1. Coadministration of OVA with papain induced OVA-specific IgE/IgG1, which was reduced in IL-33-deficient mice. We demonstrated IL-33 release, subsequent IL-33-dependent IL-5/IL-13 release, and activation of T1/ST2-expressing lineage(-)CD25(+)CD44(+) innate lymphoid cells in the lung after papain inhalation, suggesting the contribution of the IL-33-type 2 innate lymphoid cell-IL-5/IL-13 axis to the papain-induced airway eosinophilia. Rag2-deficient mice, which lack adaptive immune cells, showed significant, but less severe, eosinophilia. Collectively, these results suggest cooperation of adaptive immune cells and IL-33-responsive innate cells in protease-dependent allergic airway inflammation.

  16. Histamine H3 Receptor Integrates Peripheral Inflammatory Signals in the Neurogenic Control of Immune Responses and Autoimmune Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rebecca A.; Subramanian, Meenakumari; Noubade, Rajkumar; Rio, Roxana Del; Mawe, Gary M.; Bond, Jeffrey P.; Poynter, Matthew E.; Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P.; Teuscher, Cory

    2013-01-01

    Histamine H3 receptor (Hrh3/H3R) is primarily expressed by neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) where it functions as a presynaptic inhibitory autoreceptor and heteroreceptor. Previously, we identified an H3R-mediated central component in susceptibility to experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), the principal autoimmune model of multiple sclerosis (MS), related to neurogenic control of blood brain barrier permeability and peripheral T cell effector responses. Furthermore, we identified Hrh3 as a positional candidate for the EAE susceptibility locus Eae8. Here, we characterize Hrh3 polymorphisms between EAE-susceptible and resistant SJL and B10.S mice, respectively, and show that Hrh3 isoform expression in the CNS is differentially regulated by acute peripheral inflammatory stimuli in an allele-specific fashion. Next, we show that Hrh3 is not expressed in any subpopulations of the immune compartment, and that secondary lymphoid tissue is anatomically poised to be regulated by central H3R signaling. Accordingly, using transcriptome analysis, we show that, inflammatory stimuli elicit unique transcriptional profiles in the lymph nodes of H3RKO mice compared to WT mice, which is indicative of negative regulation of peripheral immune responses by central H3R signaling. These results further support a functional link between the neurogenic control of T cell responses and susceptibility to CNS autoimmune disease coincident with acute and/or chronic peripheral inflammation. Pharmacological targeting of H3R may therefore be useful in preventing the development and formation of new lesions in MS, thereby limiting disease progression. PMID:23894272

  17. [The systemic inflammatory response syndrome correction in acute destructive pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Agapov, M A; Khoreva, M V; Gorskiĭ, V A

    2011-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a disease of variable severity. In which some patients experience mild, self-limited attacks while others manifest a severe, highly morbid, and frequently lethal attack. The exact mechanisms by which diverse etiological factors induce an attack are still unclear. Recent studies have established the role played by inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. In our research we have estimated influence of not steroid anti-inflammatory preparation on synthesis pro-and anti-inflammatory Cytokines at healthy donors and at patients with Acute pancreatitis.

  18. Effects of Blood Products on Inflammatory Response in Endothelial Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Buddeberg, Felix; Schuppli, Caroline; Roth Z'graggen, Birgit; Hasler, Melanie; Schanz, Urs; Mehr, Manuela; Spahn, Donat R.; Beck Schimmer, Beatrice

    2012-01-01

    Background Transfusing blood products may induce inflammatory reactions within the vascular compartment potentially leading to a systemic inflammatory response. Experiments were designed to assess the inflammatory potential of different blood products in an endothelial cell-based in vitro model and to compare baseline levels of potentially activating substances in transfusion products. Methods The inflammatory response from pre-activated (endotoxin-stimulated) and non-activated endothelial cells as well as neutrophil endothelial transmigration in response to packed red blood cells (PRBC), platelet concentrates (PC) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) was determined. Baseline inflammatory mediator and lipid concentrations in blood products were evaluated. Results Following incubation with all blood products, an increased inflammatory mediator release from endothelial cells was observed. Platelet concentrates, and to a lesser extent also FFP, caused the most pronounced response, which was accentuated in already pre-stimulated endothelial cells. Inflammatory response of endothelial cells as well as blood product-induced migration of neutrophils through the endothelium was in good agreement with the lipid content of the according blood product. Conclusion Within the group of different blood transfusion products both PC and FFP have a high inflammatory potential with regard to activation of endothelial cells. Inflammation upon blood product exposure is strongly accentuated when endothelial cells are pre-injured. High lipid contents in the respective blood products goes along with an accentuated inflammatory reaction from endothelial cells. PMID:22438924

  19. Capparis ovata treatment suppresses inflammatory cytokine expression and ameliorates experimental allergic encephalomyelitis model of multiple sclerosis in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Ozgun-Acar, Ozden; Celik-Turgut, Gurbet; Gazioglu, Isil; Kolak, Ufuk; Ozbal, Seda; Ergur, Bekir U; Arslan, Sevki; Sen, Alaattin; Topcu, Gulacti

    2016-09-15

    expression profiling of the transcriptome revealed that COWE treatment caused the down regulation of a group of genes involved in the immune response, inflammatory response, antigen processing and presentation, B-cell-mediated immunity and innate immune response. Collectively, these results suggest anti-neuroinflammatory mechanisms by which COWE treatment delayed and suppressed the development of EAE and ameliorated the disease in mice with persistent clinical signs.

  20. Enhanced natural killer activity and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in mice selected for high acute inflammatory response (AIRmax).

    PubMed

    Castoldi, Lindsey; Golim, Marjorie Assis; Filho, Orlando Garcia Ribeiro; Romagnoli, Graziela Gorete; Ibañez, Olga Célia Martinez; Kaneno, Ramon

    2007-03-01

    Strains of mice with maximal and minimal acute inflammatory responsiveness (AIRmax and AIRmin, respectively) were developed through selective breeding based on their high- or low-acute inflammatory responsiveness. Previous reports have shown that AIRmax mice are more resistant to the development of a variety of tumours than AIRmin mice, including spontaneous metastasis of murine melanoma. Natural killer activity is involved in immunosurveillance against tumour development, so we analysed the number and activity of natural killer cells (CD49b(+)), T-lymphocyte subsets and in vitro cytokine production by spleen cells of normal AIRmax and AIRmin mice. Analysis of lymphocyte subsets by flow cytometry showed that AIRmax mice had a higher relative number of CD49b(+) cells than AIRmin mice, as well as cytolytic activity against Yac.1 target cells. The number of CD3(+) CD8(+) cells was also higher in AIRmax mice. These findings were associated with the ability of spleen cells from AIRmax mice in vitro to produce higher levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-12p40 and interferon-gamma but not the anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. Taken together, our data suggest that the selective breeding to achieve the AIRmax and AIRmin strains was able to polarize the genes associated with cytotoxic activity, which can be responsible for the antitumour resistance observed in AIRmax mice.

  1. Randomized study comparing inflammatory response after tonsillectomy versus tonsillotomy.

    PubMed

    Kordeluk, Sofia; Goldbart, Aviv; Novack, Lena; Kaplan, Daniel Michael; El-Saied, Sabri; Alwalidi, Musa; Shapira-Parra, Angelica; Segal, Nili; Slovik, Yuval; Max, Puterman; Joshua, Ben-Zion

    2016-11-01

    To determine if there was a difference in the inflammatory reaction after tonsil surgery with "traditional" techniques (tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy or TA) compared to partial intracapsular tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (PITA).

  2. Effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on allergic march model by suppressing Th2, Th17, and TSLP responses via CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha-Jung; Kim, Young-Joon; Lee, Seung-Hwa; Yu, Jinho; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Hong, Soo-Jong

    2014-07-01

    Allergic march (AM) is characterized by the progression of clinical signs of atopic dermatitis (AD) to allergic asthma or rhinitis, but its pathogenesis is not completely understood. We developed mouse model of AM with three 1-week exposures (separated by 2-week interval) to an OVA or saline (control) followed by OVA challenge. The development of AM was confirmed by phenotypes of AD and allergic asthma. Increases in IL-4, IL-17, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) responses were associated with the progression of AM, and these responses were suppressed by treatment with Lcr35. Moreover, Lcr35 treatment led to an increase in the number of CD4(+)CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) of AM mice. In conclusion, the oral application of Lcr35 prevented the development of AM in this model by suppressing Th2, Th17, and TSLP responses via a mechanism that may involve CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs in MLNs.

  3. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, Katrin; Rehli, Michael; Singer, Katrin; Renner-Sattler, Kathrin; Kreutz, Marina

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. - Highlights: • Lactic acid broadly delays LPS-induced gene expression in human monocytes. • Expression of important monocyte effector molecules is affected by lactic acid. • Interference of lactic acid with TLR signaling causes the delayed gene expression. • The profound effect of lactic acid might contribute to immune suppression in tumors.

  4. Dimethyl Fumarate Reduces Inflammatory Responses in Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Casili, Giovanna; Cordaro, Marika; Impellizzeri, Daniela; Bruschetta, Giuseppe; Paterniti, Irene; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Fumaric acid esters have been proven to be effective for the systemic treatment of psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. We aimed to develop a new treatment for colitis. Methods: We investigated the effect of dimethylfumarate [DMF, 10-30-100mg/kg] on an experimental model of colitis induced by dinitrobenzene sulphuric acid [DNBS]. We also evaluated the therapeutic activity of 7 weeks’ treatment with DMF [30mg/kg] on 9-week-old IL-10KO mice that spontaneously develop a T helper-1 [Th1]-dependent chronic enterocolitis after birth, that is fully established at 8–10 weeks of age. The mechanism of this pharmacological potential of DMF [10 μM] was investigated in colonic epithelial cell monolayers [Caco-2] exposed to H2O2. The barrier function was evaluated by the tight junction proteins. Results: The treatment with DMF significantly reduced the degree of haemorrhagic diarrhoea and weight loss caused by administration of DNBS. DMF [30 and 100mg/kg] also caused a substantial reduction in the degree of colon injury, in the rise in myeloperoxidase [MPO] activity, and in the increase in tumour necrosis factor [TNF]-α expression, as well as in the up-regulation of ICAM-1 caused by DNBS in the colon. Molecular studies demonstrated that DMF impaired NF-κB signalling via reduced p65 nuclear translocalisation. DMF induced a stronger antioxidant response as evidenced by a higher expression of Mn-superoxide dismutase. Moreover, DMF protected human intestinal epithelial cells against H2O2-induced barrier dysfunction, restoring ZO-1 occludin expression, via the HO-1 pathway. Conclusions: DMF treatment reduces the degree of colitis caused by DNBS. We propose that DMF treatment may be useful in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26690241

  5. Predictors of systemic inflammatory response syndrome following percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ramaraju, Karunamoorthy; Paranjothi, Arun Kumar; Namperumalsamy, Dhinakar Babu; Chennakrishnan, Ilamparuthi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: Sepsis remains one of the dreaded complications of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). To analyze prospectively the preoperative and intraoperative factors that predict the occurrence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in patients undergoing PCNL so that we can aggressively manage those patients from the preoperative period itself and avert the dangerous complications. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was carried out between August 2012 and March 2013 including all patients who underwent PCNL. Patients with infected collecting system, synchronous ureteric stones, stents, or percutaneous nephrostomy drainage were excluded from the study. Patients were evaluated with physical examination, urine analysis, urine culture and sensitivity, complete blood count, renal function test, X-ray kidney, ureter, and bladder (KUB), and plain and contrast-enhanced computerized tomography KUB. Patients who developed any two or above of the following in the postoperative period were considered to have developed SIRS. (1) Temperature >100.4°F (38°C) or <96.8°F (36°C). (2) Pulse rate >90/min. (3) Respiratory rate >20/min. (4) White blood cell count >12,000/ml or <4000/ml. Results: Of the 120 patients who underwent PCNL 29 (24.1%) developed features of SIRS. On univariate analysis, gender, diabetes mellitus, bladder urine culture, and serum creatinine were found to be statistically insignificant. Blood transfusion (P = 0.009), no of access tracts (P = 0.001), pelvic urine culture (P = 0.04), stone culture (P = 0.003), stone size (P = 0.001), age (P = 0.019), and operative time (P = 0.004) were found to be statistically significant. On multivariate regression analysis stone size, no of access tracts, operative time, and stone culture were found to be statistically significant with regard to the occurrence of SIRS. Conclusion: Patients with above-identified risk factors must be aggressively treated to prevent the occurrence of

  6. IL-10 is necessary for the expression of airway hyperresponsiveness but not pulmonary inflammation after allergic sensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkelä, M. J.; Kanehiro, A.; Borish, L.; Dakhama, A.; Loader, J.; Joetham, A.; Xing, Z.; Jordana, M.; Larsen, G. L.; Gelfand, E. W.

    2000-05-01

    Cytokines play an important role in modulating inflammatory responses and, as a result, airway tone. IL-10 is a regulatory cytokine that has been suggested for treatment of asthma because of its immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. In contrast to these suggestions, we demonstrate in a model of allergic sensitization that mice deficient in IL-10 (IL-10/) develop a pulmonary inflammatory response but fail to exhibit airway hyperresponsiveness in both in vitro and in vivo assessments of lung function. Reconstitution of these deficient mice with the IL-10 gene fully restores development of airway hyperresponsiveness comparable to control mice. These results identify an important role of IL-10, downstream of the inflammatory cascade, in regulating the tone of the airways after allergic sensitization and challenge.

  7. Nasal hyperreactivity and inflammation in allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Veld, C. de Graaf-in't; Wijk, R. Gerth van; Zijlstra, F. J.

    1996-01-01

    The history of allergic disease goes back to 1819, when Bostock described his own ‘periodical affection of the eyes and chest’, which he called ‘summer catarrh’. Since they thought it was produced by the effluvium of new hay, this condition was also called hay fever. Later, in 1873, Blackley established that pollen played an important role in the causation of hay fever. Nowadays, the definition of allergy is ‘An untoward physiologic event mediated by a variety of different immunologic reactions’. In this review, the term allergy will be restricted to the IgE-dependent reactions. The most important clinical manifestations of IgE-dependent reactions are allergic conjunctivitis, allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma and atopic dermatitis. However, this review will be restricted to allergic rhinitis. The histopathological features of allergic inflammation involve an increase in blood flow and vascular permeability, leading to plasma exudation and the formation of oedema. In addition, a cascade of events occurs which involves a variety of inflammatory cells. These inflammatory cells migrate under the influence of chemotactic agents to the site of injury and induce the process of repair. Several types of inflammatory cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis. After specific or nonspecific stimuli, inflammatory mediators are generated from cells normally found in the nose, such as mast cells, antigen-presenting cells and epithelial cells (primary effector cells) and from cells recruited into the nose, such as basophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes, platelets and neutrophils (secondary effector cells). This review describes the identification of each of the inflammatory cells and their mediators which play a role in the perennial allergic processes in the nose of rhinitis patients. PMID:18475703

  8. Involvement of TLR2 and TLR4 in inflammatory immune responses induced by fine and coarse ambient air particulate matter

    PubMed Central

    Shoenfelt, Joanna; Mitkus, Robert J.; Zeisler, Rolf; Spatz, Rabia O.; Powell, Jan; Fenton, Matthew J.; Squibb, Katherine A.; Medvedev, Andrei E.

