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Sample records for allergic respiratory disease

  1. Asthma and Respiratory Allergic Disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases such as allergy is complex and poorly understood. The causes of chronic allergic diseases including asthma involve to a large extent, immunomodulation of the adaptive and particularly the innate immune systems and are markedly influen...

  2. Probiotics for allergic respiratory diseases--putting it into perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Meenu; Ranjan Das, Rashmi

    2010-03-01

    Respiratory allergies include allergic rhinitis, sinusitis and asthma. Increasing attention on pathogenesis of allergic airway diseases has given rise to "atopic march" hypothesis i.e. clinical features of atopic eczema occur first and precede the development of asthma and allergic rhinitis. The "hygiene hypothesis" proposes that the increase in allergic diseases reflects a decrease in infections during childhood. Clinical trials also suggest that the exposure to microbes through the gastrointestinal tract powerfully shapes immune function. Probiotics are live organisms which exert a beneficial effect in the prevention as well as treatment of allergic diseases through modification of immune system of host via gut ecosystem. Intestinal microbiota differs in infants who later develop allergic diseases, and feeding probiotics to infants at risk has been shown to reduce their rate of developing eczema. This has prompted studies of feeding probiotics in prevention as well as treatment of respiratory allergy. We hereby discuss the status of probiotics in respiratory allergy. PMID:19725896

  3. Outdoor air pollution in urban areas and allergic respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G

    1999-12-01

    Respiratory allergic diseases (rhinitis, rhinosinusitis, bronchial asthma and its equivalents) appear to be increasing in most countries, and subjects living in urban and industrialized areas are more likely to experience respiratory allergic symptoms than those living in rural areas. This increase has been linked, among various factors, to air pollution, which is now an important public health hazard. Laboratory studies confirm the epidemiological evidence that inhalation of some pollutants, either individually or in combination, adversely affect lung function in asthmatics. The most abundant air pollutants in urban areas with high levels of vehicle traffic are respirable particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide and ozone. While nitrogen dioxide does not exert consistent effects on lung function, ozone, respirable particulate matter and allergens impair lung function and lead to increased airway responsiveness and bronchial obstruction in predisposed subjects. However, besides acting as irritants, airborne pollutants can modulate the allergenicity of antigens carried by airborne particles. By attaching to the surface of pollen grains and of plant-derived paucimicronic particles, pollutants can modify the morphology of these antigen-carrying agents and after their allergenic potential. In addition, by inducing airway inflammation, which increases airway epithelial permeability, pollutants overcome the mucosal barrier and so facilitate the allergen-induced inflammatory responses. Moreover, air pollutants such as diesel exhaust emissions are thought to modulate the immune response by increasing immunoglobulin E synthesis, thus facilitating allergic sensitization in atopic subjects and the subsequent development of clinical respiratory symptoms. PMID:10695313

  4. Socio-epidemiological Aspects of Respiratory Allergic Diseases in Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Taborda-Barata, Luís

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The prevalence of respiratory allergic diseases has been increasing in Southern Africa both in urban and in rural environments. Various factors may contribute toward this situation, namely, exposure to aeroallergens, such as grass pollens and house dust mites. However, other irritant environmental triggers, such as exposure to tobacco smoke and certain indoor and outdoor fumes, may also play a relevant part. Furthermore, certain parasitic and mycobacterial infections may act as allergic disease risk modifiers, although such an influence should be confirmed. Finally, certain cultural and socioeconomic factors may also influence accessibility to healthcare and adherence to treatment of these diseases. PMID:23268464

  5. Appropriateness in allergic respiratory diseases health care in Italy: definitions and organizational aspects.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Carlo; Savi, Eleonora; Costantino, Maria Teresa; Heffler, Enrico; Milanese, Manlio; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Canonica, Giorgio Walter

    2016-01-01

    In a historical period in which sustainability of the National Health Service is mandatory because of the international economical situation, the limited available resources at national level and the tendency of passing from a "population medicine" model towards the concept of "individualized medicine", the debate on appropriateness of medical and surgical procedures is of central importance. The choosing wisely campaign, started in United States in 2012 and then spread all over the world, tries to summarize which are the most inappropriate procedures for each medical and surgical speciality; as far as allergic respiratory diseases, the most relevant Italian societies and the American Academy defined the allergological procedures with the highest probability of inappropriateness. In Italy, a recent decree of the Ministry of Health defined a list of more than 200 procedures that will be considered as inappropriate in certain conditions; many of these procedures concern allergology, including allergic respiratory diseases. In this commentary we discuss the above mentioned decree and the concept of appropriateness in the field of allergic respiratory diseases, trying to figure out some practical considerations based on the current health resources available in the field of allergology in Italy. PMID:27099567

  6. Grass pollen allergens globally: the contribution of subtropical grasses to burden of allergic respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Davies, J M

    2014-06-01

    types of subtropical grass pollens to achieve optimal diagnosis and treatment of patients with allergic respiratory disease in subtropical regions of the world. PMID:24684550

  7. Climate change, air pollution and extreme events leading to increasing prevalence of allergic respiratory diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases has increased dramatically during the past few decades not only in industrialized countries. Urban air pollution from motor vehicles has been indicated as one of the major risk factors responsible for this increase. Although genetic factors are important in the development of asthma and allergic diseases, the rising trend can be explained only in changes occurred in the environment. Despite some differences in the air pollution profile and decreasing trends of some key air pollutants, air quality is an important concern for public health in the cities throughout the world. Due to climate change, air pollution patterns are changing in several urbanized areas of the world, with a significant effect on respiratory health. The observational evidence indicates that recent regional changes in climate, particularly temperature increases, have already affected a diverse set of physical and biological systems in many parts of the world. Associations between thunderstorms and asthma morbidity in pollinosis subjects have been also identified in multiple locations around the world. Allergens patterns are also changing in response to climate change and air pollution can modify the allergenic potential of pollens especially in presence of specific weather conditions. The underlying mechanisms of all these interactions are not well known yet. The consequences on health vary from decreases in lung function to allergic diseases, new onset of diseases, and exacerbation of chronic respiratory diseases. Factor clouding the issue is that laboratory evaluations do not reflect what happens during natural exposition, when atmospheric pollution mixtures in polluted cities are inhaled. In addition, it is important to recall that an individual’s response to pollution exposure depends on the source and components of air pollution, as well as meteorological conditions. Indeed, some air pollution-related incidents with asthma aggravation do not

  8. Climate change, air pollution and extreme events leading to increasing prevalence of allergic respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Gennaro; Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E; Cecchi, Lorenzo; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Nunes, Carlos; Ansotegui, Ignacio; D'Amato, Maria; Liccardi, Gennaro; Sofia, Matteo; Canonica, Walter G

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases has increased dramatically during the past few decades not only in industrialized countries. Urban air pollution from motor vehicles has been indicated as one of the major risk factors responsible for this increase.Although genetic factors are important in the development of asthma and allergic diseases, the rising trend can be explained only in changes occurred in the environment. Despite some differences in the air pollution profile and decreasing trends of some key air pollutants, air quality is an important concern for public health in the cities throughout the world.Due to climate change, air pollution patterns are changing in several urbanized areas of the world, with a significant effect on respiratory health.The observational evidence indicates that recent regional changes in climate, particularly temperature increases, have already affected a diverse set of physical and biological systems in many parts of the world. Associations between thunderstorms and asthma morbidity in pollinosis subjects have been also identified in multiple locations around the world.Allergens patterns are also changing in response to climate change and air pollution can modify the allergenic potential of pollens especially in presence of specific weather conditions.The underlying mechanisms of all these interactions are not well known yet. The consequences on health vary from decreases in lung function to allergic diseases, new onset of diseases, and exacerbation of chronic respiratory diseases.Factor clouding the issue is that laboratory evaluations do not reflect what happens during natural exposition, when atmospheric pollution mixtures in polluted cities are inhaled. In addition, it is important to recall that an individual's response to pollution exposure depends on the source and components of air pollution, as well as meteorological conditions. Indeed, some air pollution-related incidents with asthma aggravation do not depend

  9. Respiratory and allergic diseases: from upper respiratory tract infections to asthma.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Raja

    2002-06-01

    patient, mind-body interventions such as yoga, hypnosis, and biofeedback-assisted relaxation and breathing exercises are beneficial for stress reduction in general and may be helpful in further controlling asthma. Encouraging parents to learn how to massage their asthmatic children may appeal to some parents and provide benefits for parents and children alike. Acupuncture and chiropractic treatment cannot be recommended at this time, although some patients may derive benefit because of the placebo effect. For patients with allergic rhinitis, there are no good clinical research data on the use of quercetin and vitamin C. Similarly, freeze-dried stinging nettle leaves may be tried, but the applicable research evidence also is poor. Further studies are needed to assess the efficacy of these supplements and herbs. Homeopathic remedies based on extreme dilutions of the allergen may be beneficial in allergic rhinitis but require collaboration with an experienced homeopath. There are no research data on constitutional homeopathic approaches to asthma and allergic rhinitis. Patients with COPD are helped by exercise, pulmonary rehabilitation, and increased caloric protein and fat intake. Vitamin C and n-3 supplements are safe and reasonable; however, studies are needed to establish their efficacy in COPD. On the other hand, there are convincing data in favor of N-acetyl-cysteine supplementation for the patient with COPD at doses ranging between 400 and 1200 mg daily. Red blood cell magnesium levels may guide the use of magnesium replacement. The use of L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 in patients with COPD needs further study. The addition of essential oils to the dietary regimen of patients with chronic bronchitis is worth exploring. Patients with upper respiratory tract infections can expect a shorter duration of symptoms by taking high doses of vitamin C (2 g) with zinc supplements, preferably the nasal zinc gel, at the onset of their symptoms. Adding an herb such as echinacea or

  10. Occupational allergic respiratory diseases in garbage workers: relevance of molds and actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Hagemeyer, O; Bünger, J; van Kampen, V; Raulf-Heimsoth, M; Drath, C; Merget, R; Brüning, Th; Broding, H C

    2013-01-01

    Exposures to molds and bacteria (especially actinomycetes) at workplaces are common in garbage workers, but allergic respiratory diseases due to these microorganisms have been described rarely. The aim of our study was a detailed analysis of mold or bacteria-associated occupational respiratory diseases in garbage workers. From 2002 to 2011 four cases of occupational respiratory diseases related to garbage handling were identified in our institute (IPA). Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) was diagnosed in three subjects (cases 1-3, one smoker, two non-smokers), occupational asthma (OA) was diagnosed in one subject (case 4, smoker), but could not be excluded completely in case 2. Cases 1 and 2 worked in composting sites, while cases 3 and 4 worked in packaging recycling plants. Exposure periods were 2-4 years. Molds and actinomycetes were identified as allergens in all cases. Specific IgE antibodies to Aspergillus fumigatus were detected exclusively in case 4. Diagnoses of HP were essentially based on symptoms and the detection of specific IgG serum antibodies to molds and actinomycetes. OA was confirmed by bronchial provocation test with Aspergillus fumigatus in case 4. In conclusion, occupational HP and OA due to molds occur rarely in garbage workers. Technical prevention measures are insufficient and the diagnosis of HP is often inconclusive. Therefore, it is recommended to implement the full repertoire of diagnostic tools including bronchoalveolar lavage and high resolution computed tomography in the baseline examination. PMID:23835992

  11. [Real effect of specific hyposensitisation in therapy of allergic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Plavsić, Z; Petrović, M; Popovac, D

    1994-01-01

    There are different opinions on the positive effect of hyposensitisation in the treatment of allergic respiratory diseases. In this paper we wish to point out our experience, without intention to clear up these "contrary opinions". Sixty patients of both sexes, aged from 10-55 years, were on specific hyposensitisation over a period from three to five years. Two thirds (63%) were with bronchial asthma and 37% with allergic rhinitis. Most of them (80%) were on specific hyposensitisation to one allergen (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, grass or reguid polen), and to two allergens 20% patients. During this therapy 63% of patients had no additional medicamentae therapy. Most of them stopped additional medication during the first year of immunotherapy. Ten percent of patients took medicaments when they needed them, and 28% took them continually. Clinical symptoms characteristic of these diseases were also rare. The average value of IgE was 636 UI/ml before and 341 UI/ml after the immunotherapy. The efficacy of immunotherapy depended on the correct selection of patients, good standardisation of antigen extract, and a right dose of allergen in the prolonged immunotherapy. PMID:17974388

  12. Effect of thermoneutral housing on fungal-induced respiratory allergic disease in mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change is projected to increase the number of fungal, bacterial, and pollen agents both indoors and outdoors and may become a significant health impact. Combined with the thermal stress from a rise in global temperatures, it is important to consider how respiratory allerg...

  13. Respiratory Allergic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Woloski, Jason Raymond; Heston, Skye; Escobedo Calderon, Sheyla Pamela

    2016-09-01

    Allergic asthma refers to a chronic reversible bronchoconstriction influenced by an allergic trigger, leading to symptoms of cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is a complex hypersensitivity reaction, often in patients with asthma or cystic fibrosis, occurring when bronchi become colonized by Aspergillus species. The clinical picture is dominated by asthma complicated by recurrent episodes of bronchial obstruction, fever, malaise, mucus production, and peripheral blood eosinophilia. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a syndrome associated with lung inflammation from the inhalation of airborne antigens, such as molds and dust. PMID:27545731

  14. [Allergic inflammation in respiratory system].

    PubMed

    An, Lifeng; Wang, Yanshu; Li, Lin

    2015-02-01

    The pathophysiology of allergic disease such as asthma and allergic rhinitis tell the similar story: when the endogenous and exogenous inflammatory mechanisms occur disorder, the body may begin with inflammatory cell activation, namely through the release of cytokine and inflammatory mediator role in the corresponding target cells, activate the sensory nerve fiber, acting on the cell organ specificity effect, clinical symptoms. This article is divided into the following five parts focused on the research progress of allergic inflammatory diseases: (1) inflammatory cells; (2) staphylococcus aureus superantigen; (3) small molecules (cytokines, inflammatory mediators, lipid classes medium); (4) nerve fibers and effect cells; (5) genetic and epigenetic factors. PMID:26012309

  15. Beta-adrenergic receptors of lymphocytes in children with allergic respiratory diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Bittera, I.; Gyurkovits, K.; Falkay, G.; Eck, E.; Koltai, M.

    1988-01-01

    The beta-adrenergic receptor binding sites on peripheral lymphocytes in children with bronchial asthma (n = 16) and seasonal allergic rhinitis (n = 8) were examined in comparison with normal controls (n = 18) by means of /sup 124/I-cyanopindolol. The number of beta-adrenergic receptors was significantly lower in the asthmatic group (858 +/- 460/lymphocyte) than in the controls (1564 +/- 983/lymphocyte). The value (1891 +/- 1502/lymphocyte in children with allergic rhinitis was slightly higher than that in healthy controls. Of the 24 patients suffering from allergic diseases of the lower or upper airways, the bronchial histamine provocation test was performed in 21; 16 gave positive results, while 5 were negative. No difference in beta-adrenergic receptor count was found between the histamine-positive and negative patients. Neither was there any correlation between the number of beta-adrenergic receptors and the high (16/24) and low (8/24) serum IgE concentrations found in allergic patients. The significant decrease in beta-adrenergic receptor count in asthmatic children lends support to Szentivanyi's concept. Further qualitative and quantitative analysis of lymphocyte beta-adrenergic receptors may provide an individual approach to the treatment of bronchial asthma with beta-sympathomimetic drugs.

  16. [Eosinophil cationic protein in children with allergic diseases of the respiratory tract in exacerbation and remission of symptoms].

    PubMed

    Marciniak, D; Tomaszewicz-Fryca, J; Płusa, T; Chciałowski, A

    1998-02-01

    The role of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in allergic inflammatory reaction has been documented in experimental and clinical studies, but a clinical usefulness is still discussed. In the study serum level of ECP has been evaluated in children with allergic diseases of the respiratory system in exacerbation and remission of symptoms for purpose of monitoring of disease course. In 111 children aged 12.0 +/- 3.3 yrs with atopic bronchial asthma and/ or allergic rhinits ECP serum concentrations have been determined in following groups: children with grass pollen hypersensitivity (group P, 17 female and 41 male), children with hypersensitivity to D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae (group D, 16 female and 37 male) and controls without allergic hypersensitivity with negative prick skin tests (19 children, 11 female and 5 male). All children have been qualified to immunotherapy with pollen or mite allergens (Allergovit or Novo-Helisen, Nexter, Allergopharma) and ECP evaluation was performed before, during and after therapy. Serum ECP and IgE levels have been determined with CAP-system (Pharmacia) and obtained results related to clinical symptoms. In all analyzed children serum total IgE has been significantly increased in relation to controls. Serum ECP levels have been increased during clinical exacerbation of symptoms in observed children and parallel with clinical score of symptoms, especially during pollen season. Authors conclude that a degree of increase of serum ECP level is parallel with clinical score of symptoms, especially during highest exposition to pollen allergens. Observed changes of serum ECP levels during immunotherapy suggest the close relationship with allergic inflammatory reaction and indicate clinical usefulness for monitoring of this process. PMID:9591438

  17. Adaptation to impacts of climate change on aeroallergens and allergic respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Beggs, Paul J

    2010-08-01

    Climate change has the potential to have many significant impacts on aeroallergens such as pollen and mould spores, and therefore related diseases such as asthma and allergic rhinitis. This paper critically reviews this topic, with a focus on the potential adaptation measures that have been identified to date. These are aeroallergen monitoring; aeroallergen forecasting; allergenic plant management; planting practices and policies; urban/settlement planning; building design and heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC); access to health care and medications; education; and research. PMID:20948943

  18. Allergic diseases and air pollution

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suh-Young; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of allergic diseases has been increasing rapidly, especially in developing countries. Various adverse health outcomes such as allergic disease can be attributed to rapidly increasing air pollution levels. Rapid urbanization and increased energy consumption worldwide have exposed the human body to not only increased quantities of ambient air pollution, but also a greater variety of pollutants. Many studies clearly demonstrate that air pollutants potently trigger asthma exacerbation. Evidence that transportation-related pollutants contribute to the development of allergies is also emerging. Moreover, exposure to particulate matter, ozone, and nitrogen dioxide contributes to the increased susceptibility to respiratory infections. This article focuses on the current understanding of the detrimental effects of air pollutants on allergic disease including exacerbation to the development of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema as well as epigenetic regulation. PMID:23956961

  19. Climate Change and Our Environment: The Effect on Respiratory and Allergic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Charles S.; Alexis, Neil E.; Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Cohn, John R.; Demain, Jeffrey G.; Horner, Elliott; Levetin, Estelle; Nel, Andre; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is a constant and ongoing process. It is postulated that human activities have reached a point at which we are producing global climate change. This article provides suggestions to help the allergist/environmental physician integrate recommendations about improvements in outdoor and indoor air quality and the likely response to predicted alterations in the earth’s environment into their patient’s treatment plan. Many changes that affect respiratory disease are anticipated. Examples of responses to climate change include energy reduction retrofits in homes that could potentially affect exposure to allergens and irritants, more hot sunny days that increase ozone-related difficulties, and rises in sea level or altered rainfall patterns that increase exposure to damp indoor environments. Climate changes can also affect ecosystems, manifested as the appearance of stinging and biting arthropods in new areas. Higher ambient carbon dioxide concentrations, warmer temperatures, and changes in floristic zones could potentially increase exposure to ragweed and other outdoor allergens, whereas green practices such as composting can increase allergen and irritant exposure. Finally, increased energy costs may result in urban crowding and human source pollution, leading to changes in patterns of infectious respiratory illnesses. Improved governmental controls on airborne pollutants could lead to cleaner air and reduced respiratory diseases but will meet strong opposition because of their effect on business productivity. The allergy community must therefore adapt, as physician and research scientists always have, by anticipating the needs of patients and by adopting practices and research methods to meet changing environmental conditions. PMID:23687635

  20. The characteristics of indoor and outdoor fungi and their relation with allergic respiratory diseases in the southern region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Arikoglu, Tugba; Batmaz, Sehra Birgul; Coşkun, Taner; Otag, Feza; Yildirim, Didem Derici; Kuyucu, Semanur

    2016-06-01

    Indoor and outdoor fungal exposure has been shown to be associated with the development of allergic respiratory diseases. The aim of the study was to investigate the types and concentrations of airborne fungi inside and outside homes and evaluate the association between fungal levels and allergic diseases in the southern region of Turkey. A total of 61 children admitted with respiratory complaints to the pediatric allergy clinic between September 2007 and November 2008 were included in this study. The air samples were obtained using the Air IDEAL volumetric air sampler longitudinally for 1 year. A comprehensive questionnaire was used for medical history and housing conditions. Skin prick test was performed to determine fungal sensitivity and spirometric indices were employed. The predominant indoor fungal species were Cladosporium (69.3 %), Penicillium (18.9 %), Aspergillus (6.5 %), and Alternaria (3.1 %). A strong correlation between indoor and outdoor fungal levels was detected for the Cladosporium species (p < 0.001, r = 0.72) throughout the year. Living in a detached home (p = 0.036) and the presence of cockroaches (p = 0.005) were associated with total indoor fungal levels. The presence of cockroaches (aOR 3.5; 95 % CI 0.95-13.10, p = 0.059) was also associated with fungal sensitization at the edge of significance. The statistical cutoff values of indoor and outdoor Cladosporium levels to predict symptomatic asthma were found to be >176 CFU/m(3) (p = 0.003, AUC 0.696; sensitivity 65.5 %; specificity 68.7 %) and >327 CFU/m(3) (p = 0.038; AUC 0.713; sensitivity 66.6 %; specificity 76.9 %), respectively. Children with respiratory symptoms are exposed to a considerable level of fungi inside and outside their homes. The prevention of fungal exposure may provide valuable intervention for respiratory diseases. PMID:27236446

  1. Epigenomics and allergic disease

    PubMed Central

    Lockett, Gabrielle A; Patil, Veeresh K; Soto-Ramírez, Nelís; Ziyab, Ali H; Holloway, John W; Karmaus, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Allergic disease development is affected by both genes and the environment, and epigenetic mechanisms are hypothesized to mediate these environmental effects. In this article, we discuss the link between the environment, DNA methylation and allergic disease, as well as questions of causality inherent to analyses of DNA methylation. From the practical side, we describe characteristics of allergic phenotypes and contrast different epidemiologic study designs used in epigenetic research. We examine methodological considerations, how best to conduct preprocessing and analysis of DNA methylation data sets, and the latest methods, technologies and discoveries in this rapidly advancing field. DNA methylation and other epigenetic marks are firmly entwined with allergic disease, a link that may hold the basis for future allergic disease diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24283882

  2. Climate change and our environment: the effect on respiratory and allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Barne, Charles; Alexis, Neil E; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Cohn, John R; Demain, Jeffrey G; Horner, Elliot; Levetin, Estelle; Nei, Andre; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2013-03-01

    Climate change is a constant and ongoing process. It is postulated that human activities have reached a point at which we are producing global climate change. It provides suggestions to help the allergist/environmental physician integrate recommendations about improvements in outdoor and indoor air quality and the likely response to predicted alterations in the earth's environment into his or her patient's treatment plan. It incorporates references retrieved from Pub Med searches for topics, including:climate change, global warming, global climate change, greenhouse gasses, air pollution, particulates, black carbon, soot and sea level, as well as references contributed by the individual authors. Many changes that affect respiratory disease are anticipated.Examples of responses to climate change include energy reduction retrofits in homes that could potentially affect exposure to allergens and irritants, more hot sunny days that increase ozone-related difficulties, and rises in sea level or altered rainfall patterns that increase exposure to damp indoor environments.Climate changes can also affect ecosystems, manifested as the appearance of stinging and biting arthropods in new areas.Higher ambient carbon dioxide concentrations, warmer temperatures, and changes in floristic zones could potentially increase exposure to ragweed and other outdoor allergens,whereas green practices such as composting can increase allergen and irritant exposure. Finally, increased energy costs may resultin urban crowding and human source pollution, leading to changes in patterns of infectious respiratory illnesses. Improved governmental controls on airborne pollutants could lead to cleaner air and reduced respiratory diseases but will meet strong opposition because of their effect on business productivity. The allergy community must therefore adapt, as physician and research scientists always have, by anticipating the needs of patients and by adopting practices and research methods to

  3. The effects of pregnancy on the exacerbation and development of maternal allergic respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M; Copeland, Lisa B; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Ward, Marsha D W

    2009-12-01

    The T-helper 2 (T(H)2) bias associated with pregnancy may predispose the pregnant mother to the development or exacerbation of allergic disease. To determine the effects of pregnancy on pre-existing maternal sensitization, we sensitized BALB/c mice before breeding by two intratracheal aspiration (IA) exposures to the fungal allergen, Metarhizium anisopliae crude antigen (MACA). Some mice also received three IA exposures to MACA on gestational days 11, 15, and 19. After weaning, all mice were challenged IA with MACA before killing. To determine the effects of pregnancy on susceptibility to future sensitization, naïve parous and nulliparous BALB/c mice were sensitized by three IA exposures to MACA or to Hank's buffered salt solution vehicle control. Pregnancy did not have a significant effect on individual inflammatory parameters (airway responsiveness to methacholine, total serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) IgE, BALF total protein, lactate dehydrogenase activity, and total and differential cell counts) following allergen challenge in sensitized mice, regardless of post-breeding allergen exposure. In conclusion there was a weak inhibition of the overall response in mice exposed to allergen during pregnancy compared to identically treated nulliparous mice. In contrast, parous mice that did not encounter allergen post-breeding tended to have exacerbated responses. Parity had no significant impact on future susceptibility to sensitization. PMID:19845451

  4. Genetics of Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Romina A.; Barnes, Kathleen C.

    2015-01-01

    The allergic diseases are complex phenotypes for which a strong genetic basis has been firmly established. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has been widely employed in the field of allergic disease, and to date significant associations have been published for nearly 100 asthma genes/loci, in addition to multiple genes/loci for AD, AR and IgE levels, for which the overwhelming number of candidates are novel and have given a new appreciation for the role of innate as well as adaptive immune-response genes in allergic disease. A major outcome of GWAS in allergic disease has been the formation of national and international collaborations leading to consortia meta-analyses, and an appreciation for the specificity of genetic associations to sub-phenotypes of allergic disease. Molecular genetics has undergone a technological revolution, leading to next generation sequencing (NGS) strategies that are increasingly employed to hone in on the causal variants associated with allergic diseases. Unmet needs in the field include the inclusion of ethnically and racially diverse cohorts, and strategies for managing ‘big data’ that is an outcome of technological advances such as sequencing. PMID:25459575

  5. Cost-minimization analysis of sublingual immunotherapy versus subcutaneous immunotherapy for house dust mite respiratory allergic disease in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Rønborg, Steen; Johnsen, Claus R; Theilgaard, Sune; Winther, Anders; Hahn-Pedersen, Julie; Andreasen, Jakob Nørgaard; Olsen, Jens

    2016-08-01

    Objectives Currently, patients with persistent moderate-to-severe house dust mite (HDM) allergic rhinitis despite use of symptom-relieving medication can be offered subcutaneously administered allergy immunotherapy (SQ SCIT; Alutard SQ) as standard care of treatment in Denmark. Recently, a HDM sublingually administered allergy immunotherapy tablet (SQ SLIT-tablet; ACARIZAX) has been developed for at-home treatment. The purpose of this analysis is to compare the costs related to treatment and administration of SQ SLIT-tablet and SQ SCIT. Methods Assuming equal efficacy between ther SQ SLIT-tablet and SQ SCIT, the cost-minimization analysis was the most appropriate for the comparison. According to guidelines and Summary of Product Characteristics, the treatment duration of SQ SLIT-tablet is 3 years and 3-5 years for SQ SCIT. The courses of treatment vary among patients and, therefore, the costs of treatment have been calculated for an average patient with HDM respiratory allergic disease (RAD) receiving either SQ SLIT-tablet or SQ SCIT. All costs associated with allergy immunotherapy were collected, i.e., cost of medication, administration and treatment setting, and discounted according to Danish guidelines. Comprehensive univariate sensitivity analyses were carried out. Results The treatment costs for an average patient with HDM RAD are €3094 for SQ SLIT-tablet and €3799 for SQ SCIT; however, when adding indirect costs to the calculations the total costs of the treatments are €3697 and €6717 for SQ SLIT-tablet and SQ SCIT, respectively. Therefore, if 2500 patients with HDM RAD were treated with SQ SLIT-tablet instead of SQ SCIT, it would elicit a saving to the healthcare system of ∼€1.8 million. The conclusion was robust to any changes in the sensitivity analysis. Conclusion With regards to the cost of treating Danish patients with HDM RAD, it is clearly cost-saving to treat patients with SQ SLIT-tablet compared to SQ SCIT. PMID:26909663

  6. [Genetic study of allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Luo

    2012-09-01

    Allergic diseases mentioned in this review is regarding to I type allergic inflammation induced by an IgE-mediated reaction, including asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis and food allergy. It is convinced that allergic diseases belong to multiple genes diseases and are controlled by both genetic and environmental factors. Meanwhile there exists gene-gene as well as gene-environment interactions during the development of the disease. The aim of this review is to summarize the toolkit, advance, inherent difficulties and future clinical application prospect in genetic studies of allergic disease. PMID:23214325

  7. Steroids in allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Webb, D R

    1981-09-01

    From the experience above, it may be concluded that corticosteroid therapy in allergic disease has become more effective than ever before. The expected variations in usage of new important pharmacologic agents is seen with special clarity in the use of corticosteroids. The wide acclaim for the "miracle drug of the 1950's", which followed penicillin of the 1940's, soon gave away to anguish about side-effects that threatened to abolish its use entirely in the late 1950's. The 1960's brought alternate day therapy for chronic usage and recognition that short term usage was relatively safe. The 1970's saw proliferation of topically active steroids similar to those so important to the practice of Dermatology in the previous decade. Results in treating asthma and nasal diseases have been excellent and extensive research for adverse effects has been largely unrevealing. PMID:6793795

  8. Overweight/Obesity and Respiratory and Allergic Disease in Children: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) Phase Two

    PubMed Central

    Weinmayr, Gudrun; Forastiere, Francesco; Büchele, Gisela; Jaensch, Andrea; Strachan, David P.; Nagel, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity and asthma are increasing worldwide. A possible link between the two conditions has been postulated. Methods Cross-sectional studies of stratified random samples of 8–12-year-old children (n = 10 652) (16 centres in affluent and 8 centres in non-affluent countries) used the standardized methodology of ISAAC Phase Two. Respiratory and allergic symptoms were ascertained by parental questionnaires. Tests for allergic disease were performed. Height and weight were measured, and overweight and obesity were defined according to international definitions. Prevalence rates and prevalence odds ratios were calculated. Results Overweight (odds ratio = 1.14, 95%-confidence interval: 0.98; 1.33) and obesity (odds ratio = 1.67, 95%-confidence interval: 1.25; 2.21) were related to wheeze. The relationship was stronger in affluent than in non-affluent centres. Similar results were found for cough and phlegm, rhinitis and eczema but the associations were mostly driven by children with wheeze. There was a clear association of overweight and obesity with airways obstruction (change in FEV1/FVC, −0.90, 95%-confidence interval: −1.33%; −0.47%, for overweight and −2.46%, 95%-confidence interval: −3.84%; −1.07%, for obesity) whereas the results for the other objective markers, including atopy, were null. Conclusions Our data from a large international child population confirm that there is a strong relation of body mass index with wheeze especially in affluent countries. Moreover, body mass index is associated with an objective marker of airways obstruction (FEV1/FVC) but no other objective markers of respiratory and allergic disorders. PMID:25474308

  9. Immunological evaluation of allergic respiratory children with recurrent sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Costa Carvalho, Beatriz T; Nagao, Aparecida Tiemi; Arslanian, Cristina; Carneiro Sampaio, Magda M S; Naspitz, Charles K; Sorensen, Ricardo U; Leiva, Lily; Solé, Dirceu

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate humoral immunity of allergic respiratory children with chronic/recurrent sinusitis. Twenty-seven allergic respiratory (persistent mild/moderate asthma and persistent allergic rhinitis) children (7-15-year old) with chronic or recurrent sinusitis were evaluated. Patients had symptoms and abnormal computer tomography scan even after two adequate treatments (long-lasting antibiotics, decongestants, and short-term oral corticosteroids). clinical examination, sweat test, total blood cell count, measurement of serum levels of: total and specific IgE, immunoglobulins (G, M, A), IgG subclasses, antibodies to Haemophilus influenza type b (IgG anti-Ps Hib) and pneumococcal serotypes (IgG anti-Ps 1, 3, 5, 6B, 9V, and 14) before and after active immunization (Act-Hib and Pneumo23, Aventis Pasteur SA, Lyon, France), Rubella neutralizing antibody titers and human immunodeficiency virus antibodies. Specific IgE to inhalant allergens higher than class III were observed in 24/27 patients. One patient had IgA plus IgG2 deficiency and other an IgG3 deficiency. Eight and 12 of 27 patients had IgG2 and IgG3 serum levels below 2.5th percentile, respectively. Immunological responses to protein and polysaccharide antigens were normal in all patients. Although our patients have been appropriately treated of their allergic diseases, they persisted with chronic/recurrent sinusitis and 60% of them had a documented osteomeatal complex blockade. In spite of the diagnosis of IgA plus IgG2 deficiency and an isolated IgG3 deficiency, in all patients an adequate response to Ps antigens was observed. Primary and/or secondary humoral immunodeficiency seems not to be the main cause of chronic/recurrent sinusitis in patients with respiratory allergic disease. PMID:16176402

  10. STAT5-induced lunatic fringe during Th2 development alters delta-like 4-mediated Th2 cytokine production in respiratory syncytial virus-exacerbated airway allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sumanta; Rasky, Andrew J; Lundy, Phil A; Kittan, Nicolai A; Kunkel, Steven L; Maillard, Ivan P; Kowalski, Paul E; Kousis, Philaretos C; Guidos, Cynthia J; Lukacs, Nicholas W

    2014-02-01

    Notch activation plays an important role in T cell development and mature T cell differentiation. In this study, we investigated the role of Notch activation in a mouse model of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-exacerbated allergic airway disease. During RSV exacerbation, in vivo neutralization of a specific Notch ligand, Delta-like ligand (Dll)-4, significantly decreased airway hyperreactivity, mucus production, and Th2 cytokines. Lunatic Fringe (Lfng), a glycosyltransferase that enhances Notch activation by Dll4, was increased during RSV exacerbation. Lfng loss of function in Th2-skewed cells inhibited Dll4-Notch activation and subsequent IL-4 production. Further knockdown of Lfng in T cells in CD4Cre(+)Lfng(fl/fl) mice showed reduced Th2 response and disease pathology during RSV exacerbation. Finally, we identified STAT5-binding cis-acting regulatory element activation as a critical driver of Lfng transcriptional activation. These data demonstrate that STAT5-dependent amplification of Notch-modifying Lfng augments Th2 response via Dll4 and is critical for amplifying viral exacerbation during allergic airway disease. PMID:24367028

  11. Chlorination products: emerging links with allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Bernard, A

    2007-01-01

    Exposure of the human population to chlorination products has considerably increased during the 20(th) century especially after the 1960s with the development of public and leisure pools. The present article summarizes current knowledge regarding the human exposure to chlorination products and reviews studies suggesting that these chemicals might be involved in the development or exacerbation of allergic diseases. Populations regularly in contact with chlorination products such as swimmers, lifeguards or workers using chlorine as cleaning or bleaching agent show increased risks of allergic diseases or of respiratory disorders frequently associated with allergy. Experimental evidence suggests that chlorination products promote allergic sensitization by compromising the permeability or the immunoregulatory function of epithelial barriers. These findings led to the chlorine hypothesis proposing that the rise of allergic diseases could result less from the declining exposure to microbial agents (the hygiene hypothesis) than from the increasing and largely uncontrolled exposure to products of chlorination, the most widely used method to achieve hygiene in the developed world. Giving the increasing popularity of water recreational areas, there is an obvious need to assess the effects of chlorine-based oxidants on human health and their possible implication in the epidemic of allergic diseases. PMID:17627515

  12. Therapeutic strategies for allergic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter J.

    1999-11-01

    Many drugs are now in development for the treatment of atopic diseases, including asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. These treatments are based on improvements in existing therapies or on a better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in atopic diseases. Although most attention has been focused on asthma, treatments that inhibit the atopic disease process would have application to all atopic diseases, as they often coincide. Most of the many new therapies in development are aimed at inhibiting components of the allergic inflammatory response, but in the future there are real possibilities for the development of preventative and even curative treatments.

  13. The expert network and electronic portal for children with respiratory and allergic symptoms: rationale and design

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Data on baseline characteristics of children with asthma to predict individual treatment responses are lacking. We aimed to set up a data-collection system which can easily fill this gap in clinical practice. A web-based application was developed, named 'Portal for children with respiratory and allergic symptoms', hereafter called Electronic Portal (EP). It contains health- and disease-related questionnaires on respiratory- and allergic diseases. All patients, 1–18 years of age, with respiratory- and/or allergic complaints are invited to enter the EP before their first visit. By using the EP large amounts of data, gathered during routine patient care can be used for research purposes. This may help to further investigate the different treatment related asthma phenotypes and will be helpful to monitor risk factors for other atopic diseases and respiratory infections. PMID:23324209

  14. Do mouse models of allergic asthma mimic clinical disease?

    PubMed

    Epstein, Michelle M

    2004-01-01

    Experimental mouse models of allergic asthma established almost 10 years ago offered new opportunities to study disease pathogenesis and to develop new therapeutics. These models focused on the factors governing the allergic immune response, on modeling clinical behavior of allergic asthma, and led to insights into pulmonary pathophysiology. Although mouse models rarely completely reproduce all the features of human disease, after sensitization and respiratory tract challenges with antigen, wild-type mice develop a clinical syndrome that closely resembles allergic asthma, characterized by eosinophilic lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), increased IgE, mucus hypersecretion, and eventually, airway remodeling. There are, however, differences between mouse and human physiology that threaten to limit the value of mouse models. Three examples of such differences relate to both clinical manifestations of disease and underlying pathogenesis. First, in contrast to patients who have increased methacholine-induced AHR even when they are symptom-free, mice exhibit only transient methacholine-induced AHR following allergen exposure. Second, chronic allergen exposure in patients leads to chronic allergic asthma, whereas repeated exposures in sensitized mice causes suppression of disease. Third, IgE and mast cells, in humans, mediate early- and late-phase allergic responses, though both are unnecessary for the generation of allergic asthma in mice. Taken together, these observations suggest that mouse models of allergic asthma are not exact replicas of human disease and thus, question the validity of these models. However, observations from mouse models of allergic asthma support many existing paradigms, although some novel discoveries in mice have yet to be verified in patients. This review presents an overview of the clinical aspects of disease in mouse models of allergic asthma emphasizing (1). the factors influencing the pathophysiological responses during

  15. Strategies to prevent or reduce allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Susan; Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The need for allergy prevention strategies has never been greater. Surging rates of food allergy and eczema are now adding to the already substantial burden of asthma and respiratory allergic diseases. The parallel rise in many other immune diseases suggests that the developing immune system is highly vulnerable to modern environmental changes. These strong environmental pressures may be one reason why simple allergen avoidance strategies have not been successful. Another more recent strategy to curtail the allergy epidemic has been to identify factors associated with modern lifestyle that may be causally linked with allergic disease, in an attempt to restore more favourable conditions for immune tolerance during early development. More hygienic conditions and disruption of microbial exposure have prompted strategies to restore this balance using probiotic and prebiotic supplements. Modern dietary changes linked with allergic diseases have prompted supplementation studies to assess the preventive merits of specific immunomodulatory dietary nutrients such as polyunsaturated fatty acids. Other nutrients such as antioxidants, folate, and vitamin D are also currently under investigation. Modern environmental pollutants have also been associated with adverse effects on immune development and the risk of disease. While many of these avenues have provided some promise, they have not yet translated into specific recommendations. Current evidence-based guidelines for allergy prevention remain limited to avoidance of cigarette smoke, promotion of breastfeeding and the use of hydrolysed formula when breastfeeding is not possible. Allergen avoidance strategies have been largely removed from most guidelines. It is hoped that a number of ongoing studies will help provide clearer recommendations around the use of probiotics, prebiotics, specific dietary nutrients and the role of early introduction of allergenic foods for the promotion of tolerance. Despite the current

  16. Emerging concepts: mast cell involvement in allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Modena, Brian D; Dazy, Kristen; White, Andrew A

    2016-08-01

    In a process known as overt degranulation, mast cells can release all at once a diverse array of products that are preformed and present within cytoplasmic granules. This occurs typically within seconds of stimulation by environmental factors and allergens. These potent, preformed mediators (ie, histamine, heparin, serotonin, and serine proteases) are responsible for the acute symptoms experienced in allergic conditions such as allergic conjunctivitis, allergic rhinitis, allergy-induced asthma, urticaria, and anaphylaxis. Yet, there is reason to believe that the actions of mast cells are important when they are not degranulating. Mast cells release preformed mediators and inflammatory cytokines for periods after degranulation and even without degranulating at all. Mast cells are consistently seen at sites of chronic inflammation, including nonallergic inflammation, where they have the ability to temper inflammatory processes and shape tissue morphology. Mast cells can trigger actions and chemotaxis in other important immune cells (eg, eosinophils and the newly discovered type 2 innate lymphocytes) that then make their own contributions to inflammation and disease. In this review, we will discuss the many known and theorized contributions of mast cells to allergic diseases, focusing on several prototypical allergic respiratory and skin conditions: asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis, aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, allergic conjunctivitis, atopic dermatitis, and some of the more common medication hypersensitivity reactions. We discuss traditionally accepted roles that mast cells play in the pathogenesis of each of these conditions, but we also delve into new areas of discovery and research that challenge traditionally accepted paradigms. PMID:26976119

  17. A bug's view of allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Peter S; Campbell, Dianne E

    2016-06-01

    The increase in allergic airways disease has been linked to modern urbanization and lifestyle. Recent evidence suggests that the associated reduction in microbial exposure, reduction in dietary fibre intake and increased antibiotic use may cause early dysbiosis in infancy, which predisposes to immune dysregulation and allergic airways disease later in life. This implies that there may be a window of opportunity for primary prevention strategies aimed to protect or restore the microbiome early in life and thereby decrease the risk of developing allergic airways disease. Alternatively, strategies that correct dysbiosis may aid in the treatment of established allergic airways disease. PMID:27012478

  18. Environmental Changes, Microbiota, and Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byoung-Ju; Lee, So-Yeon; Kim, Hyo-Bin; Lee, Eun

    2014-01-01

    During the last few decades, the prevalence of allergic disease has increased dramatically. The development of allergic diseases has been attributed to complex interactions between environmental factors and genetic factors. Of the many possible environmental factors, most research has focused on the most commonly encountered environmental factors, such as air pollution and environmental microbiota in combination with climate change. There is increasing evidence that such environmental factors play a critical role in the regulation of the immune response that is associated with allergic diseases, especially in genetically susceptible individuals. This review deals with not only these environmental factors and genetic factors but also their interactions in the development of allergic diseases. It will also emphasize the need for early interventions that can prevent the development of allergic diseases in susceptible populations and how these interventions can be identified. PMID:25228995

  19. Assessment of disease control in allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Demoly, Pascal; Calderon, Moises A; Casale, Thomas; Scadding, Glenis; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Braun, Jean-Jacques; Delaisi, Bertrand; Haddad, Thierry; Malard, Olivier; Trébuchon, Florence; Serrano, Elie

    2013-01-01

    The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) initiative has had a significant impact, by raising awareness of allergic rhinitis (AR) and improving the diagnosis and treatment of AR sufferers. ARIA classifies the severity of AR as "mild" or "moderate/severe" on the basis of "yes"/"no" answers to four questions. This two-point classification has been criticized as providing little guidance on patient management; patients with "mild" AR are unlikely to consult a physician, whereas the group of patients with "moderate/severe" seen by specialists is heterogeneous. These perceived shortcomings have prompted attempts to improve the ARIA classification or, by analogy with the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA), adopt approaches based on "disease control" in AR. Even though "disease severity", "disease control" and "responsiveness to treatment" are different (albeit related) metrics, they are not mutually exclusive. Currently, there is no single, accepted definition, but we propose that "disease control" in AR can combine (i) measurements of the severity and/or frequency of daily or nocturnal symptoms, (ii) impairments in social, physical, professional and educational activities, (iii) respiratory function monitoring and (iv) exacerbations (e.g. unscheduled medical consultations and rescue medication use). Although control-based classifications have a number of limitations (e.g. their dependence on treatment compliance and the patient's psychological status), these instruments could be used as an adjunct to the ARIA severity classification and regional practice parameters. Here, we assess the strengths and weaknesses of the current two-level ARIA classification, analyze published proposals for its modification and review the literature on instruments that measure AR control. We conclude that there is a need for research in which severity is compared with control in terms of their effects on patient management. PMID:23419058

  20. 38 CFR 3.380 - Diseases of allergic etiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Diseases of allergic... Specific Diseases § 3.380 Diseases of allergic etiology. Diseases of allergic etiology, including bronchial... progress nor as due to the inherent nature of the disease. Seasonal and other acute allergic...

  1. 38 CFR 3.380 - Diseases of allergic etiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Diseases of allergic... Specific Diseases § 3.380 Diseases of allergic etiology. Diseases of allergic etiology, including bronchial... progress nor as due to the inherent nature of the disease. Seasonal and other acute allergic...

  2. 38 CFR 3.380 - Diseases of allergic etiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Diseases of allergic... Specific Diseases § 3.380 Diseases of allergic etiology. Diseases of allergic etiology, including bronchial... progress nor as due to the inherent nature of the disease. Seasonal and other acute allergic...

  3. 38 CFR 3.380 - Diseases of allergic etiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Diseases of allergic... Specific Diseases § 3.380 Diseases of allergic etiology. Diseases of allergic etiology, including bronchial... progress nor as due to the inherent nature of the disease. Seasonal and other acute allergic...

  4. 38 CFR 3.380 - Diseases of allergic etiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diseases of allergic... Specific Diseases § 3.380 Diseases of allergic etiology. Diseases of allergic etiology, including bronchial... progress nor as due to the inherent nature of the disease. Seasonal and other acute allergic...

  5. [Epigenetics in allergic diseases and asthma].

    PubMed

    Castro-Rodríguez, José A; Krause, Bernardo J; Uauy, Ricardo; Casanello, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases and asthma are the result of complex interactions between genetic predisposition and environmental factors. Asthma is one of the most prevalent chronic disease among children. In this article we review some environmental factors like: allergen exposition, tobacco, bacteria, microbial components, diet, obesity and stress, which influences during intrauterine and infancy life in the epigenetic regulation of asthma and allergic diseases. The review has been done in three models: in-vitro, animal and human. PMID:27055949

  6. Epithelial Cell Regulation of Allergic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Gour, Naina; Lajoie, Stephane

    2016-09-01

    Allergic diseases, which have escalated in prevalence in recent years, arise as a result of maladaptive immune responses to ubiquitous environmental stimuli. Why only certain individuals mount inappropriate type 2 immune responses to these otherwise harmless allergens has remained an unanswered question. Mounting evidence suggests that the epithelium, by sensing its environment, is the central regulator of allergic diseases. Once considered to be a passive barrier to allergens, epithelial cells at mucosal surfaces are now considered to be the cornerstone of the allergic diathesis. Beyond their function as maintaining barrier at mucosal surfaces, mucosal epithelial cells through the secretion of mediators like IL-25, IL-33, and TSLP control the fate of downstream allergic immune responses. In this review, we will discuss the advances in recent years regarding the process of allergen recognition and secretion of soluble mediators by epithelial cells that shape the development of the allergic response. PMID:27534656

  7. Regulatory T cells in allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Noval Rivas, Magali; Chatila, Talal A

    2016-09-01

    The pathogenesis of allergic diseases entails an ineffective tolerogenic immune response to allergens. Regulatory T (Treg) cells play a key role in sustaining immune tolerance to allergens, yet mechanisms by which Treg cells fail to maintain tolerance in patients with allergic diseases are not well understood. We review current concepts and established mechanisms regarding how Treg cells regulate different components of allergen-triggered immune responses to promote and maintain tolerance. We will also discuss more recent advances that emphasize the "dual" functionality of Treg cells in patients with allergic diseases: how Treg cells are essential in promoting tolerance to allergens but also how a proallergic inflammatory environment can skew Treg cells toward a pathogenic phenotype that aggravates and perpetuates disease. These advances highlight opportunities for novel therapeutic strategies that aim to re-establish tolerance in patients with chronic allergic diseases by promoting Treg cell stability and function. PMID:27596705

  8. Immunologic principles of allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Averbeck, Marco; Gebhardt, Carl; Emmrich, Frank; Treudler, Regina; Simon, Jan C

    2007-11-01

    Allergy either results from a pathological excessive immune reaction, or from the defective induction of tolerance to otherwise harmless antigens. Allergic reactions are mounted by mechanisms of innate and adaptive immunity. The development of an allergic response can be divided in sensitization and elicitation phases. Immediate type allergic reactions (e.g. anaphylaxis, urticaria, rhinoconjunctivitis allergica, allergic asthma) are mediated by IgE antibodies which are produced by B cells stimulated by allergen-specific Th2 cells. Crosslinking of allergen-specific IgE on membrane surfaces of mast cells and basophilic granulocytes leads to release of soluble mediators which may cause systemic symptoms within minutes to hours. The following infiltration of eosinophilic granulocytes and Th2 cells directs chronic inflammation. Humoral cytotoxic immune reactions (e.g. drug induced cytopenia) are mediated by IgG and IgM antibodies which are directed against membrane associated antigens. IgG and IgM antibodies directed against soluble antigens elicit immune complex mediated cytotoxicity (e.g.drug induced vasculitis). Delayed type immune reactions (e.g.contact dermatitis) are based on the activation of antigen specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and need 24 h to 48 h to develop. Upon recurrent contact with identical antigens, recruitment of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells cause inflammation and cytotoxic induced apoptosis in target cells as well as cytokine mediated leukocyte infiltration. Subsequent immigration of CD4(+) Th2 cells provides anti-inflammatory mechanisms leading to resolution of the inflammatory response and tissue repair. PMID:17976144

  9. Treatment of congestion in upper respiratory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, Eli O; Caballero, Fernan; Fromer, Leonard M; Krouse, John H; Scadding, Glenis

    2010-01-01

    Congestion, as a symptom of upper respiratory tract diseases including seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis, acute and chronic rhinosinusitis, and nasal polyposis, is principally caused by mucosal inflammation. Though effective pharmacotherapy options exist, no agent is universally efficacious; therapeutic decisions must account for individual patient preferences. Oral H1-antihistamines, though effective for the common symptoms of allergic rhinitis, have modest decongestant action, as do leukotriene receptor antagonists. Intranasal antihistamines appear to improve congestion better than oral forms. Topical decongestants reduce congestion associated with allergic rhinitis, but local adverse effects make them unsuitable for long-term use. Oral decongestants show some efficacy against congestion in allergic rhinitis and the common cold, and can be combined with oral antihistamines. Intranasal corticosteroids have broad anti-inflammatory activities, are the most potent long-term pharmacologic treatment of congestion associated with allergic rhinitis, and show some congestion relief in rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. Immunotherapy and surgery may be used in some cases refractory to pharmacotherapy. Steps in congestion management include (1) diagnosis of the cause(s), (2) patient education and monitoring, (3) avoidance of environmental triggers where possible, (4) pharmacotherapy, and (5) immunotherapy (for patients with allergic rhinitis) or surgery for patients whose condition is otherwise uncontrolled. PMID:20463825

  10. Epigenetic regulation of asthma and allergic disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics of asthma and allergic disease is a field that has expanded greatly in the last decade. Previously thought only in terms of cell differentiation, it is now evident the epigenetics regulate many processes. With T cell activation, commitment toward an allergic phenotype is tightly regulated by DNA methylation and histone modifications at the Th2 locus control region. When normal epigenetic control is disturbed, either experimentally or by environmental exposures, Th1/Th2 balance can be affected. Epigenetic marks are not only transferred to daughter cells with cell replication but they can also be inherited through generations. In animal models, with constant environmental pressure, epigenetically determined phenotypes are amplified through generations and can last up to 2 generations after the environment is back to normal. In this review on the epigenetic regulation of asthma and allergic diseases we review basic epigenetic mechanisms and discuss the epigenetic control of Th2 cells. We then cover the transgenerational inheritance model of epigenetic traits and discuss how this could relate the amplification of asthma and allergic disease prevalence and severity through the last decades. Finally, we discuss recent epigenetic association studies for allergic phenotypes and related environmental risk factors as well as potential underlying mechanisms for these associations. PMID:24932182

  11. Respiratory responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and their relationship to nonspecific airway reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, W.F.; Horstman, D.H.; Abdul-Salaam, S.; Raggio, L.J.; Green, J.A.

    1987-12-01

    Ozone exposure in man produces changes in respiratory function and symptoms. There is a large degree of unexplained intersubject variability in the magnitude of these responses. There is concern that individuals with chronic respiratory diseases may also be more responsive to ozone than normal individuals. The purpose of this study was to describe the responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and to compare these responses to those previously observed in normal individuals. A further purpose was to measure the association of baseline nonspecific airway reactivity with changes in lung function and respiratory symptoms following ozone exposure. A group of 26 nonasthmatic subjects with allergic rhinitis performed a bronchial inhalation challenge with histamine and subsequently underwent two hour exposures to both clean air and to 0.18 part per million ozone with alternating periods of rest and heavy exercise. The airway reactivity of this group of subjects was no greater than that of a comparable group of subjects without allergic rhinitis. The respiratory responses of these subjects to ozone exposure were similar to those previously reported for subjects without allergic rhinitis with the exception that the allergic rhinitis subjects appeared to have a modestly increased bronchoconstrictor response compared to normals. Furthermore, we observed no significant relationships between nonspecific airway reactivity and response to ozone as measured by changes in lung function or the induction of symptoms.

  12. Respiratory Diseases of Poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new Respiratory Diseases of Poultry CRIS will be established effective October 1, 2006. Initially, the disease agents to be studied will include Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (ORT), Bordetella avium (BART) and Pasteurella multocida. The research will focus on development of more effective vacc...

  13. Enhanced allergic responsiveness after early childhood infection with respiratory viruses: Are long-lived alternatively activated macrophages the missing link?

    PubMed

    Keegan, Achsah D; Shirey, Kari Ann; Bagdure, Dayanand; Blanco, Jorge; Viscardi, Rose M; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2016-07-01

    Early childhood infection with respiratory viruses, including human rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza, is associated with an increased risk of allergic asthma and severe exacerbation of ongoing disease. Despite the long recognition of this relationship, the mechanism linking viral infection and later susceptibility to allergic lung inflammation is still poorly understood. We discuss the literature and provide new evidence demonstrating that these viruses induce the alternative activation of macrophages. Alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) induced by RSV or influenza infection persisted in the lungs of mice up to 90 days after initial viral infection. Several studies suggest that AAM contribute to allergic inflammatory responses, although their mechanism of action is unclear. In this commentary, we propose that virus-induced AAM provide a link between viral infection and enhanced responses to inhaled allergens. PMID:27178560

  14. Occupational Exposure to Urban Air Pollution and Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vimercati, Luigi; Gatti, Maria Franca; Baldassarre, Antonio; Nettis, Eustachio; Favia, Nicola; Palma, Marco; Martina, Gabriella Lucia Maria; Di Leo, Elisabetta; Musti, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution is associated with increased morbidity from cardiovascular diseases, lung cancer, respiratory and allergic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate allergic diseases in 111 traffic wardens compared to a control group of 101 administrative employees. All participating subjects underwent a physical examination, in which a complete medical history was taken and a dedicated allergological questionnaire administered. Spirometry, Specific IgE dosage (RAST) and skin prick tests (SPT) were done. Diagnostic investigations such as the nasal cytology, a specific nasal provocation test and rhinomanometry were also performed. Statistical analyses were performed using STATA version 11. The percentage of subjects with a diagnosis of allergy was higher in the exposed workers than in the controls. As regards the clinical tests, the positivity was higher for the group of exposed subjects. Among the exposed workers, those who worked on foot or motorcycle had a higher positivity in clinical trials compared to the traffic wardens who used the car. Our study showed a higher percentage of allergic subjects in the group of workers exposed to outdoor pollutants than in the controls. These results suggest that allergological tests should be included in the health surveillance protocols for workers exposed to outdoor pollutants. PMID:26501303

  15. Occupational Exposure to Urban Air Pollution and Allergic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Vimercati, Luigi; Gatti, Maria Franca; Baldassarre, Antonio; Nettis, Eustachio; Favia, Nicola; Palma, Marco; Martina, Gabriella Lucia Maria; Di Leo, Elisabetta; Musti, Marina

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to air pollution is associated with increased morbidity from cardiovascular diseases, lung cancer, respiratory and allergic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate allergic diseases in 111 traffic wardens compared to a control group of 101 administrative employees. All participating subjects underwent a physical examination, in which a complete medical history was taken and a dedicated allergological questionnaire administered. Spirometry, Specific IgE dosage (RAST) and skin prick tests (SPT) were done. Diagnostic investigations such as the nasal cytology, a specific nasal provocation test and rhinomanometry were also performed. Statistical analyses were performed using STATA version 11. The percentage of subjects with a diagnosis of allergy was higher in the exposed workers than in the controls. As regards the clinical tests, the positivity was higher for the group of exposed subjects. Among the exposed workers, those who worked on foot or motorcycle had a higher positivity in clinical trials compared to the traffic wardens who used the car. Our study showed a higher percentage of allergic subjects in the group of workers exposed to outdoor pollutants than in the controls. These results suggest that allergological tests should be included in the health surveillance protocols for workers exposed to outdoor pollutants. PMID:26501303

  16. Respiratory responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and their relationship to nonspecific airway reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, W.F.; Horstman, D.H.; Abdul-Salaam, S.; Raggio, L.J.; Green, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Ozone exposure in man produces changes in respiratory function and symptoms. There is a large degree of unexplained intersubject variability in the magnitude of these responses. There is concern that individuals with chronic respiratory diseases may also be more responsive to ozone than normal individuals. The purpose of this study was to describe the responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and to compare these responses to those previously observed in normal individuals. A further purpose was to measure the association between baseline nonspecific airway reactivity and changes in lung function and respiratory symptoms following ozone exposure.

  17. Respiratory System Disease.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Danielle M; Singh, Shipra

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory system involvement in cystic fibrosis is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene throughout the sinopulmonary tract result in recurrent infections with a variety of organisms including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and nontuberculous mycobacteria. Lung disease occurs earlier in life than once thought and ideal methods of monitoring lung function, decline, or improvement with therapy are debated. Treatment of sinopulmonary disease may include physiotherapy, mucus-modifying and antiinflammatory agents, antimicrobials, and surgery. In the new era of personalized medicine, CFTR correctors and potentiators may change the course of disease. PMID:27469180

  18. Mast Cells in Allergic Diseases and Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Diana L.; Wasserman, Stephen I.

    1982-01-01

    Mast cells with their stores of vasoactive and chemotactic mediators are central to the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. The cross-linking of receptorbound IgE molecules on the surface of mast cells initiates a complex chain of events, including calcium ion influx, phospholipid methylation and turnover and cyclic nucleotide metabolism, ultimately resulting in the release of mediators of immediate hypersensitivity. These mast cell mediators are important in smooth muscle reactivity, in the recruitment of eosinophilic and neutrophilic leukocytes and in the generation of secondary chemical mediators. Histologic evidence of mast cell degranulation, biochemical evidence of mast cell mediators in blood and tissues and clinical evidence of signs and symptoms reproducible by these mediators have strongly supported the crucial role of mast cells in asthma, urticaria, anaphylaxis, rhinitis and mastocytosis. Because of their unique location at host environment interfaces, mast cells may both participate in allergic diseases and promote homeostasis. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:6293204

  19. Respiratory syncytial virus replication is prolonged by a concomitant allergic response

    PubMed Central

    Hassantoufighi, A; Oglesbee, M; Richter, B W M; Prince, G A; Hemming, V; Niewiesk, S; Eichelberger, M C

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show an association between early exposure to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and the development or exacerbation of asthma. This idea is supported by studies in mice that demonstrate worsened airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) when RSV-infected animals are exposed to allergen. The effect of allergen on RSV disease, however, has not been reported. Cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) that have been used as a model to study RSV pathogenesis were sensitized to extracts of Aspergillus fumigatus (Af), a common household mould. The allergic response to Af included eosinophilia, formation of granulomas and induction of Th2 type cytokines. RSV infection prior to allergen challenge resulted in exacerbation of the inflammatory response as well as increased airway responsiveness to methacholine. The exacerbated response was indeed dependent on virus replication. Virus replication in turn was influenced by the allergic response, with persistence in the noses for 2 days longer in animals challenged with allergen. This diminished clearance corresponded to decreased induction of mRNA for IFN-γ, a Th1-type cytokine that is characteristic of viral infection. Treatment of RSV-infected Af-challenged animals with recombinant IFN-γ reduced the allergic inflammatory response as well as the relative levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokine mRNA. However, this treatment did not reduce airway reactivity, showing that these pathologic and physiologic measures of exacerbated disease are independent. We speculate that the reciprocal effect of the allergic response on viral immunity may benefit the host by limiting exacerbation of physiologic responses that are IFN-γ-dependent. PMID:17335559

  20. [Asbestos and respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Scherpereel, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Previous occupational asbestos exposure (more rarely environmental or domestic exposure) may induce various pleural and/or pulmonary, benign or malignant diseases, sometimes with a very long latency for malignant mesothelioma (MM). Asbestos has been widely extracted and used in Western countries and in emerging or developing countries, resulting in a peak of MM incidence in France around 2020 and likely in a world pandemic of asbestos-induced diseases. These patients have mostly benign respiratory diseases (pleural plugs) but may also be diagnosed with lung cancer or malignant pleural mesothelioma, and have a global poor outcome. New therapeutic tools (targeted therapies, immunotherapy…) with first promising results are developed. However, it is crucial to obtain a full ban of asbestos use worldwide, and to do a regular follow-up of asbestos-exposed subjects, mostly if they are already diagnosed with benign respiratory diseases. Finally, new cancers (larynx and ovary) were recently added to the list of asbestos-induced tumors. PMID:26822071

  1. FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE RELATIVE POTENCY OF DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES AS ADJUVANTS IN ALLERGIC AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Description: Studies have shown that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) worsen respiratory diseases including allergic asthma. The adjuvant effects of DEP in the airways have been widely reported; however, the precise determinants and mechanisms of these effects are ill-defined. S...

  2. Respiratory disease and cardiovascular morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Koskela, R; Mutanen, P; Sorsa, J; Klockars, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Work related dust exposure is a risk factor for acute and chronic respiratory irritation and inflammation. Exposure to dust and cigarette smoke predisposes to exogenous viral and bacterial infections of the respiratory tract. Respiratory infection can also act as a risk factor in the development of atherosclerotic and coronary artery disease. Aims: To investigate the association of dust exposure and respiratory diseases with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and other cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Methods: The study comprised 6022 dust exposed (granite, foundry, cotton mill, iron foundry, metal product, and electrical) workers hired in 1940–76 and followed until the end of 1992. National mortality and morbidity registers and questionnaires were used. The statistical methods were person-year analysis and Cox regression. Results: Co-morbidity from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases ranged from 17% to 35%. In at least 60% of the co-morbidity cases a respiratory disease preceded a cardiovascular disease. Chronic bronchitis, pneumonia, and upper respiratory track infections predicted IHD in granite workers (rate ratio (RR) = 1.9; 95% CI 1.38 to 2.72), foundry workers (2.1; 1.48 to 2.93), and iron foundry workers (1.7; 1.16 to 2.35). Dust exposure was not a significant predictor of IHD or other CVD in any group. Dust exposure was related to respiratory morbidity. Thus, some respiratory diseases appeared to act as intermediate variables in the association of dust exposure with IHD. Conclusion: Dust exposure had only a small direct effect on IHD and other CVD. IHD morbidity was associated with preceding respiratory morbidity. A chronic infectious respiratory tract disease appeared to play an independent role in the development of IHD. PMID:16109822

  3. Effects of ozone on the respiratory health, allergic sensitization, and cellular immune system in children

    SciTech Connect

    Zwick, H.; Popp, W.; Wagner, C.; Reiser, K.; Schmoeger, J.B.; Boeck, A.H.; Herkner, K.; Radunsky, K. )

    1991-11-01

    To investigate the lasting effects of high ozone concentrations under environmental conditions, we examined the respiratory health, pulmonary function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, allergic sensitization, and lymphocyte subpopulations of 10- to 14-yr-old children. A total of 218 children recruited from an area with high ozone concentrations (Group A) were tested against 281 children coming from an area with low ozone concentrations (Group B). As to subjective complaints, categorized as 'usually cough with or without phlegm,' 'breathlessness,' and 'susceptibility to chest colds,' there was no difference between the two groups. The lung function parameters were similar, but in Group A subjects' bronchial hyperresponsiveness occurred more frequently and was found to be more severe than in Group B (29.4 versus 19.9%, p less than 0.02; PD20 2,100 {plus minus} 87 versus 2,350 {plus minus} 58 micrograms, p less than 0.05). In both groups the number of children who had been suffering from allergic diseases and sensitization to aeroallergens, found by means of the skin test, was the same. Comparison of the total IgE levels showed no difference at all between the two groups. As far as the white blood cells are concerned, the total and differential cell count was the same, whereas lymphocyte subpopulations showed readily recognizable changes.

  4. [Prevention of allergic diseases in childhood: from theory to reality].

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Allergic diseases have an increasing worldwide prevalence and a great impact on the health related costs. The research is focused on the study of etiological and risk factors of allergic diseases that can potentially be modified with primary, secondary and tertiary prevention strategies. Many of these measures do not have a definitively proven effect taking place in a controlled context different to what happens in real life. This paper aims to review the latest evidence on prevention of allergic diseases considering certainties and unresolved issues and focuses mainly on environmental, dietary, pharmacological and immunological preventive strategies for different levels of prevention. It is imperative to have a better understanding of genetic and environmental factors that cause allergic diseases to optimize preventive measures that are effective in reversing the increasing trend in the prevalence of allergic illnesses in childhood. PMID:27164342

  5. Toll-Like Receptor 7-Targeted Therapy in Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lebold, Katie M.; Jacoby, David B.; Drake, Matthew G.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis are inflammatory diseases of the respiratory tract characterized by an excessive type-2 T helper cell (Th2) immune response. Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is a single-stranded viral RNA receptor expressed in the airway that initiates a Th1 immune response and has garnered interest as a novel therapeutic target for treatment of allergic airway diseases. In animal models, synthetic TLR7 agonists reduce airway hyperreactivity, eosinophilic inflammation, and airway remodeling while decreasing Th2-associated cytokines. Furthermore, activation of TLR7 rapidly relaxes airway smooth muscle via production of nitric oxide. Thus, TLR7 has dual bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory effects. Two TLR7 ligands with promising pharmacologic profiles have entered clinical trials for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Moreover, TLR7 agonists are potential antiviral therapies against respiratory viruses. TLR7 agonists enhance influenza vaccine efficacy and also reduce viral titers when given during an active airway infection. In this review, we examine the current data supporting TLR7 as a therapeutic target in allergic airway diseases. PMID:27226793

  6. Toll-Like Receptor 7-Targeted Therapy in Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Lebold, Katie M; Jacoby, David B; Drake, Matthew G

    2016-03-01

    Allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis are inflammatory diseases of the respiratory tract characterized by an excessive type-2 T helper cell (Th2) immune response. Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is a single-stranded viral RNA receptor expressed in the airway that initiates a Th1 immune response and has garnered interest as a novel therapeutic target for treatment of allergic airway diseases. In animal models, synthetic TLR7 agonists reduce airway hyperreactivity, eosinophilic inflammation, and airway remodeling while decreasing Th2-associated cytokines. Furthermore, activation of TLR7 rapidly relaxes airway smooth muscle via production of nitric oxide. Thus, TLR7 has dual bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory effects. Two TLR7 ligands with promising pharmacologic profiles have entered clinical trials for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Moreover, TLR7 agonists are potential antiviral therapies against respiratory viruses. TLR7 agonists enhance influenza vaccine efficacy and also reduce viral titers when given during an active airway infection. In this review, we examine the current data supporting TLR7 as a therapeutic target in allergic airway diseases. PMID:27226793

  7. Allergic airway disease in Italian bakers and pastry makers.

    PubMed Central

    De Zotti, R; Larese, F; Bovenzi, M; Negro, C; Molinari, S

    1994-01-01

    A survey was carried out on respiratory symptoms and skin prick test response to common allergens (atopy), storage mites, and occupational allergens among 226 bakers and pastry makers from 105 small businesses in northern Italy. Atopy was present in 54 workers (23.4%); 40 workers (17.7%) were skin positive to at least one storage mite, 27 (11.9%) to wheat flour and 17 (7.5%) to alpha-amylase. Work related asthma was reported by 11 (4.9%) workers and rhinoconjunctivitis by 31 (17.7%); 22 workers (10.2%) complained of chronic bronchitis. The distribution of skin prick test results among bakers and among 119 white collar workers did not indicate (by logistic analysis) an increased risk for bakers to skin sensitisation to common allergens, storage mite, or to a group of five flours. Sensitisation to wheat flour, on the other hand, was present only among exposed workers. Skin sensitisation to occupational allergens was significantly associated with atopy (p < 0.001), smoking habit (p = 0.015), and work seniority (p = 0.027). The risk of work related symptoms was associated with sensitisation to wheat or alpha-amylase, and with atopy, but not with sensitisation to storage mites, work seniority, or smoking habit. The results of the study indicate that there is still a significant risk of allergic respiratory disease among Italian bakers. Not only wheat allergens, but also alpha-amylase must be considered as causative agents, although sensitisation to storage mites is not important in the occupational allergic response. Atopy must be regarded as an important predisposing factor for skin sensitisation to occupational allergens and for the onset of symptoms at work. The data confirm that for effective prevention, greater care should be taken not only in limiting environmental exposure, but also in identifying susceptible people. PMID:7951780

  8. The Cohort for Childhood Origin of Asthma and allergic diseases (COCOA) study: design, rationale and methods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    - and post-natal psychological stress, and the child’s neurodevelopment, nutritional status, and development of allergic and respiratory illnesses. The child’s microbiome, genes, epigenetics, plasma cytokine levels, and neuropsychological status, the microbiome of the residence, and the levels of indoor and outdoor pollutants are measured by standard procedures. Discussion The COCOA study will improve our understanding of how individual genetic or environmental risk factors influence susceptibility to allergic disease and how these variables interact to shape the phenotype of allergic diseases. PMID:24990471

  9. Respiratory disease in cork workers (`suberosis') 1

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, J. Cortez; Avila, Ramiro

    1973-01-01

    Pimentel, J. Cortez, and Avila, Ramiro (1973).Thorax, 28, 409-423. Respiratory disease in cork workers (`suberosis'). A clinical, immunological, and histological study of 63 workers in the cork industry with bronchopulmonary manifestations is described. From this study, it was possible to recognize three types of reaction to the inhalation of cork dust: asthma-like syndromes, extrinsic allergic alveolitis, and chronic bronchitis with bronchiectasis. The place of histological (lung biopsy and scalene node biopsy) and immunological methods in the diagnosis of these different forms of the disease is evaluated. The high incidence of precipitins to Penicillium frequentans is stressed because the antigens produced by this fungus seem to be more pathogenic than those produced by the mouldy cork itself. The histological studies have demonstrated extrapulmonary foci of disease and have also revealed for the first time, abnormalities in the lungs of symptomless subjects. Pathological changes present in the lungs of patients with the chronic form of extrinsic allergic alveolitis, long after removal from exposure to cork dust, are also described. The experimental material of Horta and Cancella (1956) is reviewed in the light of present knowledge, and the similarity between the lesions produced in animals and those found in cork workers is noted. Finally, especial importance is attached to the finding of cork dust within the lesions, the technique for its identification and staining being described. Images PMID:4200382

  10. WORKSHOP ON STATUS OF TEST METHODS FOR ASSESSING POTENTIAL OF CHEMICALS TO INDUCE RESPIRATORY ALLERGIC REACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the association between allergy and asthma and the increasing incidence of morbidity and mortality due to asthma, there is growing concern over the potential of industrial chemicals to produce allergic reactions in the respiratory tract. Two classes of chemicals have b...

