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Sample records for allergic inflammatory responses

  1. Janus Kinase-3 Dependent Inflammatory Responses in Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Malaviya, Rama; Laskin, Debra L.; Malaviya, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    Summary Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory condition of the lung characterized by reversible airway obstruction, high serum immunoglobulin (Ig) E levels, and chronic airway inflammation. A number of cells including mast cells, T-cells, macrophages and dendritic cells play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Janus Kinase (JAK) −3, a nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase, traditionally known to mediate cytokine signaling, also regulates functional responses of these cells. In this review the role of JAK-3 in regulating various pathogenic processes in allergic asthma is discussed. We propose that targeting JAK-3 is a rationale approach to control the inflammatory responses of multiple cell types responsible for the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. PMID:20430118

  2. Oleanolic Acid Controls Allergic and Inflammatory Responses in Experimental Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Carmen; Martín, Rubén; Gallego-Muñoz, Patricia; Hernández, Marita; Nieto, María L.

    2014-01-01

    Pollen is the most common aeroallergen to cause seasonal conjunctivitis. The result of allergen exposure is a strong Th2-mediated response along with conjunctival mast cell degranulation and eosinophilic infiltration. Oleanolic acid (OA) is natural a triterpene that displays strong anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties being an active anti-allergic molecule on hypersensitivity reaction models. However, its effect on inflammatory ocular disorders including conjunctivits, has not yet been addressed. Hence, using a Ragweed pollen (RWP)-specific allergic conjunctivitis (EAC) mouse model we study here whether OA could modify responses associated to allergic processes. We found that OA treatment restricted mast cell degranulation and infiltration of eosinophils in conjunctival tissue and decreased allergen-specific Igs levels in EAC mice. Th2-type cytokines, secreted phospholipase A2 type-IIA (sPLA2-IIA), and chemokines levels were also significantly diminished in the conjunctiva and serum of OA-treated EAC mice. Moreover, OA treatment also suppressed RWP-specific T-cell proliferation. In vitro studies, on relevant cells of the allergic process, revealed that OA reduced the proliferative and migratory response, as well as the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators on EoL-1 eosinophils and RBL-2H3 mast cells exposed to allergic and/or crucial inflammatory stimuli such as RWP, sPLA2-IIA or eotaxin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the beneficial activity of OA in ocular allergic processes and may provide a new intervention strategy and potential therapy for allergic diseases. PMID:24699261

  3. Antileukotriene Reverts the Early Effects of Inflammatory Response of Distal Parenchyma in Experimental Chronic Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gobbato, Nathália Brandão; de Souza, Flávia Castro Ribas; Fumagalli, Stella Bruna Napolitano; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi Tenório Quirino dos Santos; Prado, Carla Máximo; Martins, Milton Arruda; Tibério, Iolanda de Fátima Lopes Calvo; Leick, Edna Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    Aims. Compare the effects of montelukast or dexamethasone in distal lung parenchyma and airway walls of guinea pigs (GP) with chronic allergic inflammation. Methods. GP have inhaled ovalbumin (OVA group-2x/week/4weeks). After the 4th inhalation, GP were treated with montelukast or dexamethasone. After 72 hours of the 7th inhalation, GP were anesthetised, and lungs were removed and submitted to histopathological evaluation. Results. Montelukast and dexamethasone treatments reduced the number of eosinophils in airway wall and distal lung parenchyma compared to OVA group (P < 0.05). On distal parenchyma, both treatments were effective in reducing RANTES, NF-κB, and fibronectin positive cells compared to OVA group (P < 0.001). Montelukast was more effective in reducing eotaxin positive cells on distal parenchyma compared to dexamethasone treatment (P < 0.001), while there was a more expressive reduction of IGF-I positive cells in OVA-D group (P < 0.001). On airway walls, montelukast and dexamethasone were effective in reducing IGF-I, RANTES, and fibronectin positive cells compared to OVA group (P < 0.05). Dexamethasone was more effective in reducing the number of eotaxin and NF-κB positive cells than Montelukast (P < 0.05). Conclusions. In this animal model, both treatments were effective in modulating allergic inflammation and remodeling distal lung parenchyma and airway wall, contributing to a better control of the inflammatory response. PMID:24151607

  4. Suppression of allergic and inflammatory responses by essential oils derived from herbal plants and citrus fruits.

    PubMed

    Mitoshi, Mai; Kuriyama, Isoko; Nakayama, Hiroto; Miyazato, Hironari; Sugimoto, Keiichiro; Kobayashi, Yuko; Jippo, Tomoko; Kuramochi, Kouji; Yoshida, Hiromi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the biological activity of 20 essential oils (EOs) derived from herbal plants and citrus fruits. The in vitro anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory activities of these oils were investigated, and the EO which was found to have the strongest activity of the 20 EOs examined, was investigated further to identify its components and bioactive compounds. The in vitro anti-allergic activity was determined by measuring the release of β-hexosaminidase from rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells treated with the calcium ionophore, A23187. The in vitro anti-inflammatory activity was determined by measuring the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in RAW264.7 murine macrophages treated with lipopolysaccharide. Among the EOs examined, lemongrass [Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf] elicited the strongest anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory effects. A principal component of this EO is citral (3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadien-1-al) (74.5%), a mixture of the stereoisomers, geranial (trans-citral, 40.16%) and neral (cis-citral, 34.24%), as determined by chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The activities of citral and geranial are similar to those of lemongrass EO. These compounds elicited significant in vivo anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory effects, suppressing an immunoglobulin E (IgE)-induced passive cutaneous anaphylactic reaction in mice and a 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced inflammatory mouse ear edema, respectively. Our data demonstrate that lemongrass EO and its constituents, citral and geranial, may be a therapeutic candidate for allergic and inflammatory diseases. PMID:24682420

  5. Using magnetic resonance imaging to quantify the inflammatory response following allergen challenge in allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Leaker, Brian R; Scadding, Glenis; Jones, C Richard; Barnes, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Current rhinometric and flow assessments measure nasal patency and are often poorly correlated with rhinitis symptoms. To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a new method to measure inflammatory changes in nasal and sinus mucosa following nasal allergen challenge. A pilot study (n = 6) determined the optimal technical settings for MRI to measure inflammatory change which were then adopted for the main study. This study was a single blind, placebo-controlled, three-way crossover trial in 14 subjects with seasonal allergic rhinitis. Effects of cetirizine, cetirizine and pseudoephedrine (Cet+PE), or placebo on total nasal symptom scores (TNSS), peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF), nasal nitric oxide (nNO), acoustic rhinometry, and MRI end points following nasal intranasal allergen challenge were measured. There were significant changes in all parameters after allergen challenge (P < 0.01), except for nNO. MRI end points were less variable and more consistent than PNIF and acoustic rhinometry in detecting changes after allergen challenge. Total nasal airspace volume was the most sensitive and reproducible MRI measurement, with a mean reduction from -5.37 cm(3) (95%CI -7.35, -3.38; P < 0.001), which was maximal 60 min after allergen challenge. A change of one in TNSS corresponded to a change in MRI volume of -0.57 cm(3). There was an improvement in all parameters (except nNO) in subjects taking Cet+PE compared with placebo, however this did not achieve significance probably because of the small study size (overall analysis P > 0.07; comparison of active versus placebo P > 0.09). MRI provides novel insights into the anatomical inflammatory changes post allergen challenge and provides a new method for assessment of nasal patency and objective measurement of inflammatory responses. PMID:26733348

  6. Cohabitation with a sick partner increases allergic lung inflammatory response in mice.

    PubMed

    Hamasato, Eduardo Kenji; de Lima, Ana Paula Nascimento; de Oliveira, Ana Paula Ligeiro; dos Santos Franco, Adriana Lino; de Lima, Wothan Tavares; Palermo-Neto, João

    2014-11-01

    results suggest that allergic lung inflammatory response exacerbation in CSP mice is a consequence of the psychological stress induced by forced cohabitation with the sick partner. Strong involvement of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) through adrenaline and noradrenaline release and a shift of the Th1/Th2 cytokine profile toward a Th2 response were considered to be the mechanisms underlying the cell recruitment to the animal's airways. PMID:24929194

  7. Effects of Swimming on the Inflammatory and Redox Response in a Model of Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, T R; Ávila, L C M; Fortkamp, B; Greiffo, F R; Bobinski, F; Mazzardo-Martins, L; Martins, D F; Duarte, M M M F; Dafre, A; Santos, A R S; Silva, M D; Souza, L F; Vieira, R P; Hizume-Kunzler, D C

    2015-06-01

    In this study we hypothesized that swimming during sensitization phase could result in a preventive effect in mice with allergic asthma. Swiss mice were divided into 4 groups: Control and Swimming (non-sensitized), OVA and OVA+Swimming (sensitized). The allergic inflammation was induced by 2 intraperitoneal injections and 4 aerosol challenges using ovalbumin. Swimming sessions were performed at high intensity over 3 weeks. 48 h after the last challenge mice were euthanized. Swimming decreased OVA-increased total IgE, IL-1, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6 levels, as well as the number of total cells, lymphocytes and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, (p<0.05). Simultaneously, swimming also increased IL-10 and glutathione levels in the Swimming and OVA+Swimming groups (p<0.05). The levels of glutathione peroxidase and catalase were increased only in the Swimming group when compared to all groups (p<0.05). 21 days of swimming resulted in an attenuation of pulmonary allergic inflammation followed by an increase of glutathione levels in the OVA group. Swimming only increased the levels of glutathione peroxidase and catalase in non-sensitized mice (p<0.05). These data suggest that the pulmonary anti-inflammatory effects produced by 3 weeks of high-intensity swimming in this model of OVA-induced asthma may be, at least partly, modulated by reduced oxidative stress and increased IL-10 production. PMID:25837246

  8. Protective Effect of an Antibody against Specific Extracellular Domain of TLR2 on Agonists-Driven Inflammatory and Allergic Response

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tianwu; Cai, Jun; Peng, Yanxia; Zhang, Lifang; Lan, Qiaofen; Chen, Yanwen; Liao, Huanjin; Xie, Tong; Wu, Ping; Pan, Qingjun

    2016-01-01

    Specific blocking strategies of TLR2-mediated inflammatory signaling and hypersensitivity reactions may offer novel therapeutic strategies to prevent a variety of diseases. In this study, we investigated the blocking effects of a new anti-TLR2 antibody anti-T20 against a 20 mer peptide T20 located in the extracellular specific domain of mouse TLR2. In addition, the effects of the anti-T20 in vitro, measuring the inhibition of the IL-6 and TNF-α production in response to PGN, LTA, and Pam3CSK4-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, were determined. In vivo, the effects of anti-T20 on a lethal anaphylaxis model using PGN-challenged OVA allergic mice, including the rectal temperature and mortality, and serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and LTC4 were assayed. The results showed that anti-T20 specifically bound to TLR2 and significantly inhibited PGN, LTA, and Pam3CSK4-driven TNF-α and IL-6 production by RAW264.7 cells. Also, anti-T20 protected OVA allergic mice from PGN-induced lethal anaphylaxis, and the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and LTC4 of anti-T20 treated PGN-challenged OVA allergic mice were decreased as compared to isotype control of anti-T20 treated mice. In summary, this study produced a new antibody against the specific extracellular domain of TLR2 which has protective effect on TLR2 agonists-driven inflammatory and allergic response. PMID:27213155

  9. DIESEL PARTICLE INSTILLATION ENHANCES INFLAMMATORY AND NEUROTROPHIN RESPONSES IN THE LUNGS OF ALLERGIC BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) partially mediate many features of allergic airways disease including airways resistance and inflammation. Antibody blockade of NGF attenuates airways resistance associated with the allergen-specific airways responses in mice. ...

  10. The role of TRPV1 in the CD4+ T cell-mediated inflammatory response of allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hye Ran; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Ji Hye; Bae, Jun-Sang; Chung, Young-Jun; Chung, Phil-Sang; Raz, Eyal; Mo, Ji-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), which has been identified as a molecular target for the activation of sensory neurons by various painful stimuli, was reported to regulate the signaling and activation of CD4+ T cells. However, the role of TRPV1 in CD4+ T cell in allergic rhinitis remains poorly understood. In this study, TRPV1 expression was localized in CD4+ T cells. Both knockout and chemical inhibition of TRPV1 suppressed Th2/Th17 cytokine production in CD4 T cells and Jurkat T cells, respectively, and can suppress T cell receptor signaling pathways including NF-κB, MAP kinase, and NFAT. In TRPV1 knockout allergic rhinitis (AR) mice, eosinophil infiltration, Th2/Th17 cytokines in the nasal mucosa, and total and ova-specific IgE levels in serum decreased, compared with wild-type AR mice. The TRPV1 antagonists, BCTC or theobromine, showed similar inhibitory immunologic effects on AR mice models. In addition, the number of TRPV1+/CD4+ inflammatory cells increased in the nasal mucosa of patients with AR, compared with that of control subjects. Thus, TRPV1 activation on CD4+ T cells is involved in T cell receptor signaling, and it could be a novel therapeutic target in AR. PMID:26700618

  11. Allergic inflammatory response to short ragweed allergenic extract in HLA-DQ transgenic mice lacking CD4 gene.

    PubMed

    Chapoval, Svetlana P; Iijima, Koji; Marietta, Eric V; Smart, Michele K; Chapoval, Andrei I; Andrews, Amy G; David, Chella S

    2002-01-15

    To investigate the role of HLA-DQ molecules and/or CD4(+) T cells in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma, we generated HLA-DQ6 and HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice lacking endogenous class II (Abeta(null)) and CD4 genes and challenged them intranasally with short ragweed allergenic extract (SRW). We found that DQ6/CD4(null) mice developed a strong eosinophilic infiltration into the bronchoalveolar lavage and lung tissue, while DQ8/CD4(null) mice were normal. However, neither cytokines nor eosinophil peroxidase in the bronchoalveolar lavage of DQ6/CD4(null) mice was found. In addition, the airway reactivity to methacholine was elevated moderately in DQ6/CD4(null) mice compared with the high response in DQ/CD4(+) counterparts and was only partially augmented by CD4(+) T cell transfer. The DQ6/CD4(null) mice showed Th1/Th2-type cytokines and SRW-specific Abs in the immune sera in contrast to a direct Th2 response observed in DQ6/CD4(+) mice. The proliferative response of spleen mononuclear cells and peribronchial lymph node cells demonstrated that the response to SRW in DQ6/CD4(null) mice was mediated by HLA-DQ-restricted CD4(-)CD8(-)NK1.1(-) T cells. FACS analysis of PBMC and spleen mononuclear cells demonstrated an expansion of double-negative (DN) CD4(-)CD8(-)TCRalphabeta(+) T cells in SRW-treated DQ6/CD4(null) mice. These cells produced IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and IFN-gamma when stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3. IL-5 ELISPOT assay revealed that DN T cells were the cellular origin of IL-5 in allergen-challenged DQ6/CD4(null) mice. Our study shows a role for HLA-DQ-restricted CD4(+) and DN T cells in the allergic response. PMID:11777987

  12. Dissecting the inflammatory twitch in allergically inflamed mice.

    PubMed

    Pothen, Joshua J; Poynter, Matthew E; Lundblad, Lennart K A; Bates, Jason H T

    2016-05-15

    We have previously advanced the hypothesis that the allergic inflammatory response in the lungs occurs as a self-limited sequence of events that begins with the onset of inflammation and then resolves back to baseline over a predetermined time course (Pothen JJ, Poynter ME, Bates JH. J Immunol 190: 3510-3516, 2013). In the present study we tested a key prediction of this hypothesis, which is that the instigation of the allergic inflammatory response should be accompanied by a later refractory period during which the response cannot be reinitiated. We challenged groups of ovalbumin-sensitized BALB/c mice for 3, 14, 21 and 31 consecutive days with aerosolized ovalbumin. We measured airways responsiveness as well as cell counts and cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after the final challenge in subgroups from each group. In other subgroups we performed the same measurements following rest periods and after a final single recall challenge with antigen. We determined that the refractory periods for GM-CSF, KC, and IL-5 are no longer than 10 days, while those for IFNγ and IL-10 are no longer than 28 days. The refractory periods for total leukocytes and neutrophils were no greater than 28 days, while that for eosinophils was more than 28 days. The refractory period for airways resistance was less than 17, while for lung elastance it was longer than 28 days. Our results thus demonstrate that the components of the allergic inflammatory response in the lung have finite refractory periods, with the refractory period of the entire response being in the order of a month. PMID:26944087

  13. The association between maternal psychological stress and inflammatory cytokines in allergic young children

    PubMed Central

    Koriyama, Chihaya; Yamamoto, Megumi; Anan, Ayumi; Shibata, Eiji; Kawamoto, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have shown that psychological stress is linked to asthma prevalence. Parental psychological stress may potentially influence inflammatory responses in their allergic children. The purpose of this study is to clarify the association between maternal psychological status and inflammatory response of allergic young children. Methods. The study subjects were 152 young allergic children (median age: 13 months) who had not shown any allergic symptoms in the past one month. mRNA expression levels of the inflammatory response genes IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-22 were quantified by qRT-PCR. Maternal psychological status was assessed by standardized questionnaires: the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) for depression and the Japanese Perceived Stress Scale (JPSS) for perceived stress. Results. A significant positive association was observed between maternal CES-D scores and IL-6 mRNA expression in the children with asthma. The JPSS scores were also positively associated with IL-8 mRNA expression in asthmatic children and IL-6 mRNA expression in children with allergic rhinitis. Similar trends were observed among children positive for house dust mite-specific IgE, but these associations were not significant. Conclusion. This study supports the hypothesis that maternal psychological stress affects the inflammatory response in their allergic children. PMID:26819847

  14. Differences in allergic inflammatory responses between urban PM2.5 and fine particle derived from desert-dust in murine lungs.

    PubMed

    He, Miao; Ichinose, Takamichi; Kobayashi, Makoto; Arashidani, Keiichi; Yoshida, Seiichi; Nishikawa, Masataka; Takano, Hirohisa; Sun, Guifan; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2016-04-15

    The biological and chemical natures of materials adsorbed onto fine particulate matter (PM2.5) vary by origin and passage routes. The exacerbating effects of the two samples-urban PM2.5 (U-PM2.5) collected during the hazy weather in a Chinese city and fine particles (ASD-PM2.5) collected during Asian sand dust (ASD) storm event days in Japan-on murine lung eosinophilia were compared to clarify the role of toxic materials in PM2.5. The amounts of β-glucan and mineral components were higher in ASD-PM2.5 than in U-PM2.5. On the other hand, organic chemicals, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were higher in U-PM2.5 than in ASD-PM2.5. When BALB/c mice were intratracheally instilled with U-PM2.5 and ASD-PM2.5 (total 0.4 mg/mouse) with or without ovalbumin (OVA), various biological effects were observed, including enhancement of eosinophil recruitment induced by OVA in the submucosa of the airway, goblet cell proliferation in the bronchial epithelium, synergic increase of OVA-induced eosinophil-relevant cytokines and a chemokine in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and increase of serum OVA-specific IgG1 and IgE. Data demonstrate that U-PM2.5 and ASD-PM2.5 induced allergic inflammatory changes and caused lung pathology. U-PM2.5 and ASD-PM2.5 increased F4/80(+) CD11b(+) cells, indicating that an influx of inflammatory and exudative macrophages in lung tissue had occurred. The ratio of CD206 positive F4/80(+) CD11b(+) cells (M2 macrophages) in lung tissue was higher in the OVA+ASD-PM2.5 treated mice than in the OVA+U-PM2.5 treated mice. These results suggest that the lung eosinophilia exacerbated by both PM2.5 is due to activation of a Th2-associated immune response along with induced M2 macrophages and the exacerbating effect is greater in microbial element (β-glucan)-rich ASD-PM2.5 than in organic chemical-rich U-PM2.5. PMID:26917405

  15. ASSESSMENT OF ALLERGIC IMMUNE RESPONSES TO INDOOR AIR FUNGAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are using a mouse model to assess immune and inflammatory responses as well as changes in respiratory function and pathology characteristic of allergic asthma to fungal extracts M. anisopliae (MACA), S. chartarum (SCE), and P. chrysogenum (PCE). This model will be useful to a...

  16. Xanthii Fructus inhibits allergic response in the ovalbumin-sensitized mouse allergic rhinitis model

    PubMed Central

    Gwak, Nam-Gil; Kim, Eun-Young; Lee, Bina; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Im, Yong-Seok; Lee, Ka-Yeon; Jun-Kum, Chang; Kim, Ho-Seok; Cho, Hyun-Joo; Jung, Hyuk-Sang; Sohn, Youngjoo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Xanthii Fructus (XF) is widely used in traditional anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory Asian medicine. Allergic rhinitis is a common inflammatory disease characterized by markedly increased levels of anti-inflammatory factors and the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the nasal mucosa. We investigated the effects of XF in the allergen-induced rhinitis model. Materials and Methods: Following ovalbumin (OVA)/alum intraperitoneal injection on days 0, 7 and 14, the BALB/c mice (albino, laboratory-bred strain of the house mice) were challenged intranasally with OVA for 10 days a week after the last sensitization. The number of sneezes was recorded for 10 days; additionally, the levels of cytokines, histamine, immunoglobulin E (IgE) and OVA-specific serum IgE were estimated. Eosinophil infiltration, thickness of nasal mucosa and expression of caspase-1 were determined by immunohistochemistry. We also evaluated the effect of XF on the phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) and inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B-alpha (IκB-α) in human mast cell-1 (HMC-1), by Western blotting. Results: The administration of XF significantly decreased sneezing and the serum levels of histamine, IgE, OVA-specific IgE, and cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukine-1 beta (IL-1β), IL-5, IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). XF inhibited the changes in thickness of the nasal septum, influx of eosinophils and expression of capase-1. In addition, XF inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB in phorbol-myristate-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (A23187) stimulated HMC-1. Conclusion: This study suggests that XF acts a potent anti-allergic drug which alleviates the allergic responses in ovalbumin-sensitized mouse allergic rhinitis model. PMID:26664025

  17. Adjuvant and anti-inflammatory properties of cigarette smoke in murine allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Trimble, Nancy J; Botelho, Fernando M; Bauer, Carla M T; Fattouh, Ramzi; Stämpfli, Martin R

    2009-01-01

    The impact of cigarette smoke on allergic asthma remains controversial both clinically and experimentally. The objective of this study was to investigate, in a murine model, how cigarette smoke affects immune inflammatory processes elicited by a surrogate allergen. In our experimental design, mice were concurrently exposed to cigarette smoke and ovalbumin (OVA), an innocuous antigen that, unless introduced in the context of an adjuvant, induces inhalation tolerance. We show that cigarette smoke exposure has adjuvant properties, allowing for allergic mucosal sensitization to OVA. Specifically, concurrent exposure to cigarette smoke and OVA for 2 weeks led to airway eosinophilia and goblet cell hyperplasia. In vivo OVA recall challenge 1 month after the last smoke exposure showed that concurrent exposure to OVA and cigarette smoke induced antigen-specific memory. Robust eosinophilia and OVA-specific IgG1 and IgE characterized the ensuing inflammatory response. Mechanistically, allergic sensitization was, in part, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) dependent, as a significant reduction in BAL eosinophilia was observed in mice treated with an anti-GM-CSF antibody. Of note, continuous smoke exposure attenuated the OVA recall response; decreased airway eosinophilia was observed in mice continuously exposed to cigarette smoke compared with mice that ceased the smoke exposure protocol. In conclusion, we demonstrate experimentally that while cigarette smoke acts as an adjuvant allowing for allergic sensitization, it also attenuates the ensuing eosinophilic inflammatory response. PMID:18635815

  18. NKp46 regulates allergic responses

    PubMed Central

    Ghadially, Hormas; Horani, Amjad; Glasner, Ariella; Elboim, Moran; Gazit, Roi; Shoseyov, David; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic cells that are able to rapidly kill viruses, tumor cells, parasites, bacteria, and even cells considered “self”. The activity of NK cells is controlled by a fine balance of inhibitory and activating signals mediated by a complex set of different receptors. However, the function of NK cells is not restricted only to the killing of target cells, NK cells also possess other properties such as the secretion of proangiogenic factors during pregnancy. Here, we demonstrate another unique NK-cell activity, namely the regulation of T-cell mediated allergic responses, which is dependent on the NK-cell specific receptor NKp46 (Ncr1 in mice). Using mice in which the Ncr1 gene has been replaced with a green fluorescent protein, we demonstrate reduced delayed-type hypersensitivity and airway hypersensitivity. Interestingly, we show that this reduction in airway hypersensitivity is due to differences in the stimulation of T cells resulting in an altered cytokine profile. PMID:23878025

  19. NKp46 regulates allergic responses.

    PubMed

    Ghadially, Hormas; Horani, Amjad; Glasner, Ariella; Elboim, Moran; Gazit, Roi; Shoseyov, David; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2013-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic cells that are able to rapidly kill viruses, tumor cells, parasites, bacteria, and even cells considered "self". The activity of NK cells is controlled by a fine balance of inhibitory and activating signals mediated by a complex set of different receptors. However, the function of NK cells is not restricted only to the killing of target cells, NK cells also possess other properties such as the secretion of proangiogenic factors during pregnancy. Here, we demonstrate another unique NK-cell activity, namely the regulation of T-cell mediated allergic responses, which is dependent on the NK-cell specific receptor NKp46 (Ncr1 in mice). Using mice in which the Ncr1 gene has been replaced with a green fluorescent protein, we demonstrate reduced delayed-type hypersensitivity and airway hypersensitivity. Interestingly, we show that this reduction in airway hypersensitivity is due to differences in the stimulation of T cells resulting in an altered cytokine profile. PMID:23878025

  20. Quercetin and Its Anti-Allergic Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Mlcek, Jiri; Jurikova, Tunde; Skrovankova, Sona; Sochor, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin is the great representative of polyphenols, flavonoids subgroup, flavonols. Its main natural sources in foods are vegetables such as onions, the most studied quercetin containing foods, and broccoli; fruits (apples, berry crops, and grapes); some herbs; tea; and wine. Quercetin is known for its antioxidant activity in radical scavenging and anti-allergic properties characterized by stimulation of immune system, antiviral activity, inhibition of histamine release, decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokines, leukotrienes creation, and suppresses interleukin IL-4 production. It can improve the Th1/Th2 balance, and restrain antigen-specific IgE antibody formation. It is also effective in the inhibition of enzymes such as lipoxygenase, eosinophil and peroxidase and the suppression of inflammatory mediators. All mentioned mechanisms of action contribute to the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties of quercetin that can be effectively utilized in treatment of late-phase, and late-late-phase bronchial asthma responses, allergic rhinitis and restricted peanut-induced anaphylactic reactions. Plant extract of quercetin is the main ingredient of many potential anti-allergic drugs, supplements and enriched products, which is more competent in inhibiting of IL-8 than cromolyn (anti-allergic drug disodium cromoglycate) and suppresses IL-6 and cytosolic calcium level increase. PMID:27187333

  1. Chemokines and their receptors in the allergic airway inflammatory process.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, Juan Raymundo; Teran, Luis Manuel

    2011-08-01

    The development of the allergic airway disease conveys several cell types, such as T-cells, eosinophils, mast cells, and dendritic cells, which act in a special and temporal synchronization. Cellular mobilization and its complex interactions are coordinated by a broad range of bioactive mediators known as chemokines. These molecules are an increasing family of small proteins with common structural motifs and play an important role in the recruitment and cell activation of both leukocytes and resident cells at the allergic inflammatory site via their receptors. Trafficking and recruitment of cell populations with specific chemokines receptors assure the presence of reactive allergen-specific T-cells in the lung, and therefore the establishment of an allergic inflammatory process. Different approaches directed against chemokines receptors have been developed during the last decades with promising therapeutic results in the treatment of asthma. In this review we explore the role of the chemokines and chemokine receptors in allergy and asthma and discuss their potential as targets for therapy. PMID:20352527

  2. Evaluation of allergic response using dynamic thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, E.; Rok, T.; Tatoń, G.

    2015-03-01

    Skin dynamic termography supplemented by a mathematical model is presented as an objective and sensitive indicator of the skin prick test result. Termographic measurements were performed simultaneously with routine skin prick tests. The IR images were acquired every 70 s up to 910 s after skin prick. In the model histamine is treated as the principal mediator of the allergic reaction. Histamine produces vasolidation and the engorged vessels are responsible for an increase in skin temperature. The model parameters were determined by fitting the analytical solutions to the spatio-temporal distributions of the differences between measured and baseline temperatures. The model reproduces experimental data very well (coefficient of determination = 0.805÷0.995). The method offers a set of parameters to describe separately skin allergic reaction and skin reactivity. The release of histamine after allergen injection is the best indicator of allergic response. The diagnostic parameter better correlates with the standard evaluation of a skin prick test (correlation coefficient = 0.98) than the result of the thermographic planimetric method based on temperature and heated area determination (0.81). The high sensitivity of the method allows for determination of the allergic response in patients with the reduced skin reactivity.

  3. FoxO1 regulates allergic asthmatic inflammation through regulating polarization of the macrophage inflammatory phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Tae Jin; Reader, Brenda F.; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Yong Gyu; Park, Gye Young; Karpurapu, Manjula; Ballinger, Megan N.; Qian, Feng; Rusu, Luiza; Chung, Hae Young; Unterman, Terry G.; Croce, Carlo M.; Christman, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory monocyte and tissue macrophages influence the initiation, progression, and resolution of type 2 immune responses, and alveolar macrophages are the most prevalent immune-effector cells in the lung. While we were characterizing the M1- or M2-like macrophages in type 2 allergic inflammation, we discovered that FoxO1 is highly expressed in alternatively activated macrophages. Although several studies have been focused on the fundamental role of FoxOs in hematopoietic and immune cells, the exact role that FoxO1 plays in allergic asthmatic inflammation in activated macrophages has not been investigated. Growing evidences indicate that FoxO1 acts as an upstream regulator of IRF4 and could have a role in a specific inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Therefore, we hypothesized that IRF4 expression regulated by FoxO1 in alveolar macrophages is required for established type 2 immune mediates allergic lung inflammation. Our data indicate that targeted deletion of FoxO1 using FoxO1-selective inhibitor AS1842856 and genetic ablation of FoxO1 in macrophages significantly decreases IRF4 and various M2 macrophage-associated genes, suggesting a mechanism that involves FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in alveolar macrophages that works to polarize macrophages toward established type 2 immune responses. In response to the challenge of DRA (dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus) allergens, macrophage specific FoxO1 overexpression is associated with an accentuation of asthmatic lung inflammation, whereas pharmacologic inhibition of FoxO1 by AS1842856 attenuates the development of asthmatic lung inflammation. Thus, our study identifies a role for FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in the development of alternatively activated alveolar macrophages that contribute to type 2 allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27007158

  4. DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC ASTHMA RESPONSES TO PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    Indoor mold has been associated with development of allergic asthma. Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and its viable conidia can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. The hypothesis o...

  5. Neuroimmune semaphorin 4A downregulates the severity of allergic response.

    PubMed

    Nkyimbeng-Takwi, E H; Shanks, K; Smith, E; Iyer, A; Lipsky, M M; Detolla, L J; Kikutani, H; Keegan, A D; Chapoval, S P

    2012-07-01

    To define the role of semaphorin 4A (Sema4A) in allergic response, we employed Sema4A⁻/⁻ and wild-type (WT) mice in the experimental model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic airway inflammation. We observed a selective increase in eosinophilic airway infiltration accompanied by bronchial epithelial cell hyperplasia in allergen-treated Sema4A⁻/⁻ mice relative to WT mice. This enhanced inflammatory response was associated with a selective increase in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) interleukin 13 (IL-13) content, augmented airway hyperreactivity, and lower regulatory T cell (Treg) numbers. In vivo allergen-primed Sema4A⁻/⁻ CD4+ T cells were more effective in transferring T helper type 2 (Th2) response to naive mice as compared with WT CD4+ T cells. T-cell proliferation and IL-13 productions in OVA₃₂₃₋₃₃₉-restimulated Sema4A⁻/⁻ cell cultures were upregulated. Generated bone marrow chimeras showed an equal importance of both lung-resident cell and inflammatory cell Sema4A expression in optimal disease regulation. These data provide a new insight into Sema4A biology and define Sema4A as an important regulator of Th2-driven lung pathophysiology. PMID:22472774

  6. Additional evidence for the anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic properties of the sesquiterpene polygodial.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, F M; Fröde, T S; Mendes, G L; Malheiros, A; Cechinel Filho, V; Yunes, R A; Calixto, J B

    2001-11-30

    This study evaluates further the anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic properties of polygodial, a sesquiterpene extracted from the barks plant Drymis winteri (Winteraceae). Polygodial (12.8-128.1 micromol/kg, i.p.) 30 min prior, inhibited significantly the mouse paw oedema induced by prostaglandin E2, bradykinin (BK) substance P (SP), dextran, platelet activating factor (PAF) or carrageenan. Polygodial also inhibited arachidonic acid-, capsaicin- and croton oil-induced ear oedema in mice. Polygodial (42.7 micromol/kg, i.p.), significantly inhibited both exudation and cell influx when assessed in the pleurisy induced by SP and histamine, and to a less extent the inflammatory response caused by carrageenan, PAF, BK and des-Arg9-BK. Finally, polygodial (4.2-42.7 micromol/kg, i.p.) produced dose-related inhibition of paw oedema induced by ovalbumin, protecting in a time-dependent manner the anaphylactic shock induced by endovenous administration of ovalbumin in animals which had been actively sensitised by this antigen. These and our previous results indicate that the major component present in the bark of the plant D. winteri, the sesquiterpene polygodial exerts an interesting anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic properties when assessed in rats and mice. PMID:11787941

  7. Innate Immune Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials During Allergic Airway Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipkowski, Kelly Anne

    disease would modulate the innate immune response to MWCNTs. We hypothesized that Th2 cytokines and the allergic asthmatic microenvironment would alter MWCNT-induced inflammasome activation and IL- 1beta secretion both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were differentiated into macrophages and exposed to MWCNTs and or recombinant Th2 cytokines, specifically IL-4 and/or IL-13. Exposure of THP-1 cells to MWCNTs alone caused dose-dependent secretion of IL-1beta, while co-exposure to IL-4 and/or IL-13 suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Further analysis determined that IL-4 and IL-13 were phosphorylating the protein signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) and subsequently inhibiting inflammasome activation and function through suppression of caspase-1, a cysteine protease responsible for cleavage of pro-IL-1beta into an active, secretable form. In vivo, wild-type C57BL6 mice were sensitized intranasally with HDM allergen and exposed to MWCNTs via oropharyngeal aspiration. Treatment with MWCNTs alone induced secretion of IL-1beta in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) one day post-exposure, while sensitization with HDM prior to MWCNT exposure suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of lung sections from exposed animals showed that HDM sensitization inhibited MWCNT-induced pro-casapse-1 protein expression, responsible for inflammasome activation, in the airway epithelium and macrophages. MWCNT exposure combined with HDM sensitization increased inflammatory cell infiltration and subsequent acute lung inflammation and chronic fibrosis. Analysis of the systemic effects of MWCNT exposure during allergic airway sensitization showed that MWCNTs and/or HDM allergen upregulated STAT3 mRNA expression in the lungs, liver, and spleen of exposed animals, and at the same induced mixed T helper (Th) responses in the different tissues. Collectively, these data suggest that the allergic microenvironment

  8. Emerging Antigens Involved in Allergic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Platts-Mills, Thomas A.E.; Commins, Scott P.

    2013-01-01

    New allergic diseases can “emerge” because of exposure to a novel antigen, because the immune responsiveness of the subject changes, or because of a change in the behavior of the population. Novel antigens have entered the environment as new pests in the home (e.g., Asian lady beetle or stink bugs), in the diet (e.g., prebiotics or wheat isolates), or because of the spread of a biting arthropod (e.g., ticks). Over the last few years, a significant new disease has been identified, which has changed the paradigm for food allergy. Bites of the tick, Amblyomma americanum, are capable of inducing IgE antibodies to galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose, which is associated with two novel forms of anaphylaxis. In a large area of the southeastern United States, the disease of delayed anaphylaxis to mammalian meat is now common. This disease challenges many previous rules about food allergy and provides a striking model of an emerging allergic disease. PMID:24095162

  9. Non-pulmonary allergic diseases and inflammatory bowel disease: A qualitative review

    PubMed Central

    Kotlyar, David S; Shum, Mili; Hsieh, Jennifer; Blonski, Wojciech; Greenwald, David A

    2014-01-01

    While the etiological underpinnings of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are highly complex, it has been noted that both clinical and pathophysiological similarities exist between IBD and both asthma and non-pulmonary allergic phenomena. In this review, several key points on common biomarkers, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations and nutritional and probiotic interventions for both IBD and non-pulmonary allergic diseases are discussed. Histamine and mast cell activity show common behaviors in both IBD and in certain allergic disorders. IgE also represents a key immunoglobulin involved in both IBD and in certain allergic pathologies, though these links require further study. Probiotics remain a critically important intervention for both IBD subtypes as well as multiple allergic phenomena. Linked clinical phenomena, especially sinonasal disease and IBD, are discussed. In addition, nutritional interventions remain an underutilized and promising therapy for modification of both allergic disorders and IBD. Recommending new mothers breastfeed their infants, and increasing the duration of breastfeeding may also help prevent both IBD and allergic diseases, but requires more investigation. While much remains to be discovered, it is clear that non-pulmonary allergic phenomena are connected to IBD in a myriad number of ways and that the discovery of common immunological pathways may usher in an era of vastly improved treatments for patients. PMID:25170192

  10. Maternal Influences over Offspring Allergic Responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Asthma occurs as a result of complex interactions of environmental and genetic factors. Clinical studies and animal models of asthma indicate offspring of allergic mothers have increased risk of development of allergies. Environmental factors including stress-induced corticosterone and vitamin E isoforms during pregnancy regulate the risk for offspring development of allergy. In this review, we discuss mechanisms for the development of allergic disease early in life, environmental factors that may impact the development of risk for allergic disease early in life, and how the variation in global prevalence of asthma may be explained, at least in part, by some environmental components. PMID:25612797

  11. Lipopolysaccharide exposure makes allergic airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness less responsive to dexamethasone and inhibition of iNOS.

    PubMed

    Komlósi, Z I; Pozsonyi, E; Tábi, T; Szöko, E; Nagy, A; Bartos, B; Kozma, G T; Tamási, L; Orosz, M; Magyar, P; Losonczy, G

    2006-07-01

    Allergic airway disease can be refractory to anti-inflammatory treatment, whose cause is unclarified. Therefore, in the present experiment, we have tested the hypothesis that co-exposure to lipopolysacharide (Lps) and allergen results in glucocorticoid-resistant eosinophil airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness (AHR). Ovalbumin (Ova)-sensitized BALB/c mice were primed with 10 microg intranasal Lps 24 h before the start of Ova challenges (20 min on 3 consecutive days). Dexamethasone (5 mg/kg/day) was given on the last 2 days of Ova challenges. AHR, cellular build-up, cytokine and nitrite concentrations of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung histology were examined. To assess the role of iNOS-derived NO in airway responsiveness, mice were treated with a selective inhibitor of this enzyme (1400W) 2 h before AHR measurements. More severe eosinophil inflammation and higher nitrite formation were found in Lps-primed than in non-primed allergized mice. After Lps priming, AHR and concentrations of T-helper type 2 cytokines in BALF were decreased, but still remained significantly higher than in controls. Eosinophil inflammation was partially, while nitrite production and AHR were observed to be largely dexamethasone resistant in Lps-primed allergized animals. 1400W effectively and rapidly diminished the AHR in Ova-sensitized and challenged mice, but failed to affect it after Lps priming plus allergization. In conclusion, Lps inhalation may exaggerate eosinophil inflammation and reduce responsiveness to anti-inflammatory treatment in allergic airway disease. PMID:16839411

  12. Anti-allergic inflammatory effects of cyanogenic and phenolic glycosides from the seed of Prunus persica.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geum Jin; Choi, Hyun Gyu; Kim, Ji Hyang; Kim, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Seung Ho

    2013-12-01

    A methanol extract of the seed of Prunus persica (Rosaceae) was found to inhibit histamine release in human mast cells. Activity-guided fractionation of the methanol extract yielded three cyanogenic glycosides (1-3) and other phenolic compounds (4-8). To evaluate their anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory activities, the isolates (1-8) were tested for their inhibitory effects on histamine release and on the gene expressions of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 in human mast cells. Of these, phenolic glycosides 7 and 8 suppressed histamine release and inhibited the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-6. These results suggest that isolates from P. persica are among the anti-allergic inflammatory principles in this medicinal plant. PMID:24555287

  13. Non-Anticoagulant Fractions of Enoxaparin Suppress Inflammatory Cytokine Release from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Allergic Asthmatic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Horne, James; Zaidi, Syed Tabish R.; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh; Peterson, Gregory M.; Korner, Heinrich; Patel, Rahul P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Enoxaparin, a low-molecular-weight heparin, is known to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, its clinical exploitation as an anti-inflammatory agent is hampered by its anticoagulant effect and the associated risk of bleeding. Objective The aim of the current study was to examine the ability of non-anticoagulant fractions of enoxaparin to inhibit the release of key inflammatory cytokines in primed peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from allergic mild asthmatics. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from allergic asthmatics were activated with phytohaemag glutinin (PHA), concanavalin-A (ConA) or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in the presence or absence of enoxaparin fractions before cytokine levels were quantified using specific cytokine bead arrays. Together with nuclear magnetic resonance analysis,time-dependent and target-specific effects of enoxaparin fractions were used to elucidate structural determinants for their anti-inflammatory effect and gain mechanistic insights into their anti-inflammatory activity. Results Two non-anticoagulant fractions of enoxaparin were identified that significantly inhibited T-cell activation. A disaccharide fraction of enoxaparin inhibited the release of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and TNF-α by more than 57% while a tetrasaccharide fraction was found to inhibit the release of tested cytokines by more than 68%. Our data suggest that the observed response is likely to be due to an interaction of 6-O-sulfated tetrasaccharide with cellular receptor(s). Conclusion and Clinical Relevance The two identified anti-inflammatory fractions lacked anticoagulant activity and are therefore not associated with risk of bleeding. The findings highlight the potential therapeutic use of enoxaparin-derived fractions, in particular tetrasaccharide, in patients with chronic inflammatory disorders. PMID:26046354

  14. Innate Immune Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials During Allergic Airway Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipkowski, Kelly Anne

    disease would modulate the innate immune response to MWCNTs. We hypothesized that Th2 cytokines and the allergic asthmatic microenvironment would alter MWCNT-induced inflammasome activation and IL- 1beta secretion both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were differentiated into macrophages and exposed to MWCNTs and or recombinant Th2 cytokines, specifically IL-4 and/or IL-13. Exposure of THP-1 cells to MWCNTs alone caused dose-dependent secretion of IL-1beta, while co-exposure to IL-4 and/or IL-13 suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Further analysis determined that IL-4 and IL-13 were phosphorylating the protein signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) and subsequently inhibiting inflammasome activation and function through suppression of caspase-1, a cysteine protease responsible for cleavage of pro-IL-1beta into an active, secretable form. In vivo, wild-type C57BL6 mice were sensitized intranasally with HDM allergen and exposed to MWCNTs via oropharyngeal aspiration. Treatment with MWCNTs alone induced secretion of IL-1beta in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) one day post-exposure, while sensitization with HDM prior to MWCNT exposure suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of lung sections from exposed animals showed that HDM sensitization inhibited MWCNT-induced pro-casapse-1 protein expression, responsible for inflammasome activation, in the airway epithelium and macrophages. MWCNT exposure combined with HDM sensitization increased inflammatory cell infiltration and subsequent acute lung inflammation and chronic fibrosis. Analysis of the systemic effects of MWCNT exposure during allergic airway sensitization showed that MWCNTs and/or HDM allergen upregulated STAT3 mRNA expression in the lungs, liver, and spleen of exposed animals, and at the same induced mixed T helper (Th) responses in the different tissues. Collectively, these data suggest that the allergic microenvironment

  15. TRPA1 controls inflammation and pruritogen responses in allergic contact dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Boyi; Escalera, Jasmine; Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Fan, Lu; Caceres, Ana I.; Robinson, Eve; Sui, Aiwei; McKay, M. Craig; McAlexander, M. Allen; Herrick, Christina A.; Jordt, Sven E.

    2013-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a common skin disease associated with inflammation and persistent pruritus. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels in skin-innervating sensory neurons mediate acute inflammatory and pruritic responses following exogenous stimulation and may contribute to allergic responses. Genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of TRPA1, but not TRPV1, inhibited skin edema, keratinocyte hyperplasia, nerve growth, leukocyte infiltration, and antihistamine-resistant scratching behavior in mice exposed to the haptens, oxazolone and urushiol, the contact allergen of poison ivy. Hapten-challenged skin of TRPA1-deficient mice contained diminished levels of inflammatory cytokines, nerve growth factor, and endogenous pruritogens, such as substance P (SP) and serotonin. TRPA1-deficient sensory neurons were defective in SP signaling, and SP-induced scratching behavior was abolished in Trpa1−/− mice. SP receptor antagonists, such as aprepitant inhibited both hapten-induced cutaneous inflammation and scratching behavior. These findings support a central role for TRPA1 and SP in the integration of immune and neuronal mechanisms leading to chronic inflammatory responses and pruritus associated with contact dermatitis.—Liu, B., Escalera, J., Balakrishna, S., Fan, L., Caceres, A. I., Robinson, E., Sui, A., McKay, M. C., McAlexander, M. A., Herrick, C. A., Jordt, S. E. TRPA1 controls inflammation and pruritogen responses in allergic contact dermatitis. PMID:23722916

  16. Respiratory syncytial virus replication is prolonged by a concomitant allergic response

    PubMed Central

    Hassantoufighi, A; Oglesbee, M; Richter, B W M; Prince, G A; Hemming, V; Niewiesk, S; Eichelberger, M C

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show an association between early exposure to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and the development or exacerbation of asthma. This idea is supported by studies in mice that demonstrate worsened airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) when RSV-infected animals are exposed to allergen. The effect of allergen on RSV disease, however, has not been reported. Cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) that have been used as a model to study RSV pathogenesis were sensitized to extracts of Aspergillus fumigatus (Af), a common household mould. The allergic response to Af included eosinophilia, formation of granulomas and induction of Th2 type cytokines. RSV infection prior to allergen challenge resulted in exacerbation of the inflammatory response as well as increased airway responsiveness to methacholine. The exacerbated response was indeed dependent on virus replication. Virus replication in turn was influenced by the allergic response, with persistence in the noses for 2 days longer in animals challenged with allergen. This diminished clearance corresponded to decreased induction of mRNA for IFN-γ, a Th1-type cytokine that is characteristic of viral infection. Treatment of RSV-infected Af-challenged animals with recombinant IFN-γ reduced the allergic inflammatory response as well as the relative levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokine mRNA. However, this treatment did not reduce airway reactivity, showing that these pathologic and physiologic measures of exacerbated disease are independent. We speculate that the reciprocal effect of the allergic response on viral immunity may benefit the host by limiting exacerbation of physiologic responses that are IFN-γ-dependent. PMID:17335559

  17. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; de Carvalho, Katharinne Ingrid Moraes; da Silva Mendes, Diego; Melo, Christianne Bandeira; Martins, Marco Aurélio; da Silva Dias, Celidarque; Piuvezam, Márcia Regina; Bozza, Patrícia T

    2013-11-15

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca(++) influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. PMID:23994558

  18. Allergic Contact Dermatitis: A Model of Inflammatory Itch and Pain in Human and Mouse.

    PubMed

    LaMotte, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of published observations from our laboratory on the psychophysics and neurobiology of the persistent itch and pain of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). ACD is a clinically significant problem with many features characteristic of other pruritic disorders. Our approach was to produce ACD experimentally in humans and in the mouse. The goal was to use the mouse as an animal model for investigating the peripheral neural mechanisms of itch and pain of ACD in humans. Humans and mice were each sensitized by cutaneous topical application of squaric acid dibutyl ester, a hapten not encountered in the environment. Subsequent challenge at another cutaneous site produced local inflammation ("ACD") with humans reporting persistent itch (lasting up to a week) and mice exhibiting persistent itch- and pain-like behaviors directed toward the ACD site. Enhanced mechanically evoked itch and pain in surrounding skin in humans were reversibly blocked by numbing the ACD site with cold, suggesting dependence on ongoing activity from the site. In mice, in vivo recordings revealed spontaneous activity in a subset of pruriceptive, mechanoheat-sensitive nociceptors with unmyelinated axons innervating the ACD site. These and a larger subpopulation of acutely dissociated small-diameter neurons innervating the ACD site exhibited an upregulation of the receptor CXCR3 and excitatory responses to one of its ligands, the chemokine CXCL10 (IP-10) that contributes to the pathogenesis of ACD. Preliminary findings point to possible therapeutic targets that could be investigated in inflammatory itch disorders in humans. PMID:26900060

  19. Treatment of allergic asthma: Modulation of Th2 cells and their responses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Atopic asthma is a chronic inflammatory pulmonary disease characterised by recurrent episodes of wheezy, laboured breathing with an underlying Th2 cell-mediated inflammatory response in the airways. It is currently treated and, more or less, controlled depending on severity, with bronchodilators e.g. long-acting beta agonists and long-acting muscarinic antagonists or anti-inflammatory drugs such as corticosteroids (inhaled or oral), leukotriene modifiers, theophyline and anti-IgE therapy. Unfortunately, none of these treatments are curative and some asthmatic patients do not respond to intense anti-inflammatory therapies. Additionally, the use of long-term oral steroids has many undesired side effects. For this reason, novel and more effective drugs are needed. In this review, we focus on the CD4+ Th2 cells and their products as targets for the development of new drugs to add to the current armamentarium as adjuncts or as potential stand-alone treatments for allergic asthma. We argue that in early disease, the reduction or elimination of allergen-specific Th2 cells will reduce the consequences of repeated allergic inflammatory responses such as lung remodelling without causing generalised immunosuppression. PMID:21867534

  20. Hormonal control of inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Farsky, Sandra P.

    1993-01-01

    Almost any stage of inflammatory and immunological responses is affected by hormone actions. This provides the basis for the suggestion that hormones act as modulators of the host reaction against trauma and infection. Specific hormone receptors are detected in the reactive structures in inflamed areas and binding of hormone molecules to such receptors results in the generation of signals that influence cell functions relevant for the development of inflammatory responses. Diversity of hormonal functions accounts for recognized pro- and anti-inflammatory effects exerted by these substances. Most hormone systems are capable of influencing inflammatory events. Insulin and glucocorticoids, however, exert direct regulatory effects at concentrations usually found in plasma. Insulin is endowed with facilitatory actions on vascular reactivity to inflammatory mediators and inflammatory cell functions. Increased concentrations of circulating glucocorticoids at the early stages of inflammation results in downregulation of inflammatory responses. Oestrogens markedly reduce the response to injury in a variety of experimental models. Glucagon and thyroid hormones exert indirect anti-inflammatory effects mediated by the activity of the adrenal cortex. Accordingly, inflammation is not only merely a local response, but a hormone-controlled process. PMID:18475521

  1. Food-induced (allergic) arthritis. Inflammatory arthritis exacerbated by milk.

    PubMed

    Panush, R S; Stroud, R M; Webster, E M

    1986-02-01

    Suggestive, but largely unproven, observations have associated arthritis with environmental antigens, including foods. We studied a patient with inflammatory arthritis in a prospective, "blinded," controlled fashion to determine whether her symptoms were associated with food sensitivities. This 52-year-old white woman with 11 years of class I, stage I, active disease, had symptomatic exacerbations allegedly associated with meat, milk, and beans. We observed an increase in symptoms following an unblinded food challenge and then studied her in our clinical research unit. On her normal diet for 6 days, she averaged 30 minutes of morning stiffness, 9 tender joints, 3 swollen joints, 87% subjective assessment (100% = best possible), and 89% examiner assessment. While she was fasting (3 days) or taking Vivonex (2 days), we noted no morning stiffness, tender joint score of 1, swollen joint score of 0, and assessments of 100% (P less than 0.05 versus normal diet). She was then nourished with Vivonex for 33 days without difficulty and challenged in a blinded fashion at mealtimes with lyophilized foods placed into opaque capsules. Four milk challenges (equivalent to greater than or equal to 8 ounces per meal) produced up to 30 minutes of morning stiffness, 14 tender joints, 4 swollen joints, subjective assessment of 85%, and objective assessment of 80% (P less than 0.05 versus fasting-Vivonex), peaking 24-48 hours postchallenge. Placebo and other foods (lettuce and carrots) were without effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3513771

  2. Allergen-encoded signals that control allergic responses

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Hui-Ying; Landers, Cameron; Li, Evan; Porter, Paul; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose is to review the important recent advances made in how innate immune cells, microbes, and the environment contribute to the expression of allergic disease, emphasizing the allergen-related signals that drive allergic responses. Recent findings The last few years have seen crucial advances in how innate immune cells such as innate lymphoid cells group 2 and airway epithelial cells and related molecular pathways through organismal proteinases and innate immune cytokines, such as thymic stromal lymphopoietin, IL-25, and IL-33 contribute to allergy and asthma. Simultaneously with these advances, important progress has been made in our understanding of how the environment, and especially pathogenic organisms, such as bacteria, viruses, helminths, and especially fungi derived from the natural and built environments, either promote or inhibit allergic inflammation and disease. Of specific interest are how lipopolysaccharide mediates its antiallergic effect through the ubiquitin modifying factor A20 and the antiallergic activity of both helminths and protozoa. Summary Innate immune cells and molecular pathways, often activated by allergen-derived proteinases acting on airway epithelium and macrophages as well as additional unknown factors, are essential to the expression of allergic inflammation and disease. These findings suggest numerous future research opportunities and new opportunities for therapeutic intervention in allergic disease. PMID:26658015

  3. Zinc oxide nanoparticles, a novel candidate for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ho; Seo, Jun-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2014-09-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential trace metal for eukaryotes. The roles of Zn in the numerous physiological functions have been elucidated. Bamboo salt contains Zn that was shown to have anti-inflammatory effect and other health benefits. Nanoparticles of various types have found application in the biology, medicine, and physics. Here we synthesized tetrapod-like, zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZO-NP; diameter 200 nm, source of Zn) using a radio frequency thermal plasma system and investigated its effects on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammatory reactions. ZO-NP was found to inhibit the productions and mRNA expressions of inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α on the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus A23187 (PMACI)-stimulated human mast cell line, HMC-1 cells. In these stimulated cells, caspase-1 and nuclear factor-κB activations were abolished by ZO-NP, and the expressions of receptor interacting protein2 (RIP2) and IκB kinaseβ (IKKβ) induced by PAMCI were reduced. On the other hand, ZO-NP alone increased the expressions of RIP2 and IKKβ in normal condition. ZO-NP inhibited the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase in the PMACI-stimulated HMC-1 cells. Furthermore, ZO-NP significantly inhibited passive cutaneous anaphylaxis activated by anti-dinitrophenyl IgE. These findings indicate that ZO-NP effectively ameliorates mast cell-mediated allergic inflammatory reaction, and suggest that ZO-NP be considered a potential therapeutic for the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. PMID:24877691

  4. Impact on allergic immune response after treatment with vitamin A

    PubMed Central

    Matheu, Victor; Berggård, Karin; Barrios, Yvelise; Barrios, Ysamar; Arnau, Maria-Rosa; Zubeldia, Jose M; Baeza, Maria L; Back, Ove; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh

    2009-01-01

    Background Vitamin A may have some influence on the immune system, but the role in allergy modulation is still unclear. Objective To clarify whether high levels of retinoic acid (RA) affects allergic response in vivo, we used a murine experimental model of airway allergic disease. Methods Ovalbumin (OVA)-immunization/OVA-challenge (OVA/OVA) and house dust mite (HDM)-immunization/HDM-challenge (HDM/HDM) experimental murine models of allergic airway disease, using C57Bl.10/Q groups of mice (n = 10) treated subcutaneously with different concentrations of all-trans RA (0, 50, 500 and 2,500 ug) every 2-days were used to assess the allergic immune response. Results Levels of total and specific-IgE in sera were increased in all groups of RA treated OVA/OVA and HDM/HDM mice. Percentage and total amount of recruited eosinophil in airways by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were significantly enhanced in groups treated with 50, 500 and 2,500 ug of RA compared to non-treated mice. However, the group of mice treated with 2,500 ug had less eosinophil recruitment than the other two groups (50 and 500 ug). In parallel, levels of IL-5 and total IgE in BALF were also significantly diminished in the group treated with 2,500 ug compared to the other 2 groups (50 and 500 ug). Finally, total lung resistance was decreased in group treated with 2,500 ug compared to non-treated mice. Conclusion Our results suggest that retinoic acid directly enhances allergic response in vivo, but in higher doses may produce of immune suppression. PMID:19852821

  5. TRPA1 controls inflammation and pruritogen responses in allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boyi; Escalera, Jasmine; Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Fan, Lu; Caceres, Ana I; Robinson, Eve; Sui, Aiwei; McKay, M Craig; McAlexander, M Allen; Herrick, Christina A; Jordt, Sven E

    2013-09-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a common skin disease associated with inflammation and persistent pruritus. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels in skin-innervating sensory neurons mediate acute inflammatory and pruritic responses following exogenous stimulation and may contribute to allergic responses. Genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of TRPA1, but not TRPV1, inhibited skin edema, keratinocyte hyperplasia, nerve growth, leukocyte infiltration, and antihistamine-resistant scratching behavior in mice exposed to the haptens, oxazolone and urushiol, the contact allergen of poison ivy. Hapten-challenged skin of TRPA1-deficient mice contained diminished levels of inflammatory cytokines, nerve growth factor, and endogenous pruritogens, such as substance P (SP) and serotonin. TRPA1-deficient sensory neurons were defective in SP signaling, and SP-induced scratching behavior was abolished in Trpa1(-/-) mice. SP receptor antagonists, such as aprepitant inhibited both hapten-induced cutaneous inflammation and scratching behavior. These findings support a central role for TRPA1 and SP in the integration of immune and neuronal mechanisms leading to chronic inflammatory responses and pruritus associated with contact dermatitis. PMID:23722916

  6. NEUROTROPHIN MEDIATION OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS RESPONSES TO INHALED DIESEL PARTICLES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) partially mediate many features of allergic airways disease including airway hyper-responsiveness. Diesel exhaust particulates (DEP) associated with the combustion of diesel fuel exacerbate many of these allergic airways respons...

  7. Residual oil fly ash amplifies allergic cytokines, airway responsiveness, and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gavett, S H; Madison, S L; Stevens, M A; Costa, D L

    1999-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) air pollution may increase symptom severity in allergic asthmatics. To examine possible interaction, or greater than additive responses, between PM effects and allergic responses, an ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged (OVA) mouse model of allergic airways disease was utilized. After challenge, mice were intratracheally instilled with saline vehicle or 3 mg/kg (approximately 60 microg) residual oil fly ash (ROFA), a transition metal-rich emission source PM sample. Physiological and inflammatory responses were examined 1, 3, 8, and 15 d later. In response to intravenously administered methacholine, ROFA increased total respiratory system resistance and decreased compliance 1 d after exposure, whereas effects of OVA lasted at least 15 d after exposure. Significant interactions between OVA and ROFA were mainly observed 8 d after challenge and exposure, especially with respect to compliance. A strong interaction (p < 0.01) between OVA and ROFA exposure resulted in 8-fold (1 d) and 3-fold (3 d) increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid eosinophil numbers. A similarly strong interaction (8-fold) was observed in BAL fluid interleukin-4 (IL-4) 1 d after challenge and exposure. Significant though less strong interactions were also found with respect to IL-4 and IL-5 by 3 d postchallenge/exposure. This study shows that allergen challenge and exposure to emission source particulate matter containing relatively high levels of transitions metals can interact to increase Th2 cytokine production, eosinophil recruitment, and airway hyperresponsiveness in previously sensitized mice. PMID:10588603

  8. [Comparative study of homeopathic remedies clinical efficacy in comprehensive treatment of inflammatory periodontal diseases in patients with burdened allergic status].

    PubMed

    Grudianov, A I; Bezrukova, I V; Aleksandrovskaia, I Iu

    2006-01-01

    Comparative analysis of clinical efficacy of 3 antihomotoxic homeopathic preparations (Traumeel S, Engistol and Echinacea compositum S) with non-specific immunostimulating and anti-inflammatory effects was performed. The study showed that Traumeel S had maximal anti-inflammatory effect. In proportion as destructive process weighting the efficacy of homeopathic preparations was decreased. The preparations are indicated for comprehensive treatment of inflammatory periodontal diseases in patients with burdened allergic status or heavy concomitant pathology. PMID:16710274

  9. Contribution of endothelial selectins and alpha 4 integrins to eosinophil trafficking in allergic and nonallergic inflammatory reactions in skin.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, M M; Hellewell, P G

    1998-09-01

    The role of endothelial selectins in mediating eosinophil recruitment was assessed using the trafficking of 111In-labeled blood eosinophils in mouse skin. An intradermal injection of chemoattractants (leukotriene B4, macrophage inflammatory protein-l alpha, and eotaxin) resulted in a rapid accumulation of 111In eosinophils that was reduced 49 to 91% by anti-P-selectin mAb. An anti-E-selectin mAb was ineffective, although a combined E- and P-selectin blockade resulted in >95% inhibition of all responses. The accumulation of a pulse of 111In eosinophils at sites of active cutaneous anaphylaxis (ACA) at 4 to 8 h and at 20 to 24 h after Ag challenge was completely dependent upon E- and P-selectin in combination, but not in isolation. In contrast, at 20 to 24 h after Ag challenge in a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction in skin, 111In eosinophil accumulation was largely independent of endothelial selectins, even when L-selectin was also blocked. An anti-alpha 4 integrin mAb significantly reduced 111In eosinophil trafficking in both allergic reactions but was slightly more effective in the DTH reaction compared with the ACA reaction. These results show that P-selectin and to a lesser extent E-selectin mediate eosinophil recruitment in skin in acute inflammatory reactions. In allergic, late-onset inflammatory reactions, neither P- nor E-selectin alone are sufficient to mediate eosinophil accumulation; when combined, they are essential for trafficking in ACA but are less important in the DTH reaction. Whether alpha 4 integrin-based strategies will be more effective than selectin-based strategies at inhibiting eosinophil recruitment in human disease remains to be determined. PMID:9725251

  10. Anti-allergic Inflammatory Triterpenoids Isolated from the Spikes of Prunella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Choia, Hyun Gyu; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jeong Ah

    2016-01-01

    Twelve known triterpenoids (1-12) and two steroids (13 and 14) have been isolated from the spike of the plant Prunella vulgaris. Among them, 2α,3α,23-trihydroxyursa-12,20(30)-dien-28-oic acid (10) was isolated for the first time from this plant. All isolates were evaluated for their inhibitory effect on the gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), and release of histamine in human mast cells. β-Amyrin (5), 10, and euscaphic acid (12) showed suppression of histamine release with percentage inhibitions of 46.7, 57.9, and 54.2%, respectively. In addition, 5 and 10 showed strong inhibition of TNF-α and IL-6 in the test for pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that compounds 5 and 10 largely contribute to the anti-allergic inflammatory effect of P. vulgaris. PMID:26996013

  11. Induction of Allergic Responses to Peanut Allergen in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Van Gramberg, Jenna L.; de Veer, Michael J.; O'Hehir, Robyn E.; Meeusen, Els N. T.; Bischof, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Peanut allergy is the leading cause of deaths due to food-induced anaphylaxis but despite continued research, there are currently no specific treatments available. Challenge testing is limited in patients due to the high risk of adverse reactions, emphasising the need for an appropriate animal model. In the present study we examine the induction of allergic responses in a sheep model for peanut allergy. Sheep were sensitised with peanut (PN) extract and in separate injections with ovalbumin (OVA) or house dust mite (HDM) extract. Serum PN-specific IgE responses were detected in 40–50% of immunised sheep, while only 10% (1 of 10 sheep) showed detectable OVA-specific IgE. All PN-allergic sheep tested showed an Ara h 1-specific IgE response, while four out of five allergic sheep showed an Ara h 2-specific IgE response. Animals with high serum IgE levels to HDM were also PN IgE-positive. Of the PN-sensitised animals with high PN-specific IgE, 80% also showed an immediate hypersensitivity reaction following an intradermal PN injection. This new large animal model of peanut allergy may provide a useful tool for future investigations of allergen-associated immune mechanisms and specific immunotherapy. PMID:23284686

  12. A GM-CSF/IL-33 pathway facilitates allergic airway responses to sub-threshold house dust mite exposure.

    PubMed

    Llop-Guevara, Alba; Chu, Derek K; Walker, Tina D; Goncharova, Susanna; Fattouh, Ramzi; Silver, Jonathan S; Moore, Cheryl Lynn; Xie, Juliana L; O'Byrne, Paul M; Coyle, Anthony J; Kolbeck, Roland; Humbles, Alison A; Stämpfli, Martin R; Jordana, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic immune-inflammatory disease of the airways. Despite aeroallergen exposure being universal, allergic asthma affects only a fraction of individuals. This is likely related, at least in part, to the extent of allergen exposure. Regarding house dust mite (HDM), we previously identified the threshold required to elicit allergic responses in BALB/c mice. Here, we investigated the impact of an initial immune perturbation on the response to sub-threshold HDM exposure. We show that transient GM-CSF expression in the lung facilitated robust eosinophilic inflammation, long-lasting antigen-specific Th2 responses, mucus production and airway hyperresponsiveness. This was associated with increased IL-33 levels and activated CD11b(+) DCs expressing OX40L. GM-CSF-driven allergic responses were significantly blunted in IL-33-deficient mice. IL-33 was localized on alveolar type II cells and in vitro stimulation of human epithelial cells with GM-CSF enhanced intracellular IL-33 independently of IL-1α. Likewise, GM-CSF administration in vivo resulted in increased levels of IL-33 but not IL-1α. These findings suggest that exposures to environmental agents associated with GM-CSF production, including airway infections and pollutants, may decrease the threshold of allergen responsiveness and, hence, increase the susceptibility to develop allergic asthma through a GM-CSF/IL-33/OX40L pathway. PMID:24551140

  13. A GM-CSF/IL-33 Pathway Facilitates Allergic Airway Responses to Sub-Threshold House Dust Mite Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Llop-Guevara, Alba; Chu, Derek K.; Walker, Tina D.; Goncharova, Susanna; Fattouh, Ramzi; Silver, Jonathan S.; Moore, Cheryl Lynn; Xie, Juliana L.; O’Byrne, Paul M.; Coyle, Anthony J.; Kolbeck, Roland; Humbles, Alison A.; Stämpfli, Martin R.; Jordana, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic immune-inflammatory disease of the airways. Despite aeroallergen exposure being universal, allergic asthma affects only a fraction of individuals. This is likely related, at least in part, to the extent of allergen exposure. Regarding house dust mite (HDM), we previously identified the threshold required to elicit allergic responses in BALB/c mice. Here, we investigated the impact of an initial immune perturbation on the response to sub-threshold HDM exposure. We show that transient GM-CSF expression in the lung facilitated robust eosinophilic inflammation, long-lasting antigen-specific Th2 responses, mucus production and airway hyperresponsiveness. This was associated with increased IL-33 levels and activated CD11b+ DCs expressing OX40L. GM-CSF-driven allergic responses were significantly blunted in IL-33-deficient mice. IL-33 was localized on alveolar type II cells and in vitro stimulation of human epithelial cells with GM-CSF enhanced intracellular IL-33 independently of IL-1α. Likewise, GM-CSF administration in vivo resulted in increased levels of IL-33 but not IL-1α. These findings suggest that exposures to environmental agents associated with GM-CSF production, including airway infections and pollutants, may decrease the threshold of allergen responsiveness and, hence, increase the susceptibility to develop allergic asthma through a GM-CSF/IL-33/OX40L pathway. PMID:24551140

  14. Allergic inflammation--innately homeostatic.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Laurence E; Locksley, Richard M

    2015-03-01

    Allergic inflammation is associated closely with parasite infection but also asthma and other common allergic diseases. Despite the engagement of similar immunologic pathways, parasitized individuals often show no outward manifestations of allergic disease. In this perspective, we present the thesis that allergic inflammatory responses play a primary role in regulating circadian and environmental inputs involved with tissue homeostasis and metabolic needs. Parasites feed into these pathways and thus engage allergic inflammation to sustain aspects of the parasitic life cycle. In response to parasite infection, an adaptive and regulated immune response is layered on the host effector response, but in the setting of allergy, the effector response remains unregulated, thus leading to the cardinal features of disease. Further understanding of the homeostatic pressures driving allergic inflammation holds promise to further our understanding of human health and the treatment of these common afflictions. PMID:25414367

  15. Kissing reduces allergic skin wheal responses and plasma neurotrophin levels.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Hajime

    2003-11-01

    The effect of kissing on allergen-induced skin wheal responses and plasma neurotrophin levels were studied in 30 normal subjects, 30 patients with allergic rhinitis (AR), and 30 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). All of the patients with AR or AD are allergic to house dust mite (HDM) and Japanese cedar pollen (JCP). They are all Japanese and they do not kiss habitually. The subject kissed freely during 30 min with their lover or spouse alone in a room with closed doors while listening to soft music. Before and after kissing, skin prick tests were performed using commercial HDM allergen, JCP allergen, as well as histamine and control solution, and wheal responses were measured. Simultaneously, plasma levels of neurotrophin, including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and -4 (NT-4) were measured. Kissing significantly reduced wheal responses induced by HDM and JCP, but not by histamine, and decreased plasma levels of NGF, BDNF, NT-3, and NT-4 in patients with AR or AD, while it failed to do so in normal subjects. These finding indicate that kissing have some implication in the study of neuroimmunology in allergic patients. PMID:14637240

  16. Enhanced allergic responsiveness after early childhood infection with respiratory viruses: Are long-lived alternatively activated macrophages the missing link?

    PubMed

    Keegan, Achsah D; Shirey, Kari Ann; Bagdure, Dayanand; Blanco, Jorge; Viscardi, Rose M; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2016-07-01

    Early childhood infection with respiratory viruses, including human rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza, is associated with an increased risk of allergic asthma and severe exacerbation of ongoing disease. Despite the long recognition of this relationship, the mechanism linking viral infection and later susceptibility to allergic lung inflammation is still poorly understood. We discuss the literature and provide new evidence demonstrating that these viruses induce the alternative activation of macrophages. Alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) induced by RSV or influenza infection persisted in the lungs of mice up to 90 days after initial viral infection. Several studies suggest that AAM contribute to allergic inflammatory responses, although their mechanism of action is unclear. In this commentary, we propose that virus-induced AAM provide a link between viral infection and enhanced responses to inhaled allergens. PMID:27178560

  17. Molecular cues guiding inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Olga; Martín, Pilar; González-Amaro, Roberto; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Alarm signals generated at inflammatory foci reach the vascular lumen to attract immune cells towards the affected tissue. Different leucocyte subsets decipher and integrate these complex signals in order to make adequate decisions for their migration towards the inflamed tissue. Soluble cues (cytokines and chemokines) and membrane receptors in both endothelium and leucocytes orchestrate the coordinated recruitment of specific inflammatory cell subsets. All these molecules are spatio-temporally organized in specialized structures at the luminal side of endothelium and the leucocyte membrane or are generated as chemical gradients in the damaged tissue. Thus, the repertoire of chemokines and their receptors as well as adhesion molecules expressed by each leucocyte subset determine their recruitment for participation in specific inflammatory pathologies. Whenever inflammatory signals are altered or misprocessed, inflammation can become chronic, causing extensive tissue damage. To combat chronic inflammation and autoimmune diseases, novel therapeutic strategies attempt to silence the predominant signals in each inflammatory scenario. In this review, we provide a general overview of all these aspects related to the molecular regulation of leucocyte guidance in inflammatory responses. PMID:20053659

  18. DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC RESPONSES TO AN EXTRACT OF PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM IN BAL/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor mold has been associated with the development of allergic asthma. Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. Our hypothesis is that soluble components of ...