    2009-01-01

    Induction of proinflammatory mediators by alveolar macrophages exposed to ambient air particulate matter has been suggested to be a key factor in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and allergic diseases in the lungs. However, receptors and mechanisms underlying these responses have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we examined whether TLR2, TLR4, and the key adaptor protein, MyD88, mediate the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by mouse peritoneal macrophages exposed to fine and coarse PM. TLR2 deficiency blunted macrophage TNF-α and IL-6 expression in response to fine (PM2.5), while not affecting cytokine-inducing ability of coarse NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM 1648) particles. In contrast, TLR4−/− macrophages showed inhibited cytokine expression upon stimulation with NIST SRM 1648 but exhibited normal responses to PM2.5. Preincubation with polymyxin B markedly suppressed the capacity of NIST SRM 1648 to elicit TNF-α and IL-6, indicating endotoxin as a principal inducer of cytokine responses. Overexpression of TLR2 in TLR2/4-deficient human embryonic kidney 293 cells imparted PM2.5 sensitivity, as judged by IL-8 gene expression, whereas NIST SRM 1648, but not PM2.5 elicited IL-8 expression in 293/TLR4/MD-2 transfectants. Engagement of TLR4 by NIST SRM 1648 induced MyD88-independent expression of the chemokine RANTES, while TLR2-reactive NIST IRM PM2.5 failed to up-regulate this response. Consistent with the shared use of MyD88 by TLR2 and TLR4, cytokine responses of MyD88−/− macrophages to both types of air PM were significantly reduced. These data indicate differential utilization of TLR2 and TLR4 but shared use of MyD88 by fine and coarse air pollution particles. PMID:19406832

  9. Trigonella foenum-graecum alleviates airway inflammation of allergic asthma in ovalbumin-induced mouse model.

    PubMed

    Piao, Chun Hua; Bui, Thi Tho; Song, Chang Ho; Shin, Hee Soon; Shon, Dong-Hwa; Chai, Ok Hee

    2017-01-22

    Trigonella foenum-graecum, a member oldest medicinal plant in the fabaceae (legumes) family, is used as a herb, spice, and vegetable, and known for its olfactory, laxative, and galactogogue effects. However, the inhibitory effect of Trigonella foenum-graecum on allergic inflammatory response remains unclear, therefore, we investigated the precise role of Trigonella foenum-graecum in the allergic asthma and revealed the effects of Trigonella foenum-graecum in regulating airway inflammation and its possible mechanism. Allergic asthma was initiated in BALB/c mice by sensitized with OVA emulsified in aluminum on days 1 and 14, then aerosol challenged with OVA on days 27, 28 and 29. Some mice were administered Trigonella foenum-graecum by oral gavage before challenge. Then mice were evaluated for the presence of airway inflammation, production of allergen-specific cytokine response and lung pathology. Trigonella foenum-graecum significantly ameliorated the number of inflammatory cells in BALF and alleviated lung inflammation. It also reduced the collagen deposition and goblet cells. Meanwhile, Trigonella foenum-graecum treatment evidently decreased the high expression of Th2 cytokines and increased the Th1 cytokines in BALF and lung homogenates. Trigonella foenum-graecum showed a significant inhibition of serum IgE and anti-OVA IgG1. In this study, our data suggest that Trigonella foenum-graecum has a significant anti-inflammatory effect and it may prove to be an efficacious therapeutic regent on allergic asthma.

  10. PHENOTYPIC COMPARISON OF ALLERGIC AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE IN THREE RAT STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Brown Norway (BN) rats develop a robust response to antigens in the lung characterized by a large increase in allergen-specific immune function and pulmonary eosinophilia. The objective of this study was to investigate alternative models by determining if other rat s...

  11. S1PR1 expression correlates with inflammatory responses to Newcastle disease virus infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaling; Xie, Peng; Sun, Minhua; Xiang, Bin; Kang, Yinfeng; Gao, Pei; Zhu, Wenxian; Ning, Zhangyong; Ren, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is the causative agent of Newcastle disease, which is characterized by inflammatory pathological changes in the organs of chickens. The inflammatory response to this disease has not been well characterized. Previous reports showed that the sphingosine-1-phosphate-1 receptor (S1PR1), a G protein-coupled receptor, is important to the activation of inflammatory responses. To understand better the viral pathogenesis and host inflammatory response, we analyzed S1PR1 expression during NDV infection. We observed a direct correlation between chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cellular inflammatory responses and S1PR1 expression. Virulent NDV-infected CEF cells also had elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-18). When S1PR1 was inhibited by using the specific antagonist W146, pro-inflammatory cytokine production declined. Overexpression of S1PR1 resulted in increased virus-induced IL-1β production. S1PR1 expression levels did not impact significantly NDV replication. These findings highlight the important role of S1PR1 in inflammatory responses in NDV infection.

  12. Characterizing the inflammatory response in esophageal mucosal biopsies in children with eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Sayej, Wael N; Ménoret, Antoine; Maharjan, Anu S; Fernandez, Marina; Wang, Zhu; Balarezo, Fabiola; Hyams, Jeffrey S; Sylvester, Francisco A; Vella, Anthony T

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging allergic, IgE- and non-IgE (Th2 cell)-mediated disease. There are major gaps in the understanding of the basic mechanisms that drive the persistence of EoE. We investigated whether esophageal biopsies from children with EoE demonstrate an inflammatory response that is distinct from normal controls. We prospectively enrolled 84 patients, of whom 77 were included in our analysis, aged 4–17 years (12.8±3.8 years; 81% males). Five esophageal biopsies were collected from each patient at the time of endoscopy. Intramucosal lymphocytes were isolated, phenotyped and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/ionomycin to measure their potential to produce cytokines via flow cytometry. We also performed cytokine arrays on 72-h biopsy culture supernatants. CD8+ T cells, compared with CD4+ T cells, synthesized more TNF-α and interferon (IFN)-γ after mitogen stimulation in the EoE-New/Active vs EoE-Remission group (P=0.0098; P=0.02) and controls (P=0.0008; P=0.03). Culture supernatants taken from explant esophageal tissue contained 13 analytes that distinguished EoE-New/Active from EoE-Remission and Controls. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis based on these analytes distinctly separated EoE-New/Active from EoE-Remission and Controls. In summary, we have identified a previously unappreciated role for CD8+ T lymphocytes with potential to produce TNF-α and IFN-γ in EoE. Our results suggest that CD8+ T cells have a role in the persistence or progression of EoE. We have also identified a panel of analytes produced by intact esophageal biopsies that differentiates EoE-New/Active from EoE-Remission and controls. Our results suggest that esophageal epithelial cells may have specific immune effector functions in EoE that control the type and amplitude of inflammation. PMID:27525061

  13. The Diamine Oxidase Gene Is Associated with Hypersensitivity Response to Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Agúndez, José A. G.; Ayuso, Pedro; Cornejo-García, José A.; Blanca, Miguel; Torres, María J.; Doña, Inmaculada; Salas, María; Blanca-López, Natalia; Canto, Gabriela; Rondon, Carmen; Campo, Paloma; Laguna, José J.; Fernández, Javier; Martínez, Carmen; García-Martín, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the drugs most frequently involved in hypersensitivity drug reactions. Histamine is released in the allergic response to NSAIDs and is responsible for some of the clinical symptoms. The aim of this study is to analyze clinical association of functional polymorphisms in the genes coding for enzymes involved in histamine homeostasis with hypersensitivity response to NSAIDs. We studied a cohort of 442 unrelated Caucasian patients with hypersensitivity to NSAIDs. Patients who experienced three or more episodes with two or more different NSAIDs were included. If this requirement was not met diagnosis was established by challenge. A total of 414 healthy unrelated controls ethnically matched with patients and from the same geographic area were recruited. Analyses of the SNPs rs17740607, rs2073440, rs1801105, rs2052129, rs10156191, rs1049742 and rs1049793 in the HDC, HNMT and DAO genes were carried out by means of TaqMan assays. The detrimental DAO 16 Met allele (rs10156191), which causes decreased metabolic capacity, is overrepresented among patients with crossed-hypersensitivity to NSAIDs with an OR  = 1.7 (95% CI  = 1.3–2.1; Pc  = 0.0003) with a gene-dose effect (P = 0.0001). The association was replicated in two populations from different geographic areas (Pc  = 0.008 and Pc  = 0.004, respectively). Conclusions and implications The DAO polymorphism rs10156191 which causes impaired metabolism of circulating histamine is associated with the clinical response in crossed-hypersensitivity to NSAIDs and could be used as a biomarker of response. PMID:23152756

  14. The "bioregulatory effect of exercise" on the innate/inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    The effects of exercise on the innate response are primarily mediated by the SNS (sympathetic nervous system) and/or the HPA (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal) axis and by stress proteins such as Hsp72. Regular exercise can induce immuno-neuroendocrine stabilization in persons with deregulated inflammatory and stress feedback by reducing the presence of stress hormones and inflammatory cytokines. Anti-inflammatory and "anti-stress" responses seem also to be induced (paradoxically, opposite to the effects in healthy persons) after sessions of exercise, being a promising strategy for treating certain inflammatory pathologies. Nevertheless, the biomedical side effects of exercise are also needed to be considered. This article defines the "Bioregulatory Effect of Exercise" to be one that reduces or prevents any excessive effect of inflammatory mediators and stimulates (or at least does not impair) the innate defences (i.e. chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and microbicidal activities) against pathogens. It also generates immunophysiological adaptations through an optimal balance between the pro- and the anti-inflammatory responses. These effects are mediated via immuno-neuroendocrine interactions. This review analyses concepts and conclusions related to how exercise affects the innate and/or inflammatory responses and discusses some paradoxical interpretations relevant for the practical use of exercise in treating infectious and inflammatory diseases. A potential role of exercise as hormesis strategy and the concept of exercise immunization are also discussed.

  15. Eosinophils Contribute to IL-4 Production and Shape the T-Helper Cytokine Profile and Inflammatory Response in Pulmonary Cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Piehler, Daniel; Stenzel, Werner; Grahnert, Andreas; Held, Josephin; Richter, Lydia; Köhler, Gabriele; Richter, Tina; Eschke, Maria; Alber, Gottfried; Müller, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Susceptibility to infection with Cryptococcus neoformans is tightly determined by production of IL-4. In this study, we investigated the time course of IL-4 production and its innate cellular source in mice infected intranasally with C. neoformans. We show that pulmonary IL-4 production starts surprisingly late after 6 weeks of infection. Interestingly, in the lungs of infected mice, pulmonary T helper (Th) cells and eosinophils produce significant amounts of IL-4. In eosinophil-deficient ΔdblGATA mice, IL-33 receptor–expressing Th2s are significantly reduced, albeit not absent, whereas protective Th1 and Th17 responses are enhanced. In addition, recruitment of pulmonary inflammatory cells during infection with C. neoformans is reduced in the absence of eosinophils. These data expand previous findings emphasizing an exclusively destructive effector function by eosinophilic granulocytes. Moreover, in ΔdblGATA mice, fungal control is slightly enhanced in the lung; however, dissemination of Cryptococcus is not prevented. Therefore, eosinophils play an immunoregulatory role that contributes to Th2-dependent susceptibility in allergic inflammation during bronchopulmonary mycosis. PMID:21699881

  16. Effect of Kramecyne on the Inflammatory Response in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Miranda, E.; Lemus-Bautista, J.; Pérez, S.; Pérez-Ramos, J.

    2013-01-01

    Kramecyne is a new peroxide, it was isolated from Krameria cytisoides, methanol extract, and this plant was mostly found in North and South America. This compound showed potent anti-inflammatory activity; however, the mechanisms by which this compound exerts its anti-inflammatory effect are not well understood. In this study, we examined the effects of kramecyne on inflammatory responses in mouse lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced peritoneal macrophages. Our findings indicate that kramecyne inhibits LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin- (IL-) 6. During the inflammatory process, levels of cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2, nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) increased in mouse peritoneal macrophages; however, kramecyne suppressed them significantly. These results provide novel insights into the anti-inflammatory actions and support its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23573152

  17. Treatment options in severe fungal asthma and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Moss, Richard B

    2014-05-01

    Severe asthma with fungal sensitisation and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis encompass two closely related subgroups of patients with severe allergic asthma. Pulmonary disease is due to pronounced host inflammatory responses to noninvasive subclinical endobronchial infection with filamentous fungi, usually Aspergillus fumigatus. These patients usually do not achieve satisfactory disease control with conventional treatment of severe asthma, i.e. high-dose inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting bronchodilators. Although prolonged systemic corticosteroids are effective, they carry a substantial toxicity profile. Supplementary or alternative therapies have primarily focused on use of antifungal agents including oral triazoles and inhaled amphotericin B. Immunomodulation with omalizumab, a humanised anti-IgE monoclonal antibody, or "pulse" monthly high-dose intravenous corticosteroid, has also been employed. This article considers the experience with these approaches, with emphasis on recent clinical trials.

  18. Individuals with increased inflammatory response to ozone demonstrate muted signaling of immune cell trafficking pathways

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background Exposure to ozone activates innate immune function and causes neutrophilic (PMN) airway inflammation that in some individuals is robustly elevated. The interplay between immunoinflammatory function and genomic signaling in those with heightened inflammatory responsive...

  19. Endothelial Inflammatory Transcriptional Responses to an Altered Plasma Exposome Following Inhalation of Diesel Emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND:Air pollution, especially emissions derived from traffic sources, is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, it remains unclear how inhaled factors drive extrapulmonary pathology.OBJECTIVES:Previously, we found that canonical inflammatory response tra...

  20. ANTIOXIDANT SUPPLEMENTATION AND NASAL INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES AMONG YOUNG ASTHMATICS EXPOSED TO HIGH LEVELS OF OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Recent studies examining the inflammatory response in atopic asthma to ozone suggest a release of soluble mediators of inflammation factors that might be related to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Antioxidant could prove useful in subjects exposed to additional oxidati...

  1. Sequence of Tissue Responses in the Early Stages of Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis (EAE): Immunohistochemical, Light Microscopic, and Ultrastructural Observations in the Spinal Cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DAmelio, Fernando E.; Smith, Marion E.; Eng, Lawrence F.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in adult Lewis rats with purified guinea pig CNS myelin and Freund's adjuvant. As soon as the very earliest clinical signs appeared the animals were perfused with fixatives and the spinal cord analyzed by electron microscopy, silver methods, and immunocytochemistry. Our findings suggest that in the early stages of EAE a sequence of events can be traced, although these events frequently overlap. The earliest morphological change appears to be astrocytic edema in both the cell body and processes. Increased amounts of glycogen particles and dispersion of glial filaments are prominent. These changes seem to occur just prior to the time when inflammatory cells begin to penetrate the capillary walls. Invasion of the neuropil mainly by macrophages and lymphocytes closely follows. Both macrophages and microglia seem to participate in phagocytosis of oligodendrocytes and myelin. Demyelination, however, is not a prominent feature at this early stage.

  2. TIMING OF DIESEL PARTICLE INSTILLATION AND MAGNITUDE OF DOSE INFLUENCE THE SEVERITY OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS RESPONSES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particulates (DEP) arising from the combustion of diesel fuel exacerbates asthma. Several studies have shown that particulate and allergen co-exposure leads to an exacerbation of the hallmark features of allergic airways disease relative to allergen exp...

  3. Comparison of the Allergic Responses Induced by PeniciIlium chrysogenum and House Dust Mite Extracts in a Mouse Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    A report by the Institute of Medicine suggested that more research is needed to better understand mold effects on allergic disease, particularly asthma development. We compared the ability of the fungal Penicillium chrysogenum (PCE) and house dust mite (HDM) extracts to induce al...