  11. Tombs of Aspergillus: A missed cause of recurrent respiratory infections in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Onkar Kumar; Khanna, Arjun; Dabral, Charul; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Broncholithiasis is an often overlooked condition and has been associated with symptoms such as cough, hemoptysis, and recurrent respiratory infections. The most common mechanism of a broncholith formation is the enlargement and subsequent erosion of a lymph node into an adjacent airway. Here, we describe this entity in a patient with advanced allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure, and with frequent infective exacerbations. These frequent exacerbations were initially attributed to the poor lung function of the patient and the inability to cough out the secretions. The diagnosis of broncholithiasis was eventually established on bronchoscopy, when the patient was intubated and mechanically ventilated. In this patient, the mixed broncholiths were not associated with mediastinal lymphadenopathy and with biopsy showing Aspergillus with no lymph node tissue indicating its bronchial origin. A high index of suspicion should be kept in patients with recurrent infective exacerbations of pulmonary diseases, especially when computed tomography images show calcifications in the vicinity of airways even in the absence of lymphadenopathy, as most of these can be treated with routine bronchoscopic interventions. PMID:27555698

  12. Tombs of Aspergillus: A missed cause of recurrent respiratory infections in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Jha, Onkar Kumar; Khanna, Arjun; Dabral, Charul; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-07-01

    Broncholithiasis is an often overlooked condition and has been associated with symptoms such as cough, hemoptysis, and recurrent respiratory infections. The most common mechanism of a broncholith formation is the enlargement and subsequent erosion of a lymph node into an adjacent airway. Here, we describe this entity in a patient with advanced allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure, and with frequent infective exacerbations. These frequent exacerbations were initially attributed to the poor lung function of the patient and the inability to cough out the secretions. The diagnosis of broncholithiasis was eventually established on bronchoscopy, when the patient was intubated and mechanically ventilated. In this patient, the mixed broncholiths were not associated with mediastinal lymphadenopathy and with biopsy showing Aspergillus with no lymph node tissue indicating its bronchial origin. A high index of suspicion should be kept in patients with recurrent infective exacerbations of pulmonary diseases, especially when computed tomography images show calcifications in the vicinity of airways even in the absence of lymphadenopathy, as most of these can be treated with routine bronchoscopic interventions. PMID:27555698

  13. Gut Microbiota and Allergic Disease. New Insights.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Susan V

    2016-03-01

    The rapid rise in childhood allergies (atopy) in Westernized nations has implicated associated environmental exposures and lifestyles as primary drivers of disease development. Culture-based microbiological studies indicate that atopy has demonstrable ties to altered gut microbial colonization in very early life. Infants who exhibit more severe multisensitization to food- or aero-allergens have a significantly higher risk of subsequently developing asthma in childhood. Hence an emerging hypothesis posits that environment- or lifestyle-driven aberrancies in the early-life gut microbiome composition and by extension, microbial function, represent a key mediator of childhood allergic asthma. Animal studies support this hypothesis. Environmental microbial exposures epidemiologically associated with allergy protection in humans confer protection against airway allergy in mice. In addition, gut microbiome-derived short-chain fatty acids produced from a high-fiber diet have been shown to protect against allergy via modulation of both local and remote mucosal immunity as well as hematopoietic antigen-presenting cell populations. Here we review key data supporting the concept of a gut-airway axis and its critical role in childhood atopy. PMID:27027953

  14. The role of Probiotics in allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Michail, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Allergic disorders are very common in the pediatric age group. While the exact etiology is unclear, evidence is mounting to incriminate environmental factors and an aberrant gut microbiota with a shift of the Th1/Th2 balance towards a Th2 response. Probiotics have been shown to modulate the immune system back to a Th1 response. Several in vitro studies suggest a role for probiotics in treating allergic disorders. Human trials demonstrate a limited benefit for the use of probiotics in atopic dermatitis in a preventive as well as a therapeutic capacity. Data supporting their use in allergic rhinitis are less robust. Currently, there is no role for probiotic therapy in the treatment of bronchial asthma. Future studies will be critical in determining the exact role of probiotics in allergic disorders. PMID:19946408

  15. Novel delivery systems for anti-allergic agents: allergic disease and innovative treatments.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Carla M; Coelho, Pedro B; Oliveira, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Anti-allergic agents are used to treat a great variety of diseases which usually involve an inflammation reaction. These compounds act by inhibiting the release and the effects of inflammatory mediators (e.g. histamine) in the target tissue. The purpose of anti-allergy therapy is to deliver the drug to its local of action in a therapeutic concentration, minimizing the undesired side effects. In order to solve some of the anti-allergic agents' physicochemical drawbacks and the limitations associated to conventional pharmaceutical formulations (e.g. poor solubility and absorption, skin permeation, stability), novel drug delivery systems, such as cyclodextrins, liposomes, micelles, microemulsions, nano and microparticles, have been developed. Depending on the allergic condition, several administration routes are used to deliver anti-allergic agents, each with its own disadvantages to overcome. In the literature, there are a vast number of papers concerning novel delivery systems for anti-allergic agents, making it difficult to evaluate the information and the promising outcomes. The aim of the present review article is to compile the recent (i.e. in the new millennium) improvements of novel drug delivery technology focusing on the achievement of anti-allergic therapeutic delivery. The potential intrinsic benefits of these systems will reflect an increased therapeutic adherence and better patients' life quality. A critical prospect of future clinical trial directions will also be discussed. PMID:25895551

  16. Long-Acting Beta Agonists Enhance Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John M.; Mak, Garbo; Shaw, Joanne; Porter, Paul; McDermott, Catherine; Roberts, Luz; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Millien, Valentine O.; Qian, Yuping; Song, Li-Zhen; Frazier, Vincent; Kim, Choel; Kim, Jeong Joo; Bond, Richard A.; Milner, Joshua D.; Zhang, Yuan; Mandal, Pijus K.; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common of medical illnesses and is treated in part by drugs that activate the beta-2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) to dilate obstructed airways. Such drugs include long acting beta agonists (LABAs) that are paradoxically linked to excess asthma-related mortality. Here we show that LABAs such as salmeterol and structurally related β2-AR drugs such as formoterol and carvedilol, but not short-acting agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, promote exaggerated asthma-like allergic airway disease and enhanced airway constriction in mice. We demonstrate that salmeterol aberrantly promotes activation of the allergic disease-related transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in multiple mouse and human cells. A novel inhibitor of STAT6, PM-242H, inhibited initiation of allergic disease induced by airway fungal challenge, reversed established allergic airway disease in mice, and blocked salmeterol-dependent enhanced allergic airway disease. Thus, structurally related β2-AR ligands aberrantly activate STAT6 and promote allergic airway disease. This untoward pharmacological property likely explains adverse outcomes observed with LABAs, which may be overcome by agents that antagonize STAT6. PMID:26605551

  17. Long-Acting Beta Agonists Enhance Allergic Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Knight, John M; Mak, Garbo; Shaw, Joanne; Porter, Paul; McDermott, Catherine; Roberts, Luz; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Millien, Valentine O; Qian, Yuping; Song, Li-Zhen; Frazier, Vincent; Kim, Choel; Kim, Jeong Joo; Bond, Richard A; Milner, Joshua D; Zhang, Yuan; Mandal, Pijus K; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah; McMurray, John S; Corry, David B

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common of medical illnesses and is treated in part by drugs that activate the beta-2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) to dilate obstructed airways. Such drugs include long acting beta agonists (LABAs) that are paradoxically linked to excess asthma-related mortality. Here we show that LABAs such as salmeterol and structurally related β2-AR drugs such as formoterol and carvedilol, but not short-acting agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, promote exaggerated asthma-like allergic airway disease and enhanced airway constriction in mice. We demonstrate that salmeterol aberrantly promotes activation of the allergic disease-related transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in multiple mouse and human cells. A novel inhibitor of STAT6, PM-242H, inhibited initiation of allergic disease induced by airway fungal challenge, reversed established allergic airway disease in mice, and blocked salmeterol-dependent enhanced allergic airway disease. Thus, structurally related β2-AR ligands aberrantly activate STAT6 and promote allergic airway disease. This untoward pharmacological property likely explains adverse outcomes observed with LABAs, which may be overcome by agents that antagonize STAT6. PMID:26605551

  18. Macrophage Heterogeneity in Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boorsma, Carian E.; Draijer, Christina; Melgert, Barbro N.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are among the most abundant cells in the respiratory tract, and they can have strikingly different phenotypes within this environment. Our knowledge of the different phenotypes and their functions in the lung is sketchy at best, but they appear to be linked to the protection of gas exchange against microbial threats and excessive tissue responses. Phenotypical changes of macrophages within the lung are found in many respiratory diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper will give an overview of what macrophage phenotypes have been described, what their known functions are, what is known about their presence in the different obstructive and restrictive respiratory diseases (asthma, COPD, pulmonary fibrosis), and how they are thought to contribute to the etiology and resolution of these diseases. PMID:23533311

  19. Respiratory disease surveillance in Hungary

    SciTech Connect

    Agocs, M.M.; Rudnai, P.; Etzel, R.A. )

    1992-08-28

    In October 1989, the Hungarian National Institute of Hygiene initiated the Children's Acute Respiratory Morbidity (CHARM) Surveillance System to assess the association between nine reportable respiratory diseases and air pollution. The weekly number of physician-diagnosed, reportable respiratory diseases among four age groups of children (less than 1, 1-2, 3-5, and 6-14 years) was tabulated for Sopron, a city with 60,000 residents. We calculated the proportion of diseases occurring during weeks with low, moderate, and high sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations. The weekly averages of the 24-hour median SO2 concentrations were divided into thirds at less than or equal to 17.6, greater than 17.6 to less than or equal to 26.3, and greater than 26.3 micrograms/m3 (range: 0.9-79.6 micrograms/m3), and the NO2 concentrations at less than or equal to 29.8, greater than 29.8 to less than or equal to 44.1, and greater than 44.1 micrograms/m3 (range: 4.2-90.1 micrograms/m3). During 1990, 11,474 respiratory disease cases occurred among the 4,020 children less than 15 years of age living in Sopron and monitored by the CHARM system. The two most frequently reported disease categories were rhinitis/tonsillitis/pharyngitis (71.5%) and acute bronchitis (8.5%). Sixty-seven percent of pneumonia cases occurred when SO2 concentrations were highest. We found no association between levels of NO2 and respiratory diseases. The CHARM Surveillance System may characterize more fully which groups of children develop particular respiratory diseases following exposure to air pollution.

  20. [Respiratory treatments in neuromuscular disease].

    PubMed

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Cols Roig, M; Salcedo Posadas, A; Sardon Prado, O; Asensio de la Cruz, O; Torrent Vernetta, A

    2014-10-01

    In a previous article, a review was presented of the respiratory pathophysiology of the patient with neuromuscular disease, as well as their clinical evaluation and the major complications causing pulmonary deterioration. This article presents the respiratory treatments required to preserve lung function in neuromuscular disease as long as possible, as well as in special situations (respiratory infections, spinal curvature surgery, etc.). Special emphasis is made on the use of non-invasive ventilation, which is changing the natural history of many of these diseases. The increase in survival and life expectancy of these children means that they can continue their clinical care in adult units. The transition from pediatric care must be an active, timely and progressive process. It may be slightly stressful for the patient before the adaptation to this new environment, with multidisciplinary care always being maintained. PMID:24890888

  1. Intestinal microbiota and allergic diseases: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Melli, L C F L; do Carmo-Rodrigues, M S; Araújo-Filho, H B; Solé, D; de Morais, M B

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that possible imbalances in intestinal microbiota composition may be implicated in the occurrence of allergic diseases. Although several studies published until 2006 indicated a correlation between microbiota composition and allergic symptoms, it has not been possible to distinguish protective microorganisms from those associated with increased risk of allergic diseases. Therefore, the objective of this study was to review the studies published since 2007 that address the intestinal microbiota in allergic diseases. Twenty-one studies were identified after excluding those that performed a clinical intervention before stool collection. In the early microbiota of children who later developed allergies, lower bacterial diversity was observed, with a predominance of Firmicutes; a higher count of Bacteroidaceae; a higher prevalence of the anaerobic bacteria Bacteroides fragilis, Escherichia coli, Clostridium difficile, Bifidobacterium catenulatum, Bifidobacterium bifidum, and Bifidobacterium longum; and a lower prevalence of Bifidobacterium adolescentis, B. bifidum, and Lactobacillus. In the microbiota of allergic children whose intestinal microbiota was assessed at the onset of allergic symptoms, there was a higher count of Bacteroides; a lower count of Akkermansia muciniphila, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, and Clostridium; a higher prevalence of B. adolescentis; a lower prevalence of B. catenulatum and Staphylococcus aureus; and a lower bacterial diversity. PMID:25985709

  2. Immunoregulatory Role of HLA-G in Allergic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Murdaca, Giuseppe; Contini, Paola; Negrini, Simone; Ciprandi, Giorgio; Puppo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases are sustained by a T-helper 2 polarization leading to interleukin-4 secretion, IgE-dependent inflammation, and mast cell and eosinophil activation. HLA-G molecules, both in membrane-bound and in soluble forms, play a central role in modulation of immune responses. Elevated levels of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) molecules are detected in serum of patients with allergic rhinitis to seasonal and perennial allergens and correlate with allergen-specific IgE levels, clinical severity, drug consumption, and response to allergen-specific immunotherapy. sHLA-G molecules are also found in airway epithelium of patients with allergic asthma and high levels of sHLA-G molecules are detectable in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage of asthmatic patients correlating with allergen-specific IgE levels. Finally, HLA-G molecules are expressed by T cells, monocytes-macrophages, and Langerhans cells infiltrating the dermis of atopic dermatitis patients. Collectively, although at present it is difficult to completely define the role of HLA-G molecules in allergic diseases, it may be suggested that they are expressed and secreted by immune cells during the allergic reaction in an attempt to suppress allergic inflammation. PMID:27413762

  3. Immunoregulatory Role of HLA-G in Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Contini, Paola; Negrini, Simone; Ciprandi, Giorgio; Puppo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases are sustained by a T-helper 2 polarization leading to interleukin-4 secretion, IgE-dependent inflammation, and mast cell and eosinophil activation. HLA-G molecules, both in membrane-bound and in soluble forms, play a central role in modulation of immune responses. Elevated levels of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) molecules are detected in serum of patients with allergic rhinitis to seasonal and perennial allergens and correlate with allergen-specific IgE levels, clinical severity, drug consumption, and response to allergen-specific immunotherapy. sHLA-G molecules are also found in airway epithelium of patients with allergic asthma and high levels of sHLA-G molecules are detectable in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage of asthmatic patients correlating with allergen-specific IgE levels. Finally, HLA-G molecules are expressed by T cells, monocytes-macrophages, and Langerhans cells infiltrating the dermis of atopic dermatitis patients. Collectively, although at present it is difficult to completely define the role of HLA-G molecules in allergic diseases, it may be suggested that they are expressed and secreted by immune cells during the allergic reaction in an attempt to suppress allergic inflammation. PMID:27413762

  4. Fungal glycan interactions with epithelial cells in allergic airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Roy, René M.; Klein, Bruce S.

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to fungi results in a wide range of health outcomes, from invasive disease or allergy to immune tolerance. Inhaled fungi contact airway epithelial cells as an early event, and this host:fungal interaction can shape the eventual immunological outcome. Emerging evidence points to exposure to fungal cell wall carbohydrates in the development of allergic airway disease. Herein, we describe determinants of fungal allergenicity, and review the responses of airway epithelial cells to fungal carbohydrates. A greater understanding of the recognition of and response to fungal carbohydrates by airway epithelial cells may lead to the development of targeted therapies that ameliorate allergic airway disease. PMID:23602359

  5. Engineered silica nanoparticles act as adjuvants to enhance allergic airway disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the increase in production and use of engineered nanoparticles (NP; ≤ 100 nm), safety concerns have risen about the potential health effects of occupational or environmental NP exposure. Results of animal toxicology studies suggest that inhalation of NP may cause pulmonary injury with subsequent acute or chronic inflammation. People with chronic respiratory diseases like asthma or allergic rhinitis may be even more susceptible to toxic effects of inhaled NP. Few studies, however, have investigated adverse effects of inhaled NP that may enhance the development of allergic airway disease. Methods We investigated the potential of polyethylene glycol coated amorphous silica NP (SNP; 90 nm diameter) to promote allergic airway disease when co-exposed during sensitization with an allergen. BALB/c mice were sensitized by intranasal instillation with 0.02% ovalbumin (OVA; allergen) or saline (control), and co-exposed to 0, 10, 100, or 400 μg of SNP. OVA-sensitized mice were then challenged intranasally with 0.5% OVA 14 and 15 days after sensitization, and all animals were sacrificed a day after the last OVA challenge. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected, and pulmonary tissue was processed for histopathology and biochemical and molecular analyses. Results Co-exposure to SNP during OVA sensitization caused a dose-dependent enhancement of allergic airway disease upon challenge with OVA alone. This adjuvant-like effect was manifested by significantly greater OVA-specific serum IgE, airway eosinophil infiltration, mucous cell metaplasia, and Th2 and Th17 cytokine gene and protein expression, as compared to mice that were sensitized to OVA without SNP. In saline controls, SNP exposure did cause a moderate increase in airway neutrophils at the highest doses. Conclusions These results suggest that airway exposure to engineered SNP could enhance allergen sensitization and foster greater manifestation of allergic airway disease upon

  6. Probiotic Therapy as a Novel Approach for Allergic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Zheng Quan; Anzela, Anzela; Tang, Mimi L. K.; Licciardi, Paul V.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of allergic disease has increased dramatically in Western countries over the past few decades. The hygiene hypothesis, whereby reduced exposure to microbial stimuli in early life programs the immune system toward a Th2-type allergic response, is suggested to be a major mechanism to explain this phenomenon in developed populations. Such microbial exposures are recognized to be critical regulators of intestinal microbiota development. Furthermore, intestinal microbiota has an important role in signaling to the developing mucosal immune system. Intestinal dysbiosis has been shown to precede the onset of clinical allergy, possibly through altered immune regulation. Existing treatments for allergic diseases such as eczema, asthma, and food allergy are limited and so the focus has been to identify alternative treatment or preventive strategies. Over the past 10 years, a number of clinical studies have investigated the potential of probiotic bacteria to ameliorate the pathological features of allergic disease. This novel approach has stemmed from numerous data reporting the pleiotropic effects of probiotics that include immunomodulation, restoration of intestinal dysbiosis as well as maintaining epithelial barrier integrity. In this mini-review, the emerging role of probiotics in the prevention and/or treatment of allergic disease are discussed with a focus on the evidence from animal and human studies. PMID:23049509

  7. Lysophosphatidylcholine plays critical role in allergic airway disease manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Preeti; Gaur, Shailendera Nath; Arora, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 (sPLA2), pivotal for allergic and inflammatory response, hydrolyses phosphatidylcholine (PC) to lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). In present study, the role of LPC in allergic airway disease manifestation was studied using mouse model. Balb/c mice were immunized using cockroach extract (CE) and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2 inhibitor. Airway hyperresponse (AHR), lung-histology, total and differential leukocyte count (TLC&DLC), Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured. Exogenous LPC was given to the mice with or without CE sensitization, to demonstrate its role in allergic airway disease manifestation. Anti-CD1d antibody was given to study the involvement of natural killer T (NKT) cells in LPC induced response. AHR, lung-inflammation, TLC, DLC, Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels were increased on CE challenge. sPLA2 activity and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2-inhibitor, which decreased AHR, and inflammatory parameters. Exogenous LPC with or without CE sensitization increased above parameters. CE challenge or LPC exposure increased LY49C+TCRβ+ NKT cells in BALF and spleen, which was reduced by anti-CD1d antibody, accompanied with reduction in AHR and allergic airway inflammation parameters. Conclusively, LPC induces allergic airway disease manifestation and it does so probably via CD1d-restricted LY49C+TCRβ+ NKT cells. PMID:27282246

  8. Lysophosphatidylcholine plays critical role in allergic airway disease manifestation.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Preeti; Gaur, Shailendera Nath; Arora, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 (sPLA2), pivotal for allergic and inflammatory response, hydrolyses phosphatidylcholine (PC) to lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). In present study, the role of LPC in allergic airway disease manifestation was studied using mouse model. Balb/c mice were immunized using cockroach extract (CE) and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2 inhibitor. Airway hyperresponse (AHR), lung-histology, total and differential leukocyte count (TLC&DLC), Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured. Exogenous LPC was given to the mice with or without CE sensitization, to demonstrate its role in allergic airway disease manifestation. Anti-CD1d antibody was given to study the involvement of natural killer T (NKT) cells in LPC induced response. AHR, lung-inflammation, TLC, DLC, Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels were increased on CE challenge. sPLA2 activity and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2-inhibitor, which decreased AHR, and inflammatory parameters. Exogenous LPC with or without CE sensitization increased above parameters. CE challenge or LPC exposure increased LY49C(+)TCRβ(+) NKT cells in BALF and spleen, which was reduced by anti-CD1d antibody, accompanied with reduction in AHR and allergic airway inflammation parameters. Conclusively, LPC induces allergic airway disease manifestation and it does so probably via CD1d-restricted LY49C(+)TCRβ(+) NKT cells. PMID:27282246

  9. Cough and dyspnoea may discriminate allergic and infectious respiratory phenotypes in infancy.

    PubMed

    Rancière, Fanny; Clarisse, Bénédicte; Nikasinovic, Lydia; Just, Jocelyne; Momas, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    Asthma symptoms are non-specific during infancy, making the identification of different subgroups among preschool children with early respiratory manifestations an important challenge. We previously used a clustering approach to identify bronchial obstructive phenotypes in 1-yr-old infants from the Pollution and Asthma Risk: an Infant Study (PARIS) birth cohort. In the present study, we examined whether these phenotypes were stable at 3 yr and studied their comorbidity and risk factors. Partitioning around medoids (PAM) method was applied at 1 and 3 yr of age to cluster children according to wheezing, dry night cough, dyspnoea with sleep disturbance and breathlessness. The resulting groups were used to derive phenotypes in 2084 children during their first 3 yr of life. Analysis of associated comorbidity and risk factors was conducted using multinomial logistic regression. PAM groups were similarly defined at both ages so that two respiratory phenotypes were identified between birth and 3 yr: cough phenotype (CP) and dyspnoea phenotype (DP) including 14.1% and 30.7% of children, respectively. CP infants experienced more often allergic features than DP, dominated by respiratory infections. Parental history of allergy, potential allergen exposure and psychosocial factors were associated with CP. Day care centre attendance was more frequent in DP as well as exposure to domestic chemical pollution, suggesting a greater vulnerability to pathogens. Finally, dry night cough and dyspnoea disturbing the sleep appear to be markers of two respiratory profiles potentially allergic and infectious before 3 yr old. PMID:22300433

  10. Weighted Road Density and Allergic Disease in Children at High Risk of Developing Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Hansell, Anna L.; Rose, Nectarios; Cowie, Christine T.; Belousova, Elena G.; Bakolis, Ioannis; Ng, Kitty; Toelle, Brett G.; Marks, Guy B.; Almqvist, plus Catarina; Ampon, Rosario D; Ayer, Julian; Bird, Tessa; Brew, Bronwyn K; Britton, Warwick J; Celermajer, David; Cowell, Christopher T; Crisafulli, Daniele; Criss, Sally; Davis, Stella; Nabil Ezz, Wafaa; Forbes, Samantha; Garden, Frances L; Kemp, Andrew S; Knezevic, Natalia; Krause, William; Leeder, Stephen R; Mellis, Craig M; Mihrshahi, Seema; Neumann, Mark; Peat, Jennifer K; Quinones-Lucio, Andres; Skilton, Michael; Tattam, Anne; Tovey, Euan R; Vanlaar, Carl H.; Vukasin, Nicola; Wainwright, Craig; Webb, Karen L; Weber-Chrysochoou, Christina; Woolcock, Ann J; Zhou, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence for an association between traffic-related air pollution and allergic disease is inconsistent, possibly because the adverse effects may be limited to susceptible subgroups and these have not been identified. This study examined children in the Childhood Asthma Prevention Study (CAPS), potentially susceptible to air pollution effects because of a family history of asthma. Methods We examined cross-sectional associations at age eight years between road density within 75 m and 50 m of home address weighted by road type (traffic density), as a proxy for traffic-related air pollution, on the following allergic and respiratory outcomes: skin prick tests (SPTs), total and specific serum IgE, pre- and post-bronchodilator lung function, airway hyperresponsiveness, exhaled NO, and reported asthma and rhinitis. Results Weighted road density was positively associated with allergic sensitisation and allergic rhinitis. Adjusted relative risk (RR) for house dust mite (HDM) positive SPT was 1.25 (95% CI: 1.06–1.48), for detectable house dust mite-specific IgE was 1.19 (95% CI: 1.01–1.41) and for allergic rhinitis was 1.30 (95% CI: 1.03–1.63) per 100 m local road or 33.3 m motorway within 50 m of home. Associations were also seen with small decrements of peak and mid-expiratory flows and increased risk of asthma, current wheeze and rhinitis in atopic children. Conclusion Associations between road density and allergic disease were found in a potentially susceptible subgroup of children at high risk of developing atopy and asthma. PMID:24949625

  11. Respiratory and allergic symptoms in wool textile workers.

    PubMed Central

    Love, R G; Smith, T A; Gurr, D; Soutar, C A; Scarisbrick, D A; Seaton, A

    1988-01-01

    An epidemiological study of 2153 workers in 15 West Yorkshire wool textile mills was conducted to determine relations between respiratory symptoms and exposure to inspirable wool mill dust. A questionnaire designed to elicit all the common respiratory symptoms was developed and tested, and administered to all workers willing to participate (85%). It was translated and administered in Urdu for the 385 workers from Pakistan whose English was not fluent. Symptoms investigated included cough and phlegm, wheezing and chest tightness, breathlessness and its variability, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, chills, nosebleeds, and chest illnesses. Additional questions were asked, where appropriate, about the times of day, days of the week, seasons, and places that the symptoms were worse or better than normal. An environmental survey was carried out at each mill, which included 629 measurements of inspirable dust, enabling estimates to be made of the airborne concentrations of inspirable dust usually experienced by each member of the workforce under current conditions. Overall symptom prevalences were: persistent cough and phlegm, 9%; wheeze, 31%; breathlessness on walking with others on level ground, 10%; persistent rhinitis, 18%; persistent conjunctivitis, 10%; persistent chills, 2%; ten or more nosebleeds a year, 2%; and three or more chest illnesses in past three years, 5%. After allowing for the effects of age, sex, smoking habit, and ethnic group, cough and phlegm, wheeze, breathlessness, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and nosebleeds were found to be more frequent in those exposed to higher than to lower concentrations of dust. In some experiencing high concentrations (blenders and carpet yarn backwinders) cough and phlegm, wheeze, rhinitis, and conjunctivitis were related to the years worked in such jobs. Relative risks of each symptom in relation to inspirable dust concentrations were calculated by means of a logistic regression analysis. At concentrations of 10 mg/m3, the

  12. Climate change and respiratory disease: European Respiratory Society position statement.

    PubMed

    Ayres, J G; Forsberg, B; Annesi-Maesano, I; Dey, R; Ebi, K L; Helms, P J; Medina-Ramón, M; Windt, M; Forastiere, F

    2009-08-01

    Climate change will affect individuals with pre-existing respiratory disease, but the extent of the effect remains unclear. The present position statement was developed on behalf of the European Respiratory Society in order to identify areas of concern arising from climate change for individuals with respiratory disease, healthcare workers in the respiratory sector and policy makers. The statement was developed following a 2-day workshop held in Leuven (Belgium) in March 2008. Key areas of concern for the respiratory community arising from climate change are discussed and recommendations made to address gaps in knowledge. The most important recommendation was the development of more accurate predictive models for predicting the impact of climate change on respiratory health. Respiratory healthcare workers also have an advocatory role in persuading governments and the European Union to maintain awareness and appropriate actions with respect to climate change, and these areas are also discussed in the position statement. PMID:19251790

  13. Fetal growth and risk of childhood asthma and allergic disease

    PubMed Central

    Tedner, S G; Örtqvist, A K; Almqvist, C

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Early genetic and environmental factors have been discussed as potential causes for the high prevalence of asthma and allergic disease in the western world, and knowledge on fetal growth and its consequence on future health and disease development is emerging. Objective This review article is an attempt to summarize research on fetal growth and risk of asthma and allergic disease. Current knowledge and novel findings will be reviewed and open research questions identified, to give basic scientists, immunologists and clinicians an overview of an emerging research field. Methods PubMed-search on pre-defined terms and cross-references. Results Several studies have shown a correlation between low birth weight and/or gestational age and asthma and high birth weight and/or gestational age and atopy. The exact mechanism is not yet clear but both environmental and genetic factors seem to contribute to fetal growth. Some of these factors are confounders that can be adjusted for, and twin studies have been very helpful in this context. Suggested mechanisms behind fetal growth are often linked to the feto-maternal circulation, including the development of placenta and umbilical cord. However, the causal link between fetal growth restriction and subsequent asthma and allergic disease remains unexplained. New research regarding the catch-up growth following growth restriction has posited an alternative theory that diseases later on in life result from rapid catch-up growth rather than intrauterine growth restriction per se. Several studies have found a correlation between a rapid weight gain after birth and development of asthma or wheezing in childhood. Conclusion and clinical relevance Asthma and allergic disease are multifactorial. Several mechanisms seem to influence their development. Additional studies are needed before we fully understand the causal links between fetal growth and development of asthma and allergic diseases. PMID:22994341

  14. Allergic diseases: the price of civilisational progress

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Paweł; Rutkowska-Talipska, Joanna; Sulkowski, Stanisław; Rutkowski, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    Atopic disorders are a major global health problem. The prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis has been increasing over the last four decades, both in the industrialized and developing countries. It seems to be related to changes in the social structure, increasing industrialization, pollution and dietary changes. Many hypotheses link the allergy epidemic to stringent hygiene, dominance of a westernized lifestyle and an accelerated pace of life. Dietary antioxidants, lipids, sodium, vitamin D seem also to be implicated. We endeavour to review the most relevant theories with a special emphasis on the hygiene, antioxidative, lipid and air pollution hypotheses. It is however important to note that none of them explains all the aspects of unprecedented rise in the prevalence of allergic disorders. A complex interplay between host's immune response, invading pathogens, diversity of environmental factors and genetic background seems to be of a particular importance. Current allergy epidemic is multifactorial and basic and epidemiologic studies are warranted to further our understanding of this phenomenon. PMID:25097472

  15. Allergic diseases: the price of civilisational progress.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Krzysztof; Sowa, Paweł; Rutkowska-Talipska, Joanna; Sulkowski, Stanisław; Rutkowski, Ryszard

    2014-05-01

    Atopic disorders are a major global health problem. The prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis has been increasing over the last four decades, both in the industrialized and developing countries. It seems to be related to changes in the social structure, increasing industrialization, pollution and dietary changes. Many hypotheses link the allergy epidemic to stringent hygiene, dominance of a westernized lifestyle and an accelerated pace of life. Dietary antioxidants, lipids, sodium, vitamin D seem also to be implicated. We endeavour to review the most relevant theories with a special emphasis on the hygiene, antioxidative, lipid and air pollution hypotheses. It is however important to note that none of them explains all the aspects of unprecedented rise in the prevalence of allergic disorders. A complex interplay between host's immune response, invading pathogens, diversity of environmental factors and genetic background seems to be of a particular importance. Current allergy epidemic is multifactorial and basic and epidemiologic studies are warranted to further our understanding of this phenomenon. PMID:25097472

  16. Allergic diseases among children: nutritional prevention and intervention.

    PubMed

    Hendaus, Mohamed A; Jomha, Fatima A; Ehlayel, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases comprise a genetically heterogeneous group of chronic, immunomediated diseases. It has been clearly reported that the prevalence of these diseases has been on the rise for the last few decades, but at different rates, in various areas of the world. This paper discusses the epidemiology of allergic diseases among children and their negative impact on affected patients, their families, and societies. These effects include the adverse effects on quality of life and economic costs. Medical interest has shifted from tertiary or secondary prevention to primary prevention of these chronic diseases among high-risk infants in early life. Being simple, practical, and cost-effective are mandatory features for any candidate methods delivering these strategies. Dietary therapy fits this model well, as it is simple, practical, and cost-effective, and involves diverse methods. The highest priority strategy is feeding these infants breast milk. For those who are not breast-fed, there should be a strategy to maintain beneficial gut flora that positively influences intestinal immunity. We review the current use of probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics, and safety and adverse effects. Other dietary modalities of possible potential in achieving this primary prevention, such as a Mediterranean diet, use of milk formula with modified (hydrolyzed) proteins, and the role of micronutrients, are also explored. Breast-feeding is effective in reducing the risk of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic eczema among children. In addition, breast milk constitutes a major source of support for gut microbe colonization, due to its bifidobacteria and galactooligosaccharide content. The literature lacks consensus in recommending the addition of probiotics to foods for prevention and treatment of allergic diseases, while prebiotics may prove to be effective in reducing atopy in healthy children. There is insufficient evidence to support soy formulas or amino acid formulas for

  17. Allergic diseases among children: nutritional prevention and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hendaus, Mohamed A; Jomha, Fatima A; Ehlayel, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases comprise a genetically heterogeneous group of chronic, immunomediated diseases. It has been clearly reported that the prevalence of these diseases has been on the rise for the last few decades, but at different rates, in various areas of the world. This paper discusses the epidemiology of allergic diseases among children and their negative impact on affected patients, their families, and societies. These effects include the adverse effects on quality of life and economic costs. Medical interest has shifted from tertiary or secondary prevention to primary prevention of these chronic diseases among high-risk infants in early life. Being simple, practical, and cost-effective are mandatory features for any candidate methods delivering these strategies. Dietary therapy fits this model well, as it is simple, practical, and cost-effective, and involves diverse methods. The highest priority strategy is feeding these infants breast milk. For those who are not breast-fed, there should be a strategy to maintain beneficial gut flora that positively influences intestinal immunity. We review the current use of probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics, and safety and adverse effects. Other dietary modalities of possible potential in achieving this primary prevention, such as a Mediterranean diet, use of milk formula with modified (hydrolyzed) proteins, and the role of micronutrients, are also explored. Breast-feeding is effective in reducing the risk of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic eczema among children. In addition, breast milk constitutes a major source of support for gut microbe colonization, due to its bifidobacteria and galactooligosaccharide content. The literature lacks consensus in recommending the addition of probiotics to foods for prevention and treatment of allergic diseases, while prebiotics may prove to be effective in reducing atopy in healthy children. There is insufficient evidence to support soy formulas or amino acid formulas for

  18. [Preliminary results of prophylactic program of allergic diseases in children in Lodz district].

    PubMed

    Stelmach, Włodzimierz; Korzeniewska, Aleksandra; Piechota, Mariusz; Podsiadłowicz-Borzecka, Małgorzata; Majak, Paweł; Stelmach, Iwona

    2002-01-01

    Allergic diseases are one of the most important problems in medicine. As a consequence of increased frequency of allergic diseases, negative health, economical and social problems appear. To eliminate these consequences prophylactic programmes are created. In this paper preliminary results of Prophylactic Program of Allergic Diseases in Children in Łodz district in 2000-2001 years is presented. PMID:12884565

  19. Small animal disease surveillance: respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Fernando; Daly, Janet M; Jones, Philip H; Dawson, Susan; Gaskell, Rosalind; Menacere, Tarek; Heayns, Bethaney; Wardeh, Maya; Newman, Jenny; Everitt, Sally; Day, Michael J; McConnell, Katie; Noble, Peter J M; Radford, Alan D

    2016-04-01

    Presentation for respiratory disease comprised 1.7 per cent, 2.3 per cent and 2.5 per cent of canine, feline and rabbit consultations, respectively, between January 2014 and December 2015. Coughing was the most frequent respiratory sign reported in dogs (71.1 per cent of consultations); in cats it was sneezing (42.6 per cent). Mean percentage of samples testing positive for feline calicivirus (FCV) was 30.1 per cent in 2014 and 27.9 per cent in 2015. January was the month with the highest percentage of FCV-positive samples in both 2014 and 2015. PMID:27056810

  20. Role of sensitization to mammalian serum albumin in allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Liccardi, Gennaro; Asero, Riccardo; D'Amato, Maria; D'Amato, Gennaro

    2011-10-01

    Serum albumin (SA) constitutes an intriguing puzzle that is involved in allergic sensitizations from different sources and induces different clinical manifestations. In this article, we describe the role of sensitization to SAs in inducing allergic diseases and the complex interactions and cross-reactivity between SA resulting from its presence in various mammalian tissues and fluids. SAs alone are an uncommon cause of allergic sensitization in airways, but these allergenic proteins likely play a significant role as cross-reacting allergens in individuals sensitized to several types of animal dander. SAs are a minor allergen in milk but a major allergen in meats. Recently, bovine SA has been added to the culture medium of spermatozoids used for artificial insemination. As a consequence, some case reports have shown that bovine SA may be a causative agent in severe anaphylaxis after standard intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization. PMID:21809117

  1. Mechanistic impact of outdoor air pollution on asthma and allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingling; Qiu, Zhiming; Chung, Kian Fan

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, asthma and allergic diseases, such as allergic rhinitis and eczema, have become increasingly common, but the reason for this increased prevalence is still unclear. It has become apparent that genetic variation alone is not sufficient to account for the observed changes; rather, the changing environment, together with alterations in lifestyle and eating habits, are likely to have driven the increase in prevalence, and in some cases, severity of disease. This is particularly highlighted by recent awareness of, and concern about, the exposure to ubiquitous environmental pollutants, including chemicals with oxidant-generating capacities, and their impact on the human respiratory and immune systems. Indeed, several epidemiological studies have identified a variety of risk factors, including ambient pollutant gases and airborne particles, for the prevalence and the exacerbation of allergic diseases. However, the responsible pollutants remain unclear and the causal relationship has not been established. Recent studies of cellular and animal models have suggested several plausible mechanisms, with the most consistent observation being the direct effects of particle components on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the resultant oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. This review attempts to highlight the experimental findings, with particular emphasis on several major mechanistic events initiated by exposure to particulate matters (PMs) in the exposure-disease relationship. PMID:25694815

  2. The evaluation of allergens and allergic diseases in children.

    PubMed

    Lee, C S; Tang, R B; Chung, R L

    2000-12-01

    Knowing the incidence of allergic diseases and their relationship with allergens is a crucial requirement for therapeutic judgment. We present our experience on the incidence, clinical features and allergens of the allergic diseases detected by multiple allergosorbent chemiluminescent assay (MAST-CLA) in children from 1997 to 1999 at the Taipei Veterans General Hospital. The incidence of bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis are significantly different when stratified by age groups. Among the enrolled 2008 patients, 980 (48.8%) patients have positive MAST-CLA results. Of these, 562 (57.3%) are male and 418 (42.7%) are female. A significant increase among patients with positive allergens is also found when stratified by age group. Inhalant allergen is the major allergen detected in our patients. House dust mites Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp) and Dermatophagoides farinae (Df), cockroaches, feathers, and dog dander show the highest incidence in the 7- to 12-year-old group. In the fungal group, Aspergillus and Penicillium also show a significant difference in the incidence among different age groups. Pollen allergens, on a whole, show significant difference in incidence among different age groups. The food allergen group shows variable significant difference in incidence. Crab, milk, and egg white show the highest significant incidence in the 2- to 6-year-old group. These results suggest that the incidence of allergens detected in allergic diseases varies among different age groups. PMID:11269366

  3. Gender Associated High Body Mass Index in Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lokaj-Berisha, Violeta; Gacaferri-Lumezi, Besa; Minci–Bejtullahu, Ganimete; Latifi-Pupovci, Hatixhe; Karahoda–Gjurgjeala, Natyra; Berisha, Naser; Morina, Teuta

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The increasing prevalence of allergic diseases and atopy is affected by sex, age and lifestyle factors. Obesity and excess weight are reported to be potential risk factors for atopy and specifically for asthma symptoms in children and adults. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relation between body mass index (BMI) and allergic diseases in patients of both genders, as well as association of BMI with atopy in healthy subjects. METHODS: BMI (kg/m2), skin-prick test and total serum immunoglobulin E levels were assessed in 139 subjects: 109 were patients with allergic diseases (M to F ratio was 51:58) and 30 were healthy controls (M to F ratio was 6:24). RESULTS: The study population was grouped into asthma, asthmarhinitis, rhinitis, Urticaria oreczema and controls by BMI and sex. Females with the highest BMI were in asthma and urticaria/eczema group. Males with the highest BMI were in asthmarhinitis and urticariaeczema group. High BMI was associated with atopy in both genders of healthy controls. High levels of total IgE were in male allergic patients. CONCLUSION: High BMI was associated with asthma in females, urticaria/eczema in both genders and atopy in both genders of healthy controls. Higher levels of total IgE were concluded in male patients.

  4. Probiotics and prebiotics: immunological and clinical effects in allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mimi L K

    2009-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota plays an important role in immune development and may play a role in the development of allergic disorders. Manipulation of the intestinal microbiota may therefore offer an approach to the prevention or treatment of allergic diseases. Probiotics and prebiotics, used alone or together (synbiotics), can influence the intestinal microbiota and modulate immune responses in vitro and in vivo. Clinical studies suggest a potential role for selected probiotics (alone or in combination with prebiotics) in the prevention of atopic eczema. A prenatal component of treatment appears important for beneficial effects. Effects are dependent upon the specific bacteria and characteristics of the study population. One study reported beneficial effects for prebiotics in the prevention of eczema in high-risk infants, however, further studies are required to confirm this. The use of probiotics in the treatment of allergic disease is less promising. A Cochrane meta-analysis concluded that probiotics are not effective for the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Probiotic effects in the treatment of asthma and allergic rhinitis are conflicting. Probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics offer potential treatments for the prevention of atopic eczema; however, there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend their use in clinical practice. Studies to clarify the optimal dose, bacterial species/strains, whether there is added benefit with synbiotics, the optimal timing for intervention, and the patient populations who would benefit most from such therapies are warranted. PMID:19710525

  5. Sulfur mustard and respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng Ru; Loke, Weng Keong

    2012-09-01

    Victims exposed to sulfur mustard (HD) in World War I and Iran-Iraq war, and those suffered occupational or accidental exposure have endured discomfort in the respiratory system at early stages after exposure, and marked general physical deterioration at late stages due to pulmonary fibrosis, bronchiolitis obliterans or lung cancer. At molecule levels, significant changes of cytokines and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage and serum, and of selectins (in particular sE-selectin) and soluble Fas ligand in the serum have been reported in recent studies of patients exposed to HD in Iran-Iraq war, suggesting that these molecules may be associated with the pathophysiological development of pulmonary diseases. Experimental studies in rodents have revealed that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, their product peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), nitric oxide synthase, glutathione, poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase, activating protein-1 signaling pathway are promising drug targets for preventing HD-induced toxicity, whereas N-acetyl cysteine, tocopherols, melatonin, aprotinin and many other molecules have been proved to be effective in prevention of HD-induced damage to the respiratory system in different animal models. In this paper, we will systemically review clinical and pathophysiological changes of respiratory system in victims exposed to HD in the last century, update clinicians and researchers on the mechanism of HD-induced acute and chronic lung damages, and on the relevant drug targets for future development of antidotes for HD. Further research directions will also be proposed. PMID:22742653

  6. Non-pulmonary allergic diseases and inflammatory bowel disease: A qualitative review

    PubMed Central

    Kotlyar, David S; Shum, Mili; Hsieh, Jennifer; Blonski, Wojciech; Greenwald, David A

    2014-01-01

    While the etiological underpinnings of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are highly complex, it has been noted that both clinical and pathophysiological similarities exist between IBD and both asthma and non-pulmonary allergic phenomena. In this review, several key points on common biomarkers, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations and nutritional and probiotic interventions for both IBD and non-pulmonary allergic diseases are discussed. Histamine and mast cell activity show common behaviors in both IBD and in certain allergic disorders. IgE also represents a key immunoglobulin involved in both IBD and in certain allergic pathologies, though these links require further study. Probiotics remain a critically important intervention for both IBD subtypes as well as multiple allergic phenomena. Linked clinical phenomena, especially sinonasal disease and IBD, are discussed. In addition, nutritional interventions remain an underutilized and promising therapy for modification of both allergic disorders and IBD. Recommending new mothers breastfeed their infants, and increasing the duration of breastfeeding may also help prevent both IBD and allergic diseases, but requires more investigation. While much remains to be discovered, it is clear that non-pulmonary allergic phenomena are connected to IBD in a myriad number of ways and that the discovery of common immunological pathways may usher in an era of vastly improved treatments for patients. PMID:25170192

  7. Developing Primary Intervention Strategies to Prevent Allergic Disease.

    PubMed

    Rueter, Kristina; Haynes, Aveni; Prescott, Susan L

    2015-07-01

    Allergic diseases are a major cause of morbidity in the developed world, now affecting up to 40 % of the population with no evidence that this is abating. If anything, the prevalence of early onset allergic diseases such as eczema and food allergy appears to be still increasing. This is almost certainly due to the changing modern environment and lifestyle factors, acting to promote immune dysfunction through early perturbations in immune maturation, immune tolerance and regulation. This early propensity to inflammation may also have implications for the rising risk of other inflammatory non-communicable diseases (NCDs) later in life. Identifying risk factors and pathways for preventing early onset immune disease like allergy is likely to have benefits for many aspects of human health, particularly as many NCDs share similar risk factors. This review focuses on recent advances in primary intervention strategies for promoting early immune health and preventing allergic disease, highlighting the current evidence-based guidelines where applicable and areas requiring further investigation. PMID:26143389

  8. The Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiota and Allergic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kyburz, Andreas; Müller, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract microbiota is required for optimal digestion of foods, for the development of resistance against pathogens (termed colonization resistance), for the development of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, and for local as well as systemic immune homeostasis. Certain constituents of the GI tract microbiota are widely recognized as critical regulators and modulators of their host's immune response. These include bacterial members of the microbiota as well as parasitic nematodes. Immune regulation by immunomodulatory members of the GI microbiota primarily serves to subvert host antimicrobial immune defenses and promote persistent colonization, but as a side effect may prevent or suppress immunological disorders resulting from inappropriate responses to harmless antigens, such as allergy, colitis or autoimmunity. Many of the best understood GI-resident immunomodulatory species have co-evolved with their mammalian hosts for tens of thousands of years and masterfully manipulate host immune responses. In this review, we discuss the epidemiological evidence for the role of the GI tract microbiota as a whole, and of specific members, in protection against allergic and other immunological disorders. We then focus on the mechanistic basis of microbial immunomodulation, which is presented using several well-understood paradigmatic examples, that is, helminths, Helicobacter pylori, Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli. In a final chapter, we highlight past and ongoing attempts at harnessing the immunomodulatory properties of GI microbiota species and their secreted products for intervention studies and describe the promises and limitations of these experimental approaches. The effects of pro- and prebiotics, bacterial lysates, as well as of fecal microbiota transplantation are presented and compared. PMID:27028536

  9. Oral manifestations of allergic, infectious, and immune-mediated disease.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Gregory M; Lockey, Richard F

    2014-01-01

    Patients often have oral symptoms, and physicians frequently identify lesions during routine oral examination. Being able to associate these concerns and findings with systemic disease is important to providing effective management of these conditions. This review summarizes the etiology, presentation, and treatment of many oral lesions associated with systemic diseases and infections. The primary focus was on lesions associated with allergic, infectious, and immune-mediated disease; however, other common concerns are addressed as well as lesions that may be misinterpreted as disease and how to address unknown lesions. PMID:25439358

  10. Cardiovascular complications of respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Chowdhuri, Susmita; Crook, Errol D; Taylor, Herman A; Badr, M Safwan

    2007-11-01

    A major burden of morbidity and mortality due to respiratory diseases can be directly related to the cardiovascular (CV) complications of these disorders. Evidence from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies link reduced lung function and cardiovascular diseases. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. Hypoxia-induced increased sympathetic activity, blood viscosity, or inflammation, among other factors, may mediate the underlying pathogenesis. In addition, sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has been implicated by association in multiple CV diseases including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and stroke. However, the exact contribution of SDB, including obstructive and central sleep apneas, to the development of cardiovascular diseases is not fully understood. In this context, the contribution of the new large, prospective, Jackson Heart Study could be significant in that it is designed to answer several of these questions, specifically in the African American population. This review examines the current evidence that links both reduced lung function and SDB to CV diseases. PMID:18004091

  11. Foxp3 expressing regulatory T-cells in allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Nouri-Aria, Kayhan T

    2009-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma, rhinitis and eczema are increasing in prevalence worldwide, in particular in industrialised countries affecting up to 20% of the population. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) have been shown to be critical in T-cell homeostasis and in the maintenance of immune responses, such as prevention of autoimmunity and hampering allergic diseases. The so-called 'natural' CD4+CD25+ Tregs and/or IL-10-producing Tr1 cells have been shown to be responsible for the protection of immune tolerance and intact immune reactions following exposure to allergens such as aeroallergens or food allergens. In this regard, both cell-cell contact (through membrane bound TGF-beta or via suppressive molecules such as CLTA-4) and soluble cytokine-(TGF-beta and IL-10) dependent mechanisms have been shown to contribute to the ability of Tregs to operate effectively. The transcription factor Foxp3, a member of the forkhead-winged helix family, appears to be critical in the suppressive abilities of regulatory T-cells. Adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+ Tregs from healthy to diseased animals corroborated and provided further evidence of the vital role of these populations in the prevention or cure of certain autoimmune conditions. Clinical improvement seen after allergen immunotherapy for allergic diseases such as rhinitis and asthma has also been associated with the induction of IL-10 and TGF-beta producing Trl cells as well as Foxp3 expressing CD4+CD25+ T-cells, resulting in the suppression ofTh2 cytokine milieu. Activation and expansion ofantigen-specific CD4+CD25+ Tregs in vivo using adjuvants such as IL-10 or pharmacological agents such as low dose steroids or vitamin D3 could represent novel approaches to induce antigen-specific tolerance in immune-mediated conditions such as allergic asthma, autoimmune disease and the rejection of transplanted organs in man. PMID:20429425

  12. Advances and highlights in mechanisms of allergic disease in 2015.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyniak, Paulina; Akdis, Cezmi A; Finkelman, Fred D; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2016-06-01

    This review highlights some of the advances in mechanisms of allergic disease, particularly anaphylaxis, including food allergy, drug hypersensitivity, atopic dermatitis (AD), allergic conjunctivitis, and airway diseases. During the last year, a mechanistic advance in food allergy was achieved by focusing on mechanisms of allergen sensitization. Novel biomarkers and treatment for mastocytosis were presented in several studies. Novel therapeutic approaches in the treatment of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis showed that promising supplementation of the infant's diet in the first year of life with immunoactive prebiotics might have a preventive role against early development of AD and that therapeutic approaches to treat AD in children might be best directed to the correction of a TH2/TH1 imbalance. Several studies were published emphasizing the role of the epithelial barrier in patients with allergic diseases. An impaired skin barrier as a cause for sensitization to food allergens in children and its relationship to filaggrin mutations has been an important development. Numerous studies presented new approaches for improvement of epithelial barrier function and novel biologicals used in the treatment of inflammatory skin and eosinophilic diseases. In addition, novel transcription factors and signaling molecules that can develop as new possible therapeutic targets have been reported. PMID:27090934

  13. Allergic airways disease develops after an increase in allergen capture and processing in the airway mucosa.

    PubMed

    von Garnier, Christophe; Wikstrom, Matthew E; Zosky, Graeme; Turner, Debra J; Sly, Peter D; Smith, Miranda; Thomas, Jennifer A; Judd, Samantha R; Strickland, Deborah H; Holt, Patrick G; Stumbles, Philip A

    2007-11-01

    Airway mucosal dendritic cells (AMDC) and other airway APCs continuously sample inhaled Ags and regulate the nature of any resulting T cell-mediated immune response. Although immunity develops to harmful pathogens, tolerance arises to nonpathogenic Ags in healthy individuals. This homeostasis is thought to be disrupted in allergic respiratory disorders such as allergic asthma, such that a potentially damaging Th2-biased, CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory response develops against intrinsically nonpathogenic allergens. Using a mouse model of experimental allergic airways disease (EAAD), we have investigated the functional changes occurring in AMDC and other airway APC populations during disease onset. Onset of EAAD was characterized by early and transient activation of airway CD4(+) T cells coinciding with up-regulation of CD40 expression exclusively on CD11b(-) AMDC. Concurrent enhanced allergen uptake and processing occurred within all airway APC populations, including B cells, macrophages, and both CD11b(+) and CD11b(-) AMDC subsets. Immune serum transfer into naive animals recapitulated the enhanced allergen uptake observed in airway APC populations and mediated activation of naive allergen-specific, airway CD4(+) T cells following inhaled allergen challenge. These data suggest that the onset of EAAD is initiated by enhanced allergen capture and processing by a number of airway APC populations and that allergen-specific Igs play a role in the conversion of normally quiescent AMDC subsets into those capable of inducing airway CD4(+) T cell activation. PMID:17947647

  14. [Acute respiratory failure in neuromuscular disease].

    PubMed

    Damak, H; Décosterd, D

    2015-09-30

    Neuromuscular diseases can affect all respiratory muscles, leading to acute respiratory failure, which is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in those patients. Two situations must be distinguished. 1) Acute respiratory failure as part of a neuromuscular disorder of acute onset and possibly reversible (Guillain-Barre syndrome, myasthenic crisis...). 2) Acute respiratory failure occurring in a patient with an already advanced neuromuscular disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy...). This article describes the neuromuscular acute respiratory failure in these different aspects, discusses its initial management in the emergency department and identifies the parameters that have to be monitored. PMID:26619704

  15. Role of Treg in immune regulation of allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Oscar; Yaman, Görkem; Azkur, Ahmet K; Akkoc, Tunc; Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2010-05-01

    Allergy is a Th2-mediated disease that involves the formation of specific IgE antibodies against innocuous environmental substances. The prevalence of allergic diseases has dramatically increased over the past decades, affecting up to 30% of the population in industrialized countries. The understanding of mechanisms underlying allergic diseases as well as those operating in non-allergic healthy responses and allergen-specific immunotherapy has experienced exciting advances over the past 15 years. Studies in healthy non-atopic individuals and several clinical trials of allergen-specific immunotherapy have demonstrated that the induction of a tolerant state in peripheral T cells represent a key step in healthy immune responses to allergens. Both naturally occurring thymus-derived CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Treg and inducible type 1 Treg inhibit the development of allergy via several mechanisms, including suppression of other effector Th1, Th2, Th17 cells; suppression of eosinophils, mast cells and basophils; Ab isotype change from IgE to IgG4; suppression of inflammatory DC; and suppression of inflammatory cell migration to tissues. The identification of the molecules involved in these processes will contribute to the development of more efficient and safer treatment modalities. PMID:20148422

  16. [Phytotherapy of respiratory tract diseases].

    PubMed

    Bylka, Wiesława; Witkowska-Banaszczak, Ewa; Studzińska-Sroka, Elzbieta; Matławska, Irena

    2012-01-01

    Herbal medicines have been used in cough due to their antitussive and expectorant activity. Antitussives act either centrally on the cough center of the brain or peripherally on the cough receptors in the respiratory passages. The antitussive effect of many herbs results from the content of mucilage, which exerts protective and demulcent activity. The activity of expectorant herbs results primarily from their influence on the gastric mucose (saponins and ipec alkaloids). This proves reflex stimulation which leads to an increase in the secretion of bronchial glands. Volatile-oil type expectorant herbs exert a direct stimulatory effect on the bronchial glands by means of local irritation with antibacterial activity. In colds and flu, herbs containing volatile oil can be used; also, volatile oils are ingredients of syrups and liquids as well as external phytomedicines in the form of liniments, ointments, and inhalations. The paper shows the herbs and phytomedicines present on the Polish market used for the treatment of respiratory tract diseases. PMID:23289257

  17. EFFECTS OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION (UVR) ON THE RESPIRATORY ALLERGIC RESPONSES OF BALB/C MICE TO A FUNGAL ALLERGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION (UVR) ON THE RESPIRATORY ALLERGIC RESPONSES OF BALB/C MICE TO A FUNGAL ALLERGEN. M D W Ward, D M Sailstad, D L Andrews, E H Boykin, and MJ K Selgrade. National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Developmen...

  18. RESPIRATORY PHYSIOLOGICAL AND ALLERGIC-TYPE RESPONSES TO AN EXTRACT OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    RESPIRATORY PHYSIOLOGICAL AND ALLERGIC-TYPE RESPONSES TO AN EXTRACT OF Stachybotrys chartarum IN BALB/C MICE. ME Viana1, N Haykal-Coates2, S H Gavett2, MJ Selgrade2, and M D W Ward2. 1APR/CVM, NCSU, Raleigh, NC, USA. 2NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.
    Rationale: assess the ab...

  19. SENSITIZATION AND EXACERBATION OF ALLERGIC DISEASES BY DIESEL ENGINE PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Sanchez, David

    2000-08-20

    Most studies of the health effects of diesel exhaust have focused on the controversial issue of its role in cancer. However, recently the role of combustion products such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP) in modulating the immune response has garnered much attention. In particular the effect of DEP on allergic and asthmatic diseases has been the focus of many studies. A link between industrialization and allergic disease has long been presumed. Indeed, only 50 years after the first recorded reported case of allergy in 1819, Charles Blackely wrote that the ''hay-fever epidemic'' was associated with the movement of people from the country into the cities. Ishizaki et al. (1987) found that people in Japan living on busy roads lined with cedar trees have more allergies to cedar than residents living on similar streets with much less traffic. Since that time other epidemiological studies have reported similar findings. Kramer, et al., showed that hay fever is greater in residential areas with heavy truck traffic, while Weiland, et al., reported that allergic symptoms correlate with the distance of residences to roads with heavy traffic.

  20. Type-2 innate lymphoid cells in human allergic disease

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Jillian L.; McKenzie, Andrew N.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent decades have seen allergic diseases become endemic in a number of developed countries. Understanding the inflammatory processes that dictate these allergic responses is therefore important. Recent findings Critical to many allergic responses is the inappropriate release of the type-2 immune-regulatory cytokines: interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-9, and interleukin-13. The study of these inflammatory mediators has led directly to the development of two new asthma treatments: anti-interleukin-5 and anti-interleukin-13. Until recently, T helper 2 cells were considered to be the major cellular source of type-2 cytokines; however, a paradigm shift occurred with the discovery of a novel population, type-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), that can produce huge levels of type-2 cytokines and are sufficient to induce allergy in mice. This discovery raises interesting questions about how innate and adaptive type-2 immunity might interact to induce relapsing and remitting episodes of allergy in patients. Summary It is essential that alongside the mechanistic investigation using model organisms, the roles of ILC2s in human disease be explored. Here, we discuss how ILC2 traits, discovered in mouse models, have informed research in humans and how newly identified human ILC2 pathways might provide potential therapeutic benefits in the future. PMID:25115682

  1. A study of granulocyte respiratory burst in patients with allergic bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Vargas, L; Patiño, P J; Montoya, F; Vanegas, A C; Echavarría, A; García de Olarte, D

    1998-02-01

    The respiratory burst of phagocytes plays an important role in the tissue damage that accompanies the inflammatory response. One of these conditions is allergic bronchial asthma, therefore, to evaluate the activation state of peripheral granulocytes the generation of reactive oxygen metabolites was evaluated using Luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (LCL) and reduction of cytochrome C by superoxide. The resting granulocytes of the asthmatic patients under crisis showed a higher LCL compared to the noncrisis patients and control subjects. The granulocytes stimulated with PMA presented a significant increase in the respiratory burst in both groups of asthmatics. The granulocytes of noncrisis asthmatics challenged with Ops-Zym and with fMLP + Ops-Zym showed a higher metabolic activity, whereas the asthmatics under crisis presented no difference between reactive oxygen generation and that of the control group. The quantitative analysis of superoxide generation by granulocytes of the same patients did not show differences among the groups. Our findings suggest that the granulocytes of crisis and noncrisis asthmatics seem to be in a hyperreactive state and with a higher metabolic response when compared to the control group. However, the patients present a different behavior depending on stimulus used to activate cells. This could indicate that in peripheral blood exist different granulocyte populations depending on the inflammatory response taking place in the respiratory tract. PMID:9484649

  2. Epidermal RAF prevents allergic skin disease

    PubMed Central

    Raguz, Josipa; Jeric, Ines; Niault, Theodora; Nowacka, Joanna Daniela; Kuzet, Sanya Eduarda; Rupp, Christian; Fischer, Irmgard; Biggi, Silvia; Borsello, Tiziana; Baccarini, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    The RAS pathway is central to epidermal homeostasis, and its activation in tumors or in Rasopathies correlates with hyperproliferation. Downstream of RAS, RAF kinases are actionable targets regulating keratinocyte turnover; however, chemical RAF inhibitors paradoxically activate the pathway, promoting epidermal proliferation. We generated mice with compound epidermis-restricted BRAF/RAF1 ablation. In these animals, transient barrier defects and production of chemokines and Th2-type cytokines by keratinocytes cause a disease akin to human atopic dermatitis, characterized by IgE responses and local and systemic inflammation. Mechanistically, BRAF and RAF1 operate independently to balance MAPK signaling: BRAF promotes ERK activation, while RAF1 dims stress kinase activation. In vivo, JNK inhibition prevents disease onset, while MEK/ERK inhibition in mice lacking epidermal RAF1 phenocopies it. These results support a primary role of keratinocytes in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, and the animals lacking BRAF and RAF1 in the epidermis represent a useful model for this disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14012.001 PMID:27431613

  3. Mammalian-derived respiratory allergens - implications for diagnosis and therapy of individuals allergic to furry animals.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Ola B; van Hage, Marianne; Grönlund, Hans

    2014-03-01

    Furry animals cause respiratory allergies in a significant proportion of the population. A majority of all mammalian allergens are spread as airborne particles, and several have been detected in environments where furry animals are not normally kept. The repertoire of allergens from each source belongs to a restricted number of allergen families. Classification of allergen families is particularly important for the characterization of allergenicity and cross-reactivity of allergens. In fact, major mammalian allergens are taken from only three protein families, i.e. the secretoglobin, lipocalin and kallikrein families. In particular, the lipocalin superfamily harbours major allergens in all important mammalian allergen sources, and cross-reactivity between lipocalin allergens may explain cross-species sensitization between mammals. The identification of single allergen components is of importance to improve diagnosis and therapy of allergic patients using component-resolved diagnostics and allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT) respectively. Major disadvantages with crude allergen extracts for these applications emphasize the benefits of careful characterization of individual allergens. Furthermore, detailed knowledge of the characteristics of an allergen is crucial to formulate attenuated allergy vaccines, e.g. hypoallergens. The diverse repertoires of individual allergens from different mammalian species influence the diagnostic potential and clinical efficacy of ASIT to furry animals. As such, detailed knowledge of individual allergens is essential for adequate clinical evaluation. This review compiles current knowledge of the allergen families of mammalian species, and discusses how this information may be used for improved diagnosis and therapy of individuals allergic to mammals. PMID:24041755

  4. Skin testing for allergic diseases: techniques, indications and interpretations.

    PubMed

    Villacorte, G V

    1978-01-01

    Despite significant strides in serologic methodologies, the skin test, when properly done, has remained the single most sensitive and practical assay for specific dermal-bound reaginic antibody. Its value could further be enhanced if and when characterization and standardization of the allergen extracts become a reality. While the technique is simple, the indications and interpretations of allergy skin tests required the expertise of well-trained allergists. A positive skin reaction is no more than a mere supportive laboratory aid in the diagnosis of allergic disease, which is arrived at through a carefully taken detailed history and a meticulously done physical examination. PMID:748833

  5. Cardiac and Respiratory Disease in Aged Horses.

    PubMed

    Marr, Celia M

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory and cardiac diseases are common in older horses. Advancing age is a specific risk factor for cardiac murmurs and these are more likely in males and small horses. Airway inflammation is the most common respiratory diagnosis. Recurrent airway obstruction can lead to irreversible structural change and bronchiectasis; with chronic hypoxia, right heart dysfunction and failure can develop. Valvular heart disease most often affects the aortic and/or the mitral valve. Management of comorbidity is an essential element of the therapeutic approach to cardiac and respiratory disease in older equids. PMID:27329492

  6. Decreased Level of IgE is Associated with Breast Cancer and Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huayi; Guo, Gang; Jianzhong, Cao; Zheng, Yaqin

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of type I allergic diseases in patients with breast cancer by carrying out a questionnaire survey and IgE detection in a healthy population and in patients with breast cancer. Material/Method There were 309 patients enrolled and they were further divided into the type I allergic disease group, the newly diagnosed breast cancer with type I allergic disease group, the re-visit breast cancer with type I allergic disease group, and the re-visit breast cancer without type I allergic disease group, as well as a healthy control group. Serum total IgE level was detected by immunoassay. Results The IgE value in the healthy population with type I allergic diseases (89.3±51.4 IU/ml) was significantly higher than in those without type I allergic diseases (45.6±65.1 IU/ml). There was no significant difference between IgE values in the re-visit breast cancer patients with type I allergic disease (25.1±65.1 IU/ml) and those without type I allergic disease (23.0±45.9 IU/ml). The area under the ROC curve was 0.618±0.04, sensitivity was 78%, specificity was 47.1%, Youden index was 0.251, and IgE threshold was 32.6 IU/ml. Conclusions The patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer were susceptible to type I allergic disease at about the same levels as in the healthy population. There was no correlation between breast cancer and type I allergic disease. PMID:26901362

  7. Aeroallergens and viable microbes in sandstorm dust. Potential triggers of allergic and nonallergic respiratory ailments.