  19. DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC RESPONSES TO AN EXTRACT OF PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM IN BALB/MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor mold has been associated with the development of allergic asthma. Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. Our hypothesis is that soluble components of ...

  20. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; Moraes de Carvalho, Katharinne Ingrid; Silva Mendes, Diego da; Melo, Christianne Bandeira; Martins, Marco Aurélio; Silva Dias, Celidarque da; Piuvezam, Márcia Regina; and others

    2013-11-15

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca{sup ++} influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. - Highlights: • Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Chondrodendron platyphyllum. • Curine inhibits eosinophil influx and activation and airway hyper-responsiveness. • Curine

  1. Inflammatory response and extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph; Van Aken, Hugo; Zarbock, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    Patients undergoing cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation (EC) frequently develop a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Surgical trauma, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, endotoxaemia and blood contact to nonendothelial circuit compounds promote the activation of coagulation pathways, complement factors and a cellular immune response. This review discusses the multiple pathways leading to endothelial cell activation, neutrophil recruitment and production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. All these factors may induce cellular damage and subsequent organ injury. Multiple organ dysfunction after cardiac surgery with EC is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality. In addition to the pathogenesis of organ dysfunction after EC, this review deals with different therapeutic interventions aiming to alleviate the inflammatory response and consequently multiple organ dysfunction after cardiac surgery. PMID:26060024

  2. Effect of ozone inhalation on the response to nasal challenge with antigen of allergic subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Bascom, R.; Naclerio, R.M.; Fitzgerald, T.K.; Kagey-Sobotka, A.; Proud, D. )

    1990-09-01

    The effect of oxidant inhalation on allergic illness is of interest because allergic patients often report increased respiratory symptoms during episodes of poor air quality, and epidemiologic studies demonstrate an association between increased levels of the air pollutant ozone and exacerbations of asthma. The purpose of this study was to characterize the upper respiratory response to ozone inhalation in asymptomatic, allergic subjects and to determine whether ozone pre-exposure increased the acute response to nasal challenge with antigen in these subjects. A group of 12 asymptomatic subjects with a history of allergic rhinitis were exposed in a randomized, cross-over design, at rest, on each of 2 days, separated by 2 wk, to 4 h of clean air or 0.5 ppm ozone in an environmental chamber. Following the exposure period, subjects underwent nasal challenge with four doses of antigen (1 to 1,000 PNU ragweed or grass). Symptoms were rated and nasal lavage performed after each dose. Measurement of histamine and albumin concentration and TAME-esterase activity and determination of cell counts and differentials were performed. Exposure to ozone caused significant increases in upper and lower respiratory symptoms, a mixed inflammatory cell influx with a sevenfold increase in naval lavage neutrophils, a 20-fold increase in eosinophils, and a tenfold increase in mononuclear cells, as well as an apparent sloughing of epithelial cells. There was a significant increase in nasal lavage albumin concentration on the ozone exposure day and a small increase in nasal lavage histamine concentration on both the ozone and clean air exposure days. TAME-esterase activity showed no significant increase overall, but increased at least twofold in 5 of 12 subjects.

  3. Role of breast regression protein-39/YKL-40 in asthma and allergic responses

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Jack A

    2010-01-01

    BRP-39 and its human homolog YKL-40 have been regarded as a prototype of chitinase-like proteins (CLP) in mammals. Exaggerated levels of YKL-40 protein and/or mRNA have been noted in a number of diseases characterized by inflammation, tissue remodeling, and aberrant cell growth. Asthma is an inflammatory disease characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. Recently, the novel regulatory role of BRP-39/YKL-40 in the pathogenesis of asthma has been demonstrated both in human studies and allergic animal models. The levels of YKL-40 are increased in the circulation and lungs from asthmatics where they correlate with disease severity, and CHI3L1 polymorphisms correlate with serum YKL-40 levels, asthma and abnormal lung function. Animal studies using BRP-39 null mutant mice demonstrated that BRP-39 was required for optimal allergen sensitization and Th2 inflammation. These studies suggest the potential use of BRP-39 as a biomarker as well as a therapeutic target for asthma and other allergic diseases. Here, we present an overview of chitin/chitinase biology and summarize recent findings on the role of BRP-39 in the pathogenesis of asthma and allergic responses. PMID:20224674

  4. Blunted HPA axis responsiveness to stress in atopic patients is associated with the acuity and severeness of allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Buske-Kirschbaum, A; Ebrecht, M; Hellhammer, D H

    2010-11-01

    Previously we could demonstrate attenuated responsiveness of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to stress in patients with chronic allergic inflammatory disease (i.e., atopic dermatitis, allergic asthma). The present study was designed to investigate HPA axis function in an acute manifestation of allergy. Patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR; n = 20) and non-atopic controls (n = 20) were exposed to a standardized laboratory stressor ('Trier Social Stress Test'; TSST). Cortisol responses to the TSST and cortisol awakening responses (CAR) were measured in SAR subjects while suffering from acute symptoms of SAR (pollen season), and during a non-active state of their disease (pollen-free season). To assess the acuity and severity of SAR, eosinophil and basophil numbers and SAR symptomatology were determined. Non-allergic control subjects were examined at identical times during the year. To control for possible sequence effects, a cross-over design was used. SAR patients showed significantly increased symptom severity (t = 9.4; p<.001) as well as eosinophil (F(1,31) = 9.8; p<.01) and basophil (F(1,38) = 6.4; p<.05) numbers during the pollen season when compared to a pollen-free period. When exposed to the TSST, significantly attenuated cortisol responses were found in SAR subjects during acute manifestation of the disease (pollen season) when compared to the pollen-free season (F(16,456) = 1.65; p<.05). In SAR patients, there was a significant negative correlation between symptom severity and the cortisol response to the stressor (r = .53; p<.05). No significant between-group or between-condition differences with respect to the CAR could be determined (all p>.05). These findings support previous data of attenuated HPA axis responsiveness to stress in atopic conditions and further, suggest that HPA axis hyporesponsiveness in atopy may be linked to the severity of the allergic inflammatory process. PMID:20633637

  5. Role of Rho kinase isoforms in murine allergic airway responses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, M; Liu, P-Y; Kasahara, D I; Williams, A S; Verbout, N G; Halayko, A J; Fedulov, A; Shoji, T; Williams, E S; Noma, K; Shore, S A; Liao, J K

    2011-10-01

    Inhibition of Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinases (ROCKs) reduces allergic airway responses in mice. The purpose of this study was to determine the roles of the two ROCK isoforms, ROCK1 and ROCK2, in these responses. Wildtype (WT) mice and heterozygous ROCK1 and ROCK2 knockout mice (ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-), respectively) were sensitised and challenged with ovalbumin. ROCK expression and activation were assessed by western blotting. Airway responsiveness was measured by forced oscillation. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and the lungs were fixed for histological assessment. Compared with WT mice, ROCK1 and ROCK2 expression were 50% lower in lungs of ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-) mice, respectively, without changes in the other isoform. In WT lungs, ROCK activation increased after ovalbumin challenge and was sustained for several hours. This activation was reduced in ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-) lungs. Airway responsiveness was comparable in WT, ROCK1(+/-), and ROCK2(+/-) mice challenged with PBS. Ovalbumin challenge caused airway hyperresponsiveness in WT, but not ROCK1(+/-) or ROCK2(+/-) mice. Lavage eosinophils and goblet cell hyperplasia were significantly reduced in ovalbumin-challenged ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-) versus WT mice. Ovalbumin-induced changes in lavage interleukin-13, interleukin-5 and lymphocytes were also reduced in ROCK1(+/-) mice. In conclusion, both ROCK1 and ROCK2 are important in regulating allergic airway responses. PMID:21565918

  6. Vcsa1 gene peptides for the treatment of inflammatory and allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Morris, Katherine; Kuo, Byron; Wilkinson, Mark D; Davison, Joseph S; Befus, A Dean; Mathison, Ronald D

    2007-06-01

    The recently emerged Vcsa1 gene is one member of the variable coding sequence (VCS) multigene family of Rattus norvegicus. This gene encodes the precursor prohormone SMR1 (submandibular rat-1), which on enzymatic processing gives rise to several 5 to 11 amino acid peptides that modulate a variety of physiological functions. The analgesic pentapeptide sialorphin and anti-inflammatory heptapeptide submandibular gland peptide-T (TDIFEGG) are the most intensively studied. Although the Vcsa1 gene and its protein product are unique to rats, TDIFEGG or a derivative acts on all species examined to date, including human cells, in functions related to allergic reactions and inflammation. In this review, the patent and academic literature on SMR1 and its natural peptides and their derivatives are reviewed for consideration of biological targets and relevance to the development of novel therapeutic agents. The VCS gene family is discussed and we speculate on possible human homologs of these potent anti-inflammatory rat-derived peptides. The biologically active peptide products of SMR1 are considered and the mechanism of action and structure-activity relationships of the anti-inflammatory submandibular gland peptide-T and its derivatives are discussed. PMID:19075974

  7. Recent Patents and Emerging Therapeutics in the Treatment of Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Gyan P.; Tamboli, Viral; Jwala, Jwala; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2011-01-01

    Ocular allergy is an inflammatory response of the conjunctival mucosa that also affects the cornea and eyelids. Allergic conjunctivitis includes seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (SAC), perennial allergic conjunctivitis (PAC), vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC), atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) and giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC). In general, allergic conditions involve mast cell degranulation that leads to release of inflammatory mediators and activation of enzymatic cascades generating pro-inflammatory mediators. In chronic ocular inflammatory disorders associated with mast cell activation such as VKC and AKC constant inflammatory response is observed due to predominance of inflammatory mediators such as eosinophils and Th2-generated cytokines. Antihistamines, mast-cell stabilizers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, corticosteroids and immunomodulatory agents are commonly indicated for the treatment of acute and chronic allergic conjunctivitis. In recent years newer drug molecules have been introduced in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis. This article reviews recent patents and emerging therapeutics in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:21171952

  8. Nitration of β-Lactoglobulin but Not of Ovomucoid Enhances Anaphylactic Responses in Food Allergic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Diesner, Susanne C.; Schultz, Cornelia; Ackaert, Chloé; Oostingh, Gertie J.; Ondracek, Anna; Stremnitzer, Caroline; Singer, Josef; Heiden, Denise; Roth-Walter, Franziska; Fazekas, Judit; Assmann, Vera E.; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Stutz, Hanno; Duschl, Albert; Untersmayr, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Background We revealed in previous studies that nitration of food proteins reduces the risk of de novo sensitization in a murine food allergy model. In contrast, in situations with preformed specific IgE antibodies, in vitro experiments suggested an increased capacity of effector cell activation by nitrated food proteins. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of protein nitration on the effector phase of food allergy. Design BALB/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally (i.p.) with the milk allergen β-lactoglobulin (BLG) or the egg allergen ovomucoid (OVM), followed by intragastric (i.g.) gavages to induce a strong local inflammatory response and allergen-specific antibodies. Subsequently, naïve and allergic mice were intravenously (i.v.) challenged with untreated, sham-nitrated or nitrated BLG or OVM. Anaphylaxis was monitored by measuring core body temperature and determination of mouse mast cell protease-1 (mMCP-1) levels in blood. Results A significant drop of body temperature accompanied with significantly elevated concentrations of the anaphylaxis marker mMCP-1 were only observed in BLG allergic animals challenged with nitrated BLG and not in OVM allergic mice challenged with nitrated OVM. SDS-PAGE and circular dichroism analysis of the differentially modified allergens revealed an effect of nitration on the secondary protein structure exclusively for BLG together with enhanced protein aggregation. Conclusion Our data suggest that nitration affects differently the food allergens BLG and OVM. In the case of BLG, structural changes favored dimerization possibly explaining the increased anaphylactic reactivity in BLG allergic animals. PMID:25955653

  9. The Inhibitory Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation in IgE-Mediated Allergic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seon Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Kim, Cha Soon; Lee, In Kyung; Kim, Ji Young

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has different biological effects according to dose and dose rate. In particular, the biological effect of low-dose radiation is unclear. Low-dose whole-body gamma irradiation activates immune responses in several ways. However, the effects and mechanism of low-dose radiation on allergic responses remain poorly understood. Previously, we reported that low-dose ionizing radiation inhibits mediator release in IgE-mediated RBL-2H3 mast cell activation. In this study, to have any physiological relevance, we investigated whether low-dose radiation inhibits allergic responses in activated human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6) and LAD2 cells), mouse models of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and the late-phase cutaneous response. High-dose radiation induced cell death, but low-dose ionizing radiation of <0.5 Gy did not induce mast cell death. Low-dose ionizing radiation that did not induce cell death significantly suppressed mediator release from human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6) and LAD2 cells) that were activated by antigen-antibody reaction. To determine the inhibitory mechanism of mediator released by low-dose ionizing radiation, we examined the phosphorylation of intracellular signaling molecules such as Lyn, Syk, phospholipase Cγ, and protein kinase C, as well as the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). The phosphorylation of signaling molecules and [Ca2+]i following stimulation of FcεRI receptors was inhibited by low dose ionizing radiation. In agreement with its in vitro effect, ionizing radiation also significantly inhibited inflammatory cells infiltration, cytokine mRNA expression (TNF-α, IL-4, IL-13), and symptoms of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction and the late-phase cutaneous response in anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-sensitized mice. These results indicate that ionizing radiation inhibits both mast cell-mediated immediate- and delayed-type allergic reactions in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26317642

  10. The Inhibitory Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation in IgE-Mediated Allergic Responses.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hae Mi; Kang, Su Jin; Nam, Seon Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Kim, Cha Soon; Lee, In Kyung; Kim, Ji Young

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has different biological effects according to dose and dose rate. In particular, the biological effect of low-dose radiation is unclear. Low-dose whole-body gamma irradiation activates immune responses in several ways. However, the effects and mechanism of low-dose radiation on allergic responses remain poorly understood. Previously, we reported that low-dose ionizing radiation inhibits mediator release in IgE-mediated RBL-2H3 mast cell activation. In this study, to have any physiological relevance, we investigated whether low-dose radiation inhibits allergic responses in activated human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6) and LAD2 cells), mouse models of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and the late-phase cutaneous response. High-dose radiation induced cell death, but low-dose ionizing radiation of <0.5 Gy did not induce mast cell death. Low-dose ionizing radiation that did not induce cell death significantly suppressed mediator release from human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6) and LAD2 cells) that were activated by antigen-antibody reaction. To determine the inhibitory mechanism of mediator released by low-dose ionizing radiation, we examined the phosphorylation of intracellular signaling molecules such as Lyn, Syk, phospholipase Cγ, and protein kinase C, as well as the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). The phosphorylation of signaling molecules and [Ca2+]i following stimulation of FcεRI receptors was inhibited by low dose ionizing radiation. In agreement with its in vitro effect, ionizing radiation also significantly inhibited inflammatory cells infiltration, cytokine mRNA expression (TNF-α, IL-4, IL-13), and symptoms of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction and the late-phase cutaneous response in anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-sensitized mice. These results indicate that ionizing radiation inhibits both mast cell-mediated immediate- and delayed-type allergic reactions in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26317642

  11. Cleavage of fibrinogen by proteinases elicits allergic responses through Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Millien, Valentine Ongeri; Lu, Wen; Shaw, Joanne; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Mak, Garbo; Roberts, Luz; Song, Li-Zhen; Knight, J Morgan; Creighton, Chad J; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B

    2013-08-16

    Proteinases and the innate immune receptor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are essential for expression of allergic inflammation and diseases such as asthma. A mechanism that links these inflammatory mediators is essential for explaining the fundamental basis of allergic disease but has been elusive. Here, we demonstrate that TLR4 is activated by airway proteinase activity to initiate both allergic airway disease and antifungal immunity. These outcomes were induced by proteinase cleavage of the clotting protein fibrinogen, yielding fibrinogen cleavage products that acted as TLR4 ligands on airway epithelial cells and macrophages. Thus, allergic airway inflammation represents an antifungal defensive strategy that is driven by fibrinogen cleavage and TLR4 activation. These findings clarify the molecular basis of allergic disease and suggest new therapeutic strategies. PMID:23950537

  12. AN EXTRACT OF PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM INDUCES DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC ASTHMA RESPONSES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. Our hypothesis is that soluble components of P. chrysogenum (PCE) can dose-dependently induce responses typ...

  13. Mosla dianthera inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic reactions through the inhibition of histamine release and inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Hee; Kim, Sang-Hyun . E-mail: shkim72@knu.ac.kr; Eun, Jae-Soon; Shin, Tae-Yong . E-mail: tyshin@woosuk.ac.kr

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the aqueous extract of Mosla dianthera (Maxim.) (AEMD) on the mast cell-mediated allergy model and studied the possible mechanism of action. Mast cell-mediated allergic disease is involved in many diseases such as asthma, sinusitis and rheumatoid arthritis. The discovery of drugs for the treatment of allergic disease is an important subject in human health. AEMD inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic reactions in mice. AEMD decreased immunoglobulin E-mediated local allergic reactions, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. AEMD attenuated intracellular calcium level and release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80. Furthermore, AEMD attenuated the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated TNF-{alpha}, IL-8 and IL-6 secretion in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of AEMD on the pro-inflammatory cytokines was nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) dependent. AEMD decreased PMA and A23187-induced degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. Our findings provide evidence that AEMD inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and NF-{kappa}B in these effects.

  14. Food and Natural Materials Target Mechanisms to Effectively Regulate Allergic Responses.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee Soon; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    An immune hypersensitivity disorder called allergy is caused by diverse allergens entering the body via skin contact, injection, ingestion, and/or inhalation. These allergic responses may develop into allergic disorders, including inflammations such as atopic dermatitis, asthma, anaphylaxis, food allergies, and allergic rhinitis. Several drugs have been developed to treat these allergic disorders; however, long-term intake of these drugs could have adverse effects. As an alternative to these medicines, food and natural materials that ameliorate allergic disorder symptoms without producing any side effects can be consumed. Food and natural materials can effectively regulate successive allergic responses in an allergic chain-reaction mechanism in the following ways: [1] Inhibition of allergen permeation via paracellular diffusion into epithelial cells, [2] suppression of type 2 T-helper (Th) cell-related cytokine production by regulating Th1/Th2 balance, [3] inhibition of pathogenic effector CD4(+) T cell differentiation by inducing regulatory T cells (Treg), and [4] inhibition of degranulation in mast cells. The immunomodulatory effects of food and natural materials on each target mechanism were scientifically verified and shown to alleviate allergic disorder symptoms. Furthermore, consumption of certain food and natural materials such as fenugreek, skullcap, chitin/chitosan, and cheonggukjang as anti-allergics have merits such as safety (no adverse side effects), multiple suppressive effects (as a mixture would contain various components that are active against allergic responses), and ease of consumption when required. These merits and anti-allergic properties of food and natural materials help control various allergic disorders. PMID:26598817

  15. The immunomodulatory actions of prostaglandin E2 on allergic airway responses in the rat.

    PubMed

    Martin, James G; Suzuki, Masaru; Maghni, Karim; Pantano, Rosa; Ramos-Barbón, David; Ihaku, Daizo; Nantel, François; Denis, Danielle; Hamid, Qutayba; Powell, William S

    2002-10-01

    PGE(2) has been reported to inhibit allergen-induced airway responses in sensitized human subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of anti-inflammatory actions of PGE(2) in an animal model of allergic asthma. BN rats were sensitized to OVA using Bordetella pertussis as an adjuvant. One week later, an aerosol of OVA was administered. After a further week, animals were anesthetized with urethan, intubated, and subjected to measurements of pulmonary resistance (R(L)) for a period of 8 h after OVA challenge. PGE(2) (1 and 3 micro g in 100 micro l of saline) was administered by insufflation intratracheally 30 min before OVA challenge. The early response was inhibited by PGE(2) (3 micro g). The late response was inhibited by both PGE(2) (1 and 3 micro g). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from OVA-challenged rats showed eosinophilia and an increase in the number of cells expressing IL-4 and IL-5 mRNA. These responses were inhibited by PGE(2). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid levels of cysteinyl-leukotrienes were elevated after OVA challenge and were reduced after PGE(2) to levels comparable with those of sham challenged animals. We conclude that PGE(2) is a potent anti-inflammatory agent that may act by reducing allergen-induced Th2 cell activation and cysteinyl-leukotriene synthesis in the rat. PMID:12244197

  16. NEUROTROPHIN RECEPTOR BLOCKADE ATTENUATES DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICULATE MATTER (DEP) ENHANCEMENT OF ALLERGIC RESPONSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY:
    Recent investigations have linked neurotrophins including NGF, NT-3, and BDNF to allergic airways diseases. Antibody blockade of NGF attenuates airway resistance associated with allergic airway responses in mice. Mice administered an antibody against the low aff...

  17. METALS, PARTICLES AND IMPACT UPON PULMONARY ALLERGIC RESPONSES

    EPA Science Inventory


    The increase in allergic asthma over the past few decades has prompted investigations into whether air pollution may affect either the incidence or severity of allergic lung disease. Population studies have demonstrated that as air pollution rises, symptoms, medication use a...

  18. CARMA1 is necessary for optimal T cell responses in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Ramadas, Ravisankar A; Roche, Marly I; Moon, James J; Ludwig, Thomas; Xavier, Ramnik J; Medoff, Benjamin D

    2011-12-15

    CARMA1 is a lymphocyte-specific scaffold protein necessary for T cell activation. Deletion of CARMA1 prevents the development of allergic airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma due to a defect in naive T cell activation. However, it is unknown if CARMA1 is important for effector and memory T cell responses after the initial establishment of inflammation, findings that would be more relevant to asthma therapies targeted to CARMA1. In the current study, we sought to elucidate the role of CARMA1 in T cells that have been previously activated. Using mice in which floxed CARMA1 exons can be selectively deleted in T cells by OX40-driven Cre recombinase (OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F)), we report that CD4(+) T cells from these mice have impaired T cell reactivation responses and NF-κB signaling in vitro. Furthermore, in an in vivo recall model of allergic airway inflammation that is dependent on memory T cell function, OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F) mice have attenuated eosinophilic airway inflammation, T cell activation, and Th2 cytokine production. Using MHC class II tetramers, we demonstrate that the development and maintenance of Ag-specific memory T cells is not affected in OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F) mice. In addition, adoptive transfer of Th2-polarized OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F) Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells into wild-type mice induces markedly less airway inflammation in response to Ag challenge than transfer of wild-type Th2 cells. These data demonstrate a novel role for CARMA1 in effector and memory T cell responses and suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting CARMA1 could help treat chronic inflammatory disorders such as asthma. PMID:22075698

  19. Calpain activity and expression are increased in splenic inflammatory cells associated with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Shields, D C; Schaecher, K E; Goust, J M; Banik, N L

    1999-09-01

    Since calcium-activated neutral proteinase (calpain) activity and expression are significantly increased in activated glial/inflammatory cells in the central nervous system of animals with autoimmune demyelinating diseases, this enzyme may also play a role in peripheral organ systems in these diseases. In this study, the activity and expression of calpain and the endogenous inhibitor, calpastatin, were evaluated at transcriptional and translational levels in spleens of Lewis rats with acute experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) prior to the onset of clinical symptoms. Calpain activity and translational expression were increased by 475.5% and 44.3% respectively, on day 4 post-induction in adjuvant controls and animals with EAE. These levels remained elevated compared to normal controls on days 8 and 12. Calpastatin translational expression was similarly increased at these time points although transcriptional expression was not significantly altered at any time following induction of EAE. Likewise, transcriptional expression of mu-calpain was unchanged following induction, while small increases in m-calpain transcriptional expression were observed on days 2 and 8. Most calpain expression was observed in activated splenic macrophages at day 8 post-induction even though activated T cells were also calpain positive. In spinal cords of animals with EAE, calpain expression was significantly increased in rats with severe disease compared to those exhibiting only mild symptoms at day 12 post-induction. Thus, prior to symptomatic EAE, increased calpain activity and expression in peripheral lymphoid organs may play an important role in T cell migration and subsequent disease progression. PMID:10496171

  20. Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Role of ChemR23 Signaling in Pollutant-Induced Inflammatory Lung Responses.

    PubMed

    Provoost, Sharen; De Grove, Katrien C; Fraser, Graeme L; Lannoy, Vincent J; Tournoy, Kurt G; Brusselle, Guy G; Maes, Tania; Joos, Guy F

    2016-02-15

    Inhalation of traffic-related particulate matter (e.g., diesel exhaust particles [DEPs]) is associated with acute inflammatory responses in the lung, and it promotes the development and aggravation of allergic airway diseases. We previously demonstrated that exposure to DEP was associated with increased recruitment and maturation of monocytes and conventional dendritic cells (DCs), resulting in TH2 polarization. Monocytes and immature DCs express the G-protein coupled receptor chemR23, which binds the chemoattractant chemerin. Using chemR23 knockout (KO) and corresponding wild-type (WT) mice, we determined the role of chemR23 signaling in response to acute exposure to DEPs and in response to DEP-enhanced house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic airway inflammation. Exposure to DEP alone, as well as combined exposure to DEP plus HDM, elevated the levels of chemerin in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of WT mice. In response to acute exposure to DEPs, monocytes and monocyte-derived DCs accumulated in the lungs of WT mice, but this response was significantly attenuated in chemR23 KO mice. Concomitant exposure to DEP plus HDM resulted in allergic airway inflammation with increased eosinophilia, goblet cell metaplasia, and TH2 cytokine production in WT mice, which was further enhanced in chemR23 KO mice. In conclusion, we demonstrated an opposing role for chemR23 signaling depending on the context of DEP-induced inflammation. The chemR23 axis showed proinflammatory properties in a model of DEP-induced acute lung inflammation, in contrast to anti-inflammatory effects in a model of DEP-enhanced allergic airway inflammation. PMID:26773141

  1. Perilla frutescens Leaf Extract Inhibits Mite Major Allergen Der p 2-induced Gene Expression of Pro-Allergic and Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cell BEAS-2B

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jer-Yuh; Chen, Yi-Ching; Lin, Chun-Hsiang; Kao, Shao-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    Perilla frutescens has been used in traditional medicine for respiratory diseases due to its anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activity. This study aimed to investigate effects of Perilla frutescens leaf extract (PFE) on expression of pro-allergic and pro-inflammatory cytokines in airway epithelial cells exposed to mite major allergen Der p 2 (DP2) and the underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that PFE up to 100 µg/mL had no cytotoxic effect on human bronchial epithelial cell BEAS-2B. Further investigations revealed that PFE dose-dependently diminished mRNA expression of pro-allergic cytokine IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and GM-CSF, as well as pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 in BEAS-2B cells treated with DP2. In parallel to mRNA, the DP-2-elevated levels of the tested cytokines were decreased. Further investigation showed that DP2-indued phosphorylation of p38 MAPK (P38) and JNK, but not Erk1/2, was also suppressed by PFE. In addition, PFE elevated cytosolic IκBα level and decreased nuclear NF-κB level in DP2-stimulated BEAS-2B cells. Taken together, these findings revealed that PFE significantly diminished both mRNA expression and protein levels of pro-allergic and pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to DP2 through inhibition of P38/JNK and NK-κB activation. These findings suggest that PFE should be beneficial to alleviate both allergic and inflammatory responses on airway epithelium in response to aeroallergens. PMID:24204835

  2. Local Immune Responses in Children and Adults with Allergic and Nonallergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hana; Jang, Man-Young; Kim, Kyung Rae; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Cho, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis (AR) is the most common allergic disease but little is known about the difference of local immune responses in children and adults with AR. Objective To compare local immune responses between children and adults with AR and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR), and to investigate whether the association of local and systemic immune responses is different between the two age groups. Methods Fifty-one patients with chronic rhinitis were enrolled and grouped into children (N = 27, mean age 7.2 years) and adults (N = 24, mean age 29.9 years). Diagnosis of AR was based on symptoms, skin prick tests and serum specific IgEs. Nasal lavage (NAL) fluids were collected from all subjects and used to measure the levels of total IgE, specific IgEs to house dust mites (Dp and Df), and cytokines (TNF-α, IL-4, IL-10, IL-17A and IFN-γ). Flow cytometry was used to measure inflammatory cell types in NAL fluids. Results AR had significantly increased local levels of total IgE and specific IgEs to Dp and Df compared with NAR in both age groups (P < 0.05). Nasal eosinophils % (P = 0.01) was significantly increased only in children with AR. Local-systemic correlations of total IgE (r = 0.662, P = 0.000) and eosinophil % (r = 0.461, P = 0.015) between the peripheral blood and NAL fluids were found only in children. Moreover, children had correlations between total IgE and eosinophil % in the peripheral blood (r = 0.629, P = 0.001) and in NAL fluids (r = 0.373, P = 0.061). Conclusion Elevated local IgE is a common feature of AR in children and adults. Local measures in NAR showed naïve state of immune response which disagree with the hypothesis of local allergic rhinitis. Children showed intense local inflammation and close local-systemic interactions compared to adults supporting pediatric AR as a distinct feature. PMID:27281182

  3. Anaphylatoxins coordinate innate and adaptive immune responses in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Schmudde, Inken; Laumonnier, Yves; Köhl, Jörg

    2013-02-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic disease of the airways in which maladaptive Th2 and Th17 immune responses drive airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), eosinophilic and neutrophilic airway inflammation and mucus overproduction. Airway epithelial and pulmonary vascular endothelial cells in concert with different resident and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) play critical roles in allergen sensing and consecutive activation of TH cells and their differentiation toward TH2 and TH17 effector or regulatory T cells (Treg). Further, myeloid-derived regulatory cells (MDRC) act on TH cells and either suppress or enhance their activation. The complement-derived anaphylatoxins (AT) C3a and C5a are generated during initial antigen encounter and regulate the development of maladaptive immunity at allergen sensitization. Here, we will review the complex role of ATs in activation and modulation of different DC populations, MDRCs and CD4⁺ TH cells. We will also discuss the potential impact of ATs on the regulation of the pulmonary stromal compartment as an important means to regulate DC functions. PMID:23694705

  4. Secondary allergic T cell responses are regulated by dendritic cell-derived thrombospondin-1 in the setting of allergic eye disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, R E; Reyes, N J; Khandelwal, P; Schlereth, S L; Lee, H S; Masli, S; Saban, D R

    2016-08-01

    Allergic eye disease, as in most forms of atopy, ranges in severity among individuals from immediate hypersensitivity to a severe and debilitating chronic disease. Dendritic cells play a key role in stimulating pathogenic T cells in allergen re-exposure, or secondary responses. However, molecular cues by dendritic cells underpinning allergic T cell response levels and the impact that this control has on consequent severity of allergic disease are poorly understood. Here, we show that a deficiency in thrombospondin-1, a matricellular protein known to affect immune function, has subsequent effects on downstream T cell responses during allergy, as revealed in an established mouse model of allergic eye disease. More specifically, we demonstrate that a thrombospondin-1 deficiency specific to dendritic cells leads to heightened secondary T cell responses and consequent clinical disease. Interestingly, whereas thrombospondin-1-deficient dendritic cells augmented activity of allergen-primed T cells, this increase was not recapitulated with naïve T cells in vitro. The role of dendritic cell-derived thrombospondin-1 in regulating secondary allergic T cell responses was confirmed in vivo, as local transfer of thrombospondin-1-sufficient dendritic cells to the ocular mucosa of thrombospondin-1 null hosts prevented the development of augmented secondary T cell responses and heightened allergic eye disease clinical responses. Finally, we demonstrate that topical instillation of thrombospondin-1-derived peptide reduces T cell activity and clinical progression of allergic eye disease. Taken together, this study reveals an important modulatory role of dendritic cell-derived thrombospondin-1 on secondary allergic T cell responses and suggests the possible dysregulation of dendritic cell-derived thrombospondin-1 expression as a factor in allergic eye disease severity. PMID:26856994

  5. Immune response phenotype of allergic versus clinically tolerant pigs in a neonatal swine model of allergy.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Julie; Rupa, Prithy; Garvie, Sarah; Wilkie, Bruce

    2013-07-15

    The prevalence of childhood food allergy and the duration of these allergies, particularly those considered to be transient, like egg and milk allergy, are increasing. The identification of allergic individuals using minimally invasive, non-anaphylaxis-threatening methods is therefore of increasing importance. In this experiment, correlates were sought of an allergic immune response (IR) phenotype in pigs. Using pigs pre-treated with heat-killed bacteria or bacterial components before allergic sensitization with the egg white protein ovomucoid (Ovm), differences were determined in IR phenotype of pigs in the categories treated-allergic, treated-tolerant, control-allergic (CA) and control-tolerant. Phenotype was established by measuring immunoglobulin (Ig)-associated antibody activity (AbA), cytokine profiles and the proportion of blood T-regulatory cells (T-regs) and observing late-phase allergen-specific skin tests (ST). Although 100% of pigs became sensitized to Ovm, only 33% of pigs had clinical signs of allergy after oral challenge with egg white. Pigs without clinical signs were classified as clinically tolerant. Sixty-seven percent of allergic pigs had a positive, late-phase ST classified as very strong or strong, while 84% of clinically tolerant pigs did not have late-phase ST. Treated-allergic pigs and CA pigs had greater total antibody IgG (H+L), IgE and IgG1 AbA than clinically tolerant pigs. Cytokine profiles of allergic pigs and the proportion of circulating T-regs, did not differ significantly between allergic and clinically tolerant pigs. Therefore, measurement of allergen-specific IgG, IgG1 and/or IgE activity and evaluation of late-phase ID ST may be useful in identifying allergic IR phenotypes in swine models of food allergy, which may be extended toward human use. PMID:23664639

  6. No Adjuvant Effect of Bacillus thuringiensis-Maize on Allergic Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dekan, Gerhard; Epstein, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) foods are evaluated carefully for their ability to induce allergic disease. However, few studies have tested the capacity of a GM food to act as an adjuvant, i.e. influencing allergic responses to other unrelated allergens at acute onset and in individuals with pre-existing allergy. We sought to evaluate the effect of short-term feeding of GM Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)-maize (MON810) on the initiation and relapse of allergic asthma in mice. BALB/c mice were provided a diet containing 33% GM or non-GM maize for up to 34 days either before ovalbumin (OVA)-induced experimental allergic asthma or disease relapse in mice with pre-existing allergy. We observed that GM-maize feeding did not affect OVA-induced eosinophilic airway and lung inflammation, mucus hypersecretion or OVA-specific antibody production at initiation or relapse of allergic asthma. There was no adjuvant effect upon GM-maize consumption on the onset or severity of allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic asthma. PMID:25084284

  7. Immunological and Inflammatory Responses to Organic Dust in Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Jill A.; Romberger, Debra J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Agriculture represents a major industry worldwide, and despite protection against the development of IgE-mediated diseases, chronic exposure to agriculture-related organic dusts is associated with an increased risk of developing respiratory disease. This article will review the literature regarding new knowledge of important etiologic agents in the dusts and focus on the immunologic responses following acute and repetitive organic dust exposures. Recent findings Although endotoxin remains important, there is an emerging role for non-endotoxin components such as peptidoglycans from Gram-positive bacteria. Pattern recognition receptors including Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TLR2 and intracellular nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors are partially responsible for mediating the inflammatory consequences. Repeated organic dust exposures modulate innate and adaptive immune function with a resultant adaptation-like response. However, repetitive exposures cause lung parenchymal inflammation, chronic disease, and lung function decline over time. Summary The immunological consequences of organic dust exposure in the farming industry are likely explained by the diversity of microbial motifs in dust that can elicit differing innate immune receptor signaling pathways. Whereas initial activation results in a robust inflammatory response, repetitive dust exposures modulate immunity. This can result in low-grade, chronic inflammation and/or protection against allergic disease. PMID:22306554

  8. Divergent effects of urban particulate air pollution on allergic airway responses in experimental asthma: a comparison of field exposure studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increases in ambient particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm (PM2.5) are associated with asthma morbidity and mortality. The overall objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that PM2.5 derived from two distinct urban U.S. communities would induce variable responses to aggravate airway symptoms during experimental asthma. Methods We used a mobile laboratory to conduct community-based inhalation exposures to laboratory rats with ovalbumin-induced allergic airways disease. In Grand Rapids exposures were conducted within 60 m of a major roadway, whereas the Detroit was located in an industrial area more than 400 m from roadways. Immediately after nasal allergen challenge, Brown Norway rats were exposed by whole body inhalation to either concentrated air particles (CAPs) or filtered air for 8 h (7:00 AM - 3:00 PM). Both ambient and concentrated PM2.5 was assessed for mass, size fractionation, and major component analyses, and trace element content. Sixteen hours after exposures, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung lobes were collected and evaluated for airway inflammatory and mucus responses. Results Similar CAPs mass concentrations were generated in Detroit (542 μg/m3) and Grand Rapids (519 μg/m3). Exposure to CAPs at either site had no effects in lungs of non-allergic rats. In contrast, asthmatic rats had 200% increases in airway mucus and had more BALF neutrophils (250% increase), eosinophils (90%), and total protein (300%) compared to controls. Exposure to Detroit CAPs enhanced all allergic inflammatory endpoints by 30-100%, whereas inhalation of Grand Rapids CAPs suppressed all allergic responses by 50%. Detroit CAPs were characterized by high sulfate, smaller sized particles and were derived from local combustion sources. Conversely Grand Rapids CAPs were derived primarily from motor vehicle sources. Conclusions Despite inhalation exposure to the same mass concentration of urban PM2.5, disparate health

  9. A dual role for complement in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Köhl, Jörg; Wills-Karp, Marsha

    2007-06-01

    Complement is an ancient danger-sensor system of innate immunity, providing first-line defence against pathogens. Concordant with its pro-inflammatory properties, complement contributes to airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness and mucus production during the effector phase of allergic asthma. In contrast to these pro-allergic properties, complement can also protect from the development of the maladaptive Th2-biased immune response that drives airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in allergic asthma. As such, selective targeting of pro-allergic complement pathways appears an attractive therapeutic option in allergic asthma. PMID:17475559

  10. Soy Biodiesel Emissions Have Reduced Inflammatory Effects Compared to Diesel Emissions in Healthy and Allergic Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity of exhaust from combustion of petroleum diesel (BO), soy-based biodiesel (B100), or a 20% biodiesel/80% petrodiesel mix (B20) was compared in healthy and house dust mite (HDM)-allergic mice. Fuel emissions were diluted to target fine particulate matter (PM2.5) conrentrat...

  11. Pulmonary Allergic Responses Augment IL-13 Secretion by Circulating Basophils yet Suppress IFN-alpha from Plasmacytoid DCs

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, John T.; Bieneman, Anja P.; Chichester, Kristin L.; Breslin, Linda; Xiao, HuiQing; Liu, Mark C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Allergic inflammatory processes may have the capacity to propagate systemically through the actions of circulating leukocytes. Consequently, basophils from allergic individuals are often “primed”, as evidenced by their hyper-responsiveness in vitro. IFN-α, secreted predominately by plasmacytoid DCs, suppresses basophil priming for IL-13 production in vitro. Objective This study sought in vivo correlates, arising during experimental allergen challenge, that support an “axis-interplay” between basophils and pDCs. Methods Using segmental allergen challenge in the lung, the immune responses of both cell types from blood were investigated in volunteers (n=10) before and 24h after allergen exposure. These responses were then correlated with inflammatory parameters measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Results In blood, segmental allergen challenge significantly augmented IL-13 secretion by basophils induced by IL-3 (p=0.009) yet reduced IFN-α secreted by plasmacytoid dendritic cells stimulated with CpG (p=0.018). Both parameters were negatively correlated (p=0.0015), at least among those subjects secreting the latter. Circulating basophil IL-13 responses further correlated with post-segmental allergen challenge bronchoalveolar lavage parameters including IL-13 protein (p=0.04), basophil (p=0.051), eosinophil (p=0.0018) and total cell counts (p<0.003). Basophil and IL-13 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage likewise correlated (p=0.0002). Conclusions These results support a mechanism of immune regulation whereby allergen reduces innate immune responses and IFN-α production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells, resulting in enhanced inflammation and basophil cytokine production at sites of allergen exposure. PMID:20184608

  12. Inhibition of release of inflammatory mediators in primary and cultured cells by a Chinese herbal medicine formula for allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Lenon, George B; Xue, Charlie CL; Story, David F; Thien, Frank CK; McPhee, Sarah; Li, Chun G

    2007-01-01

    Background We demonstrated that a Chinese herbal formula, which we refer to as RCM-101, developed from a traditional Chinese medicine formula, reduced nasal and non-nasal symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR). The present study in primary and cultured cells was undertaken to investigate the effects of RCM-101 on the production/release of inflammatory mediators known to be involved in SAR. Methods Compound 48/80-induced histamine release was studied in rat peritoneal mast cells. Production of leukotriene B4 induced by the calcium ionophore A23187 was studied in porcine neutrophils using an HPLC assay and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated prostaglandin E2 production was studied in murine macrophage (Raw 264.7) cells by immune-enzyme assay. Expression of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was determined in Raw 264.7 cells, using western blotting techniques. Results RCM-101 (1–100 μg/mL) produced concentration-dependent inhibition of compound 48/80-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated prostaglandin E2 release from Raw 264.7 cells. Over the range 1 – 10 μg/mL, it inhibited A23187-induced leukotriene B4 production in porcine neutrophils. In addition, RCM-101 (100 μg/mL) inhibited the expression of COX-2 protein but did not affect that of COX-1. Conclusion The findings indicate that RCM-101 inhibits the release and/or synthesis of histamine, leukotriene B4 and prostaglandin E2 in cultured cells. These interactions of RCM-101 with multiple inflammatory mediators are likely to be related to its ability to reduce symptoms of allergic rhinitis. PMID:17302969

  13. Lymphocyte responses to food antigens in food sensitive patients with allergic tension-fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kondo, N; Shinoda, S; Agata, H; Nishida, T; Miwa, Y; Fujii, H; Orii, T

    1992-01-01

    Scores of radioallergosorbent test (RAST) for cow's milk or buckwheat flour and proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to bovine serum albumin and beta-lactoglobulin or buckwheat flour were measured in cow's milk or buckwheat flour sensitive patients with allergic tension-fatigue syndrome. In all 3 cow's milk sensitive patients with allergic tension-fatigue syndrome, RAST scores for cow's milk were negative or slightly positive, but PBMCs well responded to bovine serum albumin and beta-lactoglobulin, but not to ovalbumin. In a buckwheat flour sensitive patient with allergic tension-fatigue syndrome, RAST scores for buckwheat flour were negative, but PBMCs well responded to buckwheat flour, but not to ovalbumin, bovine serum albumin and beta-lactoglobulin. Conversely, in cow's milk or buckwheat flour sensitive patients with immediate allergic symptoms, RAST scores for offending foods were positive although PBMCs did not respond to offending food antigens. These results suggest that proliferative responses of PBMCs to food antigens are very useful for detection of offending foods in allergic tension-fatigue syndrome. PMID:1290724

  14. Anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory properties of a potent histamine H1 receptor antagonist, desloratadine citrate disodium injection, and its anti-inflammatory mechanism on EA.hy926 endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jie, Qiong; Kodithuwakku, Nandani Darshika; Yuan, Xin; He, Guangwei; Chen, Meiling; Xu, Shuhong; Wu, Yulin

    2015-05-01

    The present study, demonstrates that, desloratadine citrate disodium injection (DLC) possesses antihistaminic, anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory properties and elucidates its molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory properties. In vitro antihistamine activity of DLC was determined in guinea pig isolated tissues. In vivo antihistamine effects were evaluated after following intravenous administration of DLC in mice with histamine- induced paw edema and in rats with increased capillary permeability. Anti-allergic effects were assessed through passive cutaneous anaphylactic (PCA) reactions in sensitized rodents and ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis in rats. Anti-inflammatory properties and molecular mechanisms of DLC were determined on histamine- and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced EA.hy926 endothelial cells. DLC exhibited significant and reversible inhibition of histamine-induced contractions of isolated guinea pig ileum with pA2 value of 8.88. Histamine-induced paw edema and increased capillary permeability were notably inhibited by DLC intravenous administration. In the model of PCA reactions, DLC showed significant activity in a dose-dependent nd potently inhibited both the early-phase and late-phase allergic reaction of ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis in rats. DLC alleviated the rhinitis symptoms and inhibited inflammatory cell infiltration, IL-4 and protein leakage in nasal lavage fluid (NLF). In EA.hy926 cells, DLC significantly inhibited the histamine- and LPS- induced IL-6 and IL-8 production and P-selectin and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression. Moreover, DLC reduced translocation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) to the nucleus in activated EA.hy926 cells. These results provide evidence that DLC possesses potent antihistaminic, anti-allergic and, anti-inflammatory properties via suppressing IL-6, IL-8, P-selectin and ICAM-1 expression. PMID:25704613

  15. Interleukin-1 Receptor and Caspase-1 Are Required for the Th17 Response in Nitrogen Dioxide–Promoted Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rebecca A.; Ather, Jennifer L.; Lundblad, Lennart K. A.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Budd, Ralph C.; Alcorn, John F.; Flavell, Richard A.; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an environmental pollutant and endogenously generated oxidant associated with the development, severity, and exacerbation of asthma. NO2 exposure is capable of allergically sensitizing mice to the innocuous inhaled antigen ovalbumin (OVA), promoting neutrophil and eosinophil recruitment, and a mixed Th2/Th17 response upon antigen challenge that is reminiscent of severe asthma. However, the identity of IL-17A–producing cells and the mechanisms governing their ontogeny in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease remain unstudied. We measured the kinetics of lung inflammation after antigen challenge in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease, including inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage and antigen-specific IL-17A production from the lung. We determined that IL-17A+ cells were predominately CD4+T cell receptor (TCR)β+ Th17 cells, and that a functional IL-1 receptor was required for Th17, but not Th2, cytokine production after in vitro antigen restimulation of lung cells. The absence of natural killer T cells, γδ T cells, or the inflammasome scaffold nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain, leucine rich repeat and pyrin domain (Nlrp)3 did not affect the development of NO2-promoted allergic inflammation or IL-17A production. Similarly, neutrophil depletion or the neutralization of IL-1α during sensitization exerted no effect on these parameters. However, the absence of caspase-1 significantly reduced IL-17A production from lung cells without affecting Th2 cytokines or lung inflammation. Finally, the intranasal administration of IL-1β and the inhalation of antigen promoted allergic sensitization that was reflected by neutrophilic airway inflammation and IL-17A production from CD4+TCRβ+ Th17 cells subsequent to antigen challenge. These data implicate a role for caspase-1 and IL-1β in the IL-1 receptor–dependent Th17 response manifest in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease. PMID:23371061

  16. Mucosal Inflammatory Response to Salmonella typhimurium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Samir; McCormick, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    The human intestinal epithelium consists of a single layer of epithelial cells that forms a barrier against food antigens and the resident microbiota within the lumen. This delicately balanced organ functions in a highly sophisticated manner to uphold the fidelity of the intestinal epithelium and to eliminate pathogenic microorganisms. On the luminal side, this barrier is fortified by a thick mucus layer, and on the serosal side exists the lamina propria containing a resident population of immune cells. Pathogens that are able to breach this barrier disrupt the healthy epithelial lining by interfering with the regulatory mechanisms that govern the normal balance of intestinal architecture and function. This disruption results in a coordinated innate immune response deployed to eliminate the intruder that includes the release of antimicrobial peptides, activation of pattern-recognition receptors, and recruitment of a variety of immune cells. In the case of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection, induction of an inflammatory response has been linked to its virulence mechanism, the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS secretes protein effectors that exploit the host’s cell biology to facilitate bacterial entry and intracellular survival, and to modulate the host immune response. As the role of the intestinal epithelium in initiating an immune response has been increasingly realized, this review will highlight recent research that details progress made in understanding mechanisms underlying the mucosal inflammatory response to Salmonella infection, and how such inflammatory responses impact pathogenic fitness of this organism. PMID:25071772

  17. T follicular helper (Tfh ) cells in normal immune responses and in allergic disorders.

    PubMed

    Varricchi, G; Harker, J; Borriello, F; Marone, G; Durham, S R; Shamji, M H

    2016-08-01

    Follicular helper T cells (Tfh ) are located within germinal centers of lymph nodes. Cognate interaction between Tfh , B cells, and IL-21 drives B cells to proliferate and differentiate into plasma cells thereby leading to antibody production. Tfh cells and IL-21 are involved in infectious and autoimmune diseases, immunodeficiencies, vaccination, and cancer. Human peripheral blood CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells comprise different subsets of Tfh -like cells. Despite the importance of the IgE response in the pathogenesis of allergic disorders, little is known about the role of follicular and blood Tfh cells and IL-21 in human and experimental allergic disease. Here, we review recent advances regarding the phenotypic and functional characteristics of both follicular and blood Tfh cells and of the IL-21/IL-21R system in the context of allergic disorders. PMID:26970097

  18. Natural Products: Insights into Leishmaniasis Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Igor A.; Mazotto, Ana Maria; Cardoso, Verônica; Alves, Renan L.; Amaral, Ana Claudia F.; Silva, Jefferson Rocha de Andrade; Pinheiro, Anderson S.; Vermelho, Alane B.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease that affects several populations worldwide, against which there are no vaccines available and the chemotherapy is highly toxic. Depending on the species causing the infection, the disease is characterized by commitment of tissues, including the skin, mucous membranes, and internal organs. Despite the relevance of host inflammatory mediators on parasite burden control, Leishmania and host immune cells interaction may generate an exacerbated proinflammatory response that plays an important role in the development of leishmaniasis clinical manifestations. Plant-derived natural products have been recognized as bioactive agents with several properties, including anti-protozoal and anti-inflammatory activities. The present review focuses on the antileishmanial activity of plant-derived natural products that are able to modulate the inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo. The capability of crude extracts and some isolated substances in promoting an anti-inflammatory response during Leishmania infection may be used as part of an effective strategy to fight the disease. PMID:26538837

  19. EFFECTS OF PARTICLES FROM TWO GERMAN CITIES ON ALLERGIC RESPONSES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF PARTICLES FROM TWO GERMAN CITIES ON ALLERGIC RESPONSES IN MICE. S. H. Gavett, L. R. Bishop, N. Haykal-Coates, J. Heinrich*, and M. I. Gilmour. Experimental Toxicology Division, ORD/NHEERL, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, *GSF, Neuherberg, Germany.
    Chi...

  20. SYNTHETIC COPPER-CONTAINING PARTICLES ENHANCE ALLERGIC AIRWAY RESPONSES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    SYNTHETIC COPPER-CONTAINING PARTICLES ENHANCE ALLERGIC AIRWAY RESPONSES IN MICE. SH Gavett, MI Gilmour, and N Haykal-Coates. National Health and Environ Effects Research Lab, USEPA, Res Triangle Park, NC USA
    Respiratory morbidity and mortality associated with increases in ...

  1. EFFECT OF SHORT TERM DIESEL EXHAUST EXPOSURE ON NASAL RESPONSES TO INFLUENZA IN ALLERGIC RHINITICS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Recently published data suggest that diesel exhaust (DE) has special impact on allergic inflammation, suppressing Th1 and augmenting Th2 responses to allergen via oxidant stress effects on airway cells. Exposures to particulate air pollutants including DE are also a...

  2. Comparative responses to nasal allergen challenge in allergic rhinitic subjects with or without asthma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nasal allergen challenge (NAC) is useful to study the pathophysiology of rhinitis, and multiple challenges may more adequately approximate natural exposure. Objective To determine the effect of 4 consecutive daily NAC, on clinical and inflammatory parameters in rhinitics with or without asthma. Methods Rhinitic subjects were recruited: 19 with mild asthma and 13 without asthma. Subjects underwent a control challenge (normal saline) followed by 4 consecutive daily NAC. Allergen challenge consisted of spraying the chosen allergen extract into each nostril until a positive nasal response occurred. Symptoms were recorded on a Likert scale, and oral peak expiratory and nasal peak inspiratory flows allowed assessment of a nasal blockage index (NBI), for a period of 7 hours. Induced sputum and nasal lavage were performed on control day and after 1 and 4 days of NAC. Results Compared with the control day, there was a significant increase in symptom scores and NBI 10 minutes after each last daily NAC in both groups (p < 0.05). Symptom scores and NBI were similar for the 2 groups, except for nasal obstruction and rhinorrhea, which were more marked in subjects with asthma and rhinitis, respectively. Nasal lavage eosinophils were increased after 4 days of challenges in both groups, but there was no change in sputum eosinophils. No cumulative effect or any late response were observed in any of the groups over the challenge period. Conclusion Multiple NAC may be a useful tool to study the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis or its relationships with asthma. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01286129 PMID:21507261

  3. Update on local allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Altıntoprak, Niyazi; Kar, Murat; Bayar Muluk, Nuray; Oktemer, Tugba; Ipci, Kagan; Birdane, Leman; Aricigil, Mitat; Senturk, Mehmet; Bafaqeeh, Sameer Ali; Cingi, Cemal

    2016-08-01

    We here provide an update on the literature regarding local allergic rhinitis (LAR). In reviewing LAR, we have included an updated definition, classifications, mechanisms, comorbidities, and recommendations for diagnosis and treatment for LAR, as well as the defined research areas for future evidence-based studies. LAR is a localised nasal allergic response in the absence of systemic atopy characterised by local production of specific IgE (sIgE) antibodies, a TH2 pattern of mucosal cell infiltration during natural exposure to aeroallergens, and a positive nasal allergen provocation test response, with the release of inflammatory mediators. The localised allergic response of LAR is an important topic for the study of allergies. This review provides an update on the current knowledge of LAR. PMID:27368453

  4. Preventive and therapeutic anti-inflammatory properties of the sesquiterpene α-humulene in experimental airways allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rogerio, Alexandre P; Andrade, Edinéia L; Leite, Daniela FP; Figueiredo, Cláudia P; Calixto, João B

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: α-Humulene and trans-caryophyllene are plant sesquiterpenes with pronounced anti-inflammatory properties. Here, we evaluated the effects of these compounds in an experimental model of airways allergic inflammation. Experimental approach: Female BALB/c mice, sensitized to and challenged with ovalbumin received daily α-humulene or trans-caryophyllene (50 mg·kg−1, orally) or α-humulene (1 mg·mL−1, by aerosol) as either a preventive (for 22 days) or therapeutic (from the 18th to the 22nd day) treatment. Dexamethasone or budesonide was used as a positive control drug. Inflammation was determined on day 22 post-immunization by leukocyte recruitment, interleukin-5 (IL-5), CCL11, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and leukotriene (LT)B4 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In addition, transcription factors [nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), activator protein 1 (AP-1)] and P-selectin in lung tissue were measured by immunohistochemistry and mucus secretion by histochemistry. Key results: Preventive or therapeutic treatments with α-humulene, but not with trans-caryophyllene, significantly reduced the eosinophil recruitment to the BALF. In addition, α-humulene recovery INF-γ and reduced the IL-5, CCL11 and LTB4 levels in BALF, as well as the IL-5 production in mediastinal lymph nodes (in vitro assay). Furthermore, α-humulene decreased the NF-kB and the AP-1 activation, the expression of P-selectin and the increased mucus secretion in the lung. Conclusions and implications: α-Humulene, given either orally or by aerosol, exhibited marked anti-inflammatory properties in a murine model of airways allergic inflammation, an effect that seemed to be mediated via reduction of inflammatory mediators, adhesion molecule expression and transcription factors activation. This article is part of a themed issue on Mediators and Receptors in the Resolution of Inflammation. To view this issue visit http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear

  5. Toxoplasma gondii infection modulate systemic allergic immune response in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Fenoy, Ignacio M; Sánchez, Vanesa R; Soto, Ariadna S; Picchio, Mariano S; Martin, Valentina; Goldman, Alejandra

    2015-07-01

    The increased prevalence of allergies in developed countries has been attributed to a reduced exposure to some microbes. In agreement with epidemiological studies, we previously showed that Toxoplasma gondii infection prevents allergic airway inflammation. The mechanisms would be related to the strong Th1 response induced by the parasite and to regulatory cell induction. Herein we further characterized whether T. gondii allergy modulation extents to a systemic level or if it is limited to the lung. Parasite infection before allergic sensitization resulted in a diminished Th2 cytokine response and, when sensitized during acute infection, an increased in TGF-β production was detected. Allergen specific T cell proliferation was also reduced. Sensitization during both acute and chronic phases of infection resulted in a decreased anaphylaxis reaction. Our results extend earlier work and show that, in addition to lung airway inflammation, T. gondii infection can suppress allergic responses at systemic level. These results open the possibility that this protozoan infection could modulate other allergic disorders such as atopic dermatitis or oral allergies. Understanding the mechanisms by which different microorganisms regulate inflammation may potentially lead to the development of strategies aimed to control atopic diseases. PMID:25888245

  6. Anti-Interleukin-1 Beta/Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha IgY Antibodies Reduce Pathological Allergic Responses in Guinea Pigs with Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei-xu, Hu; Wen-yun, Zhou; Xi-ling, Zhu; Zhu, Wen; Li-hua, Wu; Xiao-mu, Wu; Hui-ping, Wei; Wen-ding, Wang; Dan, He; Qin, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether the combined blockade of IL-1β and TNF-α can alleviate the pathological allergic inflammatory reaction in the nasal mucosa and lung tissues in allergic rhinitis (AR) guinea pigs. Healthy guinea pigs treated with saline were used as the healthy controls. The AR guinea pigs were randomly divided into (1) the AR model group treated with intranasal saline; (2) the 0.1% nonspecific IgY treatment group; (3) the 0.1% anti-TNF-α IgY treatment group; (4) the 0.1% anti-IL-1β IgY treatment group; (5) the 0.1% combined anti-IL-1β and TNF-α IgY treatment group; and (6) the fluticasone propionate treatment group. The inflammatory cells were evaluated using Wright's staining. Histopathology was examined using hematoxylin-eosin staining. The results showed that the number of eosinophils was significantly decreased in the peripheral blood, nasal lavage fluid, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (P < 0.05), and eosinophil, neutrophil, and lymphocyte infiltration and edema were significantly reduced or absent in the nasal mucosa and lung tissues (P < 0.05) in the combined 0.1% anti-IL-1β- and TNF-α IgY-treated guinea pigs. The data suggest that topical blockade of IL-1β and TNF-α could reduce pathological allergic inflammation in the nasal mucosa and lung tissues in AR guinea pigs. PMID:27046957

  7. SUPPRESSION OF ALLERGIC IMMUNE RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE (HDM) IN RATS EXPOSED TO 2,3,7,8-TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Exposure to various xenobiotics, including oxidant gases, diesel exhaust and certain pesticides, has been reported to exacerbate pulmonary allergic hypersensitivity responses. Increased lymphocyte proliferative responses to parasite antigens or increased antibody r...

  8. Therapeutic strategies for allergic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter J.

    1999-11-01

    Many drugs are now in development for the treatment of atopic diseases, including asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. These treatments are based on improvements in existing therapies or on a better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in atopic diseases. Although most attention has been focused on asthma, treatments that inhibit the atopic disease process would have application to all atopic diseases, as they often coincide. Most of the many new therapies in development are aimed at inhibiting components of the allergic inflammatory response, but in the future there are real possibilities for the development of preventative and even curative treatments.

  9. Allergen challenge induces Ifng dependent GTPases in the lungs as part of a Th1 transcriptome response in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Dharajiya, Nilesh; Vaidya, Swapnil; Sinha, Mala; Luxon, Bruce; Boldogh, Istvan; Sur, Sanjiv

    2009-01-01

    According to the current paradigm, allergic airway inflammation is mediated by Th2 cytokines and pro-inflammatory chemokines. Since allergic inflammation is self-limited, we hypothesized that allergen challenge simultaneously induces anti-inflammatory genes to counter-balance the effects of Th2 cytokines and chemokines. To identify these putative anti-inflammatory genes, we compared the gene expression profile in the lungs of ragweed-sensitized mice four hours after challenge with either PBS or ragweed extract (RWE) using a micro-array platform. Consistent with our hypothesis, RWE challenge concurrently upregulated Th1-associated early target genes of the Il12/Stat4 pathway, such as p47 and p65 GTPases (Iigp, Tgtp and Gbp1), Socs1, Cxcl9, Cxcl10 and Gadd45g with the Th2 genes Il4, Il5, Ccl2 and Ccl7. These Th1-associated genes remain upregulated longer than the Th2 genes. Augmentation of the local Th1 milieu by administration of Il12 or CpG prior to RWE challenge further upregulated these Th1 genes. Abolition of the Th1 response by disrupting the Ifng gene increased allergic airway inflammation and abrogated RWE challenge-induced upregulation of GTPases, Cxcl9, Cxcl10 and Socs1, but not Gadd45g. Our data demonstrate that allergen challenge induces two sets of Th1-associated genes in the lungs: 1) Ifng-dependent genes such as p47 and p65 GTPases, Socs1, Cxcl9 and Cxcl10 and 2) Ifng-independent Th1-inducing genes like Gadd45g. We propose that allergen-induced airway inflammation is regulated by simultaneous upregulation of Th1 and Th2 genes, and that persistent unopposed upregulation of Th1 genes resolves allergic inflammation. PMID:20027288

  10. CTAB-coated gold nanorods elicit allergic response through degranulation and cell death in human basophils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Ka Lun; Chen, Huanjun; Chen, Qiulan; Wang, Jianfang; Ho, Ho Pui; Wong, Chun Kwok; Kong, Siu Kai

    2012-07-01

    The effect of CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide)- or PEG (polyethylene glycol)-coated gold-nanorods (Au-NRs) on the non-IgE mediated allergic response was studied. We found that the CTAB-Au-NRs released more allergic mediators such as histamine and β-hexosaminidase from human basophil KU812, a common model for studying allergy, after 20 min incubation. Also, the CTAB-Au-NRs induced more apoptosis than the PEG-Au-NRs in KU812 24 h after treatment. These short- and long-term effects were not solely due to the CTAB residues in the supernatant desorbed from the Au-NRs.The effect of CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide)- or PEG (polyethylene glycol)-coated gold-nanorods (Au-NRs) on the non-IgE mediated allergic response was studied. We found that the CTAB-Au-NRs released more allergic mediators such as histamine and β-hexosaminidase from human basophil KU812, a common model for studying allergy, after 20 min incubation. Also, the CTAB-Au-NRs induced more apoptosis than the PEG-Au-NRs in KU812 24 h after treatment. These short- and long-term effects were not solely due to the CTAB residues in the supernatant desorbed from the Au-NRs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30435j

  11. Allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Mygind, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a very frequent disease with a prevalence of 15-20%. Symptoms are most pronounced in young people while, for some unknown reason, the elderly become clinically hyposensitized. Pollen is the cause of seasonal allergic rhinitis, and house dust mite and animals are the main causes of perennial allergic rhinitis. Histamine is the main cause of sneezing and hypersecretion, while other mediators probably also play a role in nasal blockage. In polyposis, a local denervation is an important cause of vascular leakage, edema and polyp formation. Antihistamines have a positive effect on sneezing and hypersecretion, but not on blockage. As they have a quick onset of action they are useful in patients with mild and occasional symptoms. A nasal steroid is preferable in patients with persistent symptoms, since it is more effective on all nasal symptoms. Short-term use of a systemic steroid can be a valuable adjunct to topical treatment, especially in nasal polyposis, when there is a temporary failure of topical treatment in a blocked nose. A nasal vasoconstrictor can be added for short-term treatment, and an ipratropium spray can be beneficial in perennial non-allergic rhinitis, when watery secretion is the dominant symptom. Immunotherapy can be added in allergic rhinitis, when pharmacotherapy is insufficient. This chapter is based on the author's personal experience with allergic rhinitis, as a patient, a doctor and a researcher. Therefore, it is not a balanced review and the references will be highly selected as they largely consist of the author's own publications. As the text is mainly based on personal research, steroids are described in detail, while, with regard to immunotherapy, the reader is referred to another chapter. In addition to allergic rhinitis, nasal polyposis will be described. It was formerly believed to be an allergic disease, but we now know that it is not. However, with regard to histopathology and drug responsiveness this disease is

  12. Allergic Non-Asthmatic Adults Have Regional Pulmonary Responses to Segmental Allergen Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Vanessa J.; Winkler, Tilo; Venegas, Jose G.; Kone, Mamary; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Afshar, Roshi; Cho, Josalyn L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Harris, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background Allergic non-asthmatic (ANA) adults experience upper airway symptoms of allergic disease such as rhinorrhea, congestion and sneezing without symptoms of asthma. The aim of this study was to utilize PET-CT functional imaging to determine whether allergen challenge elicits a pulmonary response in ANA subjects or whether their allergic disease is truly isolated to the upper airways. Methods In 6 ANA subjects, bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were performed at baseline and 24h after instillation of an allergen and a diluent in separate lung lobes. After instillation (10h), functional imaging was performed to quantify and compare regional perfusion, ventilation, fractional gas content (Fgas), and glucose uptake rate (Ki) between the baseline, diluent and allergen lobes. BAL cell counts were also compared. Results In ANA subjects, compared to the baseline and diluent lobes, perfusion and ventilation were significantly lower in the allergen lobe (median [inter-quartile range], baseline vs. diluent vs. allergen: Mean-normalized perfusion; 0.87 [0.85–0.97] vs. 0.90 [0.86–0.98] vs. 0.59 [0.55–0.67]; p<0.05. Mean-normalized ventilation 0.89 [0.88–0.98] vs. 0.95 [0.89–1.02] vs. 0.63 [0.52–0.67], p<0.05). In contrast, no significant differences were found in Fgas between baseline, diluent and allergen lobes or in Ki. Total cell counts, eosinophil and neutrophil cell counts (cells/ml BAL) were significantly greater in the allergen lobe compared to the baseline lobe (all P<0.05). Conclusions Despite having no clinical symptoms of a lower airway allergic response (cough and wheeze) allergic non-asthmatic subjects have a pulmonary response to allergen exposure which manifests as reduced ventilation and perfusion. PMID:26640951

  13. "Siglec"ting the allergic response for therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Bochner, Bruce S

    2016-06-01

    As a physician-scientist, I have pursued research related to translational immunology with the goal of improving our ability to diagnose and treat allergic, immunologic and other diseases involving eosinophils, basophils and mast cells. We have tried to delineate novel mechanisms of human disease, working whenever possible with primary human cells and tissues, attempting to identify targets that might be amenable to the development of new therapies. As a general strategy, we have compared eosinophils, basophils, mast cells and neutrophils to look for pathways in inflammation that were unique to distinct subsets of these cells. In doing so, the concepts of glycobiology did not enter my mind until we began noticing some intriguing functional differences involving selectins and their ligands among these cell types. One simple observation, that neutrophils were coated with a glycan that allowed them to interact with an endothelial adhesion molecule while eosinophils lacked this structure, pried open the glyco-door for me. Fruitful collaborations with card-carrying glycobiologists soon followed that have forever positively influenced our science, and have enhanced our hypotheses, experimental design, research opportunities and discoveries. Within a few years, we helped to discover Siglec-8, an I-type lectin expressed only on human eosinophils, basophils, mast cells. This receptor, together with its closest mouse counterpart Siglec-F, has been the primary focus of our work now for over a decade. If not for those in the fields of glycobiology and glycoimmunology, my lab would not have made much progress toward the goal of leveraging Siglec-8 for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26911285

  14. BLOCKADE OF TRKA OR P75 NEUROTROPHIN RECEPTORS ATTENUATES DIESEL PARTICULATE-INDUCED ENHANCEMENT OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS RESPONSES IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) partially mediate many features of allergic airways disease including airway resistance. Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) associated with the combustion of diesel fuel exacerbates allergic airways responses. We tested t...

  15. Overview on the pathomechanisms of allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Sachiko; Ozu, Chika; Kimura, Satoko

    2011-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis a chronic inflammatory disease of the upper airways that has a major impact on the quality of life of patients and is a socio-economic burden. Understanding the underlying immune mechanisms is central to developing better and more targeted therapies. The inflammatory response in the nasal mucosa includes an immediate IgE-mediated mast cell response as well as a latephase response characterized by recruitment of eosinophils, basophils, and T cells expressing Th2 cytokines including interleukin (IL)-4, a switch factor for IgE synthesis, and IL-5, an eosinophil growth factor and on-going allergic inflammation. Recent advances have suggested new pathways like local synthesis of IgE, the IgE-IgE receptor mast cell cascade in on-going allergic inflammation and the epithelial expression of cytokines that regulate Th2 cytokine responses (i.e., thymic stromal lymphopoietin, IL-25, and IL-33). In this review, we briefly review the conventional pathways in the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis and then elaborate on the recent advances in the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis. An improved understanding of the immune mechanisms of allergic rhinitis can provide a better insight on novel therapeutic targets. PMID:22053313

  16. Differential Activation of Airway Eosinophils Induces IL-13 Mediated Allergic Th2 Pulmonary Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, EA; Doyle, AD; Colbert, DC; Zellner, KR; Protheroe, CA; LeSuer, WE; Lee, NA.; Lee, JJ

    2015-01-01

    Background Eosinophils are hallmark cells of allergic Th2 respiratory inflammation. However, the relative importance of eosinophil activation and the induction of effector functions such as the expression of IL-13 to allergic Th2 pulmonary disease remain to be defined. Methods Wild type or cytokine deficient (IL-13−/− or IL-4−/−) eosinophils treated with cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-4, IL-33) were adoptively transferred into eosinophil-deficient recipient mice subjected to allergen provocation using established models of respiratory inflammation. Allergen-induced pulmonary changes were assessed. Results In contrast to the transfer of untreated blood eosinophils to the lungs of recipient eosinophildeficient mice, which induced no immune/inflammatory changes either in the lung or lung draining lymph nodes (LDLNs), pretreatment of blood eosinophils with GM-CSF prior to transfer elicited trafficking of these eosinophils to LDLNs. In turn, these LDLN eosinophils elicited the accumulation of dendritic cells and CD4+ T cells to these same LDLNs without inducing pulmonary inflammation. However, exposure of eosinophils to GM-CSF, IL-4 and IL-33 prior to transfer induced not only immune events in the LDLN, but also allergen-mediated increases in airway Th2 cytokine/chemokine levels, the subsequent accumulation of CD4+ T cells as well as alternatively activated (M2) macrophages, and the induction of pulmonary histopathologies. Significantly, this allergic respiratory inflammation was dependent on eosinophil-derived IL-13 whereas IL-4 expression by eosinophils had no significant role. Conclusion The data demonstrate the differential activation of eosinophils as a function of cytokine exposure and suggest that eosinophil-specific IL-13 expression by activated cells is a necessary component of the subsequent allergic Th2 pulmonary pathologies. PMID:26009788

  17. Analyzing inflammatory response as excitable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yde, Pernille; Høgh Jensen, Mogens; Trusina, Ala

    2011-11-01

    The regulatory system of the transcription factor NF-κB plays a great role in many cell functions, including inflammatory response. Interestingly, the NF-κB system is known to up-regulate production of its own triggering signal—namely, inflammatory cytokines such as TNF, IL-1, and IL-6. In this paper we investigate a previously presented model of the NF-κB, which includes both spatial effects and the positive feedback from cytokines. The model exhibits the properties of an excitable medium and has the ability to propagate waves of high cytokine concentration. These waves represent an optimal way of sending an inflammatory signal through the tissue as they create a chemotactic signal able to recruit neutrophils to the site of infection. The simple model displays three qualitatively different states; low stimuli leads to no or very little response. Intermediate stimuli leads to reoccurring waves of high cytokine concentration. Finally, high stimuli leads to a sustained high cytokine concentration, a scenario which is toxic for the tissue cells and corresponds to chronic inflammation. Due to the few variables of the simple model, we are able to perform a phase-space analysis leading to a detailed understanding of the functional form of the model and its limitations. The spatial effects of the model contribute to the robustness of the cytokine wave formation and propagation.