  4. Allelic Variation on Murine Chromosome 11 Modifies Host Inflammatory Responses and Resistance to Bacillus anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Allelic Variation on Murine Chromosome 11 Modifies Host Inflammatory Responses and Resistance to Bacillus anthracis Jill K. Terra1, Bryan France1...of America Abstract Anthrax is a potentially fatal disease resulting from infection with Bacillus anthracis. The outcome of infection is influenced by...Inflammatory Responses and Resistance to Bacillus anthracis. PLoS Pathog 7(12): e1002469. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002469 Editor: Theresa M. Koehler, The

  5. α-terpineol reduces mechanical hypernociception and inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Makson G B; Marques, Rosemarie B; de Santana, Michele F; Santos, Amanda B D; Brito, Fabíola A; Barreto, Emiliano O; De Sousa, Damião P; Almeida, Fernanda R C; Badauê-Passos, Daniel; Antoniolli, Angelo R; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2012-08-01

    α-Terpineol (TPN), a volatile monoterpene alcohol, is relatively non-toxic and one of the major components of the essential oils of various plant species. In this study, we tested for the antihypernociceptive activity of TPN (25, 50 or 100 mg/kg, i.p.) in mice using mechanical models of hypernociception induced by carrageenan (CG, 300 μg/paw) and the involvement of important mediators of its cascade signalling, such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, 100 pg/paw), prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂, 100 ng/paw) or dopamine (DA, 30 μg/paw). We also investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of TPN on the model of carrageenan-induced pleurisy and the LPS-induced nitrite production in murine macrophages. Pre-systemic treatment with TPN (25, 50 or 100 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited the development of mechanical hypernociception induced by CG or TNF-α. A similar effect was also observed upon PGE₂ and DA administration. In addition, TPN significantly inhibited the neutrophil influx in the pleurisy model. TPN (1, 10 and 100 μg/mL) also significantly reduced (p < 0.01) nitrite production in vitro. Our results provide information about the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties of TPN on mechanical hypernociception and suggest that this compound might be potentially interesting in the development of new clinically relevant drugs for the management of painful and/or inflammatory disease.

  6. [SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome): clinical entity, definitions, and the significance].

    PubMed

    Kushimoto, S; Yamamoto, Y

    1999-01-01

    The clinical entity, definitions, and the significance of SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome) were reviewed. The term, SIRS was proposed to define sepsis and its sequelae clearly in 1991, in order to make early detection of the disease possible, and to improve the ability to compare innovative potential diagnostic and therapeutic modalities by standardizing terms. Although the criteria of SIRS is not strict and too sensitive, SIRS has been shown to be useful as a warning sign of severe condition in clinical setting. We also discussed about a new concept, CARS (compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome), which was characterized as anti-inflammatory mediators-dominant condition, in this issue.

  7. Quantitative analysis of the role of fiber length on phagocytosis and inflammatory response by alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Padmore, Trudy; Stark, Carahline; Turkevich, Leonid A.; Champion, Julie A.

    2017-01-01

    Background In the lung, macrophages attempt to engulf inhaled high aspect ratio pathogenic materials, secreting inflammatory molecules in the process. The inability of macrophages to remove these materials leads to chronic inflammation and disease. How the biophysical and biochemical mechanisms of these effects are influenced by fiber length remains undetermined. This study evaluates the role of fiber length on phagocytosis and molecular inflammatory responses to non-cytotoxic fibers, enabling development of quantitative length-based models. Methods Murine alveolar macrophages were exposed to long and short populations of JM-100 glass fibers, produced by successive sedimentation and repeated crushing, respectively. Interactions between fibers and macrophages were observed using time-lapse video microscopy, and quantified by flow cytometry. Inflammatory biomolecules (TNF-α, IL-1 α, COX-2, PGE2) were measured. Results Uptake of short fibers occurred more readily than for long, but long fibers were more potent stimulators of inflammatory molecules. Stimulation resulted in dose-dependent secretion of inflammatory biomolecules but no cytotoxicity or strong ROS production. Linear cytokine dose-response curves evaluated with length-dependent potency models, using measured fiber length distributions, resulted in identification of critical fiber lengths that cause frustrated phagocytosis and increased inflammatory biomolecule production. Conclusion Short fibers played a minor role in the inflammatory response compared to long fibers. The critical lengths at which frustrated phagocytosis occurs can be quantified by fitting dose-response curves to fiber distribution data. PMID:27784615

  8. Contribution of anaphylatoxin C5a to late airway responses after repeated exposure of antigen to allergic rats.

    PubMed

    Abe, M; Shibata, K; Akatsu, H; Shimizu, N; Sakata, N; Katsuragi, T; Okada, H

    2001-10-15

    We attempted to elucidate the contribution of complement to allergic asthma. Rat sensitized to OVA received repeated intratracheal exposures to OVA for up to 3 consecutive days, and pulmonary resistance was then estimated for up to 6 h after the last exposure. Whereas the immediate airway response (IAR) in terms of R(L) tended to decrease in proportion to the number of OVA exposures, late airway response (LAR) became prominent only after three. Although premedication with two kinds of complement inhibitors, soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) or nafamostat mesylate, resulted in inhibition of the IAR after either a single or a double exposure, the LAR was inhibited after the triple. Premedication with a C5a receptor antagonist (C5aRA) before every exposure to OVA also inhibited the LAR after three. Repeated OVA exposure resulted in eosinophil and neutrophil infiltration into the bronchial submucosa which was suppressed by premedication with sCR1 or C5aRA. Up-regulation of C5aR mRNA was shown in lungs after triple OVA exposure, but almost no up-regulation of C3aR. Pretreatment with sCR1 or C5aRA suppressed the up-regulation of C5aR expression as well as cytokine messages in the lungs. The suppression of LAR by pretreatment with sCR1 was reversed by intratracheal instillation of rat C5a desArg the action of which was inhibited by C5aRA. In contrast, rat C3a desArg or cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 induced cellular infiltration into the bronchial submucosa by costimulation with OVA, but these had no influence on the LAR. These differences might be explained by the fact that costimulation with OVA and C5a synergistically potentiated IAR, whereas that with OVA and either C3a or cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 did not. C5a generated by Ag-Ab complexes helps in the production of cytokines and contributes to the LAR after repeated exposure to Ag.

  9. The allergic march: can we prevent allergies and asthma?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Bruce R

    2011-06-01

    The allergic march is a progression of atopic disease from eczema to asthma, and then to allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. It appears to be caused by a regional allergic response with breakdown of the local epithelial barrier that initiates systemic allergic inflammation. Genetic and environmental factors predispose to developing the allergic march. There are data to support 4 possible interventions to prevent the allergic march from progressing to asthma: (1) supplements of dietary probiotics, (2) exclusive breast feeding during the first few months of life, or, alternatively (3) use of extensively hydrolyzed infant formulas, (4) treatment with inhalant allergen immunotherapy by either subcutaneous or sublingual methods.

  10. Characterization of the mechanisms underlying the inflammatory response to Polistes lanio lanio (paper wasp) venom in mouse dorsal skin.

    PubMed

    Yshii, Lídia M; Souza, Gustavo H M F; Camargo, Enilton A; Eberlin, Marcos N; Ribela, Maria Teresa C P; Muscará, Marcelo N; Hyslop, Stephen; Costa, Soraia K P

    2009-01-01

    Stings by Polistes wasps can cause life-threatening allergic reactions, pain and inflammation. We examined the changes in microvascular permeability and neutrophil influx caused by the venom of Polistes lanio a paper wasp found in southeastern Brazil. The intradermal injection of wasp venom caused long-lasting paw oedema and dose-dependently increased microvascular permeability in mouse dorsal skin. SR140333, an NK(1) receptor antagonist, markedly inhibited the response, but the NK(2) receptor antagonist SR48968 was ineffective. The oedema was reduced in capsaicin-treated rats, indicating a direct activation of sensory fibres. Dialysis of the venom partially reduced the oedema and the remaining response was further inhibited by SR140333. Mass spectrometric analysis of the venom revealed two peptides (QPPTPPEHRFPGLM and ASEPTALGLPRIFPGLM) with sequence similarities to the C-terminal region of tachykinin-like peptides found in Phoneutria nigriventer spider venom and vertebrates. Wasp venom failed to release histamine from mast cells in vitro and spectrofluorometric assay of the venom revealed a negligible content of histamine in the usual dose of P. l. lanio venom (1nmol of histamine/7mug of venom) that was removed by dialysis. The histamine H(1) receptor antagonist pyrilamine, but not bradykinin B(1) or B(2) receptor antagonists, inhibited venom-induced oedema. In conclusion, P. l. lanio venom induces potent oedema and increases vascular permeability in mice, primarily through activation of tachykinin NK(1) receptors by substance P released from sensory C fibres, which in turn releases histamine from dermal mast cells. This is the first description of a neurovascular mechanism for P. l. lanio venom-mediated inflammation. The extent to which the two tachykinin-like peptides identified here contribute to this neurogenic inflammatory response remains to be elucidated.

  11. Allergic mechanisms of Eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Leung, John; Beukema, Koen Robert; Shen, Alice Hangzhou

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is characterized by oesophageal dysfunction and oesophageal eosinophilia refractory to proton-pump-inhibitor treatment. EoE is a food allergy, as elimination of food trigger(s) abrogates the disease, while trigger reintroduction causes recurrence. The allergic mechanism of EoE involves both IgE and non-IgE processes. There is a break in oral tolerance, the immune mechanism allowing enteric exposure to food and micro-organisms without causing deleterious immune responses. Changes in life-style, alterations in gut flora and use of antibiotics may be increasing disease prevalence. Mouse models of EoE and human studies revealed the role of regulatory T-cells and iNKT-cells in the pathogenesis. Th2-cytokines like IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13, and other cytokines like TGFβ and TSLP are involved, but perhaps no one cytokine is critically important for driving the disease. Control of EoE may require a pharmaceutical approach that blocks more than one target in the Th2-inflammatory pathway.

  12. Attenuating the Systemic Inflammatory Response to Adult Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Critical Review of the Evidence Base

    PubMed Central

    Landis, R. Clive; Brown, Jeremiah R.; Fitzgerald, David; Likosky, Donald S.; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Baker, Robert A.; Hammon, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: A wide range of pharmacological, surgical, and mechanical pump approaches have been studied to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass, yet no systematically based review exists to cover the scope of anti-inflammatory interventions deployed. We therefore conducted an evidence-based review to capture “self-identified” anti-inflammatory interventions among adult cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. To be included, trials had to measure at least one inflammatory mediator and one clinical outcome, specified in the “Outcomes 2010” consensus statement. Ninety-eight papers satisfied inclusion criteria and formed the basis of the review. The review identified 33 different interventions and approaches to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response. However, only a minority of papers (35 of 98 [35.7%]) demonstrated any clinical improvement to one or more of the predefined outcome measures (most frequently myocardial protection or length of intensive care unit stay). No single intervention was supported by strong level A evidence (multiple randomized controlled trials [RCTs] or meta-analysis) for clinical benefit. Interventions at level A evidence included off-pump surgery, minimized circuits, biocompatible circuit coatings, leukocyte filtration, complement C5 inhibition, preoperative aspirin, and corticosteroid prophylaxis. Interventions at level B evidence (single RCT) for minimizing inflammation included nitric oxide donors, C1 esterase inhibition, neutrophil elastase inhibition, propofol, propionyl-L-carnitine, and intensive insulin therapy. A secondary analysis revealed that suppression of at least one inflammatory marker was necessary but not sufficient to confer clinical benefit. The most effective interventions were those that targeted multiple inflammatory pathways. These observations are consistent with a “multiple hit” hypothesis, whereby clinically effective suppression of the systemic inflammatory response

  13. Galangin attenuates mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hui-Hun; Bae, Yunju; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2013-07-01

    A great number of people are suffering from allergic inflammatory disease such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and sinusitis. Therefore discovery of drugs for the treatment of these diseases is an important subject in human health. In this study, we investigated anti-allergic inflammatory effect of galangin and underlying mechanisms of action using in vitro and in vivo models. Galangin inhibited histamine release by the reduction of intracellular calcium in phorbol 12-mystate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated human mast cells (HMC-1). Galangin decreased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, and IL-8. The inhibitory effect of galangin on theses pro-inflammatory cytokines was related with c-Jun N-terminal kinases, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-κB, and caspase-1. Furthermore, galangin attenuated IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and the expression of histamine receptor 1 at the inflamed tissue. The inhibitory effects of galangin were more potent than cromolyn, a known anti-allergic drug. Our results showed that galangin down-regulates mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory reactions by blocking histamine release and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In light of in vitro and in vivo anti-allergic inflammatory effects, galangin could be a beneficial anti-allergic inflammatory agent.

  14. Nutrition before and during Surgery and the Inflammatory Response of the Heart: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Marlieke; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Kok, Wouter E. M.; Cocchieri, Riccardo; Wisselink, Willem; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Major surgery induces a long fasting time and provokes an inflammatory response which increases the risk of infections. Nutrition given before and during surgery can avoid fasting and has been shown to increase the arginine/asymmetric dimetlhylarginine ratio, a marker of nitric oxide availability, in cardiac tissue and increased concentrations of branched chain amino acids in blood plasma. However, the effect of this new nutritional strategy on organ inflammatory response is unknown. Therefore, we studied the effect of nutrition before and during cardiac surgery on myocardial inflammatory response. In this trial, 32 patients were randomised between enteral, parenteral, and no nutrition supplementation (control) from 2 days before, during, up to 2 days after coronary artery bypass grafting. Both solutions included proteins or amino acids, glucose, vitamins, and minerals. Myocardial atrial tissue was sampled before and after revascularization and was analysed immunohistochemically, subdivided into cardiomyocytic, fatty, and fibrotic areas. Inflammatory cells, especially leukocytes, were present in cardiac tissue in all study groups. No significant differences were found in the myocardial inflammatory response between the enteral, parenteral, and control groups. In conclusion, nutrition given before and during surgery neither stimulates nor diminishes the myocardial inflammatory response in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The trial was registered in Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2183. PMID:26294967

  15. Characterization of Inflammatory Response in Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure and Relationship with Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Cristina; Solà, Elsa; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Fernàndez, Guerau; Huelin, Patricia; Graupera, Isabel; Moreira, Rebeca; de Prada, Gloria; Ariza, Xavier; Pose, Elisa; Fabrellas, Núria; Kalko, Susana G.; Jiménez, Wladimiro; Ginès, Pere

    2016-01-01

    ACLF is characterized by a systemic inflammatory response, but the cytokines involved in this process have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to characterize the systemic inflammatory response in patients with cirrhosis and ACLF and its relationship with prognosis. Fifty-five patients with cirrhosis, 26 with ACLF, were studied prospectively. Systemic inflammatory response was analyzed by measuring a large array of plasma cytokines by using a multiplex kit. A principal component analysis show noticeable differences between ACLF and decompensated cirrhosis without ACLF. Patients with ACLF had significant abnormal levels of 12 cytokines compared to those without ACLF, including: VCAM-1, VEGF-A, Fractalkine, MIP-1α, Eotaxin, IP-10, RANTES, GM-CSF, IL-1β, IL-2, ICAM-1, and MCP-1. Cytokines showing the most marked relationship with ACLF were VCAM-1 and VEGF-A (AUCROC 0.77; p = 0.001). There was a significant relationship between some of inflammatory mediators and 3-month mortality, particularly VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and GM-CSF (AUCROC>0.7; p < 0.05). Functional Enrichment Analysis showed that inflammatory markers differentially expressed in ACLF patients were enriched in leukocyte migration, particularly monocytes and macrophages, and chemotaxis pathways. In conclusion, ACLF is characterized by a marked inflammatory reaction with activation of mediators of adhesion and migration of leukocytes. The intensity of the inflammatory reaction correlates with prognosis. PMID:27578545

  16. Rheb1 deletion in myeloid cells aggravates OVA-induced allergic inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Zhang, Yue; Liang, Kang Yan; Xu, Song; Zhou, Xue Juan; Tan, Kang; Lin, Jun; Bai, Xiao Chun; Yang, Cui Lan