    PubMed

    Kwaasi, A A; Parhar, R S; al-Mohanna, F A; Harfi, H A; Collison, K S; al-Sedairy, S T

    1998-03-01

    Aeroallergens and antigens in sandstorm dust, extracts of which were skin prick test (SPT) positive in allergic patients, were detected by rocket immunoelectrophoresis and ELISA. Fungi and bacteria isolated by agar settle plates and soil dilution and soil washing methods were enumerated and identified. Cat dander, Acacia, Alternaria, Aspergillus, Chenopodium, Cladosporium, Bermuda grass, Pithecellobium, Prosopis, Rumex, cultivated rye, and Washingtonia palm allergens were detected by both methods. Viable microbes including 1892 +/- 325 colony-forming units (cfu) of bacteria, and 869 +/- 75 cfu of fungi were isolated per gram of dust by the soil dilution method. Randomly selected microbial colonies on streaking and subculture were found to consist of between two and seven mixed colonies. Fungi including Alternaria, Aspergillus, Botrytis, Cladosporium, Mortierella, Mucor, Mycelia sterilia, Penicillium, Pythium, Ulocladium, Verticillium, and some yeasts were isolated. Actinomyces, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, and mostly coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species were identified, but the bulk of unidentified bacterial isolates were mainly mixed colonies of rods, cocci, coccobacilli, and some filamentous types. Six-hour agar settle-plate counts during sandstorms were 100 and 40% higher for bacteria and fungi, respectively, than without sandstorms. The most abundant aeroallergens were those of Acacia, Alternaria, Aspergillus, Bermuda grass, Cladosporium, cultivated rye, Prosopis, and cat dander. Pithecellobium dulce, Rumex crispus, and Washingtonia palm allergens were detectable for the first time in Riyadh. IgE reactivities of the dust in man were demonstrated by ELISA using sera from atopic, exposed, and normal subjects. These results indicate that sandstorm dust is a prolific source of potential triggers of allergic and nonallergic respiratory ailments, and the methods mentioned here should be routinely used for quick sampling of the environment. PMID:9542605

  8. The association of prolonged breastfeeding and allergic disease in poor urban children.

    PubMed

    Obihara, C C; Marais, B J; Gie, R P; Potter, P; Bateman, E D; Lombard, C J; Beyers, N; Kimpen, J L L

    2005-06-01

    The fact that breastfeeding may protect against allergic disease remains controversial, with hardly any reports from developing countries. This study investigated the association between allergic disease in children and prolonged breastfeeding. Data were collected from a 15% random sample of households from two poor suburbs of Cape Town, South Africa. Parents completed a validated International Study on Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire on allergic diseases for children aged 6-14 yrs. Other questions included breastfeeding duration, maternal smoking and parental allergy. Results were adjusted for possible confounders and for possible clustering within the household. Out of the 861 children included in the study, allergic disease in general, and hay fever in particular, were significantly less frequent in those with prolonged (> or =6 months) breastfeeding. There was a significant linear inverse association between breastfeeding duration and allergic disease in children without allergic parents, but not in children with an allergic predisposition. In conclusion, these results from a developing country suggest a protective effect of prolonged breastfeeding on the development of allergic disease, particularly hay fever, in children born to nonallergic parents. This protective effect was not found in children with an allergic predisposition. PMID:15929950

  9. Hyaluronan fragments as mediators of inflammation in allergic pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sumit; Hoselton, Scott A; Dorsam, Glenn P; Schuh, Jane M

    2015-05-01

    Asthma is frequently caused and/or exacerbated by sensitization to allergens, which are ubiquitous in many indoor and outdoor environments. Severe asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and bronchial constriction in response to an inhaled allergen, leading to a disease course that is often very difficult to treat with standard asthma therapies. As a result of interactions among inflammatory cells, structural cells, and the intercellular matrix of the allergic lung, patients with sensitization to allergens may experience a greater degree of tissue injury followed by airway wall remodeling and progressive, accumulated pulmonary dysfunction as part of the disease sequela. In addition, turnover of extracellular matrix (ECM) components is a hallmark of tissue injury and repair. This review focuses on the role of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA), a component of the ECM, in pulmonary injury and repair with an emphasis on allergic asthma. Both the synthesis and degradation of the ECM are critical contributors to tissue repair and remodeling. Fragmented HA accumulates during tissue injury and functions in ways distinct from the larger native polymer. There is gathering evidence that HA degradation products are active participants in stimulating the expression of inflammatory genes in a variety of immune cells at the injury site. In this review, we will consider recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms that are associated with HA accumulation and inflammatory cell recruitment in the asthmatic lung. PMID:25582403

  10. Hyaluronan fragments as mediators of inflammation in allergic pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sumit; Hoselton, Scott A.; Dorsam, Glenn P.; Schuh, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is frequently caused and/or exacerbated by sensitization to allergens, which are ubiquitous in many indoor and outdoor environments. Severe asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and bronchial constriction in response to an inhaled allergen, leading to a disease course that is often very difficult to treat with standard asthma therapies. As a result of interactions among inflammatory cells, structural cells, and the intercellular matrix of the allergic lung, patients with sensitization to allergens may experience a greater degree of tissue injury followed by airway wall remodeling and progressive, accumulated pulmonary dysfunction as part of the disease sequela. In addition, turnover of extracellular matrix (ECM) components is a hallmark of tissue injury and repair. This review focuses on the role of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA), a component of the ECM, in pulmonary injury and repair with an emphasis on allergic asthma. Both the synthesis and degradation of the ECM are critical contributors to tissue repair and remodeling. Fragmented HA accumulates during tissue injury and functions in ways distinct from the larger native polymer. There is gathering evidence that HA degradation products are active participants in stimulating the expression of inflammatory genes in a variety of immune cells at the injury site. In this review, we will consider recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms that are associated with HA accumulation and inflammatory cell recruitment in the asthmatic lung. PMID:25582403

  11. Asthma and Allergic Diseases in Pregnancy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Asthma and allergic disorders can affect the course and outcome of pregnancy. Pregnancy itself may also affect the course of asthma and related diseases. Optimal management of these disorders during pregnancy is vital to ensure the welfare of the mother and the baby. Specific pharmacological agents for treatment of asthma or allergic diseases must be cautiously selected and are discussed here with respect to safety considerations in pregnancy. Although most drugs do not harm the fetus, this knowledge is incomplete. Any drug may carry a small risk that must be balanced against the benefits of keeping the mother and baby healthy. The goals and principles of management for acute and chronic asthma, rhinitis, and dermatologic disorders are the same during pregnancy as those for asthma in the general population. Diagnosis of allergy during pregnancy should mainly consist of the patient's history and in vitro testing. The assured and well-evaluated risk factors revealed for sensitization in mother and child are very limited, to date, and include alcohol consumption, exposure to tobacco smoke, maternal diet and diet of the newborn, drug usage, and insufficient exposure to environmental bacteria. Consequently, the recommendations for primary and secondary preventive measures are also very limited in number and verification. PMID:21151812

  12. Diseases of the respiratory tract of chelonians.

    PubMed

    Origgi, F C; Jacobson, E R

    2000-05-01

    Diseases of the respiratory tract commonly occur in captive chelonians, and several diseases also have occurred in wild chelonians. Infectious causes include viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Herpesviruses have surfaced as important pathogens of the oral cavity and respiratory tract in Hermann's tortoise (Testudo hermanii), spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca), and other tortoises in Europe and the United States. Herpesvirus-associated respiratory diseases also have been reported in the green turtle, Chelonia mydas, in mariculture in the Cayman Islands. Of diseases caused by bacteria, an upper respiratory tract disease caused by Mycoplasma sp has been reported in free-hanging and captive gopher tortoises in the southeastern United States and in desert tortoises in the Mojave Desert of the southwestern United States. Mycotic pulmonary disease is commonly reported in captive chelonians, especially in those maintained at suboptimal temperatures. An intranuclear coccidia has been seen in several species of captive tortoises in the United States, and, in one case, a severe proliferative pneumonia was associated with organisms in the lung. The most common noninfectious cause of respiratory disease in chelonians results from trauma to the carapace. Although pulmonary fibromas commonly occur in green turtles with fibropapillomatosis, for the most part, tumors of the respiratory tract are uncommon in chelonians. PMID:11228895

  13. The association between Kawasaki disease and allergic diseases, from infancy to school age.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Jing; Lin, Ching-Heng; Fu, Lin-Shien; Fu, Yun-Ching; Lin, Ming-Chih; Jan, Sheng-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the most common acquired heart disease among preschool children in most industrialized countries. An atopic trend after KD illness has been observed in epidemiological studies. This is consistent with the findings of elevated IgE levels and increased IL-4 in KD patients. However, studies on the early allergic association among children with KD are still limited. This study aimed to evaluate the association between KD and allergic diseases, from infancy to school age. Allergic diseases included atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis (AR), asthma, and urticaria. This matched case-control study used the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan as its data source. Patients born between 1997 and 2004 and with a main diagnosis of KD were retrieved for analysis. A 1:4 matched control group was selected by zip code, gender, and age. The prevalence rates and progression sequence of allergic manifestations were analyzed. During the first 5 years of life, children with KD had higher rates of allergic manifestations. Both groups have similar atopic march. In 2010, at the age of 6-13 years, there were 7072 children with KD and 27,265 children without KD. Children with KD had more AR (odds ratio [OR], 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22-1.38) and asthma (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.05-1.27) than controls. Children with KD have a higher allergic susceptibility recognized from their 1st year of life. The atopic tendency persists until school age. Additional studies are needed to elucidate the underlying determinants of this distinct immune phenotype. PMID:23998245

  14. [Oxidation phenotype as a risk factor for development of allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Niewiński, P; Orzechowska-Juzwenko, K; Patkowski, J; Wolańczyk-Medrala, A; Nittner-Marszalska, M; Rzemisławska, Z

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between genetically determined polymorphic metabolism and susceptibility to allergic diseases has aroused much interest. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether patients with allergic diseases, like atopic asthma and allergic rhinitis differ from healthy persons in their ability to oxidize sparteine as a model drug. The study was completed by 200 persons, 40 patients with allergic diseases--20 with atopic asthma and 20 with allergic rhinitis and 160 healthy volunteers as a control group. The results of our study revealed a predominance of very extensive metabolizers of sparteine among patients with allergic diseases in comparison with healthy volunteers. The difference in the oxidation metabolic ratio (MR) frequency distribution between patients with allergic diseases and healthy persons was statistically significant. Relative risk (odds ratio) of development of atopic asthma was 3.29 times higher, and that of allergic rhinitis 2.94 times higher for persons with very extensive oxidation phenotype. Our results represent some evidence for a possible relationship between extensive, rapid oxidation phenotype and the higher susceptibility to development of atopic asthma and allergic rhinitis. PMID:10592724

  15. Occurrence of Common Allergic Diseases in Children with Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chang-Ching; Lin, Cheng-Li; Shen, Te-Chun; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical and immunological studies have consistently shown a possible link between atopy and idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS). However, whether allergic diseases occur after INS develops is unknown. Methods From Taiwan’s National Health Insurance database, 1340 children with newly diagnosed INS and 5360 non-INS matched controls were identified in 2000–2007. By the end of 2008, the incidences and hazard ratios of four allergic diseases (allergic conjunctivitis, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and asthma) were calculated. Results The incidence rates of all four allergic diseases were greater in the INS cohort than in the non-INS cohort in all age groups and decreased sharply as age increased in both cohorts. Children with INS had the highest adjusted hazard ratio (4.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.50–6.83) for atopic dermatitis and the lowest adjusted hazard ratio (1.71; 95% CI, 1.39–2.09) for allergic rhinitis. Most of the allergic diseases appeared within 2–6 months after INS developed, and the incidences declined with increasing follow-up duration. Conclusions Allergic disorders are common in children with INS, especially within the first year after diagnosis. The role of INS in the development of allergic disorders should be elucidated to establish innovative disease intervention programs. PMID:25843432

  16. Respiratory disease in United States farmers

    PubMed Central

    Hoppin, Jane A; Umbach, David M; Long, Stuart; Rinsky, Jessica L; Henneberger, Paul K; Salo, Paivi M; Zeldin, Darryl C; London, Stephanie J; Alavanja, Michael C R; Blair, Aaron; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Sandler, Dale P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Farmers may be at increased risk for adverse respiratory outcomes compared with the general population due to their regular exposures to dusts, animals and chemicals. However, early life farm exposures to microbial agents may result in reduced risk. Understanding respiratory disease risk among farmers and identifying differences between farmers and other populations may lead to better understanding of the contribution of environmental exposures to respiratory disease risk in the general population. Methods We compared the prevalence of self-reported respiratory outcomes in 43548 participants from the Agricultural Health Study (AHS), a prospective cohort of farmers and their spouses from Iowa and North Carolina, with data from adult participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) over the same period (2005–2010). Results AHS participants had lower prevalences of respiratory diseases (asthma, adult-onset asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema), but higher prevalences of current respiratory symptoms (wheeze, cough and phlegm) even after controlling for smoking, body mass index and population characteristics. The overall prevalence of asthma in the AHS (7.2%, 95% CI 6.9 to 7.4) was 52% of that in NHANES (13.8%, 95% CI 13.3 to 14.3), although the prevalence of adult-onset asthma among men did not differ (3.6% for AHS, 3.7% for NHANES). Conversely, many respiratory symptoms were more common in the AHS than NHANES, particularly among men. Conclusions These findings suggest that farmers and their spouses have lower risk for adult-onset respiratory diseases compared with the general population, and potentially higher respiratory irritation as evidenced by increased respiratory symptoms. PMID:24913223

  17. Mucosal immunization application to allergic disease: sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Frati, Franco; Moingeon, Philippe; Marcucci, Francesco; Puccinelli, Paola; Sensi, Laura; Di Cara, Giuseppe; Incorvaia, Cristoforo

    2007-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is an effective and safe treatment for respiratory allergy, and its mechanism of action currently is investigated with increasing attention. Studies of pharmacokinetics showed that allergen extracts administered via the sublingual route are not directly absorbed by the oral mucosa but are long retained at mucosal level, where the allergen molecules are captured by dendritic cells and, following their migration in the draining lymph nodes, presented to T cells. This seems to be the pivotal factor underlying the mechanisms of action of SLIT, at least for the long-term effects, and for the short-term efficacy, observed with ultrarush or coseasonal treatment, a down-regulation of mast cells resulting in hyporeactivity at the peak of the pollen season may be suggested. Regarding the clinically established long-lasting effects, the core mechanism is likely to consist of T regulatory (Treg) cell activation. In particular, Treg cells differentiate from naive T cells after application of soluble antigens to the mucosae, a crucial factor being the tolerogenic function of dendritic cells, and exert a suppressive effect on both Th1 and Th2 responses. Moreover, at least for the type 1 cells (Treg1), a production of IL-10 with consequent down-modulation of the immune response has been reported. Another characteristic of sublingual immunization is the absence of effectors cells, viz., mast cells, basophils, and eosinophils, in the oral mucosa of allergic subjects, which account for the excellent tolerability of SLIT. PMID:17390755

  18. Scientists find link between allergic and autoimmune diseases in mouse study

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the National Institutes of Health, and their colleagues, have discovered that a gene called BACH2 may play a central role in the development of diverse allergic and autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, asthma, Crohn's disease, ce

  19. Respiratory Disease: Diagnostic Approaches in the Horse.

    PubMed

    Hewson, Joanne; Arroyo, Luis G

    2015-08-01

    Evaluation of the upper and lower respiratory tract of horses requires strategic selection of possible diagnostic tests based on location of suspected pathologic lesions and purpose of testing and must also include consideration of patient status. This article discusses the various diagnostic modalities that may be applied to the respiratory system of horses under field conditions, indications for use, and aspects of sample collection, handling, and laboratory processing that can impact test results and ultimately a successful diagnosis in cases of respiratory disease. PMID:26037608

  20. Impact of perinatal environmental tobacco smoke on the development of childhood allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyeon-Jong

    2016-08-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and food allergy, are most common chronic, noncommunicable diseases in childhood. In the past few decades, the prevalence has increased abruptly worldwide. There are 2 possible explanations for the rising prevalence of allergic diseases worldwide, that an increased disease-awareness of physician, patient, or caregivers, and an abrupt exposure to unknown hazards. Unfortunately, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Despite the continuing efforts worldwide, the etiologies and rising prevalence remain unclear. Thus, it is important to identify and control risk factors in the susceptible individual for the best prevention and management. Genetic susceptibility or environments may be a potential background for the development of allergic disease, however they alone cannot explain the rising prevalence worldwide. There is growing evidence that epigenetic change depends on the gene, environment, and their interactions, may induce a long-lasting altered gene expression and the consequent development of allergic diseases. In epigenetic mechanisms, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure during critical period (i.e., during pregnancy and early life) are considered as a potential cause of the development of childhood allergic diseases. However, the causal relationship is still unclear. This review aimed to highlight the impact of ETS exposure during the perinatal period on the development of childhood allergic diseases and to propose a future research direction. PMID:27610180

  1. Impact of perinatal environmental tobacco smoke on the development of childhood allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and food allergy, are most common chronic, noncommunicable diseases in childhood. In the past few decades, the prevalence has increased abruptly worldwide. There are 2 possible explanations for the rising prevalence of allergic diseases worldwide, that an increased disease-awareness of physician, patient, or caregivers, and an abrupt exposure to unknown hazards. Unfortunately, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Despite the continuing efforts worldwide, the etiologies and rising prevalence remain unclear. Thus, it is important to identify and control risk factors in the susceptible individual for the best prevention and management. Genetic susceptibility or environments may be a potential background for the development of allergic disease, however they alone cannot explain the rising prevalence worldwide. There is growing evidence that epigenetic change depends on the gene, environment, and their interactions, may induce a long-lasting altered gene expression and the consequent development of allergic diseases. In epigenetic mechanisms, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure during critical period (i.e., during pregnancy and early life) are considered as a potential cause of the development of childhood allergic diseases. However, the causal relationship is still unclear. This review aimed to highlight the impact of ETS exposure during the perinatal period on the development of childhood allergic diseases and to propose a future research direction. PMID:27610180

  2. Age-Related Changes in Immunological Factors and Their Relevance in Allergic Disease Development During Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Woo-Sung; Kim, Eun-Jin; Lim, Yeon-Mi; Yoon, Dankyu; Son, Jo-Young; Park, Jung-Won; Hong, Soo-Jong; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Allergic diseases are triggered by Th2-mediated immune reactions to allergens and orchestrated by various immunological factors, including immune cells and cytokines. Although many reports have suggested that childhood is the critical period in the onset of allergic diseases and aging leads to alter the susceptibility of an individual to allergic diseases, age-related changes in various immunological factors in healthy individuals as well as their difference between healthy and allergic children have not yet been established. Methods We investigated the ratio of Th1/Th2 cells and the levels of 22 allergy-related cytokines across all age groups in individuals who were classified as clinically non-atopic and healthy. We also examined their differences between healthy and allergic children to evaluate immunological changes induced by the development of allergic diseases during childhood. Results The Th1/Th2 ratio rose gradually during the growth period including childhood, reaching peak values in the twenties-thirties age group. Th1/Th2 ratios were significantly lower in allergic children than in healthy controls, whereas 14 of 22 cytokines were significantly higher in allergic children than in healthy controls. On the other hand, there were no differences in Th1/Th2 ratios and cytokines between healthy and allergic adolescents. Conclusions In this study, age-related changes in Th1/Th2 ratios were found in normal controls across all age groups, and decreases in Th1/Th2 ratio were observed with increasing of 14 cytokines in allergic children. The results of this study may be helpful as reference values for both monitoring immunological changes according to aging in healthy individuals and distinguishing between normal and allergic subjects in terms of immune cells and soluble factors. PMID:27126727

  3. Woodstoves, formaldehyde, and respiratory disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tuthill, R.W.

    1984-12-01

    Telephone interviews were completed in Western Massachusetts in April 1983 for 399 households (91.5 percent) in a random sample of households with elementary school children. Woodstoves were used in 64.7 percent of the homes, but such use was not associated with acute respiratory illness. However, formaldehyde exposure was significantly related, with a risk ratio of 2.4 (95 percent confidence interval 1.7-3.4). New construction/remodeling and new upholstered furniture had additive effects. Neither woodstove use nor formaldehyde exposure were significantly associated with asthma, chronic bronchitis, or allergies.

  4. [Effect of probiotics in prevention and treatment of allergic diseases in children].

    PubMed

    Xia, Li-Ping; Jiang, Yi

    2016-02-01

    The increasing incidence rate of allergic diseases has attracted global attention, and these diseases greatly threaten children′s health. The common pathogenesis of allergic diseases is the specific IgE- or cell-mediated immune response to common inhalant or food allergens. Epidemiological investigation, analysis of fecal flora, and clinical studies all suggest that the development and progression of allergic diseases are closely related to the early disturbance of intestinal flora. Probiotics can regulate intestinal immune response, increase the barrier function of epithelial cells, inhibit the adhesion and colonization of pathogenic bacteria, and thus restore or reconstruct normal intestinal flora. With the increasing understanding of allergic diseases, the effect of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of such diseases will be taken more and more seriously. PMID:26903069

  5. [Pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Casas Maldonado, F; Alfageme Michavila, I; Barchilón Cohen, V S; Peis Redondo, J I; Vargas Ortega, D A

    2014-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is an acute respiratory infectious disease which has an incidence of 3-8 cases/1,000 inhabitants, and increases with age and comorbidities. The pneumococcus is the organism most frequently involved in community-acquired pneumonia in the adult (30-35%). Around 40% of patients with community-acquired pneumonia require hospital admission, and around 10% need to be admitted to an intensive care unit. The most serious forms of pneumococcal infection include invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), which covers cases of bacteremia (associated or not to pneumonia), meningitis, pleuritis, arthritis, primary peritonitis and pericarditis. Currently, the biggest problem with the pneumococcus is the emergence of resistance to antimicrobial agents, and its high morbimortality, despite the use of appropriate antibiotics and proper medical treatment. Certain underlying medical conditions increase the risk of IPD and its complications, especially, from the respiratory diseases point of view, smoking and chronic respiratory diseases. Pneumococcal disease, according to the WHO, is the first preventable cause of death worldwide in children and adults. Among the strategies to prevent IPD is vaccination. WHO considers that its universal introduction and implementation against pneumococcus is essential and a priority in all countries. There are currently 2 pneumococcal vaccines for adults: the 23 serotypes polysaccharide and conjugate 13 serotypes. The scientific societies represented here have worked to develop some recommendations, based on the current scientific evidence, regarding the pneumococcal vaccination in the immunocompetent adult with chronic respiratory disease and smokers at risk of suffering from IPD. PMID:25107494

  6. Platelets in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Tanya M.; Boyce, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized clinically by the triad of asthma, nasal polyposis, and pathognomonic respiratory reactions after ingestion of aspirin. It is a distinct syndrome associated with eosinophilic infiltration of respiratory tissues and excessive production of cysteinyl leukotrienes. Despite the consistent clinical phenotype of the respiratory disease, the underlying pathogenesis of the disease remains unclear. In addition to their role in hemostasis, platelets have the capacity to influence the activation state and function of other immune cells during inflammation, and to facilitate granulocyte recruitment into the tissues. Platelets also possess a repertoire of potent pre-formed mediators of inflammation that are released upon activation, and are a rich source of newly-synthesized lipid mediators that alter vascular permeability and smooth muscle tone. Accordingly, the activity of platelets has been linked to diverse inflammatory diseases, including asthma. Both human and animal studies strongly suggest that platelet activity is uniquely associated with the pathophysiology of AERD. This article summarizes the evidence supporting an effector role for platelets in asthma in general and in AERD in particular, and considers the potential therapeutic implications. PMID:26051947

  7. Systems Biology of Asthma and Allergic Diseases: A Multiscale Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bunyavanich, Supinda; Schadt, Eric E.

    2014-01-01

    Systems biology is an approach to understanding living systems that focuses on modeling diverse types of high-dimensional interactions to develop a more comprehensive understanding of complex phenotypes manifested by the system. High throughput molecular, cellular, and physiologic profiling of populations is coupled with bioinformatic and computational techniques to identify new functional roles for genes, regulatory elements, and metabolites in the context of the molecular networks that define biological processes associated with system physiology. Given the complexity and heterogeneity of asthma and allergic diseases, a systems biology approach is attractive, as it has the potential to model the myriad connections and interdependencies between genetic predisposition, environmental perturbations, regulatory intermediaries, and molecular sequelae that ultimately lead to diverse disease phenotypes and treatment responses across individuals. The increasing availability of high-throughput technologies has enabled system-wide profiling of the genome, transcriptome, epigenome, microbiome, and metabolome, providing fodder for systems biology approaches to examine asthma and allergy at a more holistic level. In this article, we review the technologies and approaches for system-wide profiling as well as their more recent applications to asthma and allergy. We discuss approaches for integrating multiscale data through network analyses and provide perspective on how individually-captured health profiles will contribute to more accurate systems biology views of asthma and allergy. PMID:25468194

  8. Effect of high-dose sublingual immunotherapy on respiratory infections in children allergic to house dust mite

    PubMed Central

    Barberi, Salvatore; Verduci, Elvira; D'Auria, Enza; Poli, Piercarlo; Pietra, Benedetta; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Buttafava, Serena; Frati, Franco; Riva, Enrica

    2015-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is characterized by eosinophil inflammation. Allergic inflammation may induce susceptibility to respiratory infections (RI). House dust mite (HDM) sensitization is very frequent in childhood. Allergen immunotherapy may cure allergy as it restores a physiologic immune and clinical tolerance to allergen and exerts anti-inflammatory activity. Objective This study investigated whether six-month high-dose, such as 300 IR (index of reactivity), HDM-sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) could affect RI in allergic children. Methods Globally, 40 HDM allergic children (18 males; mean age, 9.3 years) were subdivided in 2 groups: 20 treated by symptomatic drugs (group 1) and 20 by high-dose HDM-SLIT (group 2), since September 2012 to April 2013. The daily maintenance dose of HDM-SLIT was 4 pressures corresponding to 24, 4.8, and 60 µg, respectively of the major allergens Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p) 1, Der p 2, and Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f) 1. RI was diagnosed when at least 2 symptoms or signs, and fever were present for at least 48 hours. A family pediatrician provided diagnosis on a clinical ground. Results SLIT-treated children had significantly (p = 0.01) less RI episodes (3.5) than control group (5.45). About secondary outcomes, SLIT-treated children had less episodes of pharyngo-tonsillitis (p < 0.05) and bronchitis (p < 0.005), and snoring (p < 0.05) than control group. In addition, SLIT-treated children had less fever (p < 0.01) and took fewer medications, such as antibiotics (p < 0.05) and fever-reducers (p < 0.01), than control group. Conclusion This preliminary study might suggest that also a short course (6 months) of high-dose SLIT, titrated in µg of major allergens, could reduce RI in allergic children. PMID:26240793

  9. Genetic risk factors for the development of allergic disease identified by genome-wide association

    PubMed Central

    Portelli, M A; Hodge, E; Sayers, I

    2015-01-01

    An increasing proportion of the worldwide population is affected by allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis (AR), atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic asthma and improved treatment options are needed particularly for severe, refractory disease. Allergic diseases are complex and development involves both environmental and genetic factors. Although the existence of a genetic component for allergy was first described almost 100 years ago, progress in gene identification has been hindered by lack of high throughput technologies to investigate genetic variation in large numbers of subjects. The development of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), a hypothesis-free method of interrogating large numbers of common variants spanning the entire genome in disease and non-disease subjects has revolutionised our understanding of the genetics of allergic disease. Susceptibility genes for asthma, AR and AD have now been identified with confidence, suggesting there are common and distinct genetic loci associated with these diseases, providing novel insights into potential disease pathways and mechanisms. Genes involved in both adaptive and innate immune mechanisms have been identified, notably including multiple genes involved in epithelial function/secretion, suggesting that the airway epithelium may be particularly important in asthma. Interestingly, concordance/discordance between the genetic factors driving allergic traits such as IgE levels and disease states such as asthma have further supported the accumulating evidence for heterogeneity in these diseases. While GWAS have been useful and continue to identify novel genes for allergic diseases through increased sample sizes and phenotype refinement, future approaches will integrate analyses of rare variants, epigenetic mechanisms and eQTL approaches, leading to greater insight into the genetic basis of these diseases. Gene identification will improve our understanding of disease mechanisms and generate potential

  10. Hyperresponsiveness in the human nasal airway: new targets for the treatment of allergic airway disease.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, P J; Foreman, J C

    1999-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a condition which affects over 15% of the population in the United Kingdom. The pathological process involves two stages: nasal inflammation, and the development of nasal airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to allergen and a number of other stimuli. This results in the amplification of any subsequent allergic reaction, contributing to the chronic allergic state. A number of different hypotheses have been proposed to explain the underlying mechanism of AHR, including a role for eosinophil-derived proteins, free radicals and neuropeptides. While there may be a number of independent pathways which can result in AHR, evidence obtained from both animal models and in vivo experiments in humans indicate that some mediators may interact with one another, resulting in AHR. Further research into these interactions may open new avenues for the pharmacological treatment of chronic allergic rhinitis, and possibly other allergic airway diseases. PMID:10704051

  11. Isocyanates and respiratory disease: current status

    SciTech Connect

    Musk, A.W.; Peters, J.M.; Wegman, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews the known respiratory effects of isocyanates. There is good evidence to indicate that isocyanates: cause chemical bronchitis/pneumonitis; are potent pulmonary sensitizers capable of causing isocyanate asthma; cause nonspecific airways disease, including chronic bronchitis; can induce a general asthmatic state; and can cause hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Similar dose-response relationships are seen for both acute and chronic effects. There are plants operating in which exposures are well controlled and in which no respiratory effects can be detected. Suggestions are provided for preplacement assessment and periodic surveillance for workers exposed to these compounds.114 references.

  12. Occupational respiratory disease caused by acrylates.

    PubMed

    Savonius, B; Keskinen, H; Tuppurainen, M; Kanerva, L

    1993-05-01

    Acrylates are compounds used in a variety of industrial fields and their use is increasing. They have many features which make them superior to formerly used chemicals, regarding both their industrial use and their possible health effects. Contact sensitization is, however, one of their well known adverse health effects but they may also cause respiratory symptoms. We report on 18 cases of respiratory disease, mainly asthma, caused by different acrylates, 10 cases caused by cyanoacrylates, four by methacrylates and two cases by other acrylates. PMID:8334539

  13. Secondary allergic T cell responses are regulated by dendritic cell-derived thrombospondin-1 in the setting of allergic eye disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, R E; Reyes, N J; Khandelwal, P; Schlereth, S L; Lee, H S; Masli, S; Saban, D R

    2016-08-01

    Allergic eye disease, as in most forms of atopy, ranges in severity among individuals from immediate hypersensitivity to a severe and debilitating chronic disease. Dendritic cells play a key role in stimulating pathogenic T cells in allergen re-exposure, or secondary responses. However, molecular cues by dendritic cells underpinning allergic T cell response levels and the impact that this control has on consequent severity of allergic disease are poorly understood. Here, we show that a deficiency in thrombospondin-1, a matricellular protein known to affect immune function, has subsequent effects on downstream T cell responses during allergy, as revealed in an established mouse model of allergic eye disease. More specifically, we demonstrate that a thrombospondin-1 deficiency specific to dendritic cells leads to heightened secondary T cell responses and consequent clinical disease. Interestingly, whereas thrombospondin-1-deficient dendritic cells augmented activity of allergen-primed T cells, this increase was not recapitulated with naïve T cells in vitro. The role of dendritic cell-derived thrombospondin-1 in regulating secondary allergic T cell responses was confirmed in vivo, as local transfer of thrombospondin-1-sufficient dendritic cells to the ocular mucosa of thrombospondin-1 null hosts prevented the development of augmented secondary T cell responses and heightened allergic eye disease clinical responses. Finally, we demonstrate that topical instillation of thrombospondin-1-derived peptide reduces T cell activity and clinical progression of allergic eye disease. Taken together, this study reveals an important modulatory role of dendritic cell-derived thrombospondin-1 on secondary allergic T cell responses and suggests the possible dysregulation of dendritic cell-derived thrombospondin-1 expression as a factor in allergic eye disease severity. PMID:26856994

  14. Allergic inflammation in the human lower respiratory tract affected by exposure to diesel exhaust.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Marc A; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Linn, William S; Gong, Henry; Clark, Kenneth W; Effros, Richard M; Miller, J Wayne; Cocker, David R; Berhane, Kiros T

    2012-02-01

    significantly during DE exposure. In Phase 2, indicators of airway inflammation in sputum showed a possibly meaningful response: polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and eosinophils increased after DE exposure, whereas macrophages decreased. IgE in sputum and the bronchoconstrictive response to cat allergen varied significantly between atmospheres, but not in patterns consistent with our primary hypothesis. Symptom score changes relatable to DE exposure were smaller than those in Phase 1 and not statistically significant. Controlled exposures, lasting 2 hours with intermittent exercise, to diluted DE at a particle mass concentration of 100 microg/m3 did not evoke clear and consistent lower-airway or systemic immunologic or inflammatory responses in mildly asthmatic subjects, with or without accompanying challenge with cat allergen. Likewise, these DE exposures did not significantly increase nonspecific or allergen-specific bronchial reactivity. A few isolated statistically significant or near-significant changes were observed during and after DE exposure, including increases in nonspecific symptoms (e.g., headache, nausea) suggestive of subtle, rapid-onset systemic effects. It is possible the lower respiratory tract is more resistant than the nose to adjuvant effects of diesel particles on allergic inflammation, so that no meaningful effects occur under exposure conditions like these. Alternatively, the experimental conditions may have been near a threshold for finding effects. That is, important lower respiratory effects may occur but may be detectable experimentally with slightly higher DEP concentrations, longer exposures, more invasive testing (e.g., bronchoalveolar lavage), or more susceptible subjects. However, ethical and practical barriers to such experiments are considerable. PMID:22852485

  15. RESPIRATORY RESPONSES OF SUBJECTS WITH ALLERGIC RHINITIS TO OZONE EXPOSURE AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO NONSPECIFIC AIRWAY REACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone exposure in man produces changes in respiratory function and symptoms. There is a large degree of unexplained intersubject variability in the magnitude of these responses. There is concern that individuals with chronic respiratory diseases may also be more responsive to ozo...

  16. A 9-year Trend in the Prevalence of Allergic Disease Based on National Health Insurance Data

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byoungin; Park, Yoonhyung; Park, Kwanjun; Kim, Hoseob

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate trends in the prevalence of allergic disease over a 9-year period. Methods: Using National Health Insurance Service (NHIS) data, the annual number of patients with allergic disease was obtained for each regional subdivisions (small cities, counties, and districts) from 2003 to 2011. Annual populations for each sub-region were obtained and used to calculate the standardized prevalence. To compare prevalence within the study period, data was standardized spatially and temporally. For standardization, demographic data was used to obtain the registered population and demographic structure for 2010, which was used to perform direct standardization of previous years. In addition, a geographic information system (GIS) was used to visualize prevalence for individual sub-regions, and allergic diseases were categorized into five groups according to prevalence. Results: The nationwide outpatient prevalence of allergic rhinitis increased approximately 2.3-fold, from 1.27% in 2003 to 2.97% in 2013, while inpatient prevalence also increased approximately 2.4-fold,. The outpatient prevalence of asthma increased 1.2-fold, and inpatient prevalence increased 1.3-fold. The outpatient prevalence of atopic dermatitis decreased approximately 12%, and inpatient prevalence decreased 5%. Conclusions: There was a large difference between prevalence estimated from actual treatment data and prevalence based on patients’ self-reported data, particularly for allergic rhinitis. Prevalence must continually be calculated and trends should be analyzed for the efficient management of allergic diseases. To this end, prevalence studies using NHIS claims data may be useful. PMID:26639744

  17. Respiratory Diseases Caused by Coal Mine Dust

    PubMed Central

    Laney, A. Scott; Weissman, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide an update on respiratory diseases caused by coal mine dust. Methods This article presents the results of a literature review initially performed for an International Conference on Occupational and Environmental Lung Disease held in summer 2013. Results Coal mine dust causes a spectrum of lung diseases collectively termed coal mine dust lung disease (CMDLD). These include Coal Workers’ Pneumoconiosis, silicosis, mixed dust pneumoconiosis, dust-related diffuse fibrosis (which can be mistaken for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. CMDLD continues to be a problem in the United States, particularly in the central Appalachian region. Treatment of CMDLD is symptomatic. Those with end-stage disease are candidates for lung transplantation. Because CMDLD cannot be cured, prevention is critical. Conclusions Coal mine dust remains a relevant occupational hazard and miners remain at risk for CMDLD. PMID:25285970

  18. Update on viral diseases of the equine respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Gilkerson, James R; Bailey, Kirsten E; Diaz-Méndez, Andrés; Hartley, Carol A

    2015-04-01

    Many viral agents have been associated with respiratory disease of the horse. The most important viral causes of respiratory disease in horses are equine influenza and the equine alphaherpesviruses. Agents such as equine viral arteritis virus, African horse sickness virus, and Hendra virus establish systemic infections. Clinical signs of disease resulting from infection with these agents can manifest as respiratory disease, but the respiratory tract is not the major body system affected by these viruses. Treatment of viral respiratory disease is generally limited to supportive therapies, whereas targeted antimicrobial therapy is effective in cases of bacterial infection. PMID:25648568

  19. Allergic Rhinitis: A neglected disease — A community based assessment among adults in Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, B; Vibha; Singla, R; Chowdhury, R

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Allergic Rhinitis is rather erroneously viewed as a trivial disease. It is important in that it can significantly affect quality of life. There is paucity of community based prevalence studies on the disease in India. This study was planned to assess the prevalence of allergic rhinitis in adults, the proportion of asthmatics among them, risk factors associated and treatment seeking behaviour among the patients. Materials and Methods: A community based cross sectional study was conducted in Mehrauli, South Delhi among 1200 adults, aged 30 years and over selected by systematic random sampling from two randomly selected wards. A pre-tested questionnaire was used to collect information regarding symptoms, risk factors and treatment seeking behaviour. Allergic Rhinitis was diagnosed as per ARIA guidelines. Spirometry was done to diagnose asthma among them. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was done to find the association of risk factors with disease. Results: The prevalence of Allergic Rhinitis was found to be 11% (132 subjects) and 33.3% (44 patients) among them also had asthma. Overcrowding (aOR = 6.4), absence of cross-ventilation (aOR = 2.5), occupational exposure to dust/smoke (aOR = 2.1), tobacco smoking (aOR = 2.1), family history of allergic diseases (aOR = 2.7) and clinical allergy (aOR = 10.2) were found to be independent risk factors associated with Rhinitis. More patients of Rhinitis with asthma (75%) took treatment, relative to those without asthma (40%) who, mostly relied on home remedies (42%) or, did not seek any treatment (18%) (P = 0.031). Interpretations and Conclusion: The burden of Allergic Rhinitis is high with a considerable overlap with asthma. These allergic diseases and emphasize the importance of early and regular treatment. PMID:26119436

  20. Nitric Oxide and Respiratory Helminthic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Antonio; Pérez-Arellano, José-Luís

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a very simple molecule that displays very important functions both in helminths (mainly those involved in respiratory pathology) and in mammalian hosts. In this paper we review four issues related to interaction of NO and lung helminthic diseases. Firstly, we evaluated data available on the NO synthesis and release by helminths and their biological role. Next, we summarized the effect of antigens obtained from different phases of the biological cycle on NO production by host mammalian cells (mainly from human sources). Thirdly, we revised the evaluation of NO on the biological activities and/or the viability of respiratory helminths. Lastly, the deleterious consequences of increased production of NO during helminthic human infection are detailed. PMID:20169170

  1. Impact of bone marrow on respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Sara M

    2008-06-01

    The bone marrow is not only a site of haematopoiesis but also serves as an important reservoir for mature granulocytes and stem cells, including haematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and fibrocytes. In respiratory diseases, such as asthma and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis these cells are mobilised from the bone marrow in response to blood-borne mediators and subsequently recruited to the lungs. Although the granulocytes contribute to the inflammatory reaction, stem cells may promote tissue repair or remodelling. Understanding the factors and molecular mechanisms that regulate the mobilisation of granulocytes and stem cells from the bone marrow may lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of a wide range of respiratory disorders. PMID:18372214

  2. Diet and Allergic Diseases among Population Aged 0 to 18 Years: Myth or Reality?

    PubMed Central

    Saadeh, Danielle; Salameh, Pascale; Baldi, Isabelle; Raherison, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    Allergic diseases are an important health problem. However, epidemiological studies concerning childhood diet-related allergic diseases are scarce. This review examines published articles dealing with diet, dietary patterns and nutrition in relation with allergic diseases among population aged 0 to 18 years. Studies and trials were identified using MEDLINE/PubMed and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and were limited to those published in English or French from 1992 until 2012. This manuscript also reviews the evidence for maternal diet during pregnancy and diet during early childhood and their association with childhood atopic diseases, taking into account the methodology used to evaluate dietary patterns. The evidence reviewed is derived from large epidemiological studies exploring the effects of different food categories on asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis in children. Overall, maternal diet during pregnancy and a childhood diet rich in antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids are considered as healthy diets that could be protective for allergic diseases in childhood. PMID:23995043

  3. Effect of a chemical chaperone, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, on HDM-induced allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Siddesha, Jalahalli M; Nakada, Emily M; Mihavics, Bethany R; Hoffman, Sidra M; Rattu, Gurkiranjit K; Chamberlain, Nicolas; Cahoon, Jonathon M; Lahue, Karolyn G; Daphtary, Nirav; Aliyeva, Minara; Chapman, David G; Desai, Dhimant H; Poynter, Matthew E; Anathy, Vikas

    2016-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced unfolded protein response plays a critical role in inflammatory diseases, including allergic airway disease. However, the benefits of inhibiting ER stress in the treatment of allergic airway disease are not well known. Herein, we tested the therapeutic potential of a chemical chaperone, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), in combating allergic asthma, using a mouse model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic airway disease. TUDCA was administered during the HDM-challenge phase (preventive regimen), after the HDM-challenge phase (therapeutic regimen), or therapeutically during a subsequent HDM rechallenge (rechallenge regimen). In the preventive regimen, TUDCA significantly decreased HDM-induced inflammation, markers of ER stress, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and fibrosis. Similarly, in the therapeutic regimen, TUDCA administration efficiently decreased HDM-induced airway inflammation, mucus metaplasia, ER stress markers, and AHR, but not airway remodeling. Interestingly, TUDCA administered therapeutically in the HDM rechallenge regimen markedly attenuated HDM-induced airway inflammation, mucus metaplasia, ER stress markers, methacholine-induced AHR, and airway fibrotic remodeling. These results indicate that the inhibition of ER stress in the lungs through the administration of chemical chaperones could be a valuable strategy in the treatment of allergic airway diseases. PMID:27154200

  4. Respiratory diseases and the impact of cough in Taiwan: Results from the APBORD observational study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Horng-Chyuan; Cho, Sang-Heon; Ghoshal, Aloke Gopal; Muttalif, Abdul Razak Bin Abdul; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak; Bagga, Shalini; Faruqi, Rab; Sajjan, Shiva; Cahill, Camilla L; Hamrosi, Kim K; Wang, De Yun

    2016-07-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis (AR), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and rhinosinusitis are becoming increasingly prevalent in the Asia-Pacific region. The Asia-Pacific Burden of Respiratory Diseases (APBORD) study was a cross-sectional, observational study which examined the disease and economic burden of AR, asthma, COPD, and rhinosinusitis across Asia-Pacific using 1 standard protocol. Here we report symptoms, healthcare resource use (HCRU), work impairment, and associated cost in Taiwan.Consecutive participants aged ≥ 18 years presenting to a physician with symptoms meeting the diagnostic criteria for a primary diagnosis of asthma, AR, COPD, or rhinosinusitis were enrolled. Participants and their treating physician completed surveys detailing respiratory symptoms, HCRU, work productivity, and activity impairment. Costs including direct medical costs and indirect costs associated with lost work productivity were calculated.The study enrolled 1001 patients. AR was the most frequent primary diagnosis (31.2%). A quarter of patients presented with a combination of respiratory diseases, with AR and asthma being the most frequent combination (14.1%). Cough or coughing up phlegm was the primary reason for the medical visit for patients with asthma and COPD, whereas nasal symptoms (watery runny nose, blocked nose, and congestion) were the primary reasons for AR and rhinosinusitis. Specialists were the most frequently used healthcare resource by patients with AR (26.1%), asthma (26.4%), COPD (26.6%), and rhinosinusitis (47.3%). The mean annual cost per patient with a respiratory disease was US$4511 (SD 5395). The cost was almost double for employed patients (US$8047, SD 6175), with the majority attributable to lost productivity.Respiratory diseases have a significant impact on disease burden in Taiwan. Treatment strategies that prevent lost work productivity could greatly reduce the economic burden of these diseases. PMID

  5. Contraception, pregnancy and rare respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Lara, Beatriz; Fornet, Inocencia; Goya, María; López, Francisco; De Miguel, José Ramón; Molina, María; Morales, Pilar; Quintana, Esther; Salicrú, Sabina; Suárez, Elena; Usetti, Piedad; Zurbano, Felipe

    2012-10-01

    Three percent of rare diseases are pneumopathies. Improvements in survival and quality of life have led to a new situation where patients with rare respiratory diseases want to plan their reproductive lives. The intention of this review is to present the experience accumulated in the field of the reproductive health of these women. In several rare respiratory diseases, a genetic base has been identified. The combination of preimplantation genetic diagnosis, assisted reproduction and molecular biology techniques enable embryos to be studied genetically before being transplanted into the uterus. Therefore, the risk for transmitting a certain disease or chromosome alteration may be avoided in high-risk couples, and prenatal diagnoses may be done by chorionic villus sampling or amniocentesis. As a general rule, contraceptive methods should be personalized by evaluating the general state of female patients as well as their possibilities for pregnancy, complications and the future possibility of lung transplantation. In lymphangioleiomyomatosis and primary pulmonary hypertension, pregnancy is considered a contraindication. In the former, there is a very high risk for pneumothorax and loss of lung function. In the latter, mortality reaches 33%. In cystic fibrosis, it is estimated that each year 4% of patients become pregnant and there is no observed loss in lung function. There are special circumstances in childbirth that should be considered as well as specific anesthesia risks. The present review suggests that the decision about contraceptive methods, pregnancy as a contraindication or conditions for managing a pregnancy should be both individualized and multidisciplinary. PMID:22771004

  6. Respiratory disease caused by synthetic fibres: a new occupational disease.

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, J C; Avila, R; Lourenço, A G

    1975-01-01

    Seven patients exposed to the inhalation of synthetic fibres presented with various bronchopulmonary diseases, such as asthma, extrinsic allergic alveolitis, chronic bronchitis with bronchiectasis, spontaneous pneumothorax, and chronic pneumonia. The histological features are described and an attempt has been made to set up immunological techniques for the diagnosis. A series of histochemical techniques, based on textile chemistry, are proposed for the identification of the inclusions found in bronchopulmonary lesions. The results of the experimental production of the disease in guinea-pigs by the inhalation of synthetic fibre dusts are presented. The prognosis of these cases is good in the acute or recently established cases but is poor when widespread and irreversible fibrosis has set in. The authors consider that pulmonary disease due to inhaled particles is probably set off by an individual factor, possibly immunological. Images PMID:1179318

  7. Burden of respiratory disease in Thailand: Results from the APBORD observational study.

    PubMed

    Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak; Cho, Sang-Heon; Ghoshal, Aloke Gopal; Muttalif, Abdul Razak Bin Abdul; Lin, Horng-Chyuan; Pothirat, Chaicharn; Chuaychoo, Benjamas; Aeumjaturapat, Songklot; Bagga, Shalini; Faruqi, Rab; Sajjan, Shiva; Baidya, Santwona; Wang, De Yun

    2016-07-01

    Asia-Pacific Burden of Respiratory Diseases (APBORD) was a cross-sectional, observational study examining the burden of respiratory disease in adults across 6 Asia-Pacific countries.This article reports symptoms, healthcare resource utilization (HCRU), work impairment and cost burden associated with allergic rhinitis (AR), asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and rhinosinusitis in Thailand.Consecutive participants aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of AR, asthma, COPD, or rhinosinusitis were enrolled at 4 hospitals in Thailand during October 2012 and October 2013. Participants completed a survey detailing respiratory symptoms, HCRU, work productivity, and activity impairment. Locally sourced unit costs were used in the calculation of total costs.The study enrolled 1000 patients. The most frequent primary diagnosis was AR (44.2%), followed by rhinosinusitis (24.1%), asthma (23.7%), and COPD (8.0%). Overall, 316 (31.6%) of patients were diagnosed with some combination of the 4 diseases. Blocked nose or congestion (17%) and cough or coughing up phlegm (16%) were the main reasons for the current medical visit. The mean annual cost for patients with a respiratory disease was US$1495 (SD 3133) per patient. Costs associated with work productivity loss were the principal contributor for AR and rhinosinusitis patients while medication costs were the highest contributor for asthma and COPD patients.The study findings highlight the burden associated with 4 prevalent respiratory diseases in Thailand. Thorough investigation of concomitant conditions and improved disease management may help to reduce the burden of these respiratory diseases. PMID:27428193

  8. Burden of respiratory disease in Thailand: Results from the APBORD observational study

    PubMed Central

    Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak; Cho, Sang-Heon; Ghoshal, Aloke Gopal; Muttalif, Abdul Razak Bin Abdul; Lin, Horng-Chyuan; Pothirat, Chaicharn; Chuaychoo, Benjamas; Aeumjaturapat, Songklot; Bagga, Shalini; Faruqi, Rab; Sajjan, Shiva; Baidya, Santwona; Wang, De Yun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Asia-Pacific Burden of Respiratory Diseases (APBORD) was a cross-sectional, observational study examining the burden of respiratory disease in adults across 6 Asia-Pacific countries. This article reports symptoms, healthcare resource utilization (HCRU), work impairment and cost burden associated with allergic rhinitis (AR), asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and rhinosinusitis in Thailand. Consecutive participants aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of AR, asthma, COPD, or rhinosinusitis were enrolled at 4 hospitals in Thailand during October 2012 and October 2013. Participants completed a survey detailing respiratory symptoms, HCRU, work productivity, and activity impairment. Locally sourced unit costs were used in the calculation of total costs. The study enrolled 1000 patients. The most frequent primary diagnosis was AR (44.2%), followed by rhinosinusitis (24.1%), asthma (23.7%), and COPD (8.0%). Overall, 316 (31.6%) of patients were diagnosed with some combination of the 4 diseases. Blocked nose or congestion (17%) and cough or coughing up phlegm (16%) were the main reasons for the current medical visit. The mean annual cost for patients with a respiratory disease was US$1495 (SD 3133) per patient. Costs associated with work productivity loss were the principal contributor for AR and rhinosinusitis patients while medication costs were the highest contributor for asthma and COPD patients. The study findings highlight the burden associated with 4 prevalent respiratory diseases in Thailand. Thorough investigation of concomitant conditions and improved disease management may help to reduce the burden of these respiratory diseases. PMID:27428193

  9. The spectrum of allergic fungal diseases of the upper and lower airways.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Jonathan; Caruthers, Carrie; Azmeh, Roua; Dykewicz, Mark S; Slavin, Raymond G; Knutsen, Alan P

    2016-05-01

    Fungi cause a wide spectrum of fungal diseases of the upper and lower airways. There are three main phyla involved in allergic fungal disease: (1) Ascomycota (2) Basidiomycota (3) Zygomycota. Allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS) causes chronic rhinosinusitis symptoms and is caused predominantly by Aspergillus fumigatus in India and Bipolaris in the United States. The recommended treatment approach for AFRS is surgical intervention and systemic steroids. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (APBA) is most commonly diagnosed in patients with asthma or cystic fibrosis. Long term systemic steroids are the mainstay treatment option for ABPA with the addition of an antifungal medication. Fungal sensitization or exposure increases a patient's risk of developing severe asthma and has been termed severe asthma associated with fungal sensitivity (SAFS). Investigating for triggers and causes of a patient's asthma should be sought to decrease worsening progression of the disease. PMID:26776889

  10. Exposure to cats: update on risks for sensitization and allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Dharmage, Shyamali C; Lodge, Caroline L; Matheson, Melanie C; Campbell, Brittany; Lowe, Adrian J

    2012-10-01

    Cats are the pets most commonly implicated in the etiology of asthma and allergic disease. However, systematic reviews have concluded that there is a lack of evidence to support the idea that cat exposure in early life increases the risk of allergic disease. Indeed, it appears most likely that cat exposure is protective against allergic diseases. Recent large prospective studies have shown that living with a cat during childhood, especially during the first year of a child's life, could be protective. However, any advice given to the parents should also incorporate how new acquisition of cats can affect other family members, especially those who are already sensitized. Research is urgently needed to determine whether the suggested impact of acquisition of cats in adult life is modified by the person's childhood pet ownership, to help parents who seek advice on whether or not to get a cat. PMID:22878928

  11. Bovine respiratory disease research (1983-2009).

    PubMed

    Fulton, Robert W

    2009-12-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) research has provided significant understanding of the disease over the past 26 years. Modern research tools that have been used include monoclonal antibodies, genomics, polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry (IHC), DNA vaccines and viral vectors coding for immunogens. Emerging/reemerging viruses and new antigenic strains of viruses and bacteria have been identified. Methods of detection and the role for cattle persistently infected bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) were identified; viral subunits, cellular components and bacterial products have been characterized. Product advances have included vaccines for bovine respiratory syncytial virus, Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida; the addition of BVDV2 to the existing vaccines and new antibiotics. The role of Mycoplasma spp., particularly Mycoplasma bovis in BRD, has been more extensively studied. Bovine immunology research has provided more specific information on immune responses, T cell subsets and cytokines. The molecular and genetic basis for viral-bacterial synergy in BRD has been described. Attempts have been made to document how prevention of BRD by proper vaccination and management prior to exposure to infectious agents can minimize disease and serve as economic incentives for certified health programs. PMID:20003649

  12. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia in Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Neves, Victor Ribeiro; Peltola, Mirja; Huikuri, Heikki; Rocha, Manoel Otávio da Costa; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz

    2014-10-01

    We applied the respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) quantification algorithm to 24-hour ECG recordings of Chagas disease (ChD) patients with (G1, n=148) and without left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) (G2, n=33), and in control subjects (G0, n=28). Both ChD groups displayed a reduced RSA index; G1=299 (144-812); G2=335 (162-667), p=0.011, which was correlated with vagal indexes of heart rate variability analysis. RSA index is a marker of vagal modulation in ChD patients. PMID:25130950

  13. Fexofenadine hydrochloride in the treatment of allergic disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, David; Bielory, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    Fexofenadine is a selective, non-sedating H1 receptor antagonist, marketed in the United States since 2000. The FDA approved an oral suspension in 2006, for the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis and chronic idiopathic urticaria in children. The tablet, capsule, and oral suspension are bioequivalent. Although fexofenadine does not use P450 CYP 3A4 it does interact with a number of drugs at P-glycoprotein and organic anion transporter polypeptides. The risk of toxicity from other drugs may increase with the administration of fexofenadine. Orange and grapefruit juices reduce the bioavailability of fexofenadine. Fexofenadine has been shown to have an impact on inflammatory mediators, other than histamine, such as decreasing the production of LTC4, LTD4, LTE4, PGE2, and PGF2α; inhibiting cyclo-oxygenase 2, thromboxane; limiting iNOS generation of NO; decreasing cytokine levels (ICAM-1, ELAM-1, VCAM-1, RANTES, I-TAC, MDC, TARC, MMP-2, MMP-9, tryptase); and diminishing eosinophil adherence, chemotaxis, and opsonization of particles. These effects may provide benefit to some of the inflammatory responses of an acute allergic reaction and provide a basis for future development of H1 antagonists with stronger anti-inflammatory effects. These studies also support the contention that fexofenadine is effective for the treatment of allergic rhinits and chronic idiopathic urticaria. PMID:21436982

  14. Strategic Plan for Pediatric Respiratory Diseases Research

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Mario; Ramirez, Maria I.; Gern, James E.; Cutting, Garry; Redding, Greg; Hagood, James S.; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Abman, Steve; Raj, J. Usha; Barst, Robyn; Kato, Gregory J.; Gozal, David; Haddad, Gabriel G.; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.; Gauda, Estelle; Martinez, Fernando D.; Tepper, Robert; Wood, Robert E.; Accurso, Frank; Teague, W. Gerald; Venegas, Jose; Cole, F. Sessions; Wright, Rosalind J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The Division of Lung Diseases of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) recently held a workshop to identify gaps in our understanding and treatment of childhood lung diseases and to define strategies to enhance translational research in this field. Leading experts with diverse experience in both laboratory and patient-oriented research reviewed selected areas of pediatric lung diseases, including perinatal programming and epigenetic influences;mechanisms of lung injury, repair, and regeneration; pulmonary vascular disease (PVD); sleep and control of breathing; and the application of novel translational methods to enhance personalized medicine. This report summarizes the proceedings of this workshop and provides recommendations for emphasis on targeted areas for future investigation. The priority areas identified for research in pediatric pulmonary diseases included: (1) epigenetic and environmental influences on lung development that program pediatric lung diseases, (2) injury, regeneration, and repair in the developing lung, (3) PVD in children, (4) development and adaptation of ventilatory responses to postnatal life, (5) nonatopic wheezing: aberrant large airway development or injury? (6) strategies to improve assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric respiratory diseases, and (7) predictive and personalizedmedicine for children. PMID:19086051

  15. Omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and allergic diseases in infancy and childhood.

    PubMed

    Miles, Elizabeth A; Calder, Philip C

    2014-01-01

    There may be a causal relationship between intake of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and childhood allergic diseases. This can be explained by plausible biological mechanisms involving eicosanoid mediators produced from the n-6 PUFA arachidonic acid. Long chain n-3 PUFAs are found in fish and fish oils. These fatty acids act to oppose the actions of n-6 PUFAs. Thus, it is considered that n-3 PUFAs will lower the risk of developing allergic diseases. In support of this, protective associations have been reported between maternal fish intake during pregnancy and allergic outcomes in infants and children from those pregnancies. However, studies of fish intake during infancy and childhood and allergic outcomes in those infants or children are inconsistent, although some reported a protective association. Supplementing pregnant women with fish oil can induce immunologic changes in cord blood. This supplementation has been reported in some studies to decrease sensitisation to common food allergens and to lower the prevalence and severity of atopic dermatitis in the first year of life. The protective effect of maternal n-3 PUFAs may last until adolescence of the offspring. Fish oil supplementation in infancy may decrease the risk of developing some manifestations of allergic disease, although this benefit may not persist. Whether fish oil is a useful therapy in children with asthma receiving standard therapy is not clear from studies performed to date and this requires further exploration. PMID:23701554

  16. Gut Microbiome and the Development of Food Allergy and Allergic Disease.

    PubMed

    Prince, Benjamin T; Mandel, Mark J; Nadeau, Kari; Singh, Anne Marie

    2015-12-01

    The impact of gut microbiome on human development, nutritional needs, and disease has become evident with advances in the ability to study these complex communities of microorganisms, and there is growing appreciation for the role of the microbiome in immune regulation. Several studies have examined associations between changes in the commensal microbiota and the development of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and asthma, but far less have evaluated the impact of the microbiome on the development of food allergy. This article reviews the human gastrointestinal microbiome, focusing on the theory and evidence for its role in the development of IgE-mediated food allergy and other allergic diseases. PMID:26456445

  17. The relationships among birth season, sunlight exposure during infancy, and allergic disease

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung Min; Oh, Se Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The recent increase in the prevalence of allergic diseases is hypothetically attributed to immune dysregulation in turn caused by a reduction in exposure to sunlight. We explored relationships between birth season, sunlight exposure, exercise duration, and an allergic disease. Methods We performed a questionnaire-based survey on allergic diseases among elementary school students. Birth time was categorized according to the season (summer and winter). Results The prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) "symptoms ever" was higher in the children born in winter than in those born in summer (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.49; P=0.024). Birth in winter was associated with an increase in the "symptoms in the past 12 months" prevalence of food allergy (FA) (aOR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.09-2.24; P=0.015). The lifetime prevalence of allergic diseases except FA was higher in the children whose parents considered their sunlight exposure prior to 24 months of ageas inadequate than those who considered their exposure as adequate ("diagnosis ever" asthma: aOR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.17-1.67; P<0.001; allergic rhinitis [AR]: aOR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.17-1.67; P<0.001; AD: aOR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.06-1.51; P=0.01). Neither recent sunlight exposure nor exercise duration was associated with the prevalence of an allergic disease. Conclusion Birth in winter may be associated with development of AD and FA. Inadequate sunlight exposure before the age of 24 months might possibly increase the risks of development of asthma, AR, and AD. PMID:27279886

  18. Rhinosinusitis and Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Cruz, Maria L.; Jimenez-Chobillon, M. Alejandro; Teran, Luis M.

    2012-01-01

    Rhinosinusitis is a feature of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), which in the initial phase is manifested as nasal congestion, mostly affecting females at the age of around 30 years on average. Subsequently, nasal inflammation progresses to chronic eosinophilic rhinosinusitis, asthma, nasal polyposis, and intolerance to aspirin and to other NSAIDs. While it has been long established that NSAIDs cause inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), leading to excessive metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) to cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LTs), there is now evidence that both cytokines and staphylococcus superantigens amplify the inflammatory process exacerbating the disease. This paper gives a brief overview of the development of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) in sensitive patients, and we share our experience in the diagnosis and management of CRS in AERD. PMID:22829846

  19. Use of antihistamines after serious allergic reaction to methimazole in pediatric Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Toderian, Amy B; Lawson, Margaret L

    2014-05-01

    Antithyroid drugs are usually considered first-line therapy for management of pediatric Graves' disease because they avoid permanent hypothyroidism, provide a chance for remission, and are less invasive than the alternatives of thyroidectomy or radioactive iodine. Methimazole (MMI) is the only antithyroid drug recommended in pediatrics due to the risk of propylthiouracil-induced liver toxicity. Allergic reactions with MMI occur in up to 10% of patients and, when mild, can be managed with concurrent antihistamine therapy. Guidelines recommend discontinuation of MMI with serious allergic reactions. We present the case of an adolescent girl with Graves' disease and a serious allergic reaction after starting MMI whose family refused radioactive iodine and was reluctant to proceed to surgery. Antihistamine therapy was successfully used to allow continued treatment with MMI. This case demonstrates extension of management guidelines for minor cutaneous allergic reactions to MMI, through the use of antihistamines for a serious allergic reaction, allowing us to continue MMI and provide treatment consistent with the family's preferences and values. PMID:24777217

  20. Characterization of microbiomes related to respiratory disease in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory disease is the single largest disease-related issue for the beef cattle industry in the United States, estimated to be responsible for up to 75% of morbidity in beef cattle feedlots. Despite decades of research into this problem, incidence of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) h...

  1. Circulating nerve growth factor levels are increased in humans with allergic diseases and asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Bonini, S; Lambiase, A; Bonini, S; Angelucci, F; Magrini, L; Manni, L; Aloe, L

    1996-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) serum levels were measured in 49 patients with asthma and/or rhinoconjunctivitis and/or urticaria-angioedema. Clinical and biochemical parameters, such as bronchial reactivity, total and specific serum IgE levels, and circulating eosinophil cationic protein levels, were evaluated in relation to NGF values in asthma patients. NGF was significantly increased in the 42 allergic (skin-test- or radioallergosorbent-test-positive) subjects (49.7 +/- 28.8 pg/ml) versus the 18 matched controls (3.8 +/- 1.7 pg/ml; P < 0.001). NGF levels in allergic patients with asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and urticaria-angioedema were 132.1 +/- 90.8, 17.6 +/- 6.1, and 7.6 +/- 1.8 pg/ml (P < 0.001, P < 0.002, and P < 0.05 versus controls), respectively. Patients with more than one allergic disease had higher NGF serum values than those with a single disease. When asthma patients were considered as a group, NGF serum values (87.6 +/- 59.8 pg/ml) were still significantly higher than those of control groups (P < 0.001), but allergic asthma patients had elevated NGF serum levels compared with nonallergic asthma patients (132.1 +/- 90.8 versus 4.9 +/- 2.9 pg/ml; P < 0.001). NGF serum levels correlate to total IgE serum values (rho = 0.43; P < 0.02). The highest NGF values were found in patients with severe allergic asthma, a high degree of bronchial hyperreactivity, and high total IgE and eosinophil cationic protein serum levels. This study represents the first observation (that we know of) that NGF is increased in human allergic inflammatory diseases and asthma. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8855290

  2. Changing Prevalence of Allergic Diseases in the Asia-Pacific Region

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ting Fan; Ko, Fanny W.S.

    2013-01-01

    Asia-Pacific is one of the most densely populated regions of the world and is experiencing rapid economic changes and urbanization. Environmental pollution is a significant problem associated with the rapid modernization of many cities in South Asia. It is not surprising that the prevalences of asthma and allergies are increasing rapidly, although the underlying reasons remain largely unknown. Many studies from this region have documented the changing prevalence of allergic diseases in various parts of the world. However, the methodologies used were neither standardized nor validated, making the results difficult to evaluate. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) has provided a global epidemiology map of asthma and allergic diseases, as well as the trend of changes in the prevalence of these diseases. Allergic sensitization is extremely common in many Asian communities. However, the prevalence of allergic diseases remains relatively rare. The rapid urbanization in the region, which increases environmental pollution and can affect the rural environment, will likely increase the prevalence of asthma and allergies in Asia. PMID:24003381

  3. Immunomodulatory treatments for aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Moebus, Rachel G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aspirin triad is a subclass of chronic sinusitis characterized by nasal polyposis, nonallergic induced asthma, and aspirin sensitivity. Also known as Samter's triad or aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, aspirin triad commonly affects the adult population and is seldom found in pediatric patients. Methods: This rhinosinusitis has multiple layers of pathological process, but the ultimate predicament is caused by cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs). Results: Pharmacotherapies include oral steroid, lipoxygenase inhibitor, and cysLT receptor inhibitor drugs, which can provide some relief for these patients. Conclusion: Immunomodulation via aspirin desensitization is considered when pharmacotherapy has failed. When aspirin triad is unmanageable with medical treatment alone, endoscopic sinus surgery with polypectomy can alleviate the patient's symptoms, allowing for a better response to postoperative medical management such as topical medication as well as delivery of topical medications. PMID:22487291

  4. Respiratory disease in Utah coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Rom, W.N.; Kanner, R.E.; Renzetti, A.D. Jr.; Shigeoka, J.W.; Barkman, H.W.; Nichols, M.; Turner, W.A.; Coleman, M.; Wright, W.E.

    1981-04-01

    Two hundred forty-two Utah underground coal miners volunteered to participate in a respiratory disease study. They were an older group (mean, 56 years of age) and had spent a mean of 29 years in the coal-mining industry. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 57%, and that of coal worker's pneumoconiosis, 25%; only one worker had progressive massive fibrosis. Significant impairment of pulmonary function was found among those with a history of cigarette smoking. Chronic bronchitis or coal worker's pneumoconiosis among nonsmokers did not impair pulmonary function. There was a significant association among the nonsmokers between increasing exposure to coal dust and coal worker's pneumoconiosis, but not for changes in pulmonary function. Coal mine dust had a significant influence in causing the symptom complex of chronic cough and sputum production, and coal worker's pneumoconiosis.

  5. Respiratory disease in Utah coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Rom, W.N.; Kanner, R.E.; Renzetti, A.D. Jr.; Shigeoka, J.W.; Barkman, H.W.; Nichols, M.; Turner, W.A.; Coleman, M.; Wright, W.E.

    1981-04-01

    Two hundred forty-two Utah underground coal miners volunteered to participate in a respiratory disease study. They were an older group (mean, 56 years of age) and had spent a mean of 29 years in the coal-mining industry. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 57%, and that of coal worker's pneumoconiosis, 25%; only one worker had progressive massive fibrosis. Significant impairment of pulmonary function was found among those with a history of cigarette smoking. Chronic bronchitis or coal worker's penumoconiosis among nonsmokers did not impair pulmonary function. There was a significant association among the nonsmokers between increasing exposure to coal dust and coal worker's pneumoconiosis, but not for changes in pulmonary function. Coal mine dust had a significant influence in causing the symptom complex of chronic cough and sputum production, and coal worker's pneumoconiosis.

  6. Respiratory Conditions Update: Restrictive Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Robinson, H Coleman

    2016-09-01

    Restrictive lung diseases are a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by a restrictive pattern on spirometry and confirmed by a reduction in total lung volume. Patients with more severe symptoms may have a reduced diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide. Etiologies can be intrinsic with lung parenchymal involvement, as in interstitial lung diseases, or extrinsic to the lung, as in obesity and neuromuscular disorders. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic progressive interstitial pneumonia with fibrosis for which treatment is primarily supportive with oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, and management of comorbid conditions. Newer drugs for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, such as pirfenidone and nintedanib, can slow disease progression. Referral for evaluation for lung transplantation is recommended for appropriate patients. Obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome increasingly are common health issues, with symptoms that can include snoring, daytime somnolence, difficulty concentrating, fatigue, witnessed apneas, and morning headaches. Serum bicarbonate may serve as a biomarker in screening for subclinical obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Preoperative evaluations should assess pulmonary risk in addition to cardiac risk with a thorough history, laboratory tests, and functional capacity assessments. Optimization of management may include weight loss, pulmonary rehabilitation, oxygen therapy, and respiratory support. PMID:27576233

  7. The Relationship between Vitamin D Status and Allergic Diseases in New Zealand Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    Cairncross, Carolyn; Grant, Cameron; Stonehouse, Welma; Conlon, Cath; McDonald, Barry; Houghton, Lisa; Eyles, Darryl; Camargo, Carlos A.; Coad, Jane; von Hurst, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Recent research on vitamin D in young children has expanded from bone development to exploring immunomodulatory effects. Our aim was to investigate the relationship of vitamin D status and allergic diseases in preschool-aged children in New Zealand. Dried capillary blood spots were collected from 1329 children during late-winter to early-spring for 25(OH)D measurement by LC-MS/MS. Caregivers completed a questionnaire about their child’s recent medical history. Analysis was by multivariable logistic regression. Mean 25(OH)D concentration was 52(SD19) nmol/L, with 7% of children <25 nmol/L and 49% <50 nmol/L. Children with 25(OH)D concentrations ≥75 nmol/L (n = 29) had a two-fold increased risk for parent-report of doctor-diagnosed food allergy compared to children with 25(OH)D 50–74.9 nmol/L (OR = 2.21, 1.33–3.68, p = 0.002). No associations were present between 25(OH)D concentration and presence of parent-reported eczema, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis or atopic asthma. Vitamin D deficiency was not associated with several allergic diseases in these New Zealand preschool children. In contrast, high 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with a two-fold increased risk of parental-report food allergy. This increase supports further research into the association between vitamin D status and allergic disease in preschool children. PMID:27258306

  8. The Relationship between Vitamin D Status and Allergic Diseases in New Zealand Preschool Children.

    PubMed

    Cairncross, Carolyn; Grant, Cameron; Stonehouse, Welma; Conlon, Cath; McDonald, Barry; Houghton, Lisa; Eyles, Darryl; Camargo, Carlos A; Coad, Jane; von Hurst, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Recent research on vitamin D in young children has expanded from bone development to exploring immunomodulatory effects. Our aim was to investigate the relationship of vitamin D status and allergic diseases in preschool-aged children in New Zealand. Dried capillary blood spots were collected from 1329 children during late-winter to early-spring for 25(OH)D measurement by LC-MS/MS. Caregivers completed a questionnaire about their child's recent medical history. Analysis was by multivariable logistic regression. Mean 25(OH)D concentration was 52(SD19) nmol/L, with 7% of children <25 nmol/L and 49% <50 nmol/L. Children with 25(OH)D concentrations ≥75 nmol/L (n = 29) had a two-fold increased risk for parent-report of doctor-diagnosed food allergy compared to children with 25(OH)D 50-74.9 nmol/L (OR = 2.21, 1.33-3.68, p = 0.002). No associations were present between 25(OH)D concentration and presence of parent-reported eczema, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis or atopic asthma. Vitamin D deficiency was not associated with several allergic diseases in these New Zealand preschool children. In contrast, high 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with a two-fold increased risk of parental-report food allergy. This increase supports further research into the association between vitamin D status and allergic disease in preschool children. PMID:27258306

  9. Chronic Respiratory Diseases of School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGovern, John P.

    1976-01-01

    The author examines the problems of chronic respiratory disease in school-age children from a medical viewpoint, including recognition and diagnosis, commonly encountered diseases, their effect on participation in physical exercise, emotional factors, medication, and emergency care. (MB)

  10. General anesthesia exposure in early life reduces the risk of allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ho-Chang; Yang, Ya-Ling; Ho, Shu-Chen; Guo, Mindy Ming-Huey; Jiang, Jyun-Hong; Huang, Ying-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract General anesthesia (GA) has been used for second line treatment strategy for status asthmaticus in pediatric patients. The association between GA in children and risk of followed-up allergic diseases is unclear. This study aims to assess the risk of allergic diseases after GA in children. We did a nationwide retrospective cohort study by analyzing data from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) in Taiwan. The subsequent risks for allergic diseases, including asthma (ICD-9: 493.X), allergic rhinitis (AR; ICD-9 CM code 477.X), and atopic dermatitis (AD; ICD-9-CM code 691.X), were compared between exposure to GA and none before 1 year of age throughout the follow-up period using the Cox proportional hazards model. Insurance claims data for 32,742 children younger than 1 year old from all insured children in the NHIRD. Of those, 2358 subjects were exposed to GA; 414 and 1944 children exposed to mask and intubation ventilation, respectively, served as the study cohort, whereas the remaining 30,384 children made up the comparison cohort. Children in the GA group were at a lower risk of developing asthma, AR and AD, with adjusted hazard ratios of 0.67 (0.62–0.72, 95%CI), 0.72 (0.68–0.77, 95%CI), 0.60 (0.56–0.64, 95%CI), respectively. Children who were exposed to GA in early life before 1 year of age had reduced risk of subsequently developing allergic diseases such as asthma, AD, and AR, when compared with general population. PMID:27428241

  11. Allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Mygind, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a very frequent disease with a prevalence of 15-20%. Symptoms are most pronounced in young people while, for some unknown reason, the elderly become clinically hyposensitized. Pollen is the cause of seasonal allergic rhinitis, and house dust mite and animals are the main causes of perennial allergic rhinitis. Histamine is the main cause of sneezing and hypersecretion, while other mediators probably also play a role in nasal blockage. In polyposis, a local denervation is an important cause of vascular leakage, edema and polyp formation. Antihistamines have a positive effect on sneezing and hypersecretion, but not on blockage. As they have a quick onset of action they are useful in patients with mild and occasional symptoms. A nasal steroid is preferable in patients with persistent symptoms, since it is more effective on all nasal symptoms. Short-term use of a systemic steroid can be a valuable adjunct to topical treatment, especially in nasal polyposis, when there is a temporary failure of topical treatment in a blocked nose. A nasal vasoconstrictor can be added for short-term treatment, and an ipratropium spray can be beneficial in perennial non-allergic rhinitis, when watery secretion is the dominant symptom. Immunotherapy can be added in allergic rhinitis, when pharmacotherapy is insufficient. This chapter is based on the author's personal experience with allergic rhinitis, as a patient, a doctor and a researcher. Therefore, it is not a balanced review and the references will be highly selected as they largely consist of the author's own publications. As the text is mainly based on personal research, steroids are described in detail, while, with regard to immunotherapy, the reader is referred to another chapter. In addition to allergic rhinitis, nasal polyposis will be described. It was formerly believed to be an allergic disease, but we now know that it is not. However, with regard to histopathology and drug responsiveness this disease is

  12. Increased incidence of latex allergy in children with allergic diseases in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kimata, H

    2005-12-01

    The incidence of latex allergy is increasing in Japanese adults. However, the changing incidence of latex allergy in children with or without allergic diseases has not been reported in detail. After obtaining written informed consent from parents, Japanese children under 14 years of age were studied. In total, 776 non-atopic children, 802 children with allergic rhinitis (AR), 706 children with bronchial asthma (BA) and 844 children with atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome (AEDS) were asked about symptoms of latex allergy, and tested by serum latex-specific IgE, skin prick test to latex allergen and latex-glove-wearing test between 2001 and 2003. All the patients were outpatients at Ujitakeda Hospital, while the non-atopic children were children of the staff of Ujitakeda Hospital or Unitika Ltd. This was a retrospective study. The incidence of latex allergy in 2001/2002/2003 was 1.4/3.1/4.7% in non-atopic children, 3.1/5.1/9.1% in AR patients, 3.6/6.5/10.3% in BA patients and 6.1/11.3/15.9% in AEDS patients, respectively. Moreover, although no cases of anaphylactic shock were noted in allergic patients in 2001, two and eight cases were noted in 2002 and 2003, respectively. These results indicate that the incidence of latex allergy is increasing in paediatric patients with allergic diseases. A latex-reduced environment may be desirable in future. PMID:16084541

  13. Higher risk of myasthenia gravis in patients with thyroid and allergic diseases: a national population-based study.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Jiann-Horng; Kuo, Huang-Tsung; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Chen, Yen-Kung; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the risk of myasthenia gravis (MG) in patients with allergic or autoimmune thyroid disease in a large cohort representing 99% of the population in Taiwan. Data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database were used to conduct retrospective analyses. The study comprised 1689 adult patients with MG who were 4-fold frequency matched to those without MG by sex, age, and assigned the same index year. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between allergic or autoimmune thyroid disease and MG. An increased subsequent risk of MG was observed in the patients with allergic conjunctivitis (AC), allergic rhinitis, Hashimoto thyroiditis, and Graves disease. The adjusted odds ratios (aORs) were 1.93 (1.71-2.18), 1.26 (1.09-1.45), 2.87 (1.18-6.97), and 3.97 (2.71-5.83), respectively. The aORs increased from 1.63 (1.43-1.85) in a patient with only 1 allergic or autoimmune thyroid disease to 2.09 (1.75-2.49) in a patient with 2 thyroid or allergic diseases to 2.82 (2.19-3.64) in a patient with ≥3 thyroid or allergic diseases. MG was associated with the cumulative effect of concurrent allergic and autoimmune thyroid disease with combined AC and Hashimoto thyroiditis representing the highest risk (aOR = 15.62 [2.88-87.71]). This population-based case-control study demonstrates the association between allergic or autoimmune thyroid disease and the risk of MG. The highest risk of subsequent MG was associated with combined AC and Hashimoto thyroiditis. PMID:26020387

  14. The Microbiome, Timing, and Barrier Function in the Context of Allergic Disease.

    PubMed

    Wesemann, Duane R; Nagler, Cathryn R

    2016-04-19

    Allergic disease affects millions. Despite many advances in our understanding of the immune system in the past century, the physiologic underpinning for the existence of allergy remains largely mysterious. Food allergies, in particular, have increased dramatically in recent years, adding a new sense of urgency to unraveling this mystery. The concurrence of significant lifestyle changes in Western societies with increasing disease prevalence implies a causal link. Demographic variables that influence the composition and function of the commensal microbiota early in life seem to be most important. Identifying the evolutionary and physiologic foundations of allergic disease and defining what about our modern environment is responsible for its increased incidence will provide insights critical to the development of new approaches to prevention and treatment. PMID:27096316

  15. New developments providing mechanistic insight into the impact of the microbiota on allergic disease.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Kathy D; Köller, Yasmin

    2015-08-01

    The increase in allergic diseases over the past several decades is correlated with changes in the composition and diversity of the intestinal microbiota. Microbial-derived signals are critical for instructing the developing immune system and conversely, immune regulation can impact the microbiota. Perturbations in the microbiota composition may be especially important during early-life when the immune system is still developing, resulting in a critical window of opportunity for instructing the immune system. This review highlights recent studies investigating the role of the microbiome in susceptibility or development of allergic diseases with a focus on animal models that provide insight into the mechanisms and pathways involved. Identification of a causal link between reduced microbial diversity or altered microbial composition and increased susceptibility to immune-mediated diseases will hopefully pave the way for better preventive therapies. PMID:25988860

  16. [Neuromuscular disease: respiratory clinical assessment and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Villa Asensi, J R; Luna Paredes, M C; Osona Rodríguez de Torres, F B; Peña Zarza, J A; Larramona Carrera, H; Costa Colomer, J

    2014-10-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disease are an important group at risk of frequently suffering acute or chronic respiratory failure, which is their main cause of death. They require follow-up by a pediatric respiratory medicine specialist from birth or diagnosis in order to confirm the diagnosis and treat any respiratory complications within a multidisciplinary context. The ventilatory support and the cough assistance have improved the quality of life and long-term survival for many of these patients. In this paper, the authors review the pathophysiology, respiratory function evaluation, sleep disorders, and the most frequent respiratory complications in neuromuscular diseases. The various treatments used, from a respiratory medicine point of view, will be analyzed in a next paper. PMID:24709048

  17. Upper and lower respiratory diseases after occupational and environmental disasters.

    PubMed

    Prezant, David J; Levin, Stephen; Kelly, Kerry J; Aldrich, Thomas K

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory consequences from occupational and environmental disasters are the result of inhalation exposures to chemicals, particulate matter (dusts and fibers) and/or the incomplete products of combustion that are often liberated during disasters such as fires, building collapses, explosions and volcanoes. Unfortunately, experience has shown that environmental controls and effective respiratory protection are often unavailable during the first days to week after a large-scale disaster. The English literature was reviewed using the key words-disaster and any of the following: respiratory disease, pulmonary, asthma, bronchitis, sinusitis, pulmonary fibrosis, or sarcoidosis. Respiratory health consequences after aerosolized exposures to high-concentrations of particulates and chemicals can be grouped into 4 major categories: 1) upper respiratory disease (chronic rhinosinusitis and reactive upper airways dysfunction syndrome), 2) lower respiratory diseases (reactive [lower] airways dysfunction syndrome, irritant-induced asthma, and chronic obstructive airways diseases), 3) parenchymal or interstitial lung diseases (sarcoidosis, pulmonary fibrosis, and bronchiolitis obliterans, and 4) cancers of the lung and pleura. This review describes several respiratory consequences of occupational and environmental disasters and uses the World Trade Center disaster to illustrate in detail the consequences of chronic upper and lower respiratory inflammation. PMID:18500710

  18. The prevalence and risk factors of asthma and allergic diseases among working adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Erkan; Ersu, Refika; Uyan, Zeynep Seda; Oktem, Sedat; Varol, Nezih; Karakoc, Fazilet; Karadag, Bulent; Akyol, Mesut; Dagli, Elif

    2010-01-01

    Certain occupational groups are known to be at particularly high risk of developing allergic diseases. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of allergic diseases among working adolescents. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire was used. Four hundred and thirty six adolescents working in motor, lathe-finish, coiffure and textile and 366 high school students as control group were enrolled to the study. Mean age was 16.8 +/- 1.2 years and 82.9% of them were male. There was no significant difference among groups for ever and current wheezing while doctor diagnosed asthma was higher in lathe- finish group (p = 0.036). Family history of allergy, history of allergic rhinitis, and active smoking were found to be risk factors for asthma and related symptoms. Working in coiffure (p = 0.054), and textile (p = 0.003) were significant risk factors for ever allergic rhinitis. Working in lathe finish (p = 0.023), coiffure (p = .002), and textile (p < 0.001) were associated with a higher risk for current allergic rhinitis. Working in coiffure was a risk factor for ever eczema (p = 0.008) and doctor diagnosed eczema (p = 0.014). It was concluded that working in lathe-finish was associated with doctor diagnosed asthma and active smoking was a risk factor for asthma and related symptoms. Working in coiffure, textile and lathe- finish were risk factors for rhinitis, and working in coiffure was a risk factor for eczema. Preventive measures should be taken at the onset of employment in order to prevent or reduce the detrimental effects of exposures in these occupational groups. PMID:21038780

  19. The Expert Patient and Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The concept of “expert patient” has been developed in the last two decades to define a patient who has a significant knowledge of his/her disease and treatment in addition to self-management skills. However, this concept has evolved over the last years, and these patients are now considered, not only to be more efficient in the management of their own condition and communicating effectively with health professionals, but to also act as educators for other patients and as resources for the last, provide feedback on care delivery, and be involved in the production and implementation of practice guidelines, as well as in the development and conduct of research initiatives. There are some barriers, however, to the integration of this new contributor to the health care team, and specific requirements need to be considered for an individual to be considered as an expert. This new player has, however, a potentially important role to improve current care, particularly in respiratory health. PMID:27445572

  20. The Expert Patient and Chronic Respiratory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The concept of "expert patient" has been developed in the last two decades to define a patient who has a significant knowledge of his/her disease and treatment in addition to self-management skills. However, this concept has evolved over the last years, and these patients are now considered, not only to be more efficient in the management of their own condition and communicating effectively with health professionals, but to also act as educators for other patients and as resources for the last, provide feedback on care delivery, and be involved in the production and implementation of practice guidelines, as well as in the development and conduct of research initiatives. There are some barriers, however, to the integration of this new contributor to the health care team, and specific requirements need to be considered for an individual to be considered as an expert. This new player has, however, a potentially important role to improve current care, particularly in respiratory health. PMID:27445572

  1. [SOME CLINICAL AND CYTOKINE FEATURES OF THE CLINICAL COURSE OF RECURRENT RESPIRATORY SYSTEM DISEASES IN CHILDREN WITH THE TOXOCARIASIS INVASION].

    PubMed

    Dralova, A; Usachova, E

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze clinical and cytokine features of recurrent respiratory system diseases in children with toxocariasis. 50 children aged 1 to 17 years (mean age - 10±5 years) with recurrent current of respiratory system disorders were studied. During the survey such clinical manifestations of the respiratory system disorders as obstructive bronchitis (50%), bronchial asthma (30%), pneumonia (10%) and laryngotracheitis (10%) have been revealed. Statistical analysis of the results was performed using the software package STATISTICA 6.1 (SNANSOFT). We have shown that the disorders of respiratory system in case of toxocariasis invasion often occur with severe intoxication and bronchial obstruction syndromes, temperature reaction, respiratory insufficiency and hepatomegaly. A prolonged course of the disease has been noted. "Inflammatory" indicators of general blood analysis, such as leukocytosis and increased of ESR have been recorded in patients with respiratory system disorders in children with T.canis infection significantly more often, significant "allergic" laboratory changes were in the form of eosinophilia. High average levels of pro-inflammatory IL-6, as well as low levels of IL 5 have been determined in children suffering from the respiratory system disorders and with toxocariasis invasion in the anamnesis. The obtained findings require further study. PMID:26719552

  2. Alterations of the Murine Gut Microbiome with Age and Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vital, Marius; Harkema, Jack R.; Rizzo, Mike; Tiedje, James; Brandenberger, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays an important role in the development of asthma. With advanced age the microbiome and the immune system are changing and, currently, little is known about how these two factors contribute to the development of allergic asthma in the elderly. In this study we investigated the associations between the intestinal microbiome and allergic airway disease in young and old mice that were sensitized and challenged with house dust mite (HDM). After challenge, the animals were sacrificed, blood serum was collected for cytokine analysis, and the lungs were processed for histopathology. Fecal pellets were excised from the colon and subjected to 16S rRNA analysis. The microbial community structure changed with age and allergy development, where alterations in fecal communities from young to old mice resembled those after HDM challenge. Allergic mice had induced serum levels of IL-17A and old mice developed a greater allergic airway response compared to young mice. This study demonstrates that the intestinal bacterial community structure differs with age, possibly contributing to the exaggerated pulmonary inflammatory response in old mice. Furthermore, our results show that the composition of the gut microbiota changes with pulmonary allergy, indicating bidirectional gut-lung communications. PMID:26090504

  3. Alterations of the Murine Gut Microbiome with Age and Allergic Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Vital, Marius; Harkema, Jack R; Rizzo, Mike; Tiedje, James; Brandenberger, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays an important role in the development of asthma. With advanced age the microbiome and the immune system are changing and, currently, little is known about how these two factors contribute to the development of allergic asthma in the elderly. In this study we investigated the associations between the intestinal microbiome and allergic airway disease in young and old mice that were sensitized and challenged with house dust mite (HDM). After challenge, the animals were sacrificed, blood serum was collected for cytokine analysis, and the lungs were processed for histopathology. Fecal pellets were excised from the colon and subjected to 16S rRNA analysis. The microbial community structure changed with age and allergy development, where alterations in fecal communities from young to old mice resembled those after HDM challenge. Allergic mice had induced serum levels of IL-17A and old mice developed a greater allergic airway response compared to young mice. This study demonstrates that the intestinal bacterial community structure differs with age, possibly contributing to the exaggerated pulmonary inflammatory response in old mice. Furthermore, our results show that the composition of the gut microbiota changes with pulmonary allergy, indicating bidirectional gut-lung communications. PMID:26090504

  4. Time trends of the prevalence of asthma and allergic disease in Austrian children.

    PubMed

    Schernhammer, E S; Vutuc, C; Waldhör, T; Haidinger, G

    2008-03-01

    After a substantial increase in the prevalence of atopic disease in Europe, recent studies indicate that a plateau has been reached. However, variation across countries and age groups exists. We studied the prevalence and time trends of asthma and allergic disease among schoolchildren in Austria, a country with traditionally low rates of asthma, hay fever, and eczema. As part of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC), symptoms and physician diagnoses of asthma and allergic disease of 13,399 Austrian children aged 6-7 yr and 1516 children aged 12-14 yr were surveyed between 1995 and 1997. A similar survey was conducted between 2001 and 2003. Among children aged 6-7 yr, significant increases were seen in the prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma (+16%; p = 0.013), hay fever (+22%; p < 0.001), and eczema (+37%; p < 0.001) between 1995 and 2003. These changes were paralleled by an increase in the prevalence of symptoms typical for hay fever (itchy eyes and runny nose), but not by an increase in wheeze. Among children aged 12-14 yr, the lifetime prevalence of diagnosed asthma increased by 32%, of hay fever by 19%, and of eczema by 28% (all, p < 0.001). These changes were paralleled by increases in the prevalence of wheezing as documented by both questions before and after a video showing wheezing children but not by symptoms typical for hay fever such as itchy eyes and runny nose. In conclusion, in Austria, contrary to other European countries, the prevalence of asthma and allergic disease increased among schoolchildren. Additional studies are needed to continue monitoring the dynamics of the prevalence of asthma and allergic disease in Austria and to explore trends in their risk factors. PMID:18086231

  5. In Utero Cigarette Smoke Affects Allergic Airway Disease But Does Not Alter the Lung Methylome.

    PubMed

    Eyring, Kenneth R; Pedersen, Brent S; Yang, Ivana V; Schwartz, David A

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal and postnatal cigarette smoke exposure enhances the risk of developing asthma. Despite this as well as other smoking related risks, 11% of women still smoke during pregnancy. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke exposure during prenatal development generates long lasting differential methylation altering transcriptional activity that correlates with disease. In a house dust mite (HDM) model of allergic airway disease, we measured airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation between mice exposed prenatally to cigarette smoke (CS) or filtered air (FA). DNA methylation and gene expression were then measured in lung tissue. We demonstrate that HDM-treated CS mice develop a more severe allergic airway disease compared to HDM-treated FA mice including increased AHR and airway inflammation. While DNA methylation changes between the two HDM-treated groups failed to reach genome-wide significance, 99 DMRs had an uncorrected p-value < 0.001. 6 of these 99 DMRs were selected for validation, based on the immune function of adjacent genes, and only 2 of the 6 DMRs confirmed the bisulfite sequencing data. Additionally, genes near these 6 DMRs (Lif, Il27ra, Tle4, Ptk7, Nfatc2, and Runx3) are differentially expressed between HDM-treated CS mice and HDM-treated FA mice. Our findings confirm that prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke is sufficient to modify allergic airway disease; however, it is unlikely that specific methylation changes account for the exposure-response relationship. These findings highlight the important role in utero cigarette smoke exposure plays in the development of allergic airway disease. PMID:26642056

  6. In Utero Cigarette Smoke Affects Allergic Airway Disease But Does Not Alter the Lung Methylome

    PubMed Central

    Eyring, Kenneth R.; Pedersen, Brent S.; Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal and postnatal cigarette smoke exposure enhances the risk of developing asthma. Despite this as well as other smoking related risks, 11% of women still smoke during pregnancy. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke exposure during prenatal development generates long lasting differential methylation altering transcriptional activity that correlates with disease. In a house dust mite (HDM) model of allergic airway disease, we measured airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation between mice exposed prenatally to cigarette smoke (CS) or filtered air (FA). DNA methylation and gene expression were then measured in lung tissue. We demonstrate that HDM-treated CS mice develop a more severe allergic airway disease compared to HDM-treated FA mice including increased AHR and airway inflammation. While DNA methylation changes between the two HDM-treated groups failed to reach genome-wide significance, 99 DMRs had an uncorrected p-value < 0.001. 6 of these 99 DMRs were selected for validation, based on the immune function of adjacent genes, and only 2 of the 6 DMRs confirmed the bisulfite sequencing data. Additionally, genes near these 6 DMRs (Lif, Il27ra, Tle4, Ptk7, Nfatc2, and Runx3) are differentially expressed between HDM-treated CS mice and HDM-treated FA mice. Our findings confirm that prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke is sufficient to modify allergic airway disease; however, it is unlikely that specific methylation changes account for the exposure-response relationship. These findings highlight the important role in utero cigarette smoke exposure plays in the development of allergic airway disease. PMID:26642056

  7. Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells: New Players in Human Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, TA; Broide, DH

    2015-01-01

    Allergic diseases are characterized by tissue eosinophilia, mucus secretion, IgE production, and activation of mast cells and TH2 cells. Production of TH2 cytokines including IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, and IL-13 has mainly been attributed to CD4+ TH2 cells. However, the recent discovery of group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) in humans and findings from experimental disease models have challenged conventional concepts associated with the contribution of specific cells to type 2 inflammation in allergic diseases. ILC2s produce high levels of TH2 cytokines and have been detected in human lung tissue, peripheral blood, the gastrointestinal tract, skin, and sinonasal tissue, suggesting that ILC2s could contribute to chronic rhinosinusitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, and gastrointestinal allergic disease. Moreover, depletion of ILC2s in animal models suggests a role for these cells in atopic dermatitis and asthma. This review will focus on the role of ILC2s in human allergy and asthma and provide a mechanistic insight from animal models. PMID:25898689

  8. Role in Allergic Diseases of Immunological Cross-Reactivity between Allergens and Homologues of Parasite Proteins.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Helton da Costa; Nutman, Thomas B

    2016-01-01

    Implied under the rubric of the hygiene hypothesis is that helminth infection can protect against allergic disease. It is well known that helminths induce processes associated with type 2 immune responses, but they also induce important regulatory responses that can modulate these type 2-associated responses-modulation that influences responses to bystander antigens including allergens. Indeed, most epidemiological studies demonstrate a beneficial effect of helminth infection on atopy, but there are also convincing data to demonstrate that helminth infection can precipitate or worsen allergic inflammation/disease. Reasons for these disparate findings are much debated, but there is a school of thought that suggests that helminth-triggered type 2-associated responses, including IgE to cross-reactive aeroallergens, can offset the regulatory effects imposed by the same organisms. The cross-reactivity among helminths and allergenic tropomyosins dominated the antigen/allergen cross-reactivity field, but recent data suggest that cross-reactivity is much more common than previously appreciated. It has been demonstrated that a high degree of molecular similarity exists between allergens and helminth proteins. Thus, an understanding of the mechanisms underlying the response induced by helminth infection and their impact on the induction of allergic disease in the host are critical for designing therapies using iatrogenic infections or parasite products to treat inflammatory diseases and for developing vaccines against helminth parasites. PMID:27480900

  9. Environmental protection from allergic diseases: From humans to mice and back.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Bianca; Vercelli, Donata

    2015-10-01

    Allergic diseases have a strong environmental component, illustrated by the rapid rise of their prevalence in the Western world. Environmental exposures have been consistently shown to either promote or protect against allergic disease. Here we focus on protective exposures and the pathways they regulate. Traditional farming, natural environments with high biodiversity, and pets in the home (particularly dogs) have the most potent and consistent allergy-protective effects and are actively investigated to identify the environmental and host-based factors that confer allergy protection. Recent work emphasizes the critical protective role of microbial diversity and its interactions with the gut/lung and skin/lung axes-a cross-talk through which microbial exposure in the gut or skin powerfully influences immune responses in the lung. PMID:26210896

  10. Kalanchoe pinnata inhibits mast cell activation and prevents allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz, E A; Reuter, S; Martin, H; Dehzad, N; Muzitano, M F; Costa, S S; Rossi-Bergmann, B; Buhl, R; Stassen, M; Taube, C

    2012-01-15

    Aqueous extract of Kalanchoe pinnata (Kp) have been found effective in models to reduce acute anaphylactic reactions. In the present study, we investigate the effect of Kp and the flavonoid quercetin (QE) and quercitrin (QI) on mast cell activation in vitro and in a model of allergic airway disease in vivo. Treatment with Kp and QE in vitro inhibited degranulation and cytokine production of bone marrow-derived mast cells following IgE/FcɛRI crosslinking, whereas treatment with QI had no effect. Similarly, in vivo treatment with Kp and QE decreased development of airway hyperresponsiveness, airway inflammation, goblet cell metaplasia and production of IL-5, IL-13 and TNF. In contrast, treatment with QI had no effect on these parameters. These findings demonstrate that treatment with Kp or QE is effective in treatment of allergic airway disease, providing new insights to the immunomodulatory functions of this plant. PMID:21802918

  11. EFFECTS OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS DISEASE ON INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS DISEASE ON INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN BROWN NORWAY RATS (P. Singhl, D.W. Winsett2, M.J. Daniels2,
    C.A.J. Dick', K.B. Adlerl and M.I. Gilmour2, INCSU, Raleigh, N.C., 2NHEERL/ORD/ USEPA, RTP, N.C. and 3UNC, Chapel Hill, N.C.)The interaction between ...

  12. The role of partially hydrolyzed whey formula for the prevention of allergic disease: evidence and gaps.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Adrian J; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Allen, Katrina J; Tang, Mimi L K; Hill, David J

    2013-01-01

    Hydrolyzed formulae are created by using enzymatic processes to break native proteins into smaller fragments. They may prevent development of allergic diseases by reducing exposure to intact allergens. Partially hydrolyzed whey formula (pHWF) is particularly promising for allergy prevention, as it is cheap to manufacture and palatable. Scientific organizations have recommended the use of hydrolyzed formula in the first 4-6 months of life for the prevention of allergic disease based on a limited number of trials. Three recent developments challenge these recommendations: our growing understanding of the importance of allergen exposure for induction of immune tolerance, recently published evidence that failed to identify a protective effect of pHWF, which the authors and other experts believe will necessitate updating of systematic reviews, and methodological limitations of available trials and systematic reviews on which these recommendations are based. Until more definitive evidence is obtained, the authors recommend continuing to advocate that 'breast is best', and caution against overstating the potential for pHWF to prevent allergic disease. PMID:23256762

  13. Hydrolysed formula and risk of allergic or autoimmune disease: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ierodiakonou, Despo; Khan, Tasnia; Chivinge, Jennifer; Robinson, Zoe; Geoghegan, Natalie; Jarrold, Katharine; Afxentiou, Thalia; Reeves, Tim; Cunha, Sergio; Trivella, Marialena; Garcia-Larsen, Vanessa; Leonardi-Bee, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether feeding infants with hydrolysed formula reduces their risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis, as part of a series of systematic reviews commissioned by the UK Food Standards Agency to inform guidelines on infant feeding. Two authors selected studies by consensus, independently extracted data, and assessed the quality of included studies using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Data sources Medline, Embase, Web of Science, CENTRAL, and LILACS searched between January 1946 and April 2015. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Prospective intervention trials of hydrolysed cows’ milk formula compared with another hydrolysed formula, human breast milk, or a standard cows’ milk formula, which reported on allergic or autoimmune disease or allergic sensitisation. Results 37 eligible intervention trials of hydrolysed formula were identified, including over 19 000 participants. There was evidence of conflict of interest and high or unclear risk of bias in most studies of allergic outcomes and evidence of publication bias for studies of eczema and wheeze. Overall there was no consistent evidence that partially or extensively hydrolysed formulas reduce risk of allergic or autoimmune outcomes in infants at high pre-existing risk of these outcomes. Odds ratios for eczema at age 0-4, compared with standard cows’ milk formula, were 0.84 (95% confidence interval 0.67 to 1.07; I2=30%) for partially hydrolysed formula; 0.55 (0.28 to 1.09; I2=74%) for extensively hydrolysed casein based formula; and 1.12 (0.88 to 1.42; I2=0%) for extensively hydrolysed whey based formula. There was no evidence to support the health claim approved by the US Food and Drug Administration that a partially hydrolysed formula could reduce the risk of eczema nor the conclusion of the Cochrane review that hydrolysed formula could prevent allergy to cows’ milk. Conclusion These findings do not support current guidelines

  14. Rhinoviruses and Their Receptors: Implications for Allergic Disease.

    PubMed

    Bochkov, Yury A; Gern, James E

    2016-04-01

    Human rhinoviruses (RVs) are picornaviruses that can cause a variety of illnesses including the common cold, lower respiratory tract illnesses such as bronchitis and pneumonia, and exacerbations of asthma. RVs are classified into three species, RV-A, B, and C, which include over 160 types. They utilize three major types of cellular membrane glycoproteins to gain entry into the host cell: intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) (the majority of RV-A and all RV-B), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family members (12 RV-A types), and cadherin-related family member 3 (CDHR3) (RV-C). CDHR3 is a member of cadherin superfamily of transmembrane proteins with yet unknown biological function, and there is relatively little information available about the mechanisms of RV-C interaction with CDHR3. A coding single nucleotide polymorphism (rs6967330) in CDHR3 could promote RV-C infections and illnesses in infancy, which could in turn adversely affect the developing lung to increase the risk of asthma. Further studies are needed to determine how RV infections contribute to pathogenesis of asthma and to develop the optimal treatment approach to control asthma exacerbations. PMID:26960297

  15. Advances in Diagnosis of Respiratory Diseases of Small Ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandip; Kumar, Amit; Tiwari, Ruchi; Rahal, Anu; Malik, Yash; Dhama, Kuldeep; Pal, Amar; Prasad, Minakshi

    2014-01-01

    Irrespective of aetiology, infectious respiratory diseases of sheep and goats contribute to 5.6 percent of the total diseases of small ruminants. These infectious respiratory disorders are divided into two groups: the diseases of upper respiratory tract, namely, nasal myiasis and enzootic nasal tumors, and diseases of lower respiratory tract, namely, peste des petits ruminants (PPR), parainfluenza, Pasteurellosis, Ovine progressive pneumonia, mycoplasmosis, caprine arthritis encephalitis virus, caseous lymphadenitis, verminous pneumonia, and many others. Depending upon aetiology, many of them are acute and fatal in nature. Early, rapid, and specific diagnosis of such diseases holds great importance to reduce the losses. The advanced enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the detection of antigen as well as antibodies directly from the samples and molecular diagnostic assays along with microsatellites comprehensively assist in diagnosis as well as treatment and epidemiological studies. The present review discusses the advancements made in the diagnosis of common infectious respiratory diseases of sheep and goats. It would update the knowledge and help in adapting and implementing appropriate, timely, and confirmatory diagnostic procedures. Moreover, it would assist in designing appropriate prevention protocols and devising suitable control strategies to overcome respiratory diseases and alleviate the economic losses. PMID:25028620

  16. EFFECTS OF POLLUTANTS ON HUMAN VIRAL RESPIRATORY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many epidemiologic studies have shown excessive respiratory disease morbidity in areas of high atmospheric pollution. This study was designed to develop and characterize an animal model and investigate the possible interactive effects of infection and particulate air pollutants u...

  17. Palliative care for patients with non-malignant respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Clare

    2015-05-01

    Non-malignant respiratory disease is a chronic life-limiting condition that requires holistic palliative care. Patients with non-malignant respiratory disease have a range of biopsychosocial and spiritual needs, which healthcare professionals should recognise and manage effectively. Healthcare professionals have an important role in enabling the delivery of effective palliative care to this group of patients and their carers, and in recognising the many factors that may impede delivery of palliative care. PMID:25942985

  18. New Allergic and Hypersensitivity Conditions Section in the International Classification of Diseases-11

    PubMed Central

    Tanno, Luciana K.; Calderon, Moises A.

    2016-01-01

    Allergy and hypersensitivity, originally perceived as rare and secondary disorders, are one of the fastest growing conditions worldwide, but not adequately tracked in international information systems, such as the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). Having allergic and hypersensitivity conditions classification able to capture conditions in health international information systems in a realistic manner is crucial to the identification of potential problems, and in a wider system, can identify contextually specific service deficiencies and provide the impetus for changes. Since 2013, an international collaboration of Allergy Academies has spent tremendous efforts to have a better and updated classification of allergies in the forthcoming International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-11 version, by providing scientific and technical evidences for the need for changes. The following bilateral discussions with the representatives of the ICD-11 revision, a simplification process was carried out. The new parented "Allergic and hypersensitivity conditions" section has been built under the "Disorders of the Immune System" chapter through the international collaboration of Allergy Academies and upon ICD WHO representatives support. The classification of allergic and hypersensitivity conditions has been updated through the ICD-11 revision and will allow the aggregation of reliable data to perform positive quality-improvements in health care systems worldwide. PMID:27126732

  19. New Allergic and Hypersensitivity Conditions Section in the International Classification of Diseases-11.

    PubMed

    Tanno, Luciana K; Calderon, Moises A; Demoly, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    Allergy and hypersensitivity, originally perceived as rare and secondary disorders, are one of the fastest growing conditions worldwide, but not adequately tracked in international information systems, such as the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). Having allergic and hypersensitivity conditions classification able to capture conditions in health international information systems in a realistic manner is crucial to the identification of potential problems, and in a wider system, can identify contextually specific service deficiencies and provide the impetus for changes. Since 2013, an international collaboration of Allergy Academies has spent tremendous efforts to have a better and updated classification of allergies in the forthcoming International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-11 version, by providing scientific and technical evidences for the need for changes. The following bilateral discussions with the representatives of the ICD-11 revision, a simplification process was carried out. The new parented "Allergic and hypersensitivity conditions" section has been built under the "Disorders of the Immune System" chapter through the international collaboration of Allergy Academies and upon ICD WHO representatives support. The classification of allergic and hypersensitivity conditions has been updated through the ICD-11 revision and will allow the aggregation of reliable data to perform positive quality-improvements in health care systems worldwide. PMID:27126732

  20. Genetics and molecular pathogenesis of mitochondrial respiratory chain diseases.

    PubMed

    Hanna, M G; Nelson, I P

    1999-05-01

    Dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain has been recognised as a cause of human disease for over 30 years. Advances in the past 10 years have led to a better understanding of the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of many of these disorders. Over 100 primary defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are now implicated in the pathogenesis of a group of disorders which are collectively known as the mitochondrial encephalomyopathies, and which most frequently involve skeletal muscle and/or the central nervous system. Although impaired oxidative phosphorylation is likely to be the final common pathway leading to the cellular dysfunction associated with such mtDNA mutations, the complex relationship between genotype and phenotype remains largely unexplained. Most of the genes which encode the respiratory chain reside in the nucleus, yet only five nuclear genes have been implicated in human respiratory chain diseases. There is evidence that respiratory chain dysfunction is present in common neurological diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. The precise cause of this respiratory chain dysfunction and its relationship to the disease process are unclear. This review focuses upon respiratory chain disorders associated with primary defects in mtDNA. PMID:10379358

  1. Probiotics for treatment and primary prevention of allergic diseases and asthma: looking back and moving forward.

    PubMed

    West, Christina E; Jenmalm, Maria C; Kozyrskyj, Anita L; Prescott, Susan L

    2016-06-01

    Microbial ecosystems cover the surface of the human body and it is becoming increasingly clear that our modern environment has profound effects on microbial composition and diversity. A dysbiotic gut microbiota has been associated with allergic diseases and asthma in cross-sectional and observational studies. In an attempt to restore this dysbiosis, probiotics have been evaluated in randomized controlled trials. Here, we review treatment and primary prevention studies, recent meta-analyses, and discuss the current understanding of the role of probiotics in this context. Many meta-analyses have shown a moderate benefit of probiotics for eczema prevention, whereas there is less evidence of a benefit for other allergic manifestations. Because of very low quality evidence and heterogeneity between studies, specific advice on the most effective regimens cannot yet be given - not even for eczema prevention. To be able to adopt results into specific recommendations, international expert organizations stress the need for well-designed studies. PMID:26821735

  2. Allergic- and immune-associated diseases of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Nichols, R

    1994-07-01

    Glomerular injury has a decided immunologic basis. Any infectious, inflammatory, neoplastic, or degenerative processes capable of sustained antigenic stimulation can induce immune-mediated glomerular injury. A variety of conditions and antigens, both endogenous and exogenous, are known to initiate immunologic glomerular damage. In many clinical situations, however, the precise antigenic source is occult and unrecognizable, and the glomerular disease is referred to as idiopathic. PMID:7975046

  3. Exposure to ambient bioaerosols is associated with allergic skin diseases in Greater Taipei residents.

    PubMed

    Kallawicha, Kraiwuth; Chuang, Ying-Chih; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice; Han, Bor-Cheng; Ting, Yi-Fang; Chao, Hsing Jasmine

    2016-09-01

    Allergic skin diseases may result from various types of chemical and biological allergens. This study investigated the association between ambient bioaerosol exposure and allergic skin diseases by using the exposure data obtained from land use regression models and interpolated data. Data on daily average outpatient visits for atopic dermatitis (ICD-9-CM 691.8) and contact dermatitis and other eczema (ICD-9-CM 692.9) between November 2011 and August 2012 were obtained from the National Health Insurance Research Database. A generalized estimating equation was used to analyze the associations between the skin diseases and ambient bioaerosol levels. The results indicated that during the study period, contact dermatitis and other eczema were more prevalent than atopic dermatitis in the study area. Most cases were observed in districts of Taipei City and 3 major districts of New Taipei City, namely Xinzhuang, Banqiao, and Xindian. In univariate analysis, most bioaerosols were positively associated with both skin diseases. After adjustment for air pollution and sociodemographic factors, exposure to total fungal spores was significantly associated with atopic dermatitis in males (relative risk [RR] = 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.19). Contact dermatitis and other eczema had significant relationships with Cladosporium in males (RR = 1.07; 95% CI = 1.02-1.14) and with Aspergillus/Penicillium in females (RR = 1.04; 95% CI = 1.02-1.07). Meteorological parameters, namely wind speed, temperature, and rainfall, were also significantly associated with skin diseases. Our findings reveal that exposure to ambient bioaerosols is a significant and independent risk factor for allergic skin diseases. PMID:27389548

  4. Exploiting the potential of routine data to better understand the disease burden posed by allergic disorders.

    PubMed

    Anandan, C; Simpson, C R; Fischbacher, C; Sheikh, A

    2006-07-01

    The Department of Health and Scottish Executive are currently undertaking independent reviews of allergy services in England (and Wales) and Scotland. Each review will assess the disease burden posed by allergic problems, involving secondary analyses of routine National Health Service (NHS) datasets. Major suggestions for re-structuring and/or re-focusing the NHS efforts to better deal with allergic disease are anticipated. The UK has some of the best datasets of routine health data in the world, but despite their strengths, they have important limitations. These include gaps in data collection, particularly in relation to monitoring of Accident & Emergency and out-patient consultations, and in-patient prescribing, thereby resulting in considerable under-estimates of hospital workload. The current gaps in service monitoring are likely to under-estimate the burden and workload associated with allergic problems, particularly in secondary care. One major limitation of existing data sources is the general inability to link individual patient level data between different datasets. By unlocking this potential there are very considerable potential gains to be made. Data linkage techniques currently being developed in the UK offer exciting new possibilities of looking across the primary-, secondary- and tertiary-care interfaces and also assessing short-and long-term social and educational outcomes in relation to allergic disorders. The current reviews of allergy services being undertaken need to be cognisant of these inherent limitations of existing data sources and would do well to recommend strategic initiatives that could enhance the availability, accessibility and quality of these datasets. Ideally, this should include investment in central data repositories staffed by teams with the necessary technical and statistical expertise, which would also take responsibility for progressing data linkage capabilities. PMID:16839400

  5. Toward precision medicine and health: Opportunities and challenges in allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Galli, Stephen Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Precision medicine (also called personalized, stratified, or P4 medicine) can be defined as the tailoring of preventive measures and medical treatments to the characteristics of each patient to obtain the best clinical outcome for each person while ideally also enhancing the cost-effectiveness of such interventions for patients and society. Clearly, the best clinical outcome for allergic diseases is not to get them in the first place. To emphasize the importance of disease prevention, a critical component of precision medicine can be referred to as precision health, which is defined herein as the use of all available information pertaining to specific subjects (including family history, individual genetic and other biometric information, and exposures to risk factors for developing or exacerbating disease), as well as features of their environments, to sustain and enhance health and prevent the development of disease. In this article I will provide a personal perspective on how the precision health-precision medicine approach can be applied to the related goals of preventing the development of allergic disorders and providing the most effective diagnosis, disease monitoring, and care for those with these prevalent diseases. I will also mention some of the existing and potential challenges to achieving these ambitious goals. PMID:27155026

  6. Respiratory acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory ... Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the airways (such as asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease ) Diseases of the chest ( ...

  7. Personalized Medicine in Respiratory Disease: Role of Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Priyadharshini, V S; Teran, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases affect humanity globally, with chronic lung diseases (e.g., asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, among others) and lung cancer causing extensive morbidity and mortality. These conditions are highly heterogeneous and require an early diagnosis. However, initial symptoms are nonspecific, and the clinical diagnosis is made late frequently. Over the last few years, personalized medicine has emerged as a medical care approach that uses novel technology aiming to personalize treatments according to the particular patient's medical needs. This review highlights the contributions of proteomics toward the understanding of personalized medicine in respiratory disease and its potential applications in the clinic. PMID:26827604

  8. Prevention of allergic disease in childhood: clinical and epidemiological aspects of primary and secondary allergy prevention.

    PubMed

    Halken, Susanne

    2004-06-01

    The development and phenotypic expression of atopic diseases depends on a complex interaction between genetic factors, environmental exposure to allergens,and non-specific adjuvant factors, such as tobacco smoke, air pollution and infections. Preventive measures may include both exposure to allergens and adjuvant risk/protective factors and pharmacological treatment. These measures may address the general population, children at risk for development of atopic disease (high-risk infants), children with early symptoms of allergic disease or children with chronic disease. The objective for this review was to evaluate possible preventive measures as regards prevention of development of allergic disease in childhood--primary prevention--and also some aspects of the effect of specific allergy treatment as regards secondary prevention in children with allergic asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. In one prospective observational study of a birth cohort of unselected infants we evaluated possible predictive/risk factors. In two prospective intervention studies including 1 yr birth cohorts of high-risk(HR) infants we investigated the effect of feeding HR infants exclusively breast milk (BM) and/or hydrolyzed cow's milk-based formula the first 4-6 months as regards: (i) the allergy preventive effect of BM/extensively hydrolysed formula (eHF) compared with ordinary cow's milk-based formula, (ii) the effect of two different eHFs, a whey (Profylac) and a casein-based (Nutramigen) formula, as regards development of cow's milk protein allergy (CMA), and (iii) a comparison of the preventive effect of eHF (Profylac/Nutramigen) with a partially hydrolyzed cow's milk-based formula (pHF) (NanHA) as regards development of CMA. None of the mothers had a restricted diet during pregnancy or lactation period. In two prospective randomized intervention studies we evaluated the preventive effect of specific allergen avoidance and specific immunotherapy (SIT) in children with allergic

  9. [The immunological mechanisms contributing to the clinical efficacy of allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT) in allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Asher, Ilan; Mahlab-Guri, Keren; Sthoeger, Zev

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of allergic diseases has increased dramatically in the western world. In the last 2 decades, the frequency of asthma and allergic rhinitis has doubled. Allergen specific immunotherapy [SIT] has been used successfully for more than 100 years for the treatment of allergic disorders. Allergen SIT provides not only symptomatic relief, but it is potentially curative. The immunologic mechanisms of allergen SIT include all parts of the immune system. Regulatory T cells (TR1, Treg), have a major pivotal role in the success of immunotherapy. Along with the regulatory T cells, elevated suppressor cytokines (IL-10), suppression of TH2 cells, increasing titer of specific IgG4 and gradual decline in the number and function of basophils and mast cells also contribute to the success of the treatment (SIT). The above immune mechanisms are connected and related to each other acting at different times with the treatment with SIT. In this review we focused on the current knowledge and understanding of the different immune mechanisms which are involved in the success of SIT. PMID:24364093

  10. Respiratory disease related mortality and morbidity on an island of Greece exposed to perlite and bentonite mining dust.

    PubMed

    Sampatakakis, Stefanos; Linos, Athena; Papadimitriou, Eleni; Petralias, Athanasios; Dalma, Archontoula; Papasaranti, Eirini Saranti; Christoforidou, Eleni; Stoltidis, Melina

    2013-10-01

    A morbidity and mortality study took place, focused on Milos Island, where perlite and bentonite mining sites are located. Official data concerning number and cause of deaths, regarding specific respiratory diseases and the total of respiratory diseases, for both Milos Island and the Cyclades Prefecture were used. Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs) were computed, adjusted specifically for age, gender and calendar year. Tests of linear trend were performed. By means of a predefined questionnaire, the morbidity rates of specific respiratory diseases in Milos, were compared to those of the municipality of Oinofita, an industrial region. Chi-square analysis was used and the confounding factors of age, gender and smoking were taken into account, by estimating binary logistic regression models. The SMRs for Pneumonia and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) were found elevated for both genders, although they did not reach statistical significance. For the total of respiratory diseases, a statistically significant SMR was identified regarding the decade 1989-1998. The morbidity study revealed elevated and statistically significant Odds Ratios (ORs), associated with allergic rhinitis, pneumonia, COPD and bronchiectasis. An elevated OR was also identified for asthma. After controlling for age, gender and smoking, the ORs were statistically significant and towards the same direction. PMID:24129114

  11. Respiratory Disease Related Mortality and Morbidity on an Island of Greece Exposed to Perlite and Bentonite Mining Dust

    PubMed Central

    Sampatakakis, Stefanos; Linos, Athena; Papadimitriou, Eleni; Petralias, Athanasios; Dalma, Archontoula; Papasaranti, Eirini Saranti; Christoforidou, Eleni; Stoltidis, Melina

    2013-01-01

    A morbidity and mortality study took place, focused on Milos Island, where perlite and bentonite mining sites are located. Official data concerning number and cause of deaths, regarding specific respiratory diseases and the total of respiratory diseases, for both Milos Island and the Cyclades Prefecture were used. Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs) were computed, adjusted specifically for age, gender and calendar year. Tests of linear trend were performed. By means of a predefined questionnaire, the morbidity rates of specific respiratory diseases in Milos, were compared to those of the municipality of Oinofita, an industrial region. Chi-square analysis was used and the confounding factors of age, gender and smoking were taken into account, by estimating binary logistic regression models. The SMRs for Pneumonia and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) were found elevated for both genders, although they did not reach statistical significance. For the total of respiratory diseases, a statistically significant SMR was identified regarding the decade 1989–1998. The morbidity study revealed elevated and statistically significant Odds Ratios (ORs), associated with allergic rhinitis, pneumonia, COPD and bronchiectasis. An elevated OR was also identified for asthma. After controlling for age, gender and smoking, the ORs were statistically significant and towards the same direction. PMID:24129114

  12. The ‘hygiene hypothesis’ for autoimmune and allergic diseases: an update

    PubMed Central

    Okada, H; Kuhn, C; Feillet, H; Bach, J-F

    2010-01-01

    According to the ‘hygiene hypothesis’, the decreasing incidence of infections in western countries and more recently in developing countries is at the origin of the increasing incidence of both autoimmune and allergic diseases. The hygiene hypothesis is based upon epidemiological data, particularly migration studies, showing that subjects migrating from a low-incidence to a high-incidence country acquire the immune disorders with a high incidence at the first generation. However, these data and others showing a correlation between high disease incidence and high socio-economic level do not prove a causal link between infections and immune disorders. Proof of principle of the hygiene hypothesis is brought by animal models and to a lesser degree by intervention trials in humans. Underlying mechanisms are multiple and complex. They include decreased consumption of homeostatic factors and immunoregulation, involving various regulatory T cell subsets and Toll-like receptor stimulation. These mechanisms could originate, to some extent, from changes in microbiota caused by changes in lifestyle, particularly in inflammatory bowel diseases. Taken together, these data open new therapeutic perspectives in the prevention of autoimmune and allergic diseases. PMID:20415844

  13. Nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 regulates T-cell differentiation and allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Chemmannur, S V; Badhwar, A J; Mirlekar, B; Malonia, S K; Gupta, M; Wadhwa, N; Bopanna, R; Mabalirajan, U; Majumdar, S; Ghosh, B; Chattopadhyay, S

    2015-11-01

    Asthma is a complex airway allergic disease involving the interplay of various cell types, cytokines, and transcriptional factors. Though many factors contribute to disease etiology, the molecular control of disease phenotype and responsiveness is not well understood. Here we report an essential role of the matrix attachment region (MAR)-binding protein SMAR1 in regulating immune response during allergic airway disease. Conditional knockout of SMAR1 in T cells rendered the mice resistant to eosinophilic airway inflammation against ovalbumin (OVA) allergen with low immunoglobulin E (IgE) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) levels. Moreover, a lower IgE/IgG2a ratio and higher interferon-γ (IFN-γ) response suggested aberrant skewing of T-cell differentiation toward type 1 helper T cell (Th1) response. We show that SMAR1 functions as a negative regulator of Th1 and Th17 differentiation by interacting with two potential and similar MAR regions present on the promoters of T-bet and IL-17. Thus, we present SMAR1 as a regulator of T-cell differentiation that favors the establishment of Th2 cells by modulating Th1 and Th17 responses. PMID:25736456

  14. Respiratory complications of the rheumatological diseases in childhood.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Anne E; Warrier, Kishore; Vyas, H

    2016-08-01

    Pleuropulmonary manifestations of rheumatological diseases are rare in children but pose a significant risk to overall morbidity and mortality. We have reviewed the literature to provide an overview of the respiratory complications of the commonest rheumatological diseases to occur in children (juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, juvenile dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease, granulomatosis with polyangitis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis). Pulmonary function testing in these patients can be used to refine the differential diagnosis and establish disease severity, but also has a role in ongoing monitoring for respiratory complications. Early detection of pulmonary involvement allows for prompt and targeted therapies to achieve the best outcome for the child. This is best achieved with joint specialist paediatric rheumatology and respiratory reviews in a multidisciplinary setting. PMID:26768831

  15. On-Farm Use of Ultrasonography for Bovine Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Ollivett, Theresa L; Buczinski, Sébastien

    2016-03-01

    Thoracic ultrasonography (TUS) in young cattle has recently gained momentum as an accurate and practical tool for identifying the lung lesions associated with bovine respiratory disease. As cattle producers increasingly seek input from their veterinarians on respiratory health issues, bovine practitioners should consider adding TUS to their practice models. This article discusses the relevant literature regarding TUS in young cattle, current acceptable techniques, and practical on-farm applications. PMID:26922110

  16. Update on the Management of Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Buchheit, Kathleen M; Laidlaw, Tanya M

    2016-07-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is an adult-onset upper and lower airway disease consisting of eosinophilic nasal polyps, asthma, and respiratory reactions to cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) inhibitors. Management includes guideline-based treatment of asthma and sinus disease, avoidance of COX-1 inhibitors, and for some patients aspirin desensitization followed by high-dose aspirin therapy. Despite this, many patients have inadequately controlled symptoms and require multiple sinus surgeries. In this review, we discuss the current standard approaches to the management of AERD, and we introduce several therapeutics under development that may hold promise for the treatment of AERD. PMID:27126722

  17. Update on the Management of Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Tanya M.

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is an adult-onset upper and lower airway disease consisting of eosinophilic nasal polyps, asthma, and respiratory reactions to cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) inhibitors. Management includes guideline-based treatment of asthma and sinus disease, avoidance of COX-1 inhibitors, and for some patients aspirin desensitization followed by high-dose aspirin therapy. Despite this, many patients have inadequately controlled symptoms and require multiple sinus surgeries. In this review, we discuss the current standard approaches to the management of AERD, and we introduce several therapeutics under development that may hold promise for the treatment of AERD. PMID:27126722

  18. Alcohol-induced respiratory symptoms are common in patients with aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Cardet, Juan Carlos; White, Andrew A.; Barrett, Nora A.; Feldweg, Anna M.; Wickner, Paige G.; Savage, Jessica; Bhattacharyya, Neil; Laidlaw, Tanya M.

    2014-01-01

    Background A large percentage of patients with aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) report the development of alcohol-induced respiratory reactions, but the true prevalence of respiratory reactions caused by alcoholic beverages in these patients was not known. Objective We sought to evaluate the incidence and characteristics of alcohol-induced respiratory reactions in patients with AERD. Methods A questionnaire designed to assess alcohol-induced respiratory symptoms was administered to patients at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Scripps Clinic. At least 50 patients were recruited into each of four clinical groups: 1) patients with aspirin challenge-confirmed AERD, 2) aspirin-tolerant asthmatics (ATA), 3) aspirin-tolerant patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), and 4) healthy controls. Two-tailed Fisher’s exact test with Bonferroni corrections were used to compare the prevalence of respiratory symptoms between AERD and other groups, with P≤0.017 considered significant. Results The prevalence of alcohol-induced upper (rhinorrhea/nasal congestion) respiratory reactions in patients with AERD was 75%, compared to 33% in ATA, 30% in CRS, and 14% in healthy controls (P<0.001 for all comparisons). The prevalence of alcohol-induced lower (wheezing/dyspnea) respiratory reactions in AERD was 51%, compared to 20% in ATA, and 0% in both CRS and healthy controls (P<0.001 for all comparisons). These reactions were generally not specific to one type of alcohol and often occurred after ingestion of only a few sips of alcohol. Conclusion Alcohol ingestion causes respiratory reactions in the majority of patients with AERD and clinicians should be aware that these alcohol-induced reactions are significantly more common in AERD than in aspirin-tolerant controls. PMID:24607050

  19. Is there a genetic solution to bovine respiratory disease complex?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is a complex multi-factor disease, which increases costs and reduces revenue from feedlot cattle. Multiple stressors and pathogens (viral and bacterial) have been implicated in the etiology of BRDC, therefore multiple approaches will be needed to evaluate a...

  20. Is Folate Status a Risk Factor for Asthma or Other Allergic Diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Zhang, Hong-Ping; Zhang, Xin; Liang, Zong-An; Ji, Yu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose It is controversial whether folate status is a risk factor for the development of asthma or other allergic diseases. This study was conducted to investigate whether indirect or direct exposure to folate and impaired folate metabolism, reflected as methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism, would contribute to the development of asthma and other allergic diseases. Methods Electronic databases were searched to identify all studies assessing the association between folate status and asthma or other allergic diseases. Two reviewers independently assessed the eligibility of studies and extracted data. The relative risk (RR) or odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) was calculated and pooled. Results Twenty-six studies (16 cohort, 7 case-control, and 3 cross-sectional studies) were identified. Maternal folic acid supplementation was not associated with the development of asthma, atopic dermatitis (AD), eczema, and sensitization in the offspring, whereas exposure during early pregnancy was related to wheeze occurrence in the offspring (RR=1.06, 95% CI=[1.02-1.09]). The TT genotype of MTHFR C677T polymorphism was at high risk of asthma (OR=1.41, 95% CI=[1.07-1.86]). Conclusions It is indicated that maternal folic acid supplementation during early pregnancy may increase the risk of wheeze in early childhood and that the TT genotype of MTHFR C677T polymorphism impairing folic acid metabolism would be at high risk of asthma development. These results might provide additional information for recommendations regarding forced folate consumption or folic acid supplements during pregnancy based on its well-established benefits for the prevention of congenital malformations. However, currently available evidence is of low quality which is needed to further elucidate. PMID:26333700

  1. Exogenous Glutamine in Respiratory Diseases: Myth or Reality?

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Gisele P.; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Several respiratory diseases feature increased inflammatory response and catabolic activity, which are associated with glutamine depletion; thus, the benefits of exogenous glutamine administration have been evaluated in clinical trials and models of different respiratory diseases. Recent reviews and meta-analyses have focused on the effects and mechanisms of action of glutamine in a general population of critical care patients or in different models of injury. However, little information is available about the role of glutamine in respiratory diseases. The aim of the present review is to discuss the evidence of glutamine depletion in cystic fibrosis (CF), asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and lung cancer, as well as the results of exogenous glutamine administration in experimental and clinical studies. Exogenous glutamine administration might be beneficial in ARDS, asthma, and during lung cancer treatment, thus representing a potential therapeutic tool in these conditions. Further experimental and large randomized clinical trials focusing on the development and progression of respiratory diseases are necessary to elucidate the effects and possible therapeutic role of glutamine in this setting. PMID:26861387

  2. Presence of other allergic disease modifies the effect of early childhood traffic-related air pollution exposure on asthma prevalence.

    PubMed

    Dell, Sharon D; Jerrett, Michael; Beckerman, Bernard; Brook, Jeffrey R; Foty, Richard G; Gilbert, Nicolas L; Marshall, Laura; Miller, J David; To, Teresa; Walter, Stephen D; Stieb, David M

    2014-04-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a surrogate measure of traffic-related air pollution (TRAP), has been associated with incident childhood asthma. Timing of exposure and atopic status may be important effect modifiers. We collected cross-sectional data on asthma outcomes from Toronto school children aged 5-9years in 2006. Lifetime home, school and daycare addresses were obtained to derive birth and cumulative NO2 exposures for a nested case-control subset of 1497 children. Presence of other allergic disease (a proxy for atopy) was defined as self-report of one or more of doctor-diagnosed rhinitis, eczema, or food allergy. Generalized estimating equations were used to adjust for potential confounders, and examine hypothesized effect modifiers while accounting for clustering by school. In children with other allergic disease, birth, cumulative and 2006 NO2 were associated with lifetime asthma (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.08-1.98; 1.37, 95% CI 1.00-1.86; and 1.60, 95% CI 1.09-2.36 respectively per interquartile range increase) and wheeze (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.10-1.89; 1.31, 95% CI 1.02-1.67; and 1.60, 95% CI 1.16-2.21). No or weaker effects were seen in those without allergic disease, and effect modification was amplified when a more restrictive algorithm was used to define other allergic disease (at least 2 of doctor diagnosed allergic rhinitis, eczema or food allergy). The effects of modest NO2 levels on childhood asthma were modified by the presence of other allergic disease, suggesting a probable role for allergic sensitization in the pathogenesis of TRAP initiated asthma. PMID:24472824

  3. The importance of TSLP in allergic disease and its role as a potential therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Cianferoni, Antonella; Spergel, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is an epithelial-derived cytokine similar to IL- 7, whose gene is located on chromosome 5q22.1 and it exerts its biological function through the TSLP-Receptor (TSLP-R). TSLP is expressed primarily by epithelial cells at barrier surfaces such as the skin, gut and lung in response to danger signals. Since it was cloned in 1994, there has been accumulating evidence that TSLP is crucial for the maturation of antigen presenting cells and hematopoietic cells. TSLP genetic variants and its dysregulated expression have been linked to atopic diseases such as atopic dermatitis, asthma, allergic rhinitis and eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:25340427

  4. Engineering the Microbiome: a Novel Approach to Immunotherapy for Allergic and Immune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Shen, Nan; Clemente, Jose C

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of immune disorders is growing parallel with practices associated with westernization, such as dietary changes, increased use of antibiotics, or elevated rates of Cesarean section. These practices can significantly impact the gut microbiota, the collection of bacteria residing in the human gastrointestinal tract, and subsequently disrupt the delicate balance existing between commensal flora and host immune responses. Restoring this balance by modifying the microbiota has thus emerged as a promising therapeutic approach. Here, we discuss the interaction between gut commensals and immunity, along with the potential of different interventions on the microbiota as treatment for inflammatory and allergic diseases. PMID:26143390

  5. Nanoparticle diffusion in respiratory mucus from humans without lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Benjamin S.; Suk, Jung Soo; Woodworth, Graeme F.; Hanes, Justin

    2013-01-01

    A major role of respiratory mucus is to trap inhaled particles, including pathogens and environmental particulates, to limit body exposure. Despite the tremendous health implications, how particle size and surface chemistry affect mobility in respiratory mucus from humans without lung disease is not known. We prepared polymeric nanoparticles densely coated with low molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) to minimize muco-adhesion, and compared their transport to that of uncoated particles in human respiratory mucus, which we collected from the endotracheal tubes of surgical patients with no respiratory comorbidities. We found that 100 and 200 nm diameter PEG-coated particles rapidly penetrated respiratory mucus, at rates exceeding their uncoated counterparts by approximately 15- and 35-fold, respectively. In contrast, PEG-coated particles ≥ 500 nm in diameter were sterically immobilized by the mucus mesh. Thus, even though respiratory mucus is a viscoelastic solid at the macroscopic level (as measured using a bulk rheometer), nanoparticles that are sufficiently small and muco-inert can penetrate the mucus as if it were primarily a viscous liquid. These findings help elucidate the barrier properties of respiratory mucus and provide design criteria for therapeutic nanoparticles capable of penetrating mucus to approach the underlying airway epithelium. PMID:23384790

  6. Reversible Control by Vitamin D of Granulocytes and Bacteria in the Lungs of Mice: An Ovalbumin-Induced Model of Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Shelley; Weeden, Clare E.; Tan, Daryl H. W.; Scott, Naomi M.; Hart, Julie; Foong, Rachel E.; Mok, Danny; Stephens, Nahiid; Zosky, Graeme; Hart, Prue H.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D may be essential for restricting the development and severity of allergic diseases and asthma, but a direct causal link between vitamin D deficiency and asthma has yet to be established. We have developed a ‘low dose’ model of allergic airway disease induced by intraperitoneal injection with ovalbumin (1 µg) and aluminium hydroxide (0.2 mg) in which characteristics of atopic asthma are recapitulated, including airway hyperresponsiveness, antigen-specific immunoglobulin type-E and lung inflammation. We assessed the effects of vitamin D deficiency throughout life (from conception until adulthood) on the severity of ovalbumin-induced allergic airway disease in vitamin D-replete and -deficient BALB/c mice using this model. Vitamin D had protective effects such that deficiency significantly enhanced eosinophil and neutrophil numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of male but not female mice. Vitamin D also suppressed the proliferation and T helper cell type-2 cytokine-secreting capacity of airway-draining lymph node cells from both male and female mice. Supplementation of initially vitamin D-deficient mice with vitamin D for four weeks returned serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D to levels observed in initially vitamin D-replete mice, and also suppressed eosinophil and neutrophil numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of male mice. Using generic 16 S rRNA primers, increased bacterial levels were detected in the lungs of initially vitamin D-deficient male mice, which were also reduced by vitamin D supplementation. These results indicate that vitamin D controls granulocyte levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in an allergen-sensitive manner, and may contribute towards the severity of asthma in a gender-specific fashion through regulation of respiratory bacteria. PMID:23826346

  7. Immunoglobulin E to allergen components of house dust mite in Korean children with allergic disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hwan Soo; Kang, Sung Hee; Won, Sulmui; Lee, Eu Kyoung; Chun, Yoon Hong; Kim, Hyun Hee; Kim, Jin Tack

    2015-01-01

    Background House dust mites (HDMs) are important sources of indoor allergens. Seventeen components have been identified from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p). Objective Our aim was to define the prevalence of specific IgE to components of Der p in Korea and investigate the clinical features of them in children with allergic disease. Methods We performed a prospective evaluation of 80 HDM sensitized patients with history of allergic rhinitis (AR), atopic dermatitis (AD), asthma and urticaria (UC). Patients underwent ImmunoCAP for total IgE, Der p, Der f, Der p 1, Der p 2, and Der p 10. Results Seventy-nine patients had detectable serum IgE to Der p, 80 patients were sensitized to Der f, 66 patients were sensitized to Der p 1, 63 patients to Der p 2, and 7 patients were sensitized to Der p 10. Der p 1 specific IgE was significantly lower in the UC group compared with the AD and AR group. Total IgE was significantly higher in the Der p 10 sensitized group. Der p 10 serum IgE level was highly correlated with crab and shrimp specific IgE. There was a significant positive correlation between total IgE and specific IgE to Der p and its components and Der f. Conclusion Sensitization to HDM and its components in Korea is similar to previous studies from temperate climate. The determination of Der p 1, Der p 2, and Der p 10 specific IgE helps in obtaining additional information in regards to allergic disease. PMID:26240792

  8. Application of statistical mining in healthcare data management for allergic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzyniak, Zbigniew M.; Martínez Santolaya, Sara

    2014-11-01

    The paper aims to discuss data mining techniques based on statistical tools in medical data management in case of long-term diseases. The data collected from a population survey is the source for reasoning and identifying disease processes responsible for patient's illness and its symptoms, and prescribing a knowledge and decisions in course of action to correct patient's condition. The case considered as a sample of constructive approach to data management is a dependence of allergic diseases of chronic nature on some symptoms and environmental conditions. The knowledge summarized in a systematic way as accumulated experience constitutes to an experiential simplified model of the diseases with feature space constructed of small set of indicators. We have presented the model of disease-symptom-opinion with knowledge discovery for data management in healthcare. The feature is evident that the model is purely data-driven to evaluate the knowledge of the diseases` processes and probability dependence of future disease events on symptoms and other attributes. The example done from the outcomes of the survey of long-term (chronic) disease shows that a small set of core indicators as 4 or more symptoms and opinions could be very helpful in reflecting health status change over disease causes. Furthermore, the data driven understanding of the mechanisms of diseases gives physicians the basis for choices of treatment what outlines the need of data governance in this research domain of discovered knowledge from surveys.

  9. Environmental Attributes to Respiratory Diseases of Small Ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Anu; Ahmad, Abul Hasan; Prakash, Atul; Mandil, Rajesh; Kumar, Aruna T.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are the major disease crisis in small ruminants. A number of pathogenic microorganisms have been implicated in the development of respiratory disease but the importance of environmental factors in the initiation and progress of disease can never be overemphasized. They irritate the respiratory tree producing stress in the microenvironment causing a decline in the immune status of the small ruminants and thereby assisting bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections to break down the tissue defense barriers. Environmental pollutants cause acute or chronic reactions as they deposit on the alveolar surface which are characterized by inflammation or fibrosis and the formation of transitory or persistent tissue manifestation. Some of the effects of exposures may be immediate, whereas others may not be evident for many decades. Although the disease development can be portrayed as three sets of two-way communications (pathogen-environment, host-environment, and host-pathogen), the interactions are highly variable. Moreover, the environmental scenario is never static; new compounds are introduced daily making a precise evaluation of the disease burden almost impossible. The present review presents a detailed overview of these interactions and the ultimate effect on the respiratory health of sheep and goat. PMID:24782941

  10. Environmental attributes to respiratory diseases of small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Rahal, Anu; Ahmad, Abul Hasan; Prakash, Atul; Mandil, Rajesh; Kumar, Aruna T

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are the major disease crisis in small ruminants. A number of pathogenic microorganisms have been implicated in the development of respiratory disease but the importance of environmental factors in the initiation and progress of disease can never be overemphasized. They irritate the respiratory tree producing stress in the microenvironment causing a decline in the immune status of the small ruminants and thereby assisting bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections to break down the tissue defense barriers. Environmental pollutants cause acute or chronic reactions as they deposit on the alveolar surface which are characterized by inflammation or fibrosis and the formation of transitory or persistent tissue manifestation. Some of the effects of exposures may be immediate, whereas others may not be evident for many decades. Although the disease development can be portrayed as three sets of two-way communications (pathogen-environment, host-environment, and host-pathogen), the interactions are highly variable. Moreover, the environmental scenario is never static; new compounds are introduced daily making a precise evaluation of the disease burden almost impossible. The present review presents a detailed overview of these interactions and the ultimate effect on the respiratory health of sheep and goat. PMID:24782941

  11. Nutritional approaches for the primary prevention of allergic disease: An update.

    PubMed

    Rueter, Kristina; Prescott, Susan L; Palmer, Debra J

    2015-10-01

    The dramatic rise in early childhood allergic diseases indicates the specific vulnerability of the immune system to early life environmental changes. Dietary changes are at the centre of lifestyle changes that underpin many modern inflammatory and metabolic diseases, and therefore are an essential element of prevention strategies. Although modern dietary changes are complex and involve changing patterns of many nutrients, there is also an interest in the early life effects of specific nutrients including polyunsaturated fatty acids, oligosaccharides (soluble fibre), antioxidants, folate and other vitamins that have documented effects on immune function as well as metabolism. A better understanding of nutritional programming of immune health, nutritional epigenetics and the biological processes sensitive to nutritional exposures in early life may lead to dietary strategies that provide more tolerogenic conditions during early immune programming and reduce the burden of many inflammatory diseases, not just allergy. PMID:26135523

  12. Aspirin desensitization in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    White, Andrew A; Stevenson, Donald D

    2013-05-01

    Although aspirin desensitization was discovered in 1922, it was not until 1979 that a therapeutic use for aspirin treatment, under the protection of desensitization, was discovered. In the last 33 years, details of aspirin treatment have been refined to the point where it is now recognized and accepted as a major therapeutic intervention in the treatment of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, with therapeutic efficacy in approximately two-thirds of patients. It is only effective in patients who have aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease and none of the other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, despite their cross-reactive inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1, can effectively take the place of aspirin. PMID:23639709

  13. Probiotic lactic acid bacteria and their potential in the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wróblewska, Paula; Adamczuk, Piotr; Silny, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Allergy is one of the most important and very common health problems worldwide. To reduce the proportion of people suffering from allergy, alternative methods of prevention and treatment are sought. The aim of this paper is to present the possibilities of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases. Probiotics are live microorganisms belonging mainly to the lactic acid bacteria. They modify the microflora of the human digestive system, especially the intestinal microflora. Prophylactic administration of probiotics in the early stages of life (naturally in breast milk or milk substitute synthetic compounds) is very important because intestinal microflora plays a huge role in the development of the immune system. Prevention of allergies as early as in the prenatal and postnatal periods provides huge opportunities for inhibiting the growing problem of allergy in emerging and highly developed societies. Effects of probiotic therapy depend on many factors such as the species of the microorganism used, the dose size and characteristics of the bacteria such as viability and capacity of adhesion to the intestinal walls. Authors of several studies showed beneficial effects of probiotics in the perinatal period, infancy, and also in adults in the prevention of atopic dermatitis or allergic rhinitis. Probiotics, due to their immunomodulatory properties and safety of use are a good, natural alternative for the prevention and treatment of many diseases including allergies. It is therefore important to explore the knowledge about their use and to carry out further clinical trials. PMID:26155109

  14. The genetics of asthma and allergic disease: a 21st century perspective.

    PubMed

    Ober, Carole; Yao, Tsung-Chieh

    2011-07-01

    Asthma and allergy are common conditions with complex etiologies involving both genetic and environmental contributions. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and meta-analyses of GWAS have begun to shed light on both common and distinct pathways that contribute to asthma and allergic diseases. Associations with variation in genes encoding the epithelial cell-derived cytokines, interleukin-33 (IL-33) and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), and the IL1RL1 gene encoding the IL-33 receptor, ST2, highlight the central roles for innate immune response pathways that promote the activation and differentiation of T-helper 2 cells in the pathogenesis of both asthma and allergic diseases. In contrast, variation at the 17q21 asthma locus, encoding the ORMDL3 and GSDML genes, is specifically associated with risk for childhood onset asthma. These and other genetic findings are providing a list of well-validated asthma and allergy susceptibility genes that are expanding our understanding of the common and unique biological pathways that are dysregulated in these related conditions. Ongoing studies will continue to broaden our understanding of asthma and allergy and unravel the mechanisms for the development of these complex traits. PMID:21682736

  15. Mechanisms and treatment of allergic disease in the big picture of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2009-04-01

    Various populations of regulatory T (Treg) cells have been shown to play a central role in the maintenance of peripheral homeostasis and the establishment of controlled immune responses. Their identification as key regulators of immunologic processes in peripheral tolerance to allergens has opened an important era in the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases. Both naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ Treg cells and inducible populations of allergen-specific, IL-10-secreting Treg type 1 (T(R)1) cells inhibit allergen-specific effector cells in experimental models. Skewing of allergen-specific effector T cells to a regulatory phenotype appears to be a key event in the development of healthy immune response to allergens and successful outcome in allergen-specific immunotherapy. Forkhead box protein 3-positive CD4+CD25+ Treg cells and T(R)1 cells contribute to the control of allergen-specific immune responses in several major ways, which can be summarized as suppression of dendritic cells that support the generation of effector T cells; suppression of effector T(H)1, T(H)2, and T(H)17 cells; suppression of allergen-specific IgE and induction of IgG4; suppression of mast cells, basophils, and eosinophils; interaction with resident tissue cells and remodeling; and suppression of effector T-cell migration to tissues. Current strategies for drug development and allergen-specific immunotherapy exploit these observations, with the potential for preventive therapies and cure for allergic diseases. PMID:19348912

  16. Role of omega-3 fatty acids and their metabolites in asthma and allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Jun; Arita, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), are found naturally in fish oil and are commonly thought to be anti-inflammatory nutrients, with protective effects in inflammatory diseases including asthma and allergies. The mechanisms of these effects remain mostly unknown but are of great interest for their potential therapeutic applications. Large numbers of epidemiological and observational studies investigating the effect of fish intake or omega-3 fatty acid supplementation during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adulthood on asthmatic and allergic outcomes have been conducted. They mostly indicate protective effects and suggest a causal relationship between decreased intake of fish oil in modernized diets and an increasing number of individuals with asthma or other allergic diseases. Specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPM: protectins, resolvins, and maresins) are generated from omega-3 fatty acids such as EPA and DHA via several enzymatic reactions. These mediators counter-regulate airway eosinophilic inflammation and promote the resolution of inflammation in vivo. Several reports have indicated that the biosynthesis of SPM is impaired, especially in severe asthma, which suggests that chronic inflammation in the lung might result from a resolution defect. This article focuses on the beneficial aspects of omega-3 fatty acids and offers recent insights into their bioactive metabolites including resolvins and protectins. PMID:25572556

  17. Effects of allergic diseases and age on the composition of serum IgG glycome in children.

    PubMed

    Pezer, Marija; Stambuk, Jerko; Perica, Marija; Razdorov, Genadij; Banic, Ivana; Vuckovic, Frano; Gospic, Adrijana Miletic; Ugrina, Ivo; Vecenaj, Ana; Bakovic, Maja Pucic; Lokas, Sandra Bulat; Zivkovic, Jelena; Plavec, Davor; Devereux, Graham; Turkalj, Mirjana; Lauc, Gordan

    2016-01-01

    It is speculated that immunoglobulin G (IgG) plays a regulatory role in allergic reactions. The glycans on the Fc region are known to affect IgG effector functions, thereby possibly having a role in IgG modulation of allergic response. This is the first study investigating patients' IgG glycosylation profile in allergic diseases. Subclass specific IgG glycosylation profile was analyzed in two cohorts of allergen sensitized and non-sensitized 3- to 11-year-old children (conducted at University of Aberdeen, UK and Children's Hospital Srebrnjak, Zagreb, Croatia) with 893 subjects in total. IgG was isolated from serum/plasma by affinity chromatography on Protein G. IgG tryptic glycopeptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. In the Zagreb cohort IgG glycome composition changed with age across all IgG subclasses. In both cohorts, IgG glycome composition did not differ in allergen sensitized subjects, nor children sensitized to individual allergens, single allergen mean wheal diameter or positive wheal sum values. In the Zagreb study the results were also replicated for high total serum IgE and in children with self-reported manifest allergic disease. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate no association between serum IgG glycome composition and allergic diseases in children. PMID:27616597

  18. Importance of Social Relationships in Patients with Chronic Respiratory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kurpas, Donata; Szwamel, Katarzyna; Mroczek, Bozena

    2016-01-01

    The literature lacks reports on the role of the social relationships domain (SRD) of quality of life (QoL) in shaping care for patients with chronic respiratory diseases in primary care. In this study we examined a group of 582 patients with chronic respiratory diseases and chronic non-respiratory diseases recruited from 199 primary care centers. In the patients with chronic respiratory diseases, higher SRD correlated with more frequent patient visits due to medical issue, fewer district nurse interventions over the past 12 months, less frequent hospitalizations over the past 3 years, and fewer chronic diseases. In these patients, a high SRD was most effectively created by high QoL in the Psychological, Environmental, and Physical domains, and the satisfaction with QoL. Programs for preventing a decline in SRD should include patients with low scores in the Psychological, Environmental, and Physical domains, those who show no improvement in mental or somatic well-being in the past 12 months, those with a low level of positive mental attitudes, unhealthy eating habits, and with low levels of met needs. Such programs should include older widows and widowers without permanent relationships, with only primary education, living far from a primary care center, and those whose visits were not due to a medical issue. PMID:27358182

  19. [Relationship of the ambient air concentrations of chemical substances to the spread of allergic diseases in children].

    PubMed

    Galeev, K A; Khakimova, R F

    2002-01-01

    The role of some ingredients that contaminate the ambient air in the occurrence and development of allergic diseases was studied. The closest relationships were found between the concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and the prevalence of eczema (rxy +/- m = 0.48 +/- 0.15). There was a direct correlation between the concentrations of each ingredient and the incidence of neurodermitis among children. The correlation between the summarized concentrations of ingredients and the incidence of bronchial asthma among children was rxy +/- m = 0.71 +/- 0.19. The findings serves as the basis for elaborating measures to reduce ecological tension and the incidence of allergic diseases in children. PMID:12380496

  20. Acetaminophen Attenuates House Dust Mite-Induced Allergic Airway Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gregory J; Thrall, Roger S; Cloutier, Michelle M; Manautou, Jose E; Morris, John B

    2016-09-01

    Epidemiologic evidence suggests that N-acetyl-para-aminophenol (APAP) may play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma, likely through pro-oxidant mechanisms. However, no studies have investigated the direct effects of APAP on the development of allergic inflammation. To determine the likelihood of a causal relationship between APAP and asthma pathogenesis, we explored the effects of APAP on inflammatory responses in a murine house dust mite (HDM) model of allergic airway disease. We hypothesized that APAP would enhance the development of HDM-induced allergic inflammation. The HDM model consisted of once daily intranasal instillations for up to 2 weeks with APAP or vehicle administration 1 hour prior to HDM during either week 1 or 2. Primary assessment of inflammation included bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), cytokine expression in lung tissue, and histopathology. Contrary to our hypothesis, the effects of HDM treatment were substantially diminished in APAP-treated groups compared with controls. APAP-treated groups had markedly reduced airway inflammation: including decreased inflammatory cells in the BAL fluid, lower cytokine expression in lung tissue, and less perivascular and peribronchiolar immune cell infiltration. The anti-inflammatory effect of APAP was not abrogated by an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 (P450) metabolism, suggesting that the effect was due to the parent compound or a non-P450 generated metabolite. Taken together, our studies do not support the biologic plausibility of the APAP hypothesis that APAP use may contribute to the causation of asthma. Importantly, we suggest the mechanism by which APAP modulates airway inflammation may provide novel therapeutic targets for asthma. PMID:27402277

  1. Zinc oxide nanoparticles, a novel candidate for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ho; Seo, Jun-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2014-09-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential trace metal for eukaryotes. The roles of Zn in the numerous physiological functions have been elucidated. Bamboo salt contains Zn that was shown to have anti-inflammatory effect and other health benefits. Nanoparticles of various types have found application in the biology, medicine, and physics. Here we synthesized tetrapod-like, zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZO-NP; diameter 200 nm, source of Zn) using a radio frequency thermal plasma system and investigated its effects on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammatory reactions. ZO-NP was found to inhibit the productions and mRNA expressions of inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α on the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus A23187 (PMACI)-stimulated human mast cell line, HMC-1 cells. In these stimulated cells, caspase-1 and nuclear factor-κB activations were abolished by ZO-NP, and the expressions of receptor interacting protein2 (RIP2) and IκB kinaseβ (IKKβ) induced by PAMCI were reduced. On the other hand, ZO-NP alone increased the expressions of RIP2 and IKKβ in normal condition. ZO-NP inhibited the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase in the PMACI-stimulated HMC-1 cells. Furthermore, ZO-NP significantly inhibited passive cutaneous anaphylaxis activated by anti-dinitrophenyl IgE. These findings indicate that ZO-NP effectively ameliorates mast cell-mediated allergic inflammatory reaction, and suggest that ZO-NP be considered a potential therapeutic for the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. PMID:24877691

  2. [Serological studies of the role of the respiratory syncytial virus in acute respiratory diseases in children].

    PubMed

    Vancea, D; Saşcă, C; Matinca, D; Ivanof, A

    1975-01-01

    The presence of the syncytial respiratory virus was determined by CF in 281 children admitted with acute respiratory diseases between 15 Sept. 1971 and 30 Dec. 1973, using the Long antigen prepared in the "St. Nicolau" Institute of Virology, Bucharest. In 38 children (13.5%) a serologic diagnosis of infection with the syncytial virus was established; in the other cases of respiratory infection of different etiology, antibodies to the syncytial virus were found in low but constant titers in both serum samples. The presence of these antibodies in a high proportion of the children points to the wide circulation of the syncytial virus in the infantile population, with all its clinico-epidemiologic implications. PMID:173009

  3. Respiratory diseases and their effects on respiratory function and exercise capacity.

    PubMed

    Van Erck-Westergren, E; Franklin, S H; Bayly, W M

    2013-05-01

    Given that aerobic metabolism is the predominant energy pathway for most sports, the respiratory system can be a rate-limiting factor in the exercise capacity of fit and healthy horses. Consequently, respiratory diseases, even in mild forms, are potentially deleterious to any athletic performance. The functional impairment associated with a respiratory condition depends on the degree of severity of the disease and the equestrian discipline involved. Respiratory abnormalities generally result in an increase in respiratory impedance and work of breathing and a reduced level of ventilation that can be detected objectively by deterioration in breathing mechanics and arterial blood gas tensions and/or lactataemia. The overall prevalence of airway diseases is comparatively high in equine athletes and may affect the upper airways, lower airways or both. Diseases of the airways have been associated with a wide variety of anatomical and/or inflammatory conditions. In some instances, the diagnosis is challenging because conditions can be subclinical in horses at rest and become clinically relevant only during exercise. In such cases, an exercise test may be warranted in the evaluation of the patient. The design of the exercise test is critical to inducing the clinical signs of the problem and establishing an accurate diagnosis. Additional diagnostic techniques, such as airway sampling, can be valuable in the diagnosis of subclinical lower airway problems that have the capacity to impair performance. As all these techniques become more widely used in practice, they should inevitably enhance veterinarians' diagnostic capabilities and improve their assessment of treatment effectiveness and the long-term management of equine athletes. PMID:23368813

  4. The Global Epidemiologic Transition: Noncommunicable Diseases and Emerging Health Risk of Allergic Disease in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Atiim, George A; Elliott, Susan J

    2016-04-01

    Globally, there has been a shift in the causes of illness and death from infectious diseases to noncommunicable diseases. This changing pattern has been attributed to the effects of an (ongoing) epidemiologic transition. Although researchers have applied epidemiologic transition theory to questions of global health, there have been relatively few studies exploring its relevance especially in the context of emerging allergic disorders in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). In this article, we address the growing burden of noncommunicable diseases in sub-Saharan Africa through the lens of epidemiologic transition theory. After a brief review of the literature on the evolution of the epidemiologic transition with a particular emphasis on sub-Saharan Africa, we discuss existing frameworks designed to help inform our understanding of changing health trends in the developing world. We subsequently propose a framework that privileges "place" as a key construct informing our understanding. In so doing, we use the example of allergic disease, one of the fastest growing chronic conditions in most parts of the world. PMID:27037146

  5. Functional respiratory assessment in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Reyes, José Luis; Gochicoa-Rangel, Laura; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect, to a greater or lesser degree, the alveolus, peripheral airway, and septal interstitium. Functional assessment in patients suspected of having an interstitial lung disease has implications for diagnosis and makes it possible to objectively analyze both response to treatment and prognosis. Recently the clinical value of lung-diffusing capacity and the six-minute walking test has been confirmed, and these are now important additions to the traditional assessment of lung function that is based on spirometry. Here we review the state-of-the-art methods for the assessment of patients with interstitial lung disease. PMID:25857578

  6. Cardiac Function in Kawasaki Disease Patients with Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seul Bee; Choi, Han Seul; Son, Sejung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Respiratory symptoms are often observed in children with Kawasaki disease (KD) during the acute phase. The association of respiratory viruses in children with KD was investigated using multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and tissue Doppler echocardiography. Subjects and Methods 138 KD patients were included from January 2010 to June 2013. We compared 3 groups (group 1: n=94, KD without respiratory symptoms; group 2: n=44, KD with respiratory symptoms; and group 3: n=50, febrile patients with respiratory symptoms). Laboratory data were obtained from each patient including N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). Echocardiographic measurements were compared between group 1 and group 2. RT-PCR was performed using nasopharyngeal secretion to screen for the presence of 14 viruses in groups 2 and 3. Results The incidence of KD with respiratory symptoms was 31.8%. The duration of fever was significantly longer, and coronary artery diameter was larger in group 2 than in group 1. Tei index was significantly higher and coronary artery diameter larger in group 2 than group 1. Coronary artery diameter, C-reactive protein levels, platelet count, alanine aminotransferase levels, and NT-pro BNP levels were significantly higher and albumin levels lower in group 2 compared with group 3. Conclusion NT-pro BNP was a valuable diagnostic tool in differentiating KD from other febrile viral respiratory infections. Some viruses were more frequently observed in KD patients than in febrile controls. Tei index using tissue Doppler imaging was increased in KD patients with respiratory symptoms. PMID:26240586

  7. Genomics of bovine respiratory disease complex at USMARC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selection for genetic resistance/resilience bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) would significantly increase the efficiency of beef production in the U.S. through decreased treatment costs, productivity, and death loss. Unfortunately, selection for resistance to BRDC is challenging to implemen...

  8. RESPIRATORY DISEASE IN CHILDREN EXPOSED TO SULFUR OXIDES AND PARTICULATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute lower respiratory disease was surveyed by questionnaire among parents of 10,000 children aged 1 to 12 years in two Southeastern communities representing intermediate and high exposures to particulates and low sulfur dioxide levels. Morbidity reporting patterns with respect ...

  9. Respiratory symptoms and acute painful episodes in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Eufemia; Sockrider, Marianna M; Dinu, Marlen; Acosta, Monica; Mueller, Brigitta U

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and determined whether respiratory symptoms were associated with prevalence of chest pain and number of acute painful episodes in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease. Participants (N = 93; 44 females, 49 males; mean age 9.8 +/- 4.3 years) reported coughing in the morning (21.5%), at night (31.2%), and during exercise (30.1%). Wheezing occurred both when they had a cold or infection (29.0%) and when they did not have (23.7%) a cold or infection. Sleep was disturbed by wheezing in 20.4%. Among the 76 patients who were school-age (>5 years), 19.7% of patients missed more than 4 days of school because of respiratory symptoms. The majority of patients reported having acute painful episodes (82.8%), and most (66.7%) reported having chest pain during acute painful episodes in the previous 12 months. Participants with acute pain episodes greater than 3 during the previous 12 months had significantly higher reports of breathing difficulties (P = .01) and chest pain (P = .002). The high number of respiratory symptoms (cough and wheeze) among patients with sickle cell disease may trigger acute painful episodes. Early screening and recognition, ongoing monitoring, and proactive management of respiratory symptoms may minimize the number of acute painful episodes. PMID:20038672

  10. Chronic respiratory diseases and quality of life in elderly nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Carreiro-Martins, Pedro; Gomes-Belo, Joana; Papoila, Ana Luísa; Caires, Iolanda; Palmeiro, Teresa; Gaspar-Marques, João; Leiria-Pinto, Paula; Mendes, Ana Sofia; Paulo-Teixeira, João; Botelho, Maria Amália; Neuparth, Nuno

    2016-08-01

    Few studies have assessed the quality of life (QOL) related to chronic respiratory diseases in the elderly. In the framework of the geriatric study on the health effects of air quality in elderly care centers (GERIA) study, a questionnaire was completed by elderly subjects from 53 selected nursing homes. It included various sections in order to assess respiratory complaints, QOL (World Health Organization QOL (WHOQOL)-BREF), and the cognitive and depression status. The outcome variables were the presence of a score lower than 50 (<50) in each of the WHOQOL-BREF domains (physical health, psychological health, social relationships, and environmental health). Chronic bronchitis, frequent cough, current wheezing, asthma, and allergic rhinitis were considered as potential risk factors. The surveyed sample was (n = 887) 79% female, with a mean age of 84 years (SD: 7 years). In the multivariable analysis, a score of <50 in the physical domain was associated with wheezing in the previous 12 months (odds ratio (OR): 2.03, confidence interval (CI): 1.25-3.31) and asthma (OR: 1.95, CI: 1.12-3.38). The psychological domain was related with a frequent cough (OR: 1.43, CI: 0.95-2.91). A score of <50 in the environmental domain was associated with chronic bronchitis (OR: 2.89, CI: 1.34-6.23) and emphysema (OR: 3.89, CI: 1.27-11.88). In view of these findings, the presence of respiratory diseases seems to be an important risk factor for a low QOL among elderly nursing home residents. PMID:26965222

  11. GIS-based Association Between PM10 and Allergic Diseases in Seoul: Implications for Health and Environmental Policy

    PubMed Central

    Seo, SungChul; Min, Soojin; Paul, Christopher; Yoo, Young; Choung, Ji Tae

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The role of PM10 in the development of allergic diseases remains controversial among epidemiological studies, partly due to the inability to control for spatial variations in large-scale risk factors. This study aims to investigate spatial correspondence between the level of PM10 and allergic diseases at the sub-district level in Seoul, Korea, in order to evaluate whether the impact of PM10 is observable and spatially varies across the subdistricts. Methods PM10 measurements at 25 monitoring stations in the city were interpolated to 424 sub-districts where annual inpatient and outpatient count data for 3 types of allergic diseases (atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinitis) were collected. We estimated multiple ordinary least square regression models to examine the association of the PM10 level with each of the allergic diseases, controlling for various sub-district level covariates. Geographically weighted regression (GWR) models were conducted to evaluate how the impact of PM10 varies across the sub-districts. Results PM10 was found to be a significant predictor of atopic dermatitis patient count (P<0.01), with greater association when spatially interpolated at the sub-district level. No significant effect of PM10 was observed on allergic rhinitis and asthma when socioeconomic factors were controlled for. GWR models revealed spatial variation of PM10 effects on atopic dermatitis across the sub-districts in Seoul. The relationship of PM10 levels to atopic dermatitis patient counts is found to be significant only in the Gangbuk region (P<0.01), along with other covariates including average land value, poverty rate, level of education and apartment rate (P<0.01). Conclusions Our findings imply that PM10 effects on allergic diseases might not be consistent throughout Seoul. GIS-based spatial modeling techniques could play a role in evaluating spatial variation of air pollution impacts on allergic diseases at the sub-district level, which could provide

  12. Modulation of the immune response by infection with Cryptosporidium spp. in children with allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Guangorena-Gómez, J O; Maravilla-Domínguez, A; García-Arenas, G; Cervantes-Flores, M; Meza-Velázquez, R; Rivera-Guillén, M; Acosta-Saavedra, L C; Goytia-Acevedo, R C

    2016-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that the allergic response can be ameliorated by the administration of pathogen derivatives that activate Toll-like receptors and induce a Th1-type immune response (IR). Cryptosporidium is a parasite that promotes an IR via Toll-like receptors and elicits the production of Th1-type cytokines, which limit cryptosporidiosis. The aim of this study was to investigate allergy-related immune markers in children naturally infected with Cryptosporidium. In a cross-sectional study, 49 children with or without clinical diagnosis of allergies, oocysts of Cryptosporidium spp. in the faeces were screened microscopically. We microscopically screened for leucocytes, examined T and B cells for allergy-related activation markers using flow cytometry and evaluated serum for total IgE using chemiluminescence. Children with allergies and Cryptosporidium in the faeces had significantly lower levels of total IgE, B cells, CD19(+) CD23(+) and CD19(+) CD124(+) cells as well as a greater percentage of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ(+) ) and IL-4(+) CD4(+) cells than children with allergies without Cryptosporidium. This is the first description of the modulation of the IR in children with allergic diseases in the setting of natural Cryptosporidium infection. Our findings suggest the involvement of CD4(+) cells producing IL-4 and IFN-γ in the IR to Cryptosporidium in naturally infected children. PMID:27150641

  13. Autoimmune thyroid disease and allergic contact dermatitis: two immune-related pathologies in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Niedziela, Marek; Bluvshteyn-Walker, Sasha

    2012-01-01

    A 12-year-old girl presented signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism. She had a firm goiter (II°) and she stated that she felt constant warmth, nervousness and experienced palpitations. Autoimmune hyperthyroidism was diagnosed (TSH 0.022 mIU/L↓; fT4 21.0 pmol/L; fT3 7.5 pmol/L↑; antithyroperoxidase antibodies 1148.0 U/mL↑; antithyroglobulin antibodies 41.4 U/mL; thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibodies 2.3 U/L↑). Thyroid ultrasound showed multiple hypoechogenic areas with increased vascular flow. During treatment with methimazole, a small hyperpigmented and moderately irritated region was found on the right side of the umbilicus. It was not an allergic skin reaction to methimazole but the classic contact allergic dermatitis, probably a result of nickel in her belt. Two years after stopping the treatment she returned to clinics. She was euthyroid but manifested a firm goiter and ultrasonographic features of autoimmune thyroid disease. The diagnostic work-up concerning antithyroid antibodies is mandatory to confirm the ongoing autoimmune process with a long-term significance. PMID:22570947

  14. Animal Models of Allergic Airways Disease: Where Are We and Where to Next?

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, David G.; Tully, Jane E.; Nolin, James D.; Jansen-Heininger, Yvonne M; Irvin, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    In a complex inflammatory airways disease such as asthma, abnormalities in a plethora of molecular and cellular pathways ultimately culminate in characteristic impairments in respiratory function. The ability to study disease pathophysiology in the setting of a functioning immune and respiratory system therefore makes mouse models an invaluable tool in translational research. Despite the vast understanding of inflammatory airways diseases gained from mouse models to date, concern over the validity of mouse models continues to grow. Therefore the aim of this review is two-fold; firstly, to evaluate mouse models of asthma in light of current clinical definitions, and secondly, to provide a framework by which mouse models can be continually refined so that they continue to stand at the forefront of translational science. Indeed, it is in viewing mouse models as a continual work in progress that we will be able to target our research to those patient populations in whom current therapies are insufficient. PMID:25043224

  15. [BCL1 POLYMORPHISM OF GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR GENE AND RESPIRATORY DISEASES].

    PubMed

    Prystupa, L N; Garbuzova, V Yu; Kmyta, V V

    2015-01-01

    The article analyses the results of investigating the connection between BCL1-polymorphism of glucocorticoid receptor gene and respiratory diseases. Its role in increasing sensitivity to glucocorticoids is proved here. The authors investigated the association of Bcl1 polymorphism with predisposition to bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, with the nicotine addiction degree and with progressing disorders of pulmonary function in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26118026

  16. Current and future biomarkers in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Zissler, U M; Esser-von Bieren, J; Jakwerth, C A; Chaker, A M; Schmidt-Weber, C B

    2016-04-01

    Diagnosis early in life, sensitization, asthma endotypes, monitoring of disease and treatment progression are key motivations for the exploration of biomarkers for allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. The number of genes related to allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma increases steadily; however, prognostic genes have not yet entered clinical application. We hypothesize that the combination of multiple genes may generate biomarkers with prognostic potential. The current review attempts to group more than 161 different potential biomarkers involved in respiratory inflammation to pave the way for future classifiers. The potential biomarkers are categorized into either epithelial or infiltrate-derived or mixed origin, epithelial biomarkers. Furthermore, surface markers were grouped into cell-type-specific categories. The current literature provides multiple biomarkers for potential asthma endotypes that are related to T-cell phenotypes such as Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and Tregs and their lead cytokines. Eosinophilic and neutrophilic asthma endotypes are also classified by epithelium-derived CCL-26 and osteopontin, respectively. There are currently about 20 epithelium-derived biomarkers exclusively derived from epithelium, which are likely to innovate biomarker panels as they are easy to sample. This article systematically reviews and categorizes genes and collects current evidence that may promote these biomarkers to become part of allergic rhinitis or allergic asthma classifiers with high prognostic value. PMID:26706728

  17. Turkey industry strategies for control of respiratory and enteric diseases.

    PubMed

    Poss, P E

    1998-08-01

    Current strategies to control respiratory and enteric diseases of turkeys involve sanitation and biosecurity practices to prevent the introduction of infectious agents. In addition, proper husbandry and management practice reduce stress and help maintain a competent immune system. Industry-wide monitoring programs are used in conjunction with isolation, depopulation, and orderly marketing to eliminate pathogens that cause serious economic loss. Vaccines are available and utilized against some pathogens. Effective drug treatment is available and used for some diseases but is most commonly used to control secondary disease losses when treatment is not available for the primary disease. PMID:9706086

  18. Hedgehogs and sugar gliders: respiratory anatomy, physiology, and disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Dan H

    2011-05-01

    This article discusses the respiratory anatomy, physiology, and disease of African pygmy hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) and sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps), two species commonly seen in exotic animal practice. Where appropriate, information from closely related species is mentioned because cross-susceptibility is likely and because these additional species may also be encountered in practice. Other body systems and processes are discussed insofar as they relate to or affect respiratory function. Although some topics, such as special senses, hibernation, or vocalization, may seem out of place, in each case the information relates back to respiration in some important way. PMID:21601815

  19. Respiratory and lower limb muscle function in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Panagiotou, Marios; Polychronopoulos, Vlasis; Strange, Charlie

    2016-05-01

    Growing evidence suggests that respiratory and limb muscle function may be impaired in patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Importantly, muscle dysfunction could promote dyspnoea, fatigue and functional limitation all of which are cardinal features of ILD. This article examines the risk factors for skeletal muscle dysfunction in ILD, reviews the current evidence on overall respiratory and limb muscle function and focuses on the occurrence and implications of skeletal muscle dysfunction in ILD. Research limitations and pathways to address the current knowledge gaps are highlighted. PMID:26768011

  20. An analysis of the effectiveness of heat-killed lactic acid bacteria in alleviating allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sashihara, T; Sueki, N; Ikegami, S

    2006-08-01

    Allergic diseases are reported to be caused by a skew in the balance between T helper type 1 and 2 cells. Because some lactic acid bacteria have been shown to stimulate IL-12 (p70) production, which in turn shifts the balance between the T helper type 1 and 2 cell response from the latter to the former, they have the potential to either prevent or ameliorate disease conditions or both. They have therefore been extensively studied in the recent past for their probiotic activities. Nevertheless, much less information is available concerning the microbial factors that determine the strain-dependent ability to affect the production of cytokines. The objectives of our study were first to select potentially probiotic lactobacilli that strongly stimulate cytokine production in vitro, and then to determine whether the selected Lactobacillus strains could suppress antigen-specific IgE production in vivo by using allergic model animals. Finally, our investigation was extended to analyze which bacterial components were responsible for the observed biological activity. Twenty strains of heat-killed lactobacilli isolated from humans were screened for their stimulatory activity for the production of IL-12 (p70) by murine splenocytes in vitro. The results showed that some strains of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus gasseri had a higher stimulatory activity for IL-12 (p70) production than the other lactobacilli tested; however, this effect was strain dependent rather than species dependent. Oral administration of the heat-killed strains that showed higher stimulatory activity for IL-12 (p70) production tended to reduce the serum antigen-specific IgE levels in ovalbumin-sensitized BALB/c mice compared with the controls. Among the lactobacilli tested, L. gasseri OLL2809 showed the highest activity in reducing the level of antigen-specific IgE. Furthermore, the stimulatory activity for IL-12 (p70) production was found to be reduced after treating the lactobacilli with N

  1. Farmer's Lung: Causes and Symptoms of Mold and Dust Induced Respiratory Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educational Resources Farmer's Lung: Causes and Symptoms of Mold and Dust Induced Respiratory Illness ID 442-602 ( ... noninfectious allergic disease that is caused by inhaling mold spores in the dust from moldy hay, straw, ...

  2. What's LPS Got to Do with It? A Role for Gut LPS Variants in Driving Autoimmune and Allergic Disease.

    PubMed

    Feehley, Taylor; Belda-Ferre, Pedro; Nagler, Cathryn R

    2016-05-11

    The bacterial communities that live in and on our bodies have a profound influence on our health. In a new paper in Cell, Vatanen et al. (2016) report that the composition of the early-life gut microbiome, particularly those species producing lipopolysaccharide, influences the onset of autoimmune and allergic disease. PMID:27173923

  3. Association between biomarker-quantified antioxidant status during pregnancy and infancy and allergic disease during early childhood: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Patelarou, Evridiki; Giourgouli, Gianna; Lykeridou, Aikaterini; Vrioni, Evagelia; Fotos, Nikolaos; Siamaga, Eleni; Vivilaki, Victoria; Brokalaki, Hero

    2011-11-01

    Recent findings suggest a significant association between the antioxidant status of pregnant women and of their children during the first years of life and the development of allergic disease during childhood. The aim of this review was to identify all studies that estimated the effect of intake of antioxidants in pregnant women and their children on the development of allergic disease during early childhood. A systematic review was conducted of epidemiological studies featuring original peer-reviewed data on the association between dietary antioxidant status and allergic disease during childhood. A systematic search was performed following the Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology Guidelines. A comprehensive search of the literature yielded 225 studies, 18 of which were selected for the extraction of results and were related to antioxidant status and allergic disease. The systematic review included five prospective cohort studies, four cross-sectional studies, and nine case-control studies. Eight studies reported an important association between antioxidant status and asthma onset during childhood. Similarly, wheezing and eczema were studied as an outcome in six and in five studies, respectively. Recent observational studies suggest that a higher intake of antioxidant vitamins, zinc, and selenium during pregnancy and childhood reduces the likelihood of childhood asthma, wheezing, and eczema. PMID:22029830

  4. Respiratory disease mortality in New Mexico's American Indians and Hispanics.

    PubMed Central

    Samet, J M; Key, C R; Kutvirt, D M; Wiggins, C L

    1980-01-01

    To determine the effect of ethnic group on respiratory disease occurrence, average annual sex, ethnic, and disease specific mortality rates for the period of 1969 to 1977 were calculated for New Mexico's American Indian, Hispanic, and Anglo populations. Incidence data were available for respiratory tract cancer. This study corroborates previous findings of reduced mortality from lung cancer in American Indians of both sexes and in Hispanic males. American Indian mortality from tuberculosis and from influenza and pneumonia was high. Hispanic males and American Indians of both sexes showed low mortality rates for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Differing cigarette usage is the most obvious explanation for the variations in COPD and lung cancer occurrence with ethnic group. PMID:7377419

  5. Animal models of human respiratory syncytial virus disease

    PubMed Central

    Domachowske, Joseph B.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2011-01-01

    Infection with the human pneumovirus pathogen, respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), causes a wide spectrum of respiratory disease, notably among infants and the elderly. Laboratory animal studies permit detailed experimental modeling of hRSV disease and are therefore indispensable in the search for novel therapies and preventative strategies. Present animal models include several target species for hRSV, including chimpanzees, cattle, sheep, cotton rats, and mice, as well as alternative animal pneumovirus models, such as bovine RSV and pneumonia virus of mice. These diverse animal models reproduce different features of hRSV disease, and their utilization should therefore be based on the scientific hypothesis under investigation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the strengths and limitations of each of these animal models. Our intent is to provide a resource for investigators and an impetus for future research. PMID:21571908

  6. Nanocarriers as pulmonary drug delivery systems to treat and to diagnose respiratory and non respiratory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Smola, Malgorzata; Vandamme, Thierry; Sokolowski, Adam

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the impact of nanocarriers administered by pulmonary route to treat and to diagnose respiratory and non respiratory diseases. Indeed, during the past 10 years, the removal of chlorofluorocarbon propellants from industrial and household products intended for the pulmonary route has lead to the developments of new alternative products. Amongst these ones, on one hand, a lot of attention has been focused to improve the bioavailability of marketed drugs intended for respiratory diseases and to develop new concepts for pulmonary administration of drugs and, on the other hand, to use the pulmonary route to administer drugs for systemic diseases. This has led to some marketed products through the last decade. Although the introduction of nanotechnology permitted to step over numerous problems and to improve the bioavailability of drugs, there are, however, unresolved delivery problems to be still addressed. These scientific and industrial innovations and challenges are discussed along this review together with an analysis of the current situation concerning the industrial developments. PMID:18488412

  7. Dose-Response Relationship between Exercise and Respiratory Disease Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess prospectively the dose-response relationship between respiratory disease (ICD10: J1-99), pneumonia (ICD10: J12.0-18.9), and asperation pneumonia mortality (ICD10: J69) vs. baseline walking and running energy expenditure (MET-hours/d, 1 MET = 3.5 ml O2/kg/min). Methods Cox proportional hazard analyses of 109,352 runners and 40,798 walkers adjusted for age, sex, smoking, diet, alcohol, and education. Results There were 236 deaths with respiratory disease listed as the underlying cause, and 833 deaths that were respiratory disease related (entity axis diagnosis). Included among these were 79 deaths with pneumonia listed as the underlying cause and 316 pneumonia-related deaths, and 77 deaths due to aspiration pneumonia. There was no significant difference in the effect of running compared to walking (per MET-hours/d) on mortality, thus runners and walkers were combined for analysis. Respiratory disease mortality decreased 7.9% per MET-hours/d as the underlying cause (95%CI: 1.6% to 14.0%, P=0.01) and 7.3% for all respiratory disease-related deaths (95%CI: 4.2% to 10.4%, P=10-5). Pneumonia mortality decreased 13.1% per MET-hours/d as the underlying cause (95%CI: 2.6% to 23.2%, P=0.01) and 10.5% per MET-hours/d for all pneumonia-related deaths (95%CI: 5.4% to 15.5%, P=0.0001). The risk for aspiration pneumonia mortality also did not differ between running and walking, and decreased 19.9% per MET-hours/d run or walked (95%CI: 8.9% to 30.2%, P=0.0004). These results remained significant when additionally adjusted for BMI. Conclusions Higher doses of running and walking were associated with lower risk of respiratory disease, pneumonia, and aspiration pneumonia mortality in a dose-dependent manner, and the effects of running and walking appear equivalent. These effects appear to be independent of the effects of exercise on cardiovascular disease. PMID:24002349

  8. [Choice of an antihistamine administration route in the treatment of allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Luss, L V

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases (AD) are an interdisciplinary problem in practical health care and characterized by high prevalence, severity, and huge financial costs of their treatment, prevention, and rehabilitation in patients. In this connection, control of allergy symptoms attracts the meticulous attention of physicians of all specialties. The efficiency of pharmacotherapy in clinical practice frequently depends not only on what medication, but also what mode of its delivery (administration) is used. Clinicians are well aware of the fact that oral administration of some drugs, antihistamines in particular, may be lowly effective or ineffective and their parenteral route gives rise to their sufficient clinical effect. This communication presents for general practitioners a pathogenetic rationale for prescribing histamines and indications for their parenteral administration in AD. PMID:27030338

  9. Respiratory Conditions Update: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Karel, Daphne J

    2016-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is defined as persistent airflow limitation due to irritant-induced chronic inflammation. A postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio of 0.7 or less is diagnostic in a patient with dyspnea, chronic cough or sputum production, and a history of irritant exposure. Tobacco smoking is the most significant etiology, and smoking cessation is the only intervention shown to slow disease progression. Long-acting beta2-agonists and long-acting muscarinic antagonists are first-line treatments for patients with persistently symptomatic COPD with an FEV1 of 80% or less of predicted. When COPD is uncontrolled with a long-acting bronchodilator, combination therapy with a long-acting muscarinic antagonist-long-acting beta2-agonist or long-acting beta2-agonist-inhaled corticosteroid should be prescribed. Patients with COPD and reduced exercise tolerance should undergo pulmonary rehabilitation and be evaluated for supplemental oxygen therapy. Other treatment options for persistently symptomatic COPD include inhaler triple therapy (ie, long-acting muscarinic antagonist, long-acting beta2-agonist, inhaled corticosteroid), phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitors, oxygen, and surgical interventions. PMID:27576232

  10. The gut microbiota and its role in the development of allergic disease: a wider perspective.

    PubMed

    West, C E; Jenmalm, M C; Prescott, S L

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota are critical in the homoeostasis of multiple interconnected host metabolic and immune networks. If early microbial colonization is delayed, the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) fail to develop, leading to persistent immune dysregulation in mice. Microbial colonization has also been proposed as a major driver for the normal age-related maturation of both Th1 and T regulatory (Treg) pathways that appear important in suppressing early propensity for Th2 allergic responses. There is emerging evidence that resident symbionts induce tolerogenic gut-associated Treg cells and dendritic cells that ensure the preferential growth of symbionts; keeping pathogenic strains in check and constraining proinflammatory Th1, Th2, and Th17 clones. Some effects of symbionts are mediated by short-chain fatty acids, which play a critical role in mucosal integrity and local and systemic metabolic function and stimulate the regulatory immune responses. The homoeostatic IL-10/TGF-β dominated tolerogenic response within the GALT also signals the production of secretory IgA, which have a regulating role in mucosal integrity. Contrary to the 'sterile womb' paradigm, recent studies suggest that maternal microbial transfer to the offspring begins during pregnancy, providing a pioneer microbiome. It is likely that appropriate microbial stimulation both pre- and postnatally is required for optimal Th1 and Treg development to avoid the pathophysiological processes leading to allergy. Disturbed gut colonization patterns have been associated with allergic disease, but whether microbial variation is the cause or effect of these diseases is still under investigation. We are far from understanding what constitutes a 'healthy gut microbiome' that promotes tolerance. This remains a major limitation and might explain some of the inconsistency in human intervention studies with prebiotics and probiotics. Multidisciplinary integrative approaches with researchers working in networks

  11. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2009.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2010-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects, as well as advances in allergic skin disease that were reported in the Journal in 2009. Among key epidemiologic observations, several westernized countries report that more than 1% of children have peanut allergy, and there is some evidence that environmental exposure to peanut is a risk factor. The role of regulatory T cells, complement, platelet-activating factor, and effector cells in the development and expression of food allergy were explored in several murine models and human studies. Delayed anaphylaxis to mammalian meats appears to be related to IgE binding to the carbohydrate moiety galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose, which also has implications for hypersensitivity to murine mAb therapeutics containing this oligosaccharide. Oral immunotherapy studies continue to show promise for the treatment of food allergy, but determining whether the treatment causes tolerance (cure) or temporary desensitization remains to be explored. Increased baseline serum tryptase levels might inform the risk of venom anaphylaxis and might indicate a risk for mast cell disorders in persons who have experienced such episodes. Reduced structural and immune barrier function contribute to local and systemic allergen sensitization in patients with atopic dermatitis, as well as increased propensity of skin infections in these patients. The use of increased doses of nonsedating antihistamines and potential usefulness of omalizumab for chronic urticaria was highlighted. These exciting advances reported in the Journal can improve patient care today and provide insights on how we can improve the diagnosis and treatment of these allergic diseases in the future. PMID:20109740

  12. Therapeutic effect of 0.1% Tacrolimus Eye Ointment in Allergic Ocular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shitole, Satish C; Bhagat, Nupur; Patil, Deepak; Sawant, Pawan; Patil, Kalpita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Allergic Ocular Diseases (AODs) like Atopic Keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) and Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) are chronic forms of ocular allergy that can cause severe visual complications. Pathogenesis of AODs is uncertain and treatment has been a challenge for ophthalmologists. Tacrolimus, a 23-member cyclic macrolide lactone derived from [streptomyces tsukubaensis] now in ointment form has been successfully used in AODs. Aim To study the therapeutic effect of 0.1% Tacrolimus eye ointment in patients with Allergic Ocular Diseases (AODs). Materials and Methods This prospective observational study was conducted on 36 patients with severe AOD and moderate cases not responding to conventional treatment. They were treated with 0.1% tacrolimus eye ointment twice daily for minimum three months in addition to conventional treatment and observed for a period of 6 months. Symptoms and signs after treatment were evaluated. Grades of clinical signs were assessed based on slit lamp clinical photographs; development of possible complications was assessed and analysed by Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results Mean age of patients was 9.3±4.3 years and mean duration of AODs was 3.1±1.8 years. The scores on both the four point scales for signs and symptoms decreased significantly (p<0.0001) after 1 month of 0.1% Tacrolimus eye ointment treatment. Itching was the first symptom to show dramatic relief and conjunctival hyperaemia was the first sign to show improvement. 88.88% of patients were successfully weaned off topical steroids in 6 months into Tacrolimus treatment. Even in patients unresponsive to 0.1% topical Cyclosporine, symptoms and signs scores decreased significantly (p<0.0001). The most common adverse reaction was a transient burning sensation (36.11%). Conclusion Topical 0.1% Tacrolimus eye ointment was found to be a safe and effective treatment in cases of AODs and also worked as steroid sparing and replacing agent. It was also found effective in patient

  13. [Respiratory disease caused by MMVF fibers and yarn].

    PubMed

    Riboldi, L; Rivolta, G; Barducci, M; Errigo, G; Picchi, O

    1999-01-01

    The non-carcinogenic effects of vitreous fibres on the human respiratory apparatus have been the subjects of numerous studies on large exposed populations. No evidence seems to have been produced of the existence of a fibrogenic effect. However, no definite and agreed opinion has yet been expressed by the main Agencies and Institutions working in the field of prevention. As a contribution to the discussion, the paper presents the experience of the Clinica del Lavoro of Milano involving 1000 subjects who underwent broncho-alveolar lavage during assessment and checking for suspected occupational respiratory disease. A group of 23 cases was selected who were exposed to vitreous fibres without other significant exposures to factors considered hazardous for the respiratory apparatus, especially asbestos. We observed 7 cases of alveolitis; 6 cases with pleural thickening; 2 cases of interstitial disease. On the basis of the nature of exposure (duration, latency from beginning and from the end of hazardous occupation), of the data obtained from the examination of the bronchial lavage liquid (presence of vitreous fibres, siderocytes, cellularity), and of the clinical and laboratory data (X-ray, PFR), the view expressed is tendentially reassuring concerning the possible effects of vitreous fibres on the respiratory apparatus. Although the existence of an irritative type of lesion that manifests in the form of alveolitis and localised pleural thickening seems possible, albeit in a limited number of cases, it does however appear much more difficult to admit the existence of a fibrogenic effect. PMID:10339954

  14. Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: pathophysiological insights and clinical advances

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, John W; Wilson, Jeff M

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis are heterogeneous airway diseases of the lower and upper airways, respectively. Molecular and cellular studies indicate that these diseases can be categorized into unique endotypes, which have therapeutic implications. One such endotype is aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), which encompasses the triad of asthma, aspirin (or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) hypersensitivity, and nasal polyposis. AERD has unique pathophysiological features that distinguish it from aspirin-tolerant asthma and other forms of chronic rhinosinusitis. This review details molecular and cellular features of AERD and highlights current and future therapies that are based on these insights. PMID:27022293

  15. Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: pathophysiological insights and clinical advances.

    PubMed

    Steinke, John W; Wilson, Jeff M

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis are heterogeneous airway diseases of the lower and upper airways, respectively. Molecular and cellular studies indicate that these diseases can be categorized into unique endotypes, which have therapeutic implications. One such endotype is aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), which encompasses the triad of asthma, aspirin (or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) hypersensitivity, and nasal polyposis. AERD has unique pathophysiological features that distinguish it from aspirin-tolerant asthma and other forms of chronic rhinosinusitis. This review details molecular and cellular features of AERD and highlights current and future therapies that are based on these insights. PMID:27022293

  16. Respiratory diseases and allergies in two polluted areas in East Germany.

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, J; Hoelscher, B; Wjst, M; Ritz, B; Cyrys, J; Wichmann, H

    1999-01-01

    This cross-sectional epidemiological study collected health data for 2,470 school children between 5 and 14 years of age (89% of eligible children) who had lived most of their lives in either one of two counties strongly impacted by industrial pollution (Bitterfeld and Hettstedt) or in a neighboring county without any sources of industrial pollution (Zerbst). The objective of the study was to examine whether regional differences--with respect to the occurrence of childhood respiratory diseases and symptoms or allergies--exist and, if such differences are found, whether they persist when we adjust for the effects of known risk factors such as medical and sociodemographic factors or factors related to the indoor environment. Controlling for medical, sociodemographic, and indoor factors, according to parental reports, children residing in Hettstedt have about a 50% increased lifetime prevalence for physician-diagnosed allergies, eczema, and bronchitis compared to children from Zerbst and about twice the number of respiratory symptoms such as wheeze, shortness of breath, and cough without cold. Sensitization to common aeroallergens according to skin prick tests [odds ratio (OR) = 1.38; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.02-1.86] and specific IgE levels (OR = 1.75; CI, 1.31-2.33) was more common for children from Hettstedt than children from the nonpolluted county. Bitterfeld children, on the other hand, more often received a diagnosis of asthma and eczema than children residing in Zerbst and also showed slightly increased sensitization rates. In conclusion, industrial pollution related to mining and smelting operations in the county of Hettstedt were associated with a higher lifetime prevalence of respiratory disorders and an increased rate of allergic sensitization in children between the ages of 5 and 14 years. Further studies are needed to determine what role the high dust content of heavy metals plays in Hettstedt. PMID:9872717

  17. The global burden of respiratory disease-impact on child health.

    PubMed

    Zar, Heather J; Ferkol, Thomas W

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory disease is the major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with infants and young children especially susceptible. The spectrum of disease ranges from acute infections to chronic non-communicable diseases. Five respiratory conditions dominate-acute respiratory infections, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, tuberculosis (TB), and lung cancer. Pneumonia remains the predominant cause of childhood mortality, causing nearly 1.3 million deaths each year, most of which are preventable. Asthma is the commonest non-communicable disease in children. Pediatric TB constitutes up to 20% of the TB caseload in high incidence countries. Environmental exposures such as tobacco smoke, indoor air pollution, and poor nutrition are common risk factors for acute and chronic respiratory diseases. Pediatric and adult respiratory disease is closely linked. Early childhood respiratory infection or environmental exposures may lead to chronic disease in adulthood. Childhood immunization can effectively reduce the incidence and severity of childhood pneumonia; childhood immunization is also effective for reducing pneumonia in the elderly. The Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS), representing the major respiratory societies worldwide, has produced a global roadmap of respiratory diseases, Respiratory Disease in the World: Realities of Today-Opportunities for Tomorrow. This highlights the burden of respiratory diseases globally and contains specific recommendations for effective strategies. Greater availability and upscaled implementation of effective strategies for prevention and management of respiratory diseases is needed worldwide to improve global health and diminish the current inequities in health care worldwide. PMID:24610581

  18. Respiratory disease mortality patterns among South African iron moulders.

    PubMed Central

    Sitas, F; Douglas, A J; Webster, E C

    1989-01-01

    To assess the influence of foundry exposure on malignant and non-malignant respiratory disease, the proportional mortality ratio (PMR) was used to compare the cause of death distributions of the 578 dead members of the Iron Moulders Society of South Africa, recipients of the union's death benefit fund between 1961 and 1983. Comparisons were made with the age and period specific white male deaths. For the 419 members where job information was available, the influence of occupation (journeyman, production moulder) was assessed using different techniques--the relative proportional mortality ratio (RPMR), the mortality odds ratio (MOR), and the proportional cancer mortality ratio (PCMR) for comparison. Excess PMRs were found for cancer of the trachea, bronchus, and lung (1.71, p = 0.03; Poisson one sided test) for those over 65 and for non-malignant respiratory disease (1.58, p = 0.01) and for injuries and poisonings (2.61, p less than 0.0001) in those under 65. Reduced PMRs were found for all cancers (0.75, p = 0.03) and all circulatory disease (0.91, p = 0.12) in those under 65. When comparing job types, raised risks were obtained for journeymen using all methods (RPMR, MOR, PCMR) but the small cell sizes rendered the results non-significant. The raised PMRs due to respiratory disease are unlikely to be due to smoking because of a poor association with other causes of death related to smoking. A more likely explanation is that these excess rates for malignant and non-malignant respiratory disease are due to exposure to the foundry environment. Of additional concern are the high PMRs due to injuries and poisonings, which could be related to the high accident rates in the iron and steel industry. PMID:2751928

  19. [The role of Toll-like receptors in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases - where is the truth?].

    PubMed

    Dębińska, Anna; Boznański, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors crucial for the innate and adaptive immune response to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). TLR stimulation via microbial products activates antigen-presenting cells, influences the function of T regulatory cells (Treg), determines the Th1/Th2 balance and Th17 cell differentiation, and controls cytokine production in mast cells and activation of eosinophils. The role of TLR receptors in pathogenesis of allergic diseases results from the biological function that they play in activation and regulation of the immune response. However, the exact role still remains a controversial area. Whereas numerous epidemiological studies mainly indicate a protective effect of microbial exposure, experiments show that innate immune stimulation via TLRs may be involved in both development of and protection against allergic diseases. Timing, dose, site and intensity of exposure to environmental factors and host genetic predisposition are clearly crucial to understanding the interaction between innate immune stimulation and allergy development.Furthermore, extensive clinical trials suggest that ligands for TLRs provide new therapeutic targets for protection against and treatment of asthma and allergic rhinitis. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the role of TLRs in pathogenesis of allergic diseases. We will further discuss how we can reconcile inconsistencies in the results of existing studies and review information on the potential use of ligands for TLRs in allergy prevention and therapy. PMID:24662791

  20. Allergic rhinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic to, such as dust, animal dander, or pollen. Symptoms can also occur when you eat a ... article focuses on allergic rhinitis due to plant pollens. This type of allergic rhinitis is commonly called ...

  1. Staphylococcus δ-toxin promotes mouse allergic skin disease by inducing mast cell degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yuumi; Oscherwitz, Jon; Cease, Kemp B.; Chan, Susana M.; Muñoz-Planillo, Raul; Hasegawa, Mizuho; Villaruz, Amer E.; Cheung, Gordon Y. C.; McGavin, Martin J.; Travers, Jeffrey B.; Otto, Michael; Inohara, Naohiro; Núñez, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects 15 to 30% of children and ~5% of adults in industrialized countries1. Although the pathogenesis of AD is not fully understood, the disease is mediated by an abnormal immunoglobulin E (IgE) immune response in the setting of skin barrier dysfunction2. Mast cells (MCs) contribute to IgE-mediated allergic disorders including AD3. Upon activation, MCs release their membrane-bound cytosolic granules leading to the release of multiple molecules that are important in the pathogenesis of AD and host defense4. More than 90% of AD patients are colonized with Staphylococcus aureus in the lesional skin whereas most healthy individuals do not harbor the pathogen5. Several Staphylococcal exotoxins (SEs) can act as superantigens and/or antigens in models of AD6. However, the role of these SEs in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. Here, we report that culture supernatants of S. aureus contain potent MC degranulation activity. Biochemical analysis identified δ-toxin as the MC degranulation-inducing factor produced by S. aureus. MC degranulation induced by δ-toxin depended on phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and calcium (Ca2+) influx, but unlike that mediated by IgE crosslinking, it did not require the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). In addition, IgE enhanced δ-toxin-induced MC degranulation in the absence of antigen. Furthermore, S. aureus isolates recovered from AD patients produced high levels of δ-toxin. Importantly, skin colonization with S. aureus, but not a mutant deficient in δ-toxin, promoted IgE and IL-4 production, as well as inflammatory skin disease. Furthermore, enhancement of IgE production and dermatitis by δ-toxin was abrogated in KitW-sh/W-sh MC-deficient mice and restored by MC reconstitution. These studies identify δ-toxin as a potent inducer of MC degranulation and suggest a mechanistic link between S. aureus colonization and allergic skin disease. PMID:24172897

  2. Endotypes of allergic diseases and asthma: An important step in building blocks for the future of precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Agache, Ioana; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2016-07-01

    Discoveries from basic science research in the last decade have brought significant progress in knowledge of pathophysiologic processes of allergic diseases, with a compelling impact on understanding of the natural history, risk prediction, treatment selection or mechanism-specific prevention strategies. The view of the pathophysiology of allergic diseases developed from a mechanistic approach, with a focus on symptoms and organ function, to the recognition of a complex network of immunological pathways. Several subtypes of inflammation and complex immune-regulatory networks and the reasons for their failure are now described, that open the way for the development of new diagnostic tools and innovative targeted-treatments. An endotype is a subtype of a disease condition, which is defined by a distinct pathophysiological mechanism, whereas a disease phenotype defines any observable characteristic of a disease without any implication of a mechanism. Another key word linked to disease endotyping is biomarker that is measured and evaluated to examine any biological or pathogenic processes, including response to a therapeutic intervention. These three keywords will be discussed more and more in the future with the upcoming efforts to revolutionize patient care in the direction of precision medicine and precision health. The understanding of disease endotypes based on pathophysiological principles and their validation across clinically meaningful outcomes in asthma, allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis, atopic dermatitis and food allergy will be crucial for the success of precision medicine as a new approach to patient management. PMID:27282212

  3. Effects of Air Pollution and the Introduction of the London Low Emission Zone on the Prevalence of Respiratory and Allergic Symptoms in Schoolchildren in East London: A Sequential Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Wood, Helen E; Marlin, Nadine; Mudway, Ian S; Bremner, Stephen A; Cross, Louise; Dundas, Isobel; Grieve, Andrew; Grigg, Jonathan; Jamaludin, Jeenath B; Kelly, Frank J; Lee, Tak; Sheikh, Aziz; Walton, Robert; Griffiths, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    The adverse effects of traffic-related air pollution on children's respiratory health have been widely reported, but few studies have evaluated the impact of traffic-control policies designed to reduce urban air pollution. We assessed associations between traffic-related air pollutants and respiratory/allergic symptoms amongst 8-9 year-old schoolchildren living within the London Low Emission Zone (LEZ). Information on respiratory/allergic symptoms was obtained using a parent-completed questionnaire and linked to modelled annual air pollutant concentrations based on the residential address of each child, using a multivariable mixed effects logistic regression analysis. Exposure to traffic-related air pollutants was associated with current rhinitis: NOx (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00-1.02), NO2 (1.03, 1.00-1.06), PM10 (1.16, 1.04-1.28) and PM2.5 (1.38, 1.08-1.78), all per μg/m3 of pollutant, but not with other respiratory/allergic symptoms. The LEZ did not reduce ambient air pollution levels, or affect the prevalence of respiratory/allergic symptoms over the period studied. These data confirm the previous association between traffic-related air pollutant exposures and symptoms of current rhinitis. Importantly, the London LEZ has not significantly improved air quality within the city, or the respiratory health of the resident population in its first three years of operation. This highlights the need for more robust measures to reduce traffic emissions. PMID:26295579

  4. Effects of Air Pollution and the Introduction of the London Low Emission Zone on the Prevalence of Respiratory and Allergic Symptoms in Schoolchildren in East London: A Sequential Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Helen E.; Marlin, Nadine; Mudway, Ian S.; Bremner, Stephen A.; Cross, Louise; Dundas, Isobel; Grieve, Andrew; Grigg, Jonathan; Jamaludin, Jeenath B.; Kelly, Frank J.; Lee, Tak; Sheikh, Aziz; Walton, Robert; Griffiths, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The adverse effects of traffic-related air pollution on children’s respiratory health have been widely reported, but few studies have evaluated the impact of traffic-control policies designed to reduce urban air pollution. We assessed associations between traffic-related air pollutants and respiratory/allergic symptoms amongst 8–9 year-old schoolchildren living within the London Low Emission Zone (LEZ). Information on respiratory/allergic symptoms was obtained using a parent-completed questionnaire and linked to modelled annual air pollutant concentrations based on the residential address of each child, using a multivariable mixed effects logistic regression analysis. Exposure to traffic-related air pollutants was associated with current rhinitis: NOx (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00–1.02), NO2 (1.03, 1.00–1.06), PM10 (1.16, 1.04–1.28) and PM2.5 (1.38, 1.08–1.78), all per μg/m3 of pollutant, but not with other respiratory/allergic symptoms. The LEZ did not reduce ambient air pollution levels, or affect the prevalence of respiratory/allergic symptoms over the period studied. These data confirm the previous association between traffic-related air pollutant exposures and symptoms of current rhinitis. Importantly, the London LEZ has not significantly improved air quality within the city, or the respiratory health of the resident population in its first three years of operation. This highlights the need for more robust measures to reduce traffic emissions. PMID:26295579

  5. Chronic Rhinosinusitis and Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Neha M; Katial, Rohit K

    2016-08-01

    Patients with severe asthma and concomitant chronic rhinosinusitis often have severe, refractory upper and lower airway inflammation. This inflammation has been proposed to be similar throughout the upper and lower airways leading to the unified airways concept. This article reviews chronic rhinosinusitis with and without nasal polyps, and the subgroup with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, while focusing on the relationship with asthma. Additionally, diagnosis and treatment with current and newer therapies are discussed. PMID:27401622

  6. Respiratory and allergic health effects in a young population in proximity of a major industrial park in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Alwahaibi, Adil; Zeka, Ariana

    2016-01-01

    Background Sohar industrial zone (SIZ), Oman, which started operating in 2006, contains many industries that potentially affect the health of the local population. This study's aim was to evaluate the health effects in a young population living near SIZ. Methods Patient visits to state health clinics for acute respiratory diseases (ARD), asthma, conjunctivitis and dermatitis were obtained for the period of 2006 to 2010, for children ages <20 years old, for two large provinces around SIZ. Three exposure zones were defined on the basis of the distance from SIZ determined as: ≤5, >5 to 10, ≥20 km to represent high, intermediate and control exposure zones, respectively. Age-specific and gender-specific monthly counts of visits were modelled using generalised additive models controlling for time trends. The high and intermediate exposure zones were later combined together due to the similarity of associations. Exposure effect modification by age, gender and socioeconomic status (SES) was also tested. Results Living within 10 km from SIZ showed a greater association with ARD (risk ratio (RR)=2.5; 95% CI=2.3 to 2.7), asthma (RR=3.7; 95% CI=3.1 to 4.5), conjunctivitis (RR=3.1; 95% CI=2.9 to 3.5) and dermatitis (RR=2.7; 95% CI=2.5 to 3.0) when compared with the control zone. No differences in associations were found for gender and SES groups; greater effects were noticed in the ≤14-year-old group for asthma. Conclusions This is the first study conducted in Oman to examine the health effects of a young population living near an industrial park. We hope that these findings will contribute in future developments of environmental health policies in Oman. PMID:26359504

  7. Allergic Aspergillus sinusitis and its association with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Panjabi, Chandramani

    2011-01-01

    Allergic Aspergillus sinusitis (AAS) is a three decade old clinicopathologic entity in which mucoid impaction akin to that of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) occurs in the paranasal sinuses. Features such as radiographic evidence of pansinusitis, passage of nasal plugs and recurrent nasal polyposis in patients with an atopic background is suggestive of AAS. Histopathlogic confirmation from the inspissated mucus is a sine qua non for the diagnosis. Heterogeneous densities on computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses are caused by the 'allergic mucin' in the sinuses. Many patients give a history of having undergone multiple surgical procedures for symptomatic relief. The current approach to treatment appears to include an initial surgical debridement followed by postoperative oral corticosteroids for long durations. Although both ABPA and AAS are classified as Aspergillus-related hypersensitivity respiratory disorders, their co-occurrence appears to be an infrequently recognised phenomenon. This could perhaps be attributed to the fact that these two diseases are often treated by two different specialties. A high index of suspicion is required to establish the diagnoses of ABPA and AAS. All patients with asthma and/or rhinosinusitis along with sensitisation to Aspergillus antigens are at an increased risk of developing ABPA and/or AAS. ABPA must be excluded in all patients with AAS and vice versa. Early diagnosis and initiation of appropriate therapy could plausibly alter the course of the disease processes and prevent the possible development of long term sequelae. PMID:22053309

  8. Trefoil factor-2 reverses airway remodeling changes in allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Royce, Simon G; Lim, Clarice; Muljadi, Ruth C; Samuel, Chrishan S; Ververis, Katherine; Karagiannis, Tom C; Giraud, Andrew S; Tang, Mimi L K

    2013-01-01

    Trefoil factor 2 (TFF2) is a small peptide with an important role in mucosal repair. TFF2 is up-regulated in asthma, suggesting a role in asthma pathogenesis. Given its known biological role in promoting epithelial repair, TFF2 might be expected to exert a protective function in limiting the progression of airway remodeling in asthma. The contribution of TFF2 to airway remodeling in asthma was investigated by examining the expression of TFF2 in the airway and lung, and evaluating the effects of recombinant TFF2 treatment on established airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic allergic airways disease (AAD). BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) or saline for 9 weeks, whereas mice with established OVA-induced AAD were treated with TFF2 or vehicle control (intranasally for 14 d). Effects on airway remodeling, airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness were then assessed, whereas TFF2 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. TFF2 expression was significantly increased in the airways of mice with AAD, compared with expression levels in control mice. TFF2 treatment resulted in reduced epithelial thickening, subepithelial collagen deposition, goblet-cell metaplasia, bronchial epithelium apoptosis, and airway hyperresponsiveness (all P < 0.05, versus vehicle control), but TFF2 treatment did not influence airway inflammation. The increased expression of endogenous TFF2 in response to chronic allergic inflammation is insufficient to prevent the progression of airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of chronic AAD. However, exogenous TFF2 treatment is effective in reversing aspects of established airway remodeling. TFF2 has potential as a novel treatment for airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:22652198

  9. OSCILLATION MECHANICS OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM: APPLICATIONS TO LUNG DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Kaczka, David W.; Dellacá, Raffaele L.

    2011-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1950s, the forced oscillation technique (FOT) and the measurement of respiratory impedance have evolved into powerful tools for the assessment of various mechanical phenomena in the mammalian lung during health and disease. In this review, we highlight the most recent developments in instrumentation, signal processing, and modeling relevant to FOT measurements. We demonstrate how FOT provides unparalleled information on the mechanical status of the respiratory system compared to more widely-used pulmonary function tests. The concept of mechanical impedance is reviewed, as well as the various measurement techniques used to acquire such data. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of lower, physiologic frequency ranges (typically less than 10 Hz) that are most sensitive to normal physical processes as well as pathologic structural alterations. Various inverse modeling approaches used to interpret alterations in impedance are also discussed, specifically in the context of three common respiratory diseases: asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and acute lung injury. Finally, we speculate on the potential role for FOT in the clinical arena. PMID:22011237

  10. Pulmonary hypertension during acute respiratory diseases in infants

    PubMed Central

    Bardi-Peti, Luiza; Ciofu, Eugen Pascal

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives:The study was undertaken to assess whether previously healthy infants with acute respiratory diseases develop elevated pulmonary artery pressures and to identify which type of disease is associated with pulmonary hypertension. Material and Methods:We performed 2D and Doppler echocardiography in 137 infants, aged between 1 and 12 month, from November 2007 to December 2009. 75 infants had acute respiratory diseases (49 bronchiolitis, 16 interstitial pneumonia, 3 bronchopneumonia, 6 episodic wheezing, 1 lobar pneumonia) and 62 were in the control group. We excluded children with congenital heart diseases and other conditions associated with pulmonary hypertension. The method of time to peak velocity corrected for heart rate was used to estimate pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). We analysed 2 age-subgroups: 1-2 months and 2-12 months. A Student’s t-test for independent samples was used to compare the mean values of variables. Outcomes:Increased mean pulmonary pressures (>25mmHg) were measured in 18 infants with respiratory diseases, with the next distribution: 14 bronchiolitis, 2 bronchopneumonia, 1 episodic wheezing, 1 interstitial pneumonia. The values were categorized as mild-moderate pulmonary hypertension. Mean PAP were significantly increased in subjects with clinically bronchoobstructive disease (bronchiolitis, episodic wheezing, bronchopneumonia) vs. control (p=0.05 in first age-subgroup and<0.001 in second age-subgroup). In infants with bronchoobstructive disease hospitalization was significantly longer in patients with pulmonary hypertension vs. normal PAP (p= 0.04 in first age-subgroup and 0.005 in second age-subgroup). In patients with bronchoobstructive diseases, mean PAPm and PAPs were significantly increased in subjects with a moderate/severe episode of wheezing at admission vs. a mild episode (p=0.02). Mean PAPm and PAPs were increased in subjects with interstitial pneumonia vs. control, but without statistic significance

  11. Respiratory disease and the oesophagus: reflux, reflexes and microaspiration.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Lesley A; Lee, Augustine S; Badri, Huda; DeVault, Kenneth R; Smith, Jaclyn A

    2016-08-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux is associated with a wide range of respiratory disorders, including asthma, isolated chronic cough, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Reflux can be substantial and reach the proximal margins of the oesophagus in some individuals with specific pulmonary diseases, suggesting that this association is more than a coincidence. Proximal oesophageal reflux in particular has led to concern that microaspiration might have an important, possibly even causal, role in respiratory disease. Interestingly, reflux is not always accompanied by typical reflux symptoms, such as heartburn and/or regurgitation, leading many clinicians to empirically treat for possible gastro-oesophageal reflux. Indeed, costs associated with use of acid suppressants in pulmonary disease far outweigh those in typical GERD, despite little evidence of therapeutic benefit in clinical trials. This Review comprehensively examines the possible mechanisms that might link pulmonary disease and oesophageal reflux, highlighting the gaps in current knowledge and limitations of previous research, and helping to shed light on the frequent failure of antireflux treatments in pulmonary disease. PMID:27381074

  12. Upper and lower airway pathology in young children with allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Chawes, Bo L K

    2011-05-01

    of the nasal mucosa in children already at age 6 years. Non-allergic rhinitis exhibited no change in the nasal airway patency, but some nasal eosinophilia albeit less than children with allergic rhinitis. These findings suggest different pathology in allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis which may have important clinical implications for early pharmacological treatment of rhinitis in young children. In paper II, we utilized the nasal airway patency end-points derived from paper I to examine whether upper and lower airway patency are associated. Upper airway patency was assessed by acoustic rhinometry before and after intranasal α-agonist and lower airway patency by spirometry before and after inhaled β2-agonist. Upper and lower airway patencies were strongly associated and independent of body size, rhinitis and asthma. The association was consistent for both baseline values and for decongested nasal airway patency and post-β2 FEV1. Blood and nasal eosinophilia were also associated with nasal airway obstruction. This suggests generalized diminished airway dimensions as a novel susceptibility factor for concurrent symptoms of asthma and rhinitis in early childhood and supports the notion of a common pathophysiology in asthma and rhinitis. The clinical interpretation of these findings is that all children presenting either rhinitis or asthma should be considered inflamed in the entire respiratory tract. In paper III, we aimed to describe asthma and intermediary asthma end-points associated with allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis in preschool-aged children. At age 7 years, we evaluated prevalence of asthma, eczema, food sensitization, and filaggrin mutations; levels of total IgE, FeNO, and blood-eosinophils; lung function and bronchial responsiveness to cold dry air. We found that asthma was similarly associated with allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis suggesting a link between upper and lower airway diseases beyond an allergy associated inflammation. Only children

  13. Dynamics of infectious disease transmission by inhalable respiratory droplets

    PubMed Central

    Stilianakis, Nikolaos I.; Drossinos, Yannis

    2010-01-01

    Transmission of respiratory infectious diseases in humans, for instance influenza, occurs by several modes. Respiratory droplets provide a vector of transmission of an infectious pathogen that may contribute to different transmission modes. An epidemiological model incorporating the dynamics of inhalable respiratory droplets is developed to assess their relevance in the infectious process. Inhalable respiratory droplets are divided into respirable droplets, with droplet diameter less than 10 µm, and inspirable droplets, with diameter in the range 10–100 µm: both droplet classes may be inhaled or settle. Droplet dynamics is determined by their physical properties (size), whereas population dynamics is determined by, among other parameters, the pathogen infectivity and the host contact rates. Three model influenza epidemic scenarios, mediated by different airborne or settled droplet classes, are analysed. The scenarios are distinguished by the characteristic times associated with breathing at contact and with hand-to-face contact. The scenarios suggest that airborne transmission, mediated by respirable droplets, provides the dominant transmission mode in middle and long-term epidemics, whereas inspirable droplets, be they airborne or settled, characterize short-term epidemics with high attack rates. The model neglects close-contact transmission by droplet sprays (direct projection onto facial mucous membranes), retaining close-contact transmission by inspirable droplets. PMID:20164087

  14. Challenges and opportunities for managing respiratory disease in dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Amy

    2009-12-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is important for the Ontario dairy industry due to the large economic and welfare costs of this disease. Practical science-based management techniques are needed to control and reduce the risk of this disease. Currently, the emphasis on BRD is focused on early detection of disease and prevention. These areas are important but it is not practical to assume this disease will be eliminated in the near future. It is necessary to determine the best practices for caring for sick animals, monitoring their recovery and making changes to their management to facilitate health and recovery. If management changes can be made for animals that are failing to thrive in a current situation, a more complete recovery may be possible and the welfare and economic costs of BRD may be minimized. PMID:20003645

  15. Inhaled protein/peptide-based therapies for respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Robert C; Terryah, Shawn T; Tarran, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF) are all chronic pulmonary diseases, albeit with different etiologies, that are characterized by airflow limitation, chronic inflammation, and abnormal mucus production/rheology. Small synthetic molecule-based therapies are commonly prescribed for all three diseases. However, there has been increased interest in "biologicals" to treat these diseases. Biologicals typically constitute protein- or peptide-based therapies and are often more potent than small molecule-based drugs. In this review, we shall describe the pros and cons of several different biological-based therapies for respiratory disease, including dornase alfa, a recombinant DNAase that reduces mucus viscosity and short palate lung and nasal epithelial clone 1 (SPLUNC1)-derived peptides that treat Na(+) hyperabsorption and rebalance CF airway surface liquid homeostasis. PMID:27098663

  16. Occupational respiratory diseases in the South African mining industry

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Gill

    2013-01-01

    Background Crystalline silica and asbestos are common minerals that occur throughout South Africa, exposure to either causes respiratory disease. Most studies on silicosis in South Africa have been cross-sectional and long-term trends have not been reported. Although much research has been conducted on the health effects of silica dust and asbestos fibre in the gold-mining and asbestos-mining sectors, little is known about their health effects in other mining sectors. Objective The aims of this thesis were to describe silicosis trends in gold miners over three decades, and to explore the potential for diamond mine workers to develop asbestos-related diseases and platinum mine workers to develop silicosis. Methods Mine workers for the three sub-studies were identified from a mine worker autopsy database at the National Institute for Occupational Health. Results From 1975 to 2007, the proportions of white and black gold mine workers with silicosis increased from 18 to 22% and from 3 to 32% respectively. Cases of diamond and platinum mine workers with asbestos-related diseases and silicosis, respectively, were also identified. Conclusion The trends in silicosis in gold miners at autopsy clearly demonstrate the failure of the gold mines to adequately control dust and prevent occupational respiratory disease. The two case series of diamond and platinum mine workers contribute to the evidence for the risk of asbestos-related diseases in diamond mine workers and silicosis in platinum mine workers, respectively. The absence of reliable environmental dust measurements and incomplete work history records impedes occupational health research in South Africa because it is difficult to identify and/or validate sources of dust exposure that may be associated with occupational respiratory disease. PMID:23364097

  17. Definition of nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux for studies on respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Emilsson, Össur Ingi; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Ólafsson, Ísleifur; Cook, Elizabeth; Júlíusson, Sigurður; Berg, Sören; Nordang, Leif; Björnsson, Einar Stefán; Guðlaugsdóttir, Sunna; Guðmundsdóttir, Anna Soffía; Janson, Christer; Gislason, Thorarinn

    2016-05-01

    Objective Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (nGER) has been associated with respiratory diseases. Our aim was to study a questionnaire method to identify nGER subjects with respiratory involvement in a general population. Material and methods A subgroup of Icelandic participants in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III (ECRHS III) reporting symptoms of nGER (n  =  48) as well as age and gender paired controls (n  =  42) were studied further by a structured interview, questionnaires, laryngeal fibrescopy, and exhaled breath condensate. A subgroup underwent 24-h oesophageal pH impedance (24-h MII-pH) measurements. Symptoms of nGER were assessed with a modified version of the reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ), where symptoms were divided into daytime and nocturnal. A report of nGER both at baseline and at follow-up was defined as persistent nGER. Results Participants reporting persistent nGER had significantly more signs of laryngopharyngeal reflux according to the reflux finding score than those without nGER (Mean ± SD: 5.1 ± 2.3 vs. 3.9 ± 2.2, p  =  0.02). Of the 16 persistent nGER subjects that underwent 24-h MII-pH, 11 had abnormal gastroesophageal reflux, but none of three control subjects (69% vs. 0%). Pepsin was more commonly found in exhaled breath condensate in the nGER group (67% vs. 45%, p  =  0.04). Conclusions Participants with nGER symptoms at least once a month, reported on two occasions, had a high level of positive 24-h MII-pH measurements, laryngeal inflammation and pepsin in exhaled breath condensate. This nGER definition identified a representable group for studies on nGER and respiratory diseases in a general population. PMID:26825677

  18. Highly significant linkage to chromosome 3q13.31 for rhinitis and related allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brasch‐Andersen, C; Haagerup, A; Børglum, A D; Vestbo, J; Kruse, T A

    2006-01-01

    Background Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis have closely related phenotypes and often occur with atopy. They show strong familial and intra‐individual clustering, suggesting overlapping disease aetiology. Various loci and candidate genes have been suggested to underlie allergy. Many or all are still inconclusive. Following genome‐wide scans on multiple phenotypes, we previously suggested that chromosome 3q13.12–q21.2 harbours an allergy locus. Objective To identify candidate loci in the Danish population, two additional independent sets of sib‐pair families were fine‐scale mapped in candidate regions showing maximum likelihood scores (MLS) ⩾1.5 in the genome‐wide scans. Results Twenty eight microsatellite markers in a denser map on chromosome 3q were analysed in 236 allergy sib‐pair families including 125 sib pairs with rhinitis. We report significant evidence for linkage to chromosome 3q13.31 for rhinitis (MLS 5.55, identity by descent (IBD) 63.9%) and atopy (increased specific immunoglobulin E) (MLS 3.71, IBD 61.7%). We obtained an MLS of 5.1 (IBD 67.3%) at 3q13.31 when sib pairs with both rhinitis and atopy were analysed. Conclusion This study reports the first statistically significant evidence for a genetic susceptibility locus for rhinitis and to our knowledge shows the most significant evidence to date of linkage for any allergy phenotype. PMID:16525028

  19. Factors Influencing the Onset of Chronic Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Holland, W. W.; Hall, T.; Bennett, A. E.; Elliott, A.

    1969-01-01

    To investigate the effect of different environmental and personal factors on ventilatory function 10,971 children resident and going to school in four areas of Kent were examined. Details of past respiratory illnesses were obtained by a questionary completed by the parents; the examination included measurement of height, weight, and peak expiratory flow. Area of residence, social class, family size, and a past history of pneumonia, bronchitis, or asthma were found to be associated with differing levels of peak expiratory flow. These four factors acted independently, and the effects were additive. It is suggested that environment in the early years of life can produce adverse changes which may exist throughout life and contribute to the development of chronic respiratory disease. PMID:5780426

  20. Respiratory disease in Canadian First Nations and Inuit children

    PubMed Central

    Kovesi, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    First Nations and Inuit Children are disproportionately affected by respiratory infections such as viral bronchiolitis, pneumonia and tuberculosis. Rates of long-term lung disease following severe respiratory infections early in life, such as bronchiectasis, are also elevated. In contrast, rates of asthma may be somewhat less than in other Canadian children, although rates of poor asthma control are increased. Causes for the high rates of infections include poverty, overcrowding, housing in need of major repairs and better ventilation, and increased exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. Improving these issues will require addressing the social origins of health in First Nations and Inuit communities, including poverty and employment, building more and improving existing housing, and will likely require developing enhanced immunization and surveillance strategies. PMID:23904781

  1. Hot topics in the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus disease.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Maximillian S; Patel, Sanjay; Openshaw, Peter

    2011-03-01

    The 7th International Respiratory Syncytial Virus Symposium took place in Hotel Blijdorp, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. The series has been running since 1996; this meeting took place after a 3-year gap, and was attended by approximately 200 clinicians, scientists and industry representatives from all over the world. The conference covered all aspects of respiratory syncytial virus disease, including virology, cell biology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, immunology, vaccines, antivirals and other therapeutic approaches. Reviews by invited keynote speakers were accompanied by oral and poster presentations, with ample opportunity for discussion of unpublished work. This article summarizes a small selection of hot topics from the meeting, focused on pathogenesis, therapeutics and vaccine development. PMID:21434796

  2. Halting the allergic march.

    PubMed

    Van Bever, Hugo P; Samuel, Sudesh T; Lee, Bee Wah

    2008-04-01

    The prevalence of childhood allergic diseases, such as allergic asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis, has increased exponentially. In Singapore, the prevalence of asthma at all ages exceeds 20%, and around 50% of Singaporean children show features of an underlying allergy. The exact environmental causes for the increase of allergic diseases have not yet been identified, but most researchers agree that a decreased bacterial load in young children may be one of the reasons for the increase. However, the causes of allergy are multiple, and the development of an allergic disease is the result of complex interactions between genetic constitution and environmental factors. In this review article, different aspects of allergic sensitization are covered, including prenatal and postnatal sensitization. The phenomenon of the "allergic march" (switching from one clinical expression of allergy to another) and its underlying mechanisms are discussed. The last part of this review article is on prevention and treatment of allergic diseases, including the role of bacterial products (probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics) and the role of immunotherapy, including sublingual immunotherapy. PMID:23283392

  3. Time to abandon the hygiene hypothesis: new perspectives on allergic disease, the human microbiome, infectious disease prevention and the role of targeted hygiene

    PubMed Central

    Bloomfield, Sally F; Rook, Graham AW; Scott, Elizabeth A; Shanahan, Fergus; Stanwell-Smith, Rosalind; Turner, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To review the burden of allergic and infectious diseases and the evidence for a link to microbial exposure, the human microbiome and immune system, and to assess whether we could develop lifestyles which reconnect us with exposures which could reduce the risk of allergic disease while also protecting against infectious disease. Methods: Using methodology based on the Delphi technique, six experts in infectious and allergic disease were surveyed to allow for elicitation of group judgement and consensus view on issues pertinent to the aim. Results: Key themes emerged where evidence shows that interaction with microbes that inhabit the natural environment and human microbiome plays an essential role in immune regulation. Changes in lifestyle and environmental exposure, rapid urbanisation, altered diet and antibiotic use have had profound effects on the human microbiome, leading to failure of immunotolerance and increased risk of allergic disease. Although evidence supports the concept of immune regulation driven by microbe–host interactions, the term ‘hygiene hypothesis’ is a misleading misnomer. There is no good evidence that hygiene, as the public understands, is responsible for the clinically relevant changes to microbial exposures. Conclusion: Evidence suggests a combination of strategies, including natural childbirth, breast feeding, increased social exposure through sport, other outdoor activities, less time spent indoors, diet and appropriate antibiotic use, may help restore the microbiome and perhaps reduce risks of allergic disease. Preventive efforts must focus on early life. The term ‘hygiene hypothesis’ must be abandoned. Promotion of a risk assessment approach (targeted hygiene) provides a framework for maximising protection against pathogen exposure while allowing spread of essential microbes between family members. To build on these findings, we must change public, public health and professional perceptions about the microbiome and about

  4. Effect of Near-Road Particulate Matter on Respiratory Responses and Inflammation in Healthy and Ovalbumin-Allergic Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Near-Road Exposures and Effects of Urban Air Pollutant Study (NEXUS) previously examined the association of near-roadway exposures to air pollutants and respiratory outcomes in children with asthma. This toxicological study was designed to complement NEXUS and determine which...

  5. Intranasal administration of a combination of choline chloride, vitamin C, and selenium attenuates the allergic effect in a mouse model of airway disease.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Preeti; Saw, Sanjay; Govindaraj, Dhanapal; Arora, Naveen

    2014-08-01

    Respiratory allergic disease is an inflammatory condition accompanied by oxidative stress. Supplementation of an anti-inflammatory agent with antioxidants may have a therapeutic effect. In this study, the effects of choline chloride in combination with antioxidants were evaluated via the intranasal route in a mouse model of allergic airway disease. Balb/c mice were sensitized on days 0, 7, and 14 and challenged on days 25-30 with cockroach extract (CE) and with a booster challenge on day 38. They were treated with choline chloride (ChCl; 1mg/kg), vitamin C (Vit C; 308.33 mg/kg), and selenium (Se; 1mg/kg) alone or in combination via the intranasal route on days 31, 33, 35, 37, and 39. The mice were sacrificed on day 40 to collect blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, lungs, and spleen. Mice immunized with CE showed a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), lung inflammation, Th2 cytokines, and the oxidative stress markers intracellular reactive oxygen species and 8-isoprostanes compared to the phosphate-buffered saline control group. A significant decrease was observed in these parameters with all the treatments (p<0.01). The highest decrease was noticed in the ChCl+Vit C+Se-treated group, with AHR decreased to the normal level. This group also showed the highest decrease in airway inflammation (p<0.001), IL-4 and IL-5 (p<0.001), IgE and IgG1 (p<0.001), NF-κB (p<0.001), and 8-isoprostane levels (p<0.001). Glutathione peroxidase activity, which was decreased significantly in CE-immunized mice, was restored to normal levels in this group (p<0.001). IL-10 level was decreased in CE-immunized mice and was restored to normal by combination treatment. The combination treatment induced FOXP3(+) cells in splenocyte culture, responsible for the upregulation of IL-10. In conclusion, the combination of choline chloride, vitamin C, and selenium via the intranasal route reduces AHR, inflammation, and oxidative stress, probably by causing IL-10 production by FOXP

  6. [Non-allergic gluten sensitivity. A controversial disease - or not yet sufficiently explored?].

    PubMed

    Raithel, Martin; Kluger, Anna Katharina; Dietz, Birgit; Hetterich, Urban

    2016-07-01

    The avoidance of wheat, gluten and other cereal products is a growing phenomenon in industrialized countries. The diagnostic criteria of celiac disease and of food allergy to wheat flour and/or other cereals are clearly defined. Only about 0.5-25 % of the population are affected from both of these immunological diseases.Nevertheless, there exists a significantly greater proportion of people reporting at least subjectively significant complaints and quality of life improvements after switching to a wheat- or gluten-free diet. Celiac disease or wheat allergy cannot be detected in these individuals on the basis of established criteria. The absence of clear diagnostic autoimmune or allergic criteria in these wheat sensitive patients has resulted in the description of non-celiac gluten sensitivity.It is clinically detectable in only very few individuals and may manifest with either intestinal, extra-intestinal or neurovegetative and psychosomatic symptoms, respectively. However, non-celiac disease gluten sensitivity has to be differentiated critically from irritable bowel syndrome, carbohydrate malassimilation, postinfectious conditions and psychosomatic diseases.Pathophysiologically, non-celiac disease gluten sensitivity is still poorly characterized; several non-immunological mechanisms are discussed to contribute to non-celiac gluten sensitivity. These include the effects of fructo- and galacto-oligosaccharides, of trypsin inhibitors of amylase, and wheat lectin agglutinins, which may influence or modulate intestinal permeability and/or a non-specific immune or effector cell degranulation within the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, further metabolic effects with direct or indirect influence on the intestinal flora are currently discussed.In addition to subjectively reported changes in symptoms that may affect variably intestinal, as well as extra-intestinal and/or neuropsychiatric symptoms, some studies suggest that there is little reproducibility of

  7. Diurnal and twenty-four hour patterning of human diseases: cardiac, vascular, and respiratory diseases, conditions, and syndromes.

    PubMed

    Smolensky, Michael H; Portaluppi, Francesco; Manfredini, Roberto; Hermida, Ramon C; Tiseo, Ruana; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda L; Haus, Erhard L

    2015-06-01

    Various medical conditions, disorders, and syndromes exhibit predictable-in-time diurnal and 24 h patterning in the signs, symptoms, and grave nonfatal and fatal events, e.g., respiratory ones of viral and allergic rhinorrhea, reversible (asthma) and non-reversible (bronchitis and emphysema) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, high altitude pulmonary edema, and decompression sickness; cardiac ones of atrial premature beats and tachycardia, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, 3rd degree atrial-ventricular block, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, ventricular premature beats, ventricular tachyarrhythmia, symptomatic and non-symptomatic angina pectoris, Prinzmetal vasospastic variant angina, acute (non-fatal and fatal) incidents of myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac arrest, in-bed sudden death syndrome of type-1 diabetes, acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, and heart failure; vascular and circulatory system ones of hypertension, acute orthostatic postprandial, micturition, and defecation hypotension/syncope, intermittent claudication, venous insufficiency, standing occupation leg edema, arterial and venous branch occlusion of the eye, menopausal hot flash, sickle cell syndrome, abdominal, aortic, and thoracic dissections, pulmonary thromboembolism, and deep venous thrombosis, and cerebrovascular transient ischemic attack and hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke. Knowledge of these temporal patterns not only helps guide patient care but research of their underlying endogenous mechanisms, i.e., circadian and others, and external triggers plus informs the development and application of effective chronopreventive and chronotherapeutic strategies. PMID:25129838

  8. [Comparative study of homeopathic remedies clinical efficacy in comprehensive treatment of inflammatory periodontal diseases in patients with burdened allergic status].

    PubMed

    Grudianov, A I; Bezrukova, I V; Aleksandrovskaia, I Iu

    2006-01-01

    Comparative analysis of clinical efficacy of 3 antihomotoxic homeopathic preparations (Traumeel S, Engistol and Echinacea compositum S) with non-specific immunostimulating and anti-inflammatory effects was performed. The study showed that Traumeel S had maximal anti-inflammatory effect. In proportion as destructive process weighting the efficacy of homeopathic preparations was decreased. The preparations are indicated for comprehensive treatment of inflammatory periodontal diseases in patients with burdened allergic status or heavy concomitant pathology. PMID:16710274

  9. Effect of Bovine Respiratory Disease and Overall Pathogenic Disease Incidence on Carcass Traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to evaluate the effects of incidence of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and overall incidence of pathogenic diseases (IPD) on carcass traits. Two independent populations were used; the first population comprised crossbred steers (GPE7; n=642) derived from sires of seven Bos tauru...

  10. Respiratory diseases among U.S. military personnel: countering emerging threats.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, G. C.; Callahan, J. D.; Hawksworth, A. W.; Fisher, C. A.; Gaydos, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    Emerging respiratory disease agents, increased antibiotic resistance, and the loss of effective vaccines threaten to increase the incidence of respiratory disease in military personnel. We examine six respiratory pathogens (adenoviruses, influenza viruses, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Bordetella pertussis) and review the impact of the diseases they cause, past efforts to control these diseases in U.S. military personnel, as well as current treatment and surveillance strategies, limitations in diagnostic testing, and vaccine needs. PMID:10341174

  11. Application of Functional Genomics for Bovine Respiratory Disease Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Aswathy N.; Epperson, William B.; Nanduri, Bindu

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most common economically important disease affecting cattle. For developing accurate diagnostics that can predict disease susceptibility/resistance and stratification, it is necessary to identify the molecular mechanisms that underlie BRD. To study the complex interactions among the bovine host and the multitude of viral and bacterial pathogens, as well as the environmental factors associated with BRD etiology, genome-scale high-throughput functional genomics methods such as microarrays, RNA-seq, and proteomics are helpful. In this review, we summarize the progress made in our understanding of BRD using functional genomics approaches. We also discuss some of the available bioinformatics resources for analyzing high-throughput data, in the context of biological pathways and molecular interactions. Although resources for studying host response to infection are avail-able, the corresponding information is lacking for majority of BRD pathogens, impeding progress in identifying diagnostic signatures for BRD using functional genomics approaches. PMID:26526746

  12. Application of Functional Genomics for Bovine Respiratory Disease Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rai, Aswathy N; Epperson, William B; Nanduri, Bindu

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most common economically important disease affecting cattle. For developing accurate diagnostics that can predict disease susceptibility/resistance and stratification, it is necessary to identify the molecular mechanisms that underlie BRD. To study the complex interactions among the bovine host and the multitude of viral and bacterial pathogens, as well as the environmental factors associated with BRD etiology, genome-scale high-throughput functional genomics methods such as microarrays, RNA-seq, and proteomics are helpful. In this review, we summarize the progress made in our understanding of BRD using functional genomics approaches. We also discuss some of the available bioinformatics resources for analyzing high-throughput data, in the context of biological pathways and molecular interactions. Although resources for studying host response to infection are avail-able, the corresponding information is lacking for majority of BRD pathogens, impeding progress in identifying diagnostic signatures for BRD using functional genomics approaches. PMID:26526746

  13. Pompe Disease: Cyanosed Hypotonic Infant with Normal Respiratory Rate.

    PubMed

    Koirala, S; Poudel, A; Basnet, R; Subedi, K

    2015-01-01

    Infantile hypotonia or floppy infant is a diagnostic challenge when it presents with other presenting complaints such as fever, cough or diarrhea. Many times the hypotonia goes unnoticed when other symptom covers the hypotonia and child continues to receive the treatment for other symptoms. We report a rare case from Nepal of infantile Pompe disease who presented with the history of fever and cough in the recent earthquake disaster camp at remote part of Sindhupalchowk, Nepal. He was being treated as a case of pneumonia. Pompe disease can be diagnosed clinically by taking detailed history and correlating the clinical findings during the presentation with other symptoms. In our case the normal respiratory rate, reduced Spo2 and presence of crackles dominated the hypotonia and was mistreated as pneumonia. High index of suspicion is necessary in diagnosing Pompe disease. PMID:26643838

  14. Surveillance for Occupational Respiratory Diseases in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Antao, Vinicius C.; Pinheiro, Germania A.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic diseases, including occupational respiratory diseases (ORDs), is increasing worldwide. Nevertheless, epidemiological data on these conditions are scarce in most countries. Therefore, it is important to conduct surveillance to monitor ORDs, particularly in developing countries, where the working population is especially vulnerable and the health system infrastructure is usually weak. This article provides a general framework for the implementation of ORD surveillance in developing countries. The main objectives of surveillance are to describe incidence and prevalence of ORDs, as well as to identify sentinel events and new associations between occupational exposures and health outcomes. Diseases with high morbidity and mortality and those in which early diagnosis with standardized tests are available are especially suitable for surveillance activities. Simple strategies, preferably using existing resources and technology, are the best option for surveillance in developing countries. This article offers examples of specific surveillance systems that are in place in Brazil, China, Cuba, India, and South Africa. PMID:26024351

  15. IgE in the diagnosis and treatment of allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Platts-Mills, Thomas A E; Schuyler, Alexander J; Erwin, Elizabeth A; Commins, Scott P; Woodfolk, Judith A

    2016-06-01

    Traditionally, the concept of allergy implied an abnormal response to an otherwise benign agent (eg, pollen or food), with an easily identifiable relationship between exposure and disease. However, there are syndromes in which the relationship between exposure to the relevant allergen and the "allergic" disease is not clear. In these cases the presence of specific IgE antibodies can play an important role in identifying the relevant allergen and provide a guide to therapy. Good examples include chronic asthma and exposure to perennial indoor allergens and asthma related to fungal infection. Finally, we are increasingly aware of forms of food allergy in which the relationship between exposure and the disease is delayed by 3 to 6 hours or longer. Three forms of food allergy with distinct clinical features are now well recognized. These are (1) anaphylactic sensitivity to peanut, (2) eosinophilic esophagitis related to cow's milk, and (3) delayed anaphylaxis to red meat. In these syndromes the immunology of the response is dramatically different. Peanut and galactose α-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal) are characterized by high- or very high-titer IgE antibodies for Ara h 2 and alpha-gal, respectively. By contrast, eosinophilic esophagitis is characterized by low levels of IgE specific for milk proteins with high- or very high-titer IgG4 to the same proteins. The recent finding is that patients with alpha-gal syndrome do not have detectable IgG4 to the oligosaccharide. Thus the serum results not only identify relevant antigens but also provide a guide to the nature of the immune response. PMID:27264001

  16. Nanocarriers for respiratory diseases treatment: recent advances and current challenges.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Adriana; Gioia, Sante Di; Castellani, Stefano; Carbone, Annalucia; Cavallaro, Gennara; Trapani, Giuseppe; Conese, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary delivery of locally-acting drugs encapsulated in nanocarriers provides several advantages for the treatment of respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, cystic fibrosis, tuberculosis and lung cancer. These advantages include, among others, sustained drug delivery to the lungs, reduced therapeutic dose and improved patient compliance. The aim of this review is to give an updated overview on recent advances recorded in the last few years in this field as well as on the major challenges still existing and that remain to be overcome before any clinical application. After an outline on the cellular and extracellular barriers affecting drug delivery to the airways both in physiological and pathological conditions, the significant developments recorded using inhaled polymeric- and lipid-based nanocarriers for drug and gene delivery to the lung are presented. In this discussion, the major challenges existing in the field are evidenced including the understanding of the factors governing the mucus penetration capability of these nanocarriers and the identification of new technologies for delivering drugs to specific regions or cell types of the lungs. In this regard, the recognition of receptor expressed only at lung level may facilitate drug targeting to this organ and it should improve the therapeutic efficacy of nanocarrier-based treatments for respiratory diseases. PMID:24678708

  17. Medical surveillance for the emerging occupational and environmental respiratory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To highlight the important issues to consider in deciding whether to pursue and how to conduct medical surveillance for the emerging occupational and environmental respiratory diseases. It provides several recent examples illustrating implementation and usefulness of medical surveillance and the lessons learned from these experiences. Recent findings Medical surveillance conducted after sentinel outbreaks of constrictive bronchiolitis in microwave popcorn and flavoring production plants have shown the usefulness of this approach in documenting the burden of disease, identifying particular problem areas as targets for preventive interventions, and in tracking the progress. They have also identified the usefulness of longitudinal spirometry, which allows comparison of the individuals’ results to their own previous tests. The importance of recognizing a sentinel outbreak needing greater investigation is demonstrated by the cluster of cases of constrictive bronchiolitis recognized in military veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. The World Trade Center disaster has demonstrated the importance of having baseline lung function data for future comparison and the importance of rapidly identifying exposed populations at greatest risk for health effects, and thus potentially having the greatest benefit from medical surveillance. Summary When used appropriately, medical surveillance is a useful tool in addressing the emerging occupational and environmental respiratory diseases by facilitating improvements in primary prevention and enabling interventions to help individuals through secondary prevention. PMID:24500294

  18. Murine Cytomegalovirus Influences Foxj1 Expression, Ciliogenesis, and Mucus Plugging in Mice with Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Carol A.; Peluso, John J.; Shanley, John D.; Puddington, Lynn; Thrall, Roger S.

    2008-01-01

    We have followed throughout time the development of allergic airway disease (AAD) in both uninfected mice and mice infected intranasally with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). Histological evaluation of lung tissue from uninfected mice with AAD demonstrated mucus plugging after 14 and 21 days of ovalbumin-aerosol challenge, with resolution of mucus plugging occurring by 42 days. In MCMV/AAD mice, mucus plugging was observed after 7 days of ovalbumin-aerosol challenge and remained present at 42 days. The level of interleukin-13 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from MCMV/AAD mice was decreased compared with AAD mice and was accompanied by increased levels of interferon-γ. Levels of Muc5A/C, Muc5B, or Muc2 mucin mRNA in the lungs of MCMV/AAD mice were not elevated compared with AAD mice. MCMV was able to infect the airway epithelium, resulting in decreased expression of Foxj1, a transcription factor critical for ciliogenesis, and a loss of ciliated epithelial cells. In addition, an increase in the number of epithelial cells staining positive for periodic acid-Schiff was observed in MCMV/AAD airways. Together, these findings suggest that MCMV infection of the airway epithelium enhances goblet cell metaplasia and diminishes efficient mucociliary clearance in mice with AAD, resulting in increased mucus plugging. PMID:18258850

  19. Structural Basis of Chronic Beryllium Disease: Linking Allergic Hypersensitivity and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Gina M.; Wang, Yang; Crawford, Frances; Novikov, Andrey; Wimberly, Brian T.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Falta, Michael T.; Bowerman, Natalie A.; Marrack, Philippa; Fontenot, Andrew P.; Dai, Shaodong; Kappler, John W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY T cell-mediated hypersensitivity to metal cations is common in humans. How the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) recognizes these cations bound to a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) protein and self-peptide is unknown. Individuals carrying the MHCII allele, HLA-DP2, are at risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a debilitating inflammatory lung condition caused by the reaction of CD4 T cells to inhaled beryllium. We show here that the T cell ligand is created when a Be2+ cation becomes buried in an HLA-DP2/peptide complex, where it is coordinated by both MHC and peptide acidic amino acids. Surprisingly, the TCR does not interact with the Be2+ itself, but rather with surface changes induced by the firmly bound Be2+ and an accompanying Na+ cation. Thus, CBD, by creating a new antigen by indirectly modifying the structure of pre-existing self MHC-peptide complex, lies on the border between allergic hypersensitivity and autoimmunity. PMID:24995984

  20. Structural basis of chronic beryllium disease: linking allergic hypersensitivity and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Gina M; Wang, Yang; Crawford, Frances; Novikov, Andrey; Wimberly, Brian T; Kieft, Jeffrey S; Falta, Michael T; Bowerman, Natalie A; Marrack, Philippa; Fontenot, Andrew P; Dai, Shaodong; Kappler, John W

    2014-07-01

    T-cell-mediated hypersensitivity to metal cations is common in humans. How the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) recognizes these cations bound to a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) protein and self-peptide is unknown. Individuals carrying the MHCII allele, HLA-DP2, are at risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a debilitating inflammatory lung condition caused by the reaction of CD4 T cells to inhaled beryllium. Here, we show that the T cell ligand is created when a Be(2+) cation becomes buried in an HLA-DP2/peptide complex, where it is coordinated by both MHC and peptide acidic amino acids. Surprisingly, the TCR does not interact with the Be(2+) itself, but rather with surface changes induced by the firmly bound Be(2+) and an accompanying Na(+) cation. Thus, CBD, by creating a new antigen by indirectly modifying the structure of preexisting self MHC-peptide complex, lies on the border between allergic hypersensitivity and autoimmunity. PMID:24995984

  1. A systematic review of socioeconomic position in relation to asthma and allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Uphoff, Eleonora; Cabieses, Báltica; Pinart, Mariona; Valdés, Macarena; Antó, Josep Maria; Wright, John

    2015-08-01

    The role of socioeconomic position (SEP) in the development of asthma and allergies is unclear, with some pointing to the risks of low SEP and other research pointing in the direction of higher SEP being associated with higher prevalence rates. The aim of this systematic review is to clarify associations between SEP and the prevalence of asthma and allergies. Out of 4407 records identified, 183 were included in the analysis. Low SEP was associated with a higher prevalence of asthma in 63% of the studies. Research on allergies, however, showed a positive association between higher SEP and illness in 66% of studies. Pooled estimates for the odds ratio of disease for the highest compared with the lowest SEP confirmed these results for asthma (unadjusted OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.37-1.39), allergies in general (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.62-0.72), atopic dermatitis (unadjusted OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.61-0.83) and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (unadjusted OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.46-0.59). Sensitivity analyses with a subsample of high-quality studies led to the same conclusion. Evidence from this systematic review suggests that asthma is associated with lower SEP, whereas the prevalence of allergies is associated with higher SEP. PMID:25537562

  2. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2013.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2014-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2013. Studies on food allergy suggest that (1) 7.6% of the US population is affected, (2) a "healthy" early diet might prevent food allergy, (3) the skin might be an important route of sensitization, (4) allergen component testing might aid diagnosis, (5) the prognosis of milk allergy might be predictable through early testing, (6) oral or sublingual immunotherapy show promise but also have caveats, and (7) preclinical studies show promising alternative modes of immunotherapy and desensitization. Studies on eosinophilic esophagitis show a relationship to connective tissue disorders and that dietary management is an effective treatment for adults. Markers of anaphylaxis severity have been determined and might inform potential diagnostics and therapeutic targets. Insights on serum tests for drug and insect sting allergy might result in improved diagnostics. Genetic and immune-mediated defects in skin epithelial differentiation contribute to the severity of atopic dermatitis. Novel management approaches to treatment of chronic urticaria, including use of omalizumab, are being identified. PMID:24373349

  3. [Use of the mucoregulator ascoril for respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Shmeleva, N M

    2012-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of the combined mucoregulatory drug ascoril in pulmonological care. Due to its multicomponent composition, the drug has mucoregulatory properties that combine a bronchodilator effect and an ability to dilute sputum and to synthesize the surfactant. The mechanism of action of each ascoril component is analyzed; the results of basic experimental and clinical studies on the use of the drug are given. A wide range of indications, such as respiratory system diseases, for ascoril use is demonstrated. PMID:23227508

  4. Atopic disease, rhinitis and conjunctivitis, and upper respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Wood, R A; Doran, T F

    1995-10-01

    In this section, we review three broad topics in pediatrics: atopic disease, rhinitis and conjunctivitis, and upper respiratory tract infections. These topics comprise three of the most commonly encountered problems in pediatric practice. There have been significant contributions to the pediatric literature in each of these areas over the past year, and we review those of particular interest here. The papers that we have chosen to review were selected for both their scientific significance and practicality. Both review articles and original research are included, but all should be relevant to the care of your patients. PMID:8541965

  5. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3: Area 5).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Farrell, J; Crooks, G; Hellings, P; Bel, E H; Bewick, M; Chavannes, N H; de Sousa, J Correia; Cruz, A A; Haahtela, T; Joos, G; Khaltaev, N; Malva, J; Muraro, A; Nogues, M; Palkonen, S; Pedersen, S; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Samolinski, B; Strandberg, T; Valiulis, A; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Bedbrook, A; Aberer, W; Adachi, M; Agusti, A; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Ankri, J; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Arshad, H; Bai, C; Baiardini, I; Bachert, C; Baigenzhin, A K; Barbara, C; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Kheder, A Ben; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bergmann, K C; Bieber, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Boner, A L; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Boulet, L P; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Burney, P G; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M A; Calverley, P M; Camargos, P A M; Canonica, G W; Camuzat, T; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Carriazo, A; Casale, T; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Chatzi, L; Chen, Y Z; Chiron, R; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Chung, K F; Ciprandi, G; Cirule, I; Cox, L; Costa, D J; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; De Carlo, G; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Demoly, P; Denburg, J A; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Dykewicz, M S; El-Gamal, Y; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L M; Fletcher, M; Fiocchi, A; Fink Wagner, A; Fonseca, J; Fokkens, W J; Forastiere, F; Frith, P; Gaga, M; Gamkrelidze, A; Garces, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; González Diaz, S; Gotua, M; Grisle, I; Grouse, L; Gutter, Z; Guzmán, M A; Heaney, L G; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Henderson, D; Hendry, A; Heinrich, J; Heve, D; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O' B; Howarth, P; Humbert, M; Hyland, M E; Illario, M; Ivancevich, J C; Jardim, J R; Jares, E J; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Julge, K; Jung, K S; Just, J; Kaidashev, I; Kaitov, M R; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keil, T; Keith, P K; Klimek, L; Koffi N'Goran, B; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Li, J; Lodrup Carlsen, K; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Magard, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Mair, A; Majer, I; Makela, M J; Manning, P; Mara, S; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Matignon, P; Maurer, M; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Menzies-Gow, A; Merk, H; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Mohammad, G M Y; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Nafti, S; Namazova-Baranova, L; Naclerio, R; Neou, A; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Niggemann, B; Ninot, G; Nyembue, T D; O'Hehir, R E; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Panzner, P; Papadopoulos, N; Papi, A; Park, H S; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pawankar, R; Pengelly, R; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Poethig, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Potter, P; Postma, D; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Radier Pontal, F; Repka-Ramirez, S; Reitamo, S; Rennard, S; Rodenas, F; Roberts, J; Roca, J; Rodriguez Mañas, L; Rolland, C; Roman Rodriguez, M; Romano, A; Rosado-Pinto, J; Rosario, N; Rosenwasser, L; Rottem, M; Ryan, D; Sanchez-Borges, M; Scadding, G K; Schunemann, H J; Serrano, E; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Schulz, H; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Simons, F E R; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Smit, H A; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Sunyer, J; Thijs, C; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valia, E; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; van Hage, M; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vellas, B; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Vichyanond, P; Viegi, G; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagenmann, M; Wallaert, B; Walker, S; Wang, D Y; Wahn, U; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Williams, S; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zaidi, A; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhang, L; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Mercier, J

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS integrated care pathways (ICPs), (2) the joint initiative between the Reference site MACVIA-LR (Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif) and ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma), (3) Commitments for Action to the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing and the AIRWAYS ICPs network. It is deployed in collaboration with the World Health Organization Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD). The European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing has proposed a 5-step framework for developing an individual scaling up strategy: (1) what to scale up: (1-a) databases of good practices, (1-b) assessment of viability of the scaling up of good practices, (1-c) classification of good practices for local replication and (2) how to scale up: (2-a) facilitating partnerships for scaling up, (2-b) implementation of key success factors and lessons learnt, including emerging technologies for individualised and predictive medicine. This strategy has already been applied to the chronic respiratory disease action plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. PMID:27478588

  6. [The efficacy of treating patients with allergic diseases at a health resort with a gastroenterologic profile].

    PubMed

    Avdeeva, E V; Pavlushchenko, E V; Vaganova, V S; Paniushkina, O N

    1998-01-01

    45 allergic patients were treated in gastrointestinal sanatorium. Balneological and speleo modalities were employed. The clinical symptoms and humoral immunity indicated high efficacy of such treatment. The complex is recommended for introduction in gastrointestinal sanatoria. PMID:9987974

  7. Long-term trends in cardiovascular disease mortality and association with respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Mercer, A J

    2016-03-01

    The recent decline in cardiovascular disease mortality in Western countries has been linked with changes in life style and treatment. This study considers periods of decline before effective medical interventions or knowledge about risk factors. Trends in annual age-standardized death rates from cerebrovascular disease, heart disease and circulatory disease, and all cardiovascular disease are reviewed for three phases, 1881-1916, 1920-1939, and 1940-2000. There was a consistent decline in the cerebrovascular disease death rate between 1891 and 2000, apart from brief increases after the two world wars. The heart disease and circulatory disease death rate was declining between 1891 and 1910 before cigarette smoking became prevalent. The early peak in cardiovascular mortality in 1891 coincided with an influenza pandemic and a peak in the death rate from bronchitis, pneumonia and influenza. There is also correspondence between short-term fluctuations in the death rates from these respiratory diseases and cardiovascular disease. This evidence of ecological association is consistent with the findings of many studies that seasonal influenza can trigger acute myocardial infarction and episodes of respiratory infection are followed by increased risk of cardiovascular events. Vaccination studies could provide more definitive evidence of the role in cardiovascular disease and mortality of influenza, other viruses, and common bacterial agents of respiratory infection. PMID:26243537

  8. Incidence by occupation and industry of acute work related respiratory diseases in the UK, 1992–2001

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, J; Chen, Y; Zekveld, C; Cherry, N

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To summarise incidence rates and epidemiological characteristics of new cases of work related respiratory disease reported by specialist physicians in thoracic and occupational medicine, with particular reference to occupation, industry, and causal agents for asthma, inhalation accidents, and allergic alveolitis. Methods: Cases reported 1992–2001 to the SWORD and OPRA national surveillance schemes, in which almost all UK chest and occupational physicians participate, were analysed by age, sex, cause, occupation, and industry, with incidence rates calculated against appropriate denominators. Results: Excluding diseases of long latency, infrequently seen by occupational physicians, the distribution of diagnoses in the two specialties was similar, but with rates generally much higher in occupational than chest physicians. Occupational asthma was responsible for about 25% of cases overall, affecting mainly craft related occupations and machinists, and most often attributed to isocyanates, metals, grains, wood dusts, solders, and welding fume. These same occupations were those at highest risk from inhalation injuries, most frequently caused by irritant gases, vapours, and fume. Among medical technicians and nurses, however, glutaraldehyde and latex were the main causes of occupational asthma. Allergic alveolitis was seldom reported, with almost all cases in agriculture, forestry, and fishing. Conclusion: During the 10 year period studied, there were few changes in level of reported incidence, apart from some decline in occupational asthma and inhalation injuries. These results and their implications should be distinguished from much higher estimates of asthma made worse by work derived from population surveys, based on prevalence rather than incidence, and self-reported symptoms rather than diagnoses made by specialist physicians. Even so, the reported incidence of new cases of acute respiratory illness caused by work remains substantial. PMID:16299091

  9. Regulatory T cells and immune regulation of allergic diseases: roles of IL-10 and TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Palomares, O; Martín-Fontecha, M; Lauener, R; Traidl-Hoffmann, C; Cavkaytar, O; Akdis, M; Akdis, C A

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of allergic diseases has significantly increased in industrialized countries. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) remains as the only curative treatment. The knowledge about the mechanisms underlying healthy immune responses to allergens, the development of allergic reactions and restoration of appropriate immune responses to allergens has significantly improved over the last decades. It is now well-accepted that the generation and maintenance of functional allergen-specific regulatory T (Treg) cells and regulatory B (Breg) cells are essential for healthy immune responses to environmental proteins and successful AIT. Treg cells comprise different subsets of T cells with suppressive capacity, which control the development and maintenance of allergic diseases by various ways of action. Molecular mechanisms of generation of Treg cells, the identification of novel immunological organs, where this might occur in vivo, such as tonsils, and related epigenetic mechanisms are starting to be deciphered. The key role played by the suppressor cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β produced by functional Treg cells during the generation of immune tolerance to allergens is now well established. Treg and Breg cells together have a role in suppression of IgE and induction of IgG4 isotype allergen-specific antibodies particularly mediated by IL-10. Other cell types such as subsets of dendritic cells, NK-T cells and natural killer cells producing high levels of IL-10 may also contribute to the generation of healthy immune responses to allergens. In conclusion, better understanding of the immune regulatory mechanisms operating at different stages of allergic diseases will significantly help the development of better diagnostic and predictive biomarkers and therapeutic interventions. PMID:25056447

  10. [Comparative characterization of the microflora of the upper respiratory tract mucous membranes in bronchial asthma and allergic persistent rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Romanenko, E E; Baturo, A P; Ulisko, I N

    2005-01-01

    A total of 250 patients with diagnosed bronchial asthma (BA) were examined by microbiological methods. Among them--188 children and 62 adults. In 87 patients the microflora of nasal mucosa was studied, in 40--of pharynx only and in 123 patients--both the nasal and the pharynx. For comparative analysis earlier data obtained in 69 patients with persistent allergic rhinitis (PAR) were used. The cultures isolated from the nasal mucosa of BA patients were shown to number 18 genera and 42 species, while among those isolated from pharynx mucosa 20 genera and 40 species. Monocultures were isolated from the nasal mucosa only in 23% of the examined patients and from the pharynx mucosa--only in 1.42%. Associations with different numbers of components were isolated from nasal and pharynx mucosa (2 to 6, 2 to 8 respectively). Staphylococcus aureus was regarded as the main species of nasal biocenosis in BA and PAR, as well as pharynx biocenosis in BA. Besides, in BA other Staphylococcus species (schleiferi, caprae, capitis, hominis, etc.), reversely related to the main species, could be isolated from both mucous membranes. Similarities and differences in microflora of biocenoses in both nosological forms, confirming links between PAR and BA, are considered. PMID:15881942

  11. The biodiversity hypothesis and allergic disease: world allergy organization position statement

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Biodiversity loss and climate change secondary to human activities are now being associated with various adverse health effects. However, less attention is being paid to the effects of biodiversity loss on environmental and commensal (indigenous) microbiotas. Metagenomic and other studies of healthy and diseased individuals reveal that reduced biodiversity and alterations in the composition of the gut and skin microbiota are associated with various inflammatory conditions, including asthma, allergic and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), type1 diabetes, and obesity. Altered indigenous microbiota and the general microbial deprivation characterizing the lifestyle of urban people in affluent countries appear to be risk factors for immune dysregulation and impaired tolerance. The risk is further enhanced by physical inactivity and a western diet poor in fresh fruit and vegetables, which may act in synergy with dysbiosis of the gut flora. Studies of immigrants moving from non-affluent to affluent regions indicate that tolerance mechanisms can rapidly become impaired in microbe-poor environments. The data on microbial deprivation and immune dysfunction as they relate to biodiversity loss are evaluated in this Statement of World Allergy Organization (WAO). We propose that biodiversity, the variability among living organisms from all sources are closely related, at both the macro- and micro-levels. Loss of the macrodiversity is associated with shrinking of the microdiversity, which is associated with alterations of the indigenous microbiota. Data on behavioural means to induce tolerance are outlined and a proposal made for a Global Allergy Plan to prevent and reduce the global allergy burden for affected individuals and the societies in which they live. PMID:23663440

  12. Inflammatory Marker sTREM-1 Reflects the Clinical Stage and Respiratory Tract Obstruction in Allergic Asthma Bronchiale Patients and Correlates with Number of Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Bucova, Maria; Suchankova, Magda; Dzurilla, Martin; Vrlik, Mojmir; Novosadova, Helena; Tedlova, Eva; Urban, Stefan; Hornakova, Edita; Seligova, Marianna; Durmanova, Vladimira; Penz, Peter; Javor, Juraj; Paulovicova, Ema

    2012-01-01

    The knowledge that asthma is an inflammatory disorder has prompted us to investigate the plasma levels of a new inflammatory marker sTREM-1 that is released from the surfaces of activated neutrophils and monocytes. The plasma levels of sTREM-1 were analysed by a sandwich ELISA test in the cohort of 76 patients with allergic asthma bronchiale and 39 healthy controls. Our results revealed more than 3.5 times higher levels of sTREM-1 in AB patients (92.3 pg/mL ± 125.6) compared with healthy subjects (25.7 pg/mL ± 9.2; P = 0.0001). Higher levels of sTREM-1 were found also in patients with exacerbated AB (170.5 pg/mL ± 78.2) compared with nonexacerbated AB patients (59.1 ± 78.2; P < 0.0001), patients with respiratory tract obstruction (176.4 pg/mL ± 177.8), than those without obstruction (51.99 pg/mL ± 64.0; P < 0.0001) and patients with anti-IgE therapy (P < 0.0001). Levels of sTREM-1 correlated with number of leucocytes (P = 0.002), and absolute number of neutrophils (P = 0.001). Elevated plasma levels of sTREM-1 reflect the severity, state of exacerbation, presence of respiratory tract obstruction in AB patients and together with increased number of neutrophils point to the role of neutrophils in inflammation accompanying AB. PMID:22829716

  13. State of World Allergy Report 2008: Allergy and Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the incidence of allergies and allergic diseases is on the rise globally. As an international umbrella organization for regional and national allergy and clinical immunology societies, the World Allergy Organization is at the forefront of a combined united effort across nations and organizations to address this global concern by promoting the science of allergy and clinical immunology, and advancing exchange of information. The World Allergy Organization's State of World Allergy Reports will provide a biennial review of allergic diseases worldwide, consider their medical and socioeconomic contexts, and propose effective approaches to addressing these problems. In this first State of World Allergy Report 2008, experts from different regions of the world have attempted to define the extent of the global allergy problem, examine recent trends, and provide a framework for the collaboration among world medicine, science, and government agencies that is needed to address the rapidly developing issues associated with allergy and allergic diseases. PMID:23282447

  14. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS Influenza Malaria Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Tuberculosis Zika Virus Find a Funding Opportunity Opportunities & Announcements Types of ... immunologic, and allergic diseases Ebola Virus Particles Middle Zika Virus Learn more about NIAID research to combat the ...

  15. The Rise and Fall of Hyaluronan in Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Mark E.; Dweik, Raed A.; Garantziotis, Stavros; Aronica, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    In normal airways, hyaluronan (HA) matrices are primarily located within the airway submucosa, pulmonary vasculature walls, and, to a lesser extent, the alveoli. Following pulmonary injury, elevated levels of HA matrices accumulate in these regions, and in respiratory secretions, correlating with the extent of injury. Animal models have provided important insight into the role of HA in the onset of pulmonary injury and repair, generally indicating that the induction of HA synthesis is an early event typically preceding fibrosis. The HA that accumulates in inflamed airways is of a high molecular weight (>1600 kDa) but can be broken down into smaller fragments (<150 kDa) by inflammatory and disease-related mechanisms that have profound effects on HA pathobiology. During inflammation in the airways, HA is often covalently modified with heavy chains from inter-alpha-inhibitor via the enzyme tumor-necrosis-factor-stimulated-gene-6 (TSG-6) and this modification promotes the interaction of leukocytes with HA matrices at sites of inflammation. The clearance of HA and its return to normal levels is essential for the proper resolution of inflammation. These data portray HA matrices as an important component of normal airway physiology and illustrate its integral roles during tissue injury and repair among a variety of respiratory diseases. PMID:26448757

  16. [Role of fractalkine/CX3CL1 and its receptor CX3CR1 in allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Julia, Valérie; Staumont-Salle, Delphine; Dombrowicz, David

    2016-03-01

    Allergic asthma and atopic dermatitis are diseases mainly resulting from the activation of Th2 cells, that produce cytokines favouring IgE production and eosinophilia but also of Th1 cells, that contribute to inflammation chronicity. Lymphocyte recruitment and retention of Th cells in target organs are 2 key events for asthma and atopic dermatitis pathogenesis. While lymphocyte migration is regulated by chemokines and lipid mediators such as leukotrienes and prostaglandins, factors involved in lymphocyte retention and survival within inflammatory tissues remain poorly understood. Recent works show that, in allergic diseases, there is an increased expression of fractalkine/CX3CL1 and its unique receptor CX3CR1 and that this chemokine does not act as chemoattractant. In allergic asthma, CX3CR1 expression regulates Th2 and Th1 cell survival in the inflammatory lung, while, in atopic dermatitis, it regulate Th2 and Th1 cell retention into the inflammatory site. Use of peptides blocking fractalkine binding to its receptor is currently tested in the treatment of asthma and atopic dermatitis. PMID:27011244

  17. Misdiagnosis of pulmonary embolism in patients with allergic reaction--the importance of prior probability of disease.

    PubMed

    Janata, Karin; Prokop, Mathias; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Laggner, Anton N

    2003-10-31

    Because pulmonary embolism (PE) and its treatment carry substantial risk of morbidity and mortality, accurate diagnosis is essential. We report two cases with allergic reactions, in which PE was suggested by routine ECG and D-dimer elevation and strengthened by spiral CT. Therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin was initiated and long-term anticoagulation was considered. As their histories did not reveal any predisposing factor to PE, the cases were re-evaluated. Elevation of D-dimer was now attributed to allergic reaction, ECG abnormalities were considered as constitutional, and findings from spiral CT attributed to breathing artifacts and partial-volume effects. The diagnosis of PE was therefore rejected and anticoagulant treatment discontinued without sequelae. These cases show the importance of determining clinical probability before ordering further diagnostic tests and critical interpretation of test results suggestive of PE, based on prior probability of the disease. PMID:14650950

  18. Bone marrow-derived stem cells and respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Carla P; Rankin, Sara M

    2011-07-01

    Adult bone marrow contains a number of discrete populations of progenitor cells, including endothelial, mesenchymal, and epithelial progenitor cells and fibrocytes. In the context of a range of diseases, endothelial progenitor cells have been reported to promote angiogenesis, mesenchymal stem cells are potent immunosuppressors but can also contribute directly to tissue regeneration, and fibrocytes have been shown to induce tissue fibrosis. This article provides an overview of the basic biology of these different subsets of progenitor cells, reporting their distinct phenotypes and functional activities. The differences in their secretomes are highlighted, and the relative role of cellular differentiation vs paracrine effects of progenitor cells is considered. The article reviews the literature examining the contribution of progenitor cells to the pathogenesis of respiratory disease, and discusses recent studies using bone marrow progenitor cells as stem cell therapies in the context of pulmonary hypertension, COPD, and asthma. PMID:21729891

  19. ANIMAL MODELS FOR PROTEIN RESPIRATORY SENSITIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protein induced respiratory hypersensitivity, particularly atopic disease in general, and allergic asthma in particular, has increased dramatically over the last several decades in the U.S. and other industrialized nations as a result of ill-defined changes in living conditions i...

  20. Chlorinated pool attendance, airway epithelium defects and the risks of allergic diseases in adolescents: Interrelationships revealed by circulating biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Alfred; Nickmilder, Marc; Dumont, Xavier

    2015-07-01

    It has been suggested that allergic diseases might be epithelial disorders driven by various environmental stressors but the epidemiological evidence supporting this concept is limited. In a cross-sectional study of 835 school adolescents (365 boys; mean age, 15.5 yr), we measured the serum concentrations of Club cell protein (CC16), surfactant-associated protein D (SP-D) and of total and aeroallergen-specific IgE. We used the serum CC16/SP-D concentration ratio as an index integrating changes in the permeability (SP-D) and secretory function (CC16) of the airway epithelium. In both sexes, early swimming in chlorinated pools emerged as the most consistent and strongest predictor of low CC16 and CC16/SP-D ratio in serum. Among girls, a low CC16/SP-D ratio was associated with increased odds (lowest vs. highest tertile) for pet sensitization (OR 2.97, 95% CI 1.19-8.22) and for hay fever in subjects sensitized to pollen (OR 4.12, 95% CI 1.28-14.4). Among boys, a low CC16/SP-D ratio was associated with increased odds for house-dust mite (HDM) sensitization (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.11-3.73), for allergic rhinitis in subjects sensitized to HDM (OR 3.52, 95% CI 1.22-11.1) and for asthma in subjects sensitized to any aeroallergen (OR 3.38, 95% CI 1.17-11.0), HDM (OR 5.20, 95% CI 1.40-24.2) or pollen (OR 5.82, 95% CI 1.51-27.4). Odds for allergic sensitization or rhinitis also increased with increasing SP-D or decreasing CC16 in serum. Our findings support the hypothesis linking the development of allergic diseases to epithelial barrier defects due to host factors or environmental stressors such as early swimming in chlorinated pools. PMID:25863185

  1. Strategies for Development of a Peptide Vaccine for Poultry Respiratory Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial respiratory disease of turkeys causes millions of dollars in economic losses to the poultry industries. Poultry or avian respiratory disease complex may involve several pathogens both viral and bacterial, and disease is exacerbated by environmental stress. Live attenuated vaccines are avai...

  2. Nutrition, growth, and allergic diseases among very preterm infants after hospital discharge.

    PubMed

    Zachariassen, Gitte

    2013-02-01

    The aims of this PhD thesis were: 1. Primarily to investigate the effect, of adding human milk fortifier to mother's milk while breastfeeding very preterm infants after hospital discharge, on growth until 1 year corrected age (CA) 2. Secondarily to describe breastfeeding rate and factors associated with breastfeeding among very preterm infants at hospital discharge. 3. To describe possible feeding-problems during the intervention-period, and allergic diseases during the first year of life, among very preterm infants related to their nutrition after hospital discharge. 4. To describe the content of macronutrients in human milk from mothers delivering very preterm. This PhD thesis is based on a prospective, randomized, and controlled interventional birth cohort study. A total of 633 very preterm infants with a gestational age (GA) ≤ 32 + 0 weeks were recruited consecutively from July 2004 until August 2008 of whom 157 were excluded due to diseases or circumstances influencing nutrition. Further 156 refused participation in the interventional part of the study, but data on breastfeeding, weight, and some epidemiological data until discharge were available. Results on breastfeeding rate at discharge were therefore based on data from 478 infants, and parents of 320 infants accepted participation in the intervention study. Of these 320 infants, 207 were exclusively breastfed and they were shortly before hospital discharge randomized to either breastfeeding without (group A) or with fortification (group B) until 4 months CA. Infants (n = 113) who were bottle-fed at discharge (group C) were given a preterm formula (PF) until 4 months CA. Infants were examined at the outpatient clinics at term, and at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months CA, where parameters on growth, allergic diseases, possible feeding problems, blood-samples, and milk samples were obtained. Data on duration of exclusively breastfeeding and time of introduction to formula and/or complementary food were also recorded

  3. Allergic Conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... water. This is called conjunctivitis, also known as “pink eye.” Causes & Risk Factors What causes allergic conjunctivitis? ... example, if you are allergic to pollen or mold, stay indoors when pollen and mold levels are ...

  4. How changes in nutrition have influenced the development of allergic diseases in childhood

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of allergic diseases in childhood in the last decades could be linked to concomitant dietary changes, especially with the modified and lower consumption of fruit, vegetables and minerals. The consumption of these foods by pregnant women and children in the first years of life seems to be associated with a reduced risk of asthma and related symptoms. Foods that can prevent the development of wheezing through their antioxidant effects contain vitamin C and selenium; blood levels of these elements correlate negatively with the risk of wheezing. Intake of vitamin E during pregnancy also appears to be correlated with a reduced risk of wheezing for the unborn child. Similarly, low intake of zinc and carotenoids by pregnant women is associated with an increased risk of wheezing and asthma in childhood. Fiber also has anti-inflammatory properties and protective effects against allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis and asthma. The consumption of fat influences the development of the airways. Populations in Western countries have increased their consumption of n-6 PUFAs and, in parallel, reduced n-3 PUFAs. This has led to decreased production of PGE2, which is believed to have a protective effect against inflammation of the airways. Conflicting hypotheses also concern vitamin D; both an excess and a deficiency of vitamin D, in fact, have been associated with an increased risk of asthma. Further studies on the role of these substances are necessary before any conclusions can be drawn on a clinical level. Astratto La crescente prevalenza negli ultimi decenni delle malattie allergiche in età pediatrica potrebbe essere legata a concomitanti cambiamenti nella dieta, in particolare alla minore e modificata introduzione di frutta, verdura e minerali. Il consumo di questi alimenti da parte delle donne in gravidanza e dei bambini nei primi anni di vita sembra essere associato ad un ridotto rischio di asma e di sintomi correlati. Gli alimenti che

  5. [Respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD)].

    PubMed

    Goeckenjan, G

    2003-05-01

    Respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD) designates interstitial lung changes in smokers, characterized histologically by bronchiolocentric accumulation of pigmented alveolar macrophages and fibrotic or cellular inflammatory changes of pulmonary interstitium. The definition is nearly identical to that of condensate pneumopathy, smoker's pneumopathy or smoker's lung, defined by accumulation of pigmented alveolar macrophages with bland alveoloseptal or peribronchial fibrosis and cellular inflammation of the bronchial wall. In addition to respiratory bronchiolitis, which is found in nearly all smokers, RB-ILD comprises a broad spectrum of varying degrees of the interstitial reaction to the exogenous injury of inhalation smoking with gradual transition to desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP). In most cases RB-ILD manifestations are subclinical and detected coincidentally. Radiographic features are reticulonodular and ground glass opacities of the lung. The high resolution computed tomography reveals centrilobular nodules, ground glass opacities, thickening of bronchial walls, and in some cases a reticular pattern. Mild emphysema is frequent. Lung function analysis reveals only minor restrictive or obstructive defects in most cases, often combined with hyperinflation. CO diffusing capacity is slightly to moderately impaired. Pronounced interstitial lung diseases with serious restrictive defects and arterial hypoxemia have been reported infrequently. In differential diagnosis smoking related interstitial lung diseases (DIP, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis) and other interstitial lung diseases have to be excluded. In most cases diagnosis can be achieved by bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial lung biopsy. In cases of pronounced interstitial lung disease or assumption of an additional interstitial lung disease besides RB-ILD a thoracoscopic or open lung biopsy can be necessary. RB-ILD has a favourable

  6. Firing patterns of muscle vasoconstrictor neurons in respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Macefield, Vaughan G

    2012-01-01

    Because the cardiovascular system and respiration are so intimately coupled, disturbances in respiratory control often lead to disturbances in cardiovascular control. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), and Bronchiectasis (BE) are all associated with a greatly elevated muscle vasoconstrictor drive (muscle sympathetic nerve activity, MSNA). Indeed, the increase in MSNA is comparable to that seen in congestive heart failure (CHF), in which the increase in MSNA compensates for the reduced cardiac output and thereby assists in maintaining blood pressure. However, in OSA - but not COPD or BE - the increase in MSNA can lead to hypertension. Here, the features of the sympathoexcitation in OSA, COPD, and BE are reviewed in terms of the firing properties of post-ganglionic muscle vasoconstrictor neurons. Compared to healthy subjects with low levels of resting MSNA, single-unit recordings revealed that the augmented MSNA seen in OSA, BE, COPD, and CHF were each associated with an increase in firing probability and mean firing rates of individual neurons. However, unlike patients with heart failure, all patients with respiratory disease exhibited an increase in multiple within-burst firing which, it is argued, reflects an increase in central sympathetic drive. Similar patterns to those seen in OSA, COPD, and BE were seen in healthy subjects during an acute increase in muscle vasoconstrictor drive. These observations emphasize the differences by which the sympathetic nervous system grades its output in health and disease, with an increase in firing probability of active neurons and recruitment of additional neurons being the dominant mechanisms. PMID:22654767

  7. Chlorinated pool attendance, airway epithelium defects and the risks of allergic diseases in adolescents: Interrelationships revealed by circulating biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Alfred Nickmilder, Marc; Dumont, Xavier

    2015-07-15

    It has been suggested that allergic diseases might be epithelial disorders driven by various environmental stressors but the epidemiological evidence supporting this concept is limited. In a cross-sectional study of 835 school adolescents (365 boys; mean age, 15.5 yr), we measured the serum concentrations of Club cell protein (CC16), surfactant-associated protein D (SP-D) and of total and aeroallergen-specific IgE. We used the serum CC16/SP-D concentration ratio as an index integrating changes in the permeability (SP-D) and secretory function (CC16) of the airway epithelium. In both sexes, early swimming in chlorinated pools emerged as the most consistent and strongest predictor of low CC16 and CC16/SP-D ratio in serum. Among girls, a low CC16/SP-D ratio was associated with increased odds (lowest vs. highest tertile) for pet sensitization (OR 2.97, 95% CI 1.19–8.22) and for hay fever in subjects sensitized to pollen (OR 4.12, 95% CI 1.28–14.4). Among boys, a low CC16/SP-D ratio was associated with increased odds for house-dust mite (HDM) sensitization (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.11–3.73), for allergic rhinitis in subjects sensitized to HDM (OR 3.52, 95% CI 1.22–11.1) and for asthma in subjects sensitized to any aeroallergen (OR 3.38, 95% CI 1.17–11.0), HDM (OR 5.20, 95% CI 1.40–24.2) or pollen (OR 5.82, 95% CI 1.51–27.4). Odds for allergic sensitization or rhinitis also increased with increasing SP-D or decreasing CC16 in serum. Our findings support the hypothesis linking the development of allergic diseases to epithelial barrier defects due to host factors or environmental stressors such as early swimming in chlorinated pools. - Highlights: • We conducted a cross-sectional study of 835 school adolescents. • The airway epithelium integrity was evaluated by measuring serum pneumoproteins. • The risk of allergic diseases was associated with a defective airway epithelium. • Childhood swimming in chlorinated pools can cause persistent epithelial

  8. Environmental risk factors and allergic bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G; Liccardi, G; D'Amato, M; Holgate, S

    2005-09-01

    The prevalence of allergic respiratory diseases such as bronchial asthma has increased in recent years, especially in industrialized countries. A change in the genetic predisposition is an unlikely cause of the increase in allergic diseases because genetic changes in a population require several generations. Consequently, this increase may be explained by changes in environmental factors, including indoor and outdoor air pollution. Over the past two decades, there has been increasing interest in studies of air pollution and its effects on human health. Although the role played by outdoor pollutants in allergic sensitization of the airways has yet to be clarified, a body of evidence suggests that urbanization, with its high levels of vehicle emissions, and a westernized lifestyle are linked to the rising frequency of respiratory allergic diseases observed in most industrialized countries, and there is considerable evidence that asthmatic persons are at increased risk of developing asthma exacerbations with exposure to ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide and inhalable particulate matter. However, it is not easy to evaluate the impact of air pollution on the timing of asthma exacerbations and on the prevalence of asthma in general. As concentrations of airborne allergens and air pollutants are frequently increased contemporaneously, an enhanced IgE-mediated response to aeroallergens and enhanced airway inflammation could account for the increasing frequency of allergic respiratory allergy and bronchial asthma. Pollinosis is frequently used to study the interrelationship between air pollution and respiratory allergy. Climatic factors (temperature, wind speed, humidity, thunderstorms, etc) can affect both components (biological and chemical) of this interaction. By attaching to the surface of pollen grains and of plant-derived particles of paucimicronic size, pollutants could modify not only the morphology of these antigen-carrying agents but also their allergenic

  9. [Epidemiology of allergic diseases in the Tampico-Ciudad Madero- Altamira metropolitan area].

    PubMed

    Vázquez Nava, F; Govea Gómez, C

    1992-01-01

    There is a need to know the epidemiology behavior of health problem, with the purpose of creating the supporting basis for all action to its concern. In the cities Tampico, Madero and Altamira, a systematic exploration of the prevalent situation of allergic disorders did not exist: now, there is a study of 730 people selected at random, by means of questionnaire including 55 items applied to the population as a whole that live in the different zones of this area. It has been found that 54% show an allergic illness, it must be observed that in 66% of them a familial allergic history existed, whereas 45% has seasoning crisis environmental-related. PMID:1514011

  10. Long-term exposure to house dust mite leads to suppression of allergic airway disease despite persistent lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, Sonali J.; Adami, Alexander J.; Szczepanek, Steven M.; Ehsan, Mohsin; Natarajan, Prabitha; Guernsey, Linda A.; Shahriari, Neda; Rafti, Ektor; Matson, Adam P.; Schramm, Craig M.; Thrall, Roger S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Allergic asthma is a major cause of worldwide morbidity and results from inadequate immune regulation in response to innocuous, environmental antigens. The need exists to understand the mechanisms that promote non-reactivity to human-relevant allergens such as house dust mite (HDM) in order to develop curative therapies for asthma. The aim of our study was to compare the effects of short-, intermediate- and long-term HDM administration in a murine asthma model and determine the ability of long-term HDM exposure to suppress allergic inflammation. Methods C57BL/6 mice were intranasally instilled with HDM for short-term (2 weeks), intermediate-term (5 weeks) and long-term (11 weeks) periods to induce allergic airway disease (AAD). Severity of AAD was compared across all stages of the model via both immunologic and pulmonary parameters. Results Short- and intermediate-term HDM exposure stimulated development of AAD that included eosinophilia in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), pronounced airway hyper-reactivity (AHR), and evidence of lung inflammation. Long-term HDM exposure promoted suppression of AAD, with loss of BAL eosinophilia and AHR despite persistent mononuclear inflammation in the lungs. Suppression of AAD with long-term HDM exposure was associated with an increase in both Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and IL-10+ alveolar macrophages at the site of inflammation. Conclusions This model recapitulates key features of human asthma and may facilitate investigation into the mechanisms that promote immunological tolerance against clinically relevant aeroallergens. PMID:25924733

  11. Genome-wide association analysis of eosinophilic esophagitis provides insight into the tissue specificity of this allergic disease

    PubMed Central

    Kottyan, Leah C.; Davis, Benjamin P.; Sherrill, Joseph D.; Liu, Kan; Rochman, Mark; Kaufman, Kenneth; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Vaughn, Samuel; Lazaro, Sara; Rupert, Andrew M.; Kohram, Mojtaba; Stucke, Emily M.; Kemme, Katherine A.; Magnusen, Albert; He, Hua; Dexheimer, Phillip; Chehade, Mirna; Wood, Robert A.; Pesek, Robbie D.; Vickery, Brian P.; Fleischer, David M.; Lindbad, Robert; Sampson, Hugh A.; Mukkada, Vince; Putnam, Phil E.; Abonia, J. Pablo; Martin, Lisa J.; Harley, John B.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory disorder associated with allergic hypersensitivity to food. We interrogated >1.5 million genetic variants in European EoE cases and subsequently in a multi-site cohort with local and out-of-study control subjects. In addition to replication of the 5q22 locus (meta-analysis p = 1.9×10−16), we identified association at 2p23 (encoding CAPN14, p = 2.5×10−10). CAPN14 was specifically expressed in the esophagus, dynamically upregulated as a function of disease activity and genetic haplotype and after exposure of epithelial cells to IL-13, and located in an epigenetic hotspot modified by IL-13. There was enriched esophageal expression for the genes neighboring the top 208 EoE sequence variants. Multiple allergic sensitization loci were associated with EoE susceptibility (4.8×10−2 < p < 5.1×10−11). We propose a model that elucidates the tissue specific nature of EoE that involves the interplay of allergic sensitization with an EoE-specific, IL-13–inducible esophageal response involving CAPN14. PMID:25017104

  12. Management of Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Sausen, Verra O.; Marks, Katherine E.; Sausen, Kenneth P.; Self, Timothy H.

    2005-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is the most common chronic childhood disease. Reduced quality of life is frequently caused by this IgE-mediated disease, including sleep disturbance with subsequent decreased school performance. Asthma and exercise-induced bronchospasm are commonly seen concurrently with allergic rhinitis, and poorly controlled allergic rhinitis negatively affects asthma outcomes. Nonsedating antihistamines or intranasal azelastine are effective agents to manage allergic rhinitis, often in combination with oral decongestants. For moderate to severe persistent disease, intranasal corticosteroids are the most effiective agents. Some patients require concomitant intranasal corticosteroids and nonsedating antihistamines for optimal management. Other available agents include leukotriene receptor antagonists, intranasal cromolyn, intranasal ipratropium, specific immunotherapy, and anti-IgE therapy. PMID:23118635

  13. Equine respiratory pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Foreman, J H

    1999-12-01

    Differentiation of diseases of the equine respiratory tract is based on history, clinical signs, auscultation, endoscopy, imaging, and sampling of airway exudate. Upper respiratory therapies include surgical correction of airway obstructions; flushing of localized abscesses (strangles), guttural pouch disease, or sinusitis; and oral or parenteral antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapy if deemed necessary. Pneumonia usually is treated with antimicrobials, anti-inflammatories, and bronchodilators. Pleural drainage is indicated if significant pleural effusion is present. The most commonly used therapies for early inflammatory and chronic allergic obstructive conditions include bronchodilators and anti-inflammatories. Acute respiratory distress, particularly acute pulmonary edema, is treated with diuretics (usually furosemide), intranasal oxygen, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and alleviation of the underlying cause. Furosemide also had been used in North America as a race-day preventative for exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH), but recent data have shown that furosemide may be a performance-enhancing agent itself. PMID:10589473

  14. [The incidence of occupationally-induced allergic skin diseases in a large flower market].

    PubMed

    Hausen, B M; Oestmann, G

    1988-01-01

    150 questionnaires as well as epicutaneous tests in 56 individuals from a total of 675 persons cultivating and selling ornamental plants at the largest German flower market revealed that half of those investigated were suffering from allergic contact dermatitis. The leading plant species with sensitizing properties was found to be the chrysanthemum, followed by tulips and Alstroemeria cultivars. Allergic reactions to daffodils and primulas were rarely observed. Most of the reactions obtained with other Compositae species such as arnica, marguerite, sunflower, tansy and yarrow must be interpreted as cross-reactions due to the fact that cross-reactivity predominates within the sesquiterpene lactone constituents of the various Compositae species. PMID:2971519

  15. The upper respiratory tract microbiome and its potential role in bovine respiratory disease and otitis media.

    PubMed

    Lima, Svetlana F; Teixeira, Andre Gustavo V; Higgins, Catherine H; Lima, Fabio S; Bicalho, Rodrigo C

    2016-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract (URT) hosts a complex microbial community of commensal microorganisms and potential pathogens. Analyzing the composition and nature of the healthy URT microbiota and how it changes over time will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of pneumonia and otitis. A longitudinal study was conducted including 174 Holstein calves that were divided in four groups: healthy calves, calves diagnosed with pneumonia, otitis or both diseases. Deep pharyngeal swabs were collected on days 3, 14, 28, and 35 of life, and next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene as well as quantitative PCR was performed. The URT of Holstein dairy calves aged 3 to 35 days revealed to host a highly diverse bacterial community. The relative abundances of the bacterial genera Mannheimia, Moraxella, and Mycoplasma were significantly higher in diseased versus healthy animals, and the total bacterial load of newborn calves at day 3 was higher for animals that developed pneumonia than for healthy animals. Our results corroborate the existing knowledge that species of Mannheimia and Mycoplasma are important pathogens in pneumonia and otitis. Furthermore, they suggest that species of Moraxella can potentially cause the same disorders (pneumonia and otitis), and that high neonatal bacterial load is a key contributor to the development of pneumonia. PMID:27363739

  16. The upper respiratory tract microbiome and its potential role in bovine respiratory disease and otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Svetlana F.; Teixeira, Andre Gustavo V.; Higgins, Catherine H.; Lima, Fabio S.; Bicalho, Rodrigo C.

    2016-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract (URT) hosts a complex microbial community of commensal microorganisms and potential pathogens. Analyzing the composition and nature of the healthy URT microbiota and how it changes over time will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of pneumonia and otitis. A longitudinal study was conducted including 174 Holstein calves that were divided in four groups: healthy calves, calves diagnosed with pneumonia, otitis or both diseases. Deep pharyngeal swabs were collected on days 3, 14, 28, and 35 of life, and next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene as well as quantitative PCR was performed. The URT of Holstein dairy calves aged 3 to 35 days revealed to host a highly diverse bacterial community. The relative abundances of the bacterial genera Mannheimia, Moraxella, and Mycoplasma were significantly higher in diseased versus healthy animals, and the total bacterial load of newborn calves at day 3 was higher for animals that developed pneumonia than for healthy animals. Our results corroborate the existing knowledge that species of Mannheimia and Mycoplasma are important pathogens in pneumonia and otitis. Furthermore, they suggest that species of Moraxella can potentially cause the same disorders (pneumonia and otitis), and that high neonatal bacterial load is a key contributor to the development of pneumonia. PMID:27363739

  17. Prevalence and risk factors of asthma and allergic diseases in primary schoolchildren living in Bushehr, Iran: phase I, III ISAAC protocol.

    PubMed

    Farrokhi, Shokrollah; Gheybi, Mohammad Kazzem; Movahhed, Ali; Dehdari, Reyhaneh; Gooya, Mostafa; Keshvari, Saman; Gholampour, Hossein; Mansourian, Zohreh; Khosravi, Yasaman; Ghahramani, Forough; Zandi, Sahar; Etemadan, Razieh; Tahmasebi, Rahim; Reaisi, Alireza; Keshmiri, Saeed; Fadaizadeh, Lida; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza

    2014-10-01

    Asthma and allergic diseases present a major health burden. Information on the prevalence of these diseases indicates that these diseases are increasing in various parts of the world. It was hoped that this study would be helpful to health system policy-makers in planning allergy prevention programs in the region.The prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases and relation between the various risk factors involved were assessed among schoolchildren in the city of Bushehr, Iran. The ISAAC Phase I and III questionnaires were completed by parents of 1280 children aged 6-7 years and self-completed by 1115 students aged 13-14 years.The prevalence of atopic eczema, allergic rhinitis and asthma among 6-7 year-old students were 12.1%, 11.8% and 6.7%, respectively. While, the prevalence of these diseases among 13-14 year-old students were found to be 19%, 30% and 7.6%, respectively. There was an association between asthma and allergic rhinitis as well as eczema (p<0.05). Consumption of fast food as a risk factor was significantly associated with asthma (p=0.03).The prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases was high among schoolchildren in the city of Bushehr, Iran. Also an association was observed between the fast food consumption and asthma. PMID:25150076

  18. NIOSH testimony on cancer and respiratory diseases before the Subcommittee on Labor Standards, House Committee on Education and Labor by R. F. Coene, April 9, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-09

    Testimony concerned the efforts of the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in the area of cancer and respiratory disease. The number of recognized occupational carcinogenic substances was long and continued to grow. The effort to identify these hazardous elements in the workplace was complex as many of the agents work in concert with others. The long latency period of cancer in the human body has prevented us from knowing the real prevalence of workrelated cases of the disease. Very high levels of production of many of these toxic chemicals have only occurred since the 1960s. Workers are also at risk of contracting a wide variety of nonmalignant occupational diseases and disorders such as respiratory disease. Inhalation was by far the most important route of industrial substances entry into the worker's body. Such inhalation could result in irritation, inflammation, allergic reactions, edema, emphysema, fibrosis, or cancer. The most important nonmalignant occupational respiratory diseases included coal worker's pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, byssinosis, and silicosis. Offending agents include cotton dust, coal dust, asbestos fibers, and silica dust. Recent epidemiologic studies suggestive of a relationship between occupation and cancer were listed.

  19. The global burden of chronic respiratory disease in adults.

    PubMed

    Burney, P; Jarvis, D; Perez-Padilla, R

    2015-01-01

    With an aging global population, chronic respiratory diseases are becoming a more prominent cause of death and disability. Age-standardised death rates from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are highest in low-income regions of the world, particularly South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, although airflow obstruction is relatively uncommon in these areas. Airflow obstruction is, by contrast, more common in regions with a high prevalence of cigarette smoking. COPD mortality is much more closely related to the prevalence of a low forced vital capacity which is, in turn, associated with poverty. Mortality from asthma is less common than mortality from COPD, but it is also relatively more common in poorer areas, particularly Oceania, South and South-East Asia, the Middle East and Africa. Again this contrasts with the asthma prevalence among adults, which is highest in high-income regions. In high-income areas, mortality due to asthma, which is predominantly an adult problem, has fallen substantially in recent decades with the spread of new guidelines for treatment that emphasise the use of inhaled steroids to control the disease. Although mortality rates have been falling, the prevalence of atopy has been increasing between generations in Western Europe. Changes in the prevalence of wheeze among adults has been more varied and may have been influenced by the reduction in smoking and the increase in the use of inhaled steroids. PMID:25519785

  20. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus modifies innate immunity and alters disease outcome in pigs subsequently infected with porcine respiratory coronavirus: implications for respiratory viral co-infections.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwonil; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Alekseev, Konstantin P; Fang, Ying; Tang, Yuxin; Saif, Linda J

    2009-11-01

    The innate immune response is critical for host defence against respiratory coronaviruses (CoVs). This study demonstrated that an ongoing respiratory virus infection compromises innate immune responses and affects the pathogenesis of a respiratory CoV co-infection. An innate immunosuppressive respiratory virus infection was established by infecting weaned pigs with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV); 10 days later, the pigs were exposed to porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV). The PRRSV/PRCV dual-infected pigs had reduced weight gains, a higher incidence of fever and more severe pneumonia compared with either single infection. Significant suppression of innate immune responses [reduced alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) levels in the lungs and reduced blood natural killer cell cytotoxicity] by the ongoing PRRSV infection was observed in dual-infected pigs, which coincided with exacerbated pneumonia during early PRCV infection. The subsequent PRCV infection led to enhanced PRRSV replication in the lungs and a trend towards increased serum T-helper type 1 (Th1) (IFN-gamma) but decreased Th2 [interleukin (IL)-4] responses, further exacerbating PRRSV pneumonia. Following PRCV infection, more severe PRRSV-related pulmonary alveolar macrophage (PAM) apoptosis occurred, as determined by an in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling assay, suggesting increased PRRSV replication in PAMs. Collectively, these observations suggest interactive effects between PRCV and PRRSV via early innate (IFN-alpha) and later adaptive Th1 (IFN-gamma) and Th2 (IL-4) immune responses. These findings imply that an existing immunomodulating respiratory viral co-infection may be a contributing factor to more severe pneumonia in respiratory CoV disease. This study provides new insights into host-pathogen interactions related to co-infection by CoVs and other respiratory viruses. PMID:19656969

  1. Sublingual immunotherapy for pediatric allergic rhinitis: The clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Licari, Amelia; Caimmi, Silvia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is estimated to affect 10%-20% of pediatric population and it is caused by the IgE-sensitization to environmental allergens, most importantly grass pollens and house dust mites. Allergic rhinitis can influence patient’s daily activity severely and may precede the development of asthma, especially if it is not diagnosed and treated correctly. In addition to subcutaneous immunotherapy, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) represents the only treatment being potentially able to cure allergic respiratory diseases, by modulating the immune system activity. This review clearly summarizes and analyzes the available randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials, which aimed at evaluating the effectiveness and the safety of grass pollen and house dust mite SLIT for the specific treatment of pediatric allergic rhinitis. Our analysis demonstrates the good evidence supporting the efficacy of SLIT for allergic rhinitis to grass pollens in children, whereas trials regarding pediatric allergic rhinitis to house dust mites present lower quality, although several studies supported its usefulness. PMID:26862501

  2. Sublingual immunotherapy for pediatric allergic rhinitis: The clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Licari, Amelia; Caimmi, Silvia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Allergic rhinitis is estimated to affect 10%-20% of pediatric population and it is caused by the IgE-sensitization to environmental allergens, most importantly grass pollens and house dust mites. Allergic rhinitis can influence patient's daily activity severely and may precede the development of asthma, especially if it is not diagnosed and treated correctly. In addition to subcutaneous immunotherapy, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) represents the only treatment being potentially able to cure allergic respiratory diseases, by modulating the immune system activity. This review clearly summarizes and analyzes the available randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials, which aimed at evaluating the effectiveness and the safety of grass pollen and house dust mite SLIT for the specific treatment of pediatric allergic rhinitis. Our analysis demonstrates the good evidence supporting the efficacy of SLIT for allergic rhinitis to grass pollens in children, whereas trials regarding pediatric allergic rhinitis to house dust mites present lower quality, although several studies supported its usefulness. PMID:26862501

  3. Contribution of Bordetella bronchiseptica Filamentous Hemagglutinin and Pertactin to Respiratory Disease in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory disease in pigs is the most important health concern for swine producers today. Bordetella bronchiseptica is widely prevalent in swine populations and has multiple roles in respiratory disease. It is the primary etiologic agent of atrophic rhinitis, bronchopneumonia in young pigs, and ha...

  4. The Contribution of Infections with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Viruses to Bovine Respiratory Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contribution of bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) to the development of bovine respiratory disease is the sum of a number of different factors. These factors include the contribution of acute uncomplicated BVDV infections, the high incidence of respiratory disease in animals persistently inf...

  5. Contribution of Bordetella bronchiseptica Filamentous Hemagglutinin and Pertactin to Respiratory Disease in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory disease in pigs is the most important health concern for swine producers today. Bordetella bronchiseptica is pervasive in swine populations and plays multiple roles in respiratory disease. It is a primary etiologic agent of atrophic rhinitis, bronchopneumonia in young pigs, and has been ...

  6. [The prevention of allergic diseases with a hypoallergenic formula: a follow-up at 24 months. The preliminary results].

    PubMed

    de Seta, L; Siani, P; Cirillo, G; Di Gruttola, M; Cimaduomo, L; Coletta, S

    1994-01-01

    One hundred-eight infants from atopic families were admitted to the study. Each had at least one first-degree relative affected by asthma or rhinitis, conjunctivitis, eczema, cow's milk protein intolerance. All infants not breast fed were hypoallergenic formula. 46 infants were breast fed, 39 were bottle fed by the ordinary formula and 23 received the hypoallergenic one. No other food was introduced up to 6 months. Cow's milk proteins, egg, poultry and fish were introduced after 6 months. All infants were followed up to 24 months. Incidence of allergic diseases up to 24 months was not significantly different among the 3 groups. PMID:7971447

  7. Allergic inflammation--innately homeostatic.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Laurence E; Locksley, Richard M

    2015-03-01

    Allergic inflammation is associated closely with parasite infection but also asthma and other common allergic diseases. Despite the engagement of similar immunologic pathways, parasitized individuals often show no outward manifestations of allergic disease. In this perspective, we present the thesis that allergic inflammatory responses play a primary role in regulating circadian and environmental inputs involved with tissue homeostasis and metabolic needs. Parasites feed into these pathways and thus engage allergic inflammation to sustain aspects of the parasitic life cycle. In response to parasite infection, an adaptive and regulated immune response is layered on the host effector response, but in the setting of allergy, the effector response remains unregulated, thus leading to the cardinal features of disease. Further understanding of the homeostatic pressures driving allergic inflammation holds promise to further our understanding of human health and the treatment of these common afflictions. PMID:25414367

  8. Progress in pediatrics in 2013: choices in allergology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hypertension, infectious diseases, neonatology, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Vottero, Alessandra; Dascola, Carlotta Povesi; Mirra, Virginia; Sperli, Francesco; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    This review will provide new information related to pathophysiology and management of specific diseases that have been addressed by selected articles published in the Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2013, focusing on allergology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hypertension, infectious diseases, neonatology, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses in children. Recommendations for interpretation of skin prick test to foods in atopic eczema, management of allergic conjunctivitis, hypertension and breastfeeding in women treated with antiepileptic drugs and healthy breakfast have been reported. Epidemiological studies have given emphasis to high incidence of autoimmune disorders in patients with Turner syndrome, increasing prevalence of celiac disease, frequency of hypertension in adolescents, incidence and risk factor for retinopathy of prematurity. Advances in prevention include elucidation of the role of probiotics in reducing occurrence of allergies and feeding intolerance, and events of foetal life that influence later onset of diseases. Mechanistic studies suggested a role for vitamin D deficiency in asthma and type 1 diabetes and for reactivation of Varicella-Zoster virus in aseptic meningitis. Regarding diagnosis, a new mean for the diagnosis of hyperbilirubinaemia in newborns, a score for recognition of impaired nutritional status and growth and criteria for early Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome have been suggested. New therapeutic approaches consist of use of etanercept for reducing insulin dose in type 1 diabetes, probiotics in atopic eczema, and melatonin in viral infections. PMID:25015124

  9. Respiratory diseases call for special attention from clinical and translational science.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chunxue

    2013-12-01

    Respiratory diseases will become one of the top 3 leading causes of estimated mortality in 2020 and become about one third of total causes of estimated mortality. The journal of Translational Respiratory Medicine is a truly international, peer-reviewed journal devoted to the publication of articles on outstanding work with translational potentials between basic research and clinical application to understanding respiratory disease. Translational respiratory medicine will more focus on biomarker identification and validation in pulmonary diseases in combination with clinical informatics, targeted proteomics, bioinformatics, systems medicine, or mathematical science; on different translational strategies of cell-based therapy to clinical application to treat lung diseases; on targeted therapies in combination with personalized medicine; and on distant electronic medicine to monitor a large population of people's health. Translational Respiratory Medicine is an additional but unique opportunity for scientists and clinicians who work on pulmonary diseases to publish their outstanding findings, initiative results, and critical and perceptive opinions in the journal. PMID:27234383

  10. Impact of early life exposures to geohelminth infections on the development of vaccine immunity, allergic sensitization, and allergic inflammatory diseases in children living in tropical Ecuador: the ECUAVIDA birth cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Geohelminth infections are highly prevalent infectious diseases of childhood in many regions of the Tropics, and are associated with significant morbidity especially among pre-school and school-age children. There is growing concern that geohelminth infections, particularly exposures occurring during early life in utero through maternal infections or during infancy, may affect vaccine immunogenicity in populations among whom these infections are endemic. Further, the low prevalence of allergic disease in the rural Tropics has been attributed to the immune modulatory effects of these infections and there is concern that widespread use of anthelmintic treatment in high-risk groups may be associated with an increase in the prevalence of allergic diseases. Because the most widely used vaccines are administered during the first year of life and the antecedents of allergic disease are considered to occur in early childhood, the present study has been designed to investigate the impact of early exposures to geohelminths on the development of protective immunity to vaccines, allergic sensitization, and allergic disease. Methods/Design A cohort of 2,403 neonates followed up to 8 years of age. Primary exposures are infections with geohelminth parasites during the last trimester of pregnancy and the first 2 years of life. Primary study outcomes are the development of protective immunity to common childhood vaccines (i.e. rotavirus, Haemophilus influenzae type B, Hepatitis B, tetanus toxoid, and oral poliovirus type 3) during the first 5 years of life, the development of eczema by 3 years of age, the development of allergen skin test reactivity at 5 years of age, and the development of asthma at 5 and 8 years of age. Potential immunological mechanisms by which geohelminth infections may affect the study outcomes will be investigated also. Discussion The study will provide information on the potential effects of early exposures to geohelminths (during pregnancy and

  11. [Antihistamines in allergic rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Kruszewski, Jerzy

    2007-01-01

    Antihistamines are the first line of pharmacotherapy in allergic diseases, especially in allergic rhinitis. The article also presents the interesting 2005-2007 publications on the use of antihistamine in practical point of view, especially the newly introduced ones (desloratadine, fexofenadine, levocetirizine) and those which are to be introduced soon (rupatadine). The efficacy in skin histamine provocation model and various clinical model were discussed. PMID:18260244

  12. [Therapy of allergic rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Klimek, Ludger; Sperl, Annette

    2016-03-01

    If the avoidance of the provoking allergen is insufficient or not possible, medical treatment can be tried. Therapeutics of the first choice for the treatment of the seasonal and persistent allergic rhinitis are antihistamines and topical glucocorticoids. Chromones are less effective so they should only be used for adults with a special indication, for example during pregnancy. Beside the avoidance of the allergen the immunotherapy is the only causal treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:27120870

  13. Dust exposure and respiratory disease in U. S. coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Seixas, N.S.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of the dust standards set by the Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969 in preventing obstructive lung disease by considering the exposure-response relationship in a group of miners whose exposure began in or after 1970 when the regulations took effect. Exposing-response relationships were examined among 1,270 miners from the National Study of Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between cumulative exposure and pulmonary function test results (FVC, FEV{sub 1}, and FEV{sub 1}/FVC) and respiratory symptoms were modeled using linear and logistic regression while controlling for smoking. The results over a 15 year exposure period indicated statistically significant positive associations of cumulative exposure with decrements in FEV{sub 1}, FEV{sub 1}/FVC, the likelihood of these indices being less than 80% of predicted, and symptoms, including chronic bronchitis, breathlessness and wheeze with shortness of breath. The estimated effect of exposure of FEV{sub 1} was 5.5 ml per mg/m{sup 3} -years which was substantially larger than previously reported estimates. However, examination of PFTs within five years of beginning work demonstrated a rapid initial exposure-related loss of both FVC and FEV{sub 1} and no additional exposure-related loss over the following 10 years. The results of the study suggest that exposure to coal mine dust at concentrations present since the CMHSA regulations were put into effect have not been completely successful in preventing respiratory effects. Determination of the long-term significance of the initial exposure-response relationship observed requires additional follow-up of this cohort.

  14. Pulmonary megakaryocytes: "missing link" between cardiovascular and respiratory disease?

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, G K; Talbot, I C

    1986-01-01

    Pulmonary megakaryocytes were quantitated in a series of 30 consecutive hospital necropsies using a two stage immunoperoxidase stain for factor VIII related antigen. In all 30 cases they were found with a mean density of 14.65 megakaryocytes/cm2 in lung sections of 5 micron in thickness. The maximum concentration of intrapulmonary megakaryocytes was consistently found to be in the central zone of the right upper lobe. Less than 22% of the observed cells possessed abundant cytoplasm, the rest appearing as effete, naked, and seminaked nuclei. The mean megakaryocyte count was found to be increased in association with both respiratory pathology (positive smoking history and impaired lung function) and cardiovascular disease states--shock; thromboembolism; myocardial infarction; and severe atheroma in the abdominal aorta, the coronary circulation, and the circle of Willis. Pulmonary megakaryocytes probably embolise from bone marrow. This may reflect stimulated thrombopoiesis, caused by increased platelet consumption in association with atherosclerotic disease, but it cannot be taken to confirm that the lung is the principal site of platelet production. Images PMID:3531243

  15. Biomass fuels and respiratory diseases: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Torres-Duque, Carlos; Maldonado, Darío; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio; Ezzati, Majid; Viegi, Giovanni

    2008-07-15

    Globally, about 50% of all households and 90% of rural households use solid fuels (coal and biomass) as the main domestic source of energy, thus exposing approximately 50% of the world population-close to 3 billion people-to the harmful effects of these combustion products. There is strong evidence that acute respiratory infections in children and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in women are associated with indoor biomass smoke. Lung cancer in women has been clearly associated with household coal use. Other conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in men and tuberculosis could be also associated but evidence is scarce. According to estimates of the World Health Organization, more than 1.6 million deaths and over 38.5 million disability-adjusted life-years can be attributable to indoor smoke from solid fuels affecting mainly children and women. Interventions to suppress or reduce indoor exposure include behavior changes, improvements of household ventilation, improvements of stoves, and, outstandingly, transitions to better and cleaner fuels. These changes face personal and local beliefs and economic and sociocultural conditions. In addition, selection of fuels should consider cost, sustainability, and protection of the environment. Consequently, complex solutions need to be locally adapted, and involve the commitment and active participation of governments, scientific societies, nongovernmental organizations, and the general community. PMID:18625750

  16. [Allergic fungal sinusitis: is this rare disease an allergy or infection?].

    PubMed

    Berrettini, S; Carabelli, A; Papini, M; Ciancia, E; Sellari Franceschini, S

    1996-10-01

    Allergic Fungal Sinusitis (AFS) is a newly recognized form of benign, non invasive sinusitis the histopathologic features of which are similar to those of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. AFS is a rare condition. However, because treatment and prognosis vary widely, it is important that this disorder be recognized and differentiated from chronic bacterial sinusitis and other forms of fungal sinusitis. AFS does not discriminate by age although it is primarily found in young adults. AFS patients are usually atopic, often having a history of asthma and nasal polyposis. Many have suffered from the symptoms of chronic sinusitis for years while others have had multiple sinus surgery. Radiographs reveal the involvement of multiple sinuses, often with bone destruction. Laboratory findings support an allergic state with a marked increase in eosinophilia and total IgE. At times RAST testing proves positive for fungi and immediate cutaneous reactivity to fungi is also present. Histologic review of the sinus contents reveals characteristic "allergic mucin", with numerous eosinophiles, Charcot-Leyden crystals and fungal hyphae, without any fungi tissue invasion. A wide variety of fungal agents has been implicated, although the majority belong the Dematiacee family. Those patients with allergic mucin but no documented fungi are indicated as having AFS-like syndrome. The pathogenesis of AFS is uncertain. There is controversy in the literature as to what role hypersensitivity (Gell and Coombs type I and type III responses) in infection play. To date current therapeutic recommendations include complete exenteration of all allergic mucin. Adjunctive, short-term systemic steroids often prove useful and nasal steroid spray should be continued for long term. Systemic antifungal agents are not recommended in AFS. Recurrence is common and thus close clinical, endoscopic and radiographic follow-up is important. The clinicopathologic features of one patient with AFS are reported

  17. Occupational respiratory disease in the United Kingdom 1989: a report to the British Thoracic Society and the Society of Occupational Medicine by the SWORD project group.

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, S K; Taylor, V M; McDonald, J C

    1991-01-01

    A voluntary scheme for the surveillance of work related and occupational respiratory disease (SWORD) was established in January 1989 with help from the British Thoracic Society and the Society of Occupational Medicine and support from the Health and Safety Executive. Three hundred and fifty four chest physicians representing 90% of the chest clinics in the United Kingdom and 361 occupational physicians submit reports regularly of newly diagnosed cases of work related respiratory illness with information on age, sex, residence, occupation, and suspected causal agent. In 1989 2101 cases were notified, of which frequent diagnoses were asthma (26%), mesothelioma (16%), pneumoconiosis (15%), benign pleural disease (11%), and allergic alveolitis (6%). Incidence rates calculated against denominators from the Labour Force Survey showed very large differences between occupational groups, especially for asthma and asbestos related diseases. Substantial regional variation in the incidence of asthma was not explained by the geographical distribution of high risk industries and was probably due to differing levels of ascertainment. The results imply that the true frequency of acute occupational respiratory disease in the United Kingdom may have been three times greater than that reported. PMID:2039741

  18. Can probiotic administration during pregnancy and the first year of life effectively reduce the risk of infections and allergic diseases in childhood?

    PubMed

    Esposito, S; Castellazzi, L; Garbarino, F

    2014-01-01

    Infections and allergic disorders are common pediatric diseases. It has been reported that probiotics, which are live microorganisms, confer health benefits to hosts when administered in appropriate amounts. Probiotics have been widely used in the treatment of pediatric infections and allergic disorders through modulating the microbial environment of host. However, it is still not clear whether probiotic administration during pregnancy and/or the first year of life is an efficient approach for the prevention of infections and allergic diseases in childhood. The present study aims to address this question through reviewing previous publications on this topic. Analysis of previous studies suggests that probiotic administration during pregnancy and/or the first year of life could reduce the prevalence of infectious diseases in infancy. The effects of probiotic administration during pregnancy and/or the first year of life on the prevention of allergic disorders are still not clear. In addition, the available studies differ in probiotic species, number of probiotics, dosage of probiotics, inclusion and exclusion criteria, outcomes, and diagnostic and follow-up methods. These differences highlight further studies for better understanding the effects of probiotic administration on the prevention of infections and allergic diseases in childhood. PMID:25620168

  19. Beclomethasone dipropionate hydrofluoroalkane for the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Giuliana; Montalbano, Laura; Cilluffo, Giovanna; Malizia, Velia; Marchese, Donatella; La Grutta, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a common respiratory disease, and its prevalence is increasing all over the world, both in adults and in children. Patients experience symptoms that may negatively impact on physical, social and psychological well-being. Hence, if left untreated, allergic rhinitis may significantly affect quality of life. Under current guidelines, intranasal corticosteroids are considered the most effective drugs and they are recommended as first-line therapy. Among the several corticosteroid intranasal sprays available, beclomethasone dipropionate is one of the most prescribed. Recently, new intranasal hydrofluoroalkane-propelled formulations with little or no impact on the ozone layer have been developed for the treatment of AR. The use of these devices might improve patients' adherence to treatment, avoiding some of the most common side effects associated with aqueous formulations. This review provides the most recent evidence for the efficacy and safety of beclomethasone dipropionate hydrofluoroalkane nasal aerosol in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. PMID:26558604

  20. Natural antibody repertoires: development and functional role in inhibiting allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Kearney, John F; Patel, Preeyam; Stefanov, Emily K; King, R Glenn

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss the effects of microbial exposure on the B cell repertoire. Neonatal exposure to conserved bacterial carbohydrates and phospholipids permanently reprograms the natural antibody repertoire directed toward these antigens by clonal expansion, alterations in clonal dominance, and increased serum antibody levels. These epitopes are present not only in bacterial cell walls, but also in common environmental allergens. Neonatal immunization with bacterial polysaccharide vaccines results in attenuated allergic airway responses to fungi-, house dust mite-, and cockroach-associated allergens in mouse models. The similarities between mouse and human natural antibody repertoires suggest that reduced microbial exposure in children may have the opposite effect, providing a potential mechanistic explanation for the hygiene hypothesis. We propose that understanding the effects of childhood infections on the natural antibody repertoire and the mechanisms of antibody-mediated immunoregulation observed in allergy models will lead to the development of prevention/interventional strategies for treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:25622195

  1. Acute, but not resolved, influenza A infection enhances susceptibility to house dust mite-induced allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Al-Garawi, Amal A; Fattouh, Ramzi; Walker, Tina D; Jamula, Erin B; Botelho, Fernando; Goncharova, Susanna; Reed, Jennifer; Stampfli, Martin R; O'Byrne, Paul M; Coyle, Anthony J; Jordana, Manel

    2009-03-01

    The impact of respiratory viral infections on the emergence of the asthmatic phenotype is a subject of intense investigation. Most experimental studies addressing this issue have used the inert Ag OVA with controversial results. We examined the consequences of exposure to a low dose of the common aeroallergen house dust mite (HDM) during the course of an influenza A infection. First, we delineated the kinetics of the immune-inflammatory response in the lung of mice following intranasal infection with influenza A/PR8/34. Our data demonstrate a peak response during the first 10 days, with considerable albeit not complete resolution at day 39 postinfection (p.i.). At day 7 p.i., mice were exposed, intranasally, to HDM for 10 consecutive days. We observed significantly enhanced eosinophilic inflammation, an expansion in Th2 cells, enhanced HDM-specific IgE and IgG1 responses and increased mucous production. Furthermore, lung mononuclear cells produced enhanced IFN-gamma and IL-5, unchanged IL-13, and reduced IL-4. These immunologic and structural changes lead to marked lung dysfunction. This allergic phenotype occurs at a time when there is a preferential increase in plasmacytoid dendritic cells over myeloid dendritic cells, activated CD8(+) T cells, and increased IFN-gamma production, all of which have been proposed to inhibit allergic responses. In contrast, the inflammatory response elicited by HDM was reduced when exposure occurred during the resolution phase (day 40 p.i.). Interestingly, this was not associated with a reduction in sensitization. Thus, the proinflammatory environment established during an acute influenza A infection enhances Th2-polarized immunity to a low dose of HDM and precipitates marked lung dysfunction. PMID:19234206

  2. Discovery of a novel nidovirus in cattle with respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Sameroff, Stephen; Hesse, Richard A.; Hause, Ben M.; Desai, Aaloki; Jain, Komal; Ian Lipkin, W.

    2015-01-01

    The family Coronaviridae represents a diverse group of vertebrate RNA viruses, all with genomes greater than 26 000 nt. Here, we report the discovery and genetic characterization of a novel virus present in cattle with respiratory disease. Phylogenetic characterization of this virus revealed that it clusters within the subfamily Torovirinae, in the family Coronaviridae. The complete genome consists of only 20 261 nt and represents the smallest reported coronavirus genome. We identified seven ORFs, including the canonical nidovirus ORF1a and ORF1b. Analysis of polyprotein 1ab revealed that this virus, tentatively named bovine nidovirus (BoNV), shares the highest homology with the recently described python-borne nidoviruses and contains several conserved nidovirus motifs, but does not encode the NendoU or O-MT domains that are present in other viruses within the family Coronaviridae. In concert with its reduced genome, the atypical domain architecture indicates that this virus represents a unique lineage within the order Nidovirales. PMID:25918239

  3. An evaluation of antimicrobial therapy for undifferentiated bovine respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Ken G.; Martin, S. Wayne; Shewen, Patricia E.; Menzies, Paula I.

    1990-01-01

    A field trial of antimicrobial therapy for cases of undifferentiated bovine respiratory disease (UBRD) in beef calves was conducted at four Ontario feedlots. The primary purpose of the trial was to evaluate the efficacy of three different antimicrobials (oxytetracycline, penicillin, and trimethoprim-sulfadoxine) in the treatment of UBRD occurring within the first 28 days postarrival. The response, relapse, and case fatality rates overall were 85.7%, 14.8%, and 1.4%, respectively, and were not significantly different among the three antimicrobials evaluated. Weight gains of calves treated with the different drugs were not statistically different over the feeding period. Calves that suffered a relapse posttreatment were first treated significantly earlier (p<0.001) in the postarrival period than those that did not relapse. Considered together, treated calves gained significantly less (p<0.05) over the first 28 days and throughout the entire feeding period than controls that were never sick. Cases of UBRD that responded to therapy and did not relapse had rates of gain that were not significantly different from the controls. PMID:17423676

  4. Stimulation of Respiratory Motor Output and Ventilation in a Murine Model of Pompe Disease by Ampakines.

    PubMed

    ElMallah, Mai K; Pagliardini, Silvia; Turner, Sara M; Cerreta, Anthony J; Falk, Darin J; Byrne, Barry J; Greer, John J; Fuller, David D

    2015-09-01

    Pompe disease results from a mutation in the acid α-glucosidase gene leading to lysosomal glycogen accumulation. Respiratory insufficiency is common, and the current U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment, enzyme replacement, has limited effectiveness. Ampakines are drugs that enhance α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor responses and can increase respiratory motor drive. Recent work indicates that respiratory motor drive can be blunted in Pompe disease, and thus pharmacologic stimulation of breathing may be beneficial. Using a murine Pompe model with the most severe clinical genotype (the Gaa(-/-) mouse), our primary objective was to test the hypothesis that ampakines can stimulate respiratory motor output and increase ventilation. Our second objective was to confirm that neuropathology was present in Pompe mouse medullary respiratory control neurons. The impact of ampakine CX717 on breathing was determined via phrenic and hypoglossal nerve recordings in anesthetized mice and whole-body plethysmography in unanesthetized mice. The medulla was examined using standard histological methods coupled with immunochemical markers of respiratory control neurons. Ampakine CX717 robustly increased phrenic and hypoglossal inspiratory bursting and reduced respiratory cycle variability in anesthetized Pompe mice, and it increased inspiratory tidal volume in unanesthetized Pompe mice. CX717 did not significantly alter these variables in wild-type mice. Medullary respiratory neurons showed extensive histopathology in Pompe mice. Ampakines stimulate respiratory neuromotor output and ventilation in Pompe mice, and therefore they have potential as an adjunctive therapy in Pompe disease. PMID:25569118

  5. A novel thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide, attenuates allergic airway disease by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Sun; Kim, So Ri; Park, Hee Sun; Park, Seoung Ju; Min, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Ka Young; Choe, Yeong Hun; Hong, Sang Hyun; Han, Hyo Jin; Lee, Young Rae; Kim, Jong Suk; Atlas, Daphne; Lee, Yong Chul

    2007-12-31

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Recent studies have demonstrated that antioxidants are able to reduce airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in animal models of allergic airway disease. A newly developed antioxidant, small molecular weight thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide (AD4) has been shown to increase cellular levels of glutathione and to attenuate oxidative stress related disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. However, the effects of AD4 on allergic airway disease such as asthma are unknown. We used ovalbumin (OVA)-inhaled mice to evaluate the role of AD4 in allergic airway disease. In this study with OVA-inhaled mice, the increased ROS generation, the increased levels of Th2 cytokines and VEGF, the increased vascular permeability, the increased mucus production, and the increased airway resistance in the lungs were significantly reduced by the administration of AD4. We also found that the administration of AD4 decreased the increases of the NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) levels in nuclear protein extracts of lung tissues after OVA inhalation. These results suggest that AD4 attenuates airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha as well as reducing ROS generation in allergic airway disease. PMID:18160846

  6. Timely diagnosis of dairy calf respiratory disease using a standardized scoring system.

    PubMed

    McGuirk, Sheila M; Peek, Simon F

    2014-12-01

    Respiratory disease of young dairy calves is a significant cause of morbidity, mortality, economic loss, and animal welfare concern but there is no gold standard diagnostic test for antemortem diagnosis. Clinical signs typically used to make a diagnosis of respiratory disease of calves are fever, cough, ocular or nasal discharge, abnormal breathing, and auscultation of abnormal lung sounds. Unfortunately, routine screening of calves for respiratory disease on the farm is rarely performed and until more comprehensive, practical and affordable respiratory disease-screening tools such as accelerometers, pedometers, appetite monitors, feed consumption detection systems, remote temperature recording devices, radiant heat detectors, electronic stethoscopes, and thoracic ultrasound are validated, timely diagnosis of respiratory disease can be facilitated using a standardized scoring system. We have developed a scoring system that attributes severity scores to each of four clinical parameters; rectal temperature, cough, nasal discharge, ocular discharge or ear position. A total respiratory score of five points or higher (provided that at least two abnormal parameters are observed) can be used to distinguish affected from unaffected calves. This can be applied as a screening tool twice-weekly to identify pre-weaned calves with respiratory disease thereby facilitating early detection. Coupled with effective treatment protocols, this scoring system will reduce post-weaning pneumonia, chronic pneumonia, and otitis media. PMID:25410122

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF RESPIRATORY DISEASE IN RATS FOLLOWING NEONATAL INOCULATION WITH A RAT-ADAPTED INFLUENZA VIRUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neonatal F344 rats were infected with a rat-adapted influenza virus (RAIV) as a potential model to study the combined effects of early life viral respiratory infection with air pollutant dosimetry and toxic responses, as well as on the development of respiratory disease and incre...

  8. Allergic fungal otomastoiditis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiung-Ming; Chiang, Ching-Wen

    2013-04-01

    Allergic mucin is described as thick, peanut butter-like mucus impacted in the paranasal sinuses of patients with allergic fungal rhinosinusitis. The presence of allergic mucin in the middle ear has never been reported. We encountered a 65-year-old female with allergic mucin found impacted in her left middle ear and mastoid cavity during revised tympanoplasty surgery at our institute. Bilateral endoscopic sinus surgery performed 3 months later showed no evidence of fungal infection or allergic mucin in her paranasal sinuses. We report the case herein and propose the term allergic fungal otomastoiditis for this disease entity. PMID:22825725

  9. Prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among patients with systemic arterial hypertension without respiratory symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Rabahi, Marcelo Fouad; Pereira, Sheila Alves; Silva Júnior, José Laerte Rodrigues; de Rezende, Aline Pacheco; Castro da Costa, Adeliane; de Sousa Corrêa, Krislainy; Conde, Marcus Barreto

    2015-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often delayed until later stages of the disease. The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of COPD among adults on treatment for systemic arterial hypertension independently of the presence of respiratory symptoms. Methods This cross-sectional study included adults aged ≥40 years with tobacco/occupational exposure and systemic arterial hypertension diagnosed at three Primary Health Care facilities in Goiania, Brazil. Patients were evaluated using a standardized respiratory questionnaire and spirometry. COPD prevalence was measured considering the value of forced vital capacity and/or forced expiratory volume in 1 second <0.70. Results Of a total of 570 subjects, 316 (55%) met inclusion criteria and were invited to participate. Two hundred and thirty-three (73.7%) patients with arterial hypertension reported at least one respiratory symptom, while 83 (26.3%) reported no respiratory symptoms; 41 (17.6%) patients with arterial hypertension and at least one respiratory symptom, and 10 (12%) patients with arterial hypertension but no respiratory symptoms were diagnosed with COPD (P=0.24). The prevalence of COPD in people with no previous COPD diagnosis was greater among those with no respiratory symptoms (100%) than among those with respiratory symptoms (56.1%) (P=0.01). Conclusion Our findings suggest that regardless of the presence of respiratory symptoms, individuals aged ≥40 years with tobacco/occupational exposure and arterial hypertension may benefit from spirometric evaluation. PMID:26257517

  10. IL-18 Does not Increase Allergic Airway Disease in Mice When Produced by BCG

    PubMed Central

    Amniai, L.; Biet, F.; Marquillies, P.; Locht, C.; Pestel, J.; Tonnel, A.-B.; Duez, C.

    2007-01-01

    Whilst BCG inhibits allergic airway responses in murine models, IL-18 has adversary effects depending on its environment. We therefore constructed a BCG strain producing murine IL-18 (BCG-IL-18) and evaluated its efficiency to prevent an asthma-like reaction in mice. BALB/cByJ mice were sensitized (day (D) 1 and D10) by intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA)-alum and primary (D20–22) and secondary (D62, 63) challenged with OVA aerosols. BCG or BCG-IL-18 were intraperitonealy administered 1 hour before each immunization (D1 and D10). BCG-IL-18 and BCG were shown to similarly inhibit the development of AHR, mucus production, eosinophil influx, and local Th2 cytokine production in BAL, both after the primary and secondary challenge. These data show that IL-18 did not increase allergic airway responses in the context of the mycobacterial infection, and suggest that BCG-IL-18 and BCG are able to prevent the development of local Th2 responses and therefore inhibit allergen-induced airway responses even after restimulation. PMID:18299704

  11. Death from respiratory diseases and temperature in Shiraz, Iran (2006-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadbakhsh, Manizhe; Khanjani, Narges; Bahrampour, Abbas; Haghighi, Pegah Shoae

    2016-07-01

    Some studies have suggested that the number of deaths increases as temperatures drops or rises above human thermal comfort zone. The present study was conducted to evaluate the relation between respiratory-related mortality and temperature in Shiraz, Iran. In this ecological study, data about the number of respiratory-related deaths sorted according to age and gender as well as average, minimum, and maximum ambient air temperatures during 2007-2011 were examined. The relationship between air temperature and respiratory-related deaths was calculated by crude and adjusted negative binomial regression analysis. It was adjusted for humidity, rainfall, wind speed and direction, and air pollutants including CO, NOx, PM10, SO2, O3, and THC. Spearman and Pearson correlations were also calculated between air temperature and respiratory-related deaths. The analysis was done using MINITAB16 and STATA 11. During this period, 2598 respiratory-related deaths occurred in Shiraz. The minimum number of respiratory-related deaths among all subjects happened in an average temperature of 25 °C. There was a significant inverse relationship between average temperature- and respiratory-related deaths among all subjects and women. There was also a significant inverse relationship between average temperature and respiratory-related deaths among all subjects, men and women in the next month. The results suggest that cold temperatures can increase the number of respiratory-related deaths and therefore policies to reduce mortality in cold weather, especially in patients with respiratory diseases should be implemented.

  12. Exonic Variants Associated with Development of Aspirin Exacerbated Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, HunSoo; Park, Jong Sook; Bae, Da-Jeong; Song, Hyun-Ji; Choi, Inseon S.; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Park, Hea-Sim; Kim, Lyoung Hyo; Namgoong, Suhg; Kim, Ji On; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Park, Choon-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is one phenotype of asthma, often occurring in the form of a severe and sudden attack. Due to the time-consuming nature and difficulty of oral aspirin challenge (OAC) for AERD diagnosis, non-invasive biomarkers have been sought. The aim of this study was to identify AERD-associated exonic SNPs and examine the diagnostic potential of a combination of these candidate SNPs to predict AERD. DNA from 165 AERD patients, 397 subjects with aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA), and 398 normal controls were subjected to an Exome BeadChip assay containing 240K SNPs. 1,023 models (210-1) were generated from combinations of the top 10 SNPs, selected by the p-values in association with AERD. The area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves was calculated for each model. SNP Function Portal and PolyPhen-2 were used to validate the functional significance of candidate SNPs. An exonic SNP, exm537513 in HLA-DPB1, showed the lowest p-value (p = 3.40×10−8) in its association with AERD risk. From the top 10 SNPs, a combination model of 7 SNPs (exm537513, exm83523, exm1884673, exm538564, exm2264237, exm396794, and exm791954) showed the best AUC of 0.75 (asymptotic p-value of 7.94×10−21), with 34% sensitivity and 93% specificity to discriminate AERD from ATA. Amino acid changes due to exm83523 in CHIA were predicted to be “probably damaging” to the structure and function of the protein, with a high score of ‘1’. A combination model of seven SNPs may provide a useful, non-invasive genetic marker combination for predicting AERD. PMID:25372592

  13. Interleukin-1 Receptor and Caspase-1 Are Required for the Th17 Response in Nitrogen Dioxide–Promoted Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rebecca A.; Ather, Jennifer L.; Lundblad, Lennart K. A.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Budd, Ralph C.; Alcorn, John F.; Flavell, Richard A.; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an environmental pollutant and endogenously generated oxidant associated with the development, severity, and exacerbation of asthma. NO2 exposure is capable of allergically sensitizing mice to the innocuous inhaled antigen ovalbumin (OVA), promoting neutrophil and eosinophil recruitment, and a mixed Th2/Th17 response upon antigen challenge that is reminiscent of severe asthma. However, the identity of IL-17A–producing cells and the mechanisms governing their ontogeny in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease remain unstudied. We measured the kinetics of lung inflammation after antigen challenge in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease, including inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage and antigen-specific IL-17A production from the lung. We determined that IL-17A+ cells were predominately CD4+T cell receptor (TCR)β+ Th17 cells, and that a functional IL-1 receptor was required for Th17, but not Th2, cytokine production after in vitro antigen restimulation of lung cells. The absence of natural killer T cells, γδ T cells, or the inflammasome scaffold nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain, leucine rich repeat and pyrin domain (Nlrp)3 did not affect the development of NO2-promoted allergic inflammation or IL-17A production. Similarly, neutrophil depletion or the neutralization of IL-1α during sensitization exerted no effect on these parameters. However, the absence of caspase-1 significantly reduced IL-17A production from lung cells without affecting Th2 cytokines or lung inflammation. Finally, the intranasal administration of IL-1β and the inhalation of antigen promoted allergic sensitization that was reflected by neutrophilic airway inflammation and IL-17A production from CD4+TCRβ+ Th17 cells subsequent to antigen challenge. These data implicate a role for caspase-1 and IL-1β in the IL-1 receptor–dependent Th17 response manifest in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease. PMID:23371061

  14. Smoking cessation in patients with respiratory diseases: a high priority, integral component of therapy.

    PubMed

    Tønnesen, P; Carrozzi, L; Fagerström, K O; Gratziou, C; Jimenez-Ruiz, C; Nardini, S; Viegi, G; Lazzaro, C; Campell, I A; Dagli, E; West, R

    2007-02-01

    Smoking cessation is the one of the most important ways to improve the prognosis of patients with respiratory disease. The Task Force on guidelines for smoking cessation in patients with respiratory diseases was convened to provide evidence-based recommendations on smoking cessation interventions in respiratory patients. Based on the currently available evidence and the consensus of an expert panel, the following key recommendations were made. 1) Patients with respiratory disease have a greater and more urgent need to stop smoking than the average smoker, so respiratory physicians must take a proactive and continuing role with all smokers in motivating them to stop and in providing treatment to aid smoking cessation. 2) Smoking cessation treatment should be integrated into the management of the patient's respiratory condition. 3) Therapies should include pharmacological treatment (i.e. nicotine replacement therapy, bupropion or varenicline) combined with behavioural support. 4) Respiratory physicians should receive training to ensure that they have the knowledge, attitudes and skills necessary to deliver these interventions or to refer to an appropriate specialist. 5) Although the cost of implementing these recommendations will partly be offset by a reduction in attendance for exacerbations, etc., a budget should be established to enable implementation. Research is needed to establish optimum treatment strategies specifically for respiratory patients. PMID:17264326

  15. IL-17A in Human Respiratory Diseases: Innate or Adaptive Immunity? Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bullens, Dominique M. A.; Decraene, Ann; Seys, Sven; Dupont, Lieven J.

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of IL-17 in 1995 as a T-cell cytokine, inducing IL-6 and IL-8 production by fibroblasts, and the report of a separate T-cell lineage producing IL-17(A), called Th17 cells, in 2005, the role of IL-17 has been studied in several inflammatory diseases. By inducing IL-8 production and subsequent neutrophil attraction towards the site of inflammation, IL-17A can link adaptive and innate immune responses. More specifically, its role in respiratory diseases has intensively been investigated. We here review its role in human respiratory diseases and try to unravel the question whether IL-17A only provides a link between the adaptive and innate respiratory immunity or whether this cytokine might also be locally produced by innate immune cells. We furthermore briefly discuss the possibility to reduce local IL-17A production as a treatment option for respiratory diseases. PMID:23401702

  16. An association between Helicobacter pylori and upper respiratory tract disease: Fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Kariya, Shin; Okano, Mitsuhiro; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major cause of chronic gastritis and gastric ulcers and considerable evidence supports the notion that infection with this bacterium is also associated with gastric malignancy in addition to various other conditions including pulmonary, vascular and autoimmune disorders. Gastric juice infected with H. pylori might play an important role in upper respiratory tract infection. Although direct and/or indirect mechanisms might be involved in the association between H. pylori and upper respiratory tract diseases, the etiological role of H. pylori in upper respiratory tract disorders has not yet been fully elucidated. Although various studies over the past two decades have suggested a relationship between H. pylori and upper respiratory tract diseases, the findings are inconsistent. The present overview describes the outcomes of recent investigations into the impact of H. pylori on upper respiratory tract and adjacent lesions. PMID:24587622

  17. An association between Helicobacter pylori and upper respiratory tract disease: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Kariya, Shin; Okano, Mitsuhiro; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2014-02-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major cause of chronic gastritis and gastric ulcers and considerable evidence supports the notion that infection with this bacterium is also associated with gastric malignancy in addition to various other conditions including pulmonary, vascular and autoimmune disorders. Gastric juice infected with H. pylori might play an important role in upper respiratory tract infection. Although direct and/or indirect mechanisms might be involved in the association between H. pylori and upper respiratory tract diseases, the etiological role of H. pylori in upper respiratory tract disorders has not yet been fully elucidated. Although various studies over the past two decades have suggested a relationship between H. pylori and upper respiratory tract diseases, the findings are inconsistent. The present overview describes the outcomes of recent investigations into the impact of H. pylori on upper respiratory tract and adjacent lesions. PMID:24587622

  18. Prediction of Acute Respiratory Disease in Current and Former Smokers With and Without COPD

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Victor; Regan, Elizabeth; Williams, André A. A.; Santorico, Stephanie A.; Make, Barry J.; Lynch, David A.; Hokanson, John E.; Washko, George R.; Bercz, Peter; Soler, Xavier; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Criner, Gerard J.; Ramsdell, Joe; Han, MeiLan K.; Demeo, Dawn; Anzueto, Antonio; Comellas, Alejandro; Crapo, James D.; Dransfield, Mark; Wells, J. Michael; Hersh, Craig P.; MacIntyre, Neil; Martinez, Fernando; Nath, Hrudaya P.; Niewoehner, Dennis; Sciurba, Frank; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Silverman, Edwin K.; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Wilson, Carla; Wendt, Christine; Wise, Robert A.; Curtis, Jeffrey; Kazerooni, Ella; Hanania, Nicola; Alapat, Philip; Bandi, Venkata; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha; Guy, Elizabeth; Lunn, William; Mallampalli, Antara; Trinh, Charles; Atik, Mustafa; DeMeo, Dawn; Hersh, Craig; Jacobson, Francine; Graham Barr, R.; Thomashow, Byron; Austin, John; MacIntyre, Neil; Washington, Lacey; Page McAdams, H.; Rosiello, Richard; Bresnahan, Timothy; McEvoy, Charlene; Tashjian, Joseph; Wise, Robert; Hansel, Nadia; Brown, Robert; Casaburi, Richard; Porszasz, Janos; Fischer, Hans; Budoff, Matt; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Niewoehner, Dennis; Allen, Tadashi; Rice, Kathryn; Foreman, Marilyn; Westney, Gloria; Berkowitz, Eugene; Bowler, Russell; Friedlander, Adam; Meoni, Eleonora; Criner, Gerard; Kim, Victor; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Satti, Aditi; James Mamary, A.; Steiner, Robert; Dass, Chandra; Bailey, William; Dransfield, Mark; Gerald, Lynn; Nath, Hrudaya; Ramsdell, Joe; Ferguson, Paul; Friedman, Paul; McLennan, Geoffrey; van Beek, Edwin JR; Martinez, Fernando; Han, MeiLan; Thompson, Deborah; Kazerooni, Ella; Wendt, Christine; Allen, Tadashi; Sciurba, Frank; Weissfeld, Joel; Fuhrman, Carl; Bon, Jessica; Anzueto, Antonio; Adams, Sandra; Orozco, Carlos; Santiago Restrepo, C.; Mumbower, Amy; Crapo, James; Silverman, Edwin; Make, Barry; Regan, Elizabeth; Samet, Jonathan; Willis, Amy; Stinson, Douglas; Beaty, Terri; Klanderman, Barbara; Laird, Nan; Lange, Christoph; Ionita, Iuliana; Santorico, Stephanie; Silverman, Edwin; Lynch, David; Schroeder, Joyce; Newell, John; Reilly, John; Coxson, Harvey; Judy, Philip; Hoffman, Eric; San Jose Estepar, Raul; Washko, George; Leek, Rebecca; Zach, Jordan; Kluiber, Alex; Rodionova, Anastasia; Mann, Tanya; Crapo, Robert; Jensen, Robert; Farzadegan, Homayoon; Murphy, James; Everett, Douglas; Wilson, Carla; Hokanson, John

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk factors for acute episodes of respiratory disease in current and former smokers who do not have COPD are unknown. METHODS: Eight thousand two hundred forty-six non-Hispanic white and black current and former smokers in the Genetic Epidemiology of COPD (COPDGene) cohort had longitudinal follow-up (LFU) every 6 months to determine acute respiratory episodes requiring antibiotics or systemic corticosteroids, an ED visit, or hospitalization. Negative binomial regression was used to determine the factors associated with acute respiratory episodes. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for time to first episode and an acute episode of respiratory disease risk score. RESULTS: At enrollment, 4,442 subjects did not have COPD, 658 had mild COPD, and 3,146 had moderate or worse COPD. Nine thousand three hundred three acute episodes of respiratory disease and 2,707 hospitalizations were reported in LFU (3,044 acute episodes of respiratory disease and 827 hospitalizations in those without COPD). Major predictors included acute episodes of respiratory disease in year prior to enrollment (HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.15-1.24 per exacerbation), airflow obstruction (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.91-0.96 per 10% change in % predicted FEV1), and poor health-related quality of life (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.06-1.08 for each 4-unit increase in St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire score). Risks were similar for those with and without COPD. CONCLUSIONS: Although acute episode of respiratory disease rates are higher in subjects with COPD, risk factors are similar, and at a population level, there are more episodes in smokers without COPD. PMID:24945159

  19. Effects of sublingual immunotherapy on allergic inflammation: an update.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Mona-Rita; Colombo, Giselda; Marcucci, Francesco; Caminati, Marco; Sensi, Laura; Di Cara, Giuseppe; Frati, Franco; Incorvaia, Cristoforo

    2012-08-01

    The most common allergic diseases, and especially the respiratory disorders such as rhinitis and asthma, are closely related to the allergic inflammation elicited by the causative allergen. This makes inflammation the main target of anti-allergic therapies. Among the available treatments, allergen specific immunotherapy (AIT) has a patent effect on allergic inflammation, which persists also after its discontinuation, and is the only therapy able to modify the natural history of allergy. The traditional, subcutaneous route of administration was demonstrated to modify the allergen presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) that in turn correct the phenotype of allergen-specific T cells, switching from the Th2-type response, typical of allergic inflammation and characterized by the production of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-17, and IL-32 cytokines to a Th1-type response. This immune deviation is related to an increased IFN-gamma and IL-2 production as well as to the anergy of Th2 or to tolerance, the latter being related to the generation of allergen-specific T regulatory (Treg) cells, which produce cytokines such as IL-10 and TGF-beta. Anti-inflammatory mechanisms observed during sublingual AIT with high allergen doses proved to be similar to subcutaneous immunotherapy. Data obtained from biopsies clearly indicate that the pathophysiology of the oral mucosa, with particular importance for mucosal DCs, plays a crucial role in inducing tolerance to the administered allergen. PMID:22506880

  20. Evidence for clinical safety, efficacy, and parent and physician perceptions of levocetirizine for the treatment of children with allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Pampura, A N; Papadopoulos, N G; Spičák, V; Kurzawa, R

    2011-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) and chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) are highly burdensome diseases, which are increasing in prevalence, especially in the paediatric population. Despite the availability of a large number of medications for treatment of AR and CIU, their use in children has primarily been based on data obtained from a limited number of clinical trials in children and/or testing in adults. The H(1)-antihistamines have traditionally been used as first-line treatment for the relief of both AR and CIU symptoms in children. The first-generation H(1)-antihistamines are associated with marked adverse effects such as sedation, sleepiness/drowsiness as well as difficulties in learning and cognitive processing; thus, they are recommended for limited or discontinued use in children with AR or CIU. In contrast, second-generation H(1)-antihistamines are more adapted for the use in children with AR and CIU due to better safety profiles. However, only a limited number of trials with these agents have been conducted and generally, data from well-designed trials in children are lacking. Levocetirizine is one of the most extensively investigated H(1)-antihistamines for its pharmacologic properties, safety, efficacy as well as overall global satisfaction in children aged 2-12 years. Levocetirizine is the only H(1)-antihistamine launched in the 21st century shown to lack clinically relevant adverse effects on physical and psychomotor development or routine laboratory tests over a long-term period of 18 months in 1- to 3-year-old children predisposed to development of allergic disease. Available data suggest that levocetirizine is a suitable treatment option for AR and CIU in children aged 6 months to 12 years. PMID:21346367

  1. Allergic Fungal Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Alice E W; Borish, Larry; Gurrola, José; Payne, Spencer

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the history of allergic fungal rhinosinusitis and the clinical, pathologic, and radiographic criteria necessary to establish its diagnosis and differentiate this disease from other types of chronic rhinosinusitis. Allergic fungal rhinosinusitis is a noninvasive fungal form of sinus inflammation characterized by an often times unilateral, expansile process in which the typical allergic "peanut-butter-like" mucin contributes to the formation of nasal polyps, hyposmia/anosmia, and structural changes of the face. IgE sensitization to fungi is a necessary, but not sufficient, pathophysiologic component of the disease process that is also defined by microscopic visualization of mucin-containing fungus and characteristic radiological imaging. This article expounds on these details and others including the key clinical and scientific distinctions of this diagnosis, the pathophysiologic mechanisms beyond IgE-mediated hypersensitivity that must be at play, and areas of current and future research. PMID:27393774

  2. Early adaptive immune responses in the respiratory tract of foot and mouth disease-infected cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease which affects both domestic and wildlife biungulate species. This acute disease, caused by the FMD virus (FMDV), usually includes an active replication phase in the respiratory tract up to 72 h post-infection followed by hematogenous ...

  3. Allergic rhinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your symptoms. Skin testing is the most common method of allergy testing. If your doctor determines you ... Others cause little or no sleepiness. Antihistamine nasal sprays work well for treating allergic rhinitis. Ask your ...

  4. Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... immune system identifies pollen as an invader or allergen. Your immune system overreacts by producing antibodies called ... IgE has specific "radar" for each type of allergen. That's why some people are only allergic to ...

  5. Role of Predatory Mites in Persistent Nonoccupational Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Poza Guedes, Paloma; Sánchez Machín, Inmaculada; Matheu, Víctor; Iraola, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Mites can sensitize and induce atopic disease in predisposed individuals and are an important deteriorating factor in patients with allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis. Although Pyroglyphidae mites have been extensively studied, very scarce reports are available on Cheyletidae spp. especially regarding human respiratory pathology. The main objective of the present study is to investigate the clinical role of this predator mite (Cheyletus eruditus) as a respiratory antigen in a selected sensitized human population. Fifty-two adult patients were recruited from the outpatient allergy clinic to assess their eligibility for the study. The thirty-seven subjects with persistent allergic rhinitis (PAR) who fulfilled the ARIA criteria had a positive IgE response confirmed by skin prick test (SPT) to C. eruditus. Only those individuals (37/47) with a positive SPT to C. eruditus showed a positive nasal provocation test (NPT), while 10 patients with nonallergic mild-to-moderate persistent rhinitis, control group, had a negative NPT with C. eruditus. The present paper describes a new role for the predator mite Cheyletus eruditus as a respiratory allergen in a selected subset of patients in a subtropical environment afflicted with persistent nonoccupational allergic rhinitis. PMID:27445552

  6. [Environmental epidemiological study on respiratory diseases in two Hungarian towns].

    PubMed

    Posgay, Mária; Varró, Mihály János; Szentmihályi, Renáta; Lang, Zsolt

    2010-03-01

    Authors performed standardized, respiratory and risk factor questionnaire surveys among the adult population of two towns of Hungary: the first in Nyergesújfalu, according to the distance of the flat from asbestos cement factory, and the second in Komárom, a settlement of a smaller burden of industry. They excluded the data of former asbestos industry workers from the calculations. By the analysis of the Nyergesújfalu data they concluded that odds of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) symptoms, other illnesses and tumors were not significantly higher among the inhabitants living in the vicinity of the asbestos factory than those living farther from there, based on raw and adjusted comparisons. However, the odds of these health endpoints were significantly and approximately one and a half to two and a half times greater in Nyergesújfalu than in Komárom. Indeed, more of the odds of the investigated risk factors were also greater in Nyergesújfalu than in Komárom. So the aim of this analysis was to compare the odds of COPD and other illnesses' burdens in the two towns adjusted to the checked lifestyle, household and workplace factors. Logistic regression models were used. The adjusted odds of the most COPD symptoms were also significantly greater in Nyergesújfalu than in Komárom. The conclusion is that the role of the environmental asbestos exposure should furthermore not be excluded, influencing the odds of the COPD symptoms of adults who were not exposed to asbestos occupationally. (However, even this study confirms the significant associations between the health endpoints and gender, age, smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity, occupational exposure, indoor mould and heredity.) The need for performing analytic studies, e.g. by transmission electron microscopy, can be put, for how great are, and, how different are the asbestos concentrations in the air of the two towns (this can allude to the former asbestos concentrations in the air), moreover, how

  7. Protective effect of vaccines on Mycoplasma pulmonis-induced respiratory disease of mice.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G; Howard, C J; Gourlay, R N

    1977-05-01

    Mice inoculated intranasally with either a virulent or an avirulent strain of live Mycoplasma pulmonis were resistant to respiratory disease induced by a subsequent intranasal challenge with virulent organisms. Similarly, mice inoculated intravenously with the virulent strain were resistant to intranasal challenge with the same strain. In contrast, mice inoculated intravenously with avirulent M. pulmonis were not resistant to intranasal challenge with the virulent mycoplasma strain. Studies on mice inoculated intravenously with the two strains of M. pulmonis indicated that persistance of mycoplasmas in the respiratory tract may be important in inducing resistance to intranasal challenge with M. pulmonis. These observations, together with the lack of correlation between the level of serum antibodies and resistance to M. pulmonis-induced respiratory disease, suggested that local immune mechanisms were important in resistance. It is proposed that an effective vaccination schedule to protect mice against M. pulmonis-induced respiratory disease may be one that stimulates both systemic and local immune defenses. This suggestion is supported by the observation that systemic followed by local administration of inactivated M. pulmonis was more effective in inducing resistance in mice to intranasal challenge with live organisms than was systemic administration alone. In addition, mice inoculated solely by the intranasal route with inactivated mycoplasmas were resistant to M. pulmonis-induced respiratory disease. These studies indicate the importance of local defense mechanisms in the induction of resistance to M. pulmonis-induced respiratory disease in mice. PMID:558962

  8. New occupational and environmental causes of asthma and extrinsic allergic alveolitis.

    PubMed

    Fishwick, David

    2012-12-01

    Asthma and extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA) remain prevalent respiratory diseases and the cause of a significant disease burden. This article reviews the recent occupational and environmental causes described for these conditions. Even over the limited time spam addressed by this article, novel agents and new data relating to already suggested causes have been described. Various types of work tasks or exposures are described that appear to cause both asthma and EAA. Isocyanates, the best example of dual potential to cause asthma and EAA are discussed, as is the new understanding of the role metal-working fluids play when causing respiratory diseases. PMID:23153603

  9. Relation of air pollution with epidemiology of respiratory diseases in isfahan, Iran from 2005 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi, Maasoumeh; Ramesht, Mohammad Hossein; Zohary, Moein; Poursafa, Parinaz; Kelishadi, Roya; Rashidi, Zeinab; Rouzbahani, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) scientists shows that long-term exposure to air pollutants increases the risk of respiratory diseases such as allergies, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer. Children and the elderly are particularly vulnerable to the health effects of ozone, fine particles, and other airborne toxicants. Air pollution factors are considered as one of the underlying causes of respiratory diseases. This study aimed to determine the association of respiratory diseases documented in medical records and air pollution (Map distribution) of accumulation in Isfahan province, Iran. By plotting the prevalence and spatial distribution maps, important differences from different points can be observed. Materials and Methods: The geographic information system (GIS), pollutant standards index (PSI) measurements, and remote Sensing (RS) technology were used after entering data in the mapping information table; spatial distribution was mapped and distribution of Geographical Epidemiology of Respiratory Diseases in Isfahan province (Iran) was determined in this case study from 2005 to 2009. Results: Space with tracing the distribution of respiratory diseases was scattered based on the distribution of air pollution in the points is an important part of this type of diseases in Isfahan province where air pollution was more abundant. Conclusion: The findings of this study emphasis on the importance of preventing the exposure to air pollution, and to control air pollution product industries, to improve work environmental health, and to increase the health professionals and public knowledge in this regard. PMID:24523799

  10. Animal models of respiratory syncytial virus infection and disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of human respiratory syncytial virus pathogenesis and immunity has been hampered by its exquisite host specificity, and the difficulties encountered in adapting this virus to a murine host. The reasons for this obstacle are not well understood, but appear to reflect, at least in part, the ...

  11. Supporting the validation of the new allergic and hypersensitivity conditions section of the World Health Organization International Classification of Diseases-11

    PubMed Central

    Calderon, Moises; Demoly, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Background The new International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-11 "Allergic and hypersensitivity conditions" section has been constructed as a result of a detailed and careful action plan based on scientific evidences for the necessity of changes and collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO) ICD-11 revision governance. All the efforts are being acknowledged by the Joint Allergy Academies. Objective Considering the new classification model addressed to the allergic and hypersensitivity conditions and following the ICD WHO agenda, we believe it is the appropriate time to start supporting the validation process in collaboration with the WHO ICD governance. Methods We conducted a mapping of ICD-10 allergic and hypersensitivity conditions in the ICD-11 beta phase structure and categorized the conditions as fitting by "precoordination," "postcoordination," "indexed to the ICD-11 Foundation," "no code fit properly" or "no correspondence" in the ICD-11. Results From overall 125 ICD-10 entities spread in 6 chapters, 57.6% were able to be precoordinated, 4% postcoordinated, 12% indexed to the Foundation, 9.6% had no code fitting properly and 18.6% had no correspondence in the ICD-11 framework. Conclusion We have been able to demonstrate that 83.2% of the ICD-10 allergic and hypersensitivity conditions could be captured by the current ICD-11 beta draft framework. We strongly believe that our findings constitute a key step forward for a softer transition of the ICD-10 allergic and hypersensitivity conditions to the ICD-11, supporting the WHO in this process as well as strengthening the visibility of the Allergy specialty and ensuring quality management of allergic patients. PMID:27489786

  12. Diagnosing Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Scadding, Glenis K; Scadding, Guy W

    2016-05-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is the most common immunologic disease in industrialized societies and has a significant impact on quality of life. Most asthmatics also have rhinitis. AR may present with comorbidities, including chronic otitis media with effusion, cough, and pollen-food cross-reactivity. AR may occur in isolation or be part of a mixed rhinitis. PMID:27083100

  13. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  14. Modern approaches to understanding stress and disease susceptibility: A review with special emphasis on respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Palok; Potter, Andrew A; Griebel, Philip J

    2009-01-01

    Studies in animals and humans link both physical and psychological stress with an increased incidence and severity of respiratory infections. For this manuscript we define stress as the physiological responses an individual undergoes while adjusting to a continually changing environment. It is known that stressors of various types (psychological/physical) can alter the physiological levels of certain hormones, chemokines and cytokines. These alterations send information to the central nervous system to take necessary action which then sends messages to appropriate organs/tissues/cells to respond. These messages can either activate or suppress the immune system as needed and failure to compensate for this by the body can lead to serious health-related problems. Little is known how stress affects disease susceptibility, yet understanding this mechanism is important for developing effective treatments, and for improving health and food quality. The current review focuses on (a) the effects of psychological stressors in humans and animals, (b) various methodologies employed to understand stress responses and their outcomes, and (c) the current status of the attempts to correlate stress and disease with respiratory disease as model system. The methodologies included in this review span traditional epidemiological, behavioral and immunological studies to current high throughput genomic, proteomic, metabolomic/metabonomic approaches. With the advent of various newer omics and bioinformatics methodologies we postulate that it will become feasible to understand the mechanisms through which stress can influence disease onset. Although the literature in this area is limited because of the infancy of this research area, the objective of this review is to illustrate the power of new approaches to address complex biological questions. These new approaches will also aid in our understanding how these processes are related to the dynamics and kinetics of changes in expression of

  15. Thresholds in chemical respiratory sensitisation.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Stella A; Arts, Josje H E; Ehnes, Colin; Hindle, Stuart; Hollnagel, Heli M; Poole, Alan; Suto, Hidenori; Kimber, Ian

    2015-07-01

    There is a continuing interest in determining whether it is possible to identify thresholds for chemical allergy. Here allergic sensitisation of the respiratory tract by chemicals is considered in this context. This is an important occupational health problem, being associated with rhinitis and asthma, and in addition provides toxicologists and risk assessors with a number of challenges. In common with all forms of allergic disease chemical respiratory allergy develops in two phases. In the first (induction) phase exposure to a chemical allergen (by an appropriate route of exposure) causes immunological priming and sensitisation of the respiratory tract. The second (elicitation) phase is triggered if a sensitised subject is exposed subsequently to the same chemical allergen via inhalation. A secondary immune response will be provoked in the respiratory tract resulting in inflammation and the signs and symptoms of a respiratory hypersensitivity reaction. In this article attention has focused on the identification of threshold values during the acquisition of sensitisation. Current mechanistic understanding of allergy is such that it can be assumed that the development of sensitisation (and also the elicitation of an allergic reaction) is a threshold phenomenon; there will be levels of exposure below which sensitisation will not be acquired. That is, all immune responses, including allergic sensitisation, have threshold requirement for the availability of antigen/allergen, below which a response will fail to develop. The issue addressed here is whether there are methods available or clinical/epidemiological data that permit the identification of such thresholds. This document reviews briefly relevant human studies of occupational asthma, and experimental models that have been developed (or are being developed) for the identification and characterisation of chemical respiratory allergens. The main conclusion drawn is that although there is evidence that the

  16. The Endogenous Th17 Response in NO2-Promoted Allergic Airway Disease Is Dispensable for Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Distinct from Th17 Adoptive Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rebecca A.; Ather, Jennifer L.; Daggett, Rebecca; Hoyt, Laura; Alcorn, John F.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Weiss, Daniel J.; Lundblad, Lennart K. A.; Poynter, Matthew E.

    2013-01-01

    Severe, glucocorticoid-resistant asthma comprises 5-7% of patients with asthma. IL-17 is a biomarker of severe asthma, and the adoptive transfer of Th17 cells in mice is sufficient to induce glucocorticoid-resistant allergic airway disease. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an environmental toxin that correlates with asthma severity, exacerbation, and risk of adverse outcomes. Mice that are allergically sensitized to the antigen ovalbumin by exposure to NO2 exhibit a mixed Th2/Th17 adaptive immune response and eosinophil and neutrophil recruitment to the airway following antigen challenge, a phenotype reminiscent of severe clinical asthma. Because IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling is critical in the generation of the Th17 response in vivo, we hypothesized that the IL-1R/Th17 axis contributes to pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease and manifests in glucocorticoid-resistant cytokine production. IL-17A neutralization at the time of antigen challenge or genetic deficiency in IL-1R resulted in decreased neutrophil recruitment to the airway following antigen challenge but did not protect against the development of AHR. Instead, IL-1R-/- mice developed exacerbated AHR compared to WT mice. Lung cells from NO2-allergically inflamed mice that were treated in vitro with dexamethasone (Dex) during antigen restimulation exhibited reduced Th17 cytokine production, whereas Th17 cytokine production by lung cells from recipient mice of in vitro Th17-polarized OTII T-cells was resistant to Dex. These results demonstrate that the IL-1R/Th17 axis does not contribute to AHR development in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease, that Th17 adoptive transfer does not necessarily reflect an endogenously-generated Th17 response, and that functions of Th17 responses are contingent on the experimental conditions in which they are generated. PMID:24069338

  17. Allergic diseases and risk of hematopoietic malignancies in a cohort of postmenopausal women: A report from the Iowa Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Linabery, Amy M.; Prizment, Anna E.; Anderson, Kristin E.; Cerhan, James R.; Poynter, Jenny N.; Ross, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Allergic diseases signify immune dysregulation attributable to underlying genetics and environmental exposures. Associations between various allergies and hematopoietic cancers have been observed, albeit inconsistently, however few prospective studies have examined the risk, and even fewer among older adults. Methods We examined risk of incident hematopoietic cancers in those reporting allergic diseases in a population-based cohort of 22,601 older women (Iowa Women’s Health Study). Self-reported allergic status, including asthma, hay fever, eczema and/or other allergies, was determined via questionnaire in 1997 (mean age=72 years, range 63–81 years). Incident cancers were ascertained by linkage with the Iowa Cancer Registry from 1997–2011. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to estimate multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for myeloid (N=177) and lymphoid (N=437) malignancies, respectively. Results Allergic diseases were not associated with risk of myeloid (HR=1.00, 95% CI: 0.72–1.37) or lymphoid (HR=0.99, 95% CI: 0.81–1.22) malignancies overall, or for most allergic and malignant subtypes examined. Self-reported asthma was positively associated with development of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, HR=2.00, 95% CI: 0.93–4.32). In addition, there was a 30–40% decrease in risk of both lymphoid and myeloid cancers in those reporting rural residences but no association in those reporting urban residences; the interaction between residence and allergy was statistically significant for lymphoid malignancies (Pinteraction=0.05). Conclusions and Impact These results suggest asthma may contribute to the pathogenesis of MDS, a finding consistent with the chronic antigen stimulation hypothesis. Susceptibility differences by location of residence are concordant with the hygiene hypothesis and merit additional exploration. PMID:24962839

  18. Collaborative interactions between type 2 innate lymphoid cells and antigen-specific CD4+ Th2 cells exacerbate murine allergic airway diseases with prominent eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Lee, Jee-Boong; Chen, Chun-Yu; Hershey, Gurjit K Khurana; Wang, Yui-Hsi

    2015-04-15

    Type-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) and the acquired CD4(+) Th2 and Th17 cells contribute to the pathogenesis of experimental asthma; however, their roles in Ag-driven exacerbation of chronic murine allergic airway diseases remain elusive. In this study, we report that repeated intranasal rechallenges with only OVA Ag were sufficient to trigger airway hyperresponsiveness, prominent eosinophilic inflammation, and significantly increased serum OVA-specific IgG1 and IgE in rested mice that previously developed murine allergic airway diseases. The recall response to repeated OVA inoculation preferentially triggered a further increase of lung OVA-specific CD4(+) Th2 cells, whereas CD4(+) Th17 and ILC2 cell numbers remained constant. Furthermore, the acquired CD4(+) Th17 cells in Stat6(-/-)/IL-17-GFP mice, or innate ILC2s in CD4(+) T cell-ablated mice, failed to mount an allergic recall response to OVA Ag. After repeated OVA rechallenge or CD4(+) T cell ablation, the increase or loss of CD4(+) Th2 cells resulted in an enhanced or reduced IL-13 production by lung ILC2s in response to IL-25 and IL-33 stimulation, respectively. In return, ILC2s enhanced Ag-mediated proliferation of cocultured CD4(+) Th2 cells and their cytokine production, and promoted eosinophilic airway inflammation and goblet cell hyperplasia driven by adoptively transferred Ag-specific CD4(+) Th2 cells. Thus, these results suggest that an allergic recall response to recurring Ag exposures preferentially triggers an increase of Ag-specific CD4(+) Th2 cells, which facilitates the collaborative interactions between acquired CD4(+) Th2 cells and innate ILC2s to drive the exacerbation of a murine allergic airway diseases with an eosinophilic phenotype. PMID:25780046

  19. Quality of Care for Patients with Chronic Respiratory Diseases: Data for Accreditation Plan in Primary Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Kurpas, Donata; Szwamel, Katarzyna; Mroczek, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    There are scarce reports in the literature on factors affecting the assessment of the quality of care for patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Such information is relevant in the accreditation process on implementing the healthcare. The study group consisted of 133 adult patients with chronic respiratory diseases and 125 adult patients with chronic non-respiratory diseases. In the present study, the level of satisfaction from healthcare provided by the primary healthcare unit, disease acceptance, quality of life, health behaviors, and met needs were examined, as well as associations between variables with the use of correspondence analysis. The results are that in patients with chronic respiratory diseases an increase in satisfaction depends on the improvement of well-being in the mental sphere. The lack of problems with obtaining a referral to a specialist and a higher level of fulfilled needs also have a positive effect. Additionally, low levels of satisfaction should be expected in those patients with chronic respiratory diseases who wait for an appointment in front of the office for a long time, report problems with obtaining a referral to additional tests, present a low level of health behaviors, and have a low index of benefits. PMID:26820726

  20. The Microbiome and Mental Health: Looking Back, Moving Forward with Lessons from Allergic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Logan, Alan C; Jacka, Felice N; Craig, Jeffrey M; Prescott, Susan L

    2016-05-31

    Relationships between gastrointestinal viscera and human emotions have been documented by virtually all medical traditions known to date. The focus on this relationship has waxed and waned through the centuries, with noted surges in interest driven by cultural forces. Here we explore some of this history and the emerging trends in experimental and clinical research. In particular, we pay specific attention to how the hygiene hypothesis and emerging research on traditional dietary patterns has helped re-ignite interest in the use of microbes to support mental health. At present, the application of microbes and their structural parts as a means to positively influence mental health is an area filled with promise. However, there are many limitations within this new paradigm shift in neuropsychiatry. Impediments that could block translation of encouraging experimental studies include environmental forces that work toward dysbiosis, perhaps none more important than westernized dietary patterns. On the other hand, it is likely that specific dietary choices may amplify the value of future microbial-based therapeutics. Pre-clinical and clinical research involving microbiota and allergic disorders has predated recent work in psychiatry, an early start that provides valuable lessons. The microbiome is intimately connected to diet, nutrition, and other lifestyle variables; microbial-based psychopharmacology will need to consider this contextual application, otherwise the ceiling of clinical expectations will likely need to be lowered. PMID:27121424

  1. The Microbiome and Mental Health: Looking Back, Moving Forward with Lessons from Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Alan C.; Jacka, Felice N.; Craig, Jeffrey M.; Prescott, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Relationships between gastrointestinal viscera and human emotions have been documented by virtually all medical traditions known to date. The focus on this relationship has waxed and waned through the centuries, with noted surges in interest driven by cultural forces. Here we explore some of this history and the emerging trends in experimental and clinical research. In particular, we pay specific attention to how the hygiene hypothesis and emerging research on traditional dietary patterns has helped re-ignite interest in the use of microbes to support mental health. At present, the application of microbes and their structural parts as a means to positively influence mental health is an area filled with promise. However, there are many limitations within this new paradigm shift in neuropsychiatry. Impediments that could block translation of encouraging experimental studies include environmental forces that work toward dysbiosis, perhaps none more important than westernized dietary patterns. On the other hand, it is likely that specific dietary choices may amplify the value of future microbial-based therapeutics. Pre-clinical and clinical research involving microbiota and allergic disorders has predated recent work in psychiatry, an early start that provides valuable lessons. The microbiome is intimately connected to diet, nutrition, and other lifestyle variables; microbial-based psychopharmacology will need to consider this contextual application, otherwise the ceiling of clinical expectations will likely need to be lowered. PMID:27121424

  2. The allergic emergency--management of severe allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Werner-Busse, Alexandra; Zuberbier, Torsten; Worm, Margitta

    2014-05-01

    Anaphylaxis is characterized by the sudden onset of acute allergic symptoms involving two or more organ systems. An acute allergic emergency is a challenge for physicians due to its life-threatening potential. The incidence of anaphylactic reactions has increased in recent years. Most frequent elicitors of mast cell and primarily histamine dependent anaphylactic reactions are food, insect venom or drugs. Allergic -reactions are graded into four groups according to the classification by Ring and Messmer; grade I is defined by the onset of cutaneous symptoms only whereas grade IV is characterized by cardiovascular shock as well as cardiac and/or respiratory arrest. The treatment of allergic reactions should be guided by the severity of the reaction. Initially an intramuscular epinephrine injection into the lateral thigh should be given if cutaneous, mucosal and cardiovascular/respiratory symptoms occur. Additionally, the patient should receive intravenous antihistamines and corticosteroids. For self-treatment in the case of an allergic emergency, oral antihistamines and corticosteroids should be prescribed to the patient. PMID:24673732

  3. The spectrum of respiratory disease associated with exposure to metal working fluids.

    PubMed

    Zacharisen, M C; Kadambi, A R; Schlueter, D P; Kurup, V P; Shack, J B; Fox, J L; Anderson, H A; Fink, J N

    1998-07-01

    Occupational respiratory diseases have been reported following exposure to metal working fluids. We report a spectrum of respiratory illnesses occurring in an outbreak in 30 workers of an automobile parts engine manufacturing plant. Workers presented with respiratory complaints and, after clinical and laboratory evaluations, were classified as those having hypersensitivity pneumonitis, occupational asthma, or industrial bronchitis, or those without occupational lung disease. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis affected seven workers, with six exhibiting serum precipitins to Acinetobacter Iwoffii. Occupational asthma and industrial bronchitis affected 12 and six workers, respectively. Oil-mist exposures were below current recommendations. Gram-negative bacteria, but no fungi, Thermophiles, or Legionella, were identified. Although specific agents responsible for each individual case could not be identified, probably both specific sensitizing agents and non-specific irritants from metal working fluids, additives, or contaminants contributed to this spectrum of occupational respiratory illness. PMID:9675723

  4. Within-breath respiratory impedance and airway obstruction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Karla Kristine Dames; Faria, Alvaro Camilo Dias; Lopes, Agnaldo José; de Melo, Pedro Lopes

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent work has suggested that within-breath respiratory impedance measurements performed using the forced oscillation technique may help to noninvasively evaluate respiratory mechanics. We investigated the influence of airway obstruction on the within-breath forced oscillation technique in smokers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and evaluated the contribution of this analysis to the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. METHODS: Twenty healthy individuals and 20 smokers were assessed. The study also included 74 patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We evaluated the mean respiratory impedance (Zm) as well as values for the inspiration (Zi) and expiration cycles (Ze) at the beginning of inspiration (Zbi) and expiration (Zbe), respectively. The peak-to-peak impedance (Zpp=Zbe-Zbi) and the respiratory cycle dependence (ΔZrs=Ze-Zi) were also analyzed. The diagnostic utility was evaluated by investigating the sensitivity, the specificity and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01888705. RESULTS: Airway obstruction increased the within-breath respiratory impedance parameters that were significantly correlated with the spirometric indices of airway obstruction (R=−0.65, p<0.0001). In contrast to the control subjects and the smokers, the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients presented significant expiratory-inspiratory differences (p<0.002). The adverse effects of moderate airway obstruction were detected based on the Zpp with an accuracy of 83%. Additionally, abnormal effects in severe and very severe patients were detected based on the Zm, Zi, Ze, Zbe, Zpp and ΔZrs with a high degree of accuracy (>90%). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude the following: (1) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease introduces higher respiratory cycle dependence, (2) this increase is proportional to airway obstruction, and (3) the within-breath forced oscillation technique may

  5. The traditional diagnosis and treatment of respiratory diseases: a description from Avicenna's Canon of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Seyyed Mehdi; Raza, Mohsin

    2009-12-01

    This article presents selected text on respiratory medicine from the famous book of medicine, Al-Qanun fi al-Tibb (the Canon of Medicine) by Avicenna (981-1037 AD), which was taught for 600 years as a standard text of medicine across medieval Europe. The authentic manuscript of the Canon of Medicine is located in the Central Library of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, and the section on respiratory diseases was studied for the most relevant information - information that would be informative and interesting for present day physicians and pulmonologists. The results of the analysis are presented in the article. Respiratory diseases are discussed in depth in volume 3 of the Canon of Medicine. Avicenna discusses in detail the functional anatomy and physiopathology of the pulmonary diseases that were known in his time. He also describes the signs and symptoms of various respiratory diseases and conditions in the five chapters of volume 3 (breathing, voice, cough and hemoptysis, internal wounds and inflammations and principles of treatments) that are remarkably similar to those of modern pulmonary medicine. In addition, the herbal and nonherbal treatment of respiratory diseases and their signs and symptoms, mentioned in volume 2 of the Canon of Medicine, is also presented. In the time of Avicenna, the presentation of respiratory diseases, their treatment and their prognosis was much different than in modern times. There was more reliance on history, physical examination (which was mostly based on visual observation), individual variation, environmental factors, diet, and so on, for diagnosis and treatment. Nevertheless, going through a popular historic text such as the Canon of Medicine adds to our knowledge of the developments in the area of respiratory medicine at the time of Avicenna. PMID:19880427

  6. The WHO global alliance against chronic respiratory diseases in Turkey (GARD Turkey).

    PubMed

    Yorgancioğlu, A; Türktaş, H; Kalayci, O; Yardim, N; Buzgan, T; Kocabaş, A; Karlikaya, C; Yildiz, F; Ergün, P; Mungan, D; Kart, L; Göktaş, E; Musaonbaşioğlu, S; Gündoğan, A; Akdağ, R; Akçay, S; Akin, M; Akkurt, I; Altan, P; Altunsu, T; Arpaci, N; Aydin, C; Aydin, S; Aydinli, F; Aytaç, B; Bavbek, S; Biber, C; Bingöl Karakoç, G; Ceyhun, G; Cakir, B; Celik, G; Cetinkaya, T; Ciçek, M E; Coban, S C; Cobanoğlu, N; Com, S; Cöplü, L; Demirkazik, A; Doğan, E; Ekmekçi, E B; Elbir, M; Erdoğan, A; Ergüder, T; Gemicioğlu, B; Gögen, S; Gülbahar, O; Güngör, H; Horzum, E; Içer, Y; Imamecioğlu, A R; Kahraman, N; Kakillioğlu, T; Kalyoncu, F; Karakaya, M; Karakaya, G; Karaodul, G; Kesici, C; Keskinkiliç, B; Kilinç, O; Kirmizitaş, F; Kosdak, M; Köktürk, N; Metintaş, M; Numanoğlu, S C; Gümrükçüoğlu, O F; Onal, Z; Onal, B; Ozacar, R; Ozen, H A; Ozkan, S; Oztürk, F; Polat, H; Saçkesen, C; Selçuk, T; Serin, G; Sönmez, G; Sahin, M; Sahinöz, S; Sahinöz, T; Simşek, B; Tartan, N; Toprak, A; Tugay, T; Tuncer, A; Uçan, E S; Unüvar, N; Yapicikardeşler, B; Yildirim, N; Yol, S; Yüksel, H; Khaltaev, N; Cruz, A; Minelli, E; Bateman, E; Baena Cagnani, C; Dahl, R; Bousquet, J

    2009-01-01

    In order to prevent and control non-communicable diseases (NCDs), the 61st World Health Assembly has endorsed an NCD action plan (WHA resolution 61.14). A package for essential NCDs including chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs) has also been developed. The Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD) is a new but rapidly developing voluntary alliance that is assisting World Health Organization (WHO) in the task of addressing NCDs at country level. The GARD approach was initiated in 2006. GARD Turkey is the first comprehensive programme developed by a government with all stakeholders of the country. This paper provides a summary of indicators of the prevalence and severity of chronic respiratory diseases in Turkey and the formation of GARD Turkey. PMID:20037863

  7. The role of hyaluronan in the pathobiology and treatment of respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Garantziotis, Stavros; Brezina, Martin; Castelnuovo, Paolo; Drago, Lorenzo

    2016-05-01

    Hyaluronan, a ubiquitous naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan, is a major component of the extracellular matrix, where it participates in biological processes that include water homeostasis, cell-matrix signaling, tissue healing, inflammation, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation and migration. There are emerging data that hyaluronan and its degradation products have an important role in the pathobiology of the respiratory tract. We review the role of hyaluronan in respiratory diseases and present evidence from published literature and from clinical practice supporting hyaluronan as a novel treatment for respiratory diseases. Preliminary data show that aerosolized exogenous hyaluronan has beneficial activity against airway inflammation, protects against bronchial hyperreactivity and remodeling, and disrupts the biofilm associated with chronic infection. This suggests a role in airway diseases with a predominant inflammatory component such as rhinosinusitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, and primary ciliary dyskinesia. The potential for hyaluronan to complement conventional therapy will become clearer when data are available from controlled trials in larger patient populations. PMID:26747781

  8. [The curative action of Monticelli Term's water in upper respiratory tract diseases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Turchi, R; Jemmi, G; Barani, B

    1976-01-01

    The Authors study the action of the sodio bromide-iodic water of Monticelli Terme in upper respiratory tract disease and particularly assert that is not to neglect the organic ground on which establishes mucosa's disease. Therman treatment gives the best therapeutic results in every patient presenting chronic inflammatory processes of the upper respiratory trach alternating periods of quiescency and of activity, and poor therapeutic action in patients presenting chronic inveterate diseases with great alterations in vascular and glandular components of the mucosa. PMID:1021139

  9. Genetic variability in susceptibility to occupational respiratory sensitization.

    PubMed

    Yucesoy, Berran; Johnson, Victor J

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory sensitization can be caused by a variety of substances at workplaces, and the health and economic burden linked to allergic respiratory diseases continues to increase. Although the main factors that affect the onset of the symptoms are the types and intensity of allergen exposure, there is a wide range of interindividual variation in susceptibility to occupational/environmental sensitizers. A number of gene variants have been reported to be associated with various occupational allergic respiratory diseases. Examples of genes include, but are not limited to, genes involved in immune/inflammatory regulation, antioxidant defenses, and fibrotic processes. Most of these variants act in combination with other genes and environmental factors to modify disease progression, severity, or resolution after exposure to allergens. Therefore, understanding the role of genetic variability and the interaction between genetic and environmental/occupational factors provides new insights into disease etiology and may lead to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies. This paper will focus on the current state of knowledge regarding genetic influences on allergic respiratory diseases, with specific emphasis on diisocyanate-induced asthma and chronic beryllium disease. PMID:21747866

  10. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: involvement in bovine respiratory disease and diagnostic challenges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reviews the contribution of bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) to the development of Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD). Veterinarians and producers generally consider BRD as one of the most significant diseases affecting production in the cattle industry. BRD can affect the performance (...

  11. The burden of allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Although formerly regarded as a nuisance disease, allergic rhinitis (AR) has a considerable effect on quality of life and can have significant consequences if left untreated. The total burden of this disease lies not only in impaired physical and social functioning but also in a financial burden made greater when considering evidence that AR is a possible causal factor in comorbid diseases such as asthma or sinusitis. Compared with matched controls, patients with AR have an approximate twofold increase in medication costs and 1.8-fold the number of visits to health practitioners. Hidden direct costs include the treatment of comorbid asthma, chronic sinusitis, otitis media, upper respiratory infection, and nasal polyposis. Nasal congestion, the most prominent symptom in AR, is associated with sleep-disordered breathing, a condition that can have a profound effect on mental health, including increased psychiatric disorders, depression, anxiety, and alcohol abuse. Furthermore, sleep-disordered breathing in childhood and adolescence is associated with increased disorders of learning performance, behavior, and attention. In the United States, AR results in 3.5 million lost workdays and 2 million lost schooldays annually. Patients struggle to alleviate their misery, frequently self-adjusting their treatment regimen of over-the-counter and prescription medications because of lack of efficacy, deterioration of efficacy, lack of 24-hour relief, and bothersome side effects. Ironically, health care providers overestimate patient satisfaction with therapy. Therefore, improvement in patient-practitioner communication may enhance patient adherence with prescribed regimens. PMID:17390749

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells and serelaxin synergistically abrogate established airway fibrosis in an experimental model of chronic allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Royce, Simon G; Shen, Matthew; Patel, Krupesh P; Huuskes, Brooke M; Ricardo, Sharon D; Samuel, Chrishan S

    2015-11-01

    This study determined if the anti-fibrotic drug, serelaxin (RLN), could augment human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-mediated reversal of airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) associated with chronic allergic airways disease (AAD/asthma). Female Balb/c mice subjected to the 9-week model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced chronic AAD were either untreated or treated with MSCs alone, RLN alone or both combined from weeks 9-11. Changes in airway inflammation (AI), epithelial thickness, goblet cell metaplasia, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression, myofibroblast differentiation, subepithelial and total lung collagen deposition, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression, and AHR were then assessed. MSCs alone modestly reversed OVA-induced subepithelial and total collagen deposition, and increased MMP-9 levels above that induced by OVA alone (all p<0.05 vs OVA group). RLN alone more broadly reversed OVA-induced epithelial thickening, TGF-β1 expression, myofibroblast differentiation, airway fibrosis and AHR (all p<0.05 vs OVA group). Combination treatment further reversed OVA-induced AI and airway/lung fibrosis compared to either treatment alone (all p<0.05 vs either treatment alone), and further increased MMP-9 levels. RLN appeared to enhance the therapeutic effects of MSCs in a chronic disease setting; most likely a consequence of the ability of RLN to limit TGF-β1-induced matrix synthesis complemented by the MMP-promoting effects of MSCs. PMID:26426509

  13. Antecedents of chronic lung disease following three patterns of early respiratory disease in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Laughon, Matthew; Bose, Carl; Allred, Elizabeth N.; O’Shea, T. Michael; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Van Marter, Linda J.; Leviton, Alan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/INTRODUCTION The incidence of chronic lung disease (CLD) varies among groups defined by their early pattern of respiratory disease. Although CLD is common among infants with continuous exposure to increased ambient oxygen throughout the first two postnatal weeks the antecedents of CLD among preterm infants without this exposure are not well understood. PATIENTS AND METHODS We examined data collected prospectively on the 1204 (out of 1506) infants born in 2002 to 2004 at 23 to 27 completed weeks of gestation who survived to 36 weeks post-menstrual age (PMA). Based on their initial respiratory presentation and need for supplemental oxygen during the first two weeks, infants were classified as having early and persistent pulmonary dysfunction (EPPD), early recovery of pulmonary function followed by deterioration (PD), or consistently good pulmonary function characterized by low FiO2 (Low FiO2). RESULTS CLD was diagnosed in 69% of infants with EPPD, in 52% with PD, and 17% in the Low FiO2 group. Risk factors for CLD varied among these groups. Birth weight z-score < -1 conveyed information about CLD risk in all three groups and was the major risk factor for infants in the Low FiO2 group (Odds Ratio [OR] 27; 95% confidence interval [CI] 7–95). Mechanical ventilation at 7 days was associated with increased risk in the pulmonary deterioration group (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.5–6.9) and the early and persistent pulmonary dysfunction group (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.5–4.7), but not the Low FiO2 group (OR 1.5, 95% CI 0.5–3.9). CONCLUSION Both the likelihood of a very preterm infant developing CLD and the profile of risk factors linked with CLD are related to the infant’s pattern of respiratory disease during the first two postnatal weeks. Among infants with little exposure to oxygen during this period, fetal growth restriction, not mechanical ventilation, is the factor with the strongest association with CLD. PMID:20688867

  14. Allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common disorder that is strongly linked to asthma and conjunctivitis. It is usually a long-standing condition that often goes undetected in the primary-care setting. The classic symptoms of the disorder are nasal congestion, nasal itch, rhinorrhea and sneezing. A thorough history, physical examination and allergen skin testing are important for establishing the diagnosis of allergic rhinitis. Second-generation oral antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment. Allergen immunotherapy is an effective immune-modulating treatment that should be recommended if pharmacologic therapy for allergic rhinitis is not effective or is not tolerated. This article provides an overview of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and appropriate management of this disorder. PMID:22166009

  15. Sarcoid-like lymphocytosis of the lower respiratory tract in patients with active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Smiéjan, J M; Cosnes, J; Chollet-Martin, S; Soler, P; Basset, F M; Le Quintrec, Y; Hance, A J

    1986-01-01

    To re-evaluate the relationship between Crohn's disease and sarcoidosis, we compared the numbers and types of cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage from normal volunteers and patients with Crohn's disease, with other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, and with sarcoidosis. Patients with Crohn's disease, but not patients with other inflammatory bowel disorders, had an increase in the number of T lymphocytes on the surface of the lower respiratory tract similar to that seen in patients with sarcoidosis. As in sarcoidosis, this lymphocytosis results from an expansion of the T4+ T-lymphocyte subset, is characteristic of patients with active disease only, and is not associated with similar abnormalities in the peripheral blood. Thus, patients with apparently localized Crohn's disease have sarcoid-like lymphocytosis of the lower respiratory tract, a finding that emphasizes the systemic nature of Crohn's disease and the disorder's close relationship to sarcoidosis. PMID:3940500

  16. Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Kakli, Hasan A; Riley, Timothy D

    2016-09-01

    Among the atopic disorders, allergic rhinitis is the most prevalent. Patients who suffer from allergic rhinitis sustain significant morbidity and loss of productivity. Cardinal symptoms include nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, sneezing, and nasal itching, although multiple related symptoms may occur. Causes should be ruled out with a thorough history and physical examination, with particular attention to red flag or atypical symptoms. Skin testing or serum sampling can confirm diagnosis and also guide therapy. Therapy is multimodal, tailored to a particular patient's symptom burden and quality of life. PMID:27545735

  17. Temperature effects on outpatient visits of respiratory diseases, asthma, and chronic airway obstruction in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Lin, Yu-Kai

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated the risk of outpatient visits for respiratory diseases, asthma, and chronic airway obstruction not elsewhere classified (CAO) associated with ambient temperatures and extreme temperature events from 2000 to 2008 in Taiwan. Based on geographical and socioeconomics characteristics, this study divided the whole island into seven areas. A distributed lag non-linear model was used to estimate the area-disease-specific cumulative relative risk (RR), and random-effect meta-analysis was used to estimate the pooled RR of outpatient visits, from lag 0 to lag 7 days, associated with daily temperature, and added effects of prolonged extreme heat and cold for population of all ages, the elderly and younger than 65 years. Pooled analyses showed that younger population had higher outpatient visits for exposing to low temperature of 18 °C, with cumulative 8-day RRs of 1.36 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.31-1.42) for respiratory diseases, 1.10 (95 % CI 1.03-1.18) for asthma, and 1.12 (95 % CI 1.02-1.22) for CAO. The elderly was more vulnerable to high temperature of 30 °C with the cumulative 8-day RR of 1.08 (95 % CI 1.03-1.13) for CAO. Elevated outpatient visits for all respiratory diseases and asthma were associated with extreme heat lasting for 6 to 8 days. On the contrary, the extreme cold lasting more than 8 days had significant negative association with outpatient visits of all respiratory diseases. In summary, elderly patients of respiratory diseases and CAO are vulnerable to high temperature. Cold temperature is associated with all types of respiratory diseases for younger patients.

  18. Temperature effects on outpatient visits of respiratory diseases, asthma, and chronic airway obstruction in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Lin, Yu-Kai

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluated the risk of outpatient visits for respiratory diseases, asthma, and chronic airway obstruction not elsewhere classified (CAO) associated with ambient temperatures and extreme temperature events from 2000 to 2008 in Taiwan. Based on geographical and socioeconomics characteristics, this study divided the whole island into seven areas. A distributed lag non-linear model was used to estimate the area-disease-specific cumulative relative risk (RR), and random-effect meta-analysis was used to estimate the pooled RR of outpatient visits, from lag 0 to lag 7 days, associated with daily temperature, and added effects of prolonged extreme heat and cold for population of all ages, the elderly and younger than 65 years. Pooled analyses showed that younger population had higher outpatient visits for exposing to low temperature of 18 °C, with cumulative 8-day RRs of 1.36 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.31-1.42) for respiratory diseases, 1.10 (95 % CI 1.03-1.18) for asthma, and 1.12 (95 % CI 1.02-1.22) for CAO. The elderly was more vulnerable to high temperature of 30 °C with the cumulative 8-day RR of 1.08 (95 % CI 1.03-1.13) for CAO. Elevated outpatient visits for all respiratory diseases and asthma were associated with extreme heat lasting for 6 to 8 days. On the contrary, the extreme cold lasting more than 8 days had significant negative association with outpatient visits of all respiratory diseases. In summary, elderly patients of respiratory diseases and CAO are vulnerable to high temperature. Cold temperature is associated with all types of respiratory diseases for younger patients.

  19. Population-wide preventive interventions for reducing the burden of chronic respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Abramson, M J; Koplin, J; Hoy, R; Dharmage, S C

    2015-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma impose a substantial burden of disease. This narrative review focuses on potential population-wide interventions that are likely to have an impact on these diseases. The developmental origins of adult disease commence in utero, with maternal nutrition being of particular interest. However, to date, trials of maternal allergen avoidance, dietary supplementation or probiotics have not shown consistent protective effects against asthma. Poor indoor air quality, especially from biomass fuels as well as second-hand tobacco smoke, is a well-recognised risk factor for chronic respiratory diseases. This can be modified by cleaner fuels, cooking stoves or heaters, and improved ventilation. Although allergens are a risk factor for childhood asthma, the results of interventions to reduce exposures have been disappointing. Traffic-related air pollution is associated with an increased incidence of asthma in children. Primary prevention of the adverse effects of air pollution has focused on the development of ambient air quality guidelines, but enforcement remains a challenge in many countries. Occupational asthma may be induced by sensitisers or irritants in the workplace. Prevention involves eliminating the agent or reducing exposure as far as possible, which is more effective than respiratory protective equipment. Smoking cessation remains a key proven preventive strategy for chronic respiratory diseases. There is now an international framework for tobacco control, and recent innovations include plain packaging of tobacco. Chronic respiratory diseases can be substantially prevented by the above population-wide interventions. PMID:26260817

  20. The hazards of hypercaloric nutritional support in respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    DeMeo, M T; Mobarhan, S; Van De Graaff, W

    1991-04-01

    This case illustrates the dangers of hypercaloric feeding in a patient with limited respiratory reserve, in this instance secondary to heart-lung transplantation. The patient's postoperative course was complicated by repeated bouts of infection and/or rejection that resulted in intubation and ventilatory support. The excessive caloric and protein load given to the patient resulted in increased CO2 generation with subsequent inability to wean the patient off the ventilator. Recognition of the problem and appropriate decreases in substrate intake permitted extubation. PMID:1904565

  1. Vaccination: Is it Effective in Preventing Respiratory Disease or Influencing Weight Gains in Feedlot Calves?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S. W.

    1983-01-01

    Respiratory disease, both undifferentiated and etiologically defined, remains a major problem in feedlot cattle. Vaccination has been used in an attempt to reduce the frequency and/or severity of respiratory disease in the first few weeks after the cattle arrive at the feedlot. The efficacy of vaccination has been studied both in controlled laboratory experiments and field trials as well as observational studies. (In this review, efficacy refers to the ability to reduce overall treatment rate and/or increase weight gains.) This review summarizes the data resulting from studies of vaccine efficacy. In general, there is little published data to support the use of vaccines against respiratory disease under feedlot conditions. Treatment rates and weight gains usually did not differ between vaccinated and nonvaccinated groups. The use of live bovine virus diarrhea virus vaccines was associated with a significant subsequent increase in treatment rates. Criteria to be considered in future field trials are described. PMID:17422213

  2. Effect of 12-month rehabilitation with low loading program on chronic respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Yasuhiro; Dobashi, Kunio; Uga, Daisuke; Kato, Daigo; Nakazawa, Rie; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Fueki, Makoto; Makino, Sohei

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of 12-month rehabilitation with low loading program on chronic respiratory disease. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve patients with chronic respiratory disease participated in this study, in which the effect of long-term rehabilitation for 12 months was assessed. Nine patients had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, two had asthma, and one had interstitial pneumonia. In all patients, symptoms, lower-extremity strength, walking distance, activities of daily living, and quality of life were investigated to examine the effect of respiratory rehabilitation. [Results] After 12 months, the isometric knee extension strength and weight-bearing index both showed a significant increase. [Conclusion] The findings of this study suggested that improvement in lower-limb muscle strength can be achieved through long-term intervention, and indicated the validity of repetitive standing and walking exercises. PMID:27134407

  3. The active contribution of Toll-like receptors to allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Keqiang; Xiang, Yi; Yao, Xiaohong; Liu, Ying; Gong, Wanghua; Yoshimura, Teizo; Wang, Ji Ming

    2011-10-01

    Epithelia lining the respiratory tract represent a major portal of entry for microorganisms and allergens and are equipped with innate and adaptive immune signaling receptors for host protection. These include Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize microbial components and evoke diverse responses in cells of the respiratory system. TLR stimulation by microorganism-derived molecules activates antigen presenting cells, control T helper (Th) 1, Th2, and Th17 immune cell differentiation, cytokine production by mast cells, and activation of eosinophils. It is clear that TLR are involved in the pathophysiology of allergic airway diseases such as asthma. Dendritic cells (DCs), a kind of antigen presenting cells, which play a key role in the induction of allergic airway inflammation, are privileged targets for pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). During the allergic responses, engagement of TLRs on DCs determines the Th2 polarization of the T cells. TLR signaling in mast cells increases the release of IL-5, and TLR activation of airway epithelial cells forces the generation of proallergic Th2 type of cytokines. Although these responses aim to protect the host, they may also result in inflammatory tissue damage in the airway. Under certain conditions, stimulation of TLRs, in particular, TLR9, may reduce Th2-dependent allergic inflammation by induction of Th1 responses. Therefore, understanding the complex regulatory roles of TLRs in the pathogenesis of allergic airway inflammation should facilitate the development of preventive and therapeutic measures for asthmatic patients. PMID:21624504

  4. [The clinical course of allergic diseases in children and the T-lymphocyte dynamics with adsorbed DT-m vaccination against a background of drug therapy].

    PubMed

    Fedorova, O E; Kostinov, M P

    1990-05-01

    In case of immunization with adsorbed diphtheria-tetanus toxoid with reduced antigen content the treatment of children with calcium pantothenate in combination with chloropyramine proved to be most effective. This was confirmed by the absence of postvaccinal complications and by the most active restoration of the pool of active T cells as early as 2 months after immunization. After the preliminary treatment of children with allergic diseases with calcium pantothenate, glyceram, chloropyramine or their combinations the number of T lymphocytes decreased differently in children receiving different medicinal preparations. In 2 months after immunization the restoration of the pool of T cells was incomplete in children with allergic diseases and considerably more intensive in healthy children. PMID:1974731

  5. Evidence of lateral gene transfer among strains of Streptococcus zooepidemicus in weanling horses with respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Velineni, Sridhar; Breathnach, Cormac C; Timoney, John F

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus zooepidemicus (Sz) is a tonsillar commensal of healthy horses but with potential to opportunistically invade the lower respiratory tract. Sz is genetically variable and recombinogenic based on analysis of gene sequences including szp, szm and MLST data. Although a variety of serovars of the protective SzP are commonly harbored in the tonsils of the same horse, lower respiratory infections usually involve a single clone. Nevertheless, isolation of specific clones from epizootics of respiratory disease has been recently reported in horses and dogs in N. America, Europe and Asia. In this report, we provide evidence suggestive of lateral gene exchange and recombination between strains of Sz from cases of respiratory disease secondary to experimental equine herpes 1 virus infection in an isolated group of weanling horses and ponies. Nasal swabs of 13 of 18 weanlings with respiratory disease yielded mucoid colonies of Sz following culture. Comparison of arcC, nrdE, proS, spi, tdk, tpi and yqiL of these Sz revealed 3 Clades. Clade-1 (ST-212) and 2 (ST-24) were composed of 7 and 3 isolates, respectively. ST-24 and 212 differed in all 7 housekeeping as well as szp and szm alleles. Two isolates of Clade-1 were assigned to ST-308, a single locus variant of ST-212 that contained the proS-16 allele sequenced in ST-24. One isolate of ST-308 contained szm-2, the same allele sequenced in Clade 2 isolates; the other was positive for the szp-N2HV2 allele of Clade 2. These observations are consistent with gene transfer between Sz in the natural host and may explain formation of novel clones that invade the lower respiratory tract or cause epizootics of respiratory disease in dogs and horses. PMID:24263112

  6. The role of airway epithelial cells and innate immune cells in chronic respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, Michael J.; Byers, Derek E.; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer; Wang, Xinyu

    2016-01-01

    An abnormal immune response to environmental agents is generally thought to be responsible for causing chronic respiratory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Based on studies of experimental models and human subjects, there is increasing evidence that the response of the innate immune system is crucial for the development of this type of airway disease. Airway epithelial cells and innate immune cells represent key components of the pathogenesis of chronic airway disease and are emerging targets for new therapies. In this Review, we summarize the innate immune mechanisms by which airway epithelial cells and innate immune cells regulate the development of chronic respiratory diseases. We also explain how these pathways are being targeted in the clinic to treat patients with these diseases. PMID:25234144

  7. A Systematic Review on the Development of Asthma and Allergic Diseases in Relation to International Immigration: The Leading Role of the Environment Confirmed

    PubMed Central

    Cabieses, Báltica; Uphoff, Eleonora; Pinart, Mariona; Antó, Josep Maria; Wright, John

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases is rising worldwide. Evidence on potential causal pathways of asthma and allergies is growing, but findings have been contradictory, particularly on the interplay between allergic diseases and understudied social determinants of health like migration status. This review aimed at providing evidence for the association between migration status and asthma and allergies, and to explore the mechanisms between migration status and the development of asthma and allergies. Methods and Findings Systematic review on asthma and allergies and immigration status in accordance with the guidelines set by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. The pooled odds ratio (OR) of the prevalence of asthma in immigrants compared to the host population was 0.60 (95% CI 0.45–0.84), and the pooled OR for allergies was 1.01 (95% CI 0.62–1.69). The pooled OR for the prevalence of asthma in first generation versus second generation immigrants was 0.37 (95% CI 0.25–0.58). Comparisons between populations in their countries of origin and those that emigrated vary depending on their level of development; more developed countries show higher rates of asthma and allergies. Conclusions Our findings suggest a strong influence of the environment on the development of asthma and allergic diseases throughout the life course. The prevalence of asthma is generally higher in second generation than first generation immigrants. With length of residence in the host country the prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases increases steadily. These findings are consistent across study populations, host countries, and children as well as adults. Differences have been found to be significant when tested in a linear model, as well as when comparing between early and later age of migration, and between shorter and longer time of residence. PMID:25141011

  8. Discovery and characterization of NVP-QAV680, a potent and selective CRTh2 receptor antagonist suitable for clinical testing in allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sandham, David A; Arnold, Nicola; Aschauer, Heinrich; Bala, Kamlesh; Barker, Lucy; Brown, Lyndon; Brown, Zarin; Budd, David; Cox, Brian; Docx, Cerys; Dubois, Gerald; Duggan, Nicholas; England, Karen; Everatt, Brian; Furegati, Marcus; Hall, Edward; Kalthoff, Frank; King, Anna; Leblanc, Catherine J; Manini, Jodie; Meingassner, Josef; Profit, Rachael; Schmidt, Alfred; Simmons, Jennifer; Sohal, Bindi; Stringer, Rowan; Thomas, Matthew; Turner, Katharine L; Walker, Christoph; Watson, Simon J; Westwick, John; Willis, Jennifer; Williams, Gareth; Wilson, Caroline

    2013-11-01

    Optimization of a 7-azaindole-3-acetic acid CRTh2 receptor antagonist chemotype derived from high throughput screening furnished a highly selective compound NVP-QAV680 with low nM functional potency for inhibition of CRTh2 driven human eosinophil and Th2 lymphocyte activation in vitro. The molecule exhibited good oral bioavailability in the rat, combined with efficacy in rodent CRTh2-dependent mechanistic and allergic disease models and was suitable for clinical development. PMID:24021582

  9. Heart and lung, a dangerous liaison-Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy and respiratory diseases: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Manfredini, Roberto; Fabbian, Fabio; Giorgi, Alfredo De; Pala, Marco; Menegatti, Alessandra Mallozzi; Parisi, Claudia; Misurati, Elisa; Tiseo, Ruana; Gallerani, Massimo; Salmi, Raffaella; Bossone, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the possible association between Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC)-a reversible clinical condition mimicking an acute myocardial infarction characterized by multifactorial pathophysiologic mechanisms- and respiratory system diseases. METHODS: We systematically searched PubMed and EMBASE medical information sources, to identify the different triggering causes, limiting our search to articles in English. The search keywords were: “tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy”, “takotsubo”, “takotsubo cardiomyopathy”, “broken heart syndrome”, “stress-induced cardiomyopathy”, “apical ballooning syndrome”, and “ampulla cardiomyopathy in combination with respiratory diseases, lung, pulmonary disease. For each kind of disease, we registered: author, year and country of study, patient sex, age, concurring situation, and outcome. RESULTS: Out of a total of 1725 articles found, we selected 37 papers reporting a total of 38 patients. As expected, most patients were women (81.6%), mean age was 65 ± 10 years. Outcome was favorable in 100% of cases, and all the patients have been discharged uneventfully in a few days. CONCLUSION: An association between respiratory diseases and TTC is likely to exist. Patients with severe respiratory diseases, due to the high dosages of β2-agonists used or to the need of invasive procedures, are highly exposed to the risk of developing TTC. PMID:24944763

  10. Indigenous knowledge of pastoralists on respiratory diseases of camels in northern Kenya.

    PubMed

    Wako, D D; Younan, M; Tessema, T S; Glücks, I V; Baumann, M P O

    2016-08-01

    The camel disease terminology of pastoralists in northern Kenya differentiates between two respiratory disease complexes of camels. Participatory epidemiology data were collected in 2011 in three camel keeping communities (Gabra, Garri, and Somali) and analysed to assess the validity of this differentiation. Further queries assessed recurrence of the disease in the same animal, most affected age group, relative frequency of occurrence, morbidity rates, mortality rates and response to antibiotic treatment. Based on matrix scoring the cardinal symptom nasal discharge was significantly correlated with Respiratory Disease Complex 1 (RDC1; Somali Hergeb, Gabra & Garri Furri) while cough was correlated with Respiratory Disease Complex 2 (RDC2; Somali Dhuguta, Gabra Qufa, Garri Dhugud). RDC1 appears to occur regularly every year and does not respond to antibiotic treatments while outbreaks of RDC2 are only observed at intervals of several years and treated cases do generally respond to antibiotics. While RDC1 is more severe in calves, RDC 2 is mostly associated with respiratory disease in adults. Elements of this differentiation appear to be in agreement with other authors who differentiate between camel influenza (PI3 virus) and bacterial camel pneumonia, respectively. PMID:27435647

  11. Respiratory disease (rhinotracheitis) in turkeys in Brittany, France, 1981-1982. II. Laboratory findings.

    PubMed

    Andral, B; Louzis, C; Edlinger, E; Newman, J A; Toquin, D; Bennejean, G

    1985-01-01

    After discovering that numerous turkey flocks experiencing rhinotracheitis in Brittany, France, had antibodies against chlamydia, laboratory studies were conducted to determine whether chlamydia and/or viruses would explain the respiratory disease observed. Although both lentogenic paramyxoviruses of type 1 (Newcastle disease virus) and Chlamydia psittaci were isolated, it was concluded, based on epidemiologic and other laboratory findings, that C. psittaci was the primary cause of the disease. PMID:3985882

  12. Lesson of the month: selective use of cyclophosphamide in pregnancy for severe autoimmune respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Nelson-Piercy, Catherine; Agarwal, Sangita; Lams, Boris

    2016-07-01

    We present the cases of two pregnant women who developed severe respiratory compromise in mid pregnancy, one due to rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease associated with mixed connective tissue disease and one secondary to diffuse alveolar haemorrhage due to antiglomerular basement membrane disease. Both were treated with high-dose steroids followed by pulsed intravenous cyclophosphamide. Both women went onto have live births although one baby was growth restricted and preterm. Neither baby had any evidence of congenital abnormalities. PMID:27033023

  13. [Clinico-radiological and functional aspects of respiratory syndromes caused by collagen diseases].

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, G; Allegra, L; Bianco, S; Gangarossa, C; Ortolani, C; Rizzi, A M

    1976-11-01

    The clinical and radiological features in 100 patients with collagen diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, sclerodermia, dermatomyositis, and panarteritis nodosa) were compared with respiratory performance. 56 patients were drawn from the series of Pende et Al. and 44 from a personal series. The results are set out in tables and graphs. It was found that lung lesions due to collagen disease have no special clinical and radiological features. Respiratory performance is that of a restrictive syndrome that gradually progresses from A.R. to E.S., S. and P.M., accompanied by obstruction of the large airways, as shown by hyperinsufflation in sclerodermia and reduced specific conductance in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:995294

  14. Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis: A Perplexing Clinical Entity

    PubMed Central

    Panjabi, Chandramani

    2016-01-01

    In susceptible individuals, inhalation of Aspergillus spores can affect the respiratory tract in many ways. These spores get trapped in the viscid sputum of asthmatic subjects which triggers a cascade of inflammatory reactions that can result in Aspergillus-induced asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), and allergic Aspergillus sinusitis (AAS). An immunologically mediated disease, ABPA, occurs predominantly in patients with asthma and cystic fibrosis (CF). A set of criteria, which is still evolving, is required for diagnosis. Imaging plays a compelling role in the diagnosis and monitoring of the disease. Demonstration of central bronchiectasis with normal tapering bronchi is still considered pathognomonic in patients without CF. Elevated serum IgE levels and Aspergillus-specific IgE and/or IgG are also vital for the diagnosis. Mucoid impaction occurring in the paranasal sinuses results in AAS, which also requires a set of diagnostic criteria. Demonstration of fungal elements in sinus material is the hallmark of AAS. In spite of similar histopathologic features, co-existence of ABPA and AAS is still uncommon. Oral corticosteroids continue to be the mainstay of management of allergic aspergillosis. Antifungal agents play an adjunctive role in ABPA as they help reduce the fungal load. Saprophytic colonization in cavitary ABPA may lead to aspergilloma formation, which could increase the severity of the disease. The presence of ABPA, AAS, and aspergilloma in the same patient has also been documented. All patients with Aspergillus-sensitized asthma must be screened for ABPA, and AAS should always be looked for. PMID:27126721

  15. Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis: A Perplexing Clinical Entity.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok; Panjabi, Chandramani

    2016-07-01

    In susceptible individuals, inhalation of Aspergillus spores can affect the respiratory tract in many ways. These spores get trapped in the viscid sputum of asthmatic subjects which triggers a cascade of inflammatory reactions that can result in Aspergillus-induced asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), and allergic Aspergillus sinusitis (AAS). An immunologically mediated disease, ABPA, occurs predominantly in patients with asthma and cystic fibrosis (CF). A set of criteria, which is still evolving, is required for diagnosis. Imaging plays a compelling role in the diagnosis and monitoring of the disease. Demonstration of central bronchiectasis with normal tapering bronchi is still considered pathognomonic in patients without CF. Elevated serum IgE levels and Aspergillus-specific IgE and/or IgG are also vital for the diagnosis. Mucoid impaction occurring in the paranasal sinuses results in AAS, which also requires a set of diagnostic criteria. Demonstration of fungal elements in sinus material is the hallmark of AAS. In spite of similar histopathologic features, co-existence of ABPA and AAS is still uncommon. Oral corticosteroids continue to be the mainstay of management of allergic aspergillosis. Antifungal agents play an adjunctive role in ABPA as they help reduce the fungal load. Saprophytic colonization in cavitary ABPA may lead to aspergilloma formation, which could increase the severity of the disease. The presence of ABPA, AAS, and aspergilloma in the same patient has also been documented. All patients with Aspergillus-sensitized asthma must be screened for ABPA, and AAS should always be looked for. PMID:27126721

  16. Perinatal paracetamol exposure in mice does not affect the development of allergic airways disease in early life

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Debbie C P; Walker, Simone A; Byrne, Adam J; Gregory, Lisa G; Buckley, James; Bush, Andrew; Shaheen, Seif O; Saglani, Sejal; Lloyd, Clare M

    2015-01-01

    Background Current data concerning maternal paracetamol intake during pregnancy, or intake during infancy and risk of wheezing or asthma in childhood is inconclusive based on epidemiological studies. We have investigated whether there is a causal link between maternal paracetamol intake during pregnancy and lactation and the development of house dust mite (HDM) induced allergic airways disease (AAD) in offspring using a neonatal mouse model. Methods Pregnant mice were administered paracetamol or saline by oral gavage from the day of mating throughout pregnancy and/or lactation. Subsequently, their pups were exposed to intranasal HDM or saline from day 3 of life for up to 6 weeks. Assessments of airway hyper-responsiveness, inflammation and remodelling were made at weaning (3 weeks) and 6 weeks of age. Results Maternal paracetamol exposure either during pregnancy and/or lactation did not affect development of AAD in offspring at weaning or at 6 weeks. There were no effects of maternal paracetamol at any time point on airway remodelling or IgE levels. Conclusions Maternal paracetamol did not enhance HDM induced AAD in offspring. Our mechanistic data do not support the hypothesis that prenatal paracetamol exposure increases the risk of childhood asthma. PMID:25841236

  17. Respiratory diseases research at NIOSH: reviews of research programs of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    Respiratory diseases caused by exposures to dangerous materials in the workplace have tremendous implications for worker health and, by extension, the national economy. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) estimates that deaths from work-related respiratory diseases and cancers account for about 70% of all occupational disease deaths. NIOSH conducts research in order to detect and reduce work-related hazardous exposures, injuries, and diseases; its Respiratory Disease Research Program (RDRP) focuses on respiratory diseases. This National Research Council book reviews the RDRP to evaluate the 1) relevance of its work to improvements in occupational safety and health and 2) the impact of research in reducing workplace respiratory illnesses. The assessment reveals that the program has made essential contributions to preventing occupational respiratory disease. The National Research Council has rated the Program a 5 out of 5 for relevance, and a 4 out of 5 for impact. To further increase its effectiveness, the Respiratory Disease Research Program should continue and expand its current efforts, provide resources for occupational disease surveillance, and include exposure assessment scientists in its activities. There are numerous references to respiratory systems diseases caused by coal mining. 4 apps.

  18. Heat-related Emergency Hospitalizations for Respiratory Diseases in the Medicare Population

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, G. Brooke; Dominici, Francesca; Wang, Yun; McCormack, Meredith C.; Bell, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: The heat-related risk of hospitalization for respiratory diseases among the elderly has not been quantified in the United States on a national scale. With climate change predictions of more frequent and more intense heat waves, it is of paramount importance to quantify the health risks related to heat, especially for the most vulnerable. Objectives: To estimate the risk of hospitalization for respiratory diseases associated with outdoor heat in the U.S. elderly. Methods: An observational study of approximately 12.5 million Medicare beneficiaries in 213 United States counties, January 1, 1999 to December 31, 2008. We estimate a national average relative risk of hospitalization for each 10°F (5.6°C) increase in daily outdoor temperature using Bayesian hierarchical models. Measurements and Main Results: We obtained daily county-level rates of Medicare emergency respiratory hospitalizations (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, 464–466, 480–487, 490–492) in 213 U.S. counties from 1999 through 2008. Overall, each 10°F increase in daily temperature was associated with a 4.3% increase in same-day emergency hospitalizations for respiratory diseases (95% posterior interval, 3.8, 4.8%). Counties’ relative risks were significantly higher in counties with cooler average summer temperatures. Conclusions: We found strong evidence of an association between outdoor heat and respiratory hospitalizations in the largest population of elderly studied to date. Given projections of increasing temperatures from climate change and the increasing global prevalence of chronic pulmonary disease, the relationship between heat and respiratory morbidity is a growing concern. PMID:23491405

  19. Fine Particulate Matter Pollution and Hospital Admissions for Respiratory Diseases in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qiulin; Zhao, Wenji; Gong, Zhaoning; Zhao, Wenhui; Tang, Tao

    2015-09-01

    Fine particulate matter has become the premier air pollutant of Beijing in recent years, enormously impacting the environmental quality of the city and the health of the residents. Fine particles with aerodynamic diameters of 0~0.3 μm, 0.3~0.5 μm, and 0.5~1.0 μm, from the yeasr 2007 to 2012, were monitored, and the hospital data about respiratory diseases during the same period was gathered and calculated. Then the correlation between respiratory health and fine particles was studied by spatial analysis and grey correlation analysis. The results showed that the aerial fine particulate matter pollution was mainly distributed in the Zizhuyuan sub-district office. There was a certain association between respiratory health and fine particles. Outpatients with respiratory system disease in this study area were mostly located in the southeastern regions (Balizhuang sub-district office, Ganjiakou sub-district office, Wanshoulu sub-district office, and Yongdinglu sub-district office) and east-central regions (Zizhuyuan sub-district office and Shuangyushu sub-district office) of the study area. Correspondingly, PM₁ (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 1.0 um) concentrations in these regions were higher than those in any other regions. Grey correlation analysis results showed that the correlation degree of the fine particle concentration with the number of outpatients is high, and the smaller fine particles had more obvious effects on respiratory system disease than larger particles. PMID:26402691

  20. Fine Particulate Matter Pollution and Hospital Admissions for Respiratory Diseases in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qiulin; Zhao, Wenji; Gong, Zhaoning; Zhao, Wenhui; Tang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Fine particulate matter has become the premier air pollutant of Beijing in recent years, enormously impacting the environmental quality of the city and the health of the residents. Fine particles with aerodynamic diameters of 0~0.3 μm, 0.3~0.5 μm, and 0.5~1.0 μm, from the yeasr 2007 to 2012, were monitored, and the hospital data about respiratory diseases during the same period was gathered and calculated. Then the correlation between respiratory health and fine particles was studied by spatial analysis and grey correlation analysis. The results showed that the aerial fine particulate matter pollution was mainly distributed in the Zizhuyuan sub-district office. There was a certain association between respiratory health and fine particles. Outpatients with respiratory system disease in this study area were mostly located in the southeastern regions (Balizhuang sub-district office, Ganjiakou sub-district office, Wanshoulu sub-district office, and Yongdinglu sub-district office) and east-central regions (Zizhuyuan sub-district office and Shuangyushu sub-district office) of the study area. Correspondingly, PM1 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 1.0 um) concentrations in these regions were higher than those in any other regions. Grey correlation analysis results showed that the correlation degree of the fine particle concentration with the number of outpatients is high, and the smaller fine particles had more obvious effects on respiratory system disease than larger particles. PMID:26402691

  1. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus: epidemiology and disease control measures

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Memish, Ziad A

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in 2012 resulted in an increased concern of the spread of the infection globally. MERS-CoV infection had previously caused multiple health-care-associated outbreaks and resulted in transmission of the virus within families. Community onset MERS-CoV cases continue to occur. Dromedary camels are currently the most likely animal to be linked to human MERS-CoV cases. Serologic tests showed significant infection in adult camels compared to juvenile camels. The control of MERS-CoV infection relies on prompt identification of cases within health care facilities, with institutions applying appropriate infection control measures. In addition, determining the exact route of transmission from camels to humans would further add to the control measures of MERS-CoV infection. PMID:25395865

  2. Text mining and medicine: usefulness in respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Piedra, David; Ferrer, Antoni; Gea, Joaquim

    2014-03-01

    It is increasingly common to have medical information in electronic format. This includes scientific articles as well as clinical management reviews, and even records from health institutions with patient data. However, traditional instruments, both individual and institutional, are of little use for selecting the most appropriate information in each case, either in the clinical or research field. So-called text or data «mining» enables this huge amount of information to be managed, extracting it from various sources using processing systems (filtration and curation), integrating it and permitting the generation of new knowledge. This review aims to provide an overview of text and data mining, and of the potential usefulness of this bioinformatic technique in the exercise of care in respiratory medicine and in research in the same field. PMID:24507559

  3. Characterization of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae collected from respiratory infections and invasive disease cases in Manitoba, Canada.

    PubMed

    Shuel, Michelle; Law, Dennis; Skinner, Stuart; Wylie, John; Karlowsky, James; Tsang, Raymond S W

    2010-03-01

    With the introduction of the Haemophilus influenzae serotype b (Hib) vaccine, invasive Hib disease has decreased substantially, but nontypeable H. influenzae (NT Hi) disease appears to be increasing. In order to understand the origin of NT Hi strains and their relationship with serotypeable strains, we analysed 125 NT Hi isolates collected from individual patients with either invasive disease (70 isolates) or respiratory tract infections (55 isolates). Serotype-specific and capsular transport genes were absent by PCR analysis, confirming their nonencapsulated status, which also suggested the NT Hi isolates were not encapsulated strains that shed their capsules. Multilocus sequence typing confirmed the NT Hi isolates did not have the same genetic background as serotypeable strains, including Hib. Despite the genetic heterogeneity found, two major genetic clusters were identified, both containing invasive and respiratory isolates. Fourteen invasive isolates and nine respiratory isolates produced beta-lactamase and were ampicillin resistant. More invasive (26.8%) than respiratory isolates (10.9%) showed decreased susceptibility towards ampicillin by a mechanism unrelated to beta-lactamase production. Besides a change in the capsule status of invasive Hi strains, the burden of invasive Hi disease, which used to be mainly a childhood disease, has now shifted to involve both adults and infants. PMID:20041949

  4. A previously unknown reovirus of bat origin is associated with an acute respiratory disease in humans

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Crameri, Gary; Hyatt, Alex; Yu, Meng; Tompang, Mohd Rosli; Rosli, Juliana; McEachern, Jennifer; Crameri, Sandra; Kumarasamy, Verasingam; Eaton, Bryan T.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory infections constitute the most widespread human infectious disease, and a substantial proportion of them are caused by unknown etiological agents. Reoviruses (respiratory enteric orphan viruses) were first isolated from humans in the early 1950s and so named because they were not associated with any known disease. Here, we report a previously unknown reovirus (named “Melaka virus”) isolated from a 39-year-old male patient in Melaka, Malaysia, who was suffering from high fever and acute respiratory disease at the time of virus isolation. Two of his family members developed similar symptoms ≈1 week later and had serological evidence of infection with the same virus. Epidemiological tracing revealed that the family was exposed to a bat in the house ≈1 week before the onset of the father's clinical symptoms. Genome sequence analysis indicated a close genetic relationship between Melaka virus and Pulau virus, a reovirus isolated in 1999 from fruit bats in Tioman Island, Malaysia. Screening of sera collected from human volunteers on the island revealed that 14 of 109 (13%) were positive for both Pulau and Melaka viruses. This is the first report of an orthoreovirus in association with acute human respiratory diseases. Melaka virus is serologically not related to the different types of mammalian reoviruses that were known to infect humans asymptomatically. These data indicate that bat-borne reoviruses can be transmitted to and cause clinical diseases in humans. PMID:17592121

  5. Proximity to coke works and hospital admissions for