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Sample records for allergic transfusion reactions

  1. Current understanding of allergic transfusion reactions: incidence, pathogenesis, laboratory tests, prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Fumiya

    2013-02-01

    Non-haemolytic transfusion reactions are the most common type of transfusion reaction and include transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, allergic reactions, febrile reactions, post-transfusion purpura and graft-versus- host disease. Although life-threatening anaphylaxis occurs rarely, allergic reactions occur most frequently. If possible, even mild transfusion reactions should be avoided because they add to patients' existing suffering. During the last decade, several new discoveries have been made in the field of allergic diseases and transfusion medicine. First, mast cells are not the only cells that are key players in allergic diseases, particularly in the murine immune system. Second, it has been suggested that immunologically active undigested or digested food allergens in a donor's blood may be transferred to a recipient who is allergic to these antigens, causing anaphylaxis. Third, washed platelets have been shown to be effective for preventing allergic transfusion reactions, although substantial numbers of platelets are lost during washing procedures, and platelet recovery after transfusion may not be equivalent to that with unwashed platelets. This review describes allergic transfusion reactions, including the above-mentioned points, and focusses on their incidence, pathogenesis, laboratory tests, prevention and treatment. PMID:23215650

  2. The IgE-dependent pathway in allergic transfusion reactions: involvement of donor blood allergens other than plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Nobuki; Yasui, Kazuta; Amakishi, Etsuko; Hayashi, Tomoya; Kuroishi, Ayumu; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Matsukura, Harumichi; Tani, Yoshihiko; Furuta, Rika A; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2015-07-01

    On transfusion, several plasma proteins can cause anaphylaxis in patients deficient in the corresponding plasma proteins. However, little is known about other allergens, which are encountered much more infrequently. Although it has been speculated that an allergen-independent pathway underlying allergic transfusion reactions (ATRs) is elicited by biological response modifiers accumulated in blood components during storage, the exact mechanisms remain unresolved. Furthermore, it is difficult even to determine whether ATRs are induced via allergen-dependent or allergen-independent pathways. To distinguish these two pathways in ATR cases, we established a basophil activation test, in which the basophil-activating ability of supernatants of residual transfused blood of ATR cases to whole blood basophils was assessed in the presence or absence of dasatinib, an inhibitor of IgE-mediated basophil activation. Three of 37 supernatants from the platelet concentrates with ATRs activated panel blood basophils in the absence, but not in the presence, of dasatinib. The basophil activation was inhibited by treatment of anti-fish collagen I MoAb in one case, suggesting that the involvement of fish allergens may have been present in donor plasma. We concluded that unknown non-plasma proteins, some of which had epitopes similar to fish antigens, in blood component may be involved in ATRs via an allergen/IgE-dependent pathway. PMID:25840771

  3. Effects of Leukoreduction and Premedication With Acetaminophen and Diphenhydramine in Minimizing Febrile Nonhemolytic Transfusion Reactions and Allergic Transfusion Reactions During and After Blood Product Administration: A Literature Review With Recommendations for Practice.

    PubMed

    Duran, Joana; Siddique, Sulman; Cleary, Myra

    2014-05-01

    Transfusion-related reactions cause unwanted interruptions in blood-product administration and potential complications for patients. The most common reactions are febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs) and allergic transfusion reactions (ATRs). The presence of leukocytes in blood products has been associated with these reactions, and efficacy of leukoreduction in minimizing FNHTRs and ATRs has recently been investigated. In addition, premedication with acetaminophen and diphenhydramine is the most widely used practice in minimizing FNHTRs and ATRs, yet the benefit of this is not supported by research. The aim of this systematic literature review was to evaluate the potential benefits of both of these interventions in minimizing FNHTRs and ATRs and provide recommendations for practice. We found moderate quality evidence with strong recommendations for the practice of leukoreduction in minimizing FNHTRs but not ATRs. We did not find evidence to support the use of premedications in minimizing transfusion-related reactions, and we question the need for this practice in settings where leukoreduction is used. PMID:24794886

  4. Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... immune system identifies pollen as an invader or allergen. Your immune system overreacts by producing antibodies called ... IgE has specific "radar" for each type of allergen. That's why some people are only allergic to ...

  5. Nonhemolytic, noninfectious transfusion reactions.

    PubMed

    Barton, J C

    1981-04-01

    The delivery of optimal transfusion therapy requires that the physician first have a thorough understanding of his patient's disease and prior transfusion history. Sometimes the need for blood product administration is more apparent than real. In the selection of necessary therapy, particular blood components, their volumes, and the timing of their administration should be carefully planned. The transfusion of whole blood, particularly as single-unit transfusions, is rarely indicated. Often forgotten, autotransfusion represents a means whereby many subjects who have repeated, unusual, or severe reactions may receive safe treatment. An appreciation of the frequency and manifestations of transfusion-related problems permits effective treatment of ongoing reactions. The prophylactic measures which should be taken against future reactions in most patients are specific, and are the responsibility of the clinician, based upon his bedside observations and laboratory studies. Problems should be discussed with either a hematologist, pathologist, or blood banking expert without hesitation. These guidelines help conserve a precious resource and assure that safe, effective, and economical transfusion therapy is available for all patients in need. PMID:6164098

  6. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction can be provoked by skin contact with poison plants, chemicals and animal scratches, as well as by ... dust, nuts and shellfish, may also cause allergic reaction. Medications such as penicillin and other antibiotics are ...