  18. Abnormal IgG4 antibody response to aeroallergens in allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Jeannin, P; Delneste, Y; Tillie-Leblond, I; Wallaert, B; carlier, A; Pestel, J; Tonnel, A B

    1994-01-01

    Various studies have suggested the involvement of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) antibodies (Ab) in the physiopathology of allergic disorders. Recently, an abnormal IgG4 Ab production in response to immunization has been reported in some atopic patients. Thus, in order to evidence in allergic patients, a potential abnormal IgG4 Ab response to aeroallergens following natural exposure, we compared, in 34 patients sensitive to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and in 16 healthy subjects, the IgG4 Ab response to D. pteronyssinus, grass pollen and cat dander, using a solid-phase radioimmunoassay. Since some patients were also sensitive to grass pollen and/or to cat dander, we analyzed, in all patients, the IgG4 Ab responses both towards the allergen(s) they were sensitive to (sensitizing allergen) or not (unrelated allergen). The results showed that 90% of the patients produced levels of antisensitizing allergen(s) IgG4 Ab significantly higher than the controls; this IgG4 Ab response was correlated with the corresponding specific IgE Ab level. In addition, among these patients, around 40% presented high levels of IgG4 Ab to the unrelated allergen(s). Thus, in allergic patients, while specific IgE Ab define the nature of the sensitizing allergen, the presence of IgG4 Ab directed against various allergens seems in relation with an abnormal isotype regulation associated with atopic disorders. PMID:8199463

  19. The effect of ketotifen on inflammatory markers in allergic conjunctivitis: an open, uncontrolled study

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Andrea P; Urrets-Zavalia, Julio; Berra, Alejandro; Mariani, Ana Lía; Gallino, Norberto; Demel, Eduardo Gomez; Gagliardi, Julio; Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E; Urrets-Zavalia, Enrique; M Serra, Horacio

    2003-01-01

    Background The efficacy and safety of ketotifen eye drop treatment in allergic conjunctivitis (AC) management is perfectly known by several studies, but the mechanism of action at the biochemical levels is poorly understood so we decided to perform an open, uncontrolled study in order to investigate the effect of the topical administration of ketotifen fumarate 0.05% on biochemical markers of inflammation on conjunctival cells in patients with AC. Methods Nineteen patients with symptoms and signs of AC (itching, discharge, burning, redness, increase in the watery discharge, swelling and follicles) and with a history of allergy were prescribed with two daily instillation of one drop of eyewash ketotifen fumarate 0,05% in both eyes during thirty days. They were studied by measuring clinical and immunologic parameters. Results Ketotifen fumarate treatment significantly reduced the total symptoms and signs score for each patient as well as each symptoms and signs at all time points compared with day 0 (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.016, respectively). Although the percentage of HLA-DR+ epithelial cells diminished only in 58% of patients, the numbers of CD29+ and eotaxin+ epithelial cells dropped significantly in 68% and 73 % of them (p < 0.0062 and <0.0082, respectively) as a consequence of the treatment. In 9 out of 19 patients a simultaneous decrease in the percentage of epithelial cells positive for CD29 and eotaxin was observed. Conclusion Ketotifen besides the well-known effect in reducing signs and symptoms of AC significantly diminished production of eotaxin and expression of CD29 by epithelial cells in patients with seasonal AC. PMID:12515585

  20. Collective cell migration during inflammatory response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Wound scratch healing assays of endothelial cell monolayers is a simple model to study collective cell migration as a function of biological signals. A signal of particular interest is the immune response, which after initial wounding in vivo causes the release of various inflammatory factors such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α). TNF-α is an innate inflammatory cytokine that can induce cell growth, cell necrosis, and change cell morphology. We studied the effects of TNF-α on collective cell migration using the wound healing assays and measured several migration metrics, such as rate of scratch closure, velocities of leading edge and bulk cells, closure index, and velocity correlation functions between migrating cells. We observed that TNF-α alters all migratory metrics as a function of the size of the scratch and TNF-α content. The changes observed in migration correlate with actin reorganization upon TNF-α exposure.

  1. Regulatory T cells in allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Noval Rivas, Magali; Chatila, Talal A

    2016-09-01

    The pathogenesis of allergic diseases entails an ineffective tolerogenic immune response to allergens. Regulatory T (Treg) cells play a key role in sustaining immune tolerance to allergens, yet mechanisms by which Treg cells fail to maintain tolerance in patients with allergic diseases are not well understood. We review current concepts and established mechanisms regarding how Treg cells regulate different components of allergen-triggered immune responses to promote and maintain tolerance. We will also discuss more recent advances that emphasize the "dual" functionality of Treg cells in patients with allergic diseases: how Treg cells are essential in promoting tolerance to allergens but also how a proallergic inflammatory environment can skew Treg cells toward a pathogenic phenotype that aggravates and perpetuates disease. These advances highlight opportunities for novel therapeutic strategies that aim to re-establish tolerance in patients with chronic allergic diseases by promoting Treg cell stability and function. PMID:27596705

  2. Oral supplementation with areca-derived polyphenols attenuates food allergic responses in ovalbumin-sensitized mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arecae semen, the dried slice of areca nuts, is a traditional Chinese medicine used to treat intestinal parasitosis, rectal tenesmus and diarrhea. Areca nuts contain a rich amount of polyphenols that have been shown to modulate the functionality of mast cells and T cells. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of polyphenol-enriched areca nut extracts (PANE) against food allergy, a T cell-mediated immune disorder. Methods BALB/c mice were left untreated or administered with PANE (0.05% and 0.1%) via drinking water throughout the entire experiment. The mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) twice by intraperitoneal injection, and then repeatedly challenged with OVA by gavage to induce food allergic responses. Results PANE administration attenuated OVA-induced allergic responses, including the occurrence of diarrhea and the infiltration and degranulation of mast cells in the duodenum. The serum level of OVA-specific IgE and the expression of interleukin-4 in the duodenum were suppressed by PANE treatment. In addition, PANE administration induced Gr-1+, IL-10+ and Gr-1+IL-10+ cells in the duodenum. Conclusion These results demonstrate that oral intake of areca-derived polyphenols attenuates food allergic responses accompanied with a decreased Th2 immunity and an enhanced induction of functional myeloid-derived suppressor cells. PMID:23816049

  3. Invasive versus noninvasive measurement of allergic and cholinergic airway responsiveness in mice

    PubMed Central

    Glaab, Thomas; Ziegert, Michaela; Baelder, Ralf; Korolewitz, Regina; Braun, Armin; Hohlfeld, Jens M; Mitzner, Wayne; Krug, Norbert; Hoymann, Heinz G

    2005-01-01

    Background This study seeks to compare the ability of repeatable invasive and noninvasive lung function methods to assess allergen-specific and cholinergic airway responsiveness (AR) in intact, spontaneously breathing BALB/c mice. Methods Using noninvasive head-out body plethysmography and the decrease in tidal midexpiratory flow (EF50), we determined early AR (EAR) to inhaled Aspergillus fumigatus antigens in conscious mice. These measurements were paralleled by invasive determination of pulmonary conductance (GL), dynamic compliance (Cdyn) and EF50 in another group of anesthetized, orotracheally intubated mice. Results With both methods, allergic mice, sensitized and boosted with A. fumigatus, elicited allergen-specific EAR to A. fumigatus (p < 0.05 versus controls). Dose-response studies to aerosolized methacholine (MCh) were performed in the same animals 48 h later, showing that allergic mice relative to controls were distinctly more responsive (p < 0.05) and revealed acute airway inflammation as evidenced from increased eosinophils and lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage. Conclusion We conclude that invasive and noninvasive pulmonary function tests are capable of detecting both allergen-specific and cholinergic AR in intact, allergic mice. The invasive determination of GL and Cdyn is superior in sensitivity, whereas the noninvasive EF50 method is particularly appropriate for quick and repeatable screening of respiratory function in large numbers of conscious mice. PMID:16309547

  4. [Allergic inflammation in respiratory system].

    PubMed

    An, Lifeng; Wang, Yanshu; Li, Lin

    2015-02-01

    The pathophysiology of allergic disease such as asthma and allergic rhinitis tell the similar story: when the endogenous and exogenous inflammatory mechanisms occur disorder, the body may begin with inflammatory cell activation, namely through the release of cytokine and inflammatory mediator role in the corresponding target cells, activate the sensory nerve fiber, acting on the cell organ specificity effect, clinical symptoms. This article is divided into the following five parts focused on the research progress of allergic inflammatory diseases: (1) inflammatory cells; (2) staphylococcus aureus superantigen; (3) small molecules (cytokines, inflammatory mediators, lipid classes medium); (4) nerve fibers and effect cells; (5) genetic and epigenetic factors. PMID:26012309

  5. Inflammatory responses to infection: the Dutch contribution.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Martijn A; van der Meer, Jos W M

    2014-12-01

    At any given moment, our body is under attack by a large variety of pathogens, which aim to enter and use our body to propagate and disseminate. The extensive cellular and molecular complexity of our immune system enables us to efficiently eliminate invading pathogens or at least develop a condition in which propagation of the microorganism is reduced to a minimum. Yet, the evolutionary pressure on pathogens to circumvent our immune defense mechanisms is immense, which continuously leads to the development of novel pathogenic strains that challenge the health of mankind. Understanding this battle between pathogen and the immune system has been a fruitful area of immunological research over the last century and will continue to do so for many years. In this review, which has been written on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Dutch Society for Immunology, we provide an overview of the major contributions that Dutch immunologists and infection biologists have made in the last decades on the inflammatory response to viral, bacterial, fungal or parasitic infections. We focus on those studies that have addressed both the host and the pathogen, as these are most interesting from an immunological point of view. Although it is not possible to completely cover this comprehensive research field, this review does provide an interesting overview of Dutch research on inflammatory responses to infection. PMID:25455597

  6. Scorpion venom and the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Petricevich, Vera L

    2010-01-01

    Scorpion venoms consist of a complex of several toxins that exhibit a wide range of biological properties and actions, as well as chemical compositions, toxicity, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics. These venoms are associated with high morbility and mortality, especially among children. Victims of envenoming by a scorpion suffer a variety of pathologies, involving mainly both sympathetic and parasympathetic stimulation as well as central manifestations such as irritability, hyperthermia, vomiting, profuse salivation, tremor, and convulsion. The clinical signs and symptoms observed in humans and experimental animals are related with an excessive systemic host inflammatory response to stings and stings, respectively. Although the pathophysiology of envenomation is complex and not yet fully understood, venom and immune responses are known to trigger the release of inflammatory mediators that are largely mediated by cytokines. In models of severe systemic inflammation produced by injection of high doses of venom or venoms products, the increase in production of proinflammatory cytokines significantly contributes to immunological imbalance, multiple organ dysfunction and death. The cytokines initiate a cascade of events that lead to illness behaviors such as fever, anorexia, and also physiological events in the host such as activation of vasodilatation, hypotension, and increased of vessel permeability. PMID:20300540

  7. Scorpion Venom and the Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Petricevich, Vera L.

    2010-01-01

    Scorpion venoms consist of a complex of several toxins that exhibit a wide range of biological properties and actions, as well as chemical compositions, toxicity, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics. These venoms are associated with high morbility and mortality, especially among children. Victims of envenoming by a scorpion suffer a variety of pathologies, involving mainly both sympathetic and parasympathetic stimulation as well as central manifestations such as irritability, hyperthermia, vomiting, profuse salivation, tremor, and convulsion. The clinical signs and symptoms observed in humans and experimental animals are related with an excessive systemic host inflammatory response to stings and stings, respectively. Although the pathophysiology of envenomation is complex and not yet fully understood, venom and immune responses are known to trigger the release of inflammatory mediators that are largely mediated by cytokines. In models of severe systemic inflammation produced by injection of high doses of venom or venoms products, the increase in production of proinflammatory cytokines significantly contributes to immunological imbalance, multiple organ dysfunction and death. The cytokines initiate a cascade of events that lead to illness behaviors such as fever, anorexia, and also physiological events in the host such as activation of vasodilatation, hypotension, and increased of vessel permeability. PMID:20300540

  8. Adoptive transfer of allergic airway responses with sensitized lymphocytes in BN rats.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, A; Rossi, P; Renzi, P M; Xu, L J; Guttmann, R D; Martin, J G

    1995-07-01

    To evaluate the role of lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of allergic bronchoconstriction, we investigated whether allergic airway responses are adoptively transferred by antigen-primed lymphocytes in Brown Norway (BN) rats. Animals were actively sensitized to ovalbumin (OA) or sham sensitized, and 14 d later mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from intrathoracic lymph nodes, passed through a nylon wool column, and transferred to naive syngeneic rats. Recipients were challenged with aerosolized OA or bovine serum albumin (BSA) (5% wt/vol) and analyzed for changes in lung resistance (RL), airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine (MCh), and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells. Recipients of MNCs from sensitized rats responded to OA inhalation and exhibited sustained increases in RL throughout the 8-h observation period, but without usual early airway responses. Recipients of sham-sensitized MNCs or BSA-challenged recipients failed to respond to antigen challenge. At 32 h after OA exposure, airway responsiveness to MCh was increased in four of seven rats that had received sensitized MNCs (p = 0.035). BAL eosinophils increased at 32 h in the recipients of both sensitized and sham-sensitized MNCs. However, eosinophil numbers in BAL were inversely correlated with airway responsiveness in the recipients of sensitized MNCs (r = -0.788, p = 0.036). OA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) was undetectable by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in recipient rats following adoptive transfer. In conclusion, allergic late airway responses (LAR) and cholinergic airway hyperresponsiveness, but not antigen-specific IgE and early responses, were adoptively transferred by antigen-primed lymphocytes in BN rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7599864

  9. Role of M2 Muscarinic Receptor in the Airway Response to Methacholine of Mice Selected for Minimal or Maximal Acute Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Juciane Maria de Andrade; Resende, Rodrigo R.; Florsheim, Esther; Albuquerque, Layra Lucy; Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana; Gomes, Eliane; Tavares de Lima, Wothan; de Franco, Marcelo; Ribeiro, Orlando Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle constriction induced by cholinergic agonists such as methacholine (MCh), which is typically increased in asthmatic patients, is regulated mainly by muscle muscarinic M3 receptors and negatively by vagal muscarinic M2 receptors. Here we evaluated basal (intrinsic) and allergen-induced (extrinsic) airway responses to MCh. We used two mouse lines selected to respond maximally (AIRmax) or minimally (AIRmin) to innate inflammatory stimuli. We found that in basal condition AIRmin mice responded more vigorously to MCh than AIRmax. Treatment with a specific M2 antagonist increased airway response of AIRmax but not of AIRmin mice. The expression of M2 receptors in the lung was significantly lower in AIRmin compared to AIRmax animals. AIRmax mice developed a more intense allergic inflammation than AIRmin, and both allergic mouse lines increased airway responses to MCh. However, gallamine treatment of allergic groups did not affect the responses to MCh. Our results confirm that low or dysfunctional M2 receptor activity is associated with increased airway responsiveness to MCh and that this trait was inherited during the selective breeding of AIRmin mice and was acquired by AIRmax mice during allergic lung inflammation. PMID:23691511

  10. Gedunin, a natural tetranortriterpenoid, modulates T lymphocyte responses and ameliorates allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Fausto K; Moret, Katelim Hottz; Figueiredo, Alexandre Bezerra Conde; Penido, Carmen; Henriques, Maria das Graças M O

    2012-09-01

    T lymphocytes are critical cells involved in allergy. Here, we report that the natural tetranortriterpenoid gedunin impaired allergic responses primarily by modulating T lymphocyte functions. The intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of gedunin inhibited pleural leukocyte accumulation triggered by intra-pleural (i.pl.) challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) in previously sensitized C57BL/6 mice; this inhibition was primarily due to the impairment of eosinophil and T lymphocyte influx. Likewise, i.pl. pre-treatment with gedunin inhibited eosinophil and T lymphocyte migration into mouse lungs 24 h after OVA intra-nasal (i.n.) instillation. Pre-treatment with gedunin diminished the levels of CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, CCL11, Interleukin-5 and leukotriene B(4) at the allergic site. In vitro pre-treatment with gedunin failed to inhibit T lymphocyte adhesion and chemotaxis towards pleural washes recovered from OVA-challenged mice, suggesting that gedunin inhibits T lymphocyte migration in vivo via the inhibition of chemotactic mediators in situ. In vivo pre-treatment with gedunin reduced the numbers of CD69(+) and CD25(+) T lymphocytes in the pleura and CD25(+) cells in the thoracic lymph nodes 24 h after OVA i.pl. challenge. In accordance, in vitro treatment of T lymphocytes with gedunin inhibited α-CD3 mAb-induced expression of CD69 and CD25, proliferation, Interleukin-2 production and nuclear translocation of NFκB and NFAT. Notably, post-treatment of mice with gedunin reverted OVA-induced lung allergic inflammation by decreasing the T lymphocyte and eosinophil counts and the levels of eosinophilotactic mediators in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Our results demonstrate a remarkable anti-allergic effect of gedunin due to its capability to modulate T cell activation and trafficking into the airways. PMID:22709475

  11. The Rhizomes of Acorus gramineus and the Constituents Inhibit Allergic Response In vitro and In vivo.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun; Lee, Seung Young; Lee, Kang Ro; Kim, Yeong Shik; Kim, Hyun Pyo

    2012-09-01

    The rhizomes of Acorus gramineus have frequently been used in traditional medicine mainly for sedation as well as enhancing brain function. In this study, the anti-allergic activity of A. gramineus was investigated. The 70% ethanol extract of the rhizomes of A. gramineus was found to inhibit the allergic response against 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX)-catalyzed leukotriene (LT) production from rat basophilic leukemia (RBL)-1 cells and β-hexosaminidase release from RBL-2H3 cells with IC50's of 48.9 and >200 μg/ml, respectively. Among the 9 major constituents isolated, β-asarone, (2R,3R,4S,5S)-2,4-dimethyl-1,3-bis (2',4',5'-trimethoxyphenyl)tetrahydrofuran (AF) and 2,3-dihydro-4,5,7-trimethoxy-1-ethyl-2-methyl-3-(2,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)indene (AI) strongly inhibited 5-LOX-catalyzed LT production in A23187-treated RBL-1 cells, AI being the most potent (IC50=6.7 μM). Against β-hexosaminidase release by antigen-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells, only AI exhibited strong inhibition (IC50=7.3 μM) while β-asarone and AF showed 26.0% and 39.9% inhibition at 50 μM, respectively. In addition, the ethanol extract of A. gramineus showed significant inhibitory action against the hapten-induced delayed hypersensitivity reaction in mice by oral administration at 200 mg/kg. Therefore, it is suggested that A. gramineus possesses anti-allergic activity and the constituents including β-asarone and AI certainly contribute to the anti-allergic activity of the rhizomes of A. gramineus. PMID:24009837

  12. Neutrophil recruitment by allergens contribute to allergic sensitization and allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hosoki, Koa; Boldogh, Istvan; Sur, Sanjiv

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To discuss the presence and role of neutrophils in asthma and allergic diseases, and outline importance of pollen and cat dander-induced innate neutrophil recruitment in induction of allergic sensitization and allergic inflammation. Recent findings Uncontrolled asthma is associated with elevated numbers of neutrophils, and levels of neutrophil-attracting chemokine IL-8 and IL-17 in BAL fluids. These parameters negatively correlate with lung function. Pollen allergens and cat dander recruit neutrophils to the airways in a TLR4, MD2 and CXCR2-dependent manner. Repeated recruitment of activated neutrophils by these allergens facilitates allergic sensitization and airway inflammation. Inhibition of neutrophil recruitment with CXCR2 inhibitor, disruption of TLR4, or siRNA against MD2 also inhibits allergic inflammation. The molecular mechanisms by which neutrophils shift the inflammatory response of the airways to inhaled allergens to an allergic phenotype is an area of active research. Summary Recent studies have revealed that neutrophil recruitment is important in development of allergic sensitization and inflammation. Inhibition of neutrophils recruitment may be strategy to control allergic inflammation. PMID:26694038

  13. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  14. Transport induced inflammatory responses in horses.

    PubMed

    Wessely-Szponder, J; Bełkot, Z; Bobowiec, R; Kosior-Korzecka, U; Wójcik, M

    2015-01-01

    Deleterious response to road transport is an important problem in equine practice. It determines different physiological, immunological and metabolic changes which lead to increased susceptibility to several disorders such as pneumonia, diarrhea, colics, laminitis, injuries and rhabdomyolisis. The aim of our study was to look for possible relationships between transportation of female young and older horses over a long and short distance and an inflammatory state reflected by an increase of acute phase protein concentration, oxidative stress and muscle injury. The study was conducted on 24 cold-blooded female horses divided into four groups. Six fillies aged 6-18 months and six mares aged 10-12 years were transported over the distance of about 550 km, six fillies aged 6-18 months and six mares aged 10-12 years were transported over the distance of about 50 km. Plasma and serum were obtained from blood samples taken before transportation (T0), immediately after transportation (T1) and at an abattoir during slaughter (T2). In these samples fibrinogen, MDA, AST and CK were assessed. Fibrinogen increased in all studied groups especially in fillies after long distance transportation, where it reached 205±7.07 mg/dl before transportation, 625±35.35 mg/dl after transportation, and 790±14.14 mg/dl during slaughter. MDA concentrations rose after transportation and reached the maximal level during slaughter. CK activity was more elevated after short transportation in younger horses, whereas initial activity of AST was higher in older horses. We estimated that intensified responses from acute phase, oxidative stress and muscle injury parameters indicated an inflammatory state. PMID:26172192

  15. γ-Tocopherol supplementation of allergic female mice augments development of CD11c+CD11b+ dendritic cells in utero and allergic inflammation in neonates.

    PubMed

    Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Soveg, Frank; Cook-Mills, Joan M

    2016-04-15

    γ-Tocopherol increases responses to allergen challenge in allergic adult mice, but it is not known whether γ-tocopherol regulates the development of allergic disease. Development of allergic disease often occurs early in life. In clinical studies and animal models, offspring of allergic mothers have increased responsiveness to allergen challenge. Therefore, we determined whether γ-tocopherol augments development of allergic responses in offspring of allergic female mice. Allergic female mice were supplemented with γ-tocopherol starting at mating. The pups from allergic mothers developed allergic lung responses, whereas pups from saline-treated mothers did not respond to allergen challenge. The γ-tocopherol supplementation of allergic female mice increased the numbers of eosinophils twofold in the pup bronchoalveolar lavage and lungs after allergen challenge. There was also about a twofold increase in pup lung CD11b(+) subsets of CD11c(+) dendritic cells and in numbers of these dendritic cells expressing the transcription factor IRF4. There was no change in several CD11b(-) dendritic cell subsets. Furthermore, maternal supplementation with γ-tocopherol increased the number of fetal liver CD11b(+)CD11c(+) dendritic cells twofold in utero. In the pups, γ-tocopherol increased lung expression of the inflammatory mediators CCL11, amphiregulin, activin A, and IL-5. In conclusion, maternal supplementation with γ-tocopherol increased fetal development of subsets of dendritic cells that are critical for allergic responses and increased development of allergic responses in pups from allergic mothers. These results have implications for supplementation of allergic mothers with γ-tocopherol in prenatal vitamins. PMID:26801566

  16. Respiratory responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and their relationship to nonspecific airway reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, W.F.; Horstman, D.H.; Abdul-Salaam, S.; Raggio, L.J.; Green, J.A.

    1987-12-01

    Ozone exposure in man produces changes in respiratory function and symptoms. There is a large degree of unexplained intersubject variability in the magnitude of these responses. There is concern that individuals with chronic respiratory diseases may also be more responsive to ozone than normal individuals. The purpose of this study was to describe the responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and to compare these responses to those previously observed in normal individuals. A further purpose was to measure the association of baseline nonspecific airway reactivity with changes in lung function and respiratory symptoms following ozone exposure. A group of 26 nonasthmatic subjects with allergic rhinitis performed a bronchial inhalation challenge with histamine and subsequently underwent two hour exposures to both clean air and to 0.18 part per million ozone with alternating periods of rest and heavy exercise. The airway reactivity of this group of subjects was no greater than that of a comparable group of subjects without allergic rhinitis. The respiratory responses of these subjects to ozone exposure were similar to those previously reported for subjects without allergic rhinitis with the exception that the allergic rhinitis subjects appeared to have a modestly increased bronchoconstrictor response compared to normals. Furthermore, we observed no significant relationships between nonspecific airway reactivity and response to ozone as measured by changes in lung function or the induction of symptoms.

  17. An evaluation of short-term corticosteroid response in perennial allergic rhinitis using histamine and adenosine monophosphate nasal challenge

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew M; Sims, Erika J; Orr, Linda C; Robb, Fiona; Lipworth, Brian J

    2003-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the role of AMP nasal challenge as a measure of short-term treatment response in patients receiving intranasal corticosteroids. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) challenge has been shown to be a good inflammatory surrogate in the lower airways, but it has not been properly evaluated as a nasal challenge test. Methods Fourteen patients with perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR) were randomized to receive 2 weeks treatment with placebo (PL) or 200 µg intranasal mometasone furoate (MF) once daily in a randomized single-blind crossover study. AMP (25–800 mg ml−1) and histamine (0.25–8 mg ml−1) nasal challenge testing were performed after each treatment period with 30% decrease in minimal cross-sectional area (MCA). Domiciliary symptom data were collected. Results There was a significant (P < 0.05) improvement in PC30 MCA and nasal volume with AMP but not with histamine comparing MF vs PL. This amounted to a 2.8 (95% CI 1.5, 4.0) and 0.7 (95% CI −0.5, 1.9) doubling-dose change for AMP and histamine challenges, respectively. There were significant (P < 0.05) improvements in nasal symptoms and quality of life. Conclusions AMP nasal challenge using acoustic rhinometry may be a useful test to assess short-term treatment response in patient with PAR. PMID:12680883

  18. Carbon Nanofibers Have IgE Adjuvant Capacity but Are Less Potent Than Nanotubes in Promoting Allergic Airway Responses

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsen, Mari; Marioara, Calin Daniel; Løvik, Martinus

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing concern for the possible health impact of nanoparticles. The main objective of this study was to investigate the allergy-promoting capacity of four different carbon nanofiber (CNF) samples in an injection and an airway mouse model of allergy. Secondly, the potency of the CNF was compared to the previously reported allergy-promoting capacity of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in the airway model. Ultrafine carbon black particles (ufCBP) were used as a positive control. Particles were given together with the allergen ovalbumin (OVA) either by subcutaneous injection into the footpad or intranasally to BALB/cA mice. After allergen booster, OVA-specific IgE, IgG1, and IgG2a in serum were measured. In the airway model, inflammation was determined as influx of inflammatory cells (eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages) and by mediators (MCP-1 and TNF-α present in bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF)). CNF and CNT both increased OVA-specific IgE levels in the two models, but in the airway model, the CNT gave a significantly stronger IgE response than the CNF. Furthermore, the CNT and not the CNF promoted eosinophil lung inflammation. Our data therefore suggest that nanotube-associated properties are particularly potent in promoting allergic responses. PMID:24024193

  19. Mainstream cigarette smoke exposure attenuates airway immune inflammatory responses to surrogate and common environmental allergens in mice, despite evidence of increased systemic sensitization.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Clinton S; Pouladi, Mahmoud A; Fattouh, Ramzi; Dawe, David E; Vujicic, Neda; Richards, Carl D; Jordana, Manel; Inman, Mark D; Stampfli, Martin R

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of mainstream cigarette smoke exposure (MTS) on allergic sensitization and the development of allergic inflammatory processes. Using two different experimental murine models of allergic airways inflammation, we present evidence that MTS increased cytokine production by splenocytes in response to OVA and ragweed challenge. Paradoxically, MTS exposure resulted in an overall attenuation of the immune inflammatory response, including a dramatic reduction in the number of eosinophils and activated (CD69+) and Th2-associated (T1ST2+) CD4 T lymphocytes in the lung. Although MTS did not impact circulating levels of OVA-specific IgE and IgG1, we observed a striking reduction in OVA-specific IgG2a production and significantly diminished airway hyperresponsiveness. MTS, therefore, plays a disparate role in the development of allergic responses, inducing a heightened state of allergen-specific sensitization, but dampening local immune inflammatory processes in the lung. PMID:16116169

  20. Roseotoxin B Improves Allergic Contact Dermatitis through a Unique Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism Involving Excessive Activation of Autophagy in Activated T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingqi; Hu, Chunhui; Wu, Xingxin; Wang, Shiyu; Zhang, Aihua; Chen, Wei; Shen, Yan; Tan, Renxiang; Wu, Xuefeng; Sun, Yang; Xu, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    An immunosuppressant agent with negligible or acceptable toxicity may provide a better therapeutic strategy for treatment of allergic contact dermatitis. We identified a natural cyclopeptide, roseotoxin B, that effectively suppressed cell proliferation and the production of proinflammatory cytokines in activated T cells but exhibited little naive T-cell toxicity at concentrations of 0.3-1 μmol/L. In addition, roseotoxin B inhibited the activation of AKT and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3, suppressed cell cycle-related signaling, caused G0/G1 phase arrest, reduced ribosomal protein-S3 (RPS3)-dependent NF-κB-mediated IL-2 production, and increased autophagy in activated T cells. Furthermore, picryl chloride-induced allergic contact dermatitis was significantly ameliorated by roseotoxin B in mice. The effects of roseotoxin B were inhibited in LC3-knockout mice, indicating that roseotoxin B acts in an autophagy-dependent manner in T-cell-mediated skin diseases. Overall, this study showed a mechanism for roseotoxin B-induced autophagic cell death and provided a unique perspective on autophagy-mediated down-regulation of NF-κB signaling in activated T cells. The unique anti-inflammatory mechanism of roseotoxin B against activated T lymphocytes in allergic contact dermatitis suggests that it could be a potential target for the treatment of immune-related skin diseases. PMID:27155460

  1. Cellular lesion responsible for exaggerated IgE synthesis accompanying allergic breakthrough

    SciTech Connect

    Marcelletti, J.F.; Katz, D.H.

    1989-05-01

    Appropriate levels of IgE are maintained by a cellular and molecular network composed of (1) a suppressive, Ly-1+, CD4+ T cell-dependent arm that is activated by inappropriate high levels of IgE and (2) an enhancing, CD8+ T cell-dependent arm that controls this suppression in a feedback regulatory manner. Ly-1+ T cells also function to counterbalance (inhibit) the activity of these latter CD8+ T cells. It has been previously shown that Ly-1+ T cells can reverse low-dose irradiation-induced enhancement of IgE antibody responses (i.e., allergic breakthrough). We have analyzed lymphocytes isolated from mice subjected to low-dose irradiation to determine which component of this network is defective in such animals. Stimulation of normal lymphocytes with IgE in vitro resulted in the release of lymphokines that suppress IgE antibody responses. In contrast, similar stimulation of lymphocytes from irradiated mice did not elicit secretion of such suppressive lymphokines, unless the cells were depleted of CD8+ T cells or reconstituted with normal Ly-1+ T cells. Because Ly-1+ T cells of irradiated mice could not reconstitute the response, we conclude that this functional subset of CD4+ T cells, which normally controls CD8+ T cell activity in this network, is defective in animals that exhibit irradiation-induced allergic breakthrough.

  2. Alert cell strategy: mechanisms of inflammatory response and organ protection.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Noboru; Matsuda, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is triggered by various factors such as surgical operation, trauma, burn injury, ischemia, pancreatitis and bacterial translocation. Sepsis is a SIRS associated with bacterial infection. SIRS and sepsis tend to trigger excessive production of inflammatory cytokines and other inflammatory molecules and induce multiple organ failure, such as acute lung injury, acute kidney injury and inflammatory cardiac injury. Epithelial and endothelial cells in some major organs express inflammatory receptors on the plasma membrane and work as alert cells for inflammation, and regulation of these alert cells could have a relieving effect on the inflammatory response. In inflammatory conditions, initial cardiac dysfunction is mediated by decreased preload and adequate infusion therapy is required. Tachyarrhythmia is a complication of inflammatory conditions and early control of the inflammatory reaction would prevent the structural remodeling that is resistant to therapies. Furthermore, there seems to be crosstalk between major organs with a central focus on the kidneys in inflammatory conditions. As an alert cell strategy, volatile anesthetics, sevoflurane and isoflurane, seem to have anti-inflammatory effects, and both experimental and clinical studies have shown the beneficial effects of these drugs in various settings of inflammatory conditions. On the other hand, in terms of intravenous anesthetics, propofol and ketamine, their current status is still controversial as there is a lack of confirmatory evidence on whether they have an organ-protective effect in inflammatory conditions. The local anesthetic lidocaine suppressed inflammatory responses upon both systemic and local administration. For the control of inflammatory conditions, anesthetic agents may be a target of drug development in accordance with other treatments and drugs. PMID:25229471

  3. Attenuation of IgE Affinity for FcεRI Radically Reduces the Allergic Response in Vitro and in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, James; Bracher, Marguerite G.; Shi, Jianguo; Fleury, Sébastien; Dombrowicz, David; Gould, Hannah J.; Sutton, Brian J.; Beavil, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    The high affinity of IgE for its receptor, FcεRI (Ka ∼ 1010 m–1), is responsible for the persistence of mast cell sensitization. Cross-linking of FcεRI-bound IgE by multivalent allergen leads to cellular activation and release of pro-inflammatory mediators responsible for the symptoms of allergic disease. We previously demonstrated that limiting the IgE-FcεRI interaction to just one of the two Cε3 domains in IgE-Fc, which together constitute the high affinity binding site, results in 1000-fold reduced affinity. Such attenuation, effected by a small molecule binding to part of the IgE:FcεRI interface or a distant allosteric site, rather than complete blocking of the interaction, may represent a viable approach to the treatment of allergic disease. However, the degree to which the interaction would need to be disrupted is unclear, because the importance of high affinity for immediate hypersensitivity has never been investigated. We have incorporated into human IgE a mutation, R334S, previously characterized in IgE-Fc, which reduces its affinity for FcεRI ∼50-fold. We have compared the ability of wild type and R334S IgE to stimulate allergen-induced mast cell activation in vitro and in vivo. We confirmed the expected difference in affinity between wild type and mutant IgE for FcεRI (∼50-fold) and found that, in vitro, mast cell degranulation was reduced proportionately. The effect in vivo was also marked, with a 75% reduction in the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis response. We have therefore demonstrated that the high affinity of IgE for FcεRI is critical to the allergic response, and that even moderate attenuation of this affinity has a substantial effect in vivo. PMID:18703499

  4. Contribution of Basophils to Cutaneous Immune Reactions and Th2-Mediated Allergic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Atsushi; Kabashima, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Basophils are potent effector cells of innate immunity and also play a role in T helper 2 (Th2)-mediated allergic responses. But, although their in vitro functions are well studied, their in vivo functions remain largely unknown. However, several mouse models of basophil depletion have recently been developed and used to investigate basophil functions. For example, in a croton oil-induced model of irritant contact dermatitis in conditionally basophil-depleted transgenic mice, we found that basophils rapidly infiltrate inflamed skin and subsequently induce infiltration of eosinophils. We also showed that basophils induce Th2 skewing upon epicutaneous sensitization with various haptens and peptide antigens. Intriguingly, basophils also promoted Th2 polarization upon protein antigen exposure in the presence of dendritic cells (DCs). The dermal DC subset associated with Th2 skewing was recently identified as CD301b+ DC. Such studies with basophil-deficient mouse models have significantly improved our understanding of the mechanisms involved in human immune-related diseases. In this review, we will focus on the relative contribution of basophils and DCs to Th2-mediated allergic responses. PMID:26284076

  5. Modulation of the immune response by infection with Cryptosporidium spp. in children with allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Guangorena-Gómez, J O; Maravilla-Domínguez, A; García-Arenas, G; Cervantes-Flores, M; Meza-Velázquez, R; Rivera-Guillén, M; Acosta-Saavedra, L C; Goytia-Acevedo, R C

    2016-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that the allergic response can be ameliorated by the administration of pathogen derivatives that activate Toll-like receptors and induce a Th1-type immune response (IR). Cryptosporidium is a parasite that promotes an IR via Toll-like receptors and elicits the production of Th1-type cytokines, which limit cryptosporidiosis. The aim of this study was to investigate allergy-related immune markers in children naturally infected with Cryptosporidium. In a cross-sectional study, 49 children with or without clinical diagnosis of allergies, oocysts of Cryptosporidium spp. in the faeces were screened microscopically. We microscopically screened for leucocytes, examined T and B cells for allergy-related activation markers using flow cytometry and evaluated serum for total IgE using chemiluminescence. Children with allergies and Cryptosporidium in the faeces had significantly lower levels of total IgE, B cells, CD19(+) CD23(+) and CD19(+) CD124(+) cells as well as a greater percentage of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ(+) ) and IL-4(+) CD4(+) cells than children with allergies without Cryptosporidium. This is the first description of the modulation of the IR in children with allergic diseases in the setting of natural Cryptosporidium infection. Our findings suggest the involvement of CD4(+) cells producing IL-4 and IFN-γ in the IR to Cryptosporidium in naturally infected children. PMID:27150641

  6. Enhancement of allergic responses in vivo and in vitro by butylated hydroxytoluene

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaki, Kouya; Taneda, Shinji; Yanagisawa, Rie; Inoue, Ken-ichiro; Takano, Hirohisa; Yoshino, Shin

    2007-09-01

    The effect of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), which is used widely as an antioxidant, on IgE-dependent allergic responses in vivo and in vitro was investigated. For in vivo study, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) was elicited in rats by i.d. injection of anti-DNP IgE and 48 h later by i.v. injection of DNP-HSA. BHT was i.p. given immediately after anti-DNP IgE injection. For in vitro studies, the rat mast cell line RBL2H3 sensitized with monoclonal anti-dinitrophenol (DNP) IgE was challenged with the multivalent antigen DNP-human serum albumin (DNP-HSA) in the presence or absence of BHT. {beta}-Hexosaminidase and histamine released from RBL2H3 cells, as indicators of degranulation of the cells, the concentration of intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, the level of phosphorylated-Akt, and global tyrosine phosphorylation as indicators of mast cell activation, were measured. The results showed that BHT given to anti-DNP IgE-sensitized rats augmented DNP-specific PCA in a dose-dependent manner. In the presence of BHT, IgE-induced releases of {beta}-hexosaminidase and histamine from RBL2H3 cells were increased. BHT also further elevated IgE-mediated increased concentrations of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} and the levels of phosphorylated-Akt, but did not affect global tyrosine phosphorylation, in RBL2H3 cells. Moreover, the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 inhibited IgE-dependent degranulation and its enhancement by BHT. These findings indicate that BHT may upregulate PCA by enhancing mast cell degranulation associated with enhancements of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration and PI3K activation, suggesting that BHT might affect allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis and asthma.

  7. Bronchodilator and Anti-Inflammatory Action of Theophylline in a Model of Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Urbanova, A; Kertys, M; Simekova, M; Mikolka, P; Kosutova, P; Mokra, D; Mokry, J

    2016-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) represent a super-family of 11 enzymes hydrolyzing cyclic nucleotides into inactive 5' monophosphates. Inhibition of PDEs leads to a variety of cellular effects, including airway smooth muscle relaxation, inhibition of cellular inflammation, and immune responses. In this study we focused on theophylline, a known non-selective inhibitor of PDEs. Theophylline has been used for decades in the treatment of chronic inflammatory airway diseases. It has a narrow therapeutic window and belongs to the drugs whose plasma concentration should be monitored. Therefore, the main goal of this study was to evaluate the plasma theophylline concentration and to determine its relevance to pharmacological effects after single and longer term (7 days) administration of theophylline at different doses (5, 10, 20, and 50 mg/kg) in guinea pigs. Airway hyperresponsiveness was assessed by repeated exposure to ovalbumin. Theophylline reduced specific airway resistance in response to histamine nebulization, measured in a double chamber body plethysmograph. A decrease in tracheal smooth muscle contractility after cumulative doses of histamine and acetylcholine was confirmed in vitro. A greater efficacy of theophylline after seven days long treatment indicates the predominance of its anti-inflammatory activity, which may be involved in the bronchodilating action. PMID:27334733

  8. Rupatadine in allergic rhinitis and chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Mullol, J; Bousquet, J; Bachert, C; Canonica, W G; Gimenez-Arnau, A; Kowalski, M L; Martí-Guadaño, E; Maurer, M; Picado, C; Scadding, G; Van Cauwenberge, P

    2008-04-01

    overall well-being of patients with allergic rhinitis or CIU based on findings from quality of life questionnaires and patient global rating scores in clinical trials. Thus, rupatadine is a recently introduced dual inhibitor of histamine H(1)- and PAF-receptors, which has been shown to be an effective and generally well-tolerated treatment for allergic rhinitis and chronic urticaria. It possesses a broader profile of anti-inflammatory properties inhibiting both inflammatory cells and a range of mediators involved in the early- and late-phase inflammatory response, but the clinical relevance of these effects remain to be clarified. PMID:18339040

  9. Airway Fibrinogenolysis and the Initiation of Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Millien, Valentine Ongeri; Lu, Wen; Mak, Garbo; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Knight, J. Morgan; Porter, Paul; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2014-01-01

    The past 15 years of allergic disease research have produced extraordinary improvements in our understanding of the pathogenesis of airway allergic diseases such as asthma. Whereas it was previously viewed as largely an immunoglobulin E-mediated process, the gradual recognition that T cells, especially Type 2 T helper (Th2) cells and Th17 cells, play a major role in asthma and related afflictions has inspired clinical trials targeting cytokine-based inflammatory pathways that show great promise. What has yet to be clarified about the pathogenesis of allergic inflammatory disorders, however, are the fundamental initiating factors, both exogenous and endogenous, that drive and sustain B- and T-cell responses that underlie the expression of chronic disease. Here we review how proteinases derived from diverse sources drive allergic responses. A central discovery supporting the proteinase hypothesis of allergic disease pathophysiology is the role played by airway fibrinogen, which in part appears to serve as a sensor of unregulated proteinase activity and which, when cleaved, both participates in a novel allergic signaling pathway through Toll-like receptor 4 and forms fibrin clots that contribute to airway obstruction. Unresolved at present is the ultimate source of airway allergenic proteinases. From among many potential candidates, perhaps the most intriguing is the possibility such enzymes derive from airway fungi. Together, these new findings expand both our knowledge of allergic disease pathophysiology and options for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25525732

  10. Functional Roles of Syk in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Young-Su; Son, Young-Jin; Ryou, Chongsuk; Sung, Gi-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a series of complex biological responses to protect the host from pathogen invasion. Chronic inflammation is considered a major cause of diseases, such as various types of inflammatory/autoimmune diseases and cancers. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) was initially found to be highly expressed in hematopoietic cells and has been known to play crucial roles in adaptive immune responses. However, recent studies have reported that Syk is also involved in other biological functions, especially in innate immune responses. Although Syk has been extensively studied in adaptive immune responses, numerous studies have recently presented evidence that Syk has critical functions in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses and is closely related to innate immune response. This review describes the characteristics of Syk-mediated signaling pathways, summarizes the recent findings supporting the crucial roles of Syk in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses and diseases, and discusses Syk-targeted drug development for the therapy of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25045209

  11. Elevated and cross-responsive CD1a-reactive T cells in bee and wasp venom allergic individuals.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sumithra; Aslam, Aamir; Misbah, Siraj A; Salio, Mariolina; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Moody, D Branch; Ogg, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The role of CD1a-reactive T cells in human allergic disease is unknown. We have previously shown that circulating CD1a-reactive T cells recognize neolipid antigens generated by bee and wasp venom phospholipase, and here tested the hypothesis that venom-responsive CD1a-reactive T cells associate with venom allergy. Circulating T cells from bee and wasp venom allergic individuals, before and during immunotherapy, were exposed to CD1a-transfected K562 cells in the presence of wasp or bee venom. T-cell response was evaluated based on IFNγ, GM-CSF, and IL-13 cytokine production. Venom allergic individuals showed significantly higher frequencies of IFN-γ, GM-CSF, and IL-13 producing CD1a-reactive T cells responsive to venom and venom-derived phospholipase than healthy individuals. Venom-responsive CD1a-reactive T cells were cross-responsive between wasp and bee suggesting shared pathways of allergenicity. Frequencies of CD1a-reactive T cells were initially induced during subcutaneous immunotherapy, peaking by weeks 5, but then reduced despite escalation of antigen dose. Our current understanding of venom allergy and immunotherapy is largely based on peptide and protein-specific T cell and antibody responses. Here, we show that lipid antigens and CD1a-reactive T cells associate with the allergic response. These data have implications for mechanisms of allergy and approaches to immunotherapy. PMID:26518614

  12. Elevated and cross‐responsive CD1a‐reactive T cells in bee and wasp venom allergic individuals

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Sumithra; Aslam, Aamir; Misbah, Siraj A.; Salio, Mariolina; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Moody, D Branch

    2015-01-01

    The role of CD1a‐reactive T cells in human allergic disease is unknown. We have previously shown that circulating CD1a‐reactive T cells recognize neolipid antigens generated by bee and wasp venom phospholipase, and here tested the hypothesis that venom‐responsive CD1a‐reactive T cells associate with venom allergy. Circulating T cells from bee and wasp venom allergic individuals, before and during immunotherapy, were exposed to CD1a‐transfected K562 cells in the presence of wasp or bee venom. T‐cell response was evaluated based on IFNγ, GM‐CSF, and IL‐13 cytokine production. Venom allergic individuals showed significantly higher frequencies of IFN‐γ, GM‐CSF, and IL‐13 producing CD1a‐reactive T cells responsive to venom and venom‐derived phospholipase than healthy individuals. Venom‐responsive CD1a‐reactive T cells were cross‐responsive between wasp and bee suggesting shared pathways of allergenicity. Frequencies of CD1a‐reactive T cells were initially induced during subcutaneous immunotherapy, peaking by weeks 5, but then reduced despite escalation of antigen dose. Our current understanding of venom allergy and immunotherapy is largely based on peptide and protein‐specific T cell and antibody responses. Here, we show that lipid antigens and CD1a‐reactive T cells associate with the allergic response. These data have implications for mechanisms of allergy and approaches to immunotherapy. PMID:26518614

  13. Allergic rhinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic to, such as dust, animal dander, or pollen. Symptoms can also occur when you eat a ... article focuses on allergic rhinitis due to plant pollens. This type of allergic rhinitis is commonly called ...

  14. Differential effects of endogenous and exogenous interferon-gamma on immunoglobulin E, cellular infiltration, and airway responsiveness in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Hofstra, C L; Van Ark, I; Hofman, G; Nijkamp, F P; Jardieu, P M; Van Oosterhout, A J

    1998-11-01

    The inflammatory response as seen in human allergic asthma is thought to be regulated by Th2 cells. It has been shown that interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) can downregulate the proliferation of Th2 cells and therefore might be of therapeutic use. In the present study we have investigated the in vivo role of endogenous and exogenous IFN-gamma in a murine model with features reminiscent of human allergic asthma. IFN-gamma gene knockout (GKO) and wild-type mice were sensitized with ovalbumin and exposed to repeated ovalbumin aerosol challenges. In addition, wild-type mice were treated with intraperitoneal or nebulized recombinant murine IFN-gamma during the challenge period. Sensitized wild-type mice exhibited upregulated ovalbumin-specific IgE in serum, and airway hyperresponsiveness and infiltration of eosinophils and mononuclear cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) after ovalbumin challenge. In contrast, in GKO mice only reduced eosinophilic infiltration in the BALF was observed after ovalbumin challenge. In wild-type mice, parenteral IFN-gamma treatment downregulated ovalbumin-specific IgE levels in serum, and airway hyperresponsiveness and cellular infiltration in the BALF, whereas aerosolized IFN-gamma treatment only suppressed airway hyperresponsiveness. In vitro experiments showed that these effects of IFN-gamma appear not to be mediated via a direct effect on the cytokine production of antigen-specific Th2 cells. These data indicate that airway hyperresponsiveness can be downregulated by IFN-gamma locally in the airways, whereas for downregulation of IgE and cellular infiltration systemic IFN-gamma is needed. The present study shows that exogenous IFN-gamma can downregulate the allergic response via an antigen-specific T-cell independent mechanism, but at the same time endogenous IFN-gamma plays a role in an optimal response. PMID:9806748

  15. Basophil response to peanut allergens in Mediterranean peanut-allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, C; Gomez, F; Aranda, A; Koppelman, S J; Diaz-Perales, A; Blanca-López, N; Blazquez, A B; Blanca, M; Torres, M J

    2014-07-01

    Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Ara h 3 are important sensitizers in peanut allergy. Ara h 9 has also been shown to be relevant in the Mediterranean area. We evaluated the basophil response to peanut allergens and Pru p 3 in Mediterranean patients: Group 1, peanut and peach allergy; Group 2, peanut allergy and tolerance to peach; Group 3, peach allergy and tolerance to peanut; Group 4, nonallergic subjects that tolerate both peanut and peach. Compared to controls (Group 4), there was an increased basophil activation with Ara h 2 (P = 0.031) and Pru p 3 (P = 0.009) in Group 1 and with Ara h 1 (P = 0.016), Ara h 2 (P = 0.001), and Ara h 9 (P = 0.016) in Group 2. Importantly, only Ara h 2 showed an increased activation (P = 0.009) in Group 2 compared to Group 3. Ara h 2 is the best discriminating allergen for peanut allergy diagnosis in a Mediterranean population showing two patterns: patients also allergic to peach, responding to Ara h 2 and Pru p 3, and patients allergic only to peanut, responding to Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Ara h 9. PMID:24816395

  16. Possible involvement of soluble B7-H4 in T cell-mediated inflammatory immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Yosuke; Kobori, Hiroko; Piao, Jinhua; Hashiguchi, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Koichiro; Hirose, Sachiko; Azuma, Miyuki

    2009-11-13

    B7-H4, a newly identified B7 family molecule, is reported to regulate T cell activation. However, the expression and function of B7-H4 remain controversial. Here, we demonstrated that B7-H4 expression in immune cells was undetectable at both the transcription and cell-surface protein levels. B7-H4 transfectants augmented anti-CD3 mAb-induced re-directed cytotoxicity and this was inhibited by anti-B7-H4 mAb. In a hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity model, treatment with anti-B7-H4 mAb at sensitization, but not at challenge, efficiently suppressed the ear swelling and CD8(+) T cell activation assessed by CD25 expression and IFN-gamma production. We found that cells expressing B7-H4 secreted soluble B7-H4 and the serum B7-H4 level increased with disease progression in lupus-prone and collagen-induced arthritis autoimmune mice and after the antigen challenge in allergic inflammatory diseases. Our results suggest a different action of B7-H4 in T cell-mediated inflammatory responses and the possible involvement of soluble B7-H4 in inflammatory immune responses. PMID:19723502

  17. Inhibitory effect of fermented Arctium lappa fruit extract on the IgE-mediated allergic response in RBL‑2H3 cells.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae-Myung; Yang, Ju Hye; Yang, Hye Jin; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2016-02-01

    Arctium lappa fruit has been used in traditional medicine, and it is known to exert beneficial effects, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects. However, the effects of the Arctium lappa fruit on the allergic response remain unknown. In this study, we evaluated the anti-allergic effects of Arctium lappa fruit extract (AFE) and its fermented form (F-AFE) using immunoglobulin E (IgE)-activated RBL‑2H3 cells. To investigate the anti-allergic effects of AFE or F-AFE, we examined the release of β-hexosaminidase, a key biomarker of degranulation during an allergic reaction, and the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the cells treated with or without the above-mentioned extracts. AFE weakly inhibited the release of β-hexosaminidase, whereas F-AFE significantly suppressed the release of β-hexosaminidase in a dose-dependent manner. Consistently, F-AFE suppressed the production of TNF-α and PGE2 in a dose-dependent manner. F-AFE exerted an inhibitory effect on the production of β-hexosaminidase, TNF-α and PGE2 with an IC50 value of 30.73, 46.96 and 36.27 µg/ml, respectively. Furthermore, F-AFE inhibited the phosphorylation of Lyn, Fyn and Syk, which are involved in the FcεRI signaling pathway, that of phosphoinositide phospholipase C (PLC)γ1/2 and protein kinase C (PKC)δ, which are associated with the degranulation process, as well as that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK), p38 and Akt, which are associated with cytokine expression. In the late phase, F-AFE partially suppressed the phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), but not the expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2. To compare and identify the major components of the two extracts, we used high-performance liquid chromatography. The levels of arctigenin, one of the major compounds, were elevated 6-fold in F-AFE compared with AFE, whereas the

  18. Response to Nonallergenic Irritants in Children With Allergic and Nonallergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Ji Hyeon; Cho, Eunhae; Kim, Mi Ae; Lee, Seung Won; Kang, Yu Sun; Sheen, Youn Ho; Jee, Hye Mi; Jung, Young-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Nonallergenic irritants can aggravate the symptoms of rhinitis. We investigated the clinical responses of children with allergic rhinitis (AR) and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) to nonallergenic irritants, and identified factors associated with these responses. Methods Children with chronic rhinitis (n=208) were classified as having AR or NAR based on the presence of aeroallergen-specific IgE. Healthy controls (n=24) were recruited for comparison. The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines were used to classify patients, and their irritant score (0-21 points) and current symptom score (5-35 points) were measured. Subjects with irritant scores ≥3 and <3 were classified as having irritant and nonirritant rhinitis, respectively. Results The mean age of enrolled subjects was 6.8 years (range: 1.8-16.0 years). The AR and NAR groups had similar irritant scores (P=0.394) and proportions of subjects with irritant scores ≥3 (P=0.105). Irritant score correlated positively with symptom score (P=0.005), and the proportion of subjects with irritant scores ≥3 was greater in children with moderate-severe rhinitis than in those with mild rhinitis (P=0.046). Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the presence of atopic eczema increased the risk for sensitivity to a nonallergenic irritant (aOR=2.928, 95% CI 1.567-5.473, P=0.001). Conclusions Response to a nonallergenic irritant was useful for gauging the severity of rhinitis, but not for differentiating AR from NAR. AR and NAR patients with atopic eczema may increase nasal sensitivity to nonallergenic irritants. PMID:27126728

  19. Mediator profiles in tears during the conjunctival response induced by allergic reaction in the nasal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The allergic reaction occurring primarily in the nasal mucosa can induce a secondary conjunctival response of an immediate (SICR), late (SLCR), or delayed (SDYCR) type in some patients with allergic conjunctivitis (AC). Objectives To investigate the concentration changes of histamine, tryptase, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN), leukotrienes (LTB 4, LTC4, LTE4), myeloperoxidase (MPO), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and interleukins (IL-2, IL-4, IL-5) in tears during the SICR, SLCR, and SDYCR. Methods In 32 patients with AC, 11 SICR (p<0.01), 13 SLCR (p<0.001), and eight SDYCR (p<0.01) to nasal challenges with allergens (NPTs), the NPTs and 32 control tests with PBS were repeated and supplemented with the determination of these factors in tears. Results The SICRs were associated with significant concentration changes in tears (p<0.05) of histamine, tryptase, ECP, LTC4, and IL-4. The SLCRs were accompanied by significant changes in concentrations of histamine, ECP, LTB4, LTC4, MPO, IL-4, and IL-5. The SDYCRs were associated with significant concentration changes in tears (p<0.05) of LTB4, MPO, IFN-γ, and IL-2. No significant changes in these factors were recorded in tears during the 32 PBS controls (p>0.1) or in the ten control patients (p>0.1). Conclusions These results provide evidence for causal involvement of nasal allergy in some patients with AC, inducing secondary conjunctival response of immediate (SICR), late SLCR, or delayed SDYCR type, associated with different mediator, cytokine, and cellular profiles in the tears, suggesting involvement of different hypersensitivity mechanisms. These results also emphasize the diagnostic value of nasal allergen challenge combined with monitoring of the conjunctival response in some patients with AC. PMID:23869165

  20. Neurology of allergic inflammation and rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Canning, Brendan J

    2002-05-01

    Afferent nerves, derived from the trigeminal ganglion, and postganglionic autonomic nerves, derived from sympathetic and parasympathetic ganglia expressing many different neurotransmitters, innervate the nose. Reflexes that serve to optimize the air-conditioning function of the nose by altering sinus blood flow, or serve to protect the nasal mucosal surface by mucus secretion, vasodilatation, and sneezing, can be initiated by a variety of stimuli, including allergen, cold air, and chemical irritation. Activation of nasal afferent nerves can also have profound effects on respiration, heart rate, blood pressure, and airway caliber (the diving response). Dysregulation of the nerves in the nose plays an integral role in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis. Axon reflexes can precipitate inflammatory responses in the nose, resulting in plasma extravasation and inflammatory cell recruitment, while allergic inflammation can produce neuronal hyper-responsiveness. Targeting the neuronal dysregulation in the nose may be beneficial in treating upper airway disease. PMID:11918862

  1. The ectoenzyme E-NPP3 negatively regulates ATP-dependent chronic allergic responses by basophils and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shih Han; Kinoshita, Makoto; Kusu, Takashi; Kayama, Hisako; Okumura, Ryu; Ikeda, Kayo; Shimada, Yosuke; Takeda, Akira; Yoshikawa, Soichiro; Obata-Ninomiya, Kazushige; Kurashima, Yosuke; Sato, Shintaro; Umemoto, Eiji; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Karasuyama, Hajime; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2015-02-17

    Crosslinking of the immunoglobulin receptor FcεRI activates basophils and mast cells to induce immediate and chronic allergic inflammation. However, it remains unclear how the chronic allergic inflammation is regulated. Here, we showed that ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase-phosphodiesterase 3 (E-NPP3), also known as CD203c, rapidly induced by FcεRI crosslinking, negatively regulated chronic allergic inflammation. Basophil and mast cell numbers increased in Enpp3(-/-) mice with augmented serum ATP concentrations. Enpp3(-/-) mice were highly sensitive to chronic allergic pathologies, which was reduced by ATP blockade. FcεRI crosslinking induced ATP secretion from basophils and mast cells, and ATP activated both cells. ATP clearance was impaired in Enpp3(-/-) cells. Enpp3(-/-)P2rx7(-/-) mice showed decreased responses to FcεRI crosslinking. Thus, ATP released by FcεRI crosslinking stimulates basophils and mast cells for further activation causing allergic inflammation. E-NPP3 decreases ATP concentration and suppresses basophil and mast cell activity. PMID:25692702

  2. Investigational drugs for allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Passalacqua, Giovanni; Compalati, Enrico; Canonica, Giorgio Walter

    2010-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a high-prevalence disease, triggered by an IgE-mediated reaction, and sustained by a complex inflammatory network of cells, mediators, and cytokines. When the exposure to allergens persists, the inflammatory process becomes chronic. The current therapeutic strategy is based on allergen avoidance when possible, drugs and allergen immunotherapy. The main drugs are oral and topical antihistamines and nasal steroids. They are overall effective in controlling symptoms, but do not modify the immune background that leads to allergic inflammation. In addition, safety concerns may be present, especially for prolonged treatments. Thus, efforts are currently made to improve the existing molecules and to develop new drugs, in order to achieve greater clinical efficacy with a better tolerability. Also, attempts are made to selectively block relevant signal pathways of the allergic reaction by means of specific anti-mediators. Specific immunotherapy, in addition to the clinical effect, is capable of modifying the Th2-biased immune response. Thus, an intense research activity is presently ongoing with the aim of improving the characteristics and modes of action of this treatment. PMID:20001557

  3. EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST ON PULMONARY RESPONSES DURING ALLERGIC SENSITIZATION TO AEROSOLIZED OVALBUMIN IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Diesel Exhaust on Pulmonary Responses During Allergic Sensitization to Aerosolized Ovalbumin in BALB/c Mice. P. Singh1, M.J. Daniels1, D. Andrews1, E. Boykin1, W. P. Linak2 and M.I. Gilmour1. 1USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC. 2 USEPA, ORD, NRMRL, RTP, NC.

    Inhala...

  4. EFFECTS OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION (UVR) ON THE RESPIRATORY ALLERGIC RESPONSES OF BALB/C MICE TO A FUNGAL ALLERGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION (UVR) ON THE RESPIRATORY ALLERGIC RESPONSES OF BALB/C MICE TO A FUNGAL ALLERGEN. M D W Ward, D M Sailstad, D L Andrews, E H Boykin, and MJ K Selgrade. National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Developmen...

  5. RESPIRATORY PHYSIOLOGICAL AND ALLERGIC-TYPE RESPONSES TO AN EXTRACT OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    RESPIRATORY PHYSIOLOGICAL AND ALLERGIC-TYPE RESPONSES TO AN EXTRACT OF Stachybotrys chartarum IN BALB/C MICE. ME Viana1, N Haykal-Coates2, S H Gavett2, MJ Selgrade2, and M D W Ward2. 1APR/CVM, NCSU, Raleigh, NC, USA. 2NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.
    Rationale: assess the ab...

  6. Mucosal delivery of allergen peptides expressed by Lactococcus lactis inhibit allergic responses in a BALB/c mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ai, Chunqing; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Ding, Junrong; Wang, Gang; Liu, Xiaoming; Tian, Fengwei; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is considered to be the only curative treatment of allergy, but its safety is always affected by immunologic properties and quality of allergen. Recombinant allergen derivative could be a potential therapeutic strategy, but clinical studies showed that macromolecular derivatives could not avoid T cell-mediated side effects. In this study, five Der p2-derived peptides (DPs) containing major T cell epitopes of Der p2 were first artificially synthesized. Compared with Der p2 macromolecular derivative DM, these DPs not only fully eliminated IgE-binding capacity but also reduced T cells reactivity, suggesting these DPs could be better therapeutic molecules. For their application in vivo, Lactococcus lactis was engineered to express these DPs, and their protective effects were evaluated in BALB/c mice models. Western blot showed that all DPs could be produced in the recombinant strains. Mucosal delivery of these strains could inhibit Der p2-induced allergic responses in Der p2-sensitized mice, characterized by a reduction in specific IgE antibody and lung inflammatory responses. These protective effects were associated with an increase of specific IgG2a in serum and regulatory T cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes. On the whole, the suppressive effect induced by the DP mixture could be better than single DP, but a bit weaker than DM. These DPs could be promising candidate molecules for active vaccination and induction of tolerance, and thus promote the development of non-allergenic peptide in the treatment and prevention of allergy. PMID:26621801

  7. Neurturin influences inflammatory responses and airway remodeling in different mouse asthma models.

    PubMed

    Mauffray, Marion; Domingues, Olivia; Hentges, François; Zimmer, Jacques; Hanau, Daniel; Michel, Tatiana

    2015-02-15

    Neurturin (NTN) was previously described for its neuronal activities, but recently, we have shown that this factor is also involved in asthma physiopathology. However, the underlying mechanisms of NTN are unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate NTN involvement in acute bronchial Th2 responses, to analyze its interaction with airway structural cells, and to study its implication in remodeling during acute and chronic bronchial inflammation in C57BL/6 mice. We analyzed the features of allergic airway inflammation in wild-type and NTN(-/-) mice after sensitization with two different allergens, OVA and house dust mite. We showed that NTN(-/-) dendritic cells and T cells had a stronger tendency to activate the Th2 pathway in vitro than similar wild-type cells. Furthermore, NTN(-/-) mice had significantly increased markers of airway remodeling like collagen deposition. NTN(-/-) lung tissues showed higher levels of neutrophils, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, matrix metalloproteinase 9, TNF-α, and IL-6. Finally, NTN had the capacity to decrease IL-6 and TNF-α production by immune and epithelial cells, showing a direct anti-inflammatory activity on these cells. Our findings support the hypothesis that NTN could modulate the allergic inflammation in different mouse asthma models. PMID:25595789

  8. Immunologic principles of allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Averbeck, Marco; Gebhardt, Carl; Emmrich, Frank; Treudler, Regina; Simon, Jan C

    2007-11-01

    Allergy either results from a pathological excessive immune reaction, or from the defective induction of tolerance to otherwise harmless antigens. Allergic reactions are mounted by mechanisms of innate and adaptive immunity. The development of an allergic response can be divided in sensitization and elicitation phases. Immediate type allergic reactions (e.g. anaphylaxis, urticaria, rhinoconjunctivitis allergica, allergic asthma) are mediated by IgE antibodies which are produced by B cells stimulated by allergen-specific Th2 cells. Crosslinking of allergen-specific IgE on membrane surfaces of mast cells and basophilic granulocytes leads to release of soluble mediators which may cause systemic symptoms within minutes to hours. The following infiltration of eosinophilic granulocytes and Th2 cells directs chronic inflammation. Humoral cytotoxic immune reactions (e.g. drug induced cytopenia) are mediated by IgG and IgM antibodies which are directed against membrane associated antigens. IgG and IgM antibodies directed against soluble antigens elicit immune complex mediated cytotoxicity (e.g.drug induced vasculitis). Delayed type immune reactions (e.g.contact dermatitis) are based on the activation of antigen specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and need 24 h to 48 h to develop. Upon recurrent contact with identical antigens, recruitment of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells cause inflammation and cytotoxic induced apoptosis in target cells as well as cytokine mediated leukocyte infiltration. Subsequent immigration of CD4(+) Th2 cells provides anti-inflammatory mechanisms leading to resolution of the inflammatory response and tissue repair. PMID:17976144

  9. Intranasal mite allergen induces allergic asthma-like responses in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Shibamori, Masafumi; Ogino, Keiki; Kambayashi, Yasuhiro; Ishiyama, Hironobu

    2006-01-25

    Airway responses induced by intranasal administration of mite allergen without adjuvant were studied in NC/Nga mice. A crude extract of Dermatophagoides farinae (Df) was administered for 5 consecutive days and a single intranasal challenge booster dose was given 1 week after the last sensitization. 24 h after the single challenge, the airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) was measured and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was analyzed for numbers of eosinophils and neutrophils, and both cytokine and chemokine levels. There were marked increases in number of eosinophils in the BALF, AHR, Th2 cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13), and chemokine (eotaxin-1 and eotaxin-2) levels in the BALF following Df exposure. C57BL/6N, A/J, BALB/c, and CBA/JN mouse strains were also exposed to Df crude extract, but all of the measured responses were strongest in NC/Nga mice. Furthermore, Df-exposed NC/Nga mice showed the goblet cell hyperplasia, pulmonary eosinophilic inflammation, and increases in both total serum IgE and Df-specific IgG1. After intranasal exposure of NC/Nga mice to crude extract of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, the BALF eosinophilia and AHR were similar to responses induced by Df. None of the study parameters were increased in response to intranasal exposure to ovalbumin. These data demonstrated that NC/Nga mice developed allergic asthma-like responses after intranasal exposure to mite allergens. PMID:16229861

  10. Allergic manifestations and cutaneous histamine responses in patients with McCune Albright syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background McCune Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare disorder characterized by precocious puberty, café-au-lait spots, and fibrous dysplasia. Its cause is an activating mutation in the GNAS gene, encoding a subunit of the stimulatory G protein, Gsalpha (Gsα). The action of any mediator that signals via Gsα and cyclic AMP can be up regulated in MAS. We had observed gastritis, gastroesophageal reflux, and anaphylaxis in McCune Albright patients. Objective As histamine is known to signal via histamine 1 (H1) and histamine 2 (H2) receptors, which couple with stimulatory G proteins, we attempted to mechanistically link histamine responsiveness to the activating GNAS mutation. We hypothesized that responsiveness to histamine skin testing would differ between MAS patients and healthy controls. Patients and methods After obtaining informed consent, we performed a systematic review of histamine responsiveness and allergic manifestations in 11 MAS patients and 11 sex-matched, Tanner-stage matched controls. We performed skin prick testing, quantifying the orthogonal diameters of wheals and erythema. We also quantitated G protein mRNA expression. Results The peak wheal and flare responses to histamine were significantly higher in MAS patients compared to controls. Conclusions This study suggests that MAS patients may be at risk for exaggerated histamine responsiveness compared to unaffected controls. PMID:23663565

  11. Modulation of peanut-induced allergic immune responses by oral lactic acid bacteria-based vaccines in mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chengcheng; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Wang, Gang; Ai, Chunqing; Hu, Mengsha; Liu, Xiaoming; Tian, Fengwei; Zhao, Jianxin; Chen, Yongquan; Wang, Miao; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Peanut allergy (PNA) has becoming a non-negligible health concern worldwide. Thus far, allergen-specific immunotherapy aimed at inducing mucosal tolerance has widely been regarded as a major management strategy for PNA. The safety profiles and the intrinsic probiotic properties of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) render them attractive delivery vehicles for mucosal vaccines. In the present study, we exploited genetically modified Lactococcus lactis to produce peanut allergen Ara h 2 via different protein-targeting systems and their immunomodulatory potency for allergic immune responses in mice were investigated. By comparison with the strain expressing the cytoplasmic form of Ara h 2 (LL1), the strains expressing the secreted and anchored forms of Ara h 2 (LL2 and LL3) were more potent in redirecting a Th2-polarized to a non-allergic Th1 immune responses. Induction of SIgA and regulatory T cells were also observed at the local levels by orally administration of recombinant L. lactis. Our results indicate that allergen-producing L. lactis strains modulated allergic immune responses and may be developed as promising mucosal vaccines for managing allergic diseases. PMID:24770368

  12. Macrophage Expression of Inflammatory Genes in Response to EMCV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Zachary R.; Corbett, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The expression and production of type 1 interferon is the classic cellular response to virus infection. In addition to this antiviral response, virus infection also stimulates the production of proinflammatory mediators. In this review, the pathways controlling the induction of inflammatory genes and the roles that these inflammatory mediators contribute to host defense against viral pathogens will be discussed. Specific focus will be on the role of the chemokine receptor CCR5, as a signaling receptor controlling the activation of pathways leading to virus-induced inflammatory gene expression. PMID:26295266

  13. The systemic inflammatory response in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Anderson

    2000-09-01

    The physiologic diagnosis of heart failure has changed very little over the past several decades: heart failure is the inability of the cardiac output to meet the metabolic demands of the organism. The clinical definition of heart failure (also relatively unchanged) describes it as ventricular dysfunction that is accompanied by reduced exercise tolerance. Our understanding of the true pathophysiologic processes involved in heart failure have, however, changed. We have moved from thinking of heart failure as primarily a circulatory phenomenon to seeing it as a pathophysiologic state under the control of multiple complex systems. Over the past several years the dramatic explosion of research in the fields of immunology and immunopathology have added an additional piece to the puzzle that defines heart failure and have lead to an understanding of heart failure, at least in some part, as an 'inflammatory disease'. In this review we will examine several of the key inflammatory mediators as they relate to heart failure while at the same time attempting to define the source(s) of these mediators. We will examine key elements of the inflammatory cascade as they relate to heart failure such as: cytokines, 'proximal mediators' (e.g. NF-kappaB), and distal mediators (e.g. nitric oxide). We will end with a discussion of the potential therapeutic role of anti-inflammatory strategies in the future treatment of heart failure. Also, throughout the review we will examine the potential pitfalls encountered in applying bench discoveries to the bedside as have been learned in the field of septic shock research. PMID:10978715

  14. Cassia tora Seed Extract and Its Active Compound Aurantio-obtusin Inhibit Allergic Responses in IgE-Mediated Mast Cells and Anaphylactic Models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungsuk; Lim, Sue Ji; Lee, Hee-Ju; Nho, Chu Won

    2015-10-21

    Cassia tora seed is widely used due to its various biological properties including anticancer, antidiabetic, and anti-inflammatory effects. However, there has been no report of the effects of C. tora seed extract (CTE) on immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergic responses. In this research, we demonstrated the effects of CTE and its active compound aurantio-obtusin on IgE-sensitized allergic reactions in mast cells and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA). CTE and aurantio-obtusin suppressed degranulation, histamine production, and reactive oxygen species generation and inhibited the production and mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-4. CTE and aurantio-obtusin also suppressed the prostaglandin E2 production and expression of cyclooxygenase 2. Furthermore, CTE and aurantio-obtusin suppressed IgE-mediated FcεRI signaling such as phosphorylation of Syk, protein kinase Cμ, phospholipase Cγ, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. CTE and aurantio-obtusin blocked mast cell-dependent PCA in IgE-mediated mice. These results suggest that CTE and aurantio-obtusin are a beneficial treatment for allergy-related diseases. PMID:26434611

  15. Diminished lymphocyte adhesion and alleviation of allergic responses by small-molecule- or antibody-mediated inhibition of L-selectin functions.