    2017-01-01

    The small GTPase ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) is a downstream target of tuberous sclerosis complex 1/2 (TSC1/2) and an upstream activator of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), the emerging essential modulator of M1/M2 balance in macrophages. However, the role and regulatory mechanisms of Rheb in macrophage polarization and allergic asthma are not known. In the present study, we utilized a mouse model with myeloid cell-specific deletion of the Rheb1 gene and an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma model to investigate the role of Rheb1 in allergic asthma and macrophage polarization. Increased activity of Rheb1 and mTORC1 was observed in myeloid cells of C57BL/6 mice with OVA-induced asthma. In an OVA-induced asthma model, Rheb1-KO mice demonstrated a more serious inflammatory response, more mucus production, enhanced airway hyper-responsiveness, and greater eosinophil numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). They also showed increased numbers of bone marrow macrophages and BALF myeloid cells, elevated M2 polarization and reduced M1 polarization of macrophages. Thus, we have established that Rheb1 is critical for the polarization of macrophages and inhibition of allergic asthma. Deletion of Rheb1 enhances M2 polarization but decreases M1 polarization in alveolar macrophages, leading to the aggravation of OVA-induced allergic asthma. PMID:28225024

  17. HIF-1α Inhibition Reduces Nasal Inflammation in a Murine Allergic Rhinitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Han; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Zhu, Lu-Ping; Cheng, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is an important regulator of immune and inflammatory responses. We hypothesized that nasal allergic inflammation is attenuated by HIF-1α inhibition and strengthened by HIF-1α stabilization. Objective To elucidate the role of HIF-1α in a murine model of allergic rhinitis (AR). Methods Mice were pretreated with the HIF-1α inhibitor 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) or the HIF-1α inducer cobalt chloride (CoCl2) in an established AR murine model using ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized BALB/c mice. HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in nasal mucosa was measured and multiple parameters of allergic responses were evaluated. Results HIF-1α and VEGF levels were locally up-regulated in nasal mucosa during AR. Inflammatory responses to OVA challenge, including nasal symptoms, inflammatory cell infiltration, eosinophil recruitment, up-regulation of T-helper type 2 cytokines in nasal lavage fluid, and serum OVA-specific IgE levels were present in the OVA-challenged mice. 2ME2 effectively inhibited HIF-1α and VEGF expression and attenuated the inflammatory responses. Stabilization of HIF-1α by CoCl2 facilitated nasal allergic inflammation. HIF-1α protein levels in nasal airways correlated with the severity of AR in mice. Conclusions HIF-1α is intimately involved in the pathogenesis of nasal allergies, and the inhibition of HIF-1α may be useful as a novel therapeutic approach for AR. PMID:23133644

  18. Contribution of alternatively activated macrophages to allergic lung inflammation: a tale of mice and men.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Preeta; Keegan, Achsah D

    2012-01-01

    The concept that macrophages play an active role in inflammatory responses began its development in the late 1800s with the now iconic studies by Elie Metchnikoff using starfish larvae and Daphnia [reviewed in Kaufmann SHE: Nat Immunol 2008;9:705-712 and Cavaillon JM: J Leukoc Biol 2011;90:413-424]. Based on his observation of the phagocyte response to a foreign body (rose thorn) and yeast, he proposed that phagocytes acted in host defense and were active participants in the inflammatory process. Flash forward more than 100 years and we find that these basic tenets hold true. However, it is now appreciated that macrophages come in many different flavors and can adopt a variety of nuanced phenotypes depending on the tissue environment in which the macrophage is found. In this brief review, we discuss the role of one type of macrophage termed the alternatively activated macrophage (AAM), also known as the M2 type of macrophage, in regulating allergic lung inflammation and asthma. Recent studies using mouse models of allergic lung inflammation and samples from human asthma patients contribute to the emerging concept that AAMs are not just bystanders of the interleukin (IL)-4- and IL-13-rich environment found in allergic asthma but are also active players in orchestrating allergic lung disease.

  19. Current management of allergic rhinitis in children.

    PubMed

    Georgalas, Christos; Terreehorst, Ingrid; Fokkens, Wytske

    2010-02-01

    Over the last 20 years, there has been significant progress in our understanding of the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis, including the discovery of new inflammatory mediators, the link between asthma and allergic rhinitis ('one airway-one disease' concept) and the introduction of novel therapeutic modalities. These new insights have been documented in the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma guidelines and have led to the creation of evidence-based management algorithms. We now understand the importance of a common strategy for treating allergic inflammation of the upper and lower airway as a way of improving outcome, reducing hospital admissions, providing better quality of life and perhaps, altering the natural course of the 'allergic march'. A therapeutic ladder is suggested: Whereas for mild intermittent allergic rhinitis, allergen avoidance should be the first line of treatment with subsequent addition of a second generation topical or oral antihistamine, nasal saline or cromoglycate, in cases of moderate to severe allergic rhinitis, a nasal steroid is the treatment of choice. If a patient with moderate/severe persistent allergic rhinitis fails to improve after 4 wk of adequate treatment, patient compliance or the diagnosis must be re-assessed. In such cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, a careful clinical examination including nasal endoscopy is mandatory to assess for other potential causes of nasal obstruction. In children who suffer from concomitant allergic rhinitis and asthma, a management algorithm that addresses concurrently asthma and allergic rhinitis is vital, both from a theoretical and from a practical point of view: Parents overwhelmingly prefer a single strategy for the treatment of their child's upper and lower airway symptoms; however, the overall quality of life in children with severe asthma can be significantly improved if rhinitis is adequately addressed.

  20. Deregulation of inflammatory response in the diabetic condition is associated with increased ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although elicited inflammation contributes to tissue injury, a certain level of inflammation is necessary for subsequent tissue repair/remodeling. Diabetes, a chronic low-grade inflammatory state, is a predisposing risk factor for stroke. The condition is associated with delayed wound healing, presumably due to disrupted inflammatory responses. With inclusion of the diabetic condition in an experimental animal model of stroke, this study investigates whether the condition alters inflammatory response and influences stroke-induced brain injury. Methods C57BL/6 mice were fed a diabetic diet (DD) for 8 weeks to induce an experimental diabetic condition or a normal diet (ND) for the same duration. Gene expression of inflammatory factors including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), CCR2, and CD36 was assessed in the peripheral immune cells and brains of normal and diabetic mice before and after focal cerebral ischemia. The expression of these factors was also determined in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated cultured normal and diabetic macrophages. Ischemic outcome was assessed in these mice at 3 days post-ischemia. Results DD intervention in mice resulted in obesity and elevated insulin and glucose level in the blood. The peritoneal immune cells from the diabetic mice showed higher MCP-1 mRNA levels before and after stroke. Compared to normal mice, diabetic mice showed reduced MCP-1, IL-6, and CCR2 gene expression in the brain at 6 h post-ischemia. LPS-stimulated inflammatory responses were also reduced in the diabetic macrophages. The diabetic mice showed larger infarct size and percent swelling. Conclusions These results showed that diabetic conditions deregulate acute inflammatory response and that the condition is associated with increased stroke-induced injury. The study suggests that interventions aimed at restoring appropriate inflammatory response in peripheral immune cells/macrophages may be beneficial in reducing

  1. Decision-making analysis for allergen immunotherapy versus nasal steroids in the treatment of nasal steroid–responsive allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Derek; Christophel, Jared; Borish, Larry; Payne, Spencer

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the study was to determine the age at which initiation of specific subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) becomes more cost-effective than continued lifetime intranasal steroid (NS) therapy in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, with the use of a decision analysis model. Methods: A Markov decision analysis model was created for this study. Economic analyses were performed to identify “break-even” points in the treatment of allergic rhinitis with the use of SCIT and NS. Efficacy rates for therapy and cost data were collected from the published literature. Models in which there was only incomplete improvement while receiving SCIT were also evaluated for economic break-even points. The primary perspective of the study was societal. Results: Multiple break-even point curves were obtained corresponding to various clinical scenarios. For patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis requiring NS (i.e., fluticasone) 6 months per year, the age at which initiation of SCIT provides long-term direct cost advantage is less than 41 years. For patients with perennial rhinitis symptoms requiring year-round NS, the cut-off age for SCIT cost-effectiveness increases to 60 years. Hypothetical subjects who require continued NS treatment (50% reduction of previous dosage) while receiving SCIT also display break-even points, whereby it is economically advantageous to consider allergy referral and SCIT, dependent on the cost of the NS prescribed. Conclusion: The age at which SCIT provides economic advantages over NS in the treatment of allergic rhinitis depends on multiple clinical factors. Decision analysis models can assist the physician in accounting for these factors and customize patient counseling with regard to treatment options. PMID:24717886

  2. Uric Acid Is a Mediator of the Plasmodium falciparum-Induced Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Orengo, Jamie Marie; Leliwa-Sytek, Aleksandra; Evans, James E.; Evans, Barbara; van de Hoef, Diana; Nyako, Marian; Day, Karen; Rodriguez, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Background Malaria triggers a high inflammatory response in the host that mediates most of the associated pathologies and contributes to death. The identification of pro-inflammatory molecules derived from Plasmodium is essential to understand the mechanisms of pathogenesis and to develop targeted interventions. Uric acid derived from hypoxanthine accumulated in infected erythrocytes has been recently proposed as a mediator of inflammation in rodent malaria. Methods and Findings We found that human erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum gradually accumulate hypoxanthine in their late stages of development. To analyze the role of hypoxanthine-derived uric acid induced by P. falciparum on the inflammatory cytokine response from human blood mononuclear cells, cultures were treated with allopurinol, to inhibit uric acid formation from hypoxanthine, or with uricase, to degrade uric acid. Both treatments significantly reduce the secretion of TNF, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-10 from human cells. Conclusions and Significance Uric acid is a major contributor of the inflammatory response triggered by P. falciparum in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Since the inflammatory reaction induced by P. falciparum is considered a major cause of malaria pathogenesis, identifying the mechanisms used by the parasite to induce the host inflammatory response is essential to develop urgently needed therapies against this disease. PMID:19381275

  3. Topical insulin application improves healing by regulating the wound inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuelian; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation, the initiating stage of wound healing, is characterized by increased endothelial permeability, infiltration of inflammatory cells, and secretion of numerous growth factors and chemokines. By controlling wound contamination and infection, as well as inducing the repairing process, inflammatory response plays an irreplaceable role during wound healing. We utilized a variety of approaches to observe the effect of insulin on wound inflammatory response, specifically the effect of insulin on the function of wound macrophages. We also investigated whether insulin-regulated inflammatory response contributed to insulin-induced healing. Mice excisional wounds treated with insulin showed advanced infiltration and resolution of macrophages, which correlated with the expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, a potent chemotactic factor for macrophages. Blockage of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 resulted in reduced macrophages infiltration and impaired wound healing despite the presence of insulin. In vitro studies showed insulin-facilitated monocytes/macrophages chemotaxis, pinocytosis/phagocytosis, and secretion of inflammatory mediators as well. Our study strongly suggests that insulin is a potent healing accelerant. Regulating wound inflammatory response, especially the quantity and function of macrophages, is one of the mechanisms explaining insulin-induced accelerated wound healing.

  4. [Roentgenographic pattern of interstitial pneumonia and allergic alveolitis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Stender, H S

    1977-01-01

    Roentgenographic examination of the lungs permits diagnosis of inflammatory and allergic pulmonary disease with predominantly interstitial and less alveolar involvement in which pulmonary fibrosis may develop. Reaction of the sensitised lung to allergic exposure causes typical roentgenological patterns. Development of pulmonary fibrosis in interstitial lung disease can be prevented be early cortison therapy.

  5. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiangtao; Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  6. Oral bepotastine: in allergic disorders.

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A

    2010-08-20

    Oral bepotastine is a second-generation histamine H(1) receptor antagonist that also suppresses some allergic inflammatory processes. Numerous short- and long-term clinical trials and surveillance studies have shown that twice-daily bepotastine is an effective and generally well tolerated antihistamine in the treatment of patients with allergic rhinitis, chronic urticaria or pruritus associated with skin conditions (eczema/dermatitis, prurigo or pruritus cutaneus). Bepotastine 20 mg/day was significantly more effective than terfenadine 120 mg/day in patients with perennial allergic rhinitis, as evaluated by the final global improvement rating and several other endpoints in a phase III trial. In phase III trials in patients with chronic urticaria, bepotastine 20 mg/day was more effective than placebo in improving levels of itching and eruption, and as effective as terfenadine 120 mg/day with regard to the final global improvement rating and other endpoints. In a noncomparative trial in patients with pruritus associated with skin diseases, the majority of bepotastine recipients in the overall population, as well as in the specific skin disease subgroups (eczema/dermatitis, prurigo or pruritus cutaneus), had a final global improvement rating of moderate or greater. Bepotastine was generally well tolerated in adult and paediatric patients with allergic conditions.

  7. INHIBITION OF PAN NEUROTROPHIN RECEPTOR P75 ATTENUATES DIESEL PARTICULATE-INDUCED ENHANCEMENT OF ALLERGIC AIRWAY RESPONSES IN C57/BL6J MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent investigations have linked neurotrophins including nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to allergic airways diseases. Antibody blockade of NGF attenuates airway resistance in allergic mice. Diesel exhaust particle...

  8. LPS-induced inflammatory response is suppressed by Wnt inhibitors, Dickkopf-1 and LGK974

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jaewoong; Jung, Yoonju; Kim, Youngeun; Jho, Eek-hoon; Yoon, Yoosik

    2017-01-01

    In this study, LPS-induced inflammatory responses in BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC)s were found to be prevented by Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1), a secreted Wnt antagonist, and LGK974, a small molecular inhibitor of the Wnt secretion. LPS-induced IκB degradation and NF-κB nuclear translocation as well as the expressions of pro-inflammatory genes including IL-6, IL-8, TNF- α, IL-1β, MCP-1, MMP-9, COX-2 and iNOS, were all suppressed by DKK-1 and LGK974 in a dose-dependent manner. The suppressive effects of LGK974 on NF-κB, IκB, and pro-inflammatory gene expression were rescued by ectopic expression of β-catenin, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory activity of LGK974 is mediated by modulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and not by unrelated side effects. When Wnt recombinant proteins were treated to cells, Wnt3a and Wnt5a significantly induced pro-inflammatory gene expressions, while Wnt7a and Wnt10b showed little effects. It was also found that Wnt3a and Wnt5a expressions were significantly induced by LPS treatment. Consistently, knockdown of Wnt3a and Wnt5a blocked LPS-induced inflammatory responses, while treatment of recombinant Wnt3a and Wnt5a proteins rescued the inhibition of inflammatory responses by LGK974. Findings of this study showed that DKK-1 and LGK974 suppress LPS-induced inflammatory response by modulating Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:28128299

  9. Infectious Complications and Immune/Inflammatory Response in Cardiogenic Shock Patients: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Parenica, Jiri; Jarkovsky, Jiri; Malaska, Jan; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Gottwaldova, Jana; Helanova, Katerina; Litzman, Jiri; Dastych, Milan; Tomandl, Josef; Spinar, Jindrich; Dostalova, Ludmila; Lokaj, Petr; Tomandlova, Marie; Pavkova, Monika Goldergova; Sevcik, Pavel; Legrand, Matthieu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Patients with cardiogenic shock (CS) are at a high risk of developing infectious complications; however, their early detection is difficult, mainly due to a frequently occurring noninfectious inflammatory response, which accompanies an extensive myocardial infarction (MI) or a postcardiac arrest syndrome. The goal of our prospective study was to describe infectious complications in CS and the immune/inflammatory response based on a serial measurement of several blood-based inflammatory biomarkers. Methods: Eighty patients with CS were evaluated and their infections were monitored. Inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, pentraxin 3, presepsin) were measured seven times per week. The control groups consisted of 11 patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction without CS and without infection, and 22 patients in septic shock. Results: Infection was diagnosed in 46.3% of patients with CS; 16 patients developed an infection within 48 h. Respiratory infection was most common, occurring in 33 out of 37 patients. Infection was a significant or even the main reason of death only in 3.8% of all patients with CS, and we did not find statistically significant difference in 3-month mortality between group of patients with CS with and without infection. There was no statistically significant prolongation of the duration of mechanical ventilation associated with infection. Strong inflammatory response is often in patients with CS due to MI, but we found no significant difference in the course of the inflammatory response expressed by evaluated biomarkers in patients with CS with and without infection. We found a strong relationship between the elevated inflammatory markers (sampled at 12 h) and the 3-month mortality: the area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic ranged between 0.683 and 0.875. Conclusion: The prevalence of infection in patients with CS was 46.3%, and respiratory tract infections were the most

  10. Sexual dimorphism of stress response and immune/ inflammatory reaction: the corticotropin releasing hormone perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakopoulos, Nicholas V.

    1995-01-01

    This review higlghts key aspects of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) biology of potential relevance to the sexual dimorphism of the stress response and immune/inflammatory reaction, and introduces two important new concepts based on the regulatory potential of the human (h) CRH gene: (1) a proposed mechanism to account for the tissue-specific antithetical responses of hCRH gene expression to glucocorticolds, that may also explain the frequently observed antithetical effects of chronic glucocorticoid administration in clinical practice and (2) a heuristic diagram to illustrate the proposed modulation of the stress response and immune/ inflammatory reaction by steroid hormones, from the perspective of the CRH system. PMID:18475634

  11. Rhinitis: Allergic and Non-Allergic

    PubMed Central

    Ogrady, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Rhinitis, or the “stuffy nose”, can be allergic or non-allergic in nature. Accurate diagnosis depends on a well-taken history and physical examination. Non-allergic rhinitis is characterized by absent elevation in allergen-specific IgE. Treatment is based, if possible, on the etiology. Surgical procedures on the turbinates are often needed to allow improvement. Allergic rhinitis is characterized by an increase in allergen-specific IgE. Treatment may involve environmental control, pharmocologic agents, or, finally, immunotherapy. Successful treatment requires accurate assessment of the offending agent and proper use of the above-mentioned modalities. PMID:21263880

  12. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Bains, Sonia N; Judson, Marc A

    2012-06-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is caused by an exaggerated T(H)2 response to the ubiquitous mold Aspergillus fumigatus. ABPA develops in a small fraction of patients with cystic fibrosis and asthma, suggesting that intrinsic host defects play a major role in disease susceptibility. This article reviews current understanding of the immunopathology, clinical and laboratory findings, and diagnosis and management of ABPA. It highlights clinical and laboratory clues to differentiate ABPA from cystic fibrosis and asthma, which are challenging given clinical and serologic similarities. A practical diagnostic algorithm and management scheme to aid in the treatment of these patients is outlined.

  13. Mouse Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Expressing Adipogenic and Osteogenic Transcription Factors Suppress the Macrophage Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Natalie; Renna, Heather; McHugh, Lauren; Mazolkova, Katie; Crugnola, William; Evans, Jodi F

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal progenitor cell characteristics that can identify progenitor populations with specific functions in immunity are actively being investigated. Progenitors from bone marrow and adipose tissue regulate the macrophage (MΦ) inflammatory response by promoting the switch from an inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Conversely, mesenchymal progenitors from the mouse aorta (mAo) support and contribute to the MΦ response under inflammatory conditions. We used cell lines with purported opposing immune-regulatory function, a bone marrow derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (D1) and a mouse aorta derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (mAo). Their interaction and regulation of the MΦ cell response to the inflammatory mediator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), was examined by coculture. As expected, D1 cells suppressed NO, TNF-α, and IL-12p70 production but MΦ phagocytic activity remained unchanged. The mAo cells enhanced NO and TNF-α production in coculture and enhanced MΦ phagocytic activity. Using flow cytometry and PCR array, we then sought to identify sets of MSC-associated genes and markers that are expressed by these progenitor populations. We have determined that immune-supportive mesenchymal progenitors highly express chondrogenic and tenogenic transcription factors while immunosuppressive mesenchymal progenitors highly express adipogenic and osteogenic transcription factors. These data will be useful for the isolation, purification, and modification of mesenchymal progenitors to be used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  14. Mouse Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Expressing Adipogenic and Osteogenic Transcription Factors Suppress the Macrophage Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Natalie; Renna, Heather; McHugh, Lauren; Mazolkova, Katie; Crugnola, William

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal progenitor cell characteristics that can identify progenitor populations with specific functions in immunity are actively being investigated. Progenitors from bone marrow and adipose tissue regulate the macrophage (MΦ) inflammatory response by promoting the switch from an inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Conversely, mesenchymal progenitors from the mouse aorta (mAo) support and contribute to the MΦ response under inflammatory conditions. We used cell lines with purported opposing immune-regulatory function, a bone marrow derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (D1) and a mouse aorta derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (mAo). Their interaction and regulation of the MΦ cell response to the inflammatory mediator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), was examined by coculture. As expected, D1 cells suppressed NO, TNF-α, and IL-12p70 production but MΦ phagocytic activity remained unchanged. The mAo cells enhanced NO and TNF-α production in coculture and enhanced MΦ phagocytic activity. Using flow cytometry and PCR array, we then sought to identify sets of MSC-associated genes and markers that are expressed by these progenitor populations. We have determined that immune-supportive mesenchymal progenitors highly express chondrogenic and tenogenic transcription factors while immunosuppressive mesenchymal progenitors highly express adipogenic and osteogenic transcription factors. These data will be useful for the isolation, purification, and modification of mesenchymal progenitors to be used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:28191017

  15. Role of inflammatory cytokines in the response of solid cancers to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Sun, Jinghai; Cecic, Ivana; Dougherty, Graeme J.

    2001-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) elicits a strong acute inflammatory response that has both local and systemic (acute phase response) attributes. The insult mediated by PDT-induced oxidative stress at the targeted site triggers a complex multifactorial response engaging host defence mechanisms associated with the inflammatory process to participate in the eradication of the treated tumor. Inflammatory cytokines are important mediators of critical events in this process as they regulate the activity of inflammatory, endothelial and other cells. The initial stimulus for enhanced production and release of cytokines likely originates from several types of events, such as activated transcription factors and complement deposition. The PDT-induced complement activation appears to be directly linked to the enhanced expression of various cytokines, including chemokines such as KC (in mouse models), and classic inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α , IL-6 and IL-10. A variety of interventions that modulate the activity of particular cytokines performed in conjunction with PDT were shown to influence the therapy outcome. The treatments such as using blocking antibodies and local or systemic cytokine delivery may either reduce or dramatically improve the curative effect of PDT. The inflammatory and related cytokines that at present appear particularly interesting and merit further investigation for use as adjuvants to PDT are IL-3, IL-8, IL-15, TNF-α, IFN-γ, G-CSF and GM-CSF.

  16. Maternal sleep deprivation inhibits hippocampal neurogenesis associated with inflammatory response in young offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiuying; Peng, Cheng; Wu, Xiaohui; Chen, Yubo; Wang, Cheng; You, Zili

    2014-08-01

    Although sleep complaints are very common among pregnant women, the potential adverse effects of sleep disturbance on the offspring are not well studied. Growing evidence suggests that maternal stress can induce an inflammatory environment on the fetal development. But people are not sure about the consequences of prenatal stress such as the inflammatory responses induced by maternal sleep deprivation (MSD). In the present study, we investigated the effects of MSD on long-term behavioral and cognitive consequences in offspring and its underlying inflammatory response pathway. The pregnant Wistar rats received prolonged sleep deprivation (72h) on gestational day (GD) 4, 9, and 18, respectively. The post-natal day (PND) 21 offspring showed impaired hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory in the Morris Water Maze task and anhedonia in sucrose preference experiment. Quantification of BrdU(+) and DCX(+) cells revealed a significant decrease in hippocampus neurogenesis in prepuberty offspring, especially for the late MSD (GD 18) group. Real-time RT-PCR showed that after MSD, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα) increased in the hippocampus of offspring on PND 1, 7, 14 and 21, whereas anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 reduced at the same time. Immunofluorescence found that the cells of activated microglia were higher in the brains of MSD offspring. Taken together, these results suggested that the MSD-induced inflammatory response is an important factor for neurogenesis impairment and neurobehavioral outcomes in prepuberty offspring.

  17. Metformin inhibits inflammatory response via AMPK-PTEN pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Ae; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2012-09-07

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammation of the coronary arteries. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated by cytokines and chemokines accelerate the inflammatory response and migrate to the injured endothelium during the progression of atherosclerosis. Activation of AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key sensor maintaining metabolic homeostasis, suppresses the inflammatory response. However, how AMPK regulates the inflammatory response is poorly understood. To identify the mechanism of this response, we focused on phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which is a negative regulator of inflammation. We investigated that activation of AMPK-induced PTEN expression and suppression of the inflammatory response through the AMPK-PTEN pathway in VSMCs. We treated with the well-known AMPK activator metformin to induce PTEN expression. PTEN was induced by metformin (2mM) and inhibited by compound C (10 μM) and AMPK siRNA. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) was used to induce inflammation. The inflammatory response was confirmed by cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Metformin suppressed COX-2 and iNOS mRNA and protein expression dose dependently. Treatment with compound C and bpv (pic) in the presence of metformin, iNOS and COX-2 protein expression increased. NF-κB activation decreased in response to metformin and was restored by inhibiting AMPK and PTEN. Inhibiting AMPK and PTEN restored ROS levels stimulated with TNF-α. Taken together, PTEN could be a possible downstream regulator of AMPK, and the AMPK-PTEN pathway might be important in the regulation of the inflammatory response in VSMCs.

  18. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Madera, Laurence; Greenshields, Anna; Coombs, Melanie R. Power; Hoskin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and CCL2 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) while production of interleukin-10 remained unchanged. The increased LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was transient and correlated with enhanced cytokine production in response to other Toll-like receptor agonists, including peptidoglycan and flagellin. In addition, 4T1-conditioned BMDMs exhibited strengthened LPS-induced nitric oxide production and enhanced phagocytosis of Escherichia coli. 4T1-mediated augmentation of macrophage responses to LPS was partially dependent on the NFκB pathway, macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and actin polymerization, as well as the presence of 4T1-secreted extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages obtained from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice displayed enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to LPS. These results suggest that uptake of 4T1-secreted factors and actin-mediated ingestion of 4T1-secreted exosomes by macrophages cause a transient enhancement of innate inflammatory responses. Mammary carcinoma-mediated regulation of innate immunity may have significant implications for our understanding of host defense and cancer progression. PMID:26177198

  19. The biochemical origin of pain: the origin of all pain is inflammation and the inflammatory response. Part 2 of 3 - inflammatory profile of pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Omoigui, Sota

    2007-01-01

    Every pain syndrome has an inflammatory profile consisting of the inflammatory mediators that are present in the pain syndrome. The inflammatory profile may have variations from one person to another and may have variations in the same person at different times. The key to treatment of Pain Syndromes is an understanding of their inflammatory profile. Pain syndromes may be treated medically or surgically. The goal should be inhibition or suppression of production of the inflammatory mediators and inhibition, suppression or modulation of neuronal afferent and efferent (motor) transmission. A successful outcome is one that results in less inflammation and thus less pain. We hereby briefly describe the inflammatory profile for several pain syndromes including arthritis, back pain, neck pain, fibromyalgia, interstitial cystitis, migraine, neuropathic pain, complex regional pain syndrome/reflex sympathetic dystrophy (CRPS/RSD), bursitis, shoulder pain and vulvodynia. These profiles are derived from basic science and clinical research performed in the past by numerous investigators and serve as a foundation to be built upon by other researchers and will be updated in the future by new technologies such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Our unifying theory or law of pain states: the origin of all pain is inflammation and the inflammatory response. The biochemical mediators of inflammation include cytokines, neuropeptides, growth factors and neurotransmitters. Irrespective of the type of pain whether it is acute or chronic pain, peripheral or central pain, nociceptive or neuropathic pain, the underlying origin is inflammation and the inflammatory response. Activation of pain receptors, transmission and modulation of pain signals, neuro plasticity and central sensitization are all one continuum of inflammation and the inflammatory response. Irrespective of the characteristic of the pain, whether it is sharp, dull, aching, burning, stabbing, numbing or tingling, all pain

  20. Impact of nutrition on immune function and the inflammatory response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The review utilizes data on three micronutrients (vitamin A, zinc and iron), anthropometrically defined undernutrition (stunting, wasting and underweight) and obesity to evaluate the effect on immune function, recovery of immune function in response to nutritional interventions, related health outco...

  1. Soluble Mediators in Platelet Concentrates Modulate Dendritic Cell Inflammatory Responses in an Experimental Model of Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Perros, Alexis J; Christensen, Anne-Marie; Flower, Robert L; Dean, Melinda M

    2015-10-01

    The transfusion of platelet concentrates (PCs) is widely used to treat thrombocytopenia and severe trauma. Ex vivo storage of PCs is associated with a storage lesion characterized by partial platelet activation and the release of soluble mediators, such as soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), RANTES, and interleukin (IL)-8. An in vitro whole blood culture transfusion model was employed to assess whether mediators present in PC supernatants (PC-SNs) modulated dendritic cell (DC)-specific inflammatory responses (intracellular staining) and the overall inflammatory response (cytometric bead array). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was included in parallel cultures to model the impact of PC-SNs on cell responses following toll-like receptor-mediated pathogen recognition. The impact of both the PC dose (10%, 25%) and ex vivo storage period was investigated [day 2 (D2), day 5 (D5), day 7 (D7)]. PC-SNs alone had minimal impact on DC-specific inflammatory responses and the overall inflammatory response. However, in the presence of LPS, exposure to PC-SNs resulted in a significant dose-associated suppression of the production of DC IL-12, IL-6, IL-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β and storage-associated suppression of the production of DC IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-8. For the overall inflammatory response, IL-6, TNF-α, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and inflammatory protein (IP)-10 were significantly suppressed and IL-8, IL-10, and IL-1β significantly increased following exposure to PC-SNs in the presence of LPS. These data suggest that soluble mediators present in PCs significantly suppress DC function and modulate the overall inflammatory response, particularly in the presence of an infectious stimulus. Given the central role of DCs in the initiation and regulation of the immune response, these results suggest that modulation of the DC inflammatory profile is a probable mechanism contributing to transfusion-related complications.

  2. Involvement of glycosphingolipid-enriched lipid rafts in inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are membrane components consisting of hydrophobic ceramide and hydrophilic sugar moieties. GSLs cluster with cholesterol in cell membranes to form GSL-enriched lipid rafts. Biochemical analyses have demonstrated that GSL-enriched lipid rafts contain several kinds of transducer molecules, including Src family kinases. Among the GSLs, lactosylceramide (LacCer, CDw17) can bind to various microorganisms, is highly expressed on the plasma membranes of human phagocytes, and forms lipid rafts containing the Src family tyrosine kinase Lyn. LacCer-enriched lipid rafts mediate immunological and inflammatory reactions, including superoxide generation, chemotaxis, and non-opsonic phagocytosis. Therefore, LacCer-enriched membrane microdomains are thought to function as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) expressed on microorganisms. LacCer also serves as a signal transduction molecule for functions mediated by CD11b/CD18-integrin (αM/β2-integrin, CR3, Mac-1), as well as being associated with several key cellular processes. LacCer recruits PCKα/ε and phospholipase A2 to stimulate PECAM-1 expression in human monocytes and their adhesion to endothelial cells, as well as regulating β1-integrin clustering and endocytosis on cell surfaces. This review describes the organizational and inflammation-related functions of LacCer-enriched lipid rafts.