  7. Precautions and Adverse Reactions during Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the transfused blood after it is collected. In addition to an increase in temperature, the person has chills and sometimes headache or back pain. Sometimes the person also has symptoms of an allergic reaction such as itching or a rash. Usually, acetaminophen ...

  8. Diagnostic approaches to acute transfusion reactions.

    PubMed

    Leo, A; Pedal, I

    2010-06-01

    The erroneous transfusion of ABO-incompatible red cells may lead to life-threatening hemolysis and complement-induced shock, resulting in death in less than 10% of cases (acute hemolytic transfusion reaction, AHTR). Identification of the cause of an erroneous transfusion is accomplished in nearly all incidents merely by checking the identity of the patient, blood sample and blood bag. The erroneous transfusion is confirmed by serological and--in the case of a fatality- immunohistochemical methods. The differential diagnosis should rule out transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), other immunologically triggered causes such as febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR) or allergic reactions, but also nonimmunological causes such as bacterial contamination of the blood components, transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) and other rare events such as citrate overload or embolism (by air or debris). In the case of a fatality, evaluation of a patient's medical records, serological and microbiological analyses, autopsy and histology, taken together, clarify questions of causality. PMID:20140541

  9. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  10. Transfusion reaction - hemolytic

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood you receive. Most of the time, a blood transfusion between compatible groups (such as O+ to O+) does not cause a problem. Blood transfusions between incompatible groups (such as A+ to O-) cause an immune ...

  11. Acute pain transfusion reaction.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Jody; Osswald, Michael; Walker, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    A 34-year-old woman with a diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH) received a double umbilical cord blood transplantation following a myeloablative chemotherapy preparative regimen with busulfan and cyclophosphamide. HLH is a rare, potentially fatal hematologic disorder characterized by the overactivation of histocytes and T lymphocytes, leading to organ infiltration and acute illness. On day 25 post-transplantation, the patient required a platelet transfusion for a platelet count of 6,000 per ml (normal range = 150,000-450,000 per ml). The patient's blood type prior to the cord blood transplantation was B positive and, although both umbilical cord blood donors were O positive, the patient was still B positive per blood bank testing on that day. Although the recipient of an allogenic stem cell transplantation will eventually become the blood type of the donor, the time for this process to occur varies for each person. That process must be monitored by the blood bank for the purpose of cross-matching blood products to decrease hemolysis as much as possible. The patient was premedicated with the facility's standard for platelet transfusions: acetaminophen 650 mg and diphenhydramine 25 mg about 30 minutes prior to the platelet transfusion. PMID:24161631

  12. Acute transfusion reactions: an update.

    PubMed

    Scorer, T; Doughty, H

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the use of blood products by the United Kingdom (UK) military has increased significantly; with the increase in transfusion comes an increased incidence of transfusion-related incidents. Acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) are a common consequence of transfusion, which vary widely in their severity and are likely to be under-reported, although reporting is a regulatory requirement. This paper discusses the importance of identifying ATRs and managing them appropriately. It introduces a flowchart (due to be incorporated in the next version of Joint Service Publication (JSP) 999, Clinical Guidelines for Operations (CGOs)), which is designed to assist the military multi-disciplinary team caring for patients in the operational environment. PMID:25895413

  13. Allergic reactions to medication (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A true allergy to a medication is different than a simple adverse reaction to the drug. The allergic reaction occurs when the immune system, having been exposed to the drug before, creates antibodies to ...

  14. Hypothesis: Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions Represent an Alternative Type of Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Hod, Eldad A.; Sokol, Set A.; Zimring, James C.; Spitalnik, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Classical anaphylaxis is the most severe, and potentially fatal, type of allergic reaction, manifested by hypotension, bronchoconstriction, and vascular permeability. Similarly, a hemolytic transfusion reaction (HTR) is the most feared consequence of blood transfusion. Evidence for the existence of an alternative, IgG-mediated pathway of anaphylaxis may be relevant for explaining the pathophysiology of IgG-mediated-HTRs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence for this alternative pathway of anaphylaxis and to present the hypothesis that an IgG-mediated HTR is one example of this type of anaphylaxis. PMID:18830382

  15. Guideline on the investigation and management of acute transfusion reactions. Prepared by the BCSH Blood Transfusion Task Force.