    PubMed

    Oostingh, Gertie J; Ludwig, Ralf J; Enders, Sven; Grüner, Sabine; Harms, Gesche; Boehncke, W Henning; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Tauber, Rudolf; Schön, Michael P

    2007-01-01

    Selectins are attractive targets for specific anti-inflammatory therapies. Using human lymphocytes as well as an L-selectin-transfected pre-B-cell line in dynamic flow chamber experiments, we could demonstrate that the small-molecule compound efomycine M blocks L-selectin-mediated lymphocyte rolling on sialylated Lewis(X), an action that was confirmed by plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Recruitment of naive lymphocytes to peripheral lymph nodes depends on L-selectin-mediated adhesion to high endothelial venules. We performed intravital microscopy studying lymphocyte rolling in peripheral lymph nodes and showed a 53% reduction (P=0.0006) of lymphocyte rolling in mice treated with efomycine M or a function-blocking antibody against L-selectin. In addition, the number of lymph node-homing T cells was reduced by >60% using either efomycine M or L-selectin-blocking antibodies. As recruitment of naive lymphocytes is a prerequisite for sensitization in T-cell-mediated immune reactions and allergic responses, mice were treated with efomycine M or an L-selectin-specific antibody during contact sensitization with DNFB. After adoptive transfer of corresponding T cells into non-sensitized recipient mice, the capacity of these cells to induce contact hypersensitivity was significantly reduced (P=0.0002 and P=0.0001, respectively). Our data demonstrate that it is possible, in principle, to diminish T-cell-mediated allergic reactions through interference with L-selectin functions during the early sensitization phase. PMID:16902419

  16. CROSS REACTIVITY IN ALLERGIC ASTHMA-LIKE RESPONSES BETWEEN MOLD AND HOUSE DUST MITE IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molds are ubiquitous in the environment and exposures to molds contribute to various human diseases including allergic asthma. Some mold allergens have been implicated as the causal agent for allergic asthma. Western blot analysis demonstrated IgE-binding cross-reactivity among m...

  17. ALLERGIC RESPONSE TO PLATINUM AND PALLADIUM COMPLEXES DETERMINATION OF NO-EFFECT LEVEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rabbits, guinea pigs and mice were subcutaneously injected with PtSO4 (with and without NH4Cl) and PdSO4 (with and without NH4Cl) in an attempt to sensitize the animals to platinum or palladium. No allergic induction was found. No allergic induction to platinum or palladium was f...

  18. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response in Orofacial Inflammatory Pain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eun Sun; Bae, Jin Young; Kim, Tae Heon; Kim, Yun Sook; Suk, Kyoungho

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in many neurological diseases and inflammatory responses. Inflammatory mediators induce neuronal damage and trigger the neuropathic or inflammatory pain. But there is very little data on the role of the ER stress response in pain mechanisms. In this study, we explored whether the ER stress response is involved in orofacial inflammatory pain by using a complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-injected rat model. The thermal pain hypersensitivity increased significantly after CFA injection. We found that the protein and mRNA levels of ER stress response genes, GRP78/Bip and p-eIF2α, increased significantly in trigeminal ganglion (TG) of CFA-injected rats compared to control animals. In immunofluorescence analysis, a significant increase of GRP78 and p-eIF2α immunopositive neurons was observed in CFA-injected TG compared to control TG. When we administered an ER stress modulator, salubrinal, CFA-induced thermal pain hypersensitivity was temporally reduced. Thus, our study suggests that ER stress responses in TG neurons contribute to CFA-induced inflammatory pain, and may comprise an important molecular mechanism underlying the orofacial inflammatory pain pathway. PMID:25548537

  19. Signalling pathways mediating inflammatory responses in brain ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Planas, A M; Gorina, R; Chamorro, A

    2006-12-01

    Stroke causes neuronal necrosis and generates inflammation. Pro-inflammatory molecules intervene in this process by triggering glial cell activation and leucocyte infiltration to the injured tissue. Cytokines are major mediators of the inflammatory response. Pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are released in the ischaemic brain. Anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-10, promote cell survival, whereas pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNFalpha (tumour necrosis factor alpha), can induce cell death. However, deleterious effects of certain cytokines can turn to beneficial actions, depending on particular features such as the concentration, time point and the very intricate network of intracellular signals that become activated and interact. A key player in the intracellular response to cytokines is the JAK (Janus kinase)/STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) pathway that induces alterations in the pattern of gene transcription. These changes are associated either with cell death or survival depending, among other things, on the specific proteins involved. STAT1 activation is related to cell death, whereas STAT3 activation is often associated with survival. Yet, it is clear that STAT activation must be tightly controlled, and for this reason the function of JAK/STAT modulators, such as SOCS (suppressors of cytokine signalling) and PIAS (protein inhibitor of activated STAT), and phosphatases is most relevant. Besides local effects in the ischaemic brain, cytokines are released to the circulation and affect the immune system. Unbalanced pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory plasma cytokine concentrations favouring an 'anti-inflammatory' state can decrease the immune response. Robust evidence now supports that stroke can induce an immunodepression syndrome, increasing the risk of infection. The contribution of individual cytokines and their intracellular signalling pathways to this response needs to be further investigated

  20. Schistosoma mansoni antigens modulate the allergic response in a murine model of ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, L S; Oliveira, S C; Góes, A M; Oliveira, R R; Pacífico, L G; Marinho, F V; Fonseca, C T; Cardoso, F C; Carvalho, E M; Araujo, M I

    2010-05-01

    Schistosoma mansoni infection has been associated with protection against allergies. The mechanisms underlying this association may involve regulatory cells and cytokines. We evaluated the immune response induced by the S. mansoni antigens Sm22.6, PIII and Sm29 in a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway inflammation. BALB/c mice were sensitized with subcutaneously injected OVA-alum and challenged with aerolized OVA. Mice were given three doses of the different S. mansoni antigens. Lung histopathology, cellularity of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and eosinophil peroxidase activity in lung were evaluated. Immunoglobulin (Ig)E levels in serum and cytokines in BAL were also measured. Additionally, we evaluated the frequency of CD4+forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ T cells in cultures stimulated with OVA and the expression of interleukin (IL)-10 by these cells. The number of total cells and eosinophils in BAL and the levels of OVA-specific IgE were reduced in the immunized mice. Also, the levels of IL-4 and IL-5 in the BAL of mice immunized with PIII and Sm22.6 were decreased, while the levels of IL-10 were higher in mice immunized with Sm22.6 compared to the non-immunized mice. The frequency of CD4+FoxP3+ T cells was higher in the groups of mice who received Sm22.6, Sm29 and PIII, being the expression of IL-10 by these cells only higher in mice immunized with Sm22.6. We concluded that the S. mansoni antigens used in this study are able to down-modulate allergic inflammatory mediators in a murine model of airway inflammation and that the CD4+FoxP3+ T cells, even in the absence of IL-10 expression, might play an important role in this process. PMID:20132231

  1. Schistosoma mansoni antigens modulate the allergic response in a murine model of ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, L S; Oliveira, S C; Góes, A M; Oliveira, R R; Pacífico, L G; Marinho, F V; Fonseca, C T; Cardoso, F C; Carvalho, E M; Araujo, M I

    2010-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni infection has been associated with protection against allergies. The mechanisms underlying this association may involve regulatory cells and cytokines. We evaluated the immune response induced by the S. mansoni antigens Sm22·6, PIII and Sm29 in a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway inflammation. BALB/c mice were sensitized with subcutaneously injected OVA-alum and challenged with aerolized OVA. Mice were given three doses of the different S. mansoni antigens. Lung histopathology, cellularity of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and eosinophil peroxidase activity in lung were evaluated. Immunoglobulin (Ig)E levels in serum and cytokines in BAL were also measured. Additionally, we evaluated the frequency of CD4+forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ T cells in cultures stimulated with OVA and the expression of interleukin (IL)-10 by these cells. The number of total cells and eosinophils in BAL and the levels of OVA-specific IgE were reduced in the immunized mice. Also, the levels of IL-4 and IL-5 in the BAL of mice immunized with PIII and Sm22·6 were decreased, while the levels of IL-10 were higher in mice immunized with Sm22·6 compared to the non-immunized mice. The frequency of CD4+FoxP3+ T cells was higher in the groups of mice who received Sm22·6, Sm29 and PIII, being the expression of IL-10 by these cells only higher in mice immunized with Sm22·6. We concluded that the S. mansoni antigens used in this study are able to down-modulate allergic inflammatory mediators in a murine model of airway inflammation and that the CD4+FoxP3+ T cells, even in the absence of IL-10 expression, might play an important role in this process. PMID:20132231

  2. Local inflammatory response in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Łaskowski, P; Klim, B; Ostrowski, K; Szkudlarek, M; Litwiejko-Pietryńczak, E; Kitlas, K; Nienartowicz, S; Dzięcioł, J

    2016-06-01

    Type and intensity of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in close proximity to the primary tumor are prognostically significant in postoperative patients. High intensity of TILs is considered to be a prognostically beneficial factor. The research included 66 postoperative colorectal cancer patients. The control group comprised 20 colon segments. Monoclonal antibodies LCA, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD20, CD23 and CD138 were used to differentiate between T and B lymphocytes. Types of cells in the infiltrate were defined. We found greater numbers of T and B lymphocytes located in close proximity to the cancerous tissue when compared to the control group. T lymphocyte intensity in the inflammatory infiltrations was directly correlated with the size of resected tumors, presence of regional lymphatic node metastases and histological grade of malignancy. Lymphocytic infiltrations of greater intensity located in close proximity to the primary tumor were found in subjects with less advanced colorectal cancer. The research presented here proves direct dependence between the immune system and colorectal cancer. The presence of lymphocytes in the inflammatory infiltrations located in close proximity to the cancerous tissue has been proved to be prognostically beneficial. The obtained results support the application of immunotherapy in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27543872

  3. Erythrocyte deformability - A partner of the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Silva-Herdade, Ana Santos; Andolina, Giulia; Faggio, Caterina; Calado, Ângelo; Saldanha, Carlota

    2016-09-01

    We aim to establish an in vivo animal model of acute inflammation using PAF (platelet activating factor) as inflammatory agent and to study the erythrocyte deformability changes induced by the inflammatory response. Counting the number of rolling and adherent neutrophils to endothelium after 2, 4 and 6h of intrascrotal injection of PAF we showed the induction of an inflammatory state. Blood samples are collected in order to measure the erythrocyte deformability and to quantify NO efflux from the red blood cells (RBCs). The results show an increased number of rolling and adherent neutrophils after 2h and 4h of inflammation as well as decreased values of erythrocyte deformability in the same time-points. This result is in line with the need of a low blood viscosity to the recruitment process that will improve leukocyte migration towards the endothelial wall. NO efflux from RBCs is also affected by the inflammatory response at the first hours of inflammation. This animal model demonstrates in vivo the association between an acute inflammatory response and the rheological properties of the blood, namely the RBCs deformability. For those reasons we consider this as an adequate model to study acute inflammatory responses as well as hemorheological parameters. PMID:27142964

  4. Increased Allergic Immune Response to Sarcoptes scabiei Antigens in Crusted versus Ordinary Scabies▿

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Shelley F.; Pizzutto, Susan; Slender, Amy; Viberg, Linda; Holt, Deborah; Hales, Belinda J.; Kemp, David J.; Currie, Bart J.; Rolland, Jennifer M.; O'Hehir, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    Scabies, a parasitic skin infestation by the burrowing “itch” mite Sarcoptes scabiei, causes significant health problems for children and adults worldwide. Crusted scabies is a particularly severe form of scabies in which mites multiply into the millions, causing extensive skin crusting. The symptoms and signs of scabies suggest host immunity to the scabies mite, but the specific resistant response in humans remains largely uncharacterized. We used 4 scabies mite recombinant proteins with sequence homology to extensively studied house dust mite allergens to investigate a differential immune response between ordinary scabies and the debilitating crusted form of the disease. Subjects with either disease form showed serum IgE against recombinant S. scabiei cysteine and serine proteases and apolipoprotein, whereas naive subjects showed minimal IgE reactivity. Significantly (P < 0.05) greater serum IgE and IgG4 binding to mite apolipoprotein occurred in subjects with crusted scabies than in those with ordinary scabies. Both subject groups showed strong proliferative responses (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) to the scabies antigens, but the crusted scabies group showed increased secretion of the Th2 cytokines interleukin 5 (IL-5) and IL-13 and decreased Th1 cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in response to the active cysteine protease. These data confirm that a nonprotective allergic response occurs in the crusted disease form and demonstrate that clinical severity is associated with differences in the type and magnitude of the antibody and cellular responses to scabies proteins. A quantitative IgE inhibition assay identified IgE immunoreactivity of scabies mite antigens distinct from that of house dust mite antigens, which is potentially important for specific scabies diagnosis and therapy. PMID:20631334

  5. Increased allergic immune response to Sarcoptes scabiei antigens in crusted versus ordinary scabies.

    PubMed

    Walton, Shelley F; Pizzutto, Susan; Slender, Amy; Viberg, Linda; Holt, Deborah; Hales, Belinda J; Kemp, David J; Currie, Bart J; Rolland, Jennifer M; O'Hehir, Robyn

    2010-09-01

    Scabies, a parasitic skin infestation by the burrowing "itch" mite Sarcoptes scabiei, causes significant health problems for children and adults worldwide. Crusted scabies is a particularly severe form of scabies in which mites multiply into the millions, causing extensive skin crusting. The symptoms and signs of scabies suggest host immunity to the scabies mite, but the specific resistant response in humans remains largely uncharacterized. We used 4 scabies mite recombinant proteins with sequence homology to extensively studied house dust mite allergens to investigate a differential immune response between ordinary scabies and the debilitating crusted form of the disease. Subjects with either disease form showed serum IgE against recombinant S. scabiei cysteine and serine proteases and apolipoprotein, whereas naive subjects showed minimal IgE reactivity. Significantly (P < 0.05) greater serum IgE and IgG4 binding to mite apolipoprotein occurred in subjects with crusted scabies than in those with ordinary scabies. Both subject groups showed strong proliferative responses (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) to the scabies antigens, but the crusted scabies group showed increased secretion of the Th2 cytokines interleukin 5 (IL-5) and IL-13 and decreased Th1 cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in response to the active cysteine protease. These data confirm that a nonprotective allergic response occurs in the crusted disease form and demonstrate that clinical severity is associated with differences in the type and magnitude of the antibody and cellular responses to scabies proteins. A quantitative IgE inhibition assay identified IgE immunoreactivity of scabies mite antigens distinct from that of house dust mite antigens, which is potentially important for specific scabies diagnosis and therapy. PMID:20631334

  6. Th2 differentiation in distinct lymph nodes influences the site of mucosal Th2 immune-inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, David; Arkinson, Janine L; Sun, Jiangfeng; Fattouh, Ramzi; Walker, Tina; Jordana, Manel

    2007-09-01

    Allergic individuals rarely present with concurrent multiple-organ disease but, rather, with manifestations that privilege a specific site such as the lung, skin, or gastrointestinal tract. Whether the site of allergic sensitization influences the localization of Th2 immune-inflammatory responses and, ultimately, the organ-specific expression of disease, remains to be determined. In this study, we investigated whether both the site of initial Ag exposure and concomitant Th2 differentiation in specific lymph nodes (LNs) privileges Th2 memory responses to mucosal and nonmucosal sites, and whether this restriction is associated with a differential expression in tissue-specific homing molecules. In mice exposed to Ag (OVA) via the peritoneum, lung, or skin, we examined several local and distal LNs to determine the site of Ag-specific proliferation and Th2 differentiation. Whereas respiratory and cutaneous Ag exposure led to Ag-specific proliferation and Th2 differentiation exclusively in lung- and skin-draining LNs, respectively, Ag delivery to the peritoneum evoked responses in gut-associated, as well as distal thoracic, LNs. Importantly, only mice that underwent Th2 differentiation in thoracic- or gut-associated LNs mounted Th2 immune-inflammatory responses upon respiratory or gastric Ag challenge, respectively, whereas cutaneous Th2 recall responses were evoked irrespective of the site of initial sensitization. In addition, we observed the differential expression of gut homing molecules (CCR9, alpha(4), beta(7)) in gut-associated LNs and, unexpectedly, a universal induction of skin-related homing molecules (CCR4, CCR10) in all LNs. These data suggest that the site of initial Th2 differentiation and differential homing molecule expression restricts Th2 immune-inflammatory responses to mucosal, but not cutaneous, tissues. PMID:17709545

  7. Mast Cells and Influenza A Virus: Association with Allergic Responses and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Amy C.; Temple, Rachel M.; Obar, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a widespread infectious agent commonly found in mammalian and avian species. In humans, IAV is a respiratory pathogen that causes seasonal infections associated with significant morbidity in young and elderly populations, and has a large economic impact. Moreover, IAV has the potential to cause both zoonotic spillover infection and global pandemics, which have significantly greater morbidity and mortality across all ages. The pathology associated with these pandemic and spillover infections appear to be the result of an excessive inflammatory response leading to severe lung damage, which likely predisposes the lungs for secondary bacterial infections. The lung is protected from pathogens by alveolar epithelial cells, endothelial cells, tissue resident alveolar macrophages, dendritic cells, and mast cells. The importance of mast cells during bacterial and parasitic infections has been extensively studied; yet, the role of these hematopoietic cells during viral infections is only beginning to emerge. Recently, it has been shown that mast cells can be directly activated in response to IAV, releasing mediators such histamine, proteases, leukotrienes, inflammatory cytokines, and antiviral chemokines, which participate in the excessive inflammatory and pathological response observed during IAV infections. In this review, we will examine the relationship between mast cells and IAV, and discuss the role of mast cells as a potential drug target during highly pathological IAV infections. Finally, we proposed an emerging role for mast cells in other viral infections associated with significant host pathology. PMID:26042121

  8. Th2 Allergic Immune Response to Inhaled Fungal Antigens is Modulated By TLR-4-Independent Bacterial Products

    PubMed Central

    Allard, Jenna B.; Rinaldi, Lisa; Wargo, Matt; Allen, Gilman; Akira, Shizuo; Uematsu, Satoshi; Poynter, Matthew E.; Hogan, Deborah A.; Rincon, Mercedes; Whittaker, Laurie A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Allergic airway disease is characterized by eosinophilic inflammation, mucus hypersecretion and increased airway resistance. Fungal antigens are ubiquitous within the environment and are well know triggers of allergic disease. Bacterial products are also frequently encountered within the environment and may alter the immune response to certain antigens. The consequence of simultaneous exposure to bacterial and fungal products on the lung adaptive immune response has not been explored. Here we show that oropharyngeal aspiration of fungal lysates (Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus) promotes airway eosinophilia, secretion of Th2 cytokines and mucus cell metaplasia. In contrast, oropharyngeal exposure to bacterial lysates (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) promotes airway inflammation characterized by neutrophils, Th1 cytokine secretion and no mucus production. More importantly, administration of bacterial lysates together with fungal lysates deviates the adaptive immune response to a Th1 type associated with neutrophilia and diminished mucus production. The immunomodulatory effect that bacterial lysates have on the response to fungi is TLR4-independent but MyD88 dependent. Thus, different types of microbial products within the airway can alter the host's adaptive immune response, and potentially impact the development of allergic airway disease to environmental fungal antigens. PMID:19224641

  9. Vagus nerve stimulation attenuates the systemic inflammatory response to endotoxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovikova, Lyudmila V.; Ivanova, Svetlana; Zhang, Minghuang; Yang, Huan; Botchkina, Galina I.; Watkins, Linda R.; Wang, Haichao; Abumrad, Naji; Eaton, John W.; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2000-05-01

    Vertebrates achieve internal homeostasis during infection or injury by balancing the activities of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide), produced by all gram-negative bacteria, activates macrophages to release cytokines that are potentially lethal. The central nervous system regulates systemic inflammatory responses to endotoxin through humoral mechanisms. Activation of afferent vagus nerve fibres by endotoxin or cytokines stimulates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal anti-inflammatory responses. However, comparatively little is known about the role of efferent vagus nerve signalling in modulating inflammation. Here, we describe a previously unrecognized, parasympathetic anti-inflammatory pathway by which the brain modulates systemic inflammatory responses to endotoxin. Acetylcholine, the principle vagal neurotransmitter, significantly attenuated the release of cytokines (tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-18), but not the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human macrophage cultures. Direct electrical stimulation of the peripheral vagus nerve in vivo during lethal endotoxaemia in rats inhibited TNF synthesis in liver, attenuated peak serum TNF amounts, and prevented the development of shock.

  10. Effect of raw milk on allergic responses in a murine model of gastrointestinal allergy.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, Alison J; McDonald, Natalie A; Hine, Brad

    2014-08-14

    Epidemiological studies have shown an association between the consumption of raw farm milk and reduced incidence of allergy. In the present study, we fed untreated raw milk, gamma-sterilised milk, heat-treated milk or water to mice and compared their responses to allergen exposure and challenge treatment in a mouse model of gastrointestinal allergy. From weaning (3 weeks old), groups of BALB/c female mice (n 8) received raw milk, gamma-sterilised milk, heated milk or water via drink bottles, with the control group receiving water. All mice were fed a standard (dairy protein-free) rodent diet. At 6 and 8 weeks, groups were given intra-peritoneal injections with ovalbumin (OVA)/alum to sensitise them to the antigen. Controls were sham immunised. At week 10, mice were fasted and challenged four times on alternate days by intra-gastric administration with 50 mg OVA or saline. Levels of bacteria and milk proteins were assessed in milk samples. Mouse serum levels of specific IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies and mouse mast cell protease-1 (MMCP-1) were determined. Cytokine responses to 48 h activation with OVA were measured in cultured splenocytes from mice. Sterilised and heated milks contained no viable bacteria and reduced detectable levels of many milk proteins, in contrast to raw milk. Mice drinking raw milk had highest serum MMCP-1 and specific-OVA IgE responses. Cultured splenocytes from OVA-primed mice produced similar levels of IL-4 in response to the antigen; however, IL-10 levels were highest from mice drinking raw milk. Overall, the present study adds to the evidence that consuming different types of milk can affect allergic responses to a non-related dietary antigen. PMID:24870507

  11. Comparison of the amelioration effects of two enzyme inducers on the inflammatory process of experimental allergic encephalitis (EAE) using immunohistochemical technique.

    PubMed

    El-Gouhary, I; Mohamed, A; Suleiman, S; Benghuzzi, H

    2005-01-01

    Experimental Allergic Encephalitis (EAE) is a T-cell mediated autoimmune disease, which resembles the human disease Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in rodents. The infiltration of inflammatory cells and the induction of astrocyte proliferation correlate with EAE severity. Oxidative stress is postulated to have a role in the onset and progression of MS. Therefore, by reducing oxidative stress via phase II enzymes inducers; namely the butylhydroxyanisole (BHA) and Thymoquinone (glutathione inducer), the inflammation could be ameliorated. EAE was induced in Lewis rats using Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Animals were placed into 1. those on normal rat chow, 2. those on rat chow containing BHA, 3. those receiving concomitant five day injection of thymoquinone days 1-5 post-EAE induction, 4. those receiving five doses of thymoquinone injected at day 12-17 post-EAE induction. Twenty-nine days later, animals from each group were sacrificed and tissues collected for immunohistochemistry using the anti-glial fibrillary acid (GFAP) antibody to examine the amelioration effect these two agents have on the inflammatory process occurring in EAE by examining the astrocyte proliferation in the Central Nervous System (CNS). PMID:15850135

  12. Dendritic cells induce Th2-mediated airway inflammatory responses to house dust mite via DNA-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Amarjit; Brown, Alexandra L.; Yao, Xianglan; Yang, Shutong; Park, Sung-Jun; Liu, Chengyu; Dagur, Pradeep K.; McCoy, J. Philip; Keeran, Karen J.; Nugent, Gayle Z.; Jeffries, Kenneth R.; Qu, Xuan; Yu, Zu-Xi; Levine, Stewart J.; Chung, Jay H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) mediates double stranded DNA break repair, V(D)J recombination, and immunoglobulin class switch recombination, as well as innate immune and pro-inflammatory responses. However, there is limited information regarding the role of DNA-PK in adaptive immunity mediated by dendritic cells (DCs), which are the primary antigen-presenting cells in allergic asthma. Here we show that house dust mite induces DNA-PK phosphorylation, which is a marker of DNA-PK activation, in DCs via the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. We also demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PK, as well as the specific deletion of DNA-PK in DCs, attenuates the induction of allergic sensitization and Th2 immunity via a mechanism that involves the impaired presentation of mite antigens. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PK following antigen priming similarly reduces the manifestations of mite-induced airway disease. Collectively, these findings suggest that DNA-PK may be a potential target for treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:25692509

  13. Allergic Conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... water. This is called conjunctivitis, also known as “pink eye.” Causes & Risk Factors What causes allergic conjunctivitis? ... example, if you are allergic to pollen or mold, stay indoors when pollen and mold levels are ...

  14. Diesel Exhaust Exposure and Nasal Response to Attenuated Influenza in Normal and Allergic Volunteers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Diesel exhaust enhances allergic inflammation, and pollutants are associated with heightened susceptibility to viral respiratory infections. The effects of combined diesel and virus exposure in humans are unknown. Objective: Test whether acute exposure to diesel modif...

  15. Emerging concepts: mast cell involvement in allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Modena, Brian D; Dazy, Kristen; White, Andrew A

    2016-08-01

    In a process known as overt degranulation, mast cells can release all at once a diverse array of products that are preformed and present within cytoplasmic granules. This occurs typically within seconds of stimulation by environmental factors and allergens. These potent, preformed mediators (ie, histamine, heparin, serotonin, and serine proteases) are responsible for the acute symptoms experienced in allergic conditions such as allergic conjunctivitis, allergic rhinitis, allergy-induced asthma, urticaria, and anaphylaxis. Yet, there is reason to believe that the actions of mast cells are important when they are not degranulating. Mast cells release preformed mediators and inflammatory cytokines for periods after degranulation and even without degranulating at all. Mast cells are consistently seen at sites of chronic inflammation, including nonallergic inflammation, where they have the ability to temper inflammatory processes and shape tissue morphology. Mast cells can trigger actions and chemotaxis in other important immune cells (eg, eosinophils and the newly discovered type 2 innate lymphocytes) that then make their own contributions to inflammation and disease. In this review, we will discuss the many known and theorized contributions of mast cells to allergic diseases, focusing on several prototypical allergic respiratory and skin conditions: asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis, aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, allergic conjunctivitis, atopic dermatitis, and some of the more common medication hypersensitivity reactions. We discuss traditionally accepted roles that mast cells play in the pathogenesis of each of these conditions, but we also delve into new areas of discovery and research that challenge traditionally accepted paradigms. PMID:26976119

  16. Tespa1 negatively regulates FcεRI-mediated signaling and the mast cell–mediated allergic response

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mingzhu; Qiu, Yuanjun; Guo, Chuansheng; Ji, Jian; Lei, Lei; Zhang, Xue; Liang, Jingjing; Lou, Jun; Huang, Wei; Dong, Bowen; Wu, Songquan; Wang, Jianli; Ke, Yuehai; Cao, Xuetao; Zhou, Yi Ting

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-mediated cross-linking of IgE on mast cells triggers a signaling cascade that results in their degranulation and proinflammatory cytokine production, which are key effectors in allergic reactions. We show that the activation of mast cells is negatively regulated by the newly identified adaptor protein Tespa1. Loss of Tespa1 in mouse mast cells led to hyper-responsiveness to stimulation via FcεRI. Mice lacking Tespa1 also displayed increased sensitivity to IgE-mediated allergic responses. The dysregulated signaling in KO mast cells was associated with increased activation of Grb2-PLC-γ1-SLP-76 signaling within the LAT1 (linker for activation of T cells family, member 1) signalosome versus the LAT2 signalosome. Collectively, these findings show that Tespa1 orchestrates mast cell activation by tuning the balance of LAT1 and LAT2 signalosome assembly. PMID:25422497

  17. Reduced Acute Inflammatory Responses to Microgel Conformal Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Amanda W.; Singh, Neetu; Burns, Kellie L.; Babensee, Julia E.; Lyon, L. Andrew; García, Andrés J.

    2008-01-01

    Implantation of synthetic materials into the body elicits inflammatory host responses that limit medical device integration and biological performance. This inflammatory cascade involves protein adsorption, leukocyte recruitment and activation, cytokine release, and fibrous encapsulation of the implant. We present a coating strategy based on thin films of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel microparticles (i.e. microgels) cross-linked with poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate. These particles were grafted onto a clinically relevant polymeric material to generate conformal coatings that significantly reduced in vitro fibrinogen adsorption and primary human monocytes/macrophage adhesion and spreading. These microgel coatings also reduced leukocyte adhesion and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1) in response to materials implanted acutely in the murine intraperitoneal space. These microgel coatings can be applied to biomedical implants as a protective coating to attenuate biofouling, leukocyte adhesion and activation, and adverse host responses for biomedical and biotechnological applications. PMID:18804859

  18. Supression of inflammatory responses by labdane-type diterpenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Giron, Natalia; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Lopez-Fontal, Raquel; Bosca, Lisardo; Hortelano, Sonsoles Heras, Beatriz de las

    2008-04-15

    A series of 11 labdane-type diterpenoids (1-11) with various patterns of substitution were tested for potential anti-inflammatory activity. Of these compounds, 4 and 11 were selected to evaluate their influence on targets relevant to the regulation of the inflammatory response. These diterpenoids reduced the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages, with IC50 in the range 1-10 {mu}M. Inhibition of these inflammatory mediators was related to inhibition of the expression of nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) at the transcriptional level, as determined by western-blot and RT-PCR. Examination of the effects of these diterpenoids on nuclear factor {kappa}B signaling showed that both compounds inhibit the phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and I{kappa}B{beta}, preventing their degradation and the nuclear translocation of the NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit. Inhibition of IKK activity was also observed. These derivatives displayed significant anti-inflammatory activity in vivo, suppressing mouse ear edema induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and inhibiting myeloperoxidase activity, an index of neutrophil infiltration. The anti-inflammatory effects of these labdane diterpenoids, together with their low cell toxicity, suggest potential therapeutic applications in the regulation of the inflammatory response.

  19. Saturated fatty acids trigger TLR4-mediated inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Rocha, D M; Caldas, A P; Oliveira, L L; Bressan, J; Hermsdorff, H H

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) mediate infection-induced inflammation and sterile inflammation by endogenous molecules. Among the TLR family, TLR4 is the best understood. However, while its downstream signaling pathways have been well defined, not all ligands of TLR4 are currently known. Current evidence suggests that saturated fatty acids (SFA) act as non-microbial TLR4 agonists, and trigger its inflammatory response. Thus, our present review provides a new perspective on the potential mechanism by which SFAs could modulate TLR4-induced inflammatory responses: (1) SFAs can be recognized by CD14-TLR4-MD2 complex and trigger inflammatory pathways, similar to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). (2) SFAs lead to modification of gut microbiota with an overproduction of LPS after a high-fat intake, enhancing this natural TLR4 ligand. (3) In addition, this metabolic endotoxemia leads to an oxidative stress thereby producing atherogenic lipids - oxLDL and oxidized phospholipids - which trigger CD36-TLR4-TLR6 inflammatory response. (4) Also, the high SFA consumption increases the lipemia and the mmLDL and oxLDL formation through oxidative modifications of LDL. The mmLDL, unlike oxLDL, is involved in activation of the CD14-TLR4-MD2 inflammatory pathway. Those molecules can induce TLR4 inflammatory response by MyD88-dependent and/or MyD88-independent pathways that, in turn, promotes the expression of proinflammatory transcript factors such as factor nuclear kappa B (NF-κB), which plays a crucial role in the induction of inflammatory mediators (cytokines, chemokines, or costimulatory molecules) implicated in the development and progression of many chronic diseases. PMID:26687466

  20. Respiratory responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and their relationship to nonspecific airway reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, W.F.; Horstman, D.H.; Abdul-Salaam, S.; Raggio, L.J.; Green, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Ozone exposure in man produces changes in respiratory function and symptoms. There is a large degree of unexplained intersubject variability in the magnitude of these responses. There is concern that individuals with chronic respiratory diseases may also be more responsive to ozone than normal individuals. The purpose of this study was to describe the responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and to compare these responses to those previously observed in normal individuals. A further purpose was to measure the association between baseline nonspecific airway reactivity and changes in lung function and respiratory symptoms following ozone exposure.

  1. Antibody response to low-molecular-weight antigens of Aspergillus fumigatus in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, V P; Greenberger, P A; Fink, J N

    1989-01-01

    Sera from patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) or aspergilloma and normal sera were analyzed for specific antibodies by Western (immuno-) blotting with Aspergillus fumigatus antigens transferred electrophoretically onto polyvinylidene difluoride membranes. Western blot analysis demonstrated consistent reactivity of low-molecular-weight A. fumigatus antigens against ABPA sera but not against uncomplicated aspergilloma or normal sera. None of these low-molecular-weight components had any lectin-binding activity. Sera from patients with aspergilloma, however, frequently reacted with high-molecular-weight components of A. fumigatus. The majority of these high-molecular-weight antigenic components demonstrated concanavalin A-binding activity. The low-molecular-weight bands were discernible in Western blots with sera from all ABPA patients irrespective of disease activities, such as relapse, flare, or treatment. Antibodies detected by methods such as immunodiffusion or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays demonstrated total antibody responses to most or all antigenic components, while Western blots demonstrated the reactivities of the individual components with the specific antibodies. Western blot analysis thus provided more information for immunodiagnosis of ABPA than other methods, especially when only crude antigens were available. Images PMID:2666440

  2. Adelmidrol increases the endogenous concentrations of palmitoylethanolamide in canine keratinocytes and down-regulates an inflammatory reaction in an in vitro model of contact allergic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Petrosino, S; Puigdemont, A; Della Valle, M F; Fusco, M; Verde, R; Allarà, M; Aveta, T; Orlando, P; Di Marzo, V

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate potential new target(s)/mechanism(s) for the palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) analogue, adelmidrol, and its role in an in vitro model of contact allergic dermatitis. Freshly isolated canine keratinocytes, human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells and human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells, wild-type or transfected with cDNA encoding for N-acylethanolamine-hydrolysing acid amidase (NAAA), were treated with adelmidrol or azelaic acid, and the concentrations of endocannabinoids (anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol) and related mediators (PEA and oleoylethanolamide) were measured. The mRNA expression of PEA catabolic enzymes (NAAA and fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH), and biosynthetic enzymes (N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D, NAPE-PLD) and glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase 1, was also measured. Brain or HEK-293 cell membrane fractions were used to assess the ability of adelmidrol to inhibit FAAH and NAAA activity, respectively. HaCaT cells were stimulated with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid and the release of the pro-inflammatory chemokine, monocyte chemotactic protein-2 (MCP-2), was measured in the presence of adelmidrol. Adelmidrol increased PEA concentrations in canine keratinocytes and in the other cellular systems studied. It did not inhibit the activity of PEA catabolic enzymes, although it reduced their mRNA expression in some cell types. Adelmidrol modulated the expression of PEA biosynthetic enzyme, NAPE-PLD, in HaCaT cells, and inhibited the release of the pro-inflammatory chemokine MCP-2 from stimulated HaCaT cells. This study demonstrates for the first time an 'entourage effect' of adelmidrol on PEA concentrations in keratinocytes and suggests that this effect might mediate, at least in part, the anti-inflammatory effects of this compound in veterinary practice. PMID:26639824

  3. Exposure to Triclosan Augments the Allergic Response to Ovalbumin in a Mouse Model of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacey E.; Franko, Jennifer; Kashon, Michael L.; Anderson, Katie L.; Hubbs, Ann F.; Lukomska, Ewa; Meade, B. Jean

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, there has been a remarkable and unexplained increase in the prevalence of asthma. These studies were conducted to investigate the role of dermal exposure to triclosan, an endocrine-disrupting compound, on the hypersensitivity response to ovalbumin (OVA) in a murine model of asthma. Triclosan has had widespread use in the general population as an antibacterial and antifungal agent and is commonly found in consumer products such as soaps, deodorants, toothpastes, shaving creams, mouthwashes, and cleaning supplies. For these studies, BALB/c mice were exposed dermally to concentrations of triclosan ranging from 0.75 to 3% (0.375–1.5 mg/mouse/day) for 28 consecutive days. Concordantly, mice were ip injected with OVA (0.9 μg) and aluminum hydroxide (0.5 mg) on days 1 and 10 and challenged with OVA (125 μg) by pharyngeal aspiration on days 19 and 27. Compared with the animals exposed to OVA alone, increased spleen weights, OVA-specific IgE, interleukin-13 cytokine levels, and numbers of lung eosinophils were demonstrated when mice were coexposed to OVA and triclosan. Statistically significant increases in OVA-specific and nonspecific airway hyperreactivity were observed for all triclosan coexposed groups compared with the vehicle and OVA controls. In these studies, exposure to triclosan alone was not demonstrated to be allergenic; however, coexposure with a known allergen resulted in enhancement of the hypersensitivity response to that allergen, suggesting that triclosan exposure may augment the allergic responses to other environmental allergens. PMID:23192912

  4. Exposure to triclosan augments the allergic response to ovalbumin in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stacey E; Franko, Jennifer; Kashon, Michael L; Anderson, Katie L; Hubbs, Ann F; Lukomska, Ewa; Meade, B Jean

    2013-03-01

    During the last decade, there has been a remarkable and unexplained increase in the prevalence of asthma. These studies were conducted to investigate the role of dermal exposure to triclosan, an endocrine-disrupting compound, on the hypersensitivity response to ovalbumin (OVA) in a murine model of asthma. Triclosan has had widespread use in the general population as an antibacterial and antifungal agent and is commonly found in consumer products such as soaps, deodorants, toothpastes, shaving creams, mouthwashes, and cleaning supplies. For these studies, BALB/c mice were exposed dermally to concentrations of triclosan ranging from 0.75 to 3% (0.375-1.5mg/mouse/day) for 28 consecutive days. Concordantly, mice were ip injected with OVA (0.9 µg) and aluminum hydroxide (0.5mg) on days 1 and 10 and challenged with OVA (125 µg) by pharyngeal aspiration on days 19 and 27. Compared with the animals exposed to OVA alone, increased spleen weights, OVA-specific IgE, interleukin-13 cytokine levels, and numbers of lung eosinophils were demonstrated when mice were coexposed to OVA and triclosan. Statistically significant increases in OVA-specific and nonspecific airway hyperreactivity were observed for all triclosan coexposed groups compared with the vehicle and OVA controls. In these studies, exposure to triclosan alone was not demonstrated to be allergenic; however, coexposure with a known allergen resulted in enhancement of the hypersensitivity response to that allergen, suggesting that triclosan exposure may augment the allergic responses to other environmental allergens. PMID:23192912

  5. Allergic host defences.

    PubMed

    Palm, Noah W; Rosenstein, Rachel K; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2012-04-26

    Allergies are generally thought to be a detrimental outcome of a mistargeted immune response that evolved to provide immunity to macroparasites. Here we present arguments to suggest that allergic immunity has an important role in host defence against noxious environmental substances, including venoms, haematophagous fluids, environmental xenobiotics and irritants. We argue that appropriately targeted allergic reactions are beneficial, although they can become detrimental when excessive. Furthermore, we suggest that allergic hypersensitivity evolved to elicit anticipatory responses and to promote avoidance of suboptimal environments. PMID:22538607

  6. Sphingosine Kinases Are Not Required for Inflammatory Responses in Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yuquan; Lee, Hyeuk Jong; Mariko, Boubacar; Lu, Yi-Chien; Dannenberg, Andrew J.; Haka, Abigail S.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Camerer, Eric; Proia, Richard L.; Hla, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine kinases (Sphks), which catalyze the formation of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) from sphingosine, have been implicated as essential intracellular messengers in inflammatory responses. Specifically, intracellular Sphk1-derived S1P was reported to be required for NFκB induction during inflammatory cytokine action. To examine the role of intracellular S1P in the inflammatory response of innate immune cells, we derived murine macrophages that lack both Sphk1 and Sphk2 (MΦ Sphk dKO). Compared with WT counterparts, MΦ Sphk dKO cells showed marked suppression of intracellular S1P levels whereas sphingosine and ceramide levels were strongly up-regulated. Cellular proliferation and apoptosis were similar in MΦ Sphk dKO cells compared with WT counterparts. Treatment of WT and MΦ Sphk dKO with inflammatory mediators TNFα or Escherichia coli LPS resulted in similar NFκB activation and cytokine expression. Furthermore, LPS-induced inflammatory responses, mortality, and thioglycolate-induced macrophage recruitment to the peritoneum were indistinguishable between MΦ Sphk dKO and littermate control mice. Interestingly, autophagic markers were constitutively induced in bone marrow-derived macrophages from Sphk dKO mice. Treatment with exogenous sphingosine further enhanced intracellular sphingolipid levels and autophagosomes. Inhibition of autophagy resulted in caspase-dependent cell death. Together, these data suggest that attenuation of Sphk activity, particularly Sphk2, leads to increased intracellular sphingolipids and autophagy in macrophages. PMID:24081141

  7. Mast cells mediate acute inflammatory responses to implanted biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Liping; Jennings, Timothy A.; Eaton, John W.

    1998-01-01

    Implanted biomaterials trigger acute and chronic inflammatory responses. The mechanisms involved in such acute inflammatory responses can be arbitrarily divided into phagocyte transmigration, chemotaxis, and adhesion to implant surfaces. We earlier observed that two chemokines—macrophage inflammatory protein 1α/monocyte chemoattractant protein 1—and the phagocyte integrin Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18)/surface fibrinogen interaction are, respectively, required for phagocyte chemotaxis and adherence to biomaterial surfaces. However, it is still not clear how the initial transmigration of phagocytes through the endothelial barrier into the area of the implant is triggered. Because implanted biomaterials elicit histaminic responses in the surrounding tissue, and histamine release is known to promote rapid diapedesis of inflammatory cells, we evaluated the possible role of histamine and mast cells in the recruitment of phagocytes to biomaterial implants. Using i.p. and s.c. implantation of polyethylene terephthalate disks in mice we find: (i) Extensive degranulation of mast cells, accompanied by histamine release, occurs adjacent to short-term i.p. implants. (ii) Simultaneous administration of H1 and H2 histamine receptor antagonists (pyrilamine and famotidine, respectively) greatly diminishes recruitment and adhesion of both neutrophils (<20% of control) and monocytes/macrophages (<30% of control) to implants. (iii) Congenitally mast cell-deficient mice also exhibit markedly reduced accumulation of phagocytes on both i.p. and s.c implants. (iv) Finally, mast cell reconstitution of mast cell-deficient mice restores “normal” inflammatory responses to biomaterial implants. We conclude that mast cells and their granular products, especially histamine, are important in recruitment of inflammatory cells to biomaterial implants. Improved knowledge of such responses may permit purposeful modulation of both acute and chronic inflammation affecting implanted biomaterials. PMID

  8. Guanosine Protects Against Cortical Focal Ischemia. Involvement of Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Gisele; Tonon, André Comiran; Guella, Felipe Lhywinskh; Pettenuzzo, Letícia Ferreira; Duarte, Thiago; Duarte, Marta Maria Medeiros Frescura; Oses, Jean Pierre; Achaval, Matilde; Souza, Diogo Onofre

    2015-12-01

    Stroke is the major cause of death and the most frequent cause of disability in the adult population worldwide. Guanosine plays an important neuroprotective role in several cerebral ischemic models and is involved in the modulation of oxidative responses and glutamatergic parameters. Because the excessive reactive oxygen species produced during an ischemic event can trigger an inflammatory response, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that guanosine is neuroprotective against focal cerebral ischemia, inhibits microglia/macrophages activation, and mediates an inflammatory response ameliorating the neural damage. Permanent focal cerebral ischemia was induced in adult rats, and guanosine was administered immediately, 1, 3, and 6 h after surgery. Twenty-four hours after ischemia, the asymmetry scores were evaluated by the cylinder test; neuronal damage was evaluated by Fluoro-Jade C (FJC) staining and propidium iodide (PI) incorporation; microglia and immune cells were evaluated by anti-Iba-1 antibody; and inflammatory parameters such as interleukins (IL): IL-1, IL-6, IL-10; tumor necrosis factors alpha (TNF-α); and interferon-gamma (INF-γ) were evaluated in the brain tissue and cerebrospinal fluid. The ischemic event increased the levels of Iba-1-positive cells and pro-inflammatory cytokines and decreased IL-10 levels (an anti-inflammatory cytokine) in the lesion periphery. The guanosine treatment attenuated the changes in these inflammatory parameters and also reduced the infarct volume, PI incorporation, and number of FJC-positive cells, improving the functional recovery. Thus, guanosine may have been a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of ischemic brain injury by reduction of inflammatory process triggered in an ischemic event. PMID:25394382

  9. Alveolar macrophages from allergic lungs are not committed to a pro-allergic response and can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness following ex vivo culture

    PubMed Central

    Pouliot, P.; Spahr, A.; Careau, É.; Turmel, V.; Bissonnette, E. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background We already demonstrated that adoptive transfer of alveolar macrophages (AMs) from non-allergic rats into AM-depleted allergic rats prevents airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). We also showed that AMs from non-sensitized, but not from sensitized, allergy-prone rats can prevent AHR following allergen challenge in sensitized allergic animals, establishing the importance of rat immunological status on the modulation of AM functions and suggesting that an allergic lung environment alters AM functions. Objective We investigated how the activation of allergic AMs can be modulated to reinstitute them with their capacity to reduce AHR. Methods AMs from sensitized Brown Norway rats were cultured ex vivo for up to 18 h in culture media to deprogram them from the influence of the allergic lung before being reintroduced into the lung of AM-depleted sensitized recipient. AHR and cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were measured following allergen challenge. AMs stimulated ex vivo with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin(BCG) were used as positive controls as BCG induces a T-helper type 1 activation in AMs. Results AMs ex vivo cultured for 4–18 h reduced AHR to normal level. Interestingly, pro-allergic functions of AMs were dampened by 18 h culture and they reduced AHR even after spending 48 h in an allergic lung microenvironment. Furthermore, transfer of cultured AMs caused an increase in the levels of IFN-γ and IL-12 in BAL when compared with their ovalbumin control. After 18 h of ex vivo culture, AMs expressed reduced levels of TNF, IL-1α, IL-6, and Arginase-2 mRNAs compared with freshly isolated AMs, suggesting that ex vivo culture exempted AMs from lung stimuli that affected their functions. Conclusions There is a significant crosstalk between lung microenvironment and AMs, affecting their functions. It is also the first report showing that sensitized AMs can be modulated ex vivo to reduce lung pro-allergic environment, opening the way to therapies targetting

  10. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  11. Bone marrow stromal cells use TGF-beta to suppress allergic responses in a mouse model of ragweed-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Krisztian; Keane-Myers, Andrea; Brown, Jared M; Metcalfe, Dean D; Gorham, James D; Gorham, Jared D; Bundoc, Virgilio G; Bundoc, Victor G; Hodges, Marcus G; Jelinek, Ivett; Madala, Satish; Karpati, Sarolta; Mezey, Eva

    2010-03-23

    Bone marrow stromal cells [BMSCs; also known as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)] effectively suppress inflammatory responses in acute graft-versus-host disease in humans and in a number of disease models in mice. Many of the studies concluded that BMSC-driven immunomodulation is mediated by the suppression of proinflammatory Th1 responses while rebalancing the Th1/Th2 ratio toward Th2. In this study, using a ragweed induced mouse asthma model, we studied if BMSCs could be beneficial in an allergic, Th2-dominant environment. When BMSCs were injected i.v. at the time of the antigen challenge, they protected the animals from the majority of asthma-specific pathological changes, including inhibition of eosinophil infiltration and excess mucus production in the lung, decreased levels of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) in bronchial lavage, and lowered serum levels of Th2 immunoglobulins (IgG1 and IgE). To explore the mechanism of the effect we used BMSCs isolated from a variety of knockout mice, performed in vivo blocking of cytokines and studied the effect of asthmatic serum and bronchoalveolar lavage from ragweed challenged animals on the BMSCs in vitro. Our results suggest that IL-4 and/or IL-13 activate the STAT6 pathway in the BMSCs resulting in an increase of their TGF-beta production, which seems to mediate the beneficial effect, either alone, or together with regulatory T cells, some of which might be recruited by the BMSCs. These data suggest that, in addition to focusing on graft-versus-host disease and autoimmune diseases, allergic conditions--specifically therapy resistant asthma--might also be a likely target of the recently discovered cellular therapy approach using BMSCs. PMID:20231466

  12. Cutaneous antigen priming via gene gun leads to skin-selective Th2 immune-inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, David; Harder, Greg; Fattouh, Ramzi; Sun, Jiangfeng; Goncharova, Susanna; Stämpfli, Martin R; Coyle, Anthony J; Bramson, Jonathan L; Jordana, Manel

    2005-02-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that the compartmentalization of immune responses is governed, in part, by tissue-selective homing instructions imprinted during T cell differentiation. In the context of allergic diseases, the fact that "disease" primarily manifests in particular tissue sites, despite pervasive allergen exposure, supports this notion. However, whether the original site of Ag exposure distinctly privileges memory Th2 immune-inflammatory responses to the same site, while sparing remote tissue compartments, remains to be fully investigated. We examined whether skin-targeted delivery of plasmid DNA encoding OVA via gene-gun technology in mice could generate allergic sensitization and give rise to Th2 effector responses in the skin as well as in the lung upon subsequent Ag encounter. Our data show that cutaneous Ag priming induced OVA-specific serum IgE and IgG1, robust Th2-cytokine production, and late-phase cutaneous responses and systemic anaphylactic shock upon skin and systemic Ag recall, respectively. However, repeated respiratory exposure to aerosolized OVA failed to instigate airway inflammatory responses in cutaneous Ag-primed mice, but not in mice initially sensitized to OVA via the respiratory mucosa. Importantly, these contrasting airway memory responses correlated with the occurrence of Th2 differentiation events at anatomically separate sites: indeed cutaneous Ag priming resulted in Ag-specific proliferative responses and Th2 differentiation in skin-, but not thoracic-, draining lymph nodes. These data indicate that Ag exposure to the skin leads to Th2 differentiation within skin-draining lymph nodes and subsequent Th2 immunity that is selectively manifested in the skin. PMID:15661930

  13. Alterations of the Lung Methylome in Allergic Airway Hyper-Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Robert YS; Shang, Yan; Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Dao, Tyna; Das, Sandhya; Rabold, Richard; Sham, James SK; Mitzner, Wayne; Tang, Wan-Yee

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of breathlessness and wheezing, affecting 300 million people around the world (available at: www.who.int). To date, genetic factors associated with asthma susceptibility have been unable to explain the full etiology of asthma. Recent studies have demonstrated that the epigenetic disruption of gene expression plays an equally important role in the development of asthma through interaction with our environment. We sensitized 6-week-old C57BL/6J mice with house-dust-mite (HDM) extracts intraperitoneally followed by 5 weeks of exposure to HDM challenges (three times a week) intratracheally. HDM-exposed mice showed an increase in airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and inflammation together with structural remodeling of the airways. We applied methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-next generation sequencing (MeDIP-seq) for profiling of DNA methylation changes in the lungs in response to HDM. We observed about 20 million reads by a single-run of massive parallel sequencing. We performed bioinformatics and pathway analysis on the raw sequencing data to identify differentially methylated candidate genes in HDM-exposed mice. Specifically, we have revealed that the transforming growth factor beta signaling pathway is epigenetically modulated by chronic exposure to HDM. Here, we demonstrated that a specific allergen may play a role in AHR through an epigenetic mechanism by disrupting the expression of genes in lungs that might be involved in airway inflammation and remodeling. Our findings provide new insights into the potential mechanisms by which environmental allergens induce allergic asthma and such insights may assist in the development of novel preventive and therapeutic options for this debilitative disease. PMID:24446183

  14. Alterations of the lung methylome in allergic airway hyper-responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Robert Ys; Shang, Yan; Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Dao, Tyna; Das, Sandhya; Rabold, Richard; Sham, James Sk; Mitzner, Wayne; Tang, Wan-Yee

    2014-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of breathlessness and wheezing, affecting 300 million people around the world (available at: www.who.int). To date, genetic factors associated with asthma susceptibility have been unable to explain the full etiology of asthma. Recent studies have demonstrated that the epigenetic disruption of gene expression plays an equally important role in the development of asthma through interaction with our environment. We sensitized 6-week-old C57BL/6J mice with house-dust-mite (HDM) extracts intraperitoneally followed by 5 weeks of exposure to HDM challenges (three times a week) intratracheally. HDM-exposed mice showed an increase in airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and inflammation together with structural remodeling of the airways. We applied methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-next generation sequencing (MeDIP-seq) for profiling of DNA methylation changes in the lungs in response to HDM. We observed about 20 million reads by a single-run of massive parallel sequencing. We performed bioinformatics and pathway analysis on the raw sequencing data to identify differentially methylated candidate genes in HDM-exposed mice. Specifically, we have revealed that the transforming growth factor beta signaling pathway is epigenetically modulated by chronic exposure to HDM. Here, we demonstrated that a specific allergen may play a role in AHR through an epigenetic mechanism by disrupting the expression of genes in lungs that might be involved in airway inflammation and remodeling. Our findings provide new insights into the potential mechanisms by which environmental allergens induce allergic asthma and such insights may assist in the development of novel preventive and therapeutic options for this debilitative disease. PMID:24446183

  15. The Pathogenesis of ACLF: The Inflammatory Response and Immune Function.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Although systemic inflammation is a hallmark of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF), its role in the development of this syndrome is poorly understood. Here the author first summarizes the general principles of the inflammatory response. Inflammation can be triggered by exogenous or endogenous inducers. Important exogenous inducers include bacterial products such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and virulence factors. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns elicit inflammation through structural feature recognition (using innate pattern-recognition receptors [PRRs]), whereas virulence factors generally trigger inflammation via functional feature recognition. Endogenous inducers are called danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and include molecules released by necrotic cells and products of extracellular matrix breakdown. Danger-associated molecular patterns use different PRRs. The purpose of the inflammatory response may differ according to the type of stimulus: The aim of infection-induced inflammation is to decrease pathogen burden, whereas the DAMP-induced inflammation aims to promote tissue repair. An excessive inflammatory response can induce collateral tissue damage (a process called immunopathology). However immunopathology may not be the only mechanism of tissue damage; for example, organ failure can develop because of failed disease tolerance. In this review, the author also discusses how general principles of the inflammatory response can help us to understand the development of ACLF in different contexts: bacterial infection, severe alcoholic hepatitis, and cases in which there is no identifiable trigger. PMID:27172355

  16. Effects of nanoporous alumina on inflammatory cell response.

    PubMed

    Pujari, Shiuli; Hoess, Andreas; Shen, Jinhui; Thormann, Annika; Heilmann, Andreas; Tang, Liping; Karlsson-Ott, Marjam

    2014-11-01

    The present study focuses on the effects of nanoscale porosity on inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo. Nanoporous alumina membranes with different pore sizes, 20 and 200 nm in diameter, were used. We first evaluated cell/alumina interactions in vitro by observing adhesion, proliferation, and activation of a murine fibroblast and a macrophage cell line. To investigate the chronic inflammatory response, the membranes were implanted subcutaneously in mice for 2 weeks. Cell recruitment to the site of implantation was determined by histology and the production of cytokines was measured by protein array analysis. Both in vitro and in vivo studies showed that 200 nm pores induced a stronger inflammatory response as compared to the alumina with 20 nm pores. This was observed by an increase in macrophage activation in vitro as well as higher cell recruitment and generation of proinflammatory cytokines around the alumina with 200 nm pores, in vivo. Our results suggest that nanofeatures can be modulated in order to control the inflammatory response to implants. PMID:24288233

  17. Extracellular Cyclophilins Contribute to the Regulation of Inflammatory Responses1

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Kamalpreet; Gwinn, William M.; Bower, Molly A.; Watson, Alan; Okwumabua, Ifeanyi; MacDonald, H. Robson; Bukrinsky, Michael I.; Constant, Stephanie L.

    2010-01-01

    The main regulators of leukocyte trafficking during inflammatory responses are chemokines. However, another class of recently identified chemotactic agents is extracellular cyclophilins, the proteins mostly known as receptors for the immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporine A. Cyclophilins can induce leukocyte chemotaxis in vitro and have been detected at elevated levels in inflamed tissues, suggesting that they might contribute to inflammatory responses. We recently identified CD147 as the main signaling receptor for cyclophilin A. In the current study we examined the contribution of cyclophilin-CD147 interactions to inflammatory responses in vivo using a mouse model of acute lung injury. Blocking cyclophilin-CD147 interactions by targeting CD147 (using anti-CD147 Ab) or cyclophilin (using nonimmunosuppressive cyclosporine A analog) reduced tissue neutrophilia by up to 50%, with a concurrent decrease in tissue pathology. These findings are the first to demonstrate the significant contribution of cyclophilins to inflammatory responses and provide a potentially novel approach for reducing inflammation-mediated diseases. PMID:15972687

  18. COMPARTMENTALIZATION OF THE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO INHALED GRAIN DUST

    EPA Science Inventory


    Interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and the secreted form of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (sIL-1RA) are involved in the inflammatory response to inhaled grain dust. Previously, we found considerable production of these cytokines in the lower...

  19. The choroid plexus response to a repeated peripheral inflammatory stimulus

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic systemic inflammation triggers alterations in the central nervous system that may relate to the underlying inflammatory component reported in neurodegenerative disorders such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. However, it is far from being understood whether and how peripheral inflammation contributes to induce brain inflammatory response in such illnesses. As part of the barriers that separate the blood from the brain, the choroid plexus conveys inflammatory immune signals into the brain, largely through alterations in the composition of the cerebrospinal fluid. Results In the present study we investigated the mouse choroid plexus gene expression profile, using microarray analyses, in response to a repeated inflammatory stimulus induced by the intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide every two weeks for a period of three months; mice were sacrificed 3 and 15 days after the last lipopolysaccharide injection. The data show that the choroid plexus displays a sustained response to the repeated inflammatory stimuli by altering the expression profile of several genes. From a total of 24,000 probes, 369 are up-regulated and 167 are down-regulated 3 days after the last lipopolysaccharide injection, while at 15 days the number decreases to 98 and 128, respectively. The pathways displaying the most significant changes include those facilitating entry of cells into the cerebrospinal fluid, and those participating in the innate immune response to infection. Conclusion These observations contribute to a better understanding of the brain response to peripheral inflammation and pave the way to study their impact on the progression of several disorders of the central nervous system in which inflammation is known to be implicated. PMID:19922669

  20. Titanium surface hydrophilicity modulates the human macrophage inflammatory cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Alfarsi, Mohammed A; Hamlet, Stephen M; Ivanovski, Saso

    2014-01-01

    Increased titanium surface hydrophilicity has been shown to accelerate dental implant osseointegration. Macrophages are important in the early inflammatory response to surgical implant placement and influence the subsequent healing response. This study investigated the modulatory effect of a hydrophilic titanium surface on the inflammatory cytokine expression profile in a human macrophage cell line (THP-1). Genes for 84 cytokines, chemokines, and their receptors were analyzed following exposure to (1) polished (SMO), (2) micro-rough sand blasted, acid etched (SLA), and (3) hydrophilic-modified SLA (modSLA) titanium surfaces for 1 and 3 days. By day 3, the SLA surface elicited a pro-inflammatory response compared to the SMO surface with statistically significant up-regulation of 16 genes [Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) Interleukin (IL)-1β, Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)-1, 2, 3, 4, 18, 19, and 20, Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)-1, 5, 8 and 12, Chemokine (C-C motif) receptor (CCR)-7, Lymphotoxin-beta (LTB), and Leukotriene B4 receptor (LTB4R)]. This effect was countered by the modSLA surface, which down-regulated the expression of 10 genes (TNF, IL-1α and β, CCL-1, 3, 19 and 20, CXCL-1 and 8, and IL-1 receptor type 1), while two were up-regulated (osteopontin and CCR5) compared to the SLA surface. These cytokine gene expression changes were confirmed by decreased levels of corresponding protein secretion in response to modSLA compared to SLA. These results show that a hydrophilic titanium surface can modulate human macrophage pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and protein secretion. An attenuated pro-inflammatory response may be an important molecular mechanism for faster and/or improved wound healing. PMID:23595995

  1. Combination treatment of low-fluence Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and oral tranexamic acid for post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation due to allergic contact dermatitis to henna hair dye.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Bok; Park, Sae Mi; Kim, Jin-Wou; Yu, Dong Soo

    2016-04-01

    A 64-year-old female presented with facial hyperpigmentation. She had dyed her hair monthly with pure henna powder for the past seven months. After patch tests, the patient was diagnosed as post-inflammatory hyperpigmentastion due to allergic contact dermatitis to pure henna that has rarely been reported. The patient underwent Q-switched Nd:YAG laser treatment and was treated with oral tranexamic acid for 10 weeks. The hyperpigmentation on her forehead demonstrated substantial improvement. PMID:26734817

  2. Adoptive transfer of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis: recipient response to myelin basic protein-reactive lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bouwer, H G; Hinrichs, D J

    1994-10-01

    We have used adoptive transfer of myelin basic protein (MBP)-reactive lymphocytes in the Lewis rat model of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) to identify stages of effector cell development and to investigate the nature of the subsequent recipient response to the transferred cells. Depending on the timing of cell collection, lymph node cells (LNC) obtained from MBP-CFA (MBP emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant)-immunized donors may directly transfer clinical disease; however, independent of disease development, recipients of LNC develop early onset of clinical disease following immunization of the recipients with MBP-CFA, consistent with the presence of MBP-memory cells in the LNC transfer inoculum. Similarly obtained spleen cells do not directly transfer disease and do not contain MBP-memory cells (as defined by the early onset of clinical disease following MBP-CFA challenge). Spleen cells adoptively transfer clinical disease only following in vitro culture stimulation with antigen or selected mitogens. Recipients of the primary culture-derived encephalitogenic spleen cells also develop an accelerated onset of clinical disease following MBP-CFA challenge, indicative of the presence of MBP-memory cells, and are not vaccinated. Encephalitogenic T cell lines adoptively transfer clinical disease, and in most cases recipients are vaccinated to MBP-CFA-induced active disease, but remain susceptible to adoptively transferred disease. Co-transfer of encephalitogenic T cell line cells with MBP-reactive lymph node or encephalitogenic spleen cells does not alter the vaccination response. We have found that during the process of T cell line development, the vaccinating phenotype is acquired following the second antigen stimulation cycle. These studies also demonstrate that regulation induced by T cell vaccination blocks the development of effector cells from precursor cells and that such regulation is also equally effective in blocking disease development in

  3. Lysophosphatidylcholine plays critical role in allergic airway disease manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Preeti; Gaur, Shailendera Nath; Arora, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 (sPLA2), pivotal for allergic and inflammatory response, hydrolyses phosphatidylcholine (PC) to lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). In present study, the role of LPC in allergic airway disease manifestation was studied using mouse model. Balb/c mice were immunized using cockroach extract (CE) and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2 inhibitor. Airway hyperresponse (AHR), lung-histology, total and differential leukocyte count (TLC&DLC), Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured. Exogenous LPC was given to the mice with or without CE sensitization, to demonstrate its role in allergic airway disease manifestation. Anti-CD1d antibody was given to study the involvement of natural killer T (NKT) cells in LPC induced response. AHR, lung-inflammation, TLC, DLC, Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels were increased on CE challenge. sPLA2 activity and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2-inhibitor, which decreased AHR, and inflammatory parameters. Exogenous LPC with or without CE sensitization increased above parameters. CE challenge or LPC exposure increased LY49C+TCRβ+ NKT cells in BALF and spleen, which was reduced by anti-CD1d antibody, accompanied with reduction in AHR and allergic airway inflammation parameters. Conclusively, LPC induces allergic airway disease manifestation and it does so probably via CD1d-restricted LY49C+TCRβ+ NKT cells. PMID:27282246

  4. Lysophosphatidylcholine plays critical role in allergic airway disease manifestation.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Preeti; Gaur, Shailendera Nath; Arora, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 (sPLA2), pivotal for allergic and inflammatory response, hydrolyses phosphatidylcholine (PC) to lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). In present study, the role of LPC in allergic airway disease manifestation was studied using mouse model. Balb/c mice were immunized using cockroach extract (CE) and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2 inhibitor. Airway hyperresponse (AHR), lung-histology, total and differential leukocyte count (TLC&DLC), Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured. Exogenous LPC was given to the mice with or without CE sensitization, to demonstrate its role in allergic airway disease manifestation. Anti-CD1d antibody was given to study the involvement of natural killer T (NKT) cells in LPC induced response. AHR, lung-inflammation, TLC, DLC, Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels were increased on CE challenge. sPLA2 activity and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2-inhibitor, which decreased AHR, and inflammatory parameters. Exogenous LPC with or without CE sensitization increased above parameters. CE challenge or LPC exposure increased LY49C(+)TCRβ(+) NKT cells in BALF and spleen, which was reduced by anti-CD1d antibody, accompanied with reduction in AHR and allergic airway inflammation parameters. Conclusively, LPC induces allergic airway disease manifestation and it does so probably via CD1d-restricted LY49C(+)TCRβ(+) NKT cells. PMID:27282246

  5. Inflammatory Marker sTREM-1 Reflects the Clinical Stage and Respiratory Tract Obstruction in Allergic Asthma Bronchiale Patients and Correlates with Number of Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Bucova, Maria; Suchankova, Magda; Dzurilla, Martin; Vrlik, Mojmir; Novosadova, Helena; Tedlova, Eva; Urban, Stefan; Hornakova, Edita; Seligova, Marianna; Durmanova, Vladimira; Penz, Peter; Javor, Juraj; Paulovicova, Ema

    2012-01-01

    The knowledge that asthma is an inflammatory disorder has prompted us to investigate the plasma levels of a new inflammatory marker sTREM-1 that is released from the surfaces of activated neutrophils and monocytes. The plasma levels of sTREM-1 were analysed by a sandwich ELISA test in the cohort of 76 patients with allergic asthma bronchiale and 39 healthy controls. Our results revealed more than 3.5 times higher levels of sTREM-1 in AB patients (92.3 pg/mL ± 125.6) compared with healthy subjects (25.7 pg/mL ± 9.2; P = 0.0001). Higher levels of sTREM-1 were found also in patients with exacerbated AB (170.5 pg/mL ± 78.2) compared with nonexacerbated AB patients (59.1 ± 78.2; P < 0.0001), patients with respiratory tract obstruction (176.4 pg/mL ± 177.8), than those without obstruction (51.99 pg/mL ± 64.0; P < 0.0001) and patients with anti-IgE therapy (P < 0.0001). Levels of sTREM-1 correlated with number of leucocytes (P = 0.002), and absolute number of neutrophils (P = 0.001). Elevated plasma levels of sTREM-1 reflect the severity, state of exacerbation, presence of respiratory tract obstruction in AB patients and together with increased number of neutrophils point to the role of neutrophils in inflammation accompanying AB. PMID:22829716

  6. A20-Deficient Mast Cells Exacerbate Inflammatory Responses In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Vahl, J. Christoph; Aszodi, Attila; Peschke, Katrin; Schenten, Dominik; Hammad, Hamida; Beyaert, Rudi; Saur, Dieter; van Loo, Geert; Roers, Axel; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Kool, Mirjam; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, this notion based on studies in mast cell-deficient mice is controversial. We therefore established an in vivo model for hyperactive mast cells by specifically ablating the NF-κB negative feedback regulator A20. While A20 deficiency did not affect mast cell degranulation, it resulted in amplified pro-inflammatory responses downstream of IgE/FcεRI, TLRs, IL-1R, and IL-33R. As a consequence house dust mite- and IL-33-driven lung inflammation, late phase cutaneous anaphylaxis, and collagen-induced arthritis were aggravated, in contrast to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and immediate anaphylaxis. Our results provide in vivo evidence that hyperactive mast cells can exacerbate inflammatory disorders and define diseases that might benefit from therapeutic intervention with mast cell function. PMID:24453940

  7. Lung epithelial cells modulate the inflammatory response of alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rubovitch, Vardit; Gershnabel, Shoham; Kalina, Moshe

    2007-12-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effect of alveolar epithelial cells on inflammatory responses in macrophages. Lung epithelial cells (either rat RLE-6TN or human A549 cells) reduced LPS-induced NO production in alveolar macrophages (AM) in a contact-independent mechanism. The inhibitory effect of the epithelial cells was present already at the transcriptional level: LPS-induced inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression was significantly smaller. Surfactant protein A (SP-A)-induced NO production by alveolar macrophages was also reduced in the presence of A549 cells, though, by a different kinetics. LPS-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) production (another inflammatory pathway) by alveolar macrophages was also reduced in the presence of RLE-6TN cells. These data suggest a role for lung epithelial cells in the complicated modulation of inflammatory processes, and provide an insight into the mechanism underlying. PMID:17851743

  8. Non-Invasive Optical Imaging of Eosinophilia during the Course of an Experimental Allergic Airways Disease Model and in Response to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Markus, M. Andrea; Dullin, Christian; Mitkovski, Miso; Prieschl-Grassauer, Eva; Epstein, Michelle M.; Alves, Frauke

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular imaging of lung diseases, including asthma, is limited and either invasive or non-specific. Central to the inflammatory process in asthma is the recruitment of eosinophils to the airways, which release proteases and proinflammatory factors and contribute to airway remodeling. The aim of this study was to establish a new approach to non-invasively assess lung eosinophilia during the course of experimental asthma by combining non-invasive near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging with the specific detection of Siglec-F, a lectin found predominantly on eosinophils. Methodology/Principal Findings An ovalbumin (OVA)-based model was used to induce asthma-like experimental allergic airway disease (EAAD) in BALB/c mice. By means of a NIRF imager, we demonstrate that 48 h–72 h after intravenous (i.v.) application of a NIRF-labeled anti-Siglec-F antibody, mice with EAAD exhibited up to 2 times higher fluorescence intensities compared to lungs of control mice. Furthermore, average lung intensities of dexamethasone-treated as well as beta-escin-treated mice were 1.8 and 2 times lower than those of untreated, EAAD mice, respectively and correlated with the reduction of cell infiltration in the lung. Average fluorescence intensities measured in explanted lungs confirmed the in vivo findings of significantly higher values in inflamed lungs as compared to controls. Fluorescence microscopy of lung cryosections localized the i.v. applied NIRF-labeled anti-Siglec-F antibody predominantly to eosinophils in the peribronchial areas of EAAD lungs as opposed to control lungs. Conclusion/Significance We show that monitoring the occurrence of eosinophils, a prominent feature of allergic asthma, by means of a NIRF-labeled antibody directed against Siglec-F is a novel and powerful non-invasive optical imaging approach to assess EAAD and therapeutic response in mice over time. PMID:24587190

  9. Modulation of Hemostatic and Inflammatory Responses by Leptospira Spp.

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Mônica L.; Naudin, Clément; Mörgelin, Matthias; Romero, Eliete C.; Nascimento, Ana Lucia T. O.; Herwald, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a worldwide spread zoonotic and neglected infectious disease of human and veterinary concern that is caused by pathogenic Leptospira species. In severe infections, hemostatic impairments such as coagulation/fibrinolysis dysfunction are frequently observed. These complications often occur when the host response is controlled and/or modulated by the bacterial pathogen. In the present investigation, we aimed to analyze the modulation of the hemostatic and inflammatory host responses by the bacterial pathogen Leptospira. The effects of leptospires and their secreted products on stimulation of human intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of coagulation were investigated by means of altered clotting times, assembly and activation of contact system and induction of tissue factor. We show that both extrinsic and intrinsic coagulation cascades are modulated in response to Leptospira or leptospiral secreted proteins. We further find that the pro-inflammatory mediator bradykinin is released following contact activation at the bacterial surface and that pro-coagulant microvesicles are shed from monocytes in response to infection. Also, we show that human leptospirosis patients present higher levels of circulating pro-coagulant microvesicles than healthy individuals. Here we show that both pathways of the coagulation system are modulated by leptospires, possibly leading to altered hemostatic and inflammatory responses during the disease. Our results contribute to the understanding of the leptospirosis pathophysiological mechanisms and may open new routes for the discovery of novel treatments for the severe manifestations of the disease. PMID:27167223

  10. Modulation of Hemostatic and Inflammatory Responses by Leptospira Spp.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Mônica L; Naudin, Clément; Mörgelin, Matthias; Romero, Eliete C; Nascimento, Ana Lucia T O; Herwald, Heiko

    2016-05-01

    Leptospirosis is a worldwide spread zoonotic and neglected infectious disease of human and veterinary concern that is caused by pathogenic Leptospira species. In severe infections, hemostatic impairments such as coagulation/fibrinolysis dysfunction are frequently observed. These complications often occur when the host response is controlled and/or modulated by the bacterial pathogen. In the present investigation, we aimed to analyze the modulation of the hemostatic and inflammatory host responses by the bacterial pathogen Leptospira. The effects of leptospires and their secreted products on stimulation of human intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of coagulation were investigated by means of altered clotting times, assembly and activation of contact system and induction of tissue factor. We show that both extrinsic and intrinsic coagulation cascades are modulated in response to Leptospira or leptospiral secreted proteins. We further find that the pro-inflammatory mediator bradykinin is released following contact activation at the bacterial surface and that pro-coagulant microvesicles are shed from monocytes in response to infection. Also, we show that human leptospirosis patients present higher levels of circulating pro-coagulant microvesicles than healthy individuals. Here we show that both pathways of the coagulation system are modulated by leptospires, possibly leading to altered hemostatic and inflammatory responses during the disease. Our results contribute to the understanding of the leptospirosis pathophysiological mechanisms and may open new routes for the discovery of novel treatments for the severe manifestations of the disease. PMID:27167223

  11. Exposure to particulate hexavalent chromium exacerbates allergic asthma pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Brent C.; Constant, Stephanie L.; Patierno, Steven R.; Jurjus, Rosalyn A.; Ceryak, Susan M.

    2012-02-15

    Airborne hexavalent chromate, Cr(VI), has been identified by the Environmental Protection Agency as a possible health threat in urban areas, due to the carcinogenic potential of some of its forms. Particulate chromates are produced in many different industrial settings, with high levels of aerosolized forms historically documented. Along with an increased risk of lung cancer, a high incidence of allergic asthma has been reported in workers exposed to certain inhaled particulate Cr(VI) compounds. However, a direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma has not been established. We recently showed that inhaled particulate Cr(VI) induces an innate neutrophilic inflammatory response in BALB/c mice. In the current studies we investigated how the inflammation induced by inhaled particulate Cr(VI) might alter the pathology of an allergic asthmatic response. We used a well-established mouse model of allergic asthma. Groups of ovalbumin protein (OVA)-primed mice were challenged either with OVA alone, or with a combination of OVA and particulate zinc chromate, and various parameters associated with asthmatic responses were measured. Co-exposure to particulate Cr(VI) and OVA mediated a mixed form of asthma in which both eosinophils and neutrophils are present in airways, tissue pathology is markedly exacerbated, and airway hyperresponsiveness is significantly increased. Taken together these findings suggest that inhalation of particulate forms of Cr(VI) may augment the severity of ongoing allergic asthma, as well as alter its phenotype. Such findings may have implications for asthmatics in settings in which airborne particulate Cr(VI) compounds are present at high levels. -- Highlights: ► Allergic asthma correlated with exposure to certain inhaled particulate chromates. ► Direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma not established. ► Cr exacerbated pathology and airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-challenged mouse. ► Particulate Cr

  12. Increased Mast Cell Density and Airway Responses to Allergic and Non-Allergic Stimuli in a Sheep Model of Chronic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Van der Velden, Joanne; Barker, Donna; Barcham, Garry; Koumoundouros, Emmanuel; Snibson, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased mast cell (MC) density and changes in their distribution in airway tissues is thought to contribute significantly to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the time sequence for these changes and how they impact small airway function in asthma is not fully understood. The aim of the current study was to characterise temporal changes in airway MC density and correlate these changes with functional airway responses in sheep chronically challenged with house dust mite (HDM) allergen. Methodology/Principal Findings MC density was examined on lung tissue from four spatially separate lung segments of allergic sheep which received weekly challenges with HDM allergen for 0, 8, 16 or 24 weeks. Lung tissue was collected from each segment 7 days following the final challenge. The density of tryptase-positive and chymase-positive MCs (MCT and MCTC respectively) was assessed by morphometric analysis of airway sections immunohistochemically stained with antibodies against MC tryptase and chymase. MCT and MCTC density was increased in small bronchi following 24 weeks of HDM challenges compared with controls (P<0.05). The MCTC/MCT ratio was significantly increased in HDM challenged sheep compared to controls (P<0.05). MCT and MCTC density was inversely correlated with allergen-induced increases in peripheral airway resistance after 24 weeks of allergen exposure (P<0.05). MCT density was also negatively correlated with airway responsiveness after 24 challenges (P<0.01). Conclusions MCT and MCTC density in the small airways correlates with better lung function in this sheep model of chronic asthma. Whether this finding indicates that under some conditions mast cells have protective activities in asthma, or that other explanations are to be considered requires further investigation. PMID:22606346

  13. The Systemic Inflammatory Response to Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Krishna; Erb-Downward, John R.; Walk, Seth T.; Micic, Dejan; Falkowski, Nicole; Santhosh, Kavitha; Mogle, Jill A.; Ring, Cathrin; Young, Vincent B.; Huffnagle, Gary B.; Aronoff, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The systemic inflammatory response to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is incompletely defined, particularly for patients with severe disease. Methods Analysis of 315 blood samples from 78 inpatients with CDI (cases), 100 inpatients with diarrhea without CDI (inpatient controls), and 137 asymptomatic outpatient controls without CDI was performed. Serum or plasma was obtained from subjects at the time of CDI testing or shortly thereafter. Severe cases had intensive care unit admission, colectomy, or death due to CDI within 30 days after diagnosis. Thirty different circulating inflammatory mediators were quantified using an antibody-linked bead array. Principal component analysis (PCA), multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), and logistic regression were used for analysis. Results Based on MANOVA, cases had a significantly different inflammatory profile from outpatient controls but not from inpatient controls. In logistic regression, only chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5) levels were associated with cases vs. inpatient controls. Several mediators were associated with cases vs. outpatient controls, especially hepatocyte growth factor, CCL5, and epithelial growth factor (inversely associated). Eight cases were severe and associated with elevations in IL-8, IL-6, and eotaxin. Conclusions A broad systemic inflammatory response occurs during CDI and severe cases appear to differ from non-severe infections. PMID:24643077

  14. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin: master switch for allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong-Jun

    2006-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is an interleukin (IL) 7–like cytokine that triggers dendritic cell–mediated T helper (Th)2 inflammatory responses. TSLP is highly expressed by keratinocytes in skin lesions of patients with atopic dermatitis and is associated with dendritic cell activation in situ, suggesting that TSLP might be a master switch for allergic inflammation at the epithelial cell–dendritic cell interface. New reports now establish a direct link between TSLP expression and the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis and asthma in vivo, and begin to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying TSLP-induced allergic inflammation. PMID:16432252

  15. Key Mediators in the Immunopathogenesis of Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sannette; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is described as a chronic inflammatory disorder of the conducting airways. It is characterized by reversible airway obstruction, eosinophil and Th2 infiltration, airway hyper-responsiveness and airway remodeling. Our findings to date have largely been dependent on work done using animal models, which have been instrumental in broadening our understanding of the mechanism of the disease. However, using animals to model a uniquely human disease is not without its drawbacks. This review aims to examine some of the key mediators and cells of allergic asthma learned from animal models and shed some light on emerging mediators in the pathogenesis allergic airway inflammation in acute and chronic asthma. PMID:24933589

  16. Filoviruses and the balance of innate, adaptive, and inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Mohamadzadeh, Mansour; Chen, Lieping; Olinger, Gene G; Pratt, William D; Schmaljohn, Alan L

    2006-01-01

    The Filoviruses Marburg virus and Ebola virus are among the deadliest of human pathogens, causing fulminant hemorrhagic fevers typified by overmatched specific immune responses and profuse inflammatory responses. Keys to both vaccination and treatment may reside, first, in the understanding of immune dysfunctions that parallel Filoviral disease and, second, in devising ways to redirect and restore normal immune function as well as to mitigate inflammation. Here, we describe how Filoviral infections may subvert innate immune responses through perturbances of dendritic cells and neutrophils, with particular emphasis on the downstream effects on adaptive immunity and inflammation. We suggest that pivotal events may be subject to therapeutic intervention as Filoviruses encounter immune processes. PMID:17201655

  17. Benfotiamine Attenuates Inflammatory Response in LPS Stimulated BV-2 Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Bozic, Iva; Savic, Danijela; Laketa, Danijela; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Milenkovic, Ivan; Pekovic, Sanja; Nedeljkovic, Nadezda; Lavrnja, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Microglial cells are resident immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS), recognized as key elements in the regulation of neural homeostasis and the response to injury and repair. As excessive activation of microglia may lead to neurodegeneration, therapeutic strategies targeting its inhibition were shown to improve treatment of most neurodegenerative diseases. Benfotiamine is a synthetic vitamin B1 (thiamine) derivate exerting potentially anti-inflammatory effects. Despite the encouraging results regarding benfotiamine potential to alleviate diabetic microangiopathy, neuropathy and other oxidative stress-induced pathological conditions, its activities and cellular mechanisms during microglial activation have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory effects of benfotiamine were investigated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine BV-2 microglia. We determined that benfotiamine remodels activated microglia to acquire the shape that is characteristic of non-stimulated BV-2 cells. In addition, benfotiamine significantly decreased production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO; cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70), tumor necrosis factor alpha α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), whereas it increased anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 (IL-10) production in LPS stimulated BV-2 microglia. Moreover, benfotiamine suppressed the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and protein kinase B Akt/PKB. Treatment with specific inhibitors revealed that benfotiamine-mediated suppression of NO production was via JNK1/2 and Akt pathway, while the cytokine suppression includes ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and Akt pathways. Finally, the potentially protective effect is mediated by the suppression of translocation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) in the nucleus. Therefore, benfotiamine may

  18. Inflammatory Responses to Salmonella Infections Are Serotype-Specific

    PubMed Central

    Ktsoyan, Zhanna; Ghazaryan, Karine; Manukyan, Gayane; Martirosyan, Anush; Mnatsakanyan, Armine; Arakelova, Karine; Gevorgyan, Zaruhi; Sedrakyan, Anahit; Asoyan, Ara; Boyajyan, Anna; Aminov, Rustam

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the profile of inflammatory response in patients with acute salmonellosis caused by two serotypes of Salmonella enterica, S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, as well as in convalescent patients with previous acute disease caused by S. Enteritidis. Patients with acute disease showed significantly elevated levels of IL-1β, IL-17, IL-10, and calprotectin compared to healthy control subjects. In convalescent patients, these markers were also significantly elevated, with the exception of IL-1β. Multivariate statistical analyses with the use of these variables produced models with a good predictive accuracy resulting in excellent separation of the diseased and healthy cohorts studied. Overall, the results suggest that the profile of inflammatory response in this disease is determined, to a significant degree, by the serotype of Salmonella, and the profile of certain cytokines and calprotectin remains abnormal for a number of months following the acute disease stage. PMID:26904722

  19. Inflammatory Responses to Salmonella Infections Are Serotype-Specific.

    PubMed

    Ktsoyan, Zhanna; Ghazaryan, Karine; Manukyan, Gayane; Martirosyan, Anush; Mnatsakanyan, Armine; Arakelova, Karine; Gevorgyan, Zaruhi; Sedrakyan, Anahit; Asoyan, Ara; Boyajyan, Anna; Aminov, Rustam

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the profile of inflammatory response in patients with acute salmonellosis caused by two serotypes of Salmonella enterica, S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, as well as in convalescent patients with previous acute disease caused by S. Enteritidis. Patients with acute disease showed significantly elevated levels of IL-1β, IL-17, IL-10, and calprotectin compared to healthy control subjects. In convalescent patients, these markers were also significantly elevated, with the exception of IL-1β. Multivariate statistical analyses with the use of these variables produced models with a good predictive accuracy resulting in excellent separation of the diseased and healthy cohorts studied. Overall, the results suggest that the profile of inflammatory response in this disease is determined, to a significant degree, by the serotype of Salmonella, and the profile of certain cytokines and calprotectin remains abnormal for a number of months following the acute disease stage. PMID:26904722

  20. Th2 and eosinophil responses suppress inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhu; Andreev, Darja; Oeser, Katharina; Krljanac, Branislav; Hueber, Axel; Kleyer, Arnd; Voehringer, David; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Th2–eosinophil immune responses are well known for mediating host defence against helminths. Herein we describe a function of Th2–eosinophil responses in counteracting the development of arthritis. In two independent models of arthritis, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection leads to Th2 and eosinophil accumulation in the joints associated with robust inhibition of arthritis and protection from bone loss. Mechanistically, this protective effect is dependent on IL-4/IL-13-induced STAT6 pathway. Furthermore, we show that eosinophils play a central role in the modulation of arthritis probably through the increase of anti-inflammatory macrophages into arthritic joints. The presence of these pathways in human disease is confirmed by detection of GATA3-positive cells and eosinophils in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that eosinophils and helminth-induced activation of the Th2 pathway axis effectively mitigate the course of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27273006

  1. Th2 and eosinophil responses suppress inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhu; Andreev, Darja; Oeser, Katharina; Krljanac, Branislav; Hueber, Axel; Kleyer, Arnd; Voehringer, David; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Th2-eosinophil immune responses are well known for mediating host defence against helminths. Herein we describe a function of Th2-eosinophil responses in counteracting the development of arthritis. In two independent models of arthritis, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection leads to Th2 and eosinophil accumulation in the joints associated with robust inhibition of arthritis and protection from bone loss. Mechanistically, this protective effect is dependent on IL-4/IL-13-induced STAT6 pathway. Furthermore, we show that eosinophils play a central role in the modulation of arthritis probably through the increase of anti-inflammatory macrophages into arthritic joints. The presence of these pathways in human disease is confirmed by detection of GATA3-positive cells and eosinophils in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that eosinophils and helminth-induced activation of the Th2 pathway axis effectively mitigate the course of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27273006

  2. The role of peroxiredoxin 4 in inflammatory response and aging.

    PubMed

    Klichko, Vladimir I; Orr, William C; Radyuk, Svetlana N

    2016-02-01

    In prior studies, we determined that the moderate overexpression of the Drosophila endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized peroxiredoxin (Prx), dPrx4, reduced oxidative damage and conferred beneficial effects on life span, while a high-level expression increased the incidence of tissue-specific apoptosis and dramatically shortened longevity. The detrimental pro-apoptotic and life-shortening effects were attributed to aberrant localization of dPrx4 and the apparent ER stress elicited by dPrx4 overexpression. In addition, the activation of both the NF-κB- and the JAK/STAT-mediated stress responses was detected, although it was not clear whether these served as functional alarm signals. Here we extend these findings to show that the activation of the NF-κB-dependent immunity-related/inflammatory genes, associated with life span shortening effects, is dependent on the activity of a Drosophila NF-κB ortholog, Relish. In the absence of Relish, the pro-inflammatory effects typically elicited by dPrx4 overexpression were not detected. The absence of Relish not only prevented the hyperactivation of the immunity-related genes but also significantly rescued the severe shortening of life span normally observed in dPrx4 overexpressors. The overactivation of the immune/inflammatory responses was also lessened by JAK/STAT signaling. In addition, we found that cellular immune/pro-inflammatory responses provoked by the oxidant paraquat but not bacteria are mediated via dPrx4 activity in the ER, as the upregulation of the immune-related genes was eliminated in flies underexpressing dPrx4, whereas immune responses triggered by bacteria were unaffected. Finally, efforts to reveal critical tissues where dPrx4 modulates longevity showed that broad targeting of dPrx4 to neuronal tissue had strong beneficial effects, while targeting expression to the fat body had deleterious effects. PMID:26689888

  3. Engineering macrophages to control the inflammatory response and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Eaton, K V; Yang, H L; Giachelli, C M; Scatena, M

    2015-12-10

    Macrophage (MΦ) dysregulation is increasingly becoming recognized as a risk factor for a number of inflammatory complications including atherosclerosis, cancer, and the host response elicited by biomedical devices. It is still unclear what roles the pro-inflammatory (M1) MΦ and pro-healing (M2) MΦ phenotypes play during the healing process. However, it has been shown that a local overabundance of M1 MΦs can potentially lead to a chronically inflamed state of the tissue; while a local over-exuberant M2 MΦ response can lead to tissue fibrosis and even promote tumorigenesis. These notions strengthen the argument that the tight temporal regulation of this phenotype balance is necessary to promote inflammatory resolution that leads to tissue homeostasis. In this study, we have engineered pro-inflammatory MΦs, MΦ-cTLR4 cells, which can be activated to a M1-like MΦ phenotype with a small molecule, the chemical inducer of dimerization (CID) drug. The MΦ-cTLR4 cells when activated with the CID drug, express increased levels of TNFα, IL-6, and iNOS. Activated MΦ-cTLR4 cells stay stimulated for at least 48h; once the CID drug is withdrawn, the MΦ-cTLR4 cells return to baseline state within 18h. Further, in vitro CID-activated MΦ-cTLR4 cells induce upregulation of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 on endothelial cells (EC) in a TNFα-dependent manner. With the ability to specifically modulate the MФ-cTLR4 cells with the presence or absence of a small molecule, we now have the tool necessary to observe a primarily M1 MФ response during inflammation. By isolating this phase of the wound healing response, it may be possible to determine conditions for ideal healing. PMID:26610863

  4. Post-mating inflammatory responses of the uterus.

    PubMed

    Katila, T

    2012-08-01

    This review attempts to summarize the current knowledge on uterine inflammatory response after mating in horses, pigs and cattle. Post-mating endometritis has been extensively studied in horses as it has been considered to cause infertility. The inflammation is known to occur also in cattle, but it has not been investigated to a similar extent. There are a number of publications about mechanisms of post-mating uterine inflammation in pigs, which seem to resemble those in horses. The major focus of this review is the horse, but relevant literature is presented also on swine and cattle. Spermatozoa, seminal plasma and semen extenders play roles in the induction of inflammation. In addition, sperm numbers, concentration and viability, as well as the site of semen deposition may modulate the inflammatory response. Cytokines, polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) and mononuclear cells represent the uterine inflammatory response to mating. Inflammation is the first line of defence against invasion and eliminates excess spermatozoa and bacteria. Semen deposition elicits a massive PMN invasion, followed by phagocytosis of sperm aided by the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. Exposure of the female genital tract to semen is important also for endometrial receptivity and pre-implantation embryo development. Seminal plasma (SP) and inflammation elicit transient immune tolerance to antigens present in semen. SP contains immune-regulatory molecules that activate and control immune responses to antigens by stimulating expression of cytokines and growth factors and by initiating tissue remodelling. SP also regulates ovarian function. Effective elimination of excess sperm and inflammatory by-products and subsequent rapid return of the endometrium to the normal state is a prerequisite for pregnancy. Uterine backflow, driven by myometrial contractions and requiring a patent cervix, is an important physical tool in uterine drainage. PMID:22913558

  5. Innate immune inflammatory response in the acutely ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Angelidis, Christos; Bouras, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Gerckens, Ulrich; Cleman, Michael W; Giannopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    The "holy grail" of modern interventional cardiology is the salvage of viable myocardial tissue in the distribution of an acutely occluded coronary artery. Thrombolysis and percutaneous coronary interventions, provided they can be delivered on time, can interrupt the occlusion and save tissue. At the same time restoring the patency of the coronary vessels and providing the ischemic myocardium with blood can cause additional tissue damage. A key element of ischemic and reperfusion injury and major determinant of the evolution of damage in the injured myocardium is the inflammatory response. The innate immune system initiates and directs this response which is a prerequisite for subsequent healing. The complement cascade is set in motion following the release of subcellular membrane constituents. Endogenous 'danger' signals known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from ischemic and dying cells alert the innate immune system and activate several signal transduction pathways through interactions with the highly conserved Toll like receptors (TLRs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation directly induces pro-inflammatory cascades and triggers formation of the inflammasome. The challenge lies into designing strategies that specifically block the inflammatory cascades responsible for tissue damage without affecting those concerned with tissue healing. PMID:25102201

  6. The toxic effects of indoor atmospheric fine particulate matter collected from allergic and non-allergic families in Wuhan on mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yan, Biao; Li, Jinquan; Guo, Junhui; Ma, Ping; Wu, Zhuo; Ling, ZhenHao; Guo, Hai; Hiroshi, Yoshino; Yanagi, U; Yang, Xu; Zhu, Shengwei; Chen, Mingqing

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is associated with multiple adverse health outcomes and PM2.5-induced oxidative stress is now commonly known as a proposed mechanism of PM2.5-mediated toxicity. However, the association between allergic symptoms in children and exposure to PM2.5 has not been fully elucidated, particularly the role of PM2.5 on the indoor environment involved in allergy or non-allergy is unknown. The aim of the present study was to explore whether indoor PM2.5 from the homes of children with allergic symptoms had more increased risks of allergy than that of healthy ones and then compare the toxicity and inflammatory response of them. In this study, indoor PM2.5 was collected from the homes of schoolchildren with allergic symptoms and those of healthy ones respectively, and components of PM2.5 were analyzed. PM2.5-mediated oxidative damage and inflammatory response were further evaluated in mouse peritoneal macrophages based on its effects on the levels of reactive oxygen species accumulation, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage or cytokine production. It seems that oxidative stress may contribute to PM2.5-induced toxicity, and PM2.5 from the allergic indoor environment produced more serious toxic effects and an inflammatory response on mouse peritoneal macrophages than that from a non-allergic indoor environment. PMID:26304222

  7. Tricin derivatives as anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic constituents from the aerial part of Zizania latifolia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Su; Baek, Yoon-Su; Eun, Cheong-Su; Yu, Mi-Hee; Baek, Nam-In; Chung, Dae-Kyun; Bang, Myun-Ho; Yang, Seun-Ah

    2015-01-01

    Methanol extract of Zizania latifolia was partitioned with EtOAc, n-BuOH, and H2O. From the EtOAc layers, a new flavonolignan along with a known flavone and three known flavonolignans, tricin (1), salcolin A (2), salcolin B (3), and salcolin C (4), were isolated through repeated silica gel and ODS column chromatography. The chemical structure of the new flavonolignan was determined to be tricin-4'-O-[erythro-β-guaiacyl-(7″-O-methyl)-glyceryl] ether and was named salcolin D (5) based on physicochemical and spectroscopic data, including FT-NMR and ESI-MS. All compounds were isolated for the first time from this plant. Compounds 2-5, tricin derivatives, all exhibited higher anti-inflammatory and anti-allergy activities than tricin. In particular, salcolin D (5) was shown to have the strongest inhibitory activity against LPS-induced NO production in RAW 264.7 cells as well as β-hexosaminidase release in IgE-sensitized RBL-2H3 cells. These results suggest that the presence of tricin derivatives conveys allergy and inflammation treatment ability to Z. latifolia. PMID:25559019

  8. A new, rapid in vivo method to evaluate allergic responses through distinctive distribution of a fluorescent-labeled immune complex: Potential to investigate anti-allergic effects of compounds administered either systemically or topically to the skin.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Kouya; Yoshino, Shin

    2016-01-01

    We herein established a new method to evaluate allergic responses in mice rapidly and easily with ethical improvement by reducing the number of animals used. A single intravenous injection of a mixture of anti-OVA monoclonal IgE and fluorescein-ovalbumin (FITC-OVA) induced the distinctive spotted distribution of FITC-OVA in skin, named "ASDIS (Anaphylaxis-dependent Spotted Distribution of a fluorescent-labeled Immune complex in Skin)", and this was easily detected by in vivo imaging. The parallel induction of hypothermia, scratching, serum histamine increases, and ASDIS as well as the inhibition of ASDIS by either the systemic administration of a histamine H1 receptor antagonist or mast cell-depleting antibody suggested that our method, which only required 15 min, induced these allergic responses including ASDIS. Relatively mild but significant ASDIS was induced also in mice with passive systemic anaphylaxis by the method, requiring 2 separate days. The painting of anti-histamines on the skin markedly reduced ASDIS in the painted area only, suggesting the potential of this model to simultaneously compare the anti-allergic effects of several candidate compounds with control drugs in the same mice. ASDIS was suggested to originate from extravasated FITC-OVA/OE-1 immune complexes from blood to skin tissues other than mast cells. Our new method has the advantages of rapidity, easy method, and lower animal numbers to evaluate anti-allergic compounds as well as the characteristics of the used antibody, antigen, labeling molecules, additives, and other formulations. Our model for inducing ASDIS may contribute to the development of anti-allergic drugs, especially those intended for application to the skin. PMID:26643682

  9. Inflammatory responses in Ebola virus-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    BAIZE, S; LEROY, E M; GEORGES, A J; GEORGES-COURBOT, M-C; CAPRON, M; BEDJABAGA, I; LANSOUD-SOUKATE, J; MAVOUNGOU, E

    2002-01-01

    Ebola virus subtype Zaire (Ebo-Z) induces acute haemorrhagic fever and a 60–80% mortality rate in humans. Inflammatory responses were monitored in victims and survivors of Ebo-Z haemorrhagic fever during two recent outbreaks in Gabon. Survivors were characterized by a transient release in plasma of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) and MIP-1β early in the disease, followed by circulation of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) and soluble receptors for TNFα (sTNF-R) and IL-6 (sIL-6R) towards the end of the symptomatic phase and after recovery. Fatal infection was associated with moderate levels of TNFα and IL-6, and high levels of IL-10, IL-1RA and sTNF-R, in the days before death, while IL-1β was not detected and MIP-1α and MIP-1β concentrations were similar to those of endemic controls. Simultaneous massive activation of monocytes/macrophages, the main target of Ebo-Z, was suggested in fatal infection by elevated neopterin levels. Thus, presence of IL-1β and of elevated concentrations of IL-6 in plasma during the symptomatic phase can be used as markers of non-fatal infection, while release of IL-10 and of high levels of neopterin and IL-1RA in plasma as soon as a few days after the disease onset is indicative of a fatal outcome. In conclusion, recovery from Ebo-Z infection is associated with early and well-regulated inflammatory responses, which may be crucial in controlling viral replication and inducing specific immunity. In contrast, defective inflammatory responses and massive monocyte/macrophage activation were associated with fatal outcome. PMID:11982604

  10. On the inflammatory response in metal-on-metal implants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metal-on-metal implants are a special form of hip endoprostheses that despite many advantages can entail serious complications due to release of wear particles from the implanted material. Metal wear particles presumably activate local host defence mechanisms, which causes a persistent inflammatory response with destruction of bone followed by a loosening of the implant. To better characterize this inflammatory response and to link inflammation to bone degradation, the local generation of proinflammatory and osteoclast-inducing cytokines was analysed, as was systemic T cell activation. Methods By quantitative RT-PCR, gene expression of cytokines and markers for T lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages and osteoclasts, respectively, was analysed in tissue samples obtained intraoperatively during exchange surgery of the loosened implant. Peripheral T cells were characterized by cytofluorometry before surgery and 7 to 10 days thereafter. Results At sites of osteolysis, gene expression of cathepsin K, CD14 and CD3 was seen, indicating the generation of osteoclasts, and the presence of monocytes and of T cells, respectively. Also cytokines were highly expressed, including CXCL8, IL-1ß, CXCL2, MRP-14 and CXCL-10. The latter suggest T cell activation, a notion that could be confirmed by detecting a small, though conspicuous population of activated CD4+ cells in the peripheral blood T cells prior to surgery. Conclusion Our data support the concept that metallosis is the result of a local inflammatory response, which according to histomorphology and the composition of the cellular infiltrate classifies as an acute phase of a chronic inflammatory disease. The proinflammatory environment, particularly the generation of the osteoclast-inducing cytokines CXCL8 and IL1-ß, promotes bone resorption. Loss of bone results in implant loosening, which then causes the major symptoms of metallosis, pain and reduced range of motion. PMID:24650243

  11. Acute and chronic exposure to Tyrophagus putrescentiae induces allergic pulmonary response in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Nuñez, Nailê Karine; dos Santos Dutra, Moisés; Barbosa, Gustavo Leivas; Morassutti, Alessandra Loureiro; de Souza, Rodrigo Godinho; Vargas, Mauro Henrique Moraes; Antunes, Géssica Luana; Silveira, Josiane Silva; da Silva, Guilherme Liberato; Pitrez, Paulo Márcio

    2016-01-01

    Background Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Tp) is a source of aeroallergen that causes allergic diseases. Objective To describe an acute and chronic murine model of allergic asthma with Tp extract with no systemic sensitization and no use of adjuvant. Methods Mites from dust sample were cultured and a raw extract was produced. Female BALB/c mice (6-8 weeks) were challenged intranasally with Tp extract or Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline, for 10 consecutive days (acute protocol) or for 6 weeks (chronic protocol). Twenty-four hours after the last intranasal challenge, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was performed for total and differential cells count, cytokine analysis, and eosinophil peroxidase activity. Lung tissue was also removed for histopathologic analysis. Results Tp extract has shown a significant increase in total cells count from BALF as well as an increase in absolute eosinophils count, eosinophil peroxidase activity, interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13 levels, in both acute and chronic protocols. Peribronchovascular infiltrate, goblet cells hyperplasia and collagen deposition were shown in the airways of acute and chronic Tp-exposed mice. Conclusion Our data suggest that the intranasal exposure to Tp extract, with no systemic sensitization and no use of adjuvants, induces a robust allergic inflammation in the lungs of mice, in both acute and chronic models. Our Tp extract seems to be a potent allergen extract which may be used in asthma model studies. PMID:26844220

  12. Inflammatory biomarkers as differential predictors of antidepressant response.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Although antidepressants are generally effective in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD), it can still take weeks before patients feel the full antidepressant effects. Despite the efficacy of standard treatments, approximately two-thirds of patients with MDD fail to respond to pharmacotherapy. Therefore, the identification of blood biomarkers that can predict the treatment response to antidepressants would be highly useful in order to improve this situation. This article discusses inflammatory molecules as predictive biomarkers for antidepressant responses to several classes of antidepressants, including the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine. PMID:25856677

  13. Defining the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome in Equine Neonates.

    PubMed

    Wong, David M; Wilkins, Pamela A

    2015-12-01

    Defining and describing the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis facilitated recognition and investigation of the complex disease processes involving the host response to infection and trauma. Over the years a variety of definitions of SIRS have been examined and applied to numerous research studies to improve critical care in both human and veterinary clinical practice. This article summarizes the history of the development of the SIRS definition, outlines the pathophysiologic processes that are involved in SIRS, and provides a specific definition for use in foal medicine. PMID:26612743

  14. Pathophysiological role of the acute inflammatory response during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cover, Cathleen; Liu Jie; Farhood, Anwar; Malle, Ernst; Waalkes, Michael P.; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut . E-mail: jaeschke@email.arizona.edu

    2006-10-01

    Neutrophils are recruited into the liver after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose but the pathophysiological relevance of this acute inflammatory response remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the time course of liver injury, hepatic neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory gene mRNA expression for up to 24 h after treatment with 300 mg/kg AAP in C3Heb/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice. Although there was no relevant difference in liver injury (assessed by the increase of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and the areas of necrosis), the number of neutrophils and the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-1{beta} and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) was higher in C3Heb/FeJ than in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory genes interleukin-10 and heme oxygenase-1 was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Despite substantial hepatic neutrophil accumulation, none of the liver sections from both strains stained positive for hypochlorite-modified proteins, a specific marker for a neutrophil-induced oxidant stress. In addition, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium chloride or apocynin or the anti-neutrophil antibody Gr-1 did not protect against AAP hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, although intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was previously shown to be important for neutrophil extravasation and tissue injury in several models, ICAM-1-deficient mice were not protected against AAP-mediated liver injury. Together, these data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils aggravate liver injury induced by AAP overdose.

  15. Pathophysiological role of the acute inflammatory response during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cover, Cathleen; Liu, Jie; Farhood, Anwar; Malle, Ernst; Waalkes, Michael P; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2006-10-01

    Neutrophils are recruited into the liver after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose but the pathophysiological relevance of this acute inflammatory response remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the time course of liver injury, hepatic neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory gene mRNA expression for up to 24 h after treatment with 300 mg/kg AAP in C3Heb/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice. Although there was no relevant difference in liver injury (assessed by the increase of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and the areas of necrosis), the number of neutrophils and the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) was higher in C3Heb/FeJ than in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory genes interleukin-10 and heme oxygenase-1 was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Despite substantial hepatic neutrophil accumulation, none of the liver sections from both strains stained positive for hypochlorite-modified proteins, a specific marker for a neutrophil-induced oxidant stress. In addition, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium chloride or apocynin or the anti-neutrophil antibody Gr-1 did not protect against AAP hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, although intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was previously shown to be important for neutrophil extravasation and tissue injury in several models, ICAM-1-deficient mice were not protected against AAP-mediated liver injury. Together, these data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils aggravate liver injury induced by AAP overdose. PMID:16781746

  16. The Inflammatory Response in Psoriasis: a Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yaxiong; Chang, Christopher; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-06-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by an excessively aberrant hyperproliferation of keratinocytes. The pathogenesis of psoriasis is complex and the exact mechanism remains elusive. However, psoriasis is thought to result from a combination of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental influences. Recent studies have identified that epigenetic factors including dysregulated DNA methylation levels, abnormal histone modification and microRNAs expressions are involved in the development of psoriasis. The interplay of immune cells and cytokines is another critical factor in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. These factors or pathways include Th1/Th2 homeostasis, the Th17/Treg balance and the IL-23/Th17 axis. Th17 is believed particularly important in psoriasis due to its pro-inflammatory effects and its involvement in an integrated inflammatory loop with dendritic cells and keratinocytes, contributing to an overproduction of antimicrobial peptides, inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines that leads to amplification of the immune response. In addition, other pathways and signaling molecules have been found to be involved, including Th9, Th22, regulatory T cells, γδ T cells, CD8(+) T cells, and their related cytokines. Understanding the pathogenesis of psoriasis will allow us to develop increasingly efficient targeted treatment by blocking relevant inflammatory signaling pathways and molecules. There is no cure for psoriasis at the present time, and much of the treatment involves managing the symptoms. The biologics, while lacking the adverse effects associated with some of the traditional medications such as corticosteroids and methotrexate, have their own set of side effects, which may include reactivation of latent infections. Significant challenges remain in developing safe and efficacious novel targeted therapies that depend on a better understanding of the immunological dysfunction in psoriasis. PMID:27025861

  17. Silencing Nociceptor Neurons Reduces Allergic Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Sébastien; Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E; Burkett, Patrick R; Lee, Seungkyu; Cronin, Shane J F; Pascal, Maud A; Laedermann, Cedric; Foster, Simmie L; Tran, Johnathan V; Lai, Nicole; Chiu, Isaac M; Ghasemlou, Nader; DiBiase, Matthew; Roberson, David; Von Hehn, Christian; Agac, Busranour; Haworth, Oliver; Seki, Hiroyuki; Penninger, Josef M; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Bean, Bruce P; Levy, Bruce D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2015-07-15

    Lung nociceptors initiate cough and bronchoconstriction. To elucidate if these fibers also contribute to allergic airway inflammation, we stimulated lung nociceptors with capsaicin and observed increased neuropeptide release and immune cell infiltration. In contrast, ablating Nav1.8(+) sensory neurons or silencing them with QX-314, a charged sodium channel inhibitor that enters via large-pore ion channels to specifically block nociceptors, substantially reduced ovalbumin- or house-dust-mite-induced airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We also discovered that IL-5, a cytokine produced by activated immune cells, acts directly on nociceptors to induce the release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP then stimulates CD4(+) and resident innate lymphoid type 2 cells, creating an inflammatory signaling loop that promotes allergic inflammation. Our results indicate that nociceptors amplify pathological adaptive immune responses and that silencing these neurons with QX-314 interrupts this neuro-immune interplay, revealing a potential new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:26119026

  18. Role of moesin in HMGB1-stimulated severe inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Kwon, O K; Han, M-S; Lee, Y-M; Kim, S-W; Kim, K-M; Lee, T; Lee, S; Bae, J-S

    2015-08-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that arises when the body's response to infection causes systemic inflammation. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), as a late mediator of sepsis, enhances hyperpermeability, and it is therefore a therapeutic target. Despite extensive research into the underlying mechanisms of sepsis, the target molecules controlling vascular leakage remain largely unknown. Moesin is a cytoskeletal protein involved in cytoskeletal changes and paracellular gap formation. The objectives of this study were to determine the roles of moesin in HMGB1-mediated vascular hyperpermeability and inflammatory responses and to investigate the mechanisms of action underlying these responses. Using siRNA knockdown of moesin expression in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), moesin was found to be required in HMGB1-induced F-actin rearrangement, hyperpermeability, and inflammatory responses. The mechanisms involved in moesin phosphorylation were analysed by blocking the binding of the HMGB1 receptor (RAGE) and inhibiting the Rho and MAPK pathways. HMGB1-treated HUVECs exhibited an increase in Thr558 phosphorylation of moesin. Circulating levels of moesin were measured in patients admitted to the intensive care unit with sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock; these patients showed significantly higher levels of moesin than healthy controls, which was strongly correlated with disease severity. High blood moesin levels were also observed in cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis in mice. Administration of blocking moesin antibodies attenuated CLP-induced septic death. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that the HMGB1-RAGE-moesin axis can elicit severe inflammatory responses, suggesting it to be a potential target for the development of diagnostics and therapeutics for sepsis. PMID:25947626

  19. RELATIVE POTENCY OF MOLD AND HOUSE DUST MITE EXTRACTS IN INDUCING ALLERGIC RESPONSES IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Mold has been associated with the exacerbation of allergic asthma. However, its role in induction of allergic asthma is not clear. Using a previously developed mouse model for allergic asthma, we compared potencies of two fungal extracts (Metarhizium anisop...

  20. Prostaglandin I2 Suppresses Proinflammatory Chemokine Expression, CD4 T Cell Activation, and STAT6-Independent Allergic Lung Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weisong; Zhang, Jian; Goleniewska, Kasia; Dulek, Daniel E; Toki, Shinji; Newcomb, Dawn C; Cephus, Jacqueline Y; Collins, Robert D; Wu, Pingsheng; Boothby, Mark R; Peebles, R Stokes

    2016-09-01

    Allergic airway diseases are immune disorders associated with heightened type 2 immune responses and IL-5 and IL-13 production at the site of inflammation. We have previously reported that cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition by indomethacin augmented allergic airway inflammation in a STAT6-independent manner. However, the key COX product(s) responsible for restraining indomethacin-mediated STAT6-independent allergic inflammation is unknown. In this study, using the mouse model of OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation, we identified that PGI2 receptor (IP) signaling was critical for indomethacin-induced, STAT6-independent proallergic effects. We demonstrated that IP deficiency increased inflammatory cell infiltration, eosinophilia, and IL-5 and IL-13 expression in the lung in a STAT6-independent manner. The augmented STAT6-independent allergic inflammation correlated with enhanced primary immune responses to allergic sensitization and elevated production of multiple inflammatory chemokines (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, and CXCL12) in the lung after allergen challenge. We also showed that the PGI2 analogue cicaprost inhibited CD4 T cell proliferation and IL-5 and IL-13 expression in vitro, and IP deficiency diminished the stimulatory effect of indomethacin on STAT6-independent IL-5 and IL-13 responses in vivo. The inhibitory effects of PGI2 and the IP signaling pathway on CD4 T cell activation, inflammatory chemokine production, and allergic sensitization and airway inflammation suggest that PGI2 and its analogue iloprost, both Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, may be useful in treating allergic diseases and asthma. In addition, inhibiting PGI2 signaling by drugs that either block PGI2 production or restrain IP signaling may augment STAT6-independent pathways of allergic inflammation. PMID:27456482

  1. Cutting Edge: Drebrin-Regulated Actin Dynamics Regulate IgE-Dependent Mast Cell Activation and Allergic Responses.

    PubMed

    Law, Mankit; Lee, YongChan; Morales, J Luis; Ning, Gang; Huang, Weishan; Pabon, Jonathan; Kannan, Arun K; Jeong, Ah-Reum; Wood, Amie; Carter, Chavez; Mohinta, Sonia; Song, Jihong; August, Avery

    2015-07-15

    Mast cells play critical roles in allergic responses. Calcium signaling controls the function of these cells, and a role for actin in regulating calcium influx into cells has been suggested. We have previously identified the actin reorganizing protein Drebrin as a target of the immunosuppressant 3,5-bistrifluoromethyl pyrazole, which inhibits calcium influx into cells. In this study, we show that Drebrin(-/-) mice exhibit reduced IgE-mediated histamine release and passive systemic anaphylaxis, and Drebrin(-/-) mast cells also exhibit defects in FcεRI-mediated degranulation. Drebrin(-/-) mast cells exhibit defects in actin cytoskeleton organization and calcium responses downstream of the FcεRI, and agents that relieve actin reorganization rescue mast cell FcεRI-induced degranulation. Our results indicate that Drebrin regulates the actin cytoskeleton and calcium responses in mast cells, thus regulating mast cell function in vivo. PMID:26056254

  2. Genetics of Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Romina A.; Barnes, Kathleen C.

    2015-01-01

    The allergic diseases are complex phenotypes for which a strong genetic basis has been firmly established. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has been widely employed in the field of allergic disease, and to date significant associations have been published for nearly 100 asthma genes/loci, in addition to multiple genes/loci for AD, AR and IgE levels, for which the overwhelming number of candidates are novel and have given a new appreciation for the role of innate as well as adaptive immune-response genes in allergic disease. A major outcome of GWAS in allergic disease has been the formation of national and international collaborations leading to consortia meta-analyses, and an appreciation for the specificity of genetic associations to sub-phenotypes of allergic disease. Molecular genetics has undergone a technological revolution, leading to next generation sequencing (NGS) strategies that are increasingly employed to hone in on the causal variants associated with allergic diseases. Unmet needs in the field include the inclusion of ethnically and racially diverse cohorts, and strategies for managing ‘big data’ that is an outcome of technological advances such as sequencing. PMID:25459575

  3. Inflammatory Signals Regulate IL-15 in Response to Lymphodepletion.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Scott M; Rivas, Sarai C; Colpitts, Sara L; Howard, Megan E; Stonier, Spencer W; Schluns, Kimberly S

    2016-06-01

    Induction of lymphopenia has been exploited therapeutically to improve immune responses to cancer therapies and vaccinations. Whereas IL-15 has well-established roles in stimulating lymphocyte responses after lymphodepletion, the mechanisms regulating these IL-15 responses are unclear. We report that cell surface IL-15 expression is upregulated during lymphopenia induced by total body irradiation (TBI), cyclophosphamide, or Thy1 Ab-mediated T cell depletion, as well as in RAG(-/-) mice; interestingly, the cellular profile of surface IL-15 expression is distinct in each model. In contrast, soluble IL-15 (sIL-15) complexes are upregulated only after TBI or αThy1 Ab. Analysis of cell-specific IL-15Rα conditional knockout mice revealed that macrophages and dendritic cells are important sources of sIL-15 complexes after TBI but provide minimal contribution in response to Thy1 Ab treatment. Unlike with TBI, induction of sIL-15 complexes by αThy1 Ab is sustained and only partially dependent on type I IFNs. The stimulator of IFN genes pathway was discovered to be a potent inducer of sIL-15 complexes and was required for optimal production of sIL-15 complexes in response to Ab-mediated T cell depletion and TBI, suggesting products of cell death drive production of sIL-15 complexes after lymphodepletion. Lastly, we provide evidence that IL-15 induced by inflammatory signals in response to lymphodepletion drives lymphocyte responses, as memory CD8 T cells proliferated in an IL-15-dependent manner. Overall, these studies demonstrate that the form in which IL-15 is expressed, its kinetics and cellular sources, and the inflammatory signals involved are differentially dictated by the manner in which lymphopenia is induced. PMID:27183627

  4. Systemic inflammatory responses in African tick-bite fever.

    PubMed

    Jensenius, Mogens; Ueland, Thor; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Brosstad, Frank; Stylianou, Eva; Vene, Sirkka; Myrvang, Bjørn; Raoult, Didier; Aukrust, Pål

    2003-04-15

    Information regarding the inflammatory response in African tick-bite fever (ATBF), an emerging spotted-fever-group rickettsiosis, in international travelers to sub-Saharan Africa, is scarce. Plasma/serum levels of von Willebrand factor (vWF), soluble (s) E-selectin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, interferon-gamma, IL-10, IL-13, IL-8, RANTES, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, and C-reactive protein were studied, at both first presentation and follow-up, in 15 patients with travel-associated ATBF and in 14 healthy travelers who served as control subjects. Our main and novel findings are the following: (1) patients with ATBF had increased levels of vWF and sE-selectin, with a subsequent decrease at follow-up; (2) with the exception of IFN-gamma, levels of cytokines and chemokines were also increased in these patients at the first presentation; and (3) IL-10 and IL-13 tended to increase during follow-up, whereas most of the inflammatory cytokines decreased. The induction of these mediators and the balance between them may be critical both for the regulation of inflammation and for protective immunity in ATBF. PMID:12696016

  5. Platelets in Pulmonary Immune Responses and Inflammatory Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Elizabeth A; Weyrich, Andrew S; Zimmerman, Guy A

    2016-10-01

    Platelets are essential for physiological hemostasis and are central in pathological thrombosis. These are their traditional and best known activities in health and disease. In addition, however, platelets have specializations that broaden their functional repertoire considerably. These functional capabilities, some of which are recently discovered, include the ability to sense and respond to infectious and immune signals and to act as inflammatory effector cells. Human platelets and platelets from mice and other experimental animals can link the innate and adaptive limbs of the immune system and act across the immune continuum, often also linking immune and hemostatic functions. Traditional and newly recognized facets of the biology of platelets are relevant to defensive, physiological immune responses of the lungs and to inflammatory lung diseases. The emerging view of platelets as blood cells that are much more diverse and versatile than previously thought further predicts that additional features of the biology of platelets and of megakaryocytes, the precursors of platelets, will be discovered and that some of these will also influence pulmonary immune defenses and inflammatory injury. PMID:27489307

  6. The hepatic inflammatory response after acetaminophen overdose: role of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lawson, J A; Farhood, A; Hopper, R D; Bajt, M L; Jaeschke, H

    2000-04-01

    Acetaminophen overdose induces severe liver injury and hepatic failure. There is evidence that inflammatory cells may be involved in the pathophysiology. Thus, the aim of this investigation was to characterize the neutrophilic inflammatory response after treatment of C3Heb/FeJ mice with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen. A time course study showed that neutrophils accumulate in the liver parallel to or slightly after the development of liver injury. The number of neutrophils in the liver was substantial (209 +/- 64 PMN/50 high-power fields at 12 h) compared to baseline levels (7 +/- 1). Serum levels of TNF-alpha and the C-X-C chemokines KC and MIP-2 increased by 28-, 14-, and 295-fold, respectively, over levels found in controls during the injury process. In addition, mRNA expression of MIP-2 and KC were upregulated in livers of acetaminophen-treated animals as determined by ribonuclease protection assay. However, none of these mediators were generated in large enough quantities to account for neutrophil sequestration in the liver. There was no upregulation of Mac-1 (CD11b/ CD18) or shedding of L-selectin on circulating neutrophils. Moreover, an anti-CD18 antibody had no protective effect against acetaminophen overdose during the first 24 h. These results indicate that there is a local inflammatory response after acetaminophen overdose, including a substantial accumulation of neutrophils in the liver. Because of the critical importance of beta2 integrins for neutrophil cytotoxicity, these results suggest that neutrophils do not contribute to the initiation or progression of AAP-induced liver. The inflammation observed after acetaminophen overdose may be characteristic for a response sufficient to recruit neutrophils for the purpose of removing necrotic cells but is not severe enough to cause additional damage. PMID:10774834

  7. Scutellarein Reduces Inflammatory Responses by Inhibiting Src Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nak Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are plant pigments that have been demonstrated to exert various pharmacological effects including anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the molecular mechanisms in terms of exact target proteins of flavonoids are not fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of scutellarein (SCT), a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus, Clerodendrum phlomidis and Oroxylum indicum Vent that have been traditionally used to treat various inflammatory diseases in China and Brazil. For this purpose, a nitric oxide (NO) assay, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nuclear fractionation, immunoblot analysis, a kinase assay, and an overexpression strategy were employed. Scutellarein significantly inhibited NO production in a dose-dependent manner and reduced the mRNA expression levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, SCT also dampened nuclear factor (NF)-κB-driven expression of a luciferase reporter gene upon transfection of a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) construct into Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells; similarly, NF-κ B nuclear translocation was inhibited by SCT. Moreover, the phosphorylation levels of various upstream signaling enzymes involved in NF-κB activation were decreased by SCT treatment in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Finally, SCT strongly inhibited Src kinase activity and also inhibited the autophosphorylation of overexpressed Src. Therefore, our data suggest that SCT can block the inflammatory response by directly inhibiting Src kinase activity linked to NF-κB activation. PMID:26330757

  8. Systemic inflammatory response and neuromuscular involvement in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ching-Hua; Allen, Kezia; Oei, Felicia; Leoni, Emanuela; Kuhle, Jens; Tree, Timothy; Fratta, Pietro; Sharma, Nikhil; Sidle, Katie; Howard, Robin; Orrell, Richard; Fish, Mark; Greensmith, Linda; Pearce, Neil; Gallo, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the combined blood expression of neuromuscular and inflammatory biomarkers as predictors of disease progression and prognosis in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods: Logistic regression adjusted for markers of the systemic inflammatory state and principal component analysis were carried out on plasma levels of creatine kinase (CK), ferritin, and 11 cytokines measured in 95 patients with ALS and 88 healthy controls. Levels of circulating biomarkers were used to study survival by Cox regression analysis and correlated with disease progression and neurofilament light chain (NfL) levels available from a previous study. Cytokines expression was also tested in blood samples longitudinally collected for up to 4 years from 59 patients with ALS. Results: Significantly higher levels of CK, ferritin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)–α, and interleukin (IL)–1β, IL-2, IL-8, IL-12p70, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13 and lower levels of interferon (IFN)–γ were found in plasma samples from patients with ALS compared to controls. IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ were the most highly regulated markers when all explanatory variables were jointly analyzed. High ferritin and IL-2 levels were predictors of poor survival. IL-5 levels were positively correlated with CK, as was TNF-α with NfL. IL-6 was strongly associated with CRP levels and was the only marker showing increasing expression towards end-stage disease in the longitudinal analysis. Conclusions: Neuromuscular pathology in ALS involves the systemic regulation of inflammatory markers mostly active on T-cell immune responses. Disease stratification based on the prognostic value of circulating inflammatory markers could improve clinical trials design in ALS. PMID:27308305

  9. Attachment avoidance predicts inflammatory responses to marital conflict.

    PubMed

    Gouin, Jean-Philippe; Glaser, Ronald; Loving, Timothy J; Malarkey, William B; Stowell, Jeffrey; Houts, Carrie; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2009-10-01

    Marital stress has been associated with immune dysregulation, including increased production of interleukin-6 (IL-6). Attachment style, one's expectations about the availability and responsiveness of others in intimate relationships, appears to influence physiological stress reactivity and thus could influence inflammatory responses to marital conflict. Thirty-five couples were invited for two 24-h admissions to a hospital research unit. The first visit included a structured social support interaction, while the second visit comprised the discussion of a marital disagreement. A mixed effect within-subject repeated measure model indicated that attachment avoidance significantly influenced IL-6 production during the conflict visit but not during the social support visit. Individuals with higher attachment avoidance had on average an 11% increase in total IL-6 production during the conflict visit as compared to the social support visit, while individuals with lower attachment avoidance had, on average, a 6% decrease in IL-6 production during the conflict visit as compared to the social support visit. Furthermore, greater attachment avoidance was associated with a higher frequency of negative behaviors and a lower frequency of positive behaviors during the marital interaction, providing a mechanism by which attachment avoidance may influence inflammatory responses to marital conflict. In sum, these results suggest that attachment avoidance modulates marital behavior and stress-induced immune dysregulation. PMID:18952163

  10. Allergic rhinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your symptoms. Skin testing is the most common method of allergy testing. If your doctor determines you ... Others cause little or no sleepiness. Antihistamine nasal sprays work well for treating allergic rhinitis. Ask your ...

  11. Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... immune system identifies pollen as an invader or allergen. Your immune system overreacts by producing antibodies called ... IgE has specific "radar" for each type of allergen. That's why some people are only allergic to ...

  12. So-Cheong-Ryong-Tang, a herbal medicine, modulates inflammatory cell infiltration and prevents airway remodeling via regulation of interleukin-17 and GM-CSF in allergic asthma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Woo; Lim, Chi-Yeon; Kim, Bu-Yeo; Cho, Su-In

    2014-01-01

    Background: So-Cheong-Ryong-Tang (SCRT), herbal medicine, has been used for the control of respiratory disease in East Asian countries. However, its therapeutic mechanisms, especially an inhibitory effect on inflammatory cell infiltration and airway remodeling in allergic asthma are unclear. Objective: The present study investigated the mechanism of antiasthmatic effects of SCRT in allergic asthma in mice. Materials and Methods: We investigated the influence of SCRT on levels of interleukin-17 (IL-17), granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-4, and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE in serum, and histopathological changes in allergen-induced asthma. Results: So-Cheong-Ryong-Tang decreased levels of IL-17 and GM-CSF in BALF. IL-4, a Th2-driven cytokine, was also decreased by SCRT, but IFN-γ, a Th1-driven cytokine, was not changed. Levels of OVA-specific IgE in serum were also decreased by SCRT. With SCRT treatment, histopathological findings showed reduced tendency of inflammatory cell infiltration, and prevention from airway remodeling such as epithelial hyperplasia. Conclusion: In this study, we firstly demonstrated that regulation of IL-17 and GM-CSF production may be one of the mechanism contributed to a reduction of inflammatory cell infiltration and prevention from airway remodeling. PMID:25298667

  13. Effect of Dangguibohyul-Tang, a Mixed Extract of Astragalus membranaceus and Angelica sinensis, on Allergic and Inflammatory Skin Reaction Compared with Single Extracts of Astragalus membranaceus or Angelica sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, You Yeon; Kim, Mi Hye; Hong, Jongki

    2016-01-01

    Dangguibohyul-tang (DBT), herbal formula composed of Astragalus membranaceus (AM) and Angelica sinensis (AS) at a ratio of 5 : 1, has been used for the treatment of various skin diseases in traditional medicine. We investigated the effect of DBT on allergic and inflammatory skin reaction in atopic dermatitis-like model compared to the single extract of AM or AS. DBT treatment showed the remission of clinical symptoms, including decreased skin thickness and scratching behavior, the total serum IgE level, and the number of mast cells compared to DNCB group as well as the single extract of AM- or AS-treated group. Levels of cytokines (IL-4, IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-1β) and inflammatory mediators (NF-κB, phospho-IκBα, and phospho-MAPKs) were significantly decreased in AM, AS, and DBT groups. These results demonstrated that AM, AS, and DBT may have the therapeutic property on atopic dermatitis by inhibition of allergic and inflammatory mediators and DBT formula; a mixed extract of AM and AS based on the herb pairs theory especially might be more effective on antiallergic reaction as compared with the single extract of AM or AS. PMID:27051450

  14. Effects of sublingual immunotherapy on allergic inflammation: an update.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Mona-Rita; Colombo, Giselda; Marcucci, Francesco; Caminati, Marco; Sensi, Laura; Di Cara, Giuseppe; Frati, Franco; Incorvaia, Cristoforo

    2012-08-01

    The most common allergic diseases, and especially the respiratory disorders such as rhinitis and asthma, are closely related to the allergic inflammation elicited by the causative allergen. This makes inflammation the main target of anti-allergic therapies. Among the available treatments, allergen specific immunotherapy (AIT) has a patent effect on allergic inflammation, which persists also after its discontinuation, and is the only therapy able to modify the natural history of allergy. The traditional, subcutaneous route of administration was demonstrated to modify the allergen presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) that in turn correct the phenotype of allergen-specific T cells, switching from the Th2-type response, typical of allergic inflammation and characterized by the production of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-17, and IL-32 cytokines to a Th1-type response. This immune deviation is related to an increased IFN-gamma and IL-2 production as well as to the anergy of Th2 or to tolerance, the latter being related to the generation of allergen-specific T regulatory (Treg) cells, which produce cytokines such as IL-10 and TGF-beta. Anti-inflammatory mechanisms observed during sublingual AIT with high allergen doses proved to be similar to subcutaneous immunotherapy. Data obtained from biopsies clearly indicate that the pathophysiology of the oral mucosa, with particular importance for mucosal DCs, plays a crucial role in inducing tolerance to the administered allergen. PMID:22506880

  15. Evaluation of Clinical and Immunological Responses: A 2-Year Follow-Up Study in Children with Allergic Rhinitis due to House Dust Mite

    PubMed Central

    Moed, Heleen; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Hendriks, Rudi W.; van der Wouden, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Allergic rhinitis is a disease with polarization towards Th2 and a defect of regulatory T cells. Immunological changes have been reported after immunotherapy treatment. However, there is not much known about the natural course of allergic rhinitis with respect to clinical manifestation and the relation with immunological responses. Objective. To evaluate clinical symptoms of allergic rhinitis, in relation to in vivo allergen-specific skin responses and in vitro allergen-specific effector and regulatory T cells determined at baseline and after two years. Methods. From a large trial, 59 children were randomly selected. The following variables were compared: clinical symptoms, allergen skin tests, specific IgE, T-cell proliferation, IL-5, IL-13, IFN-gamma, IL-10, TGF-beta, CD4+CD25hi cells, and Foxp3 expression. Results. Allergic symptoms had decreased after two years. Whereas skin test reactions correlated between years 0 and 2, there was no change in the size of the reaction. Also, proinflammatory reactions did not change after two years, with a positive correlation between years 0 and 2. No relevant changes were observed with respect to regulatory cells. Conclusion. Whereas, comparable to immunotherapy, allergic complaints decrease, the immunological changes of specific T-cell activity (both effector cells and regulator cells) which are observed after immunotherapy, do not change. PMID:23737646

  16. Pycnogenol inhibits immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic response in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun Ho; Yan, Guang Hai

    2009-12-01

    IgE-dependent mast cell activation is known to be associated with the allergic diseases. Pycnogenol (PYC) is a standardized extract of the bark of French maritime pine containing bioflavonoids with a potent antioxidant activity. The antiallergic activity of PYC was evaluated using both in vivo and in vitro experimental models. Oral administration of PYC significantly inhibited anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in rats. In an in vitro study, PYC dose-dependently reduced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC) triggered by anti-DNP IgE. PYC inhibited the protein expression and secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 in anti-DNP IgE-stimulated RPMC. Moreover, PYC decreased anti-DNP IgE-induced calcium uptake into RPMC. Furthermore, PYC suppressed nuclear factor-kappa B activation. From these results, the clinical use of PYC in the mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic diseases is proposed. PMID:19441014

  17. Unlipidated Outer Membrane Protein Omp16 (U-Omp16) from Brucella spp. as Nasal Adjuvant Induces a Th1 Immune Response and Modulates the Th2 Allergic Response to Cow’s Milk Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ibañez, Andrés E.; Smaldini, Paola; Coria, Lorena M.; Delpino, María V.; Pacífico, Lucila G. G.; Oliveira, Sergio C.; Risso, Gabriela S.; Pasquevich, Karina A.; Fossati, Carlos Alberto; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Docena, Guillermo H.; Cassataro, Juliana

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of novel mucosal adjuvants will help to develop new formulations to control infectious and allergic diseases. In this work we demonstrate that U-Omp16 from Brucella spp. delivered by the nasal route (i.n.) induced an inflammatory immune response in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissues. Nasal co-administration of U-Omp16 with the model antigen (Ag) ovalbumin (OVA) increased the amount of Ag in lung tissues and induced OVA-specific systemic IgG and T helper (Th) 1 immune responses. The usefulness of U-Omp16 was also assessed in a mouse model of food allergy. U-Omp16 i.n. administration during sensitization ameliorated the hypersensitivity responses of sensitized mice upon oral exposure to Cow’s Milk Protein (CMP), decreased clinical signs, reduced anti-CMP IgE serum antibodies and modulated the Th2 response in favor of Th1 immunity. Thus, U-Omp16 could be used as a broad Th1 mucosal adjuvant for different Ag formulations. PMID:23861971

  18. Impact of early life exposures to geohelminth infections on the development of vaccine immunity, allergic sensitization, and allergic inflammatory diseases in children living in tropical Ecuador: the ECUAVIDA birth cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Geohelminth infections are highly prevalent infectious diseases of childhood in many regions of the Tropics, and are associated with significant morbidity especially among pre-school and school-age children. There is growing concern that geohelminth infections, particularly exposures occurring during early life in utero through maternal infections or during infancy, may affect vaccine immunogenicity in populations among whom these infections are endemic. Further, the low prevalence of allergic disease in the rural Tropics has been attributed to the immune modulatory effects of these infections and there is concern that widespread use of anthelmintic treatment in high-risk groups may be associated with an increase in the prevalence of allergic diseases. Because the most widely used vaccines are administered during the first year of life and the antecedents of allergic disease are considered to occur in early childhood, the present study has been designed to investigate the impact of early exposures to geohelminths on the development of protective immunity to vaccines, allergic sensitization, and allergic disease. Methods/Design A cohort of 2,403 neonates followed up to 8 years of age. Primary exposures are infections with geohelminth parasites during the last trimester of pregnancy and the first 2 years of life. Primary study outcomes are the development of protective immunity to common childhood vaccines (i.e. rotavirus, Haemophilus influenzae type B, Hepatitis B, tetanus toxoid, and oral poliovirus type 3) during the first 5 years of life, the development of eczema by 3 years of age, the development of allergen skin test reactivity at 5 years of age, and the development of asthma at 5 and 8 years of age. Potential immunological mechanisms by which geohelminth infections may affect the study outcomes will be investigated also. Discussion The study will provide information on the potential effects of early exposures to geohelminths (during pregnancy and

  19. DIFFERENTIAL ALLERGIC AND NEUROTROPHIN RESPONSES TO FUNGAL COMPONENT EXTRACTS IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metarhizium anisopliae mycelium (MYC), conidia (CON) and inducible protease (IND) extracts were combined to produce the antigen MACA to screen for allergenic potential. Involuntary aspiration (IA) exposure to MACA in BALB/c mice has caused immune, inflammatory and physiological ...

  20. Effects of tityustoxin on cerebral inflammatory response in young rats.

    PubMed

    Van Fraga, Iva Tereza; Limborço-Filho, Marcelo; Lima, Onésia Cristina Oliveira; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Guidine, Patrícia Alves Maia; Moraes, Márcio Flávio Dutra; Nascimento Araújo, Ricardo; Moraes-Santos, Tasso; Massensini, André Ricardo; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana

    2015-02-19

    Accidents caused by scorpion stings, mainly affecting children, are considered an important cause of morbidity and mortality in tropical countries. Clinical studies demonstrate the relevant role of systemic inflammatory events in scorpion envenoming. However, remains poorly understood whether the major lethal component in Tityus serrulatus venom, tityustoxin (TsTX), is able to induce inflammatory responses in the cerebral microcirculation. In this study, we systematically examined leukocyte recruitment into the CNS in response to TsTX injection. Accordingly, developing rats were subjected to a subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of TsTX (0.75mg/kg), and leukocyte recruitment (i.e., 4, 8 and 12h after injection) and TNF-α levels were evaluated. Rats injected with TsTX presented a significant increase in leukocyte rolling and adhesion and higher levels of TNF-α at all time points studied, compared to the control group. Altogether, this work demonstrates the triggering of neuroimmunological mechanisms induced by TsTX injection in young rats. PMID:25545555

  1. Inflammatory Response in Preterm and Very Preterm Newborns with Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Segura-Cervantes, Enrique; Mancilla-Ramírez, Javier; González-Canudas, Jorge; Alba, Erika; Santillán-Ballesteros, René; Morales-Barquet, Deneb; Sandoval-Plata, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    The response of the adaptive immune system is usually less intense in premature neonates than term neonates. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether immunological parameters vary between preterm (PT) neonates (≥32 weeks of gestational age) and very preterm (VPT) neonates (<32 weeks of gestational age). A cross-sectional study was designed to prospectively follow PT and VPT neonates at risk of developing sepsis. Plasma concentrations of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4, and IL-10 were detected using flow cytometry. C-reactive protein (C-RP) and the complex SC5b-9 were detected in the plasma using commercial kits. A total of 83 patients were included. The laboratory results and clinical histories showed that 26 patients had sepsis; 14 were VPT, and 12 were PT. The levels of C-RP, SC5b-9 (innate immune response mediators), and IL-10 or IL-4 (anti-inflammatory cytokines) were elevated during sepsis in both groups. IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6 (proinflammatory cytokines) were differentially elevated only in PT neonates. The VPT neonates with sepsis presented increases in C-RP, SC5b-9, and anti-inflammatory cytokines but not in proinflammatory cytokines, whereas PT neonates showed increases in all studied mediators of inflammation. PMID:27293317

  2. Inflammatory Response in Preterm and Very Preterm Newborns with Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Segura-Cervantes, Enrique; Mancilla-Ramírez, Javier; González-Canudas, Jorge; Alba, Erika; Santillán-Ballesteros, René; Morales-Barquet, Deneb; Sandoval-Plata, Gabriela; Galindo-Sevilla, Norma

    2016-01-01

    The response of the adaptive immune system is usually less intense in premature neonates than term neonates. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether immunological parameters vary between preterm (PT) neonates (≥32 weeks of gestational age) and very preterm (VPT) neonates (<32 weeks of gestational age). A cross-sectional study was designed to prospectively follow PT and VPT neonates at risk of developing sepsis. Plasma concentrations of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4, and IL-10 were detected using flow cytometry. C-reactive protein (C-RP) and the complex SC5b-9 were detected in the plasma using commercial kits. A total of 83 patients were included. The laboratory results and clinical histories showed that 26 patients had sepsis; 14 were VPT, and 12 were PT. The levels of C-RP, SC5b-9 (innate immune response mediators), and IL-10 or IL-4 (anti-inflammatory cytokines) were elevated during sepsis in both groups. IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6 (proinflammatory cytokines) were differentially elevated only in PT neonates. The VPT neonates with sepsis presented increases in C-RP, SC5b-9, and anti-inflammatory cytokines but not in proinflammatory cytokines, whereas PT neonates showed increases in all studied mediators of inflammation. PMID:27293317

  3. Clara cells drive eosinophil accumulation in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S S; Ehmke, M; Marsh, L M; Dietze, J; Dudda, J C; Conrad, M L; Renz, H; Nockher, W A

    2012-02-01

    Development of allergic asthma is a complex process involving immune, neuronal and tissue cells. In the lung, Clara cells represent a major part of the "immunomodulatory barrier" of the airway epithelium. To understand the contribution of these cells to the inflammatory outcome of asthma, disease development was assessed using an adjuvant-free ovalbumin model. Mice were sensitised with subcutaneous injections of 10 μg endotoxin-free ovalbumin in conjunction with naphthalene-induced Clara cell depletion. Clara epithelial cell depletion in the lung strongly reduced eosinophil influx, which correlated with decreased eotaxin levels and, moreover, diminished the T-helper cell type 2 inflammatory response, including interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13. In contrast, airway hyperresponsiveness was increased. Further investigation revealed Clara cells as the principal source of eotaxin in the lung. These findings are the first to show that Clara airway epithelial cells substantially contribute to the infiltration of eotaxin-responsive CCR3+ immune cells and augment the allergic immune response in the lung. The present study identifies Clara cells as a potential therapeutic target in inflammatory lung diseases such as allergic asthma. PMID:21828027

  4. Allergic lung inflammation alters neither susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection nor inducibility of innate resistance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Cecilia G; Tuvim, Michael J; Evans, Christopher M; Tuvin, Daniel M; Dickey, Burton F; Evans, Scott E

    2009-01-01

    Background Protective host responses to respiratory pathogens are typically characterized by inflammation. However, lung inflammation is not always protective and it may even become deleterious to the host. We have recently reported substantial protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcal) pneumonia by induction of a robust inflammatory innate immune response to an inhaled bacterial lysate. Conversely, the allergic inflammation associated with asthma has been proposed to promote susceptibility to pneumococcal disease. This study sought to determine whether preexisting allergic lung inflammation influences the progression of pneumococcal pneumonia or reduces the inducibilty of protective innate immunity against bacteria. Methods To compare the effect of different inflammatory and secretory stimuli on defense against pneumonia, intraperitoneally ovalbumin-sensitized mice were challenged with inhaled pneumococci following exposure to various inhaled combinations of ovalbumin, ATP, and/or a bacterial lysate. Thus, allergic inflammation, mucin degranulation and/or stimulated innate resistance were induced prior to the infectious challenge. Pathogen killing was evaluated by assessing bacterial CFUs of lung homogenates immediately after infection, the inflammatory response to the different conditions was evaluated by measurement of cell counts of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 18 hours after challenge, and mouse survival was assessed after seven days. Results We found no differences in survival of mice with and without allergic inflammation, nor did the induction of mucin degranulation alter survival. As we have found previously, mice treated with the bacterial lysate demonstrated substantially increased survival at seven days, and this was not altered by the presence of allergic inflammation or mucin degranulation. Allergic inflammation was associated with predominantly eosinophilic infiltration, whereas the lysate-induced response was primarily neutrophilic

  5. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA): studies on the general and specific humoral response.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, R S; Bardana, E J; Khan, Z U; Dordevich, D M

    1978-04-14

    Serum specimens from 138 patients suffering from chronic respiratory disorders including 63 with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), 2o with suspected ABPA, 15 with pulmonary tuberculosis, 14 with bronchial asthma, 10 with chronic bronchitis and 6 with miscellaneous pulmonary conditions were studied for circulating antibodies to Aspergillus. The ammonium sulfate test was empolyed with an iodine-125 labeled mycelial component derived from Aspergillus fumigatus. When compared to normal controls from the same area, this test indicated that sera from 82 per cent of patients with ABPA had elevated binding titers to the radiolabeled antigenic component. Immunodiffusion using a culture filtrate antigen from A. fumigatus, revealed precipitating antibody to this fungus in 89 percent of sera from ABP patients. The majority of patients with ABPA demonstrated marked elevations of total serum IgE, moderate elevations of serum IgA and IgD and slightly increased levels of IgG and IgM. PMID:652026

  6. Abietic acid attenuates allergic airway inflammation in a mouse allergic asthma model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi; Zhaoyu, Liu; Xiangming, Fang; Chunyi, Lin; Jiayu, Pan; Lu, Shen; Jitao, Chen; Liangcai, Chen; Jifang, Liu

    2016-09-01

    Abietic acid (AA), one of the terpenoids isolated from Pimenta racemosa var. grissea, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. However, the anti-allergic effects of AA remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-allergic effects of AA in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma murine model. The model of mouse asthma was established by induction of OVA. AA (10, 20, 40mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage 1h after the OVA treatment on days 21 to 23. At 24h after the last challenge, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were collected to assess pathological changes, cytokines production, and NF-κB expression. The results showed that AA attenuated lung histopathologic changes, inflammatory cells infiltration, and bronchial hyper-responsiveness. AA also inhibited OVA-induced the nitric oxide (NO), IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and OVA-specific IgE production, as well as NF-κB activation. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that AA exhibited protective effects against OVA-induced allergic asthma in mice and the possible mechanism was involved in inhibiting NF-κB activation. PMID:27318791

  7. Cardiovascular and inflammatory response to cholecystokinin during endotoxemic shock.

    PubMed

    Saia, Rafael Simone; Bertozi, Giuliana; Mestriner, Fabíola Leslie; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Queiróz Cunha, Fernando; Cárnio, Evelin Capellari

    2013-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) was first described as a gastrointestinal hormone, but its receptors have been located in cardiac and vascular tissues, as well as in immune cells. Our aims were to investigate the role of CCK on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hypotension and its ability to modulate previously reported inflammatory mediators, therefore affecting cardiovascular function. To conduct these experiments, rats had their jugular vein cannulated for drug administration, and also, the femoral artery cannulated for mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate records. Endotoxemia induced by LPS from Escherichia coli (1.5 mg/kg; i.v.) stimulated the release of CCK, a progressive drop in MAP, and increase in heart rate. Plasma tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 10 (IL-10), nitrate, vasopressin, and lactate levels were elevated in the endotoxemic rats. The pretreatment with proglumide (nonselective CCK antagonist; 30 mg/kg; i.p.) aggravated the hypotension and also increased plasma TNF-α and lactate levels. On the other hand, CCK (0.4 μg/kg; i.v.) administered before LPS significantly restored MAP, reduced aortic and hepatic inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) production, and elevated plasma vasopressin and IL-10 concentrations; it did not affect TNF-α. Physiological CCK concentration reduced nitrite and iNOS synthesis by peritoneal macrophages, possibly through a self-regulatory IL-10-dependent mechanism. Together, these data suggest a new role for the peptide CCK in modulating MAP, possibly controlling the inflammatory response, stimulating the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, and reducing vascular and macrophage iNOS-derived nitric oxide production. Based on these findings, CCK could be used as an adjuvant therapeutic agent to improve cardiovascular function. PMID:23247127

  8. Biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory response of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Agrawal, Anshu; Said, Hamid M

    2016-09-01

    The water-soluble biotin (vitamin B7) is indispensable for normal human health. The vitamin acts as a cofactor for five carboxylases that are critical for fatty acid, glucose, and amino acid metabolism. Biotin deficiency is associated with various diseases, and mice deficient in this vitamin display enhanced inflammation. Previous studies have shown that biotin affects the functions of adaptive immune T and NK cells, but its effect(s) on innate immune cells is not known. Because of that and because vitamins such as vitamins A and D have a profound effect on dendritic cell (DC) function, we investigated the effect of biotin levels on the functions of human monocyte-derived DCs. Culture of DCs in a biotin-deficient medium (BDM) and subsequent activation with LPS resulted in enhanced secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-12p40, IL-23, and IL-1β compared with LPS-activated DCs cultured in biotin-sufficient (control) and biotin-oversupplemented media. Furthermore, LPS-activated DCs cultured in BDM displayed a significantly higher induction of IFN-γ and IL-17 indicating Th1/Th17 bias in T cells compared with cells maintained in biotin control or biotin-oversupplemented media. Investigations into the mechanisms suggested that impaired activation of AMP kinase in DCs cultured in BDM may be responsible for the observed increase in inflammatory responses. In summary, these results demonstrate for the first time that biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory responses of DCs. This may therefore be one of the mechanism(s) that mediates the observed inflammation that occurs in biotin deficiency. PMID:27413170

  9. Recruited alveolar macrophages, in response to airway epithelial-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein 1/CCl2, regulate airway inflammation and remodeling in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Gyu; Jeong, Jong Jin; Nyenhuis, Sharmilee; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Chung, Sangwoon; Ranjan, Ravi; Karpurapu, Manjula; Deng, Jing; Qian, Feng; Kelly, Elizabeth A B; Jarjour, Nizar N; Ackerman, Steven J; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Christman, John W; Park, Gye Young

    2015-06-01

    Although alveolar macrophages (AMs) from patients with asthma are known to be functionally different from those of healthy individuals, the mechanism by which this transformation occurs has not been fully elucidated in asthma. The goal of this study was to define the mechanisms that control AM phenotypic and functional transformation in response to acute allergic airway inflammation. The phenotype and functional characteristics of AMs obtained from human subjects with asthma after subsegmental bronchoprovocation with allergen was studied. Using macrophage-depleted mice, the role and trafficking of AM populations was determined using an acute allergic lung inflammation model. We observed that depletion of AMs in a mouse allergic asthma model attenuates Th2-type allergic lung inflammation and its consequent airway remodeling. In both human and mouse, endobronchial challenge with allergen induced a marked increase in monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCPs) in bronchoalveolar fluid, concomitant with the rapid appearance of a monocyte-derived population of AMs. Furthermore, airway allergen challenge of allergic subjects with mild asthma skewed the pattern of AM gene expression toward high levels of the receptor for MCP1 (CCR2/MCP1R) and expression of M2 phenotypic proteins, whereas most proinflammatory genes were highly suppressed. CCL2/MCP-1 gene expression was prominent in bronchial epithelial cells in a mouse allergic asthma model, and in vitro studies indicate that bronchial epithelial cells produced abundant MCP-1 in response to house dust mite allergen. Thus, our study indicates that bronchial allergen challenge induces the recruitment of blood monocytes along a chemotactic gradient generated by allergen-exposed bronchial epithelial cells. PMID:25360868

  10. Der p 1-pulsed myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells from house dust mite-sensitized allergic patients dysregulate the T cell response.

    PubMed

    Charbonnier, Anne-Sophie; Hammad, Hamida; Gosset, Philippe; Stewart, Geoffrey A; Alkan, Sefik; Tonnel, André-Bernard; Pestel, Joël

    2003-01-01

    Although reports suggest that dendritic cells (DC) are involved in the allergic reaction characterized by a T helper cell type 2 (Th2) profile, the role of myeloid (M-DC) and plasmacytoid DC (P-DC), controlling the balance Th1/Th2, remains unknown. Here, we showed that in Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt)-sensitized allergic patients and in healthy donors, M-DC displayed a higher capacity to capture Der p 1, a major allergen of Dpt, than did P-DC. However, Der p 1-pulsed M-DC from healthy subjects overexpressed CD80 and secreted interleukin (IL)-10, whereas M-DC from allergic patients did not. In contrast, with Der p 1-pulsed P-DC from both groups, no increase in human leukocyte antigen-DR, CD80, and CD86 and no IL-10 secretion were detected. When cocultured with allogeneic naive CD4(+) T cells from healthy donors, Der p 1-pulsed M-DC from allergic patients favored a Th1 profile [interferon (IFN)-gamma(high)/IL-4(low)] and Der p 1-pulsed P-DC, a Th2 profile (IFN-gamma(low)/IL-4(high)). In healthy donors, no T cell polarization (IFN-gamma(low)/IL-4(low)) was induced by Der p 1-pulsed M-DC or P-DC, but in response to Der p 1-pulsed M-DC, T cells secreted IL-10. The neutralization of IL-10 produced by Der p 1-pulsed M-DC from healthy donors led to an inhibition of IL-10 production by T cells and a polarization toward a type 1. Thus, IL-10 produced by M-DC might be an essential mediator controlling the balance between tolerance and allergic status. In addition, P-DC could contribute to the steady state in healthy donors or to the development of a Th2 response in allergic donors. PMID:12525566

  11. Fracture initiates systemic inflammatory response syndrome through recruiting polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Haipeng; Liu, Jia; Yao, Jianhua; Zhong, Jianfeng; Guo, Lei; Sun, Tiansheng

    2016-08-01

    Fracture, a common type injury in trauma patients, often results in the development of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Though the mechanism of the fracture-initiated SIRS still remains not well characterized, it is well documented that the polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) play an important role in the inflammatory process. We hypothesize that fractures recruit PMN to the local tissue, which is followed by an increase in the number of peripheral PMN and initiation of SIRS. In the current study, we established a closed femoral fracture rat model. We evaluated the levels of MPO, IL-1β and CINC-1 in fractured tissue homogenate, and we measured the levels of IL-6 and IL-10, the biomarkers for systemic inflammatory response, in the rat sera. In clinical part of the study, we collected blood from patients with isolated closed femoral fractures and evaluated PMN-related chemoattractants (IL-8, IL-1β and G-CSF) and the number of peripheral PMN. We further evaluated the level of mitochondrial DNA in the local haematoma of fracture and the circulating plasma of the patients with fracture. In the animal model of closed femoral fracture, we found a significant recruitment of PMN to the local tissue after fracture, which correlates with the elevated MPO level. We also showed that the concentration of IL-1β and CINC-1 in local tissue is significantly increased and might be responsible for the PMN recruitment. Recruitment of PMN to the local tissue was accompanied with a significant increase in the systemic levels of IL-6 and IL-10 in serum. In the patients with closed femoral fracture, we observed an increase in the number of peripheral PMN and PMN-related chemoattractants, including IL-8, IL-1β and G-CSF. The level of mitochondrial DNA in the local haematoma of fracture and the circulating plasma of patients were significantly higher compared to the healthy volunteers. Our data suggest that fracture released mitochondrial DNA into the local haematoma of

  12. Hyaluronidase Modulates Inflammatory Response and Accelerates the Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Fronza, Marcio; Caetano, Guilherme F.; Leite, Marcel N.; Bitencourt, Claudia S.; Paula-Silva, Francisco W. G.; Andrade, Thiago A. M.; Frade, Marco A. C.; Merfort, Irmgard; Faccioli, Lúcia H.

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronidases are enzymes that degrade hyaluronan an important constituent of the extracellular matrix. They have been used as a spreading agent, improving the absorption of drugs and facilitating the subcutaneous infusion of fluids. Here, we investigated the influence of bovine testes hyaluronidase (HYAL) during cutaneous wound healing in in vitro and in vivo assays. We demonstrated in the wound scratch assay that HYAL increased the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts in vitro at low concentration, e.g. 0.1 U HYAL enhanced the cell number by 20%. HYAL presented faster and higher reepithelialization in in vivo full-thickness excisional wounds generated on adult Wistar rats back skin already in the early phase at 2nd day post operatory compared to vehicle-control group. Wound closured area observed in the 16 U and 32 U HYAL treated rats reached 38% and 46% compared to 19% in the controls, respectively. Histological and biochemical analyses supported the clinical observations and showed that HYAL treated wounds exhibited increased granulation tissue, diminished edema formation and regulated the inflammatory response by modulating the release of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines, growth factor and eicosanoids mediators. Moreover, HYAL increased gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) γ and PPAR β/δ, the collagen content in the early stages of healing processes as well as angiogenesis. Altogether these data revealed that HYAL accelerates wound healing processes and might be beneficial for treating wound disorders. PMID:25393024

  13. Innate inflammatory responses in stroke: mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Youl; Kawabori, Masahito; Yenari, Midori A.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a frequent cause of long-term disability and death worldwide. Ischemic stroke is more commonly encountered compared to hemorrhagic stroke, and leads to tissue death by ischemia due to occlusion of a cerebral artery. Inflammation is known to result as a result of ischemic injury, long thought to be involved in initiating the recovery and repair process. However, work over the past few decades indicates that aspects of this inflammatory response may in fact be detrimental to stroke outcome. Acutely, inflammation appears to have a detrimental effect, and anti-inflammatory treatments have been been studied as a potential therapeutic target. Chronically, reports suggest that post-ischemic inflammation is also essential for the tissue repairing and remodeling. The majority of the work in this area has centered around innate immune mechanisms, which will be the focus of this review. This review describes the different key players in neuroinflammation and their possible detrimental and protective effects in stroke. A better understanding of the roles of the different immune cells and their temporal profile of damage versus repair will help to clarify more effective modulation of inflammation post stroke. Introduction Stroke refers to conditions caused by occlusion and/or rupture of blood vessels in the brain, and is a leading cause of death and disability in the industrialized world. PMID:24372209

  14. Hyaluronidase modulates inflammatory response and accelerates the cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Fronza, Marcio; Caetano, Guilherme F; Leite, Marcel N; Bitencourt, Claudia S; Paula-Silva, Francisco W G; Andrade, Thiago A M; Frade, Marco A C; Merfort, Irmgard; Faccioli, Lúcia H

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronidases are enzymes that degrade hyaluronan an important constituent of the extracellular matrix. They have been used as a spreading agent, improving the absorption of drugs and facilitating the subcutaneous infusion of fluids. Here, we investigated the influence of bovine testes hyaluronidase (HYAL) during cutaneous wound healing in in vitro and in vivo assays. We demonstrated in the wound scratch assay that HYAL increased the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts in vitro at low concentration, e.g. 0.1 U HYAL enhanced the cell number by 20%. HYAL presented faster and higher reepithelialization in in vivo full-thickness excisional wounds generated on adult Wistar rats back skin already in the early phase at 2nd day post operatory compared to vehicle-control group. Wound closured area observed in the 16 U and 32 U HYAL treated rats reached 38% and 46% compared to 19% in the controls, respectively. Histological and biochemical analyses supported the clinical observations and showed that HYAL treated wounds exhibited increased granulation tissue, diminished edema formation and regulated the inflammatory response by modulating the release of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines, growth factor and eicosanoids mediators. Moreover, HYAL increased gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) γ and PPAR β/δ, the collagen content in the early stages of healing processes as well as angiogenesis. Altogether these data revealed that HYAL accelerates wound healing processes and might be beneficial for treating wound disorders. PMID:25393024

  15. Toll-like receptor 4 confers inflammatory response to Suilysin

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Lili; Pian, Yaya; Chen, Shaolong; Ren, Zhiqiang; Liu, Peng; Lv, Qingyu; Zheng, Yuling; Zhang, Shengwei; Hao, Huaijie; Yuan, Yuan; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2) is an emerging human pathogen worldwide. A large outbreak occurred in the summer of 2005 in China. Serum samples from this outbreak revealed that levels of the main proinflammatory cytokines were significantly higher in patients with streptococcal toxic-shock-like syndrome (STSLS) than in patients with meningitis only. However, the mechanism underlying the cytokine storm in STSLS caused by SS2 remained unclear. In this study, we found that suilysin (SLY) is the main protein inflammatory stimulus of SS2 and that native SLY (nSLY) stimulated cytokines independently of its haemolytic ability. Interestingly, a small amount of SLY (Å Mol/L) induced strong, long-term TNF-α release from human PBMCs. We also found that nSLY stimulated TNF-α in wild-type macrophages but not in macrophages from mice that carried a spontaneous mutation in TLR4 (P712H). We demonstrated for the first time that SLY stimulates immune cells through TLR4. In addition, the Myd88 adaptor-p38-MAPK pathway was involved in this process. The present study suggested that the TLR4-dependent inflammatory responses induced by SLY in host might contribute to the STSLS caused by SS2 and that p38-MAPK could be used as a target to control the release of excess TNF-α induced by SS2. PMID:26167160

  16. Biomechanical changes in endothelial cells result from an inflammatory response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkus, Janina; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    During periods of infection and disease, the immune system induces the release of TNF-α, an inflammatory cytokine, from a variety of cell types, such as macrophages. TNF-α, while circulating in the vasculature, binds to the apical surface of endothelial cells and causes a wide range of biological and mechanical changes to the endothelium. While the biological changes have been widely studied, the biomechanical aspects have been largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the biomechanical changes of the endothelium as a function of TNF-α treatment. First, we studied the traction forces applied by the endothelium, an effect that is much less studied than others. Through the use of traction force microscopy, we found that TNF-α causes an increase in traction forces applied by the endothelial cells as compared to non-treated cells. Then, we investigated cell morphology, cell mechanics, migration, and cytoskeletal dynamics. We found that in addition to increasing applied traction forces, TNF-α causes an increase in cell area and aspect ratio on average, as well as a shift in the organization of F-actin filaments within the cell. Combining these findings together, our results show that an inflammatory response heavily impacts the morphology, cell mechanics, migration, cytoskeletal dynamics, and applied traction forces of endothelial cells.

  17. Local Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Campo, Paloma; Salas, María; Blanca-López, Natalia; Rondón, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    This review focuses on local allergic rhinitis, a new phenotype of allergic rhinitis, commonly misdiagnosed as nonallergic rhinitis. It has gained attention over last decade and can affect patients from all countries, ethnic groups and ages, impairing their quality of life, and is frequently associated with conjunctivitis and asthma. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, the demonstration of a positive response to nasal allergen provocation test and/or the detection of nasal sIgE. A positive basophil activation test may support the diagnosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that allergen immunotherapy is an effective immune-modifying treatment, highlighting the importance of early diagnosis. PMID:27083105

  18. Identification of Microcystis aeruginosa Peptides Responsible for Allergic Sensitization and Characterization of Functional Interactions between Cyanobacterial Toxins and Immunogenic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Geh, Esmond N.; Ghosh, Debajyoti; McKell, Melanie; de la Cruz, Armah A.; Stelma, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Background The cyanobacterium species Microcystis aeruginosa produces microcystin and an array of diverse metabolites believed responsible for their toxicity and/or immunogenicity. Previously, chronic rhinitis patients were demonstrated to elicit a specific IgE response to nontoxic strains of M. aeruginosa by skin-prick testing, indicating that cyanobacteria allergenicity resides in a non-toxin–producing component of the organism. Objectives We sought to identify and characterize M. aeruginosa peptide(s) responsible for allergic sensitization in susceptible individuals, and we investigated the functional interactions between cyanobacterial toxins and their coexpressed immunogenic peptides. Methods Sera from patients and extracts from M. aeruginosa toxic [MC(+)] and nontoxic [MC(–)] strains were used to test IgE-specific reactivity by direct and indirect ELISAs; 2D gel electrophoresis, followed by immunoblots and mass spectrometry (MS), was performed to identify the relevant sensitizing peptides. Cytotoxicity and mediator release assays were performed using the MC(+) and MC(–) lysates. Results We found specific IgE to be increased more in response to the MC(–) strain than the MC(+) strain. This response was inhibited by preincubation of MC(–) lysate with increasing concentrations of microcystin. MS revealed that phycocyanin and the core-membrane linker peptide are the responsible allergens, and MC(–) extracts containing these proteins induced β-hexosaminidase release in rat basophil leukemia cells. Conclusions Phycobiliprotein complexes in M. aeruginosa have been identified as the relevant sensitizing proteins. Our finding that allergenicity is inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by microcystin toxin suggests that further investigation is warranted to understand the interplay between immunogenicity and toxicity of cyanobacteria under diverse environmental conditions. Citation Geh EN, Ghosh D, McKell M, de la Cruz AA, Stelma G, Bernstein JA. 2015

  19. The Role of Protein Arginine Methyltransferases in Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, Byong Chul; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Hong, Sungyoul

    2016-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) mediate the methylation of a number of protein substrates of arginine residues and serve critical functions in many cellular responses, including cancer development, progression, and aggressiveness, T-lymphocyte activation, and hepatic gluconeogenesis. There are nine members of the PRMT family, which are divided into 4 types (types I–IV). Although most PRMTs do not require posttranslational modification (PTM) to be activated, fine-tuning modifications, such as interactions between cofactor proteins, subcellular compartmentalization, and regulation of RNA, via micro-RNAs, seem to be required. Inflammation is an essential defense reaction of the body to eliminate harmful stimuli, including damaged cells, irritants, or pathogens. However, chronic inflammation can eventually cause several types of diseases, including some cancers, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis. Therefore, inflammation responses should be well modulated. In this review, we briefly discuss the role of PRMTs in the control of inflammation. More specifically, we review the roles of four PRMTs (CARM1, PRMT1, PRMT5, and PRMT6) in modulating inflammation responses, particularly in terms of modulating the transcriptional factors or cofactors related to inflammation. Based on the regulatory roles known so far, we propose that PRMTs should be considered one of the target molecule groups that modulate inflammatory responses. PMID:27041824

  20. The Role of Protein Arginine Methyltransferases in Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, Byong Chul; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Hong, Sungyoul; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) mediate the methylation of a number of protein substrates of arginine residues and serve critical functions in many cellular responses, including cancer development, progression, and aggressiveness, T-lymphocyte activation, and hepatic gluconeogenesis. There are nine members of the PRMT family, which are divided into 4 types (types I-IV). Although most PRMTs do not require posttranslational modification (PTM) to be activated, fine-tuning modifications, such as interactions between cofactor proteins, subcellular compartmentalization, and regulation of RNA, via micro-RNAs, seem to be required. Inflammation is an essential defense reaction of the body to eliminate harmful stimuli, including damaged cells, irritants, or pathogens. However, chronic inflammation can eventually cause several types of diseases, including some cancers, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis. Therefore, inflammation responses should be well modulated. In this review, we briefly discuss the role of PRMTs in the control of inflammation. More specifically, we review the roles of four PRMTs (CARM1, PRMT1, PRMT5, and PRMT6) in modulating inflammation responses, particularly in terms of modulating the transcriptional factors or cofactors related to inflammation. Based on the regulatory roles known so far, we propose that PRMTs should be considered one of the target molecule groups that modulate inflammatory responses. PMID:27041824

  1. Regulation of inflammatory responses by IL-17F

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuexian O.; Chang, Seon Hee; Park, Heon; Nurieva, Roza; Shah, Bhavin; Acero, Luis; Wang, Yi-Hong; Schluns, Kimberly S.; Broaddus, Russell R.; Zhu, Zhou; Dong, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Although interleukin (IL) 17 has been extensively characterized, the function of IL-17F, which has an expression pattern regulated similarly to IL-17, is poorly understood. We show that like IL-17, IL-17F regulates proinflammatory gene expression in vitro, and this requires IL-17 receptor A, tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor 6, and Act1. In vivo, overexpression of IL-17F in lung epithelium led to infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages and mucus hyperplasia, similar to observations made in IL-17 transgenic mice. To further understand the function of IL-17F, we generated and analyzed mice deficient in IL-17F or IL-17. IL-17, but not IL-17F, was required for the initiation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Mice deficient in IL-17F, but not IL-17, had defective airway neutrophilia in response to allergen challenge. Moreover, in an asthma model, although IL-17 deficiency reduced T helper type 2 responses, IL-17F–deficient mice displayed enhanced type 2 cytokine production and eosinophil function. In addition, IL-17F deficiency resulted in reduced colitis caused by dextran sulfate sodium, whereas IL-17 knockout mice developed more severe disease. Our results thus demonstrate that IL-17F is an important regulator of inflammatory responses that seems to function differently than IL-17 in immune responses and diseases. PMID:18411338

  2. Regulation of inflammatory responses by IL-17F.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuexian O; Chang, Seon Hee; Park, Heon; Nurieva, Roza; Shah, Bhavin; Acero, Luis; Wang, Yi-Hong; Schluns, Kimberly S; Broaddus, Russell R; Zhu, Zhou; Dong, Chen

    2008-05-12

    Although interleukin (IL) 17 has been extensively characterized, the function of IL-17F, which has an expression pattern regulated similarly to IL-17, is poorly understood. We show that like IL-17, IL-17F regulates proinflammatory gene expression in vitro, and this requires IL-17 receptor A, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6, and Act1. In vivo, overexpression of IL-17F in lung epithelium led to infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages and mucus hyperplasia, similar to observations made in IL-17 transgenic mice. To further understand the function of IL-17F, we generated and analyzed mice deficient in IL-17F or IL-17. IL-17, but not IL-17F, was required for the initiation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Mice deficient in IL-17F, but not IL-17, had defective airway neutrophilia in response to allergen challenge. Moreover, in an asthma model, although IL-17 deficiency reduced T helper type 2 responses, IL-17F-deficient mice displayed enhanced type 2 cytokine production and eosinophil function. In addition, IL-17F deficiency resulted in reduced colitis caused by dextran sulfate sodium, whereas IL-17 knockout mice developed more severe disease. Our results thus demonstrate that IL-17F is an important regulator of inflammatory responses that seems to function differently than IL-17 in immune responses and diseases. PMID:18411338

  3. Allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common disorder that is strongly linked to asthma and conjunctivitis. It is usually a long-standing condition that often goes undetected in the primary-care setting. The classic symptoms of the disorder are nasal congestion, nasal itch, rhinorrhea and sneezing. A thorough history, physical examination and allergen skin testing are important for establishing the diagnosis of allergic rhinitis. Second-generation oral antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment. Allergen immunotherapy is an effective immune-modulating treatment that should be recommended if pharmacologic therapy for allergic rhinitis is not effective or is not tolerated. This article provides an overview of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and appropriate management of this disorder. PMID:22166009

  4. Allergic Responses Induced by a Fungal Biopesticide Metarhizium anisopliae and House Dust Mite Are Compared in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Ward, Marsha D W; Chung, Yong Joo; Copeland, Lisa B; Doerfler, Donald L

    2011-01-01

    Biopesticides can be effective in controlling their target pest. However, research regarding allergenicity and asthma development is limited. We compared the ability of fungal biopesticide Metarhizium anisopliae (MACA) and house dust mite (HDM) extracts to induce allergic responses in BALB/c mice. The extracts were administered by intratracheal aspiration at doubling doses (2.5-80 μg protein) 4X over a four-week period. Three days after the last exposure, serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. The extracts' relative allergenicity was evaluated based on response robustness (lowest significant dose response compared to control (0 μg)). MACA induced a more robust serum total IgE response than HDM. However, in the antigen-specific IgE assay, a similar dose of both MACA and HDM was required to achieve the same response level. Our data suggest a threshold dose of MACA for allergy induction and that M. anisopliae may be similar to HDM in allergy induction potential. PMID:21785589

  5. Allergic Responses Induced by a Fungal Biopesticide Metarhizium anisopliae and House Dust Mite Are Compared in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Marsha D. W.; Chung, Yong Joo; Copeland, Lisa B.; Doerfler, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    Biopesticides can be effective in controlling their target pest. However, research regarding allergenicity and asthma development is limited. We compared the ability of fungal biopesticide Metarhizium anisopliae (MACA) and house dust mite (HDM) extracts to induce allergic responses in BALB/c mice. The extracts were administered by intratracheal aspiration at doubling doses (2.5–80 μg protein) 4X over a four-week period. Three days after the last exposure, serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. The extracts' relative allergenicity was evaluated based on response robustness (lowest significant dose response compared to control (0 μg)). MACA induced a more robust serum total IgE response than HDM. However, in the antigen-specific IgE assay, a similar dose of both MACA and HDM was required to achieve the same response level. Our data suggest a threshold dose of MACA for allergy induction and that M. anisopliae may be similar to HDM in allergy induction potential. PMID:21785589

  6. Allergic responses to the biopesticide Metarhizium anisopliae in Balb/c mice.

    PubMed

    Ward, M D; Sailstad, D M; Selgrade, M K

    1998-10-01

    Metarhizium anisopliae is used as a microbial pesticide to control cockroaches and other insects. M. anisopliae has demonstrated neither infectivity nor toxicity in mammals. However, allergenicity has not been assessed. M. anisopliae is a prototype for other organisms released into the environment for pesticide or other beneficial applications. Hence this study is part of an effort to develop methods for screening such organisms for allergenic potential. Soluble factors from fungal components were combined in equal protein amounts to form a crude fungal antigen (MACA). Balb/c mice were intratracheally (IT) challenged with 25 micrograms fungal antigen 13 days post intraperitoneal sensitization with the fungal antigen in alhydrogel adjuvant. Additionally, mice were sensitized with adjuvant alone or chitin media in adjuvant as experimental controls. Serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were harvested prior to challenge and at 1 and 7 days post IT challenge (DPIT). These mice exhibited immune and pulmonary inflammatory responses to MACA characteristic of allergy. Total serum IgE for antigen-sensitized animals increased 7.6- and 14.7-fold over that for chitin media and adjuvant controls, respectively, at 7 DPIT. Less striking increases were seen at 24 DPIT and prior to challenge. BALF IL-4 was dramatically elevated only in MACA-sensitized and challenged mice and only at 1 DPIT. Additionally, there was a dose-dependent increase in BALF eosinophils from MACA-sensitized mice at both 1 and 7 DPIT. While lymphocyte counts were increased for all treatment groups at 1 DPIT, by 7 DPIT lymphocyte counts for MACA-sensitized mice only were significantly elevated compared to controls. Pulmonary inflammation, edema, and cell damage were apparent at 1 DPIT (25 micrograms MACA), as indicated by a neutrophilic influx and elevated levels of total protein and LDH, in both sensitized and control groups. These effects were significantly decreased, but not eliminated by reduction

  7. Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation response plays an important role in host survival, and it also leads to acute and chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, bowel diseases, allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis and various neurodegenerative diseases. During the course of inflammation, the ROS level increases. In addition to ROS, several inflammatory mediators produced at the site lead to numerous cell-mediated damages. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, is a chronic intestinal disorder resulting from a dysfunctional epithelial, innate and adaptive immune response to intestinal microorganisms. The methods involving indomethacin-induced enterocolitis in rats with macroscopic changes of IBD, myeloperoxidase assay, microscopic (histologic) characters and biochemical parameters are discussed. PMID:26939275

  8. Morphological features of the inflammatory response in molluscs.

    PubMed

    De Vico, G; Carella, F

    2012-12-01

    Over the last few years, there has been a large increase in studying the biology and pathology of molluscs, predominantly in addressing the molecular patterns involved in their immune-mediated and inflammatory responses. Conversely, the literature-based diagnostic criteria concerning the morphology of the above phenomena still involves pathogenetic confusion and conflicting terminology. A comparison of bibliographic resources, such as the Abridged Glossary of Terms Used in Invertebrate Pathology and the National Status manual for molluscan histopathological examination and analysis from the NOAA, have revealed variability in the definitions of superimposable lesions, emphasising the need for further efforts in establishing standard terminology and methodologies in this field of study. This review suggests some possible solutions for overcoming the use of parallel terminologies in diagnosing inflammation in molluscs and also highlights conflicting features requiring further discussion. PMID:22513124

  9. Engineering Immunomodulatory Biomaterials To Tune the Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, Ajaykumar; Bhise, Nupura S; Evangelista, Marta B; Rouwkema, Jeroen; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Vrana, Nihal Engin; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Current state-of-the-art biomedical implants and tissue engineering methods promise technologies to improve or even restore the function of diseased organs. However, one of the biggest challenges to clinical success is the lack of functional integration. A series of cellular and molecular events following biomaterial implantation poses an important bottleneck for developing breakthrough solutions. With inflammation increasingly recognized as a crucial component influencing regeneration, immunomodulation or immuno-engineering has emerged as a potential solution to overcome this key challenge in regenerative medicine. We postulate possibilities to utilize biomaterial physicochemical modifications to modulate the host inflammatory response and develop strategies for effective biomaterial integration. Biomaterial-based immunomodulation strategies can significantly ameliorate the outcomes of medical implants and tissue engineering therapies. PMID:27138899

  10. Particulate oil shale inhalation and pulmonary inflammatory response in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.S.; Holland, L.M.; Halleck, M.S.; Martinez, E.; Saunders, G.

    1983-01-01

    This experiment detrimetal that long-term inhalation of shale dusts by rats elicits a limited inflammatory response in the lung less profound than that observed in animals exposed to equivalent levels of quartz alone. This observation suggests that organic and inorganic constituents of shale may provide a protective effect. The implications for fibrogenic disease are two-fold: (1) inhalation of oil shale dusts appeared to be less detriemtal than the inhalation of quartz along, and (2) there was no apparent synergistic action of quartz and the complex of organic materials present in shale. Animals exposed to shale dusts failed to develop any significant lung lesions, while all of the animals exposed to quartz developed granulomas and some frank fibrosis.

  11. Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Kakli, Hasan A; Riley, Timothy D

    2016-09-01

    Among the atopic disorders, allergic rhinitis is the most prevalent. Patients who suffer from allergic rhinitis sustain significant morbidity and loss of productivity. Cardinal symptoms include nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, sneezing, and nasal itching, although multiple related symptoms may occur. Causes should be ruled out with a thorough history and physical examination, with particular attention to red flag or atypical symptoms. Skin testing or serum sampling can confirm diagnosis and also guide therapy. Therapy is multimodal, tailored to a particular patient's symptom burden and quality of life. PMID:27545735

  12. Novel cytokines and cytokine-producing T cells in allergic disorders.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Julia A; Borish, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Allergic diseases reflect various pathways of T lymphocyte inflammation and largely comprise T helper (Th) 2-associated processes. Recent investigations have identified pathways involved in promoting Th2 responses. Additionally, novel T-cell subtypes, each with its own distinct cytokine profile, contribute to the heterogeneous presentations of allergic diseases. This article focuses on recent developments including novel effector (nuocytes, Th9, and Th22) and regulatory T-cell (Treg) families of lymphocytes as well as cytokines that are central in driving Th2 differentiation (interleukin [IL]-4, IL-9, IL-25, thymic stromal lymphopoietin [TSLP], and IL-33). Recent literature and investigations were reviewed. Unregulated IL-25, TSLP, and IL-33 activity results in activation of Th2 cells, mast cells, dendritic cells, eosinophils, and basophils, leading to inflammatory processes that define allergic disease. As such, these cytokines are central mediators capable of instigating the inflammatory processes responsible for allergen-mediated diseases. The previous paradigm of Th1/Th2 imbalance driving allergic disease is expanded by identification of novel T helper families (nuocytes, Th9, Th17, and Th22) with their signature cytokines, which provide alterative avenues for investigation of neutrophil-predominant asthma and other heterogeneous presentations of allergic diseases. IL-25, TSLP, and IL-33 are attractive targets for therapeutics designed to ameliorate Th2-mediated diseases such as allergic rhinitis and asthma. Moreover, the ability to delineate novel regulatory and effector T-cell lineages among CD4(+) T cells challenges the Th1/Th2 paradigm of allergic disease and invites further avenues of investigation into the role of these cells in allergic disease. PMID:21439160

  13. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles increase inflammatory responses in vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sung Gu; Newsome, Bradley; Hennig, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that remains the leading cause of death in the United States. Numerous risk factors for endothelial cell inflammation and the development of atherosclerosis have been identified, including inhalation of ultrafine particles. Recently, engineered nanoparticles (NPs) such as titanium (TiO2) NPs have attracted much attention due to their wide range of applications. However, there are also great concerns surrounding potential adverse health effects in vascular systems. Although TiO2 NPs are known to induce oxidative stress and inflammation, the associated signaling pathways have not been well studied. The focus of this work, therefore, deals with examination of the cellular signaling pathways responsible for TiO2 NP-induced endothelial oxidative stress and inflammation. In this study, primary vascular endothelial cells were treated with TiO2 NPs for 2–16 h at concentrations of 0–50 µg/mL. TiO2 NP exposure increased cellular oxidative stress and DNA binding of NF-κB. Further, phosphorylation of Akt, ERK, JNK and p38 was increased in cells exposed to TiO2 NPs. TiO2 NPs also significantly increased induction of mRNA and protein levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and mRNA levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Pretreatment with inhibitors for NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate), oxidative stress (epigallocatechin gallate and apocynin), Akt (LY294002), ERK (PD98059), JNK (SP600125) and p38 (SB203580) significantly attenuated TiO2 NP-induced MCP-1 and VCAM-1 gene expression, as well as activation of NF-κB. These data indicate that TiO2 NPs can induce endothelial inflammatory responses via redox-sensitive cellular signaling pathways. PMID:23380242

  14. Inflammatory Response to Burn Trauma: Nicotine Attenuates Proinflammatory Cytokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Papst, S.; Reimers, K.; Stukenborg-Colsman, C.; Steinstraesser, L.; Vogt, P. M.; Kraft, T.; Niederbichler, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The immune response to an inflammatory stimulus is balanced and orchestrated by stimulatory and inhibitory factors. After a thermal trauma, this balance is disturbed and an excessive immune reaction with increased production and release of proinflammatory cytokines results. The nicotine-stimulated anti-inflammatory reflex offsets this. The goal of this study was to verify that transdermal administration of nicotine downregulates proinflammatory cytokine release after burn trauma. Methods: A 30% total body surface area full-thickness rat burn model was used in Sprague Dawley rats (n = 35, male). The experimental animals were divided into a control group, a burn trauma group, a burn trauma group with additional nicotine treatment, and a sham + nicotine group with 5 experimental animals per group. The last 2 groups received a transdermal nicotine administration of 1.75 mg. The concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 beta, and interleukin 6 were determined in homogenates of hearts, livers, and spleens 12 or 24 hours after burn trauma. Results: Experimental burn trauma resulted in a significant increase in cytokine levels in hearts, livers, and spleens. Nicotine treatment led to a decrease of the effect of the burn trauma with significantly lower concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 beta, and interleukin 6 compared to the trauma group. Conclusions: This study confirms in a standardized burn model that stimulation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is involved in the regulation of effectory molecules of the immune response. Looking at the results of our study, further experiments designed to explore and evaluate the potency and mechanisms of the immunomodulating effects of this receptor system are warranted. PMID:25671045

  15. Update and clinical utility of alcaftadine ophthalmic solution 0.25% in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Chigbu, DeGaulle I; Coyne, Alissa M

    2015-01-01

    Allergic disorders of the ocular surface are primarily characterized as IgE- and/or T-lymphocyte-mediated disorders that affect the cornea, conjunctiva, and eyelid. Approximately 40% of individuals in the developed countries have allergic conjunctivitis, and as such, it is the most common form of ocular allergy. Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis is the most prevalent type of allergic conjunctivitis that impacts the quality of life of patients. This article reviews the pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, clinical efficacy, and safety of alcaftadine. Histamine and the pathological mechanism of ocular allergy will be briefly reviewed with the intent of providing a background for the detailed discussion on the clinical utility of alcaftadine in allergic conjunctivitis. The Medline PubMed, Elsevier Science Direct, and Google Scholar databases were used to search for evidence-based literature on histamine and immunopathological mechanism of allergic conjunctivitis, as well as on pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, and clinical efficacy of alcaftadine. The treatment and management goals of allergic conjunctivitis are to prevent or minimize the inflammatory cascade associated with allergic response in the early stages of the pathological mechanism. It is of note that activation of histamine receptors on immune and nonimmune cells are associated with allergen-induced inflammation of the conjunctiva and its associated ocular allergic manifestations, including itching, edema, hyperemia, and tearing. Alcaftadine is an efficacious multiple action antiallergic therapeutic agent with inverse agonist activity on H1, H2, and H4 receptors, as well as anti-inflammatory and mast cell stabilizing effects that could provide therapeutic benefits to patients with allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:26185412

  16. Update and clinical utility of alcaftadine ophthalmic solution 0.25% in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Chigbu, DeGaulle I; Coyne, Alissa M

    2015-01-01

    Allergic disorders of the ocular surface are primarily characterized as IgE- and/or T-lymphocyte-mediated disorders that affect the cornea, conjunctiva, and eyelid. Approximately 40% of individuals in the developed countries have allergic conjunctivitis, and as such, it is the most common form of ocular allergy. Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis is the most prevalent type of allergic conjunctivitis that impacts the quality of life of patients. This article reviews the pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, clinical efficacy, and safety of alcaftadine. Histamine and the pathological mechanism of ocular allergy will be briefly reviewed with the intent of providing a background for the detailed discussion on the clinical utility of alcaftadine in allergic conjunctivitis. The Medline PubMed, Elsevier Science Direct, and Google Scholar databases were used to search for evidence-based literature on histamine and immunopathological mechanism of allergic conjunctivitis, as well as on pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, and clinical efficacy of alcaftadine. The treatment and management goals of allergic conjunctivitis are to prevent or minimize the inflammatory cascade associated with allergic response in the early stages of the pathological mechanism. It is of note that activation of histamine receptors on immune and nonimmune cells are associated with allergen-induced inflammation of the conjunctiva and its associated ocular allergic manifestations, including itching, edema, hyperemia, and tearing. Alcaftadine is an efficacious multiple action antiallergic therapeutic agent with inverse agonist activity on H1, H2, and H4 receptors, as well as anti-inflammatory and mast cell stabilizing effects that could provide therapeutic benefits to patients with allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:26185412

  17. Puerarin partly counteracts the inflammatory response after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion via activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojie; Mei, Zhigang; Qian, Jingping; Zeng, Yongbao; Wang, Mingzhi

    2013-12-01

    Puerarin, a major isoflavonoid derived from the Chinese medical herb radix puerariae (Gegen), has been reported to inhibit neuronal apoptosis and play an anti-inflammatory role in focal cerebral ischemia model rats. Recent findings regarding stroke pathophysiology have recognized that anti-inflammation is an important target for the treatment of ischemic stroke. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is a highly robust neural-immune mechanism for inflammation control. This study was to investigate whether activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway can be involved in the mechanism of inhibiting the inflammatory response during puerarin-induced cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rats. Results showed that puerarin pretreatment (intravenous injection) reduced the ischemic infarct volume, improved neurological deficit after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion and decreased the levels of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in brain tissue. Pretreatment with puerarin (intravenous injection) attenuated the inflammatory response in rats, which was accompanied by janus-activated kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) inhibition. These observations were inhibited by the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR) antagonist α-bungarotoxin (α-BGT). In addition, puerarin pretreatment increased the expression of α7nAchR mRNA in ischemic cerebral tissue. These data demonstrate that puerarin pretreatment strongly protects the brain against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and inhibits the inflammatory response. Our results also indicated that the anti-inflammatory effect of puerarin may partly be mediated through the activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. PMID:25206641

  18. The Endogenous Th17 Response in NO2-Promoted Allergic Airway Disease Is Dispensable for Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Distinct from Th17 Adoptive Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rebecca A.; Ather, Jennifer L.; Daggett, Rebecca; Hoyt, Laura; Alcorn, John F.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Weiss, Daniel J.; Lundblad, Lennart K. A.; Poynter, Matthew E.

    2013-01-01

    Severe, glucocorticoid-resistant asthma comprises 5-7% of patients with asthma. IL-17 is a biomarker of severe asthma, and the adoptive transfer of Th17 cells in mice is sufficient to induce glucocorticoid-resistant allergic airway disease. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an environmental toxin that correlates with asthma severity, exacerbation, and risk of adverse outcomes. Mice that are allergically sensitized to the antigen ovalbumin by exposure to NO2 exhibit a mixed Th2/Th17 adaptive immune response and eosinophil and neutrophil recruitment to the airway following antigen challenge, a phenotype reminiscent of severe clinical asthma. Because IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling is critical in the generation of the Th17 response in vivo, we hypothesized that the IL-1R/Th17 axis contributes to pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease and manifests in glucocorticoid-resistant cytokine production. IL-17A neutralization at the time of antigen challenge or genetic deficiency in IL-1R resulted in decreased neutrophil recruitment to the airway following antigen challenge but did not protect against the development of AHR. Instead, IL-1R-/- mice developed exacerbated AHR compared to WT mice. Lung cells from NO2-allergically inflamed mice that were treated in vitro with dexamethasone (Dex) during antigen restimulation exhibited reduced Th17 cytokine production, whereas Th17 cytokine production by lung cells from recipient mice of in vitro Th17-polarized OTII T-cells was resistant to Dex. These results demonstrate that the IL-1R/Th17 axis does not contribute to AHR development in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease, that Th17 adoptive transfer does not necessarily reflect an endogenously-generated Th17 response, and that functions of Th17 responses are contingent on the experimental conditions in which they are generated. PMID:24069338

  19. Suppression of ovalbumin-induced airway inflammatory responses in a mouse model of asthma by Mimosa pudica extract.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eun Ju; Lee, Ji-Sook; Yun, Chi-Young; Ryang, Yong Suk; Kim, Jong-Bae; Kim, In Sik

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory airway disease. The pathogenic mechanisms of asthma include the infiltration of leukocytes and release of cytokines. Mimosa pudica (Mp) has been used traditionally for the treatment of insomnia, diarrhea and inflammatory diseases. Although Mp extract has various therapeutic properties, the effect of this extract on asthma has not yet been reported. This study investigated the suppressive effects of Mp extract on asthmatic responses both in vitro and in vivo. Mp extract was acquired from dried and powdered whole plants of M. pudica using 80% ethanol. BALB/c mice were used for the mouse model of asthma induced by ovalbumin. Mp extract significantly inhibited the HMC-1 cell migration induced by stem cell factor and blocked the release of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in EoL-1 cells. Leukocytosis, eosinophilia and mucus hypersecretion in asthmatic lung were significantly suppressed by Mp extract. The release of ovalbumin-specific IgE in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum was also decreased. Mp extract treatment resulted in no liver cytotoxicity. The Mp extract has inhibitory properties on asthma and may be used as a potent therapeutic agent for allergic lung inflammation. PMID:20623591

  20. RELATIVE POTENCY OF FUNGAL EXTRACTS IN INDUCING ALLERGIC ASTHMA-LIKE RESPONSES IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor mold has been associated with the development of allergic asthma. However, relative potency of molds in the induction of allergic asthma is not clear. In this study, we tested the relative potency of fungal extracts (Metarizium anisophilae [MACA], Stachybotrys ...

  1. Booster responses in the study of allergic reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Serrano, M C; Caballero, M T; Barranco, P; Martinez-Alzamora, F

    1996-01-01

    The observation of negative skin and challenge tests to beta-lactams in some patients with prior histories of reactions to these antibiotics led us to develop a protocol ("booster study") which systematically included the performance of skin and challenge tests to beta-lactams ten to thirty days after the study to confirm the negative results. From a total of 430 patients who came to our outpatient clinic because of a reaction to a beta-lactam or unknown antibiotic, 249 completed the study. Out of the patients who completed the second phase, or "booster study," the results were positive in the first phase, or conventional study in 42 patients, and negative in 207. The booster study was negative in 197 patients (95 percent) and positive in ten patients (5 percent). Skin tests were positive in 5 of them (penicilloyl-polylysine: 5; benzylpenicillin: 3; amoxicillin: 2; minor determinant mixture: 1), and 5 patients developed an allergic reaction after rechallenge (benzylpenicillin: 4; amoxicillin: 1). One patient with both negative skin tests and amoxicillin oral challenge in the booster study developed an immediate generalized urticaria with the oral intake of amoxicillin one month later at home; skin tests became positive at that moment. The negative results in the first phase of the study and the development of positive results in the second phase could be due to the existence of an immunological amnestic reaction or to sensitization after reexposure to beta-lactams in the diagnostic procedures. PMID:8833166

  2. Inhibitory effect of 1,2,4,5-tetramethoxybenzene on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation through suppression of IκB kinase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Je, In-Gyu; Choi, Hyun Gyu; Kim, Hui-Hun; Lee, Soyoung; Choi, Jin Kyeong; Kim, Sung-Wan; Kim, Duk-Sil; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Shin, Tae-Yong; Park, Pil-Hoon; Khang, Dongwoo; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    As the importance of allergic disorders such as atopic dermatitis and allergic asthma, research on potential drug candidates becomes more necessary. Mast cells play an important role as initiators of allergic responses through the release of histamine; therefore, they should be the target of pharmaceutical development for the management of allergic inflammation. In our previous study, anti-allergic effect of extracts of Amomum xanthioides was demonstrated. To further investigate improved candidates, 1,2,4,5-tetramethoxybenzene (TMB) was isolated from methanol extracts of A. xanthioides. TMB dose-dependently attenuated the degranulation of mast cells without cytotoxicity by inhibiting calcium influx. TMB decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-4 at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Increased expression of these cytokines was caused by translocation of nuclear factor-κB into the nucleus, and it was hindered by suppressing activation of IκB kinase complex. To confirm the effect of TMB in vivo, the ovalbumin (OVA)-induced active systemic anaphylaxis (ASA) and IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) models were used. In the ASA model, hypothermia was decreased by oral administration of TMB, which attenuated serum histamine, OVA-specific IgE, and IL-4 levels. Increased pigmentation of Evans blue was reduced by TMB in a dose-dependent manner in the PCA model. Our results suggest that TMB is a possible therapeutic candidate for allergic inflammatory diseases that acts through the inhibition of mast cell degranulation and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. - Highlights: • TMB reduced the degranulation of mast cells. • TMB inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. • TMB suppressed both active and passive anaphylaxis. • Anti-allergic inflammatory effects of TMB might be due to the blocking IKK complex. • TMB might be a candidate for the treatment of

  3. External Application of Apo-9'-fucoxanthinone, Isolated from Sargassum muticum, Suppresses Inflammatory Responses in a Mouse Model of Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang-Chul; Kang, Na-Jin; Yoon, Weon-Jong; Kim, Sejin; Na, Min-Chull; Koh, Young-Sang; Hyun, Jin-Won; Lee, Nam-Ho; Ko, Mi-Hee; Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Yoo, Eun-Sook

    2016-04-01

    Allergic skin inflammation such as atopic dermatitis is characterized by skin barrier dysfunction, edema, and infiltration with various inflammatory cells. The anti-inflammatory effects of Apo-9'-fucoxanthinone, isolated from Sargassum muticum, have been described in many diseases, but the mechanism by which it modulates the immune system is poorly understood. In this study, the ability of Apo-9'-fucoxanthinone to suppress allergic reactions was investigated using a mouse model of atopic dermatitis. The Apo-9'-fucoxanthinone-treated group showed significantly decreased immunoglobulin E in serum. Also, Apo-9'-fucoxanthinone treatment resulted in a smaller lymph node size with reduced the thickness and length compared to the induction group. In addition, Apo-9'-fucoxanthinone inhibited the expression of interleukin-4, interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin-stimulated lymphocytes. These results suggest that Apo-9'-fucoxanthinone may be a useful therapeutic strategy for treating chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27123161

  4. Imbalanced secondary mucosal antioxidant response in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Kruidenier, Laurens; Kuiper, Ineke; Van Duijn, Wim; Mieremet-Ooms, Marij A C; van Hogezand, Ruud A; Lamers, Cornelis B H W; Verspaget, Hein W

    2003-09-01

    cells that expressed CAT remained unchanged during inflammation and GPO was found in only a very low and constant number of epithelial cells. In addition, the inflamed epithelium displayed decreased expression of the hydroxyl radical (OH(*)) scavenger MT. In view of the high epithelial SOD levels in inflamed IBD epithelium, it is speculated that the efficient removal of excess H(2)O(2) is hampered in these cells, thereby increasing not only the risk of detrimental effects of H(2)O(2) directly, but also those of its extremely reactive derivatives such as OH(*). Taken together, the results suggest an imbalanced and inefficient endogenous antioxidant response in the intestinal mucosa of IBD patients, which may contribute to both the pathogenesis and the perpetuation of the inflammatory processes. PMID:12950013

  5. A Controlled Challenge Study on Di(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate (DEHP) in House Dust and the Immune Response in Human Nasal Mucosa of Allergic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Deutschle, Tom; Reiter, Rudolf; Butte, Werner; Heinzow, Birger; Keck, Tilman; Riechelmann, Herbert

    2008-01-01

    Background Few studies have yet addressed the effects of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) in house dust on human nasal mucosa. Objectives We investigated the effects of house dust containing DEHP on nasal mucosa of healthy and house dust mite (HDM)–allergic subjects in a short-term exposure setting. Methods We challenged 16 healthy and 16 HDM-allergic subjects for 3 hr with house dust at a concentration of 300 μg/m3 containing either low (0.41 mg/g) or high (2.09 mg/g) levels of DEHP. Exposure to filtered air served as control. After exposure, we measured proteins and performed a DNA microarray analysis. Results Nasal exposure to house dust with low or high DEHP had no effect on symptom scores. Healthy subjects had almost no response to inhaled dust, but HDM-allergic subjects showed varied responses: DEHPlow house dust increased eosinophil cationic protein, granulocyte-colony–stimulating factor (G-CSF), interleukin (IL)-5, and IL-6, whereas DEHPhigh house dust decreased G-CSF and IL-6. Furthermore, in healthy subjects, DEHP concentration resulted in 10 differentially expressed genes, whereas 16 genes were differentially expressed in HDM-allergic subjects, among them anti-Müllerian hormone, which was significantly up-regulated after exposure to DEHPhigh house dust compared with exposure to DEHPlow house dust, and fibroblast growth factor 9, IL-6, and transforming growth factor-β1, which were down-regulated. Conclusions Short-term exposure to house dust with high concentrations of DEHP has attenuating effects on human nasal immune response in HDM-allergic subjects, concerning both gene expression and cytokines. PMID:19057701

  6. Modulation of inflammatory response of wounds by antimicrobial photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mrinalini; Gupta, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: Management of infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is becoming difficult due to the rapid emergence of multi-antibiotic resistant strains. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) has a lot of potential as an alternative approach for inactivation of antibiotic resistant bacteria. In this study we report results of our investigations on the effect of poly-L-lysine conjugate of chlorine p6 (pl-cp6) mediated APDT on the healing of P.aeruginosa infected wounds and the role of Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-kB) induced inflammatory response in this process. Materials and method: Excisional wounds created in Swiss albino mice were infected with ∼107 colony forming units of P.aeruginosa. Mice with wounds were divided into three groups: 1) Uninfected, 2) Infected, untreated control (no light, no pl-cp6), 3) Infected, APDT. After 24 h of infection (day 1 post wounding), the wounds were subjected to APDT [pl-cp6 applied topically and exposed to red light (660 ± 25 nm) fluence of ∼ 60 J/cm2]. Subsequent to APDT, on day 2 and 5 post wounding (p.w), measurements were made on biochemical parameters of inflammation [toll like receptor-4 (TLR-4), NF-kB, Inteleukin (IL)-[1α, IL-β, and IL-2)] and cell proliferation [(fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), alkaline phosphatase (ALP)]. Results: In comparison with untreated control, while expression of TLR-4, NF-kB (p105 and p50), and proinflammatory interleukins (IL-1α, IL-1β,IL-2) were reduced in the infected wounds subjected to APDT, the levels of FGF-2 and ALP increased, on day 5 p.w. Conclusion: The measurements made on the inflammatory markers and cell proliferation markers suggest that APDT reduces inflammation caused by P.aeruginosa and promotes cell proliferation in wounds. PMID:26557735

  7. Eosinophil-mediated signalling attenuates inflammatory responses in experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Masterson, Joanne C; McNamee, Eóin N; Fillon, Sophie A; Hosford, Lindsay; Harris, Rachel; Fernando, Shahan D; Jedlicka, Paul; Iwamoto, Ryo; Jacobsen, Elizabeth; Protheroe, Cheryl; Eltzschig, Holger K; Colgan, Sean P; Arita, Makoto; Lee, James J; Furuta, Glenn T

    2015-01-01

    Objective Eosinophils reside in the colonic mucosa and increase significantly during disease. Although a number of studies have suggested that eosinophils contribute to the pathogenesis of GI inflammation, the expanding scope of eosinophil-mediated activities indicate that they also regulate local immune responses and modulate tissue inflammation. We sought to define the impact of eosinophils that respond to acute phases of colitis in mice. Design Acute colitis was induced in mice by administration of dextran sulfate sodium, 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid or oxazolone to C57BL/6J (control) or eosinophil deficient (PHIL) mice. Eosinophils were also depleted from mice using antibodies against interleukin (IL)-5 or by grafting bone marrow from PHIL mice into control mice. Colon tissues were collected and analysed by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and reverse transcription PCR; lipids were analysed by mass spectroscopy. Results Eosinophil-deficient mice developed significantly more severe colitis, and their colon tissues contained a greater number of neutrophils, than controls. This compensatory increase in neutrophils was accompanied by increased levels of the chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL2, which attract neutrophils. Lipidomic analyses of colonic tissue from eosinophil-deficient mice identified a deficiency in the docosahexaenoic acid-derived anti-inflammatory mediator 10, 17- dihydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (diHDoHE), namely protectin D1 (PD1). Administration of an exogenous PD1-isomer (10S, 17S-DiHDoHE) reduced the severity of colitis in eosinophil-deficient mice. The PD1-isomer also attenuated neutrophil infiltration and reduced levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and inducible NO-synthase in colons of mice. Finally, in vitro assays identified a direct inhibitory effect of PD1-isomer on neutrophil transepithelial migration. Conclusions Eosinophils exert a protective effect in acute mouse colitis, via production of anti-inflammatory lipid

  8. Essential role of peripheral node addressin in lymphocyte homing to nasal-associated lymphoid tissues and allergic immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ohmichi, Yukari; Hirakawa, Jotaro; Imai, Yasuyuki; Fukuda, Minoru

    2011-01-01

    Nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) is a mucosal immune tissue that provides immune responses against inhaled antigens. Lymphocyte homing to NALT is mediated by specific interactions between lymphocytes and high endothelial venules (HEVs) in NALT. In contrast to HEVs in other mucosal lymphoid tissues, NALT HEVs strongly express peripheral node addressins (PNAds) that bear sulfated glycans recognized by the monoclonal antibody MECA-79. We investigated the role of PNAd in lymphocyte homing to NALT using sulfotransferase N-acetylglucosamine-6-O-sulfotransferase (GlcNAc6ST) 1 and GlcNAc6ST-2 double knockout (DKO) mice. The expression of PNAd in NALT HEVs was eliminated in DKO mice. Short-term homing assays indicated that lymphocyte homing to NALT was diminished by 90% in DKO mice. Production of antigen-specific IgE and the number of sneezes in response to nasally administered ovalbumin were also substantially diminished. Consistently, the NALT of DKO mice showed reduced production of IL-4 and increased production of IL-10 together with an increase in CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells). Compared with the homing of CD4+CD25− conventional T cells, the homing of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells to NALT was less dependent on the L-selectin–PNAd interaction but was partially dependent on PSGL-1 (P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1) and CD44. These results demonstrate that PNAd is essential for lymphocyte homing to NALT and nasal allergic responses. PMID:21518796

  9. Platelet activation and apoptosis modulate monocyte inflammatory responses in dengue

    PubMed Central

    Hottz, Eugenio D.; Medeiros-de-Moraes, Isabel M.; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; de Assis, Edson F.; Vals-de-Souza, Rogério; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.; Bozza, Fernando A.; Bozza, Patrícia T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is the most prevalent human arbovirus disease in the world. Dengue infection has a large spectrum of clinical manifestations from self-limited febrile illness to severe syndromes accompanied by bleeding and shock. Thrombocytopenia and vascular leak with altered cytokine profiles in plasma are features of severe dengue. Although monocytes have been recognized as important sources of cytokines in dengue, the contributions of platelet-monocyte interactions to inflammatory responses in dengue have not been addressed. Patients/Methods Patients with dengue were investigated for platelet-monocyte aggregate formation and markers of monocyte activation. Platelet-induced cytokine responses by monocytes and underlying mechanisms were also investigated in vitro. Results We observed increased levels of platelet-monocyte aggregates in blood samples from patients with dengue, especially patients with thrombocytopenia and increased vascular permeability. Moreover, the exposure of monocytes from healthy volunteers to platelets from patients with dengue induced the secretion of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10 and MCP-1, while the exposure to platelets from healthy volunteers only induced the secretion of MCP-1. In addition to the well-established modulation of monocyte cytokine responses by activated platelets through P-selectin binding, we found that interaction of monocytes with apoptotic platelets mediate IL-10 secretion through phosphatidylserine recognition in platelet-monocyte aggregates. Moreover, IL-10 secretion required platelet-monocyte contact but not phagocytosis. Conclusions Together, our results demonstrate that activated and apoptotic platelets aggregate with monocytes during dengue infection and signal specific cytokine responses that may contribute to the pathogenesis of dengue. PMID:25015827

  10. Cerebral analgesic response to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Hodkinson, Duncan J; Khawaja, Nadine; OʼDaly, Owen; Thacker, Michael A; Zelaya, Fernando O; Wooldridge, Caroline L; Renton, Tara F; Williams, Steven C R; Howard, Matthew A

    2015-07-01

    Nonopioid agents, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), are the most commonly used class of analgesics. Increasing evidence suggests that cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition at both peripheral and central sites can contribute to the antihyperalgesic effects of NSAIDs, with the predominant clinical effect being mediated centrally. In this study, we examined the cerebral response to ibuprofen in presurgical and postsurgical states and looked at the analgesic interaction between surgical state and treatment. We used an established clinical pain model involving third molar extraction, and quantitative arterial spin labelling (ASL) imaging to measure changes in tonic/ongoing neural activity. Concurrent to the ASL scans, we presented visual analogue scales inside the scanner to evaluate the subjective experience of pain. This novel methodology was incorporated into a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled design, with an open method of drug administration. We found that independent of its antinociceptive action, ibuprofen has no effect on regional cerebral blood flow under pain-free conditions (presurgery). However, in the postsurgical state, we observed increased activation of top-down modulatory circuits, which was accompanied by decreases in the areas engaged because of ongoing pain. Our findings demonstrate that ibuprofen has a measurable analgesic response in the human brain, with the subjective effects of pain relief reflected in two distinct brain networks. The observed activation of descending modulatory circuits warrants further investigation, as this may provide new insights into the inhibitory mechanisms of analgesia that might be exploited to improve safety and efficacy in pain management. PMID:25851460

  11. A pneumococcal pilus influences virulence and host inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Barocchi, M A; Ries, J; Zogaj, X; Hemsley, C; Albiger, B; Kanth, A; Dahlberg, S; Fernebro, J; Moschioni, M; Masignani, V; Hultenby, K; Taddei, A R; Beiter, K; Wartha, F; von Euler, A; Covacci, A; Holden, D W; Normark, S; Rappuoli, R; Henriques-Normark, B

    2006-02-21

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. The initial event in invasive pneumococcal disease is the attachment of encapsulated pneumococci to epithelial cells in the upper respiratory tract. This work provides evidence that initial bacterial adhesion and subsequent ability to cause invasive disease is enhanced by pili, long organelles able to extend beyond the polysaccharide capsule, previously unknown to exist in pneumococci. These adhesive pili-like appendages are encoded by the pneumococcal rlrA islet, present in some, but not all, clinical isolates. Introduction of the rlrA islet into an encapsulated rlrA-negative isolate allowed pilus expression, enhanced adherence to lung epithelial cells, and provided a competitive advantage upon mixed intranasal challenge of mice. Furthermore, a pilus-expressing rlrA islet-positive clinical isolate was more virulent than a nonpiliated deletion mutant, and it out-competed the mutant in murine models of colonization, pneumonia, and bacteremia. Additionally, piliated pneumococci evoked a higher TNF response during systemic infection, compared with nonpiliated derivatives, suggesting that pneumococcal pili not only contribute to adherence and virulence but also stimulate the host inflammatory response. PMID:16481624

  12. Acute Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and Clinical Response to Parenteral Doxycycline

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Anthony W.; Malkasian, Kay L.; Marshall, John R.; Guze, Lucien B.

    1975-01-01

    The bacteriology of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and clinical response to parenteral doxycycline were evaluated in 30 patients. Only 3 of 21 cul-de-sac cultures from PID patients were sterile, whereas all 8 normal control subjects yielded negative results (P< 0.005). Poor correlation was observed between cervical and cul-de-sac cultures. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, isolated from the cervix in 17 patients (57%), was recovered from the cul-de-sac only once. Streptococcus, Peptococcus, Peptostreptococcus, coliforms, and other organisms normally present in the vagina were the predominant isolates recovered from the cul-de-sac. Parenteral doxycycline resulted in rapid resolution of signs and symptoms (within 48 h) in 20 of 27 evaluable patients (74%). In five others, signs and symptoms of infection abated within 4 days. The remaining two patients failed to respond; in both cases, adnexal masses developed during doxycycline therapy. Gonococci were eradicated from the cervix in all but one patient who, nevertheless, had a rapid defervescence of symptoms. There was no clear-cut correlation between the clinical response and in vitro susceptibility of cul-de-sac isolates to doxycycline. These data confirm the usefulness of broad-spectrum antibiotics in acute PID. Culdocentesis is a reliable means of obtaining material for the bacteriological diagnosis of acute PID; however, the pathogenetic role and relative importance of gonococci and various other bacteria in acute PID need to be clarified further. PMID:1169908

  13. Histone deacetylase 5 regulates the inflammatory response of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Poralla, Lukas; Stroh, Thorsten; Erben, Ulrike; Sittig, Marie; Liebig, Sven; Siegmund, Britta; Glauben, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Modifying the chromatin structure and interacting with non-histone proteins, histone deacetylases (HDAC) are involved in vital cellular processes at different levels. We here specifically investigated the direct effects of HDAC5 in macrophage activation in response to bacterial or cytokine stimuli. Using murine and human macrophage cell lines, we studied the expression profile and the immunological function of HDAC5 at transcription and protein level in over-expression as well as RNA interference experiments. Toll-like receptor-mediated stimulation of murine RAW264.7 cells significantly reduced HDAC5 mRNA within 7 hrs but presented baseline levels after 24 hrs, a mechanism that was also found for Interferon-γ treatment. If treated with lipopolysaccharide, RAW264.7 cells transfected for over-expression only of full-length but not of mutant HDAC5, significantly elevated secretion of tumour necrosis factor α and of the monocyte chemotactic protein-1. These effects were accompanied by increased nuclear factor-κB activity. Accordingly, knock down of HDAC5-mRNA expression using specific siRNA significantly reduced the production of these cytokines in RAW264.7 or human U937 cells. Taken together, our results suggest a strong regulatory function of HDAC5 in the pro-inflammatory response of macrophages. PMID:26059794

  14. A pneumococcal pilus influences virulence and host inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Barocchi, M. A.; Ries, J.; Zogaj, X.; Hemsley, C.; Albiger, B.; Kanth, A.; Dahlberg, S.; Fernebro, J.; Moschioni, M.; Masignani, V.; Hultenby, K.; Taddei, A. R.; Beiter, K.; Wartha, F.; von Euler, A.; Covacci, A.; Holden, D. W.; Normark, S.; Rappuoli, R.; Henriques-Normark, B.

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. The initial event in invasive pneumococcal disease is the attachment of encapsulated pneumococci to epithelial cells in the upper respiratory tract. This work provides evidence that initial bacterial adhesion and subsequent ability to cause invasive disease is enhanced by pili, long organelles able to extend beyond the polysaccharide capsule, previously unknown to exist in pneumococci. These adhesive pili-like appendages are encoded by the pneumococcal rlrA islet, present in some, but not all, clinical isolates. Introduction of the rlrA islet into an encapsulated rlrA-negative isolate allowed pilus expression, enhanced adherence to lung epithelial cells, and provided a competitive advantage upon mixed intranasal challenge of mice. Furthermore, a pilus-expressing rlrA islet-positive clinical isolate was more virulent than a nonpiliated deletion mutant, and it out-competed the mutant in murine models of colonization, pneumonia, and bacteremia. Additionally, piliated pneumococci evoked a higher TNF response during systemic infection, compared with nonpiliated derivatives, suggesting that pneumococcal pili not only contribute to adherence and virulence but also stimulate the host inflammatory response. PMID:16481624

  15. Irritancy and allergic responses induced by topical application of ortho-phthalaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stacey E; Umbright, Christina; Sellamuthu, Rajendran; Fluharty, Kara; Kashon, Michael; Franko, Jennifer; Jackson, Laurel G; Johnson, Victor J; Joseph, Pius

    2010-06-01

    Although ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA) has been suggested as an alternative to glutaraldehyde for the sterilization and disinfection of hospital equipment, the toxicity has not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the irritancy and sensitization potential of OPA. The EpiDerm Skin Irritation Test was used to evaluate in vitro irritancy potential of OPA and glutaraldehyde. Treatment with 0.4125 and 0.55% OPA induced irritation, while glutaraldehyde exposure at these concentrations did not. Consistent with the in vitro results, OPA induced irritancy, evaluated by ear swelling, when mice were treated with 0.75%. Initial evaluation of the sensitization potential was conducted using the local lymph node assay at concentrations ranging from 0.005 to 0.75%. A concentration-dependent increase in lymphocyte proliferation was observed with a calculated EC3 value of 0.051% compared to that of 0.089%, previously determined for glutaraldehyde. Immunoglobulin (Ig) E-inducing potential was evaluated by phenotypic analysis of draining lymph node (DLN) cells and measurement of total and specific serum IgE levels. The 0.1 and 0.75% exposed groups yielded significant increases in the IgE+B220+ cell population in the lymph nodes while the 0.75% treated group demonstrated significant increases in total IgE, OPA-specific IgE, and OPA-specific IgG(1). In addition, significant increases in interleukin-4 messenger RNA and protein expression in the DLNs were observed in OPA-treated groups. The results demonstrate the dermal irritancy and allergic potential of OPA and raise concern about the proposed/intended use of OPA as a safe alternative to glutaraldehyde. PMID:20176622

  16. Apoptosis of resident and inflammatory macrophages before and during the inflammatory response of the virgin bovine mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Macrophages may play a prominent role in defense of the bovine mammary gland, and their functionality is necessary for successful eradication of bacterial pathogens. In contrast to necrosis, however, apoptosis has not yet been studied in macrophages from bovine mammary glands. Therefore, the aim of this study was to confirm the occurrence of apoptosis in macrophages from resting heifer mammary glands and during the inflammatory response. Methods Inflammatory response was induced by phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Resident macrophages (RESMAC) were obtained before and inflammatory macrophages (INFMAC) 24, 48, 72 and 168 hours after inducing inflammatory response in mammary glands of unbred heifers. Cell samples were analyzed for differential counts, apoptosis and necrosis using flow cytometry. Results Populations of RESMAC and INFMAC contained monocyte-like cells and vacuolized cells. Apoptosis was detected differentially in both morphologically different types of RESMAC and INFMAC and also during initiation and resolution of the inflammatory response. In the RESMAC population, approximately one-tenth of monocyte-like cells and one-third of vacuolized cells were apoptotic. In the INFMAC population obtained 24 h after PBS treatment, approximately one-tenth of monocyte-like cells and almost one-quarter of vacuolized cells were apoptotic. At the same time following LPS, however, we observed a significantly lower percentage of apoptotic cells in the population of monocyte-like INFMAC and vacuolized INFMAC. Moreover, a higher percentage of apoptotic cells in INFMAC was detected during all time points after PBS in contrast to LPS. Comparing RESMAC and INFMAC, we observed that vacuolized cells from populations of RESMAC and INFMAC underwent apoptosis more intensively than did monocyte-like cells. Conclusions We conclude that apoptosis of virgin mammary gland macrophages is involved in regulating their lifespan, and it is involved

  17. Fexofenadine hydrochloride in the treatment of allergic disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, David; Bielory, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    Fexofenadine is a selective, non-sedating H1 receptor antagonist, marketed in the United States since 2000. The FDA approved an oral suspension in 2006, for the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis and chronic idiopathic urticaria in children. The tablet, capsule, and oral suspension are bioequivalent. Although fexofenadine does not use P450 CYP 3A4 it does interact with a number of drugs at P-glycoprotein and organic anion transporter polypeptides. The risk of toxicity from other drugs may increase with the administration of fexofenadine. Orange and grapefruit juices reduce the bioavailability of fexofenadine. Fexofenadine has been shown to have an impact on inflammatory mediators, other than histamine, such as decreasing the production of LTC4, LTD4, LTE4, PGE2, and PGF2α; inhibiting cyclo-oxygenase 2, thromboxane; limiting iNOS generation of NO; decreasing cytokine levels (ICAM-1, ELAM-1, VCAM-1, RANTES, I-TAC, MDC, TARC, MMP-2, MMP-9, tryptase); and diminishing eosinophil adherence, chemotaxis, and opsonization of particles. These effects may provide benefit to some of the inflammatory responses of an acute allergic reaction and provide a basis for future development of H1 antagonists with stronger anti-inflammatory effects. These studies also support the contention that fexofenadine is effective for the treatment of allergic rhinits and chronic idiopathic urticaria. PMID:21436982

  18. Pro-inflammatory responses of RAW264.7 macrophages when treated with ultralow concentrations of silver, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Giovanni, Marcella; Yue, Junqi; Zhang, Lifeng; Xie, Jianping; Ong, Choon Nam; Leong, David Tai

    2015-10-30

    To cellular systems, nanoparticles are considered as foreign particles. Upon particles and cells contact, innate immune system responds by activating the inflammatory pathway. However, excessive inflammation had been linked to various diseases ranging from allergic responses to cancer. Common nanoparticles, namely silver, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide exist in the environment as well as in consumer products at ultralow level of 10(-6)-10(-3) μg mL(-1). However, so far the risks of such low NPs concentrations remain unexplored. Therefore, we attempted to screen the pro-inflammatory responses after ultralow concentration treatments of the three nanoparticles on RAW264.7 macrophages, which are a part of the immune system, at both cellular and gene levels. Even though cytotoxicity was only observed at nanoparticles concentrations as high as 10 μg mL(-1), through the level of NF-κB and upregulation of pro-inflammatory genes, we observed activation of the induction of genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines starting already at 10(-7) μg mL(-1). This calls for more thorough characterization of nanoparticles in the environment as well as in consumer products to ascertain the health and safety of the consumers and living systems in general. PMID:25956645

  19. DISREGULATION OF INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES BY CHRONIC CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION

    PubMed Central

    Castanon-Cervantes, Oscar; Wu, Mingwei; Ehlen, J. Christopher; Paul, Ketema; Gamble, Karen L.; Johnson, Russell L.; Besing, Rachel C.; Menaker, Michael; Gewirtz, Andrew T.; Davidson, Alec J.

    2010-01-01

    Circadian rhythms modulate nearly every mammalian physiological process. Chronic disruption of circadian timing in shift work or during chronic jet lag in animal models leads to a higher risk of several pathologies. Many of these conditions in both shift workers and experimental models share the common risk factor of inflammation. Here we show that experimentally-induced circadian disruption altered innate immune responses. Endotoxemic shock induced by LPS was magnified leading to hypothermia and death after 4 consecutive weekly 6h phase-advances of the light-dark schedule, with 89% mortality compared with 21% in unshifted control mice. This may be due to a heightened release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to LPS treatment in shifted animals. Isolated peritoneal macrophages harvested from shifted mice exhibited a similarly heightened response to LPS in vitro, indicating that these cells are a target for jet lag. Sleep deprivation and stress are known to alter immune function and are potential mediators of the effects we describe. However polysomnographic recording in mice exposed to the shifting schedule revealed no sleep loss, and stress measures were not altered in shifted mice. In contrast, we observed altered or abolished rhythms in the expression of clock genes in the central clock, liver, thymus and peritoneal macrophages in mice after chronic jet lag. We conclude that circadian disruption, but not sleep loss or stress, are associated with jet lag-related disregulation of the innate immune system. Such immune changes might be a common mechanism for the myriad negative health effects of shift work. PMID:20944004

  20. Utility of IgE (total and Aspergillus fumigatus specific) in monitoring for response and exacerbations in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ritesh; Aggarwal, Ashutosh N; Sehgal, Inderpaul S; Dhooria, Sahajal; Behera, Digambar; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke

    2016-01-01

    The role of total and specific IgE in monitoring treatment responses in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) remains poorly studied. Here in, we evaluate the utility of total and Aspergillus fumigatus specific IgE in the follow-up of ABPA. Eighty-one consecutive treatment-naïve patients of ABPA (acute stage) with pulmonary infiltrates and bronchiectasis underwent measurement of total and A. fumigatus specific IgE at baseline, after 8 weeks of glucocorticoid therapy, and during exacerbations. There was clinical and radiological improvement after treatment with median decline of total IgE by 51.9%. The total IgE declined by at least 35%, 25% and 20% in 69 (85.2%), 76 (93.6%) and 78 (96.3%) patients, respectively. On the other hand, the A. fumigatus specific IgE increased in 42 (51.9%) subjects, and the mean increase was 1.4%, after 8 weeks. Among 13 patients with exacerbation, 12 (92.3%) had a rise of total IgE by >50%. The A. fumigatus specific IgE increased in only five (38.5%) subjects during exacerbation. Thus, the total IgE is a useful test in monitoring treatment responses in ABPA while A. fumigatus specific IgE has limited utility. PMID:26575791

  1. Aspergillus fumigatus-specific antibodies in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and aspergilloma: evidence for a polyclonal antibody response.

    PubMed Central

    Brummund, W; Resnick, A; Fink, J N; Kurup, V P

    1987-01-01

    Patients with the Aspergillus-induced diseases allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), aspergilloma (fungus ball), and Aspergillus skin test-positive asthma were differentiated immunologically by radioimmunoassay based on their total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and Aspergillus fumigatus-specific IgE levels. In this study, a new, highly sensitive biotin-avidin-linked immunosorbent assay was used to evaluate A. fumigatus-specific antibodies of all immunoglobulin classes. Studied populations included 13 patients with ABPA, 12 with aspergilloma, 9 with Aspergillus skin test-positive asthma, and 9 normal individuals without asthma. A. fumigatus-specific antibodies of all classes were elevated in patients with ABPA, variably elevated in those with aspergilloma, and lowest in the other two groups. This assay demonstrated significantly higher specific IgE antibody levels in the ABPA group over those of the other groups, even with 1:1,000 dilutions of the sera. This study demonstrated that ABPA is a disease characterized by a polyclonal antibody response to Aspergillus antigen and not just a response to IgE and IgG antibody classes. The measurement of other antibody classes, particularly IgD and IgA, could enhance the immunodiagnosis of ABPA. The biotin-avidin-linked immunosorbent assay was found to be a highly sensitive assay that can be a clinically useful alternative to radioimmunoassay in the measurement of A. fumigatus-specific antibodies. PMID:3539998

  2. Exposure to Aedes aegypti Bites Induces a Mixed-Type Allergic Response following Salivary Antigens Challenge in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Michele S.; Gomes, Eliane; Gueroni, Daniele I.; Ramos, Anderson D.; Mirotti, Luciana; Florsheim, Esther; Bizzarro, Bruna; Lino, Ciro N. R.; Maciel, Ceres; Lino-Dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana; Tavares-de-Lima, Wothan; Capurro, Margareth L.; Russo, Momtchilo

    2016-01-01

    Classical studies have shown that Aedes aegypti salivary secretion is responsible for the sensitization to mosquito bites and many of the components present in saliva are immunogenic and capable of inducing an intense immune response. Therefore, we have characterized a murine model of adjuvant-free systemic allergy induced by natural exposure to mosquito bites. BALB/c mice were sensitized by exposure to A. aegypti mosquito bites and intranasally challenged with phosphate-buffered saline only or the mosquito’s salivary gland extract (SGE). Blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung were collected and evaluated for cellularity, histopathological analyses, cytokines and antibody determination. Respiratory pattern was analyzed by Penh measurements and tracheal segments were obtained to study in vitro reactivity to methacholine. BAL recovered from sensitized mice following challenge with SGE showed an increased number of eosinophils and Th2 cytokines such as IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13. Peribronchoalveolar eosinophil infiltration, mucus and collagen were also observed in lung parenchyma of sensitized mice, suggesting the development of a typical Th2 response. However, the antibody profile in serum of these mice evidenced a mixed-type response with presence of both, IgG1/IgE (Th2-related) and IgG2a (Th1-related) isotypes. In addition, changes in breathing pattern and tracheal reactivity to methacholine were not found. Taken together, our results show that A. aegypti bites trigger an atypical allergic reaction, with some classical cellular and soluble Th2 components in the lung, but also systemic Th1 and Th2 antibody isotypes and no change in either the respiratory pattern or the trachea responsiveness to agonist. PMID:27203689

  3. Pulpal inflammatory responses following non-carious class V restorations.

    PubMed

    About, I; Murray, P E; Franquin, J C; Remusat, M; Smith, A J

    2001-01-01

    The effects of inflammatory activity following surgical intervention can injure pulp tissues; in severe cases it can lead to pulpal complications. With this article, the authors report on the effects of cavity preparation and restoration events and how they can interact together to reduce or increase the severity of pulpal inflammatory activity in 202 restored Class V cavities. Although some inflammatory activity was observed in the absence of bacteria, the severity of pulpal inflammatory activity was increased when cavity restorations became infected. Zinc oxide eugenol and resin-modified glass ionomer cement prevented bacterial microleakage in cavity restorations, with no severe inflammatory activity observed with these materials. Bacteria were observed in cavities restored with enamel bonding resin and adhesive bonded composites and were associated with severe grades of inflammatory activity. The cavity remaining dentin thickness influenced the grade of inflammatory activity. In the absence of infection, the grade of inflammatory activity decreased after 20 weeks post-operatively. In the presence of infection, the grade of pulpal inflammation remained stable until a minimum of 30 weeks had elapsed. PMID:11504432

  4. Triggering of inflammatory response by myeloperoxidase-oxidized LDL.

    PubMed

    Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Legssyer, Ilham; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Kisoka, Roger Lema; Babar, Sajida; Moguilevsky, Nicole; Delree, Paul; Ducobu, Jean; Remacle, Claude; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; Brohee, Dany

    2006-10-01

    The oxidation theory proposes that LDL oxidation is an early event in atherosclerosis and that oxidized LDL contributes to atherogenesis in triggering inflammation. In contrast to the copper-modified LDL, there are few studies using myeloperoxidase-modified LDL (Mox-LDL) as an inflammation inducer. Our aim is to test whether Mox-LDL could constitute a specific inducer of the inflammatory response. Albumin, which is the most abundant protein in plasma and which is present to an identical concentration of LDL in the intima, was used for comparison. The secretion of IL-8 by endothelial cells (Ea.hy926) and TNF-alpha by monocytes (THP-1) was measured in the cell medium after exposure of these cells to native LDL, native albumin, Mox-LDL, or Mox-albumin. We observed that Mox-LDL induced a 1.5- and 2-fold increase (ANOVA; P < 0.001) in IL-8 production at 100 microg/mL and 200 microg/mL, respectively. The incubation of THP-1 cells with Mox-LDL (100 microg/mL) increased the production of TNF-alpha 2-fold over the control. Native LDL, albumin, and Mox-albumin showed no effect in either cellular types. The myeloperoxidase-modified LDL increase in cytokine release by endothelial and monocyte cells and by firing both local and systemic inflammation could induce atherogenesis and its development. PMID:17167545

  5. Acute inflammatory response in spinal cord following impact injury.

    PubMed

    Carlson, S L; Parrish, M E; Springer, J E; Doty, K; Dossett, L

    1998-05-01

    Numerous factors are involved in the spread of secondary damage in spinal cord after traumatic injury, including ischemia, edema, increased excitatory amino acids, and oxidative damage to the tissue from reactive oxygen species. Neutrophils and macrophages can produce reactive oxygen species when activated and thus may contribute to the lipid peroxidation that is known to occur after spinal cord injury. This study examined the rostral-caudal distribution of neutrophils and macrophages/microglia at 4, 6, 24, and 48 h after contusion injury to the T10 spinal cord of rat (10 g weight, 50 mm drop). Neutrophils were located predominantly in necrotic regions, with a time course that peaked at 24 h as measured with assays of myeloperoxidase activity (MPO). The sharpest peak of MPO activity was localized between 4 mm rostral and caudal to the injury. Macrophages/microglia were visualized with antibodies against ED1 and OX-42. Numerous cells with a phagocytic morphology were present by 24 h, with a higher number by 48 h. These cells were predominantly located within the gray matter and dorsal funiculus white matter. The number of cells gradually declined through 6 mm rostral and caudal to the lesion. OX-42 staining also revealed reactive microglia with blunt processes, particularly at levels distant to the lesion. The number of macrophages/microglia was significantly correlated with the amount of tissue damage at each level. Treatments to decrease the inflammatory response are likely to be beneficial to recovery of function after traumatic spinal cord injury. PMID:9582256

  6. Role of Fiber Length on Phagocytosis & Inflammatory Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkevich, Leonid; Stark, Carahline; Champion, Julie

    2014-03-01

    Asbestos fibers have long been associated with lung cancer death. The inability of immune cells (e.g. macrophages) to effectively remove asbestos leads to chronic inflammation and disease. This study examines the role of fiber length on toxicity at the cellular level using model glass fibers. A major challenge is obtaining single diameter fibers but differing in length. Samples of 1 micron diameter fibers with different length distributions were prepared: short fibers (less than 15 microns) by aggressive crushing, and long fibers (longer than 15 microns) by successive sedimentation. Time-lapse video microscopy monitored the interaction of MH-S murine alveolar macrophages with the fibers: short fibers were easily internalized by the macrophages, but long fibers resisted internalization over many hours. Production of TNF- α (tumor necrosis factor alpha), a general inflammatory secreted cytokine, and Cox-2 (cyclo-oxygenase-2), an enzyme that produces radicals, each exhibited a dose-dependence that was greater for long than for short fibers. These results corroborate the importance of fiber length in both physical and biochemical cell response and support epidemiological observations of higher toxicity for longer fibers.

  7. Capparis ovata treatment suppresses inflammatory cytokine expression and ameliorates experimental allergic encephalomyelitis model of multiple sclerosis in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Ozgun-Acar, Ozden; Celik-Turgut, Gurbet; Gazioglu, Isil; Kolak, Ufuk; Ozbal, Seda; Ergur, Bekir U; Arslan, Sevki; Sen, Alaattin; Topcu, Gulacti

    2016-09-15

    expression profiling of the transcriptome revealed that COWE treatment caused the down regulation of a group of genes involved in the immune response, inflammatory response, antigen processing and presentation, B-cell-mediated immunity and innate immune response. Collectively, these results suggest anti-neuroinflammatory mechanisms by which COWE treatment delayed and suppressed the development of EAE and ameliorated the disease in mice with persistent clinical signs. PMID:27609283

  8. Pollen-induced antigen presentation by mesenchymal stem cells and T cells from allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mauli B; Gavrilova, Tatyana; Liu, Jianjun; Patel, Shyam A; Kartan, Saritha; Greco, Steven J; Capitle, Eugenio; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2013-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising cellular suppressor of inflammation. This function of MSCs is partly due to their licensing by inflammatory mediators. In cases with reduced inflammation, MSCs could become immune-enhancer cells. MSCs can suppress the inflammatory response of antigen-challenged lymphocytes from allergic asthma. Although allergic rhinitis (AR) is also an inflammatory response, it is unclear if MSCs can exert similar suppression. This study investigated the immune effects (suppressor vs enhancer) of MSCs on allergen-stimulated lymphocytes from AR subjects (grass or weed allergy). In contrast to subjects with allergic asthma, MSCs caused a significant (P<0.05) increase in the proliferation of antigen-challenged lymphocytes from AR subjects. The increase in lymphocyte proliferation was caused by the MSCs presenting the allergens to CD4(+) T cells (antigen-presenting cells (APCs)). This correlated with increased production of inflammatory cytokines from T cells, and increased expressions of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-II and CD86 on MSCs. The specificity of APC function was demonstrated in APC assay using MSCs that were knocked down for the master regulator of MHC-II transcription, CIITA. The difference in the effects of MSCs on allergic asthma and AR could not be explained by the sensitivity to the allergen, based on skin tests. Thus, we deduced that the contrasting immune effects of MSCs for antigen-challenged lymphocytes on AR and allergic asthma could be disease specific. It is possible that the enhanced inflammation from asthma might be required to license the MSCs to become suppressor cells. This study underscores the need for robust preclinical studies to effectively translate MSCs for any inflammatory disorder. PMID:25505949

  9. Acute hypoxemia in humans enhances the neutrophil inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Douglas Y; Moore, Ernest E; Partrick, David A; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Offner, Patrick J; Silliman, Christopher C

    2002-04-01

    The neutrophil (PMN) is regarded as a key component in the hyperinflammatory response known as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and subsequent multiple organ failure (MOF) are related to the severity of this hyperinflammation. ICU patients who are at highest risk of developing MOF may have acute hypoxic events that complicate their hospital course. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of acute hypoxia and subsequent hypoxemia on circulating PMNs in human volunteers. Healthy subjects were exposed to a changing O2/N2 mixture until their O2 saturation (SaO2) reached a level of 68% saturation. These subjects were then exposed to room air and then returned to their baseline SaO2. PMNs were isolated from pre- and post-hypoxemic arterial blood samples and were then either stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) or PMA alone, or they were primed with L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine, beta-acetyl-gamma-O-alkyl (PAF) followed by fMLP activation. Reactive oxygen species generation as measured by superoxide anion production was enhanced in primed PMNs after hypoxemia. Protease degranulation as measured by elastase release was enhanced in both quiescent PMNs and primed PMNs after fMLP activation following the hypoxemic event. Adhesion molecule upregulation as measured by CD11b/CD18, however, was not significantly changed after hypoxemia. Apoptosis of quiescent PMNs was delayed after the hypoxemic event. TNFalpha, IL-1, IL-6, and IL-8 cytokine levels were unchanged following hypoxemia. These results indicate that relevant acute hypoxemic events observed in the clinical setting enhance several PMN cytotoxic functions and suggest that a transient hypoxemic insult may promote hyperinflammation. PMID:11954825

  10. Helicobacter hepaticus Induces an Inflammatory Response in Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kleine, Moritz; Worbs, Tim; Schrem, Harald; Vondran, Florian W. R.; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Förster, Reinhold; Josenhans, Christine; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Bektas, Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter spp. on human liver cells, resulting in an inflammatory response with increased synthesis of inflammatory mediators and consecutive monocyte activation. PMID:24932686

  11. Burn size determines the inflammatory and hypermetabolic response

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Marc G; Mlcak, Ronald P; Finnerty, Celeste C; Norbury, William B; Gauglitz, Gerd G; Kulp, Gabriela A; Herndon, David N

    2007-01-01

    Background Increased burn size leads to increased mortality of burned patients. Whether mortality is due to inflammation, hypermetabolism or other pathophysiologic contributing factors is not entirely determined. The purpose of the present study was to determine in a large prospective clinical trial whether different burn sizes are associated with differences in inflammation, body composition, protein synthesis, or organ function. Methods Pediatric burned patients were divided into four burn size groups: <40% total body surface area (TBSA) burn, 40–59% TBSA burn, 60–79% TBSA burn, and >80% TBSA burn. Demographic and clinical data, hypermetabolism, the inflammatory response, body composition, the muscle protein net balance, serum and urine hormones and proteins, and cardiac function and changes in liver size were determined. Results One hundred and eighty-nine pediatric patients of similar age and gender distribution were included in the study (<40% TBSA burn, n = 43; 40–59% TBSA burn, n = 79; 60–79% TBSA burn, n = 46; >80% TBSA burn, n = 21). Patients with larger burns had more operations, a greater incidence of infections and sepsis, and higher mortality rates compared with the other groups (P < 0.05). The percentage predicted resting energy expenditure was highest in the >80% TBSA group, followed by the 60–79% TBSA burn group (P < 0.05). Children with >80% burns lost the most body weight, lean body mass, muscle protein and bone mineral content (P < 0.05). The urine cortisol concentration was highest in the 80–99% and 60–79% TBSA burn groups, associated with significant myocardial depression and increased change in liver size (P < 0.05). The cytokine profile showed distinct differences in expression of IL-8, TNF, IL-6, IL-12p70, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (P < 0.05). Conclusion Morbidity and mortality in burned patients is burn size dependent, starts at a 60% TBSA burn and is due to an

  12. Nasal hyperreactivity and inflammation in allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Veld, C. de Graaf-in't; Wijk, R. Gerth van; Zijlstra, F. J.

    1996-01-01

    The history of allergic disease goes back to 1819, when Bostock described his own ‘periodical affection of the eyes and chest’, which he called ‘summer catarrh’. Since they thought it was produced by the effluvium of new hay, this condition was also called hay fever. Later, in 1873, Blackley established that pollen played an important role in the causation of hay fever. Nowadays, the definition of allergy is ‘An untoward physiologic event mediated by a variety of different immunologic reactions’. In this review, the term allergy will be restricted to the IgE-dependent reactions. The most important clinical manifestations of IgE-dependent reactions are allergic conjunctivitis, allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma and atopic dermatitis. However, this review will be restricted to allergic rhinitis. The histopathological features of allergic inflammation involve an increase in blood flow and vascular permeability, leading to plasma exudation and the formation of oedema. In addition, a cascade of events occurs which involves a variety of inflammatory cells. These inflammatory cells migrate under the influence of chemotactic agents to the site of injury and induce the process of repair. Several types of inflammatory cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis. After specific or nonspecific stimuli, inflammatory mediators are generated from cells normally found in the nose, such as mast cells, antigen-presenting cells and epithelial cells (primary effector cells) and from cells recruited into the nose, such as basophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes, platelets and neutrophils (secondary effector cells). This review describes the identification of each of the inflammatory cells and their mediators which play a role in the perennial allergic processes in the nose of rhinitis patients. PMID:18475703

  13. Nasal epithelial and inflammatory response to ozone exposure: a review of laboratory-based studies published since 1985.

    PubMed

    Nikasinovic, L; Momas, I; Seta, N

    2003-01-01

    This article summarizes biological events in human and animal nasal epithelium after short- and long-term exposure to ozone, the principal agent in photochemical smog. Despite anatomical and histological interspecies differences, ozone exposures resulted in common nasal qualitative alterations with an anterior-posterior gradient of phenomena occurring immediately, and with a lag time postexposure: epithelial disruption and increased permeability, inflammatory cell influx, and proliferative and secretory responses. Described mechanisms of toxicity included a direct effect of ozone on epithelial lining fluid and cellular membranes and the subsequent release of cytokines and cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase products. An indirect effect of ozone was indicated by a decreased mucociliary clearance, free radicals production interacting with a gene promoting factor, and increased DNA synthesis. Studies highlighted the pivotal role of activated neutrophils and mast cells leading to the release of deleterious enzymes (tryptase, eosinophil cationic protein) and numerous cytokines. Experiments performed with ozone exposure/allergen challenge reported that, besides the intrinsic deleterious properties of ozone, it also had a priming effect on the late-phase response to allergen challenge, providing new insights into the pathophysiology of respiratory allergic diseases. PMID:12888446

  14. The pollen enigma: modulation of the allergic immune response by non-allergenic, pollen-derived compounds.

    PubMed

    Gilles, Stefanie; Behrendt, Heidrun; Ring, Johannes; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The question what makes an allergen an allergen puzzled generations of researchers. Pollen grains of anemophilous plants are the most important allergen carriers in ambient air, and pollinosis is a highly prevalent multi-organ disease in civilized countries. In the past, research on the allergenicity of pollen has mainly focused on elucidating genetic predisposing factors and on defining certain structural characteristics of pollen derived allergens. Recently, studies extended to the analysis of non-allergenic, adjuvant mediators co-released from pollen. Besides active proteases and oxidases, extracts of pollen contain low molecular weight molecules like pollen-associated lipid mediators or adenosine exhibiting a potential to stimulate and modulate cultured human immune cells. This article reviews our current knowledge on non-allergenic, protein and non-protein compounds from pollen and their in vitro and in vivo effects on the allergic immune response. To ultimately judge the physiological relevance of these compounds, a systematic approach will be needed comparing their releasability, content and activity in different, allergenic and non-allergenic, pollen species. System biology such as proteome and metabolome analysis will be a useful future approach to better understand pollen biology. PMID:22390694

  15. Role of Treg in immune regulation of allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Oscar; Yaman, Görkem; Azkur, Ahmet K; Akkoc, Tunc; Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2010-05-01

    Allergy is a Th2-mediated disease that involves the formation of specific IgE antibodies against innocuous environmental substances. The prevalence of allergic diseases has dramatically increased over the past decades, affecting up to 30% of the population in industrialized countries. The understanding of mechanisms underlying allergic diseases as well as those operating in non-allergic healthy responses and allergen-specific immunotherapy has experienced exciting advances over the past 15 years. Studies in healthy non-atopic individuals and several clinical trials of allergen-specific immunotherapy have demonstrated that the induction of a tolerant state in peripheral T cells represent a key step in healthy immune responses to allergens. Both naturally occurring thymus-derived CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Treg and inducible type 1 Treg inhibit the development of allergy via several mechanisms, including suppression of other effector Th1, Th2, Th17 cells; suppression of eosinophils, mast cells and basophils; Ab isotype change from IgE to IgG4; suppression of inflammatory DC; and suppression of inflammatory cell migration to tissues. The identification of the molecules involved in these processes will contribute to the development of more efficient and safer treatment modalities. PMID:20148422

  16. Type-2 innate lymphoid cells in human allergic disease

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Jillian L.; McKenzie, Andrew N.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent decades have seen allergic diseases become endemic in a number of developed countries. Understanding the inflammatory processes that dictate these allergic responses is therefore important. Recent findings Critical to many allergic responses is the inappropriate release of the type-2 immune-regulatory cytokines: interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-9, and interleukin-13. The study of these inflammatory mediators has led directly to the development of two new asthma treatments: anti-interleukin-5 and anti-interleukin-13. Until recently, T helper 2 cells were considered to be the major cellular source of type-2 cytokines; however, a paradigm shift occurred with the discovery of a novel population, type-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), that can produce huge levels of type-2 cytokines and are sufficient to induce allergy in mice. This discovery raises interesting questions about how innate and adaptive type-2 immunity might interact to induce relapsing and remitting episodes of allergy in patients. Summary It is essential that alongside the mechanistic investigation using model organisms, the roles of ILC2s in human disease be explored. Here, we discuss how ILC2 traits, discovered in mouse models, have informed research in humans and how newly identified human ILC2 pathways might provide potential therapeutic benefits in the future. PMID:25115682

  17. The major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 induces different responses in dendritic cells of birch pollen allergic and healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Smole, Ursula; Radauer, Christian; Lengger, Nina; Svoboda, Martin; Rigby, Neil; Bublin, Merima; Gaier, Sonja; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Mechtcheriakova, Diana; Breiteneder, Heimo

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells play a fundamental role in shaping the immune response to allergens. The events that lead to allergic sensitization or tolerance induction during the interaction of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 and dendritic cells are not very well studied. Here, we analyzed the uptake of Bet v 1 and the cross-reactive celery allergen Api g 1 by immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (iMoDCs) of allergic and normal donors. In addition, we characterized the allergen-triggered intracellular signaling and transcriptional events. Uptake kinetics, competitive binding, and internalization pathways of labeled allergens by iMoDCs were visualized by live-cell imaging. Surface-bound IgE was detected by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Allergen- and IgE-induced gene expression of early growth response genes and Th1 and Th2 related cytokines and chemokines were analyzed by real-time PCR. Phosporylation of signaling kinases was analyzed by Western blot. Internalization of Bet v 1 by iMoDCs of both donor groups, likely by receptor-mediated caveolar endocytosis, followed similar kinetics. Bet v 1 outcompeted Api g 1 in cell surface binding and uptake. MoDCs of allergic and healthy donors displayed surface-bound IgE and showed a pronounced upregulation of Th2 cytokine- and NFκB-dependent genes upon non-specific Fcε receptor cross-linking. In contrast to these IgE-mediated responses, Bet v 1-stimulation increased transcript levels of the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 but not of NFκB-related genes in MoDCs of BP allergic donors. Cells of healthy donors were either unresponsive or showed elevated mRNA levels of Th1-promoting chemokines. Moreover, Bet v 1 was able to induce Erk1/2 and p38 MAPK activation in BP allergics but only a slight p38 activation in normal donors. In conclusion, our data indicate that Bet v 1 favors the activation of a Th2 program only in DCs of BP allergic individuals. PMID:25635684

  18. The Major Birch Pollen Allergen Bet v 1 Induces Different Responses in Dendritic Cells of Birch Pollen Allergic and Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Smole, Ursula; Radauer, Christian; Lengger, Nina; Svoboda, Martin; Rigby, Neil; Bublin, Merima; Gaier, Sonja; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Mechtcheriakova, Diana; Breiteneder, Heimo

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells play a fundamental role in shaping the immune response to allergens. The events that lead to allergic sensitization or tolerance induction during the interaction of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 and dendritic cells are not very well studied. Here, we analyzed the uptake of Bet v 1 and the cross-reactive celery allergen Api g 1 by immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (iMoDCs) of allergic and normal donors. In addition, we characterized the allergen-triggered intracellular signaling and transcriptional events. Uptake kinetics, competitive binding, and internalization pathways of labeled allergens by iMoDCs were visualized by live-cell imaging. Surface-bound IgE was detected by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Allergen- and IgE-induced gene expression of early growth response genes and Th1 and Th2 related cytokines and chemokines were analyzed by real-time PCR. Phosporylation of signaling kinases was analyzed by Western blot. Internalization of Bet v 1 by iMoDCs of both donor groups, likely by receptor-mediated caveolar endocytosis, followed similar kinetics. Bet v 1 outcompeted Api g 1 in cell surface binding and uptake. MoDCs of allergic and healthy donors displayed surface-bound IgE and showed a pronounced upregulation of Th2 cytokine- and NFκB-dependent genes upon non-specific Fcε receptor cross-linking. In contrast to these IgE-mediated responses, Bet v 1-stimulation increased transcript levels of the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 but not of NFκB-related genes in MoDCs of BP allergic donors. Cells of healthy donors were either unresponsive or showed elevated mRNA levels of Th1-promoting chemokines. Moreover, Bet v 1 was able to induce Erk1/2 and p38 MAPK activation in BP allergics but only a slight p38 activation in normal donors. In conclusion, our data indicate that Bet v 1 favors the activation of a Th2 program only in DCs of BP allergic individuals. PMID:25635684

  19. Effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on allergic march model by suppressing Th2, Th17, and TSLP responses via CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha-Jung; Kim, Young-Joon; Lee, Seung-Hwa; Yu, Jinho; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Hong, Soo-Jong

    2014-07-01

    Allergic march (AM) is characterized by the progression of clinical signs of atopic dermatitis (AD) to allergic asthma or rhinitis, but its pathogenesis is not completely understood. We developed mouse model of AM with three 1-week exposures (separated by 2-week interval) to an OVA or saline (control) followed by OVA challenge. The development of AM was confirmed by phenotypes of AD and allergic asthma. Increases in IL-4, IL-17, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) responses were associated with the progression of AM, and these responses were suppressed by treatment with Lcr35. Moreover, Lcr35 treatment led to an increase in the number of CD4(+)CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) of AM mice. In conclusion, the oral application of Lcr35 prevented the development of AM in this model by suppressing Th2, Th17, and TSLP responses via a mechanism that may involve CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs in MLNs. PMID:24769377

  20. Primary nasal epithelium exposed to house dust mite extract shows activated expression in allergic individuals.

    PubMed

    Vroling, Aram B; Jonker, Martijs J; Luiten, Silvia; Breit, Timo M; Fokkens, Wytske J; van Drunen, Cornelis M

    2008-03-01

    Nasal epithelial cells form the outermost protective layer against environmental factors. However, this defense is not just physical; it has been shown that epithelial cells respond by the production of inflammatory mediators that may affect local immune responses. In this research we set out to characterize potential differences between the responses of nasal epithelium from healthy and allergic individuals to house dust mite (HDM) allergen. These differences will help us to define local mechanisms that could contribute to allergic disease expression. Epithelial cells were cultured from nasal biopsies taken from five healthy and five allergic individuals. These cultures were exposed for 24 hours to culture medium containing HDM allergen, or to culture medium alone. Isolated RNA was used for microarray analysis. Gene-ontology of the response in healthy epithelium revealed mainly up-regulation of chemokines, growth factors, and structural proteins. Moreover, we saw increased expression of two transcription factors (NF-kappaB and AP-1) and their regulatory members. The expression pattern of epithelium from allergic individuals in the absence of the HDM stimulus suggests that it is already in an activated state. Most striking is that, while the already activated NF-kappaB regulatory pathway remained unchanged in allergic epithelium, the AP-1 pathway is down-regulated upon exposure to HDM allergen; this is contrary to what we see in healthy epithelium. Clear differences in the expression pattern exist between epithelial cells isolated from healthy and allergic individuals at baseline and between their responses to allergen exposure; these differences may contribute to the inflammatory response. PMID:17901406

  1. Induction of eosinophil apoptosis by hydrogen peroxide promotes the resolution of allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Reis, A C; Alessandri, A L; Athayde, R M; Perez, D A; Vago, J P; Ávila, T V; Ferreira, T P T; de Arantes, A C S; Coutinho, D de Sá; Rachid, M A; Sousa, L P; Martins, M A; Menezes, G B; Rossi, A G; Teixeira, M M; Pinho, V

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are effector cells that have an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. Defective removal of these cells likely leads to chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the mechanisms responsible for the elimination of eosinophils from inflammatory sites. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for certain mediators and molecular pathways responsible for the survival and death of leukocytes at sites of inflammation. Reactive oxygen species have been described as proinflammatory mediators but their role in the resolution phase of inflammation is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of reactive oxygen species in the resolution of allergic inflammatory responses. An eosinophilic cell line (Eol-1) was treated with hydrogen peroxide and apoptosis was measured. Allergic inflammation was induced in ovalbumin sensitized and challenged mouse models and reactive oxygen species were administered at the peak of inflammatory cell infiltrate. Inflammatory cell numbers, cytokine and chemokine levels, mucus production, inflammatory cell apoptosis and peribronchiolar matrix deposition was quantified in the lungs. Resistance and elastance were measured at baseline and after aerosolized methacholine. Hydrogen peroxide accelerates resolution of airway inflammation by induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils and decrease remodeling, mucus deposition, inflammatory cytokine production and airway hyperreactivity. Moreover, the inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by apocynin or in gp91(phox-/-) mice prolonged the inflammatory response. Hydrogen peroxide induces Eol-1 apoptosis in vitro and enhances the resolution of inflammation and improves lung function in vivo by inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils. PMID:25675292

  2. Induction of eosinophil apoptosis by hydrogen peroxide promotes the resolution of allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Reis, A C; Alessandri, A L; Athayde, R M; Perez, D A; Vago, J P; Ávila, T V; Ferreira, T P T; de Arantes, A CS; de Sá Coutinho, D; Rachid, M A; Sousa, L P; Martins, M A; Menezes, G B; Rossi, A G; Teixeira, M M; Pinho, V

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are effector cells that have an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. Defective removal of these cells likely leads to chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the mechanisms responsible for the elimination of eosinophils from inflammatory sites. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for certain mediators and molecular pathways responsible for the survival and death of leukocytes at sites of inflammation. Reactive oxygen species have been described as proinflammatory mediators but their role in the resolution phase of inflammation is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of reactive oxygen species in the resolution of allergic inflammatory responses. An eosinophilic cell line (Eol-1) was treated with hydrogen peroxide and apoptosis was measured. Allergic inflammation was induced in ovalbumin sensitized and challenged mouse models and reactive oxygen species were administered at the peak of inflammatory cell infiltrate. Inflammatory cell numbers, cytokine and chemokine levels, mucus production, inflammatory cell apoptosis and peribronchiolar matrix deposition was quantified in the lungs. Resistance and elastance were measured at baseline and after aerosolized methacholine. Hydrogen peroxide accelerates resolution of airway inflammation by induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils and decrease remodeling, mucus deposition, inflammatory cytokine production and airway hyperreactivity. Moreover, the inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by apocynin or in gp91phox−/− mice prolonged the inflammatory response. Hydrogen peroxide induces Eol-1 apoptosis in vitro and enhances the resolution of inflammation and improves lung function in vivo by inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils. PMID:25675292

  3. Prokineticin 1 Induces Inflammatory Response in Human Myometrium

    PubMed Central

    Gorowiec, Marta R.; Catalano, Rob D.; Norman, Jane E.; Denison, Fiona C.; Jabbour, Henry N.

    2011-01-01

    The infiltration of human myometrium and cervix with leukocytes and the formation of a pro-inflammatory environment within the uterus have been associated with the initiation of both term and preterm parturition. The mechanism regulating the onset of this pro-inflammatory cascade is not fully elucidated. We demonstrate that prokineticin 1 (PROK1) is up-regulated in human myometrium and placenta during labor. The expression of PROK1 receptor remains unchanged during labor and is abundantly expressed in the myometrium. Gene array analysis identified 65 genes up-regulated by PROK1 in human myometrium, mainly cytokines and chemokines, including IL-1β, chemokine C-C motif ligand 3, and colony-stimulating factor 3. In addition, we demonstrate that PROK1 increases the expression of chemokine C-C motif ligand 20, IL-6, IL-8, prostaglandin synthase 2, and prostaglandin E2 and F2α secretion. The treatment of myometrial explants with 100 ng/mL of lipopolysaccharide up-regulates the expression of PROK1, PROK1 receptor, and inflammatory mediators. The infection of myometrial explants with lentiviral microRNA targeting PROK1, preceding treatment with lipopolysaccharide, reduces the expression of inflammatory genes. We propose that PROK1 is a novel inflammatory mediator that can contribute to the onset of human parturition at term and partially mediate premature onset of inflammatory pathways during bacterial infection. PMID:21983634

  4. Immune Regulatory Mechanisms in Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review This review highlights recent findings regarding the immune regulation of allergic conjunctivitis (AC). Mouse models have facilitated prospective studies that have not been possible in patients. The availability of gene knockout mice and the wealth of monoclonal antibodies have permitted exquisite dissection of the pathophysiology and immune regulation of AC. Recent findings New insights have emerged in three areas: a) role of costimulatory molecules in the induction of Th2 immune responses; b) crucial role of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in the expression of AC; and c) the function of T regulatory cells in shaping conjunctival inflammation once the immune response has been initiated. Summary Allergic conjunctivitis involves early phase and late phase reactions. The early phase reaction (EPR) is IgE antibody-dependent, while the late phase reaction (LPR) is IgE-independent and is mediated by inflammatory cells, especially eosinophils. Recent studies in mouse models of AC have provided important insights into the immune regulation of both the EPR and LPR of AC. Mounting evidence suggests that IFN-γ is crucial for optimum expression of AC. Costimulatory molecules influence the induction of Th2 immune responses and the EPR while regulatory T cells shape the expression of the LPR of AC. PMID:18769204

  5. Early inflammatory response in epithelial ovarian tumor cyst fluids.

    PubMed

    Kristjánsdóttir, Björg; Partheen, Karolina; Fung, Eric T; Yip, Christine; Levan, Kristina; Sundfeldt, Karin

    2014-10-01

    Mortality rates for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) are high, mainly due to late-stage diagnosis. The identification of biomarkers for this cancer could contribute to earlier diagnosis and increased survival rates. Given that chronic inflammation plays a central role in cancer initiation and progression, we selected and tested 15 cancer-related cytokines and growth factors in 38 ovarian cyst fluid samples. We used ovarian cyst fluid since it is found in proximity to the pathology and mined it for inflammatory biomarkers suitable for early detection of EOC. Immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sample fractionation were obtained by using tandem antibody libraries bead and mass spectrometry. Two proteins, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) and interleucin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8), were significantly (P < 0.0001) higher in the malignant (n = 16) versus benign (n = 22) tumor cysts. Validation of MCP-1, IL-8, and growth-regulated protein-α (GROα/CXCL1) was performed with ELISA in benign, borderline, and malignant cyst fluids (n = 256) and corresponding serum (n = 256). CA125 was measured in serum from all patients and used in the algorithms performed. MCP-1, IL-8, and GROα are proinflammatory cytokines and promoters of tumor growth. From 5- to 100-fold higher concentrations of MCP-1, IL-8 and GROα were detected in the cyst fluids compared to the serum. Significant (P < 0.001) cytokine response was already established in borderline cyst fluids and stage I EOC. In serum a significant (P < 0.01) increase of IL-8 and GROα was found, but not until stage I and stage III EOC, respectively. These findings confirm that early events in tumorigenesis can be analyzed and detected in the tumor environment and we conclude that ovarian cyst fluid is a promising source in the search for new biomarkers for early ovarian tumors. PMID:24947406

  6. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, Katrin; Rehli, Michael; Singer, Katrin; Renner-Sattler, Kathrin; Kreutz, Marina

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. - Highlights: • Lactic acid broadly delays LPS-induced gene expression in human monocytes. • Expression of important monocyte effector molecules is affected by lactic acid. • Interference of lactic acid with TLR signaling causes the delayed gene expression. • The profound effect of lactic acid might contribute to immune suppression in tumors.

  7. Transfer of allergic airway responses with antigen-primed CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells in brown Norway rats.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, A; Mishima, H; Renzi, P M; Xu, L J; Hamid, Q; Martin, J G

    1995-01-01

    Activated CD4+ helper T cells have been demonstrated in asthmatic airways and postulated to play a central role in eliciting allergic inflammation; direct evidence of their involvement seems to be lacking. We hypothesized that CD4+ T cells have the potential to induce allergic responses to antigen challenge, and tested this hypothesis in a model of allergic bronchoconstriction, the Brown Norway rat, using the approach of adoptive transfer. Animals were actively sensitized to either ovalbumin (OVA) or BSA and were used as donors of T cells. W3/25(CD4)+ or OX8(CD8)+ T cells were isolated from the cervical lymph nodes of sensitized donors and transferred to naive BN rats. 2 d after adoptive transfer recipient rats were challenged by OVA inhalation, and changes in lung resistance (RL), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells, and serum levels of antigen-specific IgE were studied. After OVA challenge recipients of OVA-primed W3/25+ T cells exhibited sustained increases in RL throughout the entire 8-h observation period and had significant bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophilia, which was detected by immunocytochemistry using an antimajor basic protein mAb. Recipients of BSA-primed W3/25+ T cells or OVA-primed OX8+ T cells failed to respond to inhaled OVA. OVA-specific immunoglobulin E was undetectable by ELISA or skin testing in any of the recipient rats after adoptive transfer. In conclusion, antigen-induced airway bronchoconstriction and eosinophilia were successfully transferred by antigen-specific W3/25+ T cells in Brown Norway rats. These responses were dependent on antigen-primed W3/25+ T cells and appeared to be independent of IgE-mediated mast cell activation. This study provides clear evidence for T cell mediated immune mechanisms in allergic airway responses in this experimental model. Images PMID:7657805

  8. Involvement of TLR2 and TLR4 in inflammatory immune responses induced by fine and coarse ambient air particulate matter

    PubMed Central

    Shoenfelt, Joanna; Mitkus, Robert J.; Zeisler, Rolf; Spatz, Rabia O.; Powell, Jan; Fenton, Matthew J.; Squibb, Katherine A.; Medvedev, Andrei E.

    2009-01-01

    Induction of proinflammatory mediators by alveolar macrophages exposed to ambient air particulate matter has been suggested to be a key factor in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and allergic diseases in the lungs. However, receptors and mechanisms underlying these responses have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we examined whether TLR2, TLR4, and the key adaptor protein, MyD88, mediate the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by mouse peritoneal macrophages exposed to fine and coarse PM. TLR2 deficiency blunted macrophage TNF-α and IL-6 expression in response to fine (PM2.5), while not affecting cytokine-inducing ability of coarse NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM 1648) particles. In contrast, TLR4−/− macrophages showed inhibited cytokine expression upon stimulation with NIST SRM 1648 but exhibited normal responses to PM2.5. Preincubation with polymyxin B markedly suppressed the capacity of NIST SRM 1648 to elicit TNF-α and IL-6, indicating endotoxin as a principal inducer of cytokine responses. Overexpression of TLR2 in TLR2/4-deficient human embryonic kidney 293 cells imparted PM2.5 sensitivity, as judged by IL-8 gene expression, whereas NIST SRM 1648, but not PM2.5 elicited IL-8 expression in 293/TLR4/MD-2 transfectants. Engagement of TLR4 by NIST SRM 1648 induced MyD88-independent expression of the chemokine RANTES, while TLR2-reactive NIST IRM PM2.5 failed to up-regulate this response. Consistent with the shared use of MyD88 by TLR2 and TLR4, cytokine responses of MyD88−/− macrophages to both types of air PM were significantly reduced. These data indicate differential utilization of TLR2 and TLR4 but shared use of MyD88 by fine and coarse air pollution particles. PMID:19406832

  9. Exposure to Particulate Hexavalent Chromium Exacerbates Allergic Asthma Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Brent C.; Constant, Stephanie L.; Patierno, Steven R.; Jurjus, Rosalyn A.; Ceryak, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Airborne hexavalent chromate, Cr(VI), has been identified by the Environmental Protection Agency as a possible health threat in urban areas, due to the carcinogenic potential of some of its forms. Particulate chromates are produced in many different industrial settings, with high levels of aerosolized forms historically documented. Along with an increased risk of lung cancer, a high incidence of allergic asthma has been reported in workers exposed to certain inhaled particulate Cr(VI) compounds. However, a direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma has not been established. We recently showed that inhaled particulate Cr(VI) induces an innate neutrophilic inflammatory response in BALB/c mice. In the current studies we investigated how the inflammation induced by inhaled particulate Cr(VI) might alter the pathology of an allergic asthmatic response. We used a well-established mouse model of allergic asthma. Groups of ovalbumin protein (OVA)-primed mice were challenged either with OVA alone, or with a combination of OVA and particulate zinc chromate, and various parameters associated with asthmatic responses were measured. Co-exposure to particulate Cr(VI) and OVA mediated a mixed form of asthma in which both eosinophils and neutrophils are present in airways, tissue pathology is markedly exacerbated, and airway hyperresponsiveness is significantly increased. Taken together these findings suggest that inhalation of particulate forms of Cr(VI) may augment the severity of ongoing allergic asthma, as well as alter its phenotype. Such findings may have implications for asthmatics in settings in which airborne particulate Cr(VI) compounds are present at high levels. PMID:22178736

  10. The active contribution of Toll-like receptors to allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Keqiang; Xiang, Yi; Yao, Xiaohong; Liu, Ying; Gong, Wanghua; Yoshimura, Teizo; Wang, Ji Ming

    2011-10-01

    Epithelia lining the respiratory tract represent a major portal of entry for microorganisms and allergens and are equipped with innate and adaptive immune signaling receptors for host protection. These include Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize microbial components and evoke diverse responses in cells of the respiratory system. TLR stimulation by microorganism-derived molecules activates antigen presenting cells, control T helper (Th) 1, Th2, and Th17 immune cell differentiation, cytokine production by mast cells, and activation of eosinophils. It is clear that TLR are involved in the pathophysiology of allergic airway diseases such as asthma. Dendritic cells (DCs), a kind of antigen presenting cells, which play a key role in the induction of allergic airway inflammation, are privileged targets for pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). During the allergic responses, engagement of TLRs on DCs determines the Th2 polarization of the T cells. TLR signaling in mast cells increases the release of IL-5, and TLR activation of airway epithelial cells forces the generation of proallergic Th2 type of cytokines. Although these responses aim to protect the host, they may also result in inflammatory tissue damage in the airway. Under certain conditions, stimulation of TLRs, in particular, TLR9, may reduce Th2-dependent allergic inflammation by induction of Th1 responses. Therefore, understanding the complex regulatory roles of TLRs in the pathogenesis of allergic airway inflammation should facilitate the development of preventive and therapeutic measures for asthmatic patients. PMID:21624504

  11. Langerhans cells in allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Tuchinda, P; Gaspari, A A

    2010-12-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a common skin disease that has significant socio-economic impact. ACD is mediated by a T-cell mediated inflammatory reaction. Langerhans cells (LCs) are an epidermal DCs subset specialized in antigen presentation. After hapten exposure, LCs play a major role as in induction adaptive immune response against allergens. LCs recognize, take up and process haptens and migrate to the local draining lymph nodes. However, LCs specific functions and the LCs migration to local draining lymph nodes are not yet clearly defined. Recent advance in the knowledge of LCs function has increased in the past decades including the evidence for a tolerogenic function of LCs. The present review will focus on the role for LCs response to contact allergens. PMID:21139551

  12. Topical glucocorticoid or pimecrolimus treatment suppresses thymic stromal lymphopoietin-related allergic inflammatory mechanism in an oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis murine model.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Na Young; Jung, Min young; Kim, Dong Hye; Lee, Hae Jin; Choi, Eung Ho

    2015-09-01

    Congenitally or early impaired skin barrier as the first event starting the 'atopic march' in atopic dermatitis (AD) patients can increase allergen penetration that results in sensitization, even in the airways, followed by asthma and allergic rhinitis. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a cytokine existing in high levels in AD skin and is considered as a novel therapeutic target for atopic disease. We generated oxazolone (Ox)-induced AD-like (Ox-AD) hairless mice and divided them into four groups according to the therapeutic challenges: topical glucocorticoid, pimecrolimus, emollient, and control (acetone-only treated). We assessed the functional studies of skin barrier, epidermal expressions of differentiation markers, IL-1α, TNF-α, proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2), TSLP and antimicrobial peptides (AMP), and serum IgE in each group. Topical glucocorticoid or pimecrolimus treatment improved AD-like skin lesions and barrier functions, and restored the epidermal expression of differentiation markers, IL-1α, TNF-α, PAR-2, and TSLP, in Ox-AD mice. The improvement was relatively better with the glucocorticoid than pimecrolimus. Epidermal AMP expression was restored by topical glucocorticoid, but not pimecrolimus. Our result showed that topical glucocorticoid or pimecrolimus improved the AD-like skin lesions and barrier impairment by suppressing TSLP-related allergic inflammation. PMID:25786383

  13. E-cadherin expression in macrophages dampens their inflammatory responsiveness in vitro, but does not modulate M2-regulated pathologies in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bossche, Jan; Laoui, Damya; Naessens, Thomas; Smits, Hermelijn H.; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Stijlemans, Benoît; Grooten, Johan; De Baetselier, Patrick; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.

    2015-01-01

    IL-4/IL-13-induced alternatively activated macrophages (M(IL-4/IL-13), AAMs or M2) are known to express E-cadherin, enabling them to engage in heterotypic cellular interactions and IL-4-driven macrophage fusion in vitro. Here we show that E-cadherin overexpression in Raw 264.7 macrophages inhibits their inflammatory response to LPS stimulation, as demonstrated by a reduced secretion of inflammatory mediators like interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and nitric oxide (NO). To study the function of E-cadherin in M(IL-4/IL-13) macrophages in vivo, we generated macrophage-specific E-cadherin-deficient C57BL/6 mice. Using this new tool, we analyzed immunological parameters during two typical AAM-associated Th2-driven diseases and assessed Th2-associated granuloma formation. Although E-cadherin is strongly induced in AAMs during Taenia crassiceps helminth infections and allergic airway inflammation, its deletion in macrophages does not affect the course of both Th2 cytokine-driven diseases. Moreover, macrophage E-cadherin expression is largely redundant for granuloma formation around Schistosoma mansoni ova. Overall, we conclude that E-cadherin is a valuable AAM marker which suppresses the inflammatory response when overexpressed. Yet E-cadherin deletion in macrophages does not affect M(LPS+IFNγ) and M(IL-4) polarization in vitro, nor in vivo macrophage function, at least in the conditions tested. PMID:26226941

  14. PHENOTYPIC COMPARISON OF ALLERGIC AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE IN THREE RAT STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Brown Norway (BN) rats develop a robust response to antigens in the lung characterized by a large increase in allergen-specific immune function and pulmonary eosinophilia. The objective of this study was to investigate alternative models by determining if other rat s...

  15. Characterizing the inflammatory response in esophageal mucosal biopsies in children with eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Sayej, Wael N; Ménoret, Antoine; Maharjan, Anu S; Fernandez, Marina; Wang, Zhu; Balarezo, Fabiola; Hyams, Jeffrey S; Sylvester, Francisco A; Vella, Anthony T

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging allergic, IgE- and non-IgE (Th2 cell)-mediated disease. There are major gaps in the understanding of the basic mechanisms that drive the persistence of EoE. We investigated whether esophageal biopsies from children with EoE demonstrate an inflammatory response that is distinct from normal controls. We prospectively enrolled 84 patients, of whom 77 were included in our analysis, aged 4–17 years (12.8±3.8 years; 81% males). Five esophageal biopsies were collected from each patient at the time of endoscopy. Intramucosal lymphocytes were isolated, phenotyped and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/ionomycin to measure their potential to produce cytokines via flow cytometry. We also performed cytokine arrays on 72-h biopsy culture supernatants. CD8+ T cells, compared with CD4+ T cells, synthesized more TNF-α and interferon (IFN)-γ after mitogen stimulation in the EoE-New/Active vs EoE-Remission group (P=0.0098; P=0.02) and controls (P=0.0008; P=0.03). Culture supernatants taken from explant esophageal tissue contained 13 analytes that distinguished EoE-New/Active from EoE-Remission and Controls. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis based on these analytes distinctly separated EoE-New/Active from EoE-Remission and Controls. In summary, we have identified a previously unappreciated role for CD8+ T lymphocytes with potential to produce TNF-α and IFN-γ in EoE. Our results suggest that CD8+ T cells have a role in the persistence or progression of EoE. We have also identified a panel of analytes produced by intact esophageal biopsies that differentiates EoE-New/Active from EoE-Remission and controls. Our results suggest that esophageal epithelial cells may have specific immune effector functions in EoE that control the type and amplitude of inflammation. PMID:27525061

  16. Characterizing the inflammatory response in esophageal mucosal biopsies in children with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Sayej, Wael N; Ménoret, Antoine; Maharjan, Anu S; Fernandez, Marina; Wang, Zhu; Balarezo, Fabiola; Hyams, Jeffrey S; Sylvester, Francisco A; Vella, Anthony T

    2016-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging allergic, IgE- and non-IgE (Th2 cell)-mediated disease. There are major gaps in the understanding of the basic mechanisms that drive the persistence of EoE. We investigated whether esophageal biopsies from children with EoE demonstrate an inflammatory response that is distinct from normal controls. We prospectively enrolled 84 patients, of whom 77 were included in our analysis, aged 4-17 years (12.8±3.8 years; 81% males). Five esophageal biopsies were collected from each patient at the time of endoscopy. Intramucosal lymphocytes were isolated, phenotyped and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/ionomycin to measure their potential to produce cytokines via flow cytometry. We also performed cytokine arrays on 72-h biopsy culture supernatants. CD8(+) T cells, compared with CD4(+) T cells, synthesized more TNF-α and interferon (IFN)-γ after mitogen stimulation in the EoE-New/Active vs EoE-Remission group (P=0.0098; P=0.02) and controls (P=0.0008; P=0.03). Culture supernatants taken from explant esophageal tissue contained 13 analytes that distinguished EoE-New/Active from EoE-Remission and Controls. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis based on these analytes distinctly separated EoE-New/Active from EoE-Remission and Controls. In summary, we have identified a previously unappreciated role for CD8(+) T lymphocytes with potential to produce TNF-α and IFN-γ in EoE. Our results suggest that CD8(+) T cells have a role in the persistence or progression of EoE. We have also identified a panel of analytes produced by intact esophageal biopsies that differentiates EoE-New/Active from EoE-Remission and controls. Our results suggest that esophageal epithelial cells may have specific immune effector functions in EoE that control the type and amplitude of inflammation. PMID:27525061

  17. The Diamine Oxidase Gene Is Associated with Hypersensitivity Response to Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Agúndez, José A. G.; Ayuso, Pedro; Cornejo-García, José A.; Blanca, Miguel; Torres, María J.; Doña, Inmaculada; Salas, María; Blanca-López, Natalia; Canto, Gabriela; Rondon, Carmen; Campo, Paloma; Laguna, José J.; Fernández, Javier; Martínez, Carmen; García-Martín, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the drugs most frequently involved in hypersensitivity drug reactions. Histamine is released in the allergic response to NSAIDs and is responsible for some of the clinical symptoms. The aim of this study is to analyze clinical association of functional polymorphisms in the genes coding for enzymes involved in histamine homeostasis with hypersensitivity response to NSAIDs. We studied a cohort of 442 unrelated Caucasian patients with hypersensitivity to NSAIDs. Patients who experienced three or more episodes with two or more different NSAIDs were included. If this requirement was not met diagnosis was established by challenge. A total of 414 healthy unrelated controls ethnically matched with patients and from the same geographic area were recruited. Analyses of the SNPs rs17740607, rs2073440, rs1801105, rs2052129, rs10156191, rs1049742 and rs1049793 in the HDC, HNMT and DAO genes were carried out by means of TaqMan assays. The detrimental DAO 16 Met allele (rs10156191), which causes decreased metabolic capacity, is overrepresented among patients with crossed-hypersensitivity to NSAIDs with an OR  = 1.7 (95% CI  = 1.3–2.1; Pc  = 0.0003) with a gene-dose effect (P = 0.0001). The association was replicated in two populations from different geographic areas (Pc  = 0.008 and Pc  = 0.004, respectively). Conclusions and implications The DAO polymorphism rs10156191 which causes impaired metabolism of circulating histamine is associated with the clinical response in crossed-hypersensitivity to NSAIDs and could be used as a biomarker of response. PMID:23152756

  18. The "bioregulatory effect of exercise" on the innate/inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    The effects of exercise on the innate response are primarily mediated by the SNS (sympathetic nervous system) and/or the HPA (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal) axis and by stress proteins such as Hsp72. Regular exercise can induce immuno-neuroendocrine stabilization in persons with deregulated inflammatory and stress feedback by reducing the presence of stress hormones and inflammatory cytokines. Anti-inflammatory and "anti-stress" responses seem also to be induced (paradoxically, opposite to the effects in healthy persons) after sessions of exercise, being a promising strategy for treating certain inflammatory pathologies. Nevertheless, the biomedical side effects of exercise are also needed to be considered. This article defines the "Bioregulatory Effect of Exercise" to be one that reduces or prevents any excessive effect of inflammatory mediators and stimulates (or at least does not impair) the innate defences (i.e. chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and microbicidal activities) against pathogens. It also generates immunophysiological adaptations through an optimal balance between the pro- and the anti-inflammatory responses. These effects are mediated via immuno-neuroendocrine interactions. This review analyses concepts and conclusions related to how exercise affects the innate and/or inflammatory responses and discusses some paradoxical interpretations relevant for the practical use of exercise in treating infectious and inflammatory diseases. A potential role of exercise as hormesis strategy and the concept of exercise immunization are also discussed. PMID:26979741

  19. A novel pathway by which the environmental toxin 4-Nonylphenol may promote an inflammatory response in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Albert; Jung, Byeong Ho; Cadet, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Background 4-Nonylphenol is a ubiquitous environmental toxin that is formed as a byproduct in the manufacturing and/or sewage treatment of regular household items. Previous work in our lab has implicated 4-NP in the progression of autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease in which macrophages mistakenly attack the intestinal linings, causing chronic inflammation. Several key pro-and anti-inflammatory molecules have been shown to be involved in the manifestation of this disease, including IL-23A, COX-2, IL-8, TLR-4, and IL-10. Material/Methods 4-NP’s effects on these known mediators of IBD were effectively analyzed using a novel model for IBD, by which 4-NP may promote an inflammatory response. Data were collected using DNA Microarray, RT-PCR, and ELISA, after 48 hour treatment of U937 histiocytic lymphocyte cells and COLO320DM human intestinal epithelial cells with 1 nM and 5 nM concentrations of 4-NP. Results Significant dysregulation of the expression of both pro- and anti-inflammatory genes was observed in U937 cells that would promote and prolong inflammation. However, TLR-4, IL-8, and COX-2 gene expressions showed unprecedented effects in COLO320DM cells suggesting that these genes mediate apoptotic processes within the gastrointestinal tract. Conclusions Overall, our results suggest that 4-NP administration engenders immune responses linked to apoptotic processes via dysregulation of macrophage signaling. In sum, 4-NP appears to increases the risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease by promoting or prolonging adverse progression of inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24717721

  20. Eosinophils Contribute to IL-4 Production and Shape the T-Helper Cytokine Profile and Inflammatory Response in Pulmonary Cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Piehler, Daniel; Stenzel, Werner; Grahnert, Andreas; Held, Josephin; Richter, Lydia; Köhler, Gabriele; Richter, Tina; Eschke, Maria; Alber, Gottfried; Müller, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Susceptibility to infection with Cryptococcus neoformans is tightly determined by production of IL-4. In this study, we investigated the time course of IL-4 production and its innate cellular source in mice infected intranasally with C. neoformans. We show that pulmonary IL-4 production starts surprisingly late after 6 weeks of infection. Interestingly, in the lungs of infected mice, pulmonary T helper (Th) cells and eosinophils produce significant amounts of IL-4. In eosinophil-deficient ΔdblGATA mice, IL-33 receptor–expressing Th2s are significantly reduced, albeit not absent, whereas protective Th1 and Th17 responses are enhanced. In addition, recruitment of pulmonary inflammatory cells during infection with C. neoformans is reduced in the absence of eosinophils. These data expand previous findings emphasizing an exclusively destructive effector function by eosinophilic granulocytes. Moreover, in ΔdblGATA mice, fungal control is slightly enhanced in the lung; however, dissemination of Cryptococcus is not prevented. Therefore, eosinophils play an immunoregulatory role that contributes to Th2-dependent susceptibility in allergic inflammation during bronchopulmonary mycosis. PMID:21699881

  1. Procalcitonin does discriminate between sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Arkader, R; Troster, E J; Lopes, M R; Júnior, R R; Carcillo, J A; Leone, C; Okay, T S

    2006-01-01

    Aims To evaluate whether procalcitonin (PCT) and C reactive protein (CRP) are able to discriminate between sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in critically ill children. Methods Prospective, observational study in a paediatric intensive care unit. Kinetics of PCT and CRP were studied in patients undergoing open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) (SIRS model; group I1) and patients with confirmed bacterial sepsis (group II). Results In group I, PCT median concentration was 0.24 ng/ml (reference value <2.0 ng/ml). There was an increment of PCT concentrations which peaked immediately after CPB (median 0.58 ng/ml), then decreased to 0.47 ng/ml at 24 h; 0.33 ng/ml at 48 h, and 0.22 ng/ml at 72 h. CRP median concentrations remained high on POD1 (36.6 mg/l) and POD2 (13.0 mg/l). In group II, PCT concentrations were high at admission (median 9.15 ng/ml) and subsequently decreased in 11/14 patients who progressed favourably (median 0.31 ng/ml). CRP levels were high in only 11/14 patients at admission. CRP remained high in 13/14 patients at 24 h; in 12/14 at 48 h; and in 10/14 patients at 72 h. Median values were 95.0, 50.9, 86.0, and 20.3 mg/l, respectively. The area under the ROC curve was 0.99 for PCT and 0.54 for CRP. Cut off concentrations to differentiate SIRS from sepsis were >2 ng/ml for PCT and >79 mg/l for CRP. Conclusion PCT is able to differentiate between SIRS and sepsis while CRP is not. Moreover, unlike CRP, PCT concentrations varied with the evolution of sepsis. PMID:16326799

  2. Allergic conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the eyes. Take over-the-counter oral antihistamines. These medicines can offer more relief, but they ... a health care provider for treatments such as: Antihistamine or anti-inflammatory drops Mild eye steroid drops ...

  3. Effect of diesel exhaust particles on allergic reactions and airway responsiveness in ovalbumin-sensitized brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Dong, Caroline C; Yin, Xuejun J; Ma, Jane Y C; Millecchia, Lyndell; Wu, Zhong-Xin; Barger, Mark W; Roberts, Jenny R; Antonini, James M; Dey, Richard D; Ma, Joseph K H

    2005-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated that exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) prior to ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization in rats reduced OVA-induced airway inflammation. In the present study, Brown Norway rats were first sensitized to OVA (42.3 +/- 5.7 mg/m3) for 30 min on days 1, 8, and 15, then exposed to filtered air or DEP (22.7 +/- 2.5 mg/m3) for 4 h/day on days 24-28, and challenged with OVA on day 29. Airway responsiveness was examined on day 30, and animals were sacrificed on day 31. Ovalbumin sensitization and challenge resulted in a significant infiltration of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils into the lung, elevated presence of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in lung draining lymph nodes, and increased production of serum OVA-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG. Diesel exhaust particles pre-exposure augmented OVA-induced production of allergen-specific IgE and IgG and pulmonary inflammation characterized by marked increases in T lymphocytes and infiltration of eosinophils after OVA challenge, whereas DEP alone did not have these effects. Although OVA-sensitized rats showed modest response to methacholine challenge, it was the combined DEP and OVA exposure that produced significant airway hyperresponsiveness in this animal model. The effect of DEP pre-exposure on OVA-induced immune responses correlated with an interactive effect of DEP with OVA on increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) by alveolar macrophages (AM) and alveolar type II (ATII) cells, NO levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, the induction of inducible NO synthase expression in AM and ATII cells, and a depletion of total intracellular glutathione (GSH) in AM and lymphocytes. These results show that DEP pre-exposure exacerbates the allergic responses to the subsequent challenge with OVA in OVA-sensitized rats. This DEP effect may be, at least partially, attributed to the elevated generation of ROS in AM and ATII cells, a depletion of GSH in AM and

  4. T cell-derived Act1 is necessary for IL-25-mediated Th2 responses and allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Swaidani, Shadi; Bulek, Katarzyna; Kang, Zizhen; Gulen, Muhammet Fatih; Liu, Caini; Yin, Weiguo; Abbadi, Amina; Aronica, Mark; Li, Xiaoxia

    2011-09-15

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms driven by IL-25 and its cognate receptor IL-17RB necessary for the promotion of Th2-mediating pathogenic pulmonary inflammation remains to be defined. We have previously reported the critical role of the U-box-type E3 ubiquitin ligase Act1 (1) for the downstream signaling of the IL-17 cytokine family including the Th2-promoting cytokine IL-25 (IL-17E) (2). In this study, we report that IL-25-driven but not conventional IL-4-driven Th2 polarization and cytokine production is impaired in Act1-deficient T cells. Also, Act1 deficiency in the T cell compartment results in the abrogation of eosinophilic airway infiltration as well as airway hyperresponsiveness in mouse models of Ag-induced airway inflammation. The in vivo generation of Ag-specific Th2 cytokine-producing cells is defective in the absence of Act1 expression in T cells after OVA/aluminum hydroxide immunization. Notably, the production of OVA-specific IgG(1) but not IgG(2a) or IgE is also impaired. At the molecular level, we report that IL-25-mediated induction of Th2 master regulator GATA-3 and the transcription factor GFI-1 is attenuated in Act1-deficient T cells. Taken together, our findings indicate that Act1 expression in T cells is required for cellular and humoral Th2-mediated allergic responses and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness, in part, through Act1's function in IL-25-induced development of Th2 T cells. PMID:21856933

  5. Effect of Kramecyne on the Inflammatory Response in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Miranda, E.; Lemus-Bautista, J.; Pérez, S.; Pérez-Ramos, J.

    2013-01-01

    Kramecyne is a new peroxide, it was isolated from Krameria cytisoides, methanol extract, and this plant was mostly found in North and South America. This compound showed potent anti-inflammatory activity; however, the mechanisms by which this compound exerts its anti-inflammatory effect are not well understood. In this study, we examined the effects of kramecyne on inflammatory responses in mouse lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced peritoneal macrophages. Our findings indicate that kramecyne inhibits LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin- (IL-) 6. During the inflammatory process, levels of cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2, nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) increased in mouse peritoneal macrophages; however, kramecyne suppressed them significantly. These results provide novel insights into the anti-inflammatory actions and support its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23573152

  6. Foxo1-mediated inflammatory response after cerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenyu; He, Qi; Zhai, Xuan; You, Yan; Li, Lingyu; Hou, Yanghao; He, Faming; Zhao, Yong; Zhao, Jing

    2016-08-26

    The forkhead box O (Foxo) family of transcription factors plays a crucial role in cell apoptosis, immune regulation, and tissue development. Foxo1, as the foremost member of the Foxo family, regulates a wide range of molecular signals in many tissues, including tumor, liver, and brain. This study investigated Foxo1 expression at different time points and in different brain areas, and the role of Foxo1 in vivo in regulating inflammatory injury in a rat model of autologous blood-injected cerebral hemorrhage injury. We found that Foxo1 expression peaked at 12h post-intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and in the ipsilateral corpus striatum. Foxo1 knockdown by Foxo1 siRNA decreased ICH injury, improved neurological function, and decreased the expression of inflammatory factors downstream of the Foxo1 pathway, including TLR4, NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-18. Foxo1 knockdown also decreased the expression and activity of myeloperoxidase, IL-1β, and IL-18. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that Foxo1 is a key regulator of inflammatory injury in rats after ICH. By identifying the molecular mechanisms of Foxo1/TLR4/NF-κB signaling, we provide a novel rationale for therapeutic approaches to managing inflammatory injury after ICH. PMID:27288017

  7. A small molecule, orally active, α4β1/α4β7 dual antagonist reduces leukocyte infiltration and airway hyper-responsiveness in an experimental model of allergic asthma in Brown Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    Cortijo, Julio; Sanz, María-Jesús; Iranzo, Arantxa; Montesinos, José Luis; Nabah, Yafa Naim Abu; Alfón, José; Gómez, Luis A; Merlos, Manuel; Morcillo, Esteban J

    2006-01-01

    α4β1 and α4β7 integrins are preferentially expressed on eosinophils and mononuclear leukocytes and play critical roles in their recruitment to inflammatory sites. We investigated the effects of TR14035, a small molecule, α4β1/α4β7 dual antagonist, in a rat model of allergic asthma. Actively sensitized rats were challenged with aerosol antigen or saline on day 21, and the responses evaluated 24 and 48-h later. TR14035 (3 mg kg−1, p.o.) was given 1-h before and 4-h after antigen or saline challenge. Airway hyper-responsiveness to intravenous 5-hydroxytryptamine was suppressed in TR14035-treated rats. Eosinophil, mononuclear cell and neutrophil counts, and eosinophil peroxidase and protein content in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were decreased in TR14035-treated rats. Histological study showed a marked reduction of lung inflammatory lesions by TR14035. At 24-h postchallenge, antigen-induced lung interleukin (IL)-5 mRNA upregulation was suppressed in TR14035-treated rats. By contrast, IL-4 levels in BALF were not significantly affected by TR14035 treatment. IL-4 selectively upregulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), which is the main endothelial ligand of α4 integrins. Intravital microscopy within the rat mesenteric microcirculation showed that 24-h exposure to 1 μg per rat of IL-4 induced a significant increase in leukocyte rolling flux, adhesion and emigration. These responses were decreased by 48, 100 and 99%, respectively in animals treated with TR14035. In conclusion, TR14035, by acting on α4β1 and α4β7 integrins, is an orally active inhibitor of airway leukocyte recruitment and hyper-responsiveness in animal models with potential interest for the treatment of asthma. PMID:16432509

  8. Discovery of isoquinolinone indole acetic acids as antagonists of chemoattractant receptor homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells (CRTH2) for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Kaila, Neelu; Follows, Bruce; Leung, Louis; Thomason, Jennifer; Huang, Adrian; Moretto, Alessandro; Janz, Kristin; Lowe, Michael; Mansour, Tarek S; Hubeau, Cedric; Page, Karen; Morgan, Paul; Fish, Susan; Xu, Xin; Williams, Cara; Saiah, Eddine

    2014-02-27

    Previously we reported the discovery of CRA-898 (1), a diazine indole acetic acid containing CRTH2 antagonist. This compound had good in vitro and in vivo potency, low rates of metabolism, moderate permeability, and good oral bioavailability in rodents. However, it showed low oral exposure in nonrodent safety species (dogs and monkeys). In the current paper, we wish to report our efforts to understand and improve the poor PK in nonrodents and development of a new isoquinolinone subseries that led to identification of a new development candidate, CRA-680 (44). This compound was efficacious in both a house dust mouse model of allergic lung inflammation (40 mg/kg qd) as well as a guinea pig allergen challenge model of lung inflammation (20 mg/kg bid). PMID:24512187

  9. Peanut proteins in periodate specific anion sensing: An ensuing reduction in allergic response.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Sumanta Kumar; Sen, Souvik; Majumdar, Dipanwita; Singha, Achintya; Sen, Kamalika

    2016-04-15

    Peanut proteins conarachin II, conarachin I and arachin were found to behave as highly selective fluorescence sensors for periodate amongst a set of different anions. The interactions of the proteins with periodate were also confirmed by other spectral methods and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results indicate a selective interaction of peanut proteins with periodate amongst chloride, sulphate, iodide, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, bromide, fluoride, persulphate, acetate, thiosulphate, arsenite, arsenate, sulphite, and iodide. Periodate sensing using different synthesized organic molecules are already reported in the literature. In this article we report the efficiency of peanut proteins as anion sensor which are bioactive and inexpensive too. The protein periodate interactions have also resulted in a simultaneous reduction in allergenicity of the peanut proteins. A change in the secondary structure of the protein was found responsible for this change which was further established with the help of circular dichroism and Raman spectroscopy. PMID:26675870

  10. The anti-inflammatory effects of methylsulfonylmethane on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Hee; Kim, Dae Hwan; Lim, Hwan; Baek, Doo-Yeon; Shin, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Jin-Kyung

    2009-04-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), also known as dimethyl sulfone and methyl sulfone, is an organic sulfur-containing compound that occurs naturally in a variety of fruits, vegetables, grains, and animals, including humans. In the present study, we demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of MSM in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages, RAW264.7 cells. MSM significantly inhibited the release of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E(2) by alleviating the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, the levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were decreased by MSM treatment in cell culture supernatants. Further study indicated that the translocation of the p65 subunit of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB to the nucleus was inhibited by MSM treatment in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, in which it helped block degradation of inhibitor of NF-kappaB. In addition, in vivo studies demonstrated that topical administration of MSM at 500-1250 microg/ear resulted in similar inhibitory activities in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-induced mouse ear edema. Collectively, theses results indicate that MSM inhibits LPS-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators in murine macrophages through downregulation of NF-kappaB signaling. PMID:19336900

  11. Individuals with increased inflammatory response to ozone demonstrate muted signaling of immune cell trafficking pathways

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background Exposure to ozone activates innate immune function and causes neutrophilic (PMN) airway inflammation that in some individuals is robustly elevated. The interplay between immunoinflammatory function and genomic signaling in those with heightened inflammatory responsive...

  12. Endothelial Inflammatory Transcriptional Responses to an Altered Plasma Exposome Following Inhalation of Diesel Emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND:Air pollution, especially emissions derived from traffic sources, is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, it remains unclear how inhaled factors drive extrapulmonary pathology.OBJECTIVES:Previously, we found that canonical inflammatory response tra...

  13. ANTIOXIDANT SUPPLEMENTATION AND NASAL INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES AMONG YOUNG ASTHMATICS EXPOSED TO HIGH LEVELS OF OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Recent studies examining the inflammatory response in atopic asthma to ozone suggest a release of soluble mediators of inflammation factors that might be related to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Antioxidant could prove useful in subjects exposed to additional oxidati...

  14. Sequence of Tissue Responses in the Early Stages of Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis (EAE): Immunohistochemical, Light Microscopic, and Ultrastructural Observations in the Spinal Cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DAmelio, Fernando E.; Smith, Marion E.; Eng, Lawrence F.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in adult Lewis rats with purified guinea pig CNS myelin and Freund's adjuvant. As soon as the very earliest clinical signs appeared the animals were perfused with fixatives and the spinal cord analyzed by electron microscopy, silver methods, and immunocytochemistry. Our findings suggest that in the early stages of EAE a sequence of events can be traced, although these events frequently overlap. The earliest morphological change appears to be astrocytic edema in both the cell body and processes. Increased amounts of glycogen particles and dispersion of glial filaments are prominent. These changes seem to occur just prior to the time when inflammatory cells begin to penetrate the capillary walls. Invasion of the neuropil mainly by macrophages and lymphocytes closely follows. Both macrophages and microglia seem to participate in phagocytosis of oligodendrocytes and myelin. Demyelination, however, is not a prominent feature at this early stage.

  15. Epithelial Cell Regulation of Allergic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Gour, Naina; Lajoie, Stephane

    2016-09-01

    Allergic diseases, which have escalated in prevalence in recent years, arise as a result of maladaptive immune responses to ubiquitous environmental stimuli. Why only certain individuals mount inappropriate type 2 immune responses to these otherwise harmless allergens has remained an unanswered question. Mounting evidence suggests that the epithelium, by sensing its environment, is the central regulator of allergic diseases. Once considered to be a passive barrier to allergens, epithelial cells at mucosal surfaces are now considered to be the cornerstone of the allergic diathesis. Beyond their function as maintaining barrier at mucosal surfaces, mucosal epithelial cells through the secretion of mediators like IL-25, IL-33, and TSLP control the fate of downstream allergic immune responses. In this review, we will discuss the advances in recent years regarding the process of allergen recognition and secretion of soluble mediators by epithelial cells that shape the development of the allergic response. PMID:27534656

  16. TIMING OF DIESEL PARTICLE INSTILLATION AND MAGNITUDE OF DOSE INFLUENCE THE SEVERITY OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS RESPONSES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particulates (DEP) arising from the combustion of diesel fuel exacerbates asthma. Several studies have shown that particulate and allergen co-exposure leads to an exacerbation of the hallmark features of allergic airways disease relative to allergen exp...

  17. Comparison of the Allergic Responses Induced by PeniciIlium chrysogenum and House Dust Mite Extracts in a Mouse Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    A report by the Institute of Medicine suggested that more research is needed to better understand mold effects on allergic disease, particularly asthma development. We compared the ability of the fungal Penicillium chrysogenum (PCE) and house dust mite (HDM) extracts to induce al...

  18. Surfactant and allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Carla; Hohlfeld, Jens M

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of unique proteins and lipids that covers the airway lumen. Surfactant prevents alveolar collapse and maintains airway patency by reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Furthermore, it provides a defence against antigen uptake by binding foreign particles and enhancing cellular immune responses. Allergic asthma is associated with chronic airway inflammation and presents with episodes of airway narrowing. The pulmonary inflammation and bronchoconstriction can be triggered by exposure to allergens or pathogens present in the inhaled air. Pulmonary surfactant has the potential to interact with various immune cells which orchestrate allergen- or pathogen-driven episodes of airway inflammation. The complex nature of surfactant allows multiple sites of interaction, but also makes it susceptible to external alterations, which potentially impair its function. This duality of modulating airway physiology and immunology during inflammatory conditions, while at the same time being prone to alterations accompanied by restricted function, has stimulated numerous studies in recent decades, which are reviewed in this article. PMID:23896983

  19. Allergic mechanisms of Eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Leung, John; Beukema, Koen Robert; Shen, Alice Hangzhou

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is characterized by oesophageal dysfunction and oesophageal eosinophilia refractory to proton-pump-inhibitor treatment. EoE is a food allergy, as elimination of food trigger(s) abrogates the disease, while trigger reintroduction causes recurrence. The allergic mechanism of EoE involves both IgE and non-IgE processes. There is a break in oral tolerance, the immune mechanism allowing enteric exposure to food and micro-organisms without causing deleterious immune responses. Changes in life-style, alterations in gut flora and use of antibiotics may be increasing disease prevalence. Mouse models of EoE and human studies revealed the role of regulatory T-cells and iNKT-cells in the pathogenesis. Th2-cytokines like IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13, and other cytokines like TGFβ and TSLP are involved, but perhaps no one cytokine is critically important for driving the disease. Control of EoE may require a pharmaceutical approach that blocks more than one target in the Th2-inflammatory pathway. PMID:26552770

  20. Novel T-cell epitopes on Schistosoma japonicum SjP40 protein and their preventive effect on allergic asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiling; Hu, Lizhi; Yang, Jing; Yang, Liang; Gao, Fei; Lu, Ping; Fan, Mengyu; Zhu, Yunjuan; Liu, Junyan; Chen, Lingling; Gupta, Shimpy; Yang, Xi; Liu, Peimei

    2016-05-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease mediated by Th2 cell immune responses. Currently, immunotherapies based on immune deviation are attractive, preventive, and therapeutic strategies for asthma. Many studies have shown that intracellular bacterial infections such as mycobacteria and their components can suppress asthmatic reactions by enhancing Th1 responses, while helminth infections and their proteins can inhibit allergic asthma via immune regulation. However, some helminth proteins such as SmP40, the major egg antigen of Schistosoma mansoni, are found as Th1 type antigens. Using a panel of overlapping peptides, we identified T-cell epitopes on SjP40 protein of Schistosoma japonicum, which can induce Th1 cytokine and inhibit the production of Th2 cytokines and airway inflammation in a mouse model of allergic asthma. These results reveal a novel form of immune protective mechanism, which may play an important role in the modulating effect of helminth infection on allergic asthmatic reactions. PMID:26840774

  1. Cells from Degenerative Intervertebral Discs Demonstrate Unfavorable Responses to Mechanical and Inflammatory Stimuli: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Coelho, J. Paulo; Vo, Nam V.; Pacek, Corey; Westrick, Edward; Kang, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mechanical forces and inflammatory signaling influence intervertebral disc matrix homeostasis. We hypothesized that annulus fibrosus cells from degenerative discs would have altered responses to mechanical and inflammatory stimuli compared with cells isolated from normal discs. Design Annulus fibrosus cells were isolated from New Zealand White rabbits with normal and magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed degenerative discs created by annular stab. Cells were cultured with and without inflammatory and mechanical stimuli (tensile strain). After 4 or 24 hrs, the mRNA expression of inflammatory, catabolic, and anabolic genes was measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Baseline gene expression differences were noted between cells from normal and degenerative discs. Degenerative cells demonstrated a more proinflammatory response profile to inflammatory and mechanical stimuli and loss of the beneficial effects of mechanical signaling. Decreased expression of catabolic and anabolic genes was observed in degenerative cells under conditions of inflammatory and mechanical stimuli. Conclusions These data demonstrate that degenerative cells have a decreased capacity to respond positively to beneficial levels of mechanical strain and demonstrate an exaggerated response to an inflammatory stimulus. This may, in part, help to explain differential responses to motion-based therapies in patients with intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:22760106

  2. Basophils and allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Siracusa, Mark C; Kim, Brian S; Spergel, Jonathan M; Artis, David

    2013-10-01

    Basophils were discovered by Paul Ehrlich in 1879 and represent the least abundant granulocyte population in mammals. The relative rarity of basophils and their phenotypic similarities with mast cells resulted in this cell lineage being historically overlooked, both clinically and experimentally. However, recent studies in human subjects and murine systems have shown that basophils perform nonredundant effector functions and significantly contribute to the development and progression of TH2 cytokine-mediated inflammation. Although the potential functions of murine and human basophils have provoked some controversy, recent genetic approaches indicate that basophils can migrate into lymphoid tissues and, in some circumstances, cooperate with other immune cells to promote optimal TH2 cytokine responses in vivo. This article provides a brief historical perspective on basophil-related research and discusses recent studies that have identified previously unappreciated molecules and pathways that regulate basophil development, activation, and function in the context of allergic inflammation. Furthermore, we highlight the unique effector functions of basophils and discuss their contributions to the development and pathogenesis of allergic inflammation in human disease. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting basophils in preventing or alleviating the development and progression of allergic inflammation. PMID:24075190

  3. Sleep deprivation attenuates inflammatory responses and ischemic cell death.

    PubMed

    Weil, Zachary M; Norman, Greg J; Karelina, Kate; Morris, John S; Barker, Jacqueline M; Su, Alan J; Walton, James C; Bohinc, Steven; Nelson, Randy J; DeVries, A Courtney

    2009-07-01

    Although the biological function of sleep remains uncertain, the consequences of sleep deprivation are well-described and are reported to be detrimental to cognitive function and affective well-being. Sleep deprivation also is strongly associated with elevated risk factors for cardiovascular disease. We used a mouse model of cardiac arrest/cardiopulmonary resuscitation to test the hypothesis that acute sleep deprivation would exacerbate neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration after global ischemia. The resulting data led to a rejection of our hypothesis that sleep deprivation is necessarily detrimental. Indeed, acute sleep deprivation (ASD) was associated with a reduction in ischemia-induced interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta) gene expression and attenuation of neuronal damage in the hippocampus. Further, sleep deprivation increased gene expression of two anti-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and IL-10 that are associated with improved ischemic outcome. To determine whether the anti-inflammatory properties of ASD were specific to ischemia, mice were treated systemically with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a potent inflammogen. Acute sleep deprivation attenuated the central and peripheral increase in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and increased IL-10 expression. Together, the ischemia and LPS data suggest that, ASD produces an anti-inflammatory bias that could be exploited to improve medical procedures that are compromised by inflammation. PMID:19409382

  4. 5-Aminolevulinic acid regulates the inflammatory response and alloimmune reaction.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Masayuki; Nishio, Yoshiaki; Ito, Hidenori; Tanaka, Tohru; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2016-08-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is a naturally occurring amino acid and precursor of heme and protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). Exogenously administrated 5-ALA increases the accumulation of PpIX in tumor cells specifically due to the compromised metabolism of 5-ALA to heme in mitochondria. PpIX emits red fluorescence by the irradiation of blue light and the formation of reactive oxygen species and singlet oxygen. Thus, performing a photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) using 5-ALA have given rise to a new strategy for tumor diagnosis and therapy. In addition to the field of tumor therapy, 5-ALA has been implicated in the treatment of inflammatory disease, autoimmune disease and transplantation due to the anti-inflammation and immunoregulation properties that are elicited with the expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1, an inducible enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the oxidative degradation of heme to free iron, biliverdin and carbon monoxide (CO), in combination with sodium ferrous citrate (SFC), because an inhibitor of HO-1 abolishes the effects of 5-ALA. Furthermore, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and heme are involved in the HO-1 expression. Biliverdin and CO are also known to have anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory functions. We herein review the current use of 5-ALA in inflammatory diseases, transplantation medicine, and tumor therapy. PMID:26643355

  5. Improved detection of allergen-specific T-cell responses in allergic contact dermatitis through the addition of 'cytokine cocktails'.

    PubMed

    Moed, Helen; von Blomberg, Mary; Bruynzeel, Derk P; Scheper, Rik; Gibbs, Susan; Rustemeyer, Thomas

    2005-08-01

    The gold standard for the diagnosis of allergic hypersensitivity is skin patch testing with the suspected allergens. This diagnostic tool, however, has distinct disadvantages, and therefore the development of alternative or complementary in vitro tests is of great importance. In this study, we evaluate the applicability of an in vitro test method, as developed earlier for nickel allergy, to detect allergen-specific T cells in the blood of patients allergic to frequent sensitizers (chromate, cobalt, paraphenylenediamine, fragrances and chloromethyl-isothiazolinone). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of allergic patients and healthy controls were cultured in the absence or presence of allergen. Additionally, type 1 (IL-7 and IL-12) or type 2 (IL-7 and IL-4) stimulating cytokines were added; after 6-day proliferation, IFN-gamma and IL-5 secretions were determined. Without the addition of cytokines, consistent allergen-induced proliferation was observed in PBMCs of nickel-allergic patients only. By contrast, the addition of type 1 or type 2 stimulating cytokines resulted in a significantly enhanced allergen-specific proliferation for all allergens tested (sensitivity increased from 26 to 43% or 38%, respectively, P < 0.05). In these cultures, allergen-induced IFN-gamma and IL-5 secretion was also significantly increased, compared to healthy controls (P < 0.05, for IFN-gamma sensitivity 79%, specificity 93%; for IL-5 sensitivity 74%, specificity 81%). In conclusion, these results demonstrate an increased proliferative capacity and cytokine production by allergen-specific T cells from allergic patients, but not of healthy individuals upon stimulation with allergens in combination with type 1 or 2 skewing cytokines. The present data warrant further exploration of the application of this test to a broader set of allergens. PMID:16026586

  6. Outdoor air pollution in urban areas and allergic respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G

    1999-12-01

    Respiratory allergic diseases (rhinitis, rhinosinusitis, bronchial asthma and its equivalents) appear to be increasing in most countries, and subjects living in urban and industrialized areas are more likely to experience respiratory allergic symptoms than those living in rural areas. This increase has been linked, among various factors, to air pollution, which is now an important public health hazard. Laboratory studies confirm the epidemiological evidence that inhalation of some pollutants, either individually or in combination, adversely affect lung function in asthmatics. The most abundant air pollutants in urban areas with high levels of vehicle traffic are respirable particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide and ozone. While nitrogen dioxide does not exert consistent effects on lung function, ozone, respirable particulate matter and allergens impair lung function and lead to increased airway responsiveness and bronchial obstruction in predisposed subjects. However, besides acting as irritants, airborne pollutants can modulate the allergenicity of antigens carried by airborne particles. By attaching to the surface of pollen grains and of plant-derived paucimicronic particles, pollutants can modify the morphology of these antigen-carrying agents and after their allergenic potential. In addition, by inducing airway inflammation, which increases airway epithelial permeability, pollutants overcome the mucosal barrier and so facilitate the allergen-induced inflammatory responses. Moreover, air pollutants such as diesel exhaust emissions are thought to modulate the immune response by increasing immunoglobulin E synthesis, thus facilitating allergic sensitization in atopic subjects and the subsequent development of clinical respiratory symptoms. PMID:10695313

  7. Salicylic acid derivatives as potential anti asthmatic agents using disease responsive drug delivery system for prophylactic therapy of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Raju, Kalidhindi Rama Satyanarayana; Ambhore, Nilesh S; Mulukutla, Shashank; Gupta, Saurabh; Murthy, Vishakantha; Kumar, M N Kiran; Madhunapantula, Subba Rao V; Kuppuswamy, Gowthamarajan; Elango, Kannan

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a multi-factorial and complicated lung disorder of the immune system which has expanded to a wider ambit unveiling its etiology to be omnipresent at both ends of the spectrum involving basic pharmacology and in-depth immunology. As asthma occurs through triggered activation of various immune cells due to different stimuli, it poses a great challenge to uncover specific targets for therapeutic interventions. Recent pharmacotherapeutic approaches for asthma have been focused on molecular targeting of transcription factors and their signaling pathways; mainly nucleus factor kappa B (NFκB) and its associated pathways which orchestrate the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, GM-CSF), chemokines (RANTES, MIP-1a, eotaxin), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1) and inflammatory enzymes (cyclooxygenase-2 and iNOS). 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) and sodium salicylate are known to suppress NFκB activation by inhibiting inhibitor of kappa B kinase (IKκB). In order to target the transcription factor, a suitable carrier system for delivering the drug to the intracellular space is essential. 5-ASA and sodium salicylate loaded liposomes incorporated into PEG-4-acrylate and CCRGGC microgels (a polymer formed by crosslinking of trypsin sensitive peptide and PEG-4-acrylate) could probably suit the needs for developing a disease responsive drug delivery system which will serve as a prophylactic therapy for asthmatic patients. PMID:26643666

  8. Attenuating the Systemic Inflammatory Response to Adult Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Critical Review of the Evidence Base

    PubMed Central

    Landis, R. Clive; Brown, Jeremiah R.; Fitzgerald, David; Likosky, Donald S.; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Baker, Robert A.; Hammon, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: A wide range of pharmacological, surgical, and mechanical pump approaches have been studied to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass, yet no systematically based review exists to cover the scope of anti-inflammatory interventions deployed. We therefore conducted an evidence-based review to capture “self-identified” anti-inflammatory interventions among adult cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. To be included, trials had to measure at least one inflammatory mediator and one clinical outcome, specified in the “Outcomes 2010” consensus statement. Ninety-eight papers satisfied inclusion criteria and formed the basis of the review. The review identified 33 different interventions and approaches to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response. However, only a minority of papers (35 of 98 [35.7%]) demonstrated any clinical improvement to one or more of the predefined outcome measures (most frequently myocardial protection or length of intensive care unit stay). No single intervention was supported by strong level A evidence (multiple randomized controlled trials [RCTs] or meta-analysis) for clinical benefit. Interventions at level A evidence included off-pump surgery, minimized circuits, biocompatible circuit coatings, leukocyte filtration, complement C5 inhibition, preoperative aspirin, and corticosteroid prophylaxis. Interventions at level B evidence (single RCT) for minimizing inflammation included nitric oxide donors, C1 esterase inhibition, neutrophil elastase inhibition, propofol, propionyl-L-carnitine, and intensive insulin therapy. A secondary analysis revealed that suppression of at least one inflammatory marker was necessary but not sufficient to confer clinical benefit. The most effective interventions were those that targeted multiple inflammatory pathways. These observations are consistent with a “multiple hit” hypothesis, whereby clinically effective suppression of the systemic inflammatory response

  9. Attenuating the Systemic Inflammatory Response to Adult Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Critical Review of the Evidence Base.

    PubMed

    Landis, R Clive; Brown, Jeremiah R; Fitzgerald, David; Likosky, Donald S; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Baker, Robert A; Hammon, John W

    2014-09-01

    A wide range of pharmacological, surgical, and mechanical pump approaches have been studied to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass, yet no systematically based review exists to cover the scope of anti-inflammatory interventions deployed. We therefore conducted an evidence-based review to capture "self-identified" anti-inflammatory interventions among adult cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. To be included, trials had to measure at least one inflammatory mediator and one clinical outcome, specified in the "Outcomes 2010" consensus statement. Ninety-eight papers satisfied inclusion criteria and formed the basis of the review. The review identified 33 different interventions and approaches to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response. However, only a minority of papers (35 of 98 [35.7%]) demonstrated any clinical improvement to one or more of the predefined outcome measures (most frequently myocardial protection or length of intensive care unit stay). No single intervention was supported by strong level A evidence (multiple randomized controlled trials [RCTs] or meta-analysis) for clinical benefit. Interventions at level A evidence included off-pump surgery, minimized circuits, biocompatible circuit coatings, leukocyte filtration, complement C5 inhibition, preoperative aspirin, and corticosteroid prophylaxis. Interventions at level B evidence (single RCT) for minimizing inflammation included nitric oxide donors, C1 esterase inhibition, neutrophil elastase inhibition, propofol, propionyl-L-carnitine, and intensive insulin therapy. A secondary analysis revealed that suppression of at least one inflammatory marker was necessary but not sufficient to confer clinical benefit. The most effective interventions were those that targeted multiple inflammatory pathways. These observations are consistent with a "multiple hit" hypothesis, whereby clinically effective suppression of the systemic inflammatory response requires hitting multiple

  10. Role of virulence factors on host inflammatory response induced by diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Villamil, Javier; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens are able to breach the intestinal barrier, and different bacterial species can display different abilities to colonize hosts and induce inflammation. Inflammatory response studies induced by enteropathogens as Escherichia coli are interesting since it has acquired diverse genetic mobile elements, leading to different E. coli pathotypes. Diarrheagenic E. coli secrete toxins, effectors and virulence factors that exploit the host cell functions to facilitate the bacterial colonization. Many bacterial proteins are delivered to the host cell for subverting the inflammatory response. Hereby, we have highlighted the specific processes used by E. coli pathotypes, by that subvert the inflammatory pathways. These mechanisms include an arrangement of pro- and anti-inflammatory responses to favor the appropriate environmental niche for the bacterial survival and growth. PMID:26059623

  11. Role of T-helper type 2 cytokines in down-modulation of fas mRNA and receptor on the surface of activated CD4(+) T cells: molecular basis for the persistence of the allergic immune response.

    PubMed

    Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Fizzotti, M; Bassotti, G; Russano, A; Droetto, S; Bistoni, O; Grignani, F; Bertotto, A

    1998-12-01

    The mechanisms responsible for persistence of T lymphocytes at the sites of allergic inflammation are not completely understood. Activated T cells, usually expressing Fas on their surface, undergo activation-induced apoptotic death, thus limiting the dangerous consequences of a persistent immune reaction. We have previously shown that pulmonary T lymphocytes from untreated asthmatic subjects do not express surface Fas receptors nor do they contain Fas mRNA, yet they display normal levels of Fas ligand. This is not an inherited defect and is confined to mucosal T cells. To gain insights into the mechanism responsible for these findings, we performed a set of experiments with both purified Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus allergen and recombinant human cytokines: interleukin 2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-5, transforming growth factor beta1, interferon gamma, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). In vitro exposure of purified CD4(+) lymphocytes to allergen yielded only transient up-regulation of surface Fas but did not influence susceptibility to Fas-mediated cell death. T-helper type 2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and GM-CSF) had a dose-dependent and specific inhibitory effect on Fas mRNA, suggesting a new fundamental biological role in the survival of inflammatory cells during allergen exposure. PMID:9837865

  12. Anti-IgE treatment, airway inflammation and remodelling in severe allergic asthma: current knowledge and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Samitas, Konstantinos; Delimpoura, Vasiliki; Zervas, Eleftherios; Gaga, Mina

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is a disorder of the airways involving various inflammatory cells and mediators and characterised by bronchial hyperresponsiveness, chronic inflammation and structural alterations in the airways, also known as remodelling. IgE is an important mediator of allergic reactions and has a central role in allergic asthma pathophysiology, as it is implicated in both the early and late phase allergic response. Moreover, clinical and mechanistic evidence has lately emerged, implicating IgE in the development of airway remodelling. The use of monoclonal antibodies targeting IgE, such as omalizumab, has proven very effective in improving respiratory symptoms and quality of life, while reducing asthma exacerbations, emergency room visits and the use of systemic corticosteroids in allergic severe asthma. These effects are believed to be mainly mediated by omalizumab's inhibitory effect on the initiation and further propagation of the allergic inflammation cascade. However, there is evidence to suggest that anti-IgE treatment remains effective long after it has been discontinued. In part, these findings could be attributed to the possible ameliorating effects of anti-IgE treatment on airway remodelling. In this review, we discuss recent findings supporting the notion that anti-IgE treatment modulates the complex immune responses that manifest clinically as asthma and ameliorates airway remodelling changes often observed in allergic severe asthma phenotypes. PMID:26621973

  13. Nutrition before and during Surgery and the Inflammatory Response of the Heart: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Marlieke; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Kok, Wouter E. M.; Cocchieri, Riccardo; Wisselink, Willem; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Major surgery induces a long fasting time and provokes an inflammatory response which increases the risk of infections. Nutrition given before and during surgery can avoid fasting and has been shown to increase the arginine/asymmetric dimetlhylarginine ratio, a marker of nitric oxide availability, in cardiac tissue and increased concentrations of branched chain amino acids in blood plasma. However, the effect of this new nutritional strategy on organ inflammatory response is unknown. Therefore, we studied the effect of nutrition before and during cardiac surgery on myocardial inflammatory response. In this trial, 32 patients were randomised between enteral, parenteral, and no nutrition supplementation (control) from 2 days before, during, up to 2 days after coronary artery bypass grafting. Both solutions included proteins or amino acids, glucose, vitamins, and minerals. Myocardial atrial tissue was sampled before and after revascularization and was analysed immunohistochemically, subdivided into cardiomyocytic, fatty, and fibrotic areas. Inflammatory cells, especially leukocytes, were present in cardiac tissue in all study groups. No significant differences were found in the myocardial inflammatory response between the enteral, parenteral, and control groups. In conclusion, nutrition given before and during surgery neither stimulates nor diminishes the myocardial inflammatory response in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The trial was registered in Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2183. PMID:26294967

  14. JAK2/STAT3 pathway mediating inflammatory responses in heatstroke-induced rats.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhen; Cheng, Ming; Wang, Shu-Cai; Lv, Wei; Hu, Huai-Qiang; Li, Chuan-Fen; Cao, Bing-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Heatstroke not only directly induces cell injury, but also causes large amounts of inflammatory mediators release and cells with extensive biological activities to induce a systemic inflammatory response and immune dysfunction. This study aimed to observe the effects of JAK2 inhibitor AG490 on the brain injury and inflammatory responses of rats with systemic heatstroke. Under the light microscope, the hippocampus tissues of rat with heatstroke were edema and apoptotic rate was increased. Up-regulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and down-regulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were also found after heatstroke in rats, which compared with that of the control group. Heatstroke induced inflammation factors secretions and up-regulated levels of matrix metallopeptidase 2 and 9 (MMP2 and MMP-9) and systemic inflammatory response molecules including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), tumor necrosis factor-beta 1 (TNF-β1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). However, the JAK2 inhibitor AG490 was significantly attenuated the brain injury and inflammatory responses induced by heatstroke in rats. The survival time of heatstroke rats showed that AG490 notably lived longer than heatstroke rats without AG490 treatment. These findings suggest that AG490 may prevent the occurrence of heatstroke via inhibiting the JAK2/STAT3 pathway and the systemic inflammatory responses. PMID:26261556

  15. JAK2/STAT3 pathway mediating inflammatory responses in heatstroke-induced rats

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Zhen; Cheng, Ming; Wang, Shu-Cai; Lv, Wei; Hu, Huai-Qiang; Li, Chuan-Fen; Cao, Bing-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Heatstroke not only directly induces cell injury, but also causes large amounts of inflammatory mediators release and cells with extensive biological activities to induce a systemic inflammatory response and immune dysfunction. This study aimed to observe the effects of JAK2 inhibitor AG490 on the brain injury and inflammatory responses of rats with systemic heatstroke. Under the light microscope, the hippocampus tissues of rat with heatstroke were edema and apoptotic rate was increased. Up-regulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and down-regulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were also found after heatstroke in rats, which compared with that of the control group. Heatstroke induced inflammation factors secretions and up-regulated levels of matrix metallopeptidase 2 and 9 (MMP2 and MMP-9) and systemic inflammatory response molecules including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), tumor necrosis factor-beta 1 (TNF-β1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). However, the JAK2 inhibitor AG490 was significantly attenuated the brain injury and inflammatory responses induced by heatstroke in rats. The survival time of heatstroke rats showed that AG490 notably lived longer than heatstroke rats without AG490 treatment. These findings suggest that AG490 may prevent the occurrence of heatstroke via inhibiting the JAK2/STAT3 pathway and the systemic inflammatory responses. PMID:26261556

  16. Functional Food Targeting the Regulation of Obesity-Induced Inflammatory Responses and Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Shizuka; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Lin, Shan; Uemura, Taku; Yu, Rina; Kawada, Teruo

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a low-grade systemic chronic inflammatory state, characterized by the abnormal production of pro- and anti-inflammatory adipocytokines. It has been found that immune cells such as macrophages can infiltrate adipose tissue and are responsible for the majority of inflammatory cytokine production. Obesity-induced inflammation is considered a potential mechanism linking obesity to its related pathologies, such as insulin resistance, cardiovascular diseases, type-2 diabetes, and some immune disorders. Therefore, targeting obesity-related inflammatory components may be a useful strategy to prevent or ameliorate the development of such obesity-related diseases. It has been shown that several food components can modulate inflammatory responses in adipose tissue via various mechanisms, some of which are dependent on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), whereas others are independent on PPARγ, by attenuating signals of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and/or c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK). In this review, we introduce the beneficial effects of anti-inflammatory phytochemicals that can help prevent obesity-induced inflammatory responses and pathologies. PMID:20508825

  17. Characterization of Inflammatory Response in Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure and Relationship with Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Cristina; Solà, Elsa; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Fernàndez, Guerau; Huelin, Patricia; Graupera, Isabel; Moreira, Rebeca; de Prada, Gloria; Ariza, Xavier; Pose, Elisa; Fabrellas, Núria; Kalko, Susana G.; Jiménez, Wladimiro; Ginès, Pere

    2016-01-01

    ACLF is characterized by a systemic inflammatory response, but the cytokines involved in this process have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to characterize the systemic inflammatory response in patients with cirrhosis and ACLF and its relationship with prognosis. Fifty-five patients with cirrhosis, 26 with ACLF, were studied prospectively. Systemic inflammatory response was analyzed by measuring a large array of plasma cytokines by using a multiplex kit. A principal component analysis show noticeable differences between ACLF and decompensated cirrhosis without ACLF. Patients with ACLF had significant abnormal levels of 12 cytokines compared to those without ACLF, including: VCAM-1, VEGF-A, Fractalkine, MIP-1α, Eotaxin, IP-10, RANTES, GM-CSF, IL-1β, IL-2, ICAM-1, and MCP-1. Cytokines showing the most marked relationship with ACLF were VCAM-1 and VEGF-A (AUCROC 0.77; p = 0.001). There was a significant relationship between some of inflammatory mediators and 3-month mortality, particularly VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and GM-CSF (AUCROC>0.7; p < 0.05). Functional Enrichment Analysis showed that inflammatory markers differentially expressed in ACLF patients were enriched in leukocyte migration, particularly monocytes and macrophages, and chemotaxis pathways. In conclusion, ACLF is characterized by a marked inflammatory reaction with activation of mediators of adhesion and migration of leukocytes. The intensity of the inflammatory reaction correlates with prognosis. PMID:27578545

  18. Characterization of Inflammatory Response in Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure and Relationship with Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Solé, Cristina; Solà, Elsa; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Fernàndez, Guerau; Huelin, Patricia; Graupera, Isabel; Moreira, Rebeca; de Prada, Gloria; Ariza, Xavier; Pose, Elisa; Fabrellas, Núria; Kalko, Susana G; Jiménez, Wladimiro; Ginès, Pere

    2016-01-01

    ACLF is characterized by a systemic inflammatory response, but the cytokines involved in this process have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to characterize the systemic inflammatory response in patients with cirrhosis and ACLF and its relationship with prognosis. Fifty-five patients with cirrhosis, 26 with ACLF, were studied prospectively. Systemic inflammatory response was analyzed by measuring a large array of plasma cytokines by using a multiplex kit. A principal component analysis show noticeable differences between ACLF and decompensated cirrhosis without ACLF. Patients with ACLF had significant abnormal levels of 12 cytokines compared to those without ACLF, including: VCAM-1, VEGF-A, Fractalkine, MIP-1α, Eotaxin, IP-10, RANTES, GM-CSF, IL-1β, IL-2, ICAM-1, and MCP-1. Cytokines showing the most marked relationship with ACLF were VCAM-1 and VEGF-A (AUCROC 0.77; p = 0.001). There was a significant relationship between some of inflammatory mediators and 3-month mortality, particularly VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and GM-CSF (AUCROC>0.7; p < 0.05). Functional Enrichment Analysis showed that inflammatory markers differentially expressed in ACLF patients were enriched in leukocyte migration, particularly monocytes and macrophages, and chemotaxis pathways. In conclusion, ACLF is characterized by a marked inflammatory reaction with activation of mediators of adhesion and migration of leukocytes. The intensity of the inflammatory reaction correlates with prognosis. PMID:27578545

  19. Different airway inflammatory responses in asthmatic and healthy humans exposed to diesel.

    PubMed

    Stenfors, N; Nordenhäll, C; Salvi, S S; Mudway, I; Söderberg, M; Blomberg, A; Helleday, R; Levin, J O; Holgate, S T; Kelly, F J; Frew, A J; Sandström, T

    2004-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution adversely affects the airways, with asthmatic subjects thought to be especially sensitive. The authors hypothesised that exposure to diesel exhaust (DE), a major source of PM, would induce airway neutrophilia in healthy subjects, and that either these responses would be exaggerated in subjects with mild allergic asthma, or DE would exacerbate pre-existent allergic airways. Healthy and mild asthmatic subjects were exposed for 2 h to ambient levels of DE (particles with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of 10 microm (PM10) 108 microg x m(-3)) and lung function and airway inflammation were assessed. Both groups showed an increase in airway resistance of similar magnitude after DE exposure. Healthy subjects developed airway inflammation 6 h after DE exposure, with airways neutrophilia and lymphocytosis together with an increase in interleukin-8 (IL-8) protein in lavage fluid, increased IL-8 messenger ribonucleic acid expression in the bronchial mucosa and upregulation of the endothelial adhesion molecules. In asthmatic subjects, DE exposure did not induce a neutrophilic response or exacerbate their pre-existing eosinophilic airway inflammation. Epithelial staining for the cytokine IL-10 was increased after DE in the asthmatic group. Differential effects on the airways of healthy subjects and asthmatics of particles with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of 10 microm at concentrations below current World Health Organisation air quality standards have been observed in this study. Further work is required to elucidate the significance of these differential responses. PMID:14738236

  20. Listening to mozart reduces allergic skin wheal responses and in vitro allergen-specific IgE production in atopic dermatitis patients with latex allergy.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Hajime

    2003-01-01

    In atopic dermatitis patients with latex allergy, listening to Mozart reduced skin wheal responses induced by latex, but not by histamine, whereas listening to Beethoven failed to produce similar results. Listening to Mozart also decreased in vitro total IgE and latex-specific IgE production with concomitant skewing of the cytokine pattern toward the Th1 type, that is, an increase in Th1 cytokine production and decrease in Th2 cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells, whereas listening to Beethoven failed to do so. These results suggest that therapy using specific types of music may be an effective treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:14977243

  1. Eosinophilic Inflammation in Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Possa, Samantha S.; Leick, Edna A.; Prado, Carla M.; Martins, Mílton A.; Tibério, Iolanda F. L. C.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils are circulating granulocytes involved in pathogenesis of asthma. A cascade of processes directed by Th2 cytokine producing T-cells influence the recruitment of eosinophils into the lungs. Furthermore, multiple elements including interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, chemoattractants such as eotaxin, Clara cells, and CC chemokine receptor (CCR)3 are already directly involved in recruiting eosinophils to the lung during allergic inflammation. Once recruited, eosinophils participate in the modulation of immune response, induction of airway hyperresponsiveness and remodeling, characteristic features of asthma. Various types of promising treatments for reducing asthmatic response are related to reduction in eosinophil counts both in human and experimental models of pulmonary allergic inflammation, showing that the recruitment of these cells really plays an important role in the pathophysiology of allergic diseases such asthma. PMID:23616768

  2. Gangliosides trigger inflammatory responses via TLR4 in brain glia.

    PubMed

    Jou, Ilo; Lee, Jee Hoon; Park, Soo Young; Yoon, Hee Jung; Joe, Eun-Hye; Park, Eun Jung

    2006-05-01

    Gangliosides participate in various cellular events of the central nervous system and have been closely implicated in many neuronal diseases. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the pathological activity of gangliosides are poorly understood. Here we report that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) may mediate the ganglioside-triggered inflammation in glia, brain resident immune cells. Gangliosides rapidly altered the cell surface expression of TLR4 in microglia and astrocytes within 3 hours. Using TLR4-specific siRNA and a dominant-negative TLR4 gene, we clearly demonstrate the functional importance of TLR4 in ganglioside-triggered activation of glia. Inhibition of TLR4 expression by TLR4-siRNA suppressed nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB-binding activity, NF-kappaB-dependent luciferase activity, and transcription of inflammatory cytokines after exposure to gangliosides. Transient transfection of dominant-negative TLR4 also attenuated NF-kappaB-binding activity and interleukin-6 promoter activity. In contrast, these activities were slightly elevated in cells with wild-type TLR4. In addition, CD14 was required for ganglioside-triggered activation of glia, and lipid raft formation may be associated with ganglioside-stimulated signal propagation. Taken together, these results suggest that TLR4 may provide an explanation for the pathological ability of gangliosides to cause inflammatory conditions in the brain. PMID:16651628

  3. Malarial Pigment Hemozoin and the Innate Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Martin; Van Den Ham, Kristin; Shio, Marina Tiemi; Kassa, Fikregabrail Aberra; Fougeray, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a deadly infectious disease caused by the intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite Plasmodium. The four species of Plasmodium known to affect humans all produce an inorganic crystal called hemozoin (HZ) during the heme detoxification process. HZ is released from the food vacuole into circulation during erythrocyte lysis, while the released parasites further infect additional naive red blood cells. Once in circulation, HZ is rapidly taken up by circulating monocytes and tissue macrophages, inducing the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Over the last few years, it has been reported that HZ, similar to uric acid crystals, asbestos, and silica, is able to trigger IL-1β production via the activation of the NOD-like receptor containing pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome complex. Additionally, recent findings have shown that host factors, such as fibrinogen, have the ability to adhere to free HZ and modify its capacity to activate host immune cells. Although much has been discovered regarding NLRP3 inflammasome induction, the mechanism through which this intracellular multimolecular complex is activated remains unclear. In the present review, the most recent discoveries regarding the capacity of HZ to trigger this innate immune complex as well as the impact of HZ on several other inflammatory signaling pathways will be discussed. PMID:24550911

  4. Fatty acid-binding protein 5 limits the anti-inflammatory response in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sherri M; Holt, Vivian V; Malpass, Lillie R; Hines, Ian N; Wheeler, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    The beginning stages of liver damage induced by various etiologies (i.e. high fat diet, alcohol consumption, toxin exposure) are characterized by abnormal accumulation of lipid in liver. Alterations in intracellular lipid transport, storage, and metabolism accompanied by cellular insult within the liver play an important role in the pathogenesis of liver disease, often involving a sustained inflammatory response. The intracellular lipid transporter, fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5), is highly expressed in macrophages and may play an important role in the hepatic inflammatory response after endotoxin exposure in mice. This study tested the hypothesis that FABP5 regulates macrophage response to LPS in male C57bl/6 (wild type) and FABP5 knockout mice, both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with LPS revealed that loss of FABP5 enhances the number of hepatic F4/80(+) macrophages in the liver despite limited liver injury. Conversely, FABP5 knock out mice display higher mRNA levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10, arginase, YM-1, and Fizz-1 in liver compared to wild type mice. Bone marrow derived macrophages stimulated with inflammatory (LPS and IFN-γ) or anti-inflammatory (IL-4) mediators also showed significantly higher expression of anti-inflammatory/regulatory factors. These findings reveal a regulatory role of FABP5 in the acute inflammatory response to LPS-induced liver injury, which is consistent with the principle finding that FABP5 is a regulator of macrophage phenotype. Specifically, these findings demonstrate that loss of FABP5 promotes a more anti-inflammatory response. PMID:26105806

  5. INHIBITION OF PAN NEUROTROPHIN RECEPTOR P75 ATTENUATES DIESEL PARTICULATE-INDUCED ENHANCEMENT OF ALLERGIC AIRWAY RESPONSES IN C57/BL6J MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent investigations have linked neurotrophins including nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to allergic airways diseases. Antibody blockade of NGF attenuates airway resistance in allergic mice. Diesel exhaust particle...

  6. Obesity and inflammatory arthritis: impact on occurrence, disease characteristics and therapeutic response

    PubMed Central

    Daïen, Claire I; Sellam, Jérémie

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing worldwide and now reach about one-third of the world's population. Obesity also involves patients with inflammatory arthritis. Knowing the impact of obesity on rheumatic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis) is thus an important issue. This article first reviews the epidemiological and clinical data available on obesity in inflammatory rheumatic diseases, that is, its impact on incident disease, disease characteristics and the therapeutic response. The second part of this review gives an overview of the factors potentially involved in the specifics of inflammatory arthritis in patients with obesity, such as limitations in the clinical assessment, diet, microbiota and adipokines. PMID:26509048

  7. Hyaluronan fragments as mediators of inflammation in allergic pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sumit; Hoselton, Scott A; Dorsam, Glenn P; Schuh, Jane M

    2015-05-01

    Asthma is frequently caused and/or exacerbated by sensitization to allergens, which are ubiquitous in many indoor and outdoor environments. Severe asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and bronchial constriction in response to an inhaled allergen, leading to a disease course that is often very difficult to treat with standard asthma therapies. As a result of interactions among inflammatory cells, structural cells, and the intercellular matrix of the allergic lung, patients with sensitization to allergens may experience a greater degree of tissue injury followed by airway wall remodeling and progressive, accumulated pulmonary dysfunction as part of the disease sequela. In addition, turnover of extracellular matrix (ECM) components is a hallmark of tissue injury and repair. This review focuses on the role of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA), a component of the ECM, in pulmonary injury and repair with an emphasis on allergic asthma. Both the synthesis and degradation of the ECM are critical contributors to tissue repair and remodeling. Fragmented HA accumulates during tissue injury and functions in ways distinct from the larger native polymer. There is gathering evidence that HA degradation products are active participants in stimulating the expression of inflammatory genes in a variety of immune cells at the injury site. In this review, we will consider recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms that are associated with HA accumulation and inflammatory cell recruitment in the asthmatic lung. PMID:25582403

  8. Hyaluronan fragments as mediators of inflammation in allergic pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sumit; Hoselton, Scott A.; Dorsam, Glenn P.; Schuh, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is frequently caused and/or exacerbated by sensitization to allergens, which are ubiquitous in many indoor and outdoor environments. Severe asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and bronchial constriction in response to an inhaled allergen, leading to a disease course that is often very difficult to treat with standard asthma therapies. As a result of interactions among inflammatory cells, structural cells, and the intercellular matrix of the allergic lung, patients with sensitization to allergens may experience a greater degree of tissue injury followed by airway wall remodeling and progressive, accumulated pulmonary dysfunction as part of the disease sequela. In addition, turnover of extracellular matrix (ECM) components is a hallmark of tissue injury and repair. This review focuses on the role of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA), a component of the ECM, in pulmonary injury and repair with an emphasis on allergic asthma. Both the synthesis and degradation of the ECM are critical contributors to tissue repair and remodeling. Fragmented HA accumulates during tissue injury and functions in ways distinct from the larger native polymer. There is gathering evidence that HA degradation products are active participants in stimulating the expression of inflammatory genes in a variety of immune cells at the injury site. In this review, we will consider recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms that are associated with HA accumulation and inflammatory cell recruitment in the asthmatic lung. PMID:25582403

  9. The effects of levan on the acute inflammatory response.

    PubMed Central

    Sedgwick, A. D.; Rutman, A.; Sin, Y. M.; Mackay, A. R.; Willoughby, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The fructose polymer levan has been shown to affect the accumulation of leucocytes in inflammatory lesions. The present study has investigated the effect of levan on experimental pleurisy induced by carrageenan and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals. Total pleural polymorphonuclear leucocyte counts and exudate volumes were significantly reduced by levan treatment. We were, however, unable to detect any effect on mononuclear cell numbers. Furthermore, levan treatment significantly reduced peripheral leucocyte numbers. The counter-irritant activity of levan was compared with that of a known counter-irritant, dextran. The ability of levan to reduce pleural polymorph numbers and exudate volume could not be accounted for totally by counter-irritation. Studies using an in-vitro leucocyte adhesion assay system indicate that levan affects leucocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium. PMID:6201184

  10. Inflammatory response and neuronal necrosis in rats with cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lingfeng; Zhang, Kunnan; Hu, Guozhu; Yan, Haiyu; Xie, Chen; Wu, Xiaomu

    2014-01-01

    In the middle cerebral artery occlusion model of ischemic injury, inflammation primarily occurs in the infarct and peripheral zones. In the ischemic zone, neurons undergo necrosis and apoptosis, and a large number of reactive microglia are present. In the present study, we investigated the pathological changes in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion. Neuronal necrosis appeared 12 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion, and the peak of neuronal apoptosis appeared 4 to 6 days after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Inflammatory cytokines and microglia play a role in damage and repair after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Serum intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 levels were positively correlated with the permeability of the blood-brain barrier. These findings indicate that intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 may be involved in blood-brain barrier injury, microglial activation, and neuronal apoptosis. Inhibiting blood-brain barrier leakage may alleviate neuronal injury following ischemia. PMID:25422636

  11. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiangtao; Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  12. Glucocorticoid-Induced Attenuation of the Inflammatory Response in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chatzopoulou, Antonia; Heijmans, Jeroen P M; Burgerhout, Erik; Oskam, Nienke; Spaink, Herman P; Meijer, Annemarie H; Schaaf, Marcel J M

    2016-07-01

    Glucocorticoids are steroid hormones that are secreted upon stress. Their effects are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor, which acts as a transcription factor. Because the antiinflammatory activity of glucocorticoids has been well established, they are widely used clinically to treat many inflammatory and immune-related diseases. However, the exact specificity, mechanisms, and level of regulation of different inflammatory pathways have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, a tail fin amputation assay was used in 3-day-old zebrafish larvae to study the immunomodulatory effects of the synthetic glucocorticoid beclomethasone. First, a transcriptome analysis was performed, which showed that upon amputation mainly immune-related genes are regulated. This regulation was inhibited by beclomethasone for 86% of regulated genes. For two immune-related genes, tlr4bb and alox5ap, the amputation-induced increase was not attenuated by beclomethasone. Alox5ap is involved in eicosanoid biosynthesis, but the increase in leukotriene B4 concentration upon amputation was abolished, and lipoxin A4 levels were unaffected by beclomethasone. Furthermore, we studied the migration of neutrophils and macrophages toward the wound site. Our results show that amputation induced migration of both types of leukocytes and that this migration was dependent on de novo protein synthesis. Beclomethasone treatment attenuated the migratory behavior of neutrophils in a glucocorticoid receptor-dependent manner but left the migration of macrophages unaffected. In conclusion, beclomethasone has a dramatic inhibitory effect on the amputation-induced proinflammatory gene regulation, and this is reflected in an inhibition of the neutrophil migration but not the migration of macrophages, which are likely to be involved in inflammation resolution. PMID:27219276

  13. The Laminin Response in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Protection or Malignancy?

    PubMed Central

    Spenlé, Caroline; Lefebvre, Olivier; Lacroute, Joël; Méchine-Neuville, Agnès; Barreau, Frédérick; Blottière, Hervé M.; Duclos, Bernard; Arnold, Christiane; Hussenet, Thomas; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Gullberg, Donald; Kedinger, Michèle; Sorokin, Lydia; Orend, Gertraud; Simon-Assmann, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Laminins (LM), basement membrane molecules and mediators of epithelial-stromal communication, are crucial in tissue homeostasis. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) are multifactorial pathologies where the microenvironment and in particular LM play an important yet poorly understood role in tissue maintenance, and in cancer progression which represents an inherent risk of IBD. Here we showed first that in human IBD colonic samples and in murine colitis the LMα1 and LMα5 chains are specifically and ectopically overexpressed with a concomitant nuclear p53 accumulation. Linked to this observation, we provided a mechanism showing that p53 induces LMα1 expression at the promoter level by ChIP analysis and this was confirmed by knockdown in cell transfection experiments. To mimic the human disease, we induced colitis and colitis-associated cancer by chemical treatment (DSS) combined or not with a carcinogen (AOM) in transgenic mice overexpressing LMα1 or LMα5 specifically in the intestine. We demonstrated that high LMα1 or LMα5 expression decreased susceptibility towards experimentally DSS-induced colon inflammation as assessed by histological scoring and decrease of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Yet in a pro-oncogenic context, we showed that LM would favor tumorigenesis as revealed by enhanced tumor lesion formation in both LM transgenic mice. Altogether, our results showed that nuclear p53 and associated overexpression of LMα1 and LMα5 protect tissue from inflammation. But in a mutation setting, the same LM molecules favor progression of IBD into colitis-associated cancer. Our transgenic mice represent attractive new models to acquire knowledge about the paradoxical effect of LM that mediate either tissue reparation or cancer according to the microenvironment. In the early phases of IBD, reinforcing basement membrane stability/organization could be a promising therapeutic approach. PMID:25347196

  14. Dual oxidase regulates neutrophil recruitment in allergic airways.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sandra; Linderholm, Angela; Franzi, Lisa; Kenyon, Nicholas; Grasberger, Helmut; Harper, Richart

    2013-12-01

    Enhanced reactive oxygen species production in allergic airways is well described and correlates with increased airway contractions, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell metaplasia, and mucus hypersecretion. There is also an abundance of interleukin-4/interleukin-13 (IL-4/IL-13)- or interleukin-5-secreting cells that are thought to be central to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. We postulated that the dual oxidases (DUOX1 and DUOX2), members of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase family that release hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the respiratory tract, are critical proteins in the pathogenesis of allergic airways. DUOX activity is regulated by cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-13, and DUOX-mediated H2O2 influences several important features of allergic asthma: mucin production, IL-8 secretion, and wound healing. The objective of this study was to establish the contribution of DUOXs to the development of allergic asthma in a murine model. To accomplish this goal, we utilized a DUOXA-deficient mouse model (Duoxa(-/-)) that lacked maturation factors for both DUOX1 and DUOX2. Our results are the first to demonstrate evidence of DUOX protein and DUOX functional activity in murine airway epithelium. We also demonstrate that DUOXA maturation factors are required for airway-specific H2O2 production and localization of DUOX to cilia of fully differentiated airway epithelial cells. We compared wild-type and Duoxa(-/-) mice in an ovalbumin exposure model to determine the role of DUOX in allergic asthma. In comparison to DUOX-intact mice, Duoxa(-/-) mice had reduced mucous cell metaplasia and lower levels of TH2 cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, increased airway resistance in response to methacholine was observed in Duoxa(+/+) mice, as expected, but was absent in Duoxa(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, Duoxa(-/-) mice had decreased influx of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue sections associated with a lower level of the

  15. Dual Oxidase Regulates Neutrophil Recruitment in Allergic Airways

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sandra; Linderholm, Angela; Franzi, Lisa; Kenyon, Nicholas; Grasberger, Helmut; Harper, Richart

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced reactive oxygen species production in allergic airways is well described, and correlates with increased airway contractions, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell metaplasia, and mucus hypersecretion. There is also an abundance of interleukin-4/interleukin-13 (IL-4/IL-13) or interleukin-5-secreting cells that are thought to be central to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. We postulated that dual oxidases (DUOX1 and DUOX2), members of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase family that release hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the respiratory tract, are critical proteins in the pathogenesis of allergic airways. DUOX activity is regulated by cytokines including IL-4 and IL-13, and DUOX-mediated H2O2 influences several important features of allergic asthma: mucin production, IL-8 secretion, and wound healing. The objective of this study was to establish the contribution of DUOX to the development of allergic asthma in a murine model. To accomplish this goal, we utilized a DUOXA-deficient mouse model (Duoxa−/−) that lacked maturation factors for both DUOX1 and DUOX2. Our results are the first to demonstrate evidence of DUOX protein and DUOX functional activity in murine airway epithelium. We also demonstrate that DUOXA maturation factors are required for airway-specific H2O2 production and localization of DUOX to cilia of fully differentiated airway epithelial cells. We compared wild-type and Duoxa−/− mice in an ovalbumin exposure model to determine the role of DUOX in allergic asthma. In comparison to DUOX-intact mice, Duoxa−/− mice had reduced mucous cell metaplasia, and lower levels of TH2 cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, increased airway resistance in response to methacholine was observed in Duoxa+/+ mice as expected, but was absent in Duoxa−/− mice. Surprisingly, Duoxa−/− mice had decreased influx of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue sections associated with a lower level of

  16. Sexual dimorphism of stress response and immune/ inflammatory reaction: the corticotropin releasing hormone perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakopoulos, Nicholas V.

    1995-01-01

    This review higlghts key aspects of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) biology of potential relevance to the sexual dimorphism of the stress response and immune/inflammatory reaction, and introduces two important new concepts based on the regulatory potential of the human (h) CRH gene: (1) a proposed mechanism to account for the tissue-specific antithetical responses of hCRH gene expression to glucocorticolds, that may also explain the frequently observed antithetical effects of chronic glucocorticoid administration in clinical practice and (2) a heuristic diagram to illustrate the proposed modulation of the stress response and immune/ inflammatory reaction by steroid hormones, from the perspective of the CRH system. PMID:18475634

  17. The Biochemical Origin of Pain: The origin of all Pain is Inflammation and the Inflammatory Response. PART 2 of 3 –Inflammatory Profile of Pain Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Every pain syndrome has an inflammatory profile consisting of the inflammatory mediators that are present in the pain syndrome. The inflammatory profile may have variations from one person to another and may have variations in the same person at different times. The key to treatment of Pain Syndromes is an understanding of their inflammatory profile. Pain syndromes may be treated medically or surgically. The goal should be inhibition or suppression of production of the inflammatory mediators and inhibition, suppression or modulation of neuronal afferent and efferent (motor) transmission. A successful outcome is one that results in less inflammation and thus less pain. We hereby describe the inflammatory profile for several pain syndromes including arthritis, back pain, neck pain, fibromyalgia, interstitial cystitis, migraine, neuropathic pain, complex regional pain syndrome / reflex sympathetic dystrophy (CRPS/RSD), bursitis, shoulder pain and vulvodynia. These profiles are derived from basic science and clinical research performed in the past by numerous investigators and will be updated in the future by new technologies such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Our unifying theory or law of pain states: The origin of all pain is inflammation and the inflammatory response. The biochemical mediators of inflammation include cytokines, neuropeptides, growth factors and neurotransmitters. Irrespective of the type of pain whether it is acute or chronic pain, peripheral or central pain, nociceptive or neuropathic pain, the underlying origin is inflammation and the inflammatory response. Activation of pain receptors, transmission and modulation of pain signals, neuro plasticity and central sensitization are all one continuum of inflammation and the inflammatory response. Irrespective of the characteristic of the pain, whether it is sharp, dull, aching, burning, stabbing, numbing or tingling, all pain arise from inflammation and the inflammatory response. We are proposing

  18. Role of inflammatory cytokines in the response of solid cancers to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Sun, Jinghai; Cecic, Ivana; Dougherty, Graeme J.

    2001-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) elicits a strong acute inflammatory response that has both local and systemic (acute phase response) attributes. The insult mediated by PDT-induced oxidative stress at the targeted site triggers a complex multifactorial response engaging host defence mechanisms associated with the inflammatory process to participate in the eradication of the treated tumor. Inflammatory cytokines are important mediators of critical events in this process as they regulate the activity of inflammatory, endothelial and other cells. The initial stimulus for enhanced production and release of cytokines likely originates from several types of events, such as activated transcription factors and complement deposition. The PDT-induced complement activation appears to be directly linked to the enhanced expression of various cytokines, including chemokines such as KC (in mouse models), and classic inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α , IL-6 and IL-10. A variety of interventions that modulate the activity of particular cytokines performed in conjunction with PDT were shown to influence the therapy outcome. The treatments such as using blocking antibodies and local or systemic cytokine delivery may either reduce or dramatically improve the curative effect of PDT. The inflammatory and related cytokines that at present appear particularly interesting and merit further investigation for use as adjuvants to PDT are IL-3, IL-8, IL-15, TNF-α, IFN-γ, G-CSF and GM-CSF.

  19. Maternal sleep deprivation inhibits hippocampal neurogenesis associated with inflammatory response in young offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiuying; Peng, Cheng; Wu, Xiaohui; Chen, Yubo; Wang, Cheng; You, Zili

    2014-08-01

    Although sleep complaints are very common among pregnant women, the potential adverse effects of sleep disturbance on the offspring are not well studied. Growing evidence suggests that maternal stress can induce an inflammatory environment on the fetal development. But people are not sure about the consequences of prenatal stress such as the inflammatory responses induced by maternal sleep deprivation (MSD). In the present study, we investigated the effects of MSD on long-term behavioral and cognitive consequences in offspring and its underlying inflammatory response pathway. The pregnant Wistar rats received prolonged sleep deprivation (72h) on gestational day (GD) 4, 9, and 18, respectively. The post-natal day (PND) 21 offspring showed impaired hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory in the Morris Water Maze task and anhedonia in sucrose preference experiment. Quantification of BrdU(+) and DCX(+) cells revealed a significant decrease in hippocampus neurogenesis in prepuberty offspring, especially for the late MSD (GD 18) group. Real-time RT-PCR showed that after MSD, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα) increased in the hippocampus of offspring on PND 1, 7, 14 and 21, whereas anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 reduced at the same time. Immunofluorescence found that the cells of activated microglia were higher in the brains of MSD offspring. Taken together, these results suggested that the MSD-induced inflammatory response is an important factor for neurogenesis impairment and neurobehavioral outcomes in prepuberty offspring. PMID:24769004

  20. Effect of a chemical chaperone, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, on HDM-induced allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Siddesha, Jalahalli M; Nakada, Emily M; Mihavics, Bethany R; Hoffman, Sidra M; Rattu, Gurkiranjit K; Chamberlain, Nicolas; Cahoon, Jonathon M; Lahue, Karolyn G; Daphtary, Nirav; Aliyeva, Minara; Chapman, David G; Desai, Dhimant H; Poynter, Matthew E; Anathy, Vikas

    2016-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced unfolded protein response plays a critical role in inflammatory diseases, including allergic airway disease. However, the benefits of inhibiting ER stress in the treatment of allergic airway disease are not well known. Herein, we tested the therapeutic potential of a chemical chaperone, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), in combating allergic asthma, using a mouse model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic airway disease. TUDCA was administered during the HDM-challenge phase (preventive regimen), after the HDM-challenge phase (therapeutic regimen), or therapeutically during a subsequent HDM rechallenge (rechallenge regimen). In the preventive regimen, TUDCA significantly decreased HDM-induced inflammation, markers of ER stress, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and fibrosis. Similarly, in the therapeutic regimen, TUDCA administration efficiently decreased HDM-induced airway inflammation, mucus metaplasia, ER stress markers, and AHR, but not airway remodeling. Interestingly, TUDCA administered therapeutically in the HDM rechallenge regimen markedly attenuated HDM-induced airway inflammation, mucus metaplasia, ER stress markers, methacholine-induced AHR, and airway fibrotic remodeling. These results indicate that the inhibition of ER stress in the lungs through the administration of chemical chaperones could be a valuable strategy in the treatment of allergic airway diseases. PMID:27154200

  1. Anti-Allergic Effect of Oroxylin A from Oroxylum indicum Using in vivo and in vitro Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ae-Yeon; Kang, Saeromi; Park, Soo-Jin; Huang, Jin; Im, Dong-Soon

    2016-01-01

    Oroxylum indicum has long been used in Asian traditional medicine to prevent and treat respiratory diseases, diabetes, diarrhea and other conditions. Oroxylin A is a flavone that is present in Oroxylum indicum and in Scutellaria baicalensis. Because the root extracts of both plants have been shown to have anti-allergic effects, the authors investigated whether oroxylin A is likely to have beneficial effects on allergic asthma using female Balb/c mice and rat RBL-2H3 mast cells. Antigen-induced degranulation was measured in vitro by measuring β-hexosaminidase activity. A murine ovalbumin-induced allergic asthma model was used to test the in vivo efficacy of oroxylin A. Sensitization and challenge of ovalbumin induced allergic asthma responses, the accumulations of eosinophils and Th2 cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissues. Oroxylin A administration decreased numbers of inflammatory cells, especially eosinophils, and reduced the expression and secretion of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-13, in lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Histologic studies showed oroxylin A reduced inflammatory signs and mucin production in lungs. These findings provide evidence that oroxylin A has potential use as an anti-allergic therapeutic. PMID:27133260

  2. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Madera, Laurence; Greenshields, Anna; Coombs, Melanie R. Power; Hoskin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and CCL2 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) while production of interleukin-10 remained unchanged. The increased LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was transient and correlated with enhanced cytokine production in response to other Toll-like receptor agonists, including peptidoglycan and flagellin. In addition, 4T1-conditioned BMDMs exhibited strengthened LPS-induced nitric oxide production and enhanced phagocytosis of Escherichia coli. 4T1-mediated augmentation of macrophage responses to LPS was partially dependent on the NFκB pathway, macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and actin polymerization, as well as the presence of 4T1-secreted extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages obtained from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice displayed enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to LPS. These results suggest that uptake of 4T1-secreted factors and actin-mediated ingestion of 4T1-secreted exosomes by macrophages cause a transient enhancement of innate inflammatory responses. Mammary carcinoma-mediated regulation of innate immunity may have significant implications for our understanding of host defense and cancer progression. PMID:26177198

  3. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Madera, Laurence; Greenshields, Anna; Coombs, Melanie R Power; Hoskin, David W

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and CCL2 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) while production of interleukin-10 remained unchanged. The increased LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was transient and correlated with enhanced cytokine production in response to other Toll-like receptor agonists, including peptidoglycan and flagellin. In addition, 4T1-conditioned BMDMs exhibited strengthened LPS-induced nitric oxide production and enhanced phagocytosis of Escherichia coli. 4T1-mediated augmentation of macrophage responses to LPS was partially dependent on the NFκB pathway, macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and actin polymerization, as well as the presence of 4T1-secreted extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages obtained from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice displayed enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to LPS. These results suggest that uptake of 4T1-secreted factors and actin-mediated ingestion of 4T1-secreted exosomes by macrophages cause a transient enhancement of innate inflammatory responses. Mammary carcinoma-mediated regulation of innate immunity may have significant implications for our understanding of host defense and cancer progression. PMID:26177198

  4. The S1P/S1PR2 axis regulates early airway T cell infiltration in murine mast cell-dependent acute allergic responses

    PubMed Central

    Oskeritzian, Carole A.; Hait, Nitai C.; Wedman, Piper; Chumanevich, Alena; Kolawole, Elizabeth M.; Price, Megan M.; Falanga, Yves T.; Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil B.; Ryan, John J.; Milstien, Sheldon; Sabbadini, Roger; Spiegel, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Background Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid produced by mast cells (MC) upon cross-linking of their high affinity receptors for IgE by antigen (Ag) that can amplify MC responses by binding to its S1P receptors. Acute MC-dependent allergic reaction can lead to systemic shock but the early events of its development in lung tissues have not been investigated, and S1P functions in the onset of allergic processes remain to be examined. Objective We used a highly specific neutralizing anti-S1P antibody (mAb) and an S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2) antagonist, JTE-013, to study S1P and S1PR2 signaling contributions to MC- and IgE-dependent airway allergic responses in mice within minutes after Ag challenge. Methods Allergic reaction was triggered by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of Ag in sensitized mice pre-treated i.p. with anti-S1P or isotype control mAb, or JTE-013 or vehicle prior to Ag challenge. Results Kinetics experiments revealed early pulmonary infiltration of mostly T cells around blood vessels of sensitized mice 20 minutes post-Ag exposure. Pre-treatment with anti-S1P mAb inhibited in vitro MC activation, as well as in vivo development of airway infiltration and MC activation, reducing serum levels of histamine, cytokines and the chemokines MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3 and RANTES/CCL5. S1PR2 antagonism or deficiency, or MC deficiency recapitulated these results. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated MC S1PR2 dependency for chemokine release and the necessity for signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) activation. Conclusion Activation of S1PR2 by S1P and downstream Stat3 signaling in MC regulate early T cell recruitment to antigen-challenged lungs by chemokine production. PMID:25512083

  5. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction can be provoked by skin contact with poison plants, chemicals and animal scratches, as well as by ... dust, nuts and shellfish, may also cause allergic reaction. Medications such as penicillin and other antibiotics are ...

  6. Mucosal production of uric acid by airway epithelial cells contributes to particulate matter-induced allergic sensitization.

    PubMed

    Gold, M J; Hiebert, P R; Park, H Y; Stefanowicz, D; Le, A; Starkey, M R; Deane, A; Brown, A C; Liu, G; Horvat, J C; Ibrahim, Z A; Sukkar, M B; Hansbro, P M; Carlsten, C; VanEeden, S; Sin, D D; McNagny, K M; Knight, D A; Hirota, J A

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM), a major component of air pollution, contributes to increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. PM induces innate immune responses and contributes to allergic sensitization, although the mechanisms governing this process remain unclear. Lung mucosal uric acid has also been linked to allergic sensitization. The links among PM exposure, uric acid, and allergic sensitization remain unexplored. We therefore investigated the mechanisms behind PM-induced allergic sensitization in the context of lung mucosal uric acid. PM10 and house dust mite exposure selectively induced lung mucosal uric acid production and secretion in vivo, which did not occur with other challenges (lipopolysaccharide, virus, bacteria, or inflammatory/fibrotic stimuli). PM10-induced uric acid mediates allergic sensitization and augments antigen-specific T-cell proliferation, which is inhibited by uricase. We then demonstrate that human airway epithelial cells secrete uric acid basally and after stimulation through a previously unidentified mucosal secretion system. Our work discovers a previously unknown mechanism of air pollution-induced, uric acid-mediated, allergic sensitization that may be important in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:26509876

  7. Inflammatory Response Influences Treatment of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Allin, N; Cruz-Almeida, Y; Velsko, I; Vovk, A; Hovemcamp, N; Harrison, P; Huang, H; Aukhil, I; Wallet, S M; Shaddox, L M

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported a systemic hyperinflammatory response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in children with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP). Additionally, different levels of this response were observed within the LAP group. It is unknown whether this hyperinflammatory response influences the clinical response to periodontal treatment in these children. Therefore, the goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of LPS responsiveness present prior to treatment on the clinical response to treatment within the LAP cohort. Prior to treatment, peripheral blood was collected from 60 African American participants aged 5 to 21 y, free of systemic diseases, and diagnosed with LAP. Blood was stimulated with ultrapure LPS from Escherichia coli, and Luminex assays were performed to quantify 14 cytokine/chemokine levels. Principal component and cluster analyses were used to find patterns of cytokine/chemokine expression among participants and subdivide them into clusters. Three distinct clusters emerged among LAP participants: a high responder group (high level of response for INFg, IL6, and IL12p40), a mixed responder group (low for some and high for other cytokines/chemokines), and a low responder group (low overall cytokine/chemokine response). Periodontal clinical parameters were compared among these groups prior to and 3, 6, and 12 mo following treatment with mechanical debridement and systemic antibiotics. High responders presented the lowest reductions in clinical parameters after treatment, whereas the low responders presented the highest reductions. In our LAP participants, distinct patterns of LPS response were significantly predictive of changes in clinical parameters after treatment. Future studies are needed to evaluate the underlying mechanisms predicting the heterogeneity of LAP activity, severity, and response to treatment (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01330719). PMID:26917438

  8. Orally-Induced Intestinal CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg Controlled Undesired Responses towards Oral Antigens and Effectively Dampened Food Allergic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Smaldini, Paola Lorena; Orsini Delgado, María Lucía; Fossati, Carlos Alberto; Docena, Guillermo Horacio

    2015-01-01

    The induction of peripheral tolerance may constitute a disease-modifying treatment for allergic patients. We studied how oral immunotherapy (OIT) with milk proteins controlled allergy in sensitized mice (cholera toxin plus milk proteins) upon exposure to the allergen. Symptoms were alleviated, skin test was negativized, serum specific IgE and IgG1 were abrogated, a substantial reduction in the secretion of IL-5 and IL-13 by antigen-stimulated spleen cells was observed, while IL-13 gene expression in jejunum was down-regulated, and IL-10 and TGF-β were increased. In addition, we observed an induction of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ cells and IL-10- and TGF-β-producing regulatory T cells in the lamina propria. Finally, transfer experiments confirmed the central role of these cells in tolerance induction. We demonstrated that the oral administration of milk proteins pre- or post-sensitization controlled the Th2-immune response through the elicitation of mucosal IL-10- and TGF-β-producing Tregs that inhibited hypersensitivity symptoms and the allergic response. PMID:26517875

  9. Soluble Mediators in Platelet Concentrates Modulate Dendritic Cell Inflammatory Responses in an Experimental Model of Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Perros, Alexis J; Christensen, Anne-Marie; Flower, Robert L; Dean, Melinda M

    2015-10-01

    The transfusion of platelet concentrates (PCs) is widely used to treat thrombocytopenia and severe trauma. Ex vivo storage of PCs is associated with a storage lesion characterized by partial platelet activation and the release of soluble mediators, such as soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), RANTES, and interleukin (IL)-8. An in vitro whole blood culture transfusion model was employed to assess whether mediators present in PC supernatants (PC-SNs) modulated dendritic cell (DC)-specific inflammatory responses (intracellular staining) and the overall inflammatory response (cytometric bead array). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was included in parallel cultures to model the impact of PC-SNs on cell responses following toll-like receptor-mediated pathogen recognition. The impact of both the PC dose (10%, 25%) and ex vivo storage period was investigated [day 2 (D2), day 5 (D5), day 7 (D7)]. PC-SNs alone had minimal impact on DC-specific inflammatory responses and the overall inflammatory response. However, in the presence of LPS, exposure to PC-SNs resulted in a significant dose-associated suppression of the production of DC IL-12, IL-6, IL-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β and storage-associated suppression of the production of DC IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-8. For the overall inflammatory response, IL-6, TNF-α, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and inflammatory protein (IP)-10 were significantly suppressed and IL-8, IL-10, and IL-1β significantly increased following exposure to PC-SNs in the presence of LPS. These data suggest that soluble mediators present in PCs significantly suppress DC function and modulate the overall inflammatory response, particularly in the presence of an infectious stimulus. Given the central role of DCs in the initiation and regulation of the immune response, these results suggest that modulation of the DC inflammatory profile is a probable mechanism contributing to transfusion-related complications. PMID:26133961

  10. Effect of maternal exposure to ozone on reproductive outcome and immune, inflammatory, and allergic responses in the offspring

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern that exposure to air pollutants during pregnancy affects health outcomes in the offspring due to alterations in the development of immune and other homeostatic processes. To assess the risks of maternal inhalation exposure to ozone (O3), timed pregnant BA...

  11. [Recent advances in allergic rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Liang, Meijun; Xu, Rui; Xu, Geng

    2015-02-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) clinically expressed by sneezing, rhinorrhea, nasal itching and congestion is an allergen-driven mucosal inflammatory disease which is modulated by immunoglobulin E. Epidemiological studies have indicated that prevalence of AR continues to increase, and it has been a worldwide health problem that places a significant healthcare burden on individuals and society. Given the evolving understanding of the process by which an allergen is recognized and the roles of mediators which account for AR progress, the pathogenesis of AR has become clearer. Current studies have demonstrated local allergic rhinitis (LAR) that patients with both sug- gestive symptoms of AR and a negative diagnostic test for atopy may have local allergic inflammation is a prevalent entity in patients evaluated with rhinitis, but further research remains needed. Management of AR includes aller- gen avoidance, pharmacological treatment and allergen-specific immunotherapy. Recently montelukast has exhibited previously undocumented anti-inflammatory properties, leukotriene receptor antagonists therefore may serve a more important role in the treatment of AR. Not only has immunotherapy proved its efficacy, but also been able to alter disease course and thereby mitigate progression to asthma. Thus immunotherapy can be initiated while receiving pharmacotherapy, especially in children with AR. As clinical guidelines, the ARIA (