  3. Comparison of Inflammatory Response to Transgastric and Transcolonic NOTES

    PubMed Central

    Hucl, Tomas; Benes, Marek; Kocik, Matej; Splichalova, Alla; Maluskova, Jana; Krak, Martin; Lanska, Vera; Heczkova, Marie; Kieslichova, Eva; Oliverius, Martin; Spicak, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The aim of our study was to determine the physiologic impact of NOTES and to compare the transgastric and transcolonic approaches. Methods. Thirty pigs were randomized to transgastric, transcolonic, or laparoscopic peritoneoscopy. Blood was drawn and analyzed for C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-6, WBCs, and platelets. Results. Endoscopic closure with an OTSC was successful in all 20 animals. The postoperative course was uneventful in all animals. CRP values rose on day 1 in all animals and slowly declined to baseline levels on day 14 with no differences between the groups (P > 0.05, NS). The levels of TNF-α were significantly increased in the transcolonic group (P < 0.01); however this difference was already present prior to the procedure and remained unchanged. No differences were observed in IL1-β and IL-6 values. There was a temporary rise of WBC on day 1 and of platelets on day 7 in all groups (P > 0.05, NS). Conclusions. Transgastric, transcolonic, and laparoscopic peritoneoscopy resulted in similar changes in systemic inflammatory markers. Our findings do not support the assumption that NOTES is less invasive than laparoscopy. PMID:27403157

  4. Bitter gourd suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Kobori, Masuko; Nakayama, Hirosuke; Fukushima, Kenji; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Ono, Hiroshi; Fukushima, Tatsunobu; Akimoto, Yukari; Masumoto, Saeko; Yukizaki, Chizuko; Hoshi, Yoshikazu; Deguchi, Tomoaki; Yoshida, Mitsuru

    2008-06-11

    Bitter gourd ( Momordica charantia L.) is a popular tropical vegetable in Asian countries. Previously it was shown that bitter gourd placenta extract suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNFalpha production in RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells. Here it is shown that the butanol-soluble fraction of bitter gourd placenta extract strongly suppresses LPS-induced TNFalpha production in RAW 264.7 cells. Gene expression analysis using a fibrous DNA microarray showed that the bitter gourd butanol fraction suppressed expression of various LPS-induced inflammatory genes, such as those for TNF, IL1alpha, IL1beta, G1p2, and Ccl5. The butanol fraction significantly suppressed NFkappaB DNA binding activity and phosphorylation of p38, JNK, and ERK MAPKs. Components in the active fraction from bitter gourd were identified as 1-alpha-linolenoyl-lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), 2-alpha-linolenoyl-LPC, 1-lynoleoyl-LPC, and 2-linoleoyl-LPC. Purified 1-alpha-linolenoyl-LPC and 1-linoleoyl-LPC suppressed the LPS-induced TNFalpha production of RAW 264.7 cells at a concentration of 10 microg/mL.

  5. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 inhibits inflammatory response and regulates atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shu-jian; Zhang, Ming-xiang; Wang, Xu-ping; Yuan, Qiu-huan; Xue, Li; Wang, Jia-li; Cui, Zhao-qiang; Zhang, Yun; Xu, Feng; Chen, Yu-guo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) rs671 polymorphism, which eliminates ALDH2 activity down to 1%-6%, is a susceptibility gene for coronary disease. Here we investigated the underlying mechanisms based on our prior clinical and experimental studies. Male apoE−/− mice were transfected with GFP, ALDH2-overexpression and ALDH2-RNAi lentivirus respectively (n=20 each) after constrictive collars were placed around the right common carotid arteries. Consequently, ALDH2 gene silencing led to an increased en face plaque area, more unstable plaque with heavier accumulation of lipids, more macrophages, less smooth muscle cells and collagen, which were associated with aggravated inflammation. However, ALDH2 overexpression displayed opposing effects. We also found that ALDH2 activity decreased in atherosclerotic plaques of human and aged apoE−/− mice. Moreover, in vitro experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells further illustrated that, inhibition of ALDH2 activity resulted in elevating inflammatory molecules, an increase of nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and enhanced phosphorylation of NF-κB p65, AP-1 c-Jun, Jun-N terminal kinase and p38 MAPK, while ALDH2 activation could trigger contrary effects. These findings suggested that ALDH2 can influence plaque development and vulnerability, and inflammation via MAPK, NF-κB and AP-1 signaling pathways. PMID:27191745

  6. Rosmarinus officinalis extract suppresses Propionibacterium acnes-induced inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Hsien; Chuang, Lu-Te; Lien, Tsung-Jung; Liing, Yau-Rong; Chen, Wei-Yu; Tsai, Po-Jung

    2013-04-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a key pathogen involved in the progression of acne inflammation. The development of a new agent possessing antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity against P. acnes is therefore of interest. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extract on P. acnes-induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that ethanolic rosemary extract (ERE) significantly suppressed the secretion and mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α in P. acnes-stimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. In an in vivo mouse model, concomitant intradermal injection of ERE attenuated the P. acnes-induced ear swelling and granulomatous inflammation. Since ERE suppressed the P. acnes-induced nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation and mRNA expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, the suppressive effect of ERE might be due, at least partially, to diminished NF-κB activation and TLR2-mediated signaling pathways. Furthermore, three major constituents of ERE, carnosol, carnosic acid, and rosmarinic acid, exerted different immumodulatory activities in vitro. In brief, rosmarinic acid significantly suppressed IL-8 production, while the other two compounds inhibited IL-1β production. Further study is needed to explore the role of bioactive compounds of rosemary in mitigation of P. acnes-induced inflammation.

  7. Rosmarinus officinalis Extract Suppresses Propionibacterium acnes–Induced Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Hsien; Chuang, Lu-Te; Lien, Tsung-Jung; Liing, Yau-Rong; Chen, Wei-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Propionibacterium acnes is a key pathogen involved in the progression of acne inflammation. The development of a new agent possessing antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity against P. acnes is therefore of interest. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extract on P. acnes–induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that ethanolic rosemary extract (ERE) significantly suppressed the secretion and mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α in P. acnes–stimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. In an in vivo mouse model, concomitant intradermal injection of ERE attenuated the P. acnes–induced ear swelling and granulomatous inflammation. Since ERE suppressed the P. acnes–induced nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation and mRNA expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, the suppressive effect of ERE might be due, at least partially, to diminished NF-κB activation and TLR2-mediated signaling pathways. Furthermore, three major constituents of ERE, carnosol, carnosic acid, and rosmarinic acid, exerted different immumodulatory activities in vitro. In brief, rosmarinic acid significantly suppressed IL-8 production, while the other two compounds inhibited IL-1β production. Further study is needed to explore the role of bioactive compounds of rosemary in mitigation of P. acnes–induced inflammation. PMID:23514231

  8. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS): where did it come from and is it still relevant today?

    PubMed

    Balk, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The concept of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) to describe the complex pathophysiologic response to an insult such as infection, trauma, burns, pancreatitis, or a variety of other injuries came from a 1991 consensus conference charged with the task of developing an easy-to-apply set of clinical parameters to aid in the early identification of potential candidates to enter into clinical trials to evaluate new treatments for sepsis. There was recognition that a diverse group of injuries produced a common inflammatory response in the host and provided attractive targets for new anti-inflammatory molecules designed to prevent further propagation and/or provide specific treatment. Effective application of these new anti-inflammatory strategies necessitated identification of early clinical markers that could be assessed in real-time and were likely to define a population of patients that would have a beneficial response to the targeted intervention. It was felt that early clinical manifestations might be more readily available to clinicians than more sophisticated and specific assays for inflammatory substances that were systemically released by the network of injurious inflammatory events. Therefore, the early definition of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) was built upon a foundation of basic clinical and laboratory abnormalities that were readily available in almost all clinical settings. With further refinement, it was hoped, that this definition would have a high degree of sensitivity, coupled with a reasonable degree of specificity. This manuscript reviews the derivation, application, utilization, potential benefits, and speculation regarding the future of the SIRS definition.

  9. Rat lung inflammatory responses after in vivo and in vitro exposure to various stone particles.

    PubMed

    Becher, R; Hetland, R B; Refsnes, M; Dahl, J E; Dahlman, H J; Schwarze, P E

    2001-09-01

    Rat lung alveolar macrophages and type 2 cells were exposed for 20 h in vitro to various stone particles with differing contents of metals and minerals (a type of mylonite, gabbro, feldspar, and quartz). The capability to induce the release of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) was investigated. We found marked differences in potency between the various particles, with mylonite being most potent overall, followed by gabbro, and with feldspar and quartz having an approximately similar order of lower potency. The results also demonstrated differences in cytokine release pattern between the two cell types. For all particle types including quartz, type 2 cells showed the most marked increase in MIP-2 and IL-6 secretion, whereas the largest increase in TNF-alpha release was observed in macrophages. To investigate possible correlations between in vitro and in vivo inflammatory responses, rats were instilled with the same types of particles and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected after 20 h. The results demonstrated a correlation between the in vitro cytokine responses and the number of neutrophilic cells in the BAL fluid. The BAL fluid also showed a strong MIP-2 response to mylonite. However, this was the only particle type to give a significant cytokine response in the BAL fluid. We further examined whether a similar graded inflammatory response would be continued in type 2 cells and alveolar macrophages isolated from the exposed animals. Again a differential cytokine release pattern was observed between type 2 cells and macrophages, although the order of potency between particle types was altered. In conclusion, various stone particles caused differential inflammatory responses after both in vitro and in vivo exposure, with mylonite being the most potent stone particle. The results suggest the alveolar type 2 cell to be an important participant in the

  10. Effect of maternal exposure to ozone on reproductive outcome and immune, inflammatory, and allergic responses in the offspring

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern that exposure to air pollutants during pregnancy affects health outcomes in the offspring due to alterations in the development of immune and other homeostatic processes. To assess the risks of maternal inhalation exposure to ozone (O3), timed pregnant BA...

  11. Cockroach protease allergen induces allergic airway inflammation via epithelial cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Sagar L.; Agrawal, Komal; Gaur, Shailendra Nath; Arora, Naveen

    2017-01-01

    Protease allergens are known to enhance allergic inflammation but their exact role in initiation of allergic reactions at mucosal surfaces still remains elusive. This study was aimed at deciphering the role of serine protease activity of Per a 10, a major cockroach allergen in initiation of allergic inflammation at mucosal surfaces. We demonstrate that Per a 10 increases epithelial permeability by disruption of tight junction proteins, ZO-1 and occludin, and enhances the migration of Monocyte derived dendritic cell precursors towards epithelial layer as exhibited by trans-well studies. Per a 10 exposure also leads to secretion of IL-33, TSLP and intracellular Ca2+ dependent increase in ATP levels. Further, in vivo experiments revealed that Per a 10 administration in mice elevated allergic inflammatory parameters along with high levels of IL-33, TSLP, IL-1α and uric acid in the mice lungs. We next demonstrated that Per a 10 cleaves CD23 (low affinity IgE receptor) from the surface of PBMCs and purified B cells and CD25 (IL-2 receptor) from the surface of PBMCs and purified T cells in an activity dependent manner, which might favour Th2 responses. In conclusion, protease activity of Per a 10 plays a significant role in initiation of allergic airway inflammation at the mucosal surfaces. PMID:28198394

  12. Anti-Allergic Effect of Oroxylin A from Oroxylum indicum Using in vivo and in vitro Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ae-Yeon; Kang, Saeromi; Park, Soo-Jin; Huang, Jin; Im, Dong-Soon

    2016-01-01

    Oroxylum indicum has long been used in Asian traditional medicine to prevent and treat respiratory diseases, diabetes, diarrhea and other conditions. Oroxylin A is a flavone that is present in Oroxylum indicum and in Scutellaria baicalensis. Because the root extracts of both plants have been shown to have anti-allergic effects, the authors investigated whether oroxylin A is likely to have beneficial effects on allergic asthma using female Balb/c mice and rat RBL-2H3 mast cells. Antigen-induced degranulation was measured in vitro by measuring β-hexosaminidase activity. A murine ovalbumin-induced allergic asthma model was used to test the in vivo efficacy of oroxylin A. Sensitization and challenge of ovalbumin induced allergic asthma responses, the accumulations of eosinophils and Th2 cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissues. Oroxylin A administration decreased numbers of inflammatory cells, especially eosinophils, and reduced the expression and secretion of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-13, in lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Histologic studies showed oroxylin A reduced inflammatory signs and mucin production in lungs. These findings provide evidence that oroxylin A has potential use as an anti-allergic therapeutic. PMID:27133260

  13. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction can be provoked by skin contact with poison plants, chemicals and animal scratches, as well as by ... dust, nuts and shellfish, may also cause allergic reaction. Medications such as penicillin and other antibiotics are ...

  14. Inflammatory responses and cell adhesion to self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiolates on gold.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Judite N; Barbosa, Mário A; Aguas, Artur P

    2004-06-01

    The acute inflammatory response and the adhesion of cells to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of well-defined surface chemistry was studied in vivo using a rodent air-pouch model of inflammation. SAMs with three different terminal functional groups (OH, COOH and CH3) were implanted in subcutaneous air pouches induced in BALB/c mice. After 24 h, inflammatory cells were recovered from the air pouches and the implants were removed and prepared for observation by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The implants coated with OH and CH3, were found to cause the highest recruitment of inflammatory cells into the subcutaneous pouches. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) leukocytes predominated over mononuclear cells in inflammatory exudates of SAMs-coated implants, the opposite being found in uncoated implants (controls). CH3-coated implants induced the highest number of inflammatory cells and also the largest percentage of PMNs seen in the subcutaneous pouches. Control and OH-covered implants presented the higher densities of attached inflammatory cells detected by SEM. In contrast, the CH3-coated implants showed a very low density of cells adherent to the implant surface. We conclude that the chemical nature and the degree of hydrophobicity of the surface of implants modulate both the local acute inflammatory reaction and the adhesion of leukocytes.

  15. Metabolic factors-triggered inflammatory response drives antidepressant effects of exercise in CUMS rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weina; Wang, Hongmei; Wang, Yangkai; Li, Haipeng; Ji, Liu

    2015-08-30

    Chronic stress is a potential contributing factor for depression, accompanying with metabolic and inflammatory response. Exercise is considered as a treatment for depression, but mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects still remain unknown. The objectives of present study were to confirm that metabolic factors-triggered inflammatory response mediates the antidepressant actions of exercise in chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) rats. It has been found that CUMS stimulated expression of ghrelin and its receptor Ghsr, but inhibited expression of leptin and its receptor LepRb. Ghrelin, via binding to Ghsr, induced phosphorylation of GSK-3β on Tyr216 and decreased phosphorylation on Ser9, thus increasing GSK-3β activity. Conversely, ghrelin binding to Ghsr decreased STAT3 activity, through decreasing phosphorylation of STAT3 on Tyr705 and increasing Ser727 phosphorylation. Negatively correlated with ghrelin, leptin binding to LepRb had opposite effects on the activity of GSK-3β and STAT3 via phosphorylation. In addition, decreased leptin level initiated NLRP3 activity via LepRb. Furthermore, GSK-3β inhibited STAT3 activation, thus promoting the expression of NLRP3. Meanwhile, swim improved metabolic and inflammatory response both in CUMS and control rats. Our findings suggest that exercise not only ameliorates metabolic disturbance and inflammatory response in depression, but also contributes to metabolic and inflammatory function in normal conditions.

  16. Time-of-Day Dictates Transcriptional Inflammatory Responses to Cytotoxic Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Borniger, Jeremy C.; Walker II, William H.; Gaudier-Diaz, Monica M.; Stegman, Curtis J.; Zhang, Ning; Hollyfield, Jennifer L.; Nelson, Randy J.; DeVries, A. Courtney

    2017-01-01

    Many cytotoxic chemotherapeutics elicit a proinflammatory response which is often associated with chemotherapy-induced behavioral alterations. The immune system is under circadian influence; time-of-day may alter inflammatory responses to chemotherapeutics. We tested this hypothesis by administering cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin (Cyclo/Dox), a common treatment for breast cancer, to female BALB/c mice near the beginning of the light or dark phase. Mice were injected intravenously with Cyclo/Dox or the vehicle two hours after lights on (zeitgeber time (ZT2), or two hours after lights off (ZT14). Tissue was collected 1, 3, 9, and 24 hours later. Mice injected with Cyclo/Dox at ZT2 lost more body mass than mice injected at ZT14. Cyclo/Dox injected at ZT2 increased the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes within the spleen; this was not evident among mice treated at ZT14. Transcription of enzymes within the liver responsible for converting Cyclo/Dox into their toxic metabolites increased among mice injected at ZT2; furthermore, transcription of these enzymes correlated with splenic pro-inflammatory gene expression when treatment occurred at ZT2 but not ZT14. The pattern was reversed in the brain; pro-inflammatory gene expression increased among mice injected at ZT14. These data suggest that inflammatory responses to chemotherapy depend on time-of-day and are tissue specific. PMID:28117419

  17. Sepsis, systemic inflammatory response, and multiple organ dysfunction: the mystery continues.

    PubMed

    Fry, Donald E

    2012-01-01

    Human sepsis is thought to be systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) that is activated by invasive infection. The multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is the identified failure of critical organ function in patients that have sustained SIRS. Because SIRS and MODS are consequences of the excessive activation of inflammation, extensive research and numerous clinical trials have pursued treatments that would modify the inflammatory response. This presentation reviews the normal local mechanisms of inflammation and provides a theoretical framework for the transition of the inflammatory process to a systemic level. Clinical trials with biomodulators to block or inhibit inflammation have generally failed to improve the outcomes in patients with severe sepsis, septic shock, and MODS. The role of counter-inflammatory signaling and the newer concept of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway are being investigated, and newer hypotheses are focusing upon the balancing of proinflammatory and counter-inflammatory mechanisms as important directions for newer therapies. It is concluded that failure to define novel and effective treatments reflects fundamental gaps in our understanding of inflammation and its regulation.

  18. Macrophage-mediated inflammatory response decreases mycobacterial survival in mouse MSCs by augmenting NO production

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Wu, Yongjian; Xie, Heping; Li, Miao; Ming, Siqi; Li, Liyan; Li, Meiyu; Wu, Minhao; Gong, Sitang; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a hard-to-eradicate intracellular microbe, which escapes host immune attack during latent infection. Recent studies reveal that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide a protective niche for MTB to maintain latency. However, the regulation of mycobacterial residency in MSCs in the infectious microenvironment remains largely unknown. Here, we found that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during MTB infection facilitated the clearance of bacilli residing in mouse MSCs. Higher inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production were observed in mouse MSCs under macrophage-mediated inflammatory circumstance. Blocking NO production in MSCs increased the survival of intracellular mycobacteria, indicating NO-mediated antimycobacterial activity. Moreover, both nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathways were involved in iNOS expression and NO production in inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β could trigger NO production in MSCs and exert anti-mycobacterial activity via NF-κB signaling pathway. Neutralization of interleukin-1β in macrophage-mediated inflammatory microenvironment dampened the ability of mouse MSCs to produce NO. Together, our findings demonstrated that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during mycobacterial infection promotes the clearance of bacilli in mouse MSCs by increasing NO production, which may provide a better understanding of latent MTB infection. PMID:27251437

  19. γδ T-Cells: Potential Regulators of the Post-Burn Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Schwacha, Martin G.

    2009-01-01

    Burn injury induces an immunopathological response that can contribute to the development of a systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) and subsequent multiple organ failure. While, multiple immune cells type (T-cells, macrophages, neutrophils) are involved in this response, recent evidence suggests that a unique T-cell subset, γδ T-cells are central in the response to injury. While γδ T-cells represent only a small percentage of the total T-cell population, they display specific functional characteristics that uniquely position them in the immune/inflammatory axis to influence a number of important aspects of the body’s response to burn injury. This review will focus on the potential regulator role of γδ T-cells in immunopathological response following burn injury and thereby their potential as therapeutic targets for modulation of post-burn inflammation and healing. PMID:18951718

  20. Sepsis and mechanisms of inflammatory response: is exercise a good model?

    PubMed Central

    Shephard, R

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—The immune changes induced by a bout of prolonged and vigorous exercise have been suggested to be a useful experimental model of sepsis and the inflammatory response. Available literature was reviewed to evaluate this hypothesis. Methods—Literature describing the immune response to various patterns of exercise was compared with data on the immune changes observed during sepsis and inflammation. Results—Although there are qualitative similarities between the immune responses to exercise and sepsis, the magnitude of the changes induced by most forms of exercise remains much smaller than in a typical inflammatory response. Indeed, the exercise induced changes in some key elements such as plasma cytokine concentrations are too small to be detected reliably by current technology. Conclusions—If exercise is to provide a valid model of sepsis and the inflammatory response, it will be necessary to focus on subjects who are willing to exercise extremely hard, to use the pattern of exercise that has the greatest effect on the immune system, and to combine this stimulus with other psychological, environmental, or nutritional stressors. Key Words: sepsis; inflammatory response; exercise; cytokines; endorphins; immune function PMID:11477013

  1. Linking lung function and inflammatory responses in ventilator-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, Vincenzo; Hantos, Zoltan; Sly, Peter D; Zosky, Graeme R

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the mechanisms of ventilator-induced lung injury are poorly understood. We used strain-dependent responses to mechanical ventilation in mice to identify associations between mechanical and inflammatory responses in the lung. BALB/c, C57BL/6, and 129/Sv mice were ventilated using a protective [low tidal volume and moderate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment maneuvers] or injurious (high tidal volume and zero PEEP) ventilation strategy. Lung mechanics and lung volume were monitored using the forced oscillation technique and plethysmography, respectively. Inflammation was assessed by measuring numbers of inflammatory cells, cytokine (IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α) levels, and protein content of the BAL. Principal components factor analysis was used to identify independent associations between lung function and inflammation. Mechanical and inflammatory responses in the lung were dependent on ventilation strategy and mouse strain. Three factors were identified linking 1) pulmonary edema, protein leak, and macrophages, 2) atelectasis, IL-6, and TNF-α, and 3) IL-1β and neutrophils, which were independent of responses in lung mechanics. This approach has allowed us to identify specific inflammatory responses that are independently associated with overstretch of the lung parenchyma and loss of lung volume. These data provide critical insight into the mechanical responses in the lung that drive local inflammation in ventilator-induced lung injury and the basis for future mechanistic studies in this field.

  2. Circulating inflammatory miRNA signature in response to different doses of aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    de Gonzalo-Calvo, David; Dávalos, Alberto; Montero, Ana; García-González, Ángela; Tyshkovska, Iryna; González-Medina, Antonio; Soares, Sara M A; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Casas-Agustench, Patricia; Rabadán, Manuel; Díaz-Martínez, Ángel E; Úbeda, Natalia; Iglesias-Gutiérrez, Eduardo

    2015-07-15

    While moderate acute exercise has been associated with strong anti-inflammatory mechanisms, strenuous exercise has been linked to deleterious inflammatory perturbations. It is therefore fundamental to elucidate the mechanisms that regulate the exercise-induced inflammatory cascade. Information on novel regulators such as circulating inflammatory microRNAs (c-inflammamiRs) is incomplete. In this study, we evaluated the response of a panel of c-inflammamiRs to different doses of acute aerobic exercise. We first studied the exercise-induced inflammatory cascade in serum samples of nine active middle-aged males immediately before and after (0 h, 24 h, 72 h) 10-km, half-marathon, and marathon races. Next, we analyzed the circulating profile of 106 specific c-inflammamiRs immediately before) and after (0 h, 24 h) 10-km (low inflammatory response) and marathon (high inflammatory response) races. Analysis of classical inflammatory parameters revealed a dose-dependent effect of aerobic exercise on systemic inflammation, with higher levels detected after marathon. We observed an increase in miR-150-5p immediately after the 10-km race. Levels of 12 c-inflammamiRs were increased immediately after the marathon (let-7d-3p, let-7f-2-3p, miR-125b-5p, miR-132-3p, miR-143-3p, miR-148a-3p, miR-223-3p, miR-223-5p, miR-29a-3p, miR-34a-5p, miR-424-3p, and miR-424-5p). c-inflammamiRs returned to basal levels after 24 h. Correlation and in silico analyses supported a close association between the observed c-inflammamiR pattern and regulation of the inflammatory process. In conclusion, we found that different doses of acute aerobic exercise induced a distinct and specific c-inflammamiR response, which may be associated with control of the exercise-induced inflammatory cascade. Our findings point to c-inflammamiRs as potential biomarkers of exercise-induced inflammation, and hence, exercise dose.

  3. Test of the antiorthostatic suspension model on mice - Effects on the inflammatory cell response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenkrans, Charles F., Jr.; Chapes, Stephen K.; Fleming, Sherry D.

    1990-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model was tested for use as a 1G model to study the effects of factors that will be encountered during space travel on inflammation. No differences were found in inflammatory cells induced in antiorthostatically suspended mice. However, the superoxide response (used for oxidative killing of bacteria such as S. aureus) was impaired in antiorthostatically oriented mice compared to control mice. Elevated corticosterone levels were found in antiorthostatically suspended mice, indicating that stress may be a factor in the model. If the stress factor of the model correlates with the physiological stress of space flight, antiorthostatic suspension may be an acceptable model for studying inflammatory responses in mice.

  4. Sublingual administration of Lactobacillus paracasei KW3110 inhibits Th2-dependent allergic responses via upregulation of PD-L2 on dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Inamine, Ayako; Sakurai, Daijyu; Horiguchi, Shigetoshi; Yonekura, Syuji; Hanazawa, Toyoyuki; Hosokawa, Hiroyuki; Matuura-Suzuki, Asaka; Nakayama, Toshinori; Okamoto, Yoshitaka

    2012-05-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have potential in immunomodulation therapy, but their clinical efficacy and underlying mechanisms are unclear. We aimed to clarify the anti-allergic immune responses induced by intragastric and sublingual administration of heat-killed Lactobacillus paracasei KW3110 and Lactobacillus acidophilus L-92. The KW3110 strain (but not the L-92 strain) enhanced ovalbumin (OVA)-induced expression of CCR-7 and PD-L2 in murine dendritic cells (DCs), and strongly inhibited IL-5 and IL-13 production in vitro in co-cultures with Th2-skewed CD4(+) T cells from DO11.10 transgenic mice. Sublingual administration of low-dose KW3110 (but not L-92) to OVA-sensitized mice selectively suppressed serum IgE production and Th2 cytokine expression in cervical lymph nodes, and significantly improved symptoms after OVA provocation in vivo. KW3110 probably accelerates DC migration into the regional lymph nodes and inhibits Th2 cytokine production through enhanced CCR-7 and PD-L2 expression. Thus, sublingual KW3110 administration may be effective in reducing allergic inflammation.

  5. Immune Responses in Healthy and Allergic Individuals Are Characterized by a Fine Balance between Allergen-specific T Regulatory 1 and T Helper 2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Akdis, Mübeccel; Verhagen, Johan; Taylor, Alison; Karamloo, Fariba; Karagiannidis, Christian; Crameri, Reto; Thunberg, Sarah; Deniz, Günnur; Valenta, Rudolf; Fiebig, Helmut; Kegel, Christian; Disch, Rainer; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B.; Blaser, Kurt; Akdis, Cezmi A.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms by which immune responses to nonpathogenic environmental antigens lead to either allergy or nonharmful immunity are unknown. Single allergen-specific T cells constitute a very small fraction of the whole CD4+ T cell repertoire and can be isolated from the peripheral blood of humans according to their cytokine profile. Freshly purified interferon-γ–, interleukin (IL)-4–, and IL-10–producing allergen-specific CD4+ T cells display characteristics of T helper cell (Th)1-, Th2-, and T regulatory (Tr)1–like cells, respectively. Tr1 cells consistently represent the dominant subset specific for common environmental allergens in healthy individuals; in contrast, there is a high frequency of allergen-specific IL-4–secreting T cells in allergic individuals. Tr1 cells use multiple suppressive mechanisms, IL-10 and TGF-β as secreted cytokines, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 and programmed death 1 as surface molecules. Healthy and allergic individuals exhibit all three allergen-specific subsets in different proportions, indicating that a change in the dominant subset may lead to allergy development or recovery. Accordingly, blocking the suppressor activity of Tr1 cells or increasing Th2 cell frequency enhances allergen-specific Th2 cell activation ex vivo. These results indicate that the balance between allergen-specific Tr1 cells and Th2 cells may be decisive in the development of allergy. PMID:15173208

  6. Tobacco and e-cigarette products initiate Kupffer cell inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, David A; Hom, Sarah; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Yin, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Kupffer cells are liver resident macrophages that are responsible for screening and clearing blood of pathogens and foreign particles. It has recently been shown that Kupffer cells interact with platelets, through an adhesion based mechanism, to aid in pathogen clearance and then these platelets re-enter the general systemic circulation. Thus, a mechanism has been identified that relates liver inflammation to possible changes in the systemic circulation. However, the role that Kupffer cells play in cardiovascular disease initiation/progression has not been elucidated. Thus, our objective was to determine whether or not Kupffer cells are responsive to a classical cardiovascular risk factor and if these changes can be transmitted into the general systemic circulation. If Kupffer cells initiate inflammatory responses after exposure to classical cardiovascular risk factors, then this provides a potential alternative/synergistic pathway for cardiovascular disease initiation. We aimed to elucidate the prevalence of this potential pathway. We hypothesized that Kupffer cells would initiate a robust inflammatory response after exposure to tobacco cigarette or e-cigarette products and that the inflammatory response would have the potential to antagonize other salient cells for cardiovascular disease progression. To test this, Kupffer cells were incubated with tobacco smoke extracts, e-cigarette vapor extracts or pure nicotine. Complement deposition onto Kupffer cells, Kupffer cell complement receptor expression, oxidative stress production, cytokine release and viability and density were assessed after the exposure. We observed a robust inflammatory response, oxidative stress production and cytokine release after Kupffer cells were exposed to tobacco or e-cigarette extracts. We also observed a marginal decrease in cell viability coupled with a significant decrease in cell density. In general, this was not a function of the extract formulation (e.g. tobacco vs. e

  7. miR-146a-mediated suppression of the inflammatory response in human adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Julian; Enlund, Eveliina; Funcke, Jan-Bernd; Tews, Daniel; Holzmann, Karlheinz; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Wabitsch, Martin; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    The obesity-associated inflammation of white adipose tissue (WAT) is one of the factors leading to the development of related diseases such as insulin resistance and liver steatosis. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) were identified as important regulators of WAT functions. Herein, we cultured human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) adipocytes with macrophage-conditioned medium (MacCM) and performed an Affimetrix miRNA array to identify miRNAs differentially expressed under inflammatory conditions. We identified 24 miRNAs differentially expressed upon inflammation in human adipocytes and miR-146a was the most up-regulated miRNA species. In subcutaneous WAT, miR-146a was elevated in both human and murine obesity. Transfection of miR-146a mimics prevented the MacCM-induced inflammatory response in SGBS adipocytes as seen by reduced levels of IL-8 and MCP-1 mRNA and protein. We identified IRAK1 and TRAF6 as targets of miR-146a in human adipocytes and detected a reduced inflammation-induced activation of JNK and p38 upon miR-146a transfection. Taken together, we could show that miR-146a reduces the inflammatory response in human adipocytes. In a negative feedback loop miR-146a might contribute to the regulation of inflammatory processes in WAT and possibly prevent an overwhelming inflammatory response. PMID:27922090

  8. CXCR2 deficient mice display macrophage-dependent exaggerated acute inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Douglas P.; Pallas, Kenneth; Ruiz, Laura Medina; Schuette, Fabian; Wilson, Gillian J.; Graham, Gerard J.

    2017-01-01

    CXCR2 is an essential regulator of neutrophil recruitment to inflamed and damaged sites and plays prominent roles in inflammatory pathologies and cancer. It has therefore been highlighted as an important therapeutic target. However the success of the therapeutic targeting of CXCR2 is threatened by our relative lack of knowledge of its precise in vivo mode of action. Here we demonstrate that CXCR2-deficient mice display a counterintuitive transient exaggerated inflammatory response to cutaneous and peritoneal inflammatory stimuli. In both situations, this is associated with reduced expression of cytokines associated with the resolution of the inflammatory response and an increase in macrophage accumulation at inflamed sites. Analysis using neutrophil depletion strategies indicates that this is a consequence of impaired recruitment of a non-neutrophilic CXCR2 positive leukocyte population. We suggest that these cells may be myeloid derived suppressor cells. Our data therefore reveal novel and previously unanticipated roles for CXCR2 in the orchestration of the inflammatory response. PMID:28205614

  9. Aged neutrophils contribute to the first line of defense in the acute inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Bernd; Vadlau, Yannick; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Nekolla, Katharina; Sharaf, Kariem; Gaertner, Florian; Massberg, Steffen; Krombach, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Under steady-state conditions, aged neutrophils are removed from the circulation in bone marrow, liver, and spleen, thereby maintaining myeloid cell homeostasis. The fate of these aged immune cells under inflammatory conditions, however, remains largely obscure. Here, we demonstrate that in the acute inflammatory response during endotoxemia, aged neutrophils cease returning to the bone marrow and instead rapidly migrate to the site of inflammation. Having arrived in inflamed tissue, aged neutrophils were found to exhibit a higher phagocytic activity as compared with the subsequently recruited nonaged neutrophils. This distinct behavior of aged neutrophils under inflammatory conditions is dependent on specific age-related changes in their molecular repertoire that enable these “experienced” immune cells to instantly translate inflammatory signals into immune responses. In particular, aged neutrophils engage Toll-like receptor-4- and p38 MAPK-dependent pathways to induce conformational changes in β2 integrins that allow these phagocytes to effectively accomplish their mission in the front line of the inflammatory response. Hence, ageing in the circulation might represent a critical process for neutrophils that enables these immune cells to properly unfold their functional properties for host defense. PMID:27609642

  10. HMGB1 Protein Does Not Mediate the Inflammatory Response in Spontaneous Spinal Cord Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yingying; Gu, Yun; Huan, Youjuan; Wang, Yingjie; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Ding, Fei; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    Uncontrolled, excessive inflammation contributes to the secondary tissue damage of traumatic spinal cord, and HMGB1 is highlighted for initiation of a vicious self-propagating inflammatory circle by release from necrotic cells or immune cells. Several regenerative-competent vertebrates have evolved to circumvent the second damages during the spontaneous spinal cord regeneration with an unknown HMGB1 regulatory mechanism. By genomic surveys, we have revealed that two paralogs of HMGB1 are broadly retained from fish in the phylogeny. However, their spatial-temporal expression and effects, as shown in lowest amniote gecko, were tightly controlled in order that limited inflammation was produced in spontaneous regeneration. Two paralogs from gecko HMGB1 (gHMGB1) yielded distinct injury and infectious responses, with gHMGB1b significantly up-regulated in the injured cord. The intracellular gHMGB1b induced less release of inflammatory cytokines than gHMGB1a in macrophages, and the effects could be shifted by exchanging one amino acid in the inflammatory domain. Both intracellular proteins were able to mediate neuronal programmed apoptosis, which has been indicated to produce negligible inflammatory responses. In vivo studies demonstrated that the extracellular proteins could not trigger a cascade of the inflammatory cytokines in the injured spinal cord. Signal transduction analysis found that gHMGB1 proteins could not bind with cell surface receptors TLR2 and TLR4 to activate inflammatory signaling pathway. However, they were able to interact with the receptor for advanced glycation end products to potentiate oligodendrocyte migration by activation of both NFκB and Rac1/Cdc42 signaling. Our results reveal that HMGB1 does not mediate the inflammatory response in spontaneous spinal cord regeneration, but it promotes CNS regeneration. PMID:23649623

  11. [Inflammatory response and haematological disorders in cardiac surgery: toward a more physiological cardiopulmonary bypass].

    PubMed

    Baufreton, C; Corbeau, J-J; Pinaud, F

    2006-05-01

    The systemic inflammatory response in cardiac surgery is closely related to the haemostasis disturbances. It is responsible of a significant morbidity and mortality that was previously suspected to be caused by cardiopulmonary bypass alone. However, it is time now to clearly identify the factors that are material-dependent from that material-independent. From this point of view, off-pump surgery allowed for better comprehension of the multiple sources of the inflammatory response. Numerous pathways are activated, involving complement, platelets, neutrophiles and monocytes. The tissue pathway of the coagulation system, through tissue factor, is of major importance and has to be surgically considered in order to reduce the whole body inflammatory response postoperatively. The quality of the extracorporeal perfusion through its consequences on organ perfusion, particularly in the splanchnic area, also participates to this pathophysiological process. Beyond the progress of technology provided by the industry, particularly the minimally extracorporeal circulation derived from off-pump surgery evolution, the surgical approach is of major importance in the control of the systemic inflammatory response and must not be ignored yet.

  12. Coagulation response in dogs with and without systemic inflammatory response syndrome - preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Natali; Moritz, Andreas

    2013-02-01

    The impact of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) on all phases of coagulation is largely unknown in dogs. Fifty-six healthy dogs (controls) and 25 diseased dogs were included. Based on physical and hematological examination, dogs were classified as "no-SIRS" (n=7) or "SIRS" (n=18). Evaluated coagulation variables included platelets, coagulation times, fibrinogen, antithrombin (AT), FVIII, protein C, protein S, activated protein C (APC)-ratio, calculated from aPTT with and without presence of APC, and kaolin-activated thrombelastography (TEG). Overall, no-SIRS and SIRS were characterized by hypocoaguable state (P<0.001 compared to controls) i.e., prolonged coagulation times, decreased AT (median 59 U/L and 89 U/L versus 126 U/L), and FVIII (median 19 U/L and 70 U/L versus 102 U/L). In no-SIRS and SIRS, APC-ratio was significantly lower than in the controls (median 1.1 and 2.0 versus 2.5, P<0.01, P<0.001). Severe coagulopathies may be present in critically ill dogs without concurrent SIRS. APC-resistance is a frequent finding in severely diseased dogs.

  13. Interaction of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses in microglia by Staphylococcus aureus-derived lipoteichoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Bor-Ren; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Tseng, Wen-Pei; Huang, Shiang-Suo; Wu, Chi-Rei; Lin, Chingju; Yeh, Wei-Lan; Lu, Dah-Yuu

    2013-05-15

    We investigated the interaction between proinflammatory and inflammatory responses caused by Staphylococcus aureus-derived lipoteichoic acid (LTA) in primary cultured microglial cells and BV-2 microglia. LTA induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein levels increase in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Meanwhile, LTA also increased nitric oxide (NO) and PGE{sub 2} production in microglia. Administration of TLR2 antagonist effectively inhibited LTA-induced NO, iNOS, and COX-2 expression. Moreover, treatment of cells with LTA caused a time-dependent activation of ERK, p38, JNK, as well as AKT. We also found that LTA-induced iNOS and COX-2 up-regulation were attenuated by p38, JNK, and PI3-kinase inhibitors. On the other hand, LTA-enhanced HO-1 expression was attenuated by p38 and PI3-kinase inhibitors. Treatment of cells with NF-κB and AP-1 inhibitors antagonized LTA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression. However, only NF-κB inhibitors reduced LTA-induced HO-1 expression in microglia. Furthermore, stimulation of cells with LTA also activated IκBα phosphorylation, p65 phosphorylation at Ser{sup 536}, and c-Jun phosphorylation. Moreover, LTA-induced increases of κB-DNA and AP-1-DNA binding activity were inhibited by p38, JNK, and PI3-kinase inhibitors. HO-1 activator CoPP IX dramatically reversed LTA-induced iNOS expression. Our results provided mechanisms linking LTA and inflammation/anti-inflammation, and indicated that LTA plays a regulatory role in microglia activation. - Highlights: • LTA causes an increase in iNOS, COX-2, and HO-1 expression in microglia. • LTA induces iNOS and COX-2 expression through TLR-2/NF-κB and AP-1 pathways. • HO-1 expression is regulated through p38, JNK, PI3K/AKT and AP-1 pathways. • Induced HO-1 reduces LTA-induced iNOS expression. • LTA plays a regulatory role on inflammatory/anti-inflammatory responses.

  14. Monitoring the inflammatory response to infection through the integration of MALDI IMS and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Ahmed S.; Schroeder, Kaitlin A.; Seeley, Erin H.; Wilson, Kevin J.; Hammer, Neal D.; Colvin, Daniel C.; Manier, M. Lisa; Nicklay, Joshua J.; Rose, Kristie L.; Gore, John C.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Systemic bacterial infection is characterized by a robust whole organism inflammatory response. Analysis of the immune response to infection involves technologies that typically focus on single organ systems and lack spatial information. Additionally, the analysis of individual inflammatory proteins requires antibodies specific to the protein of interest, limiting the panel of proteins that can be analyzed. Herein we describe the application of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) to mice systemically infected with Staphylococcus aureus to identify inflammatory protein masses that respond to infection throughout an entire infected animal. Integrating the resolution afforded by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the sensitivity of MALDI IMS provides three-dimensional spatially resolved information regarding the distribution of innate immune proteins during systemic infection, allowing comparisons to in vivo structural information and soft tissue contrast via MRI. Thus, integrating MALDI IMS with MRI provides a systems biology approach to study inflammation during infection. PMID:22704626

  15. Managing the inflammatory response after cardiopulmonary bypass: review of the studies in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Gabriel Romero; Kanas, Alexandre Fligelman; Moreira, Luiz Felipe Pinho

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review studies performed in animal models that evaluated therapeutic interventions to inflammatory response and microcirculatory changes after cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods It was used the search strategy ("Cardiopulmonary Bypass" (MeSH)) and ("Microcirculation" (MeSH) or "Inflammation" (MeSH) or "Inflammation Mediators" (MeSH)). Repeated results, human studies, non-English language articles, reviews and studies without control were excluded. Results Blood filters, system miniaturization, specific primers regional perfusion, adequate flow and temperature and pharmacological therapies with anticoagulants, vasoactive drugs and anti-inflammatories reduced changes in microcirculation and inflammatory response. Conclusion Demonstrated efficacy in animal models establishes a perspective for evaluating these interventions in clinical practice. PMID:24896169

  16. The emerging role of microRNAs in regulating immune and inflammatory responses in the lung.

    PubMed

    Foster, Paul S; Plank, Maximilian; Collison, Adam; Tay, Hock L; Kaiko, Gerard E; Li, Jingjing; Johnston, Sebastian L; Hansbro, Philip M; Kumar, Rakesh K; Yang, Ming; Mattes, Joerg

    2013-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases of the lung are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many of these disorders can be attributed to abnormal immune responses to environmental stimuli and infections. As such, understanding the innate host defense pathways and their regulatory systems will be critical to developing new approaches to treatment. In this regard, there is increasing interest in the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the regulation of pulmonary innate host defense responses and the inflammatory sequelae in respiratory disease. In this review, we discuss recent findings that indicate an important role for miRNAs in the regulation in mouse models of various respiratory diseases and in host defense against bacterial and viral infection. We also discuss the potential utility and limitations of targeting these molecules as anti-inflammatory strategies and also as a means to improve pathogen clearance from the lung.

  17. Cigarette smoke and ozone effect on murine inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Gardi, Concetta; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2012-07-01

    Air pollution has been associated with many different diseases, such as cancer, and respiratory, cardiovascular, and cutaneous chronic diseases. These effects are enhanced in people exposed to combined air pollutants, such as ozone and cigarette smoke. Chronic exposure to these pollutants causes an increase in oxidative stress and inflammation and has been associated with an increase in pulmonary diseases and mortality. Clinical and epidemiological studies reported interindividual variability in the adverse health effects of air pollutants, suggesting a genetic predisposition. The identification of subgroups of the population who are particularly vulnerable to air pollution is, therefore, of importance. Mouse models are a useful tool for studying the mechanisms underlying different susceptibility, as they show differences in strain responses to both ozone and cigarette smoke. This review analyses the role of inflammation and the influence of genetic factors on the mechanisms of lung injury caused by ozone and cigarette smoke.

  18. Leukotrienes orchestrating allergic skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sadik, Christian D; Sezin, Tanya; Kim, Nancy D

    2013-11-01

    Leukotrienes constitute a group of lipid mediators, which may be subdivided into two groups, with leukotriene B4 on the one hand and cysteinyl leukotrienes on the other. Although leukotrienes are abundantly expressed in skin affected by diverse chronic inflammatory diseases, including atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid, their pathological roles in these diseases have remained elusive. Recent data now reveal that both leukotriene B4 and cysteinyl leukotrienes are indispensable in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, with leukotriene B4 initiating the recruitment of inflammatory cells, particularly neutrophils and TH 2 cells into the skin, and cysteinyl leukotrienes later inducing characteristic structural alterations of chronically affected skin, specifically skin fibrosis and keratinocyte proliferation. Thus, these results reveal a sequential cooperation of LTB4 and cysteinyl leukotrienes to initiate and perpetuate allergic skin inflammation. These new insights highlight leukotrienes as promising therapeutic targets in allergic skin inflammation and should encourage more research into the role of leukotrienes in other inflammatory skin diseases.

  19. microRNA-155 Regulates Alpha-Synuclein-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Models of Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Thome, Aaron D; Harms, Ashley S; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura A; Standaert, David G

    2016-02-24

    Increasing evidence points to inflammation as a chief mediator of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and widespread aggregates of the protein α-synuclein (α-syn). Recently, microRNAs, small, noncoding RNAs involved in regulating gene expression at the posttranscriptional level, have been recognized as important regulators of the inflammatory environment. Using an array approach, we found significant upregulation of microRNA-155 (miR-155) in an in vivo model of PD produced by adeno-associated-virus-mediated expression of α-syn. Using a mouse with a complete deletion of miR-155, we found that loss of miR-155 reduced proinflammatory responses to α-syn and blocked α-syn-induced neurodegeneration. In primary microglia from miR-155(-/-) mice, we observed a markedly reduced inflammatory response to α-syn fibrils, with attenuation of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) and proinflammatory inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. Treatment of these microglia with a synthetic mimic of miR-155 restored the inflammatory response to α-syn fibrils. Our results suggest that miR-155 has a central role in the inflammatory response to α-syn in the brain and in α-syn-related neurodegeneration. These effects are at least in part due to a direct role of miR-155 on the microglial response to α-syn. These data implicate miR-155 as a potential therapeutic target for regulating the inflammatory response in PD.

  20. Carbon dioxide is largely responsible for the acute inflammatory effects of tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Laurent; Guais, Adeline; Chaumet-Riffaud, Philippe; Grévillot, Georges; Sasco, Annie J; Molina, Thierry Jo; Mohammad, Abolhassani

    2010-06-01

    Tobacco smoking is responsible for a vast array of diseases, particularly chronic bronchitis and lung cancer. It is still unclear which constituent(s) of the smoke is responsible for its toxicity. The authors decided to focus on carbon dioxide, since its level of concentration in mainstream cigarette smoke is about 200 times higher than in the atmosphere. The authors previously demonstrated that inhalation of carbon dioxide concentrations above 5% has a deleterious effect on lungs. In this study, the authors assessed the inflammatory potential of carbon dioxide contained in cigarette smoke. Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke containing a high or reduced CO(2) level by filtration through a potassium hydroxyde solution. The inflammatory response was evaluated by histological analysis, protein phosphatase 2 A (PP2A) and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation, and proinflammatory cytokine secretion measurements. The data show that the toxicity of cigarette smoke may be largely due to its high level of CO(2). Pulmonary injuries consequent to tobacco smoke inhalation observed by histology were greatly diminished when CO(2) was removed. Cigarette smoke exposure causes an inflammatory respons