    PubMed

    Tinegate, Hazel; Birchall, Janet; Gray, Alexandra; Haggas, Richard; Massey, Edwin; Norfolk, Derek; Pinchon, Deborah; Sewell, Carrock; Wells, Angus; Allard, Shubha

    2012-10-01

    Although acute non-haemolytic febrile or allergic reactions (ATRs) are a common complication of transfusion and often result in little or no morbidity, prompt recognition and management are essential. The serious hazards of transfusion haemovigilance organisation (SHOT) receives 30-40 reports of anaphylactic reactions each year. Other serious complications of transfusion, such as acute haemolysis, bacterial contamination, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) or transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) may present with similar clinical features to ATR. This guideline describes the approach to a patient developing adverse symptoms and signs related to transfusion, including initial recognition, establishing a likely cause, treatment, investigations, planning future transfusion and reporting within the hospital and to haemovigilance organisations. Key recommendations are that adrenaline should be used as first line treatment of anaphylaxis, and that transfusions should only be carried out where patients can be directly observed and where staff are trained in manging complications of transfusion, particularly anaphylaxis. Management of ATRs is not dependent on classification but should be guided by symptoms and signs. Patients who have experienced an anaphylactic reaction should be discussed with an allergist or immunologist, in keeping with UK resuscitation council guidelines. PMID:22928769

  16. Severe allergic reaction to Dermabond.

    PubMed

    Perry, Arthur W; Sosin, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The use of 2-octyl cyanoacrylate (Dermabond; Ethicon, Somerville, NJ) for wound closure is increasingly popular. Problems with Dermabond are generally related to application techniques and rarely relate to the chemical nature of the adhesive. This article describes a severe allergic reaction to Dermabond following breast augmentation/mastopexy. PMID:19717065

  17. Transfusion-related adverse reactions: From institutional hemovigilance effort to National Hemovigilance program

    PubMed Central

    Vasudev, Rahul; Sawhney, Vijay; Dogra, Mitu; Raina, Tilak Raj

    2016-01-01

    Aims: In this study we have evaluated the various adverse reactions related to transfusion occurring in our institution as a pilot institutional effort toward a hemovigilance program. This study will also help in understanding the problems faced by blood banks/Transfusion Medicine departments in implementing an effective hemovigilance program. Materials and Methods: All the adverse reactions related to transfusion of whole blood and its components in various clinical specialties were studied for a period of 1 year. Any transfusion-related adverse event was worked up in accordance with guidelines laid down by the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) and departmental standard operating procedures. Results: During the study period from November 1, 2011 to October 31, 2012, 45812 components were issued [30939 WB/PRBC; 12704 fresh frozen plasma (FFP); 2169 platelets]. Risk estimation per 1000 units of red cells (WB/PRBC) transfused was estimated to be: 0.8 for febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR), 0.7 for allergic reaction, 0.19 for acute hemolytic transfusion reaction (AcHTR), 0.002 for anaphylactoid reactions, 0.1 for bacterial sepsis, and 0.06 for hypervolemia and hypocalcemia. 0.09 is the risk for delayed transfusion reaction and 0.03 is the risk for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Risk estimate per 1,000 units of platelets transfused was estimated to be 1.38 for FNHTR, 1.18 for allergic reaction, and 1 in case of bacterial sepsis. Risk estimation per 1,000 units of FFP was estimated to be 0.15 for FNHTR and 0.2 for allergic reactions. Conclusions: Factors such as clerical checks at various levels, improvement in blood storage conditions outside blood banks, leukodepletion, better inventory management, careful donor screening, bedside monitoring of transfusion, and documentation of adverse events may decrease transfusion-related adverse events. Better coordination between transfusion specialists and various clinical specialties

  18. Frequency and Pattern of Noninfectious Adverse Transfusion Reactions at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jooyoung; Choi, Seung Jun; Kim, Sinyoung; Alghamdi, Essam

    2016-01-01

    Background Although transfusion is a paramount life-saving therapy, there are multiple potential significant risks. Therefore, all adverse transfusion reaction (ATR) episodes require close monitoring. Using the computerized reporting system, we assessed the frequency and pattern of non-infectious ATRs. Methods We analyzed two-year transfusion data from electronic medical records retrospectively. From March 2013 to February 2015, 364,569 units of blood were transfused. Of them, 334,582 (91.8%) records were identified from electronic nursing records. For the confirmation of ATRs by blood bank physicians, patients' electronic medical records were further evaluated. Results According to the nursing records, the frequency of all possible transfusion-related events was 3.1%. After the blood bank physicians' review, the frequency was found to be 1.2%. The overall frequency of febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs) to red blood cells (RBCs), platelet (PLT) components, and fresh frozen plasmas (FFPs) were 0.9%, 0.3%, and 0.2%, respectively, and allergic reactions represented 0.3% (RBCs), 0.9% (PLTs), and 0.9% (FFPs), respectively. The pre-storage leukocyte reduction significantly decreased the frequency of FNHTRs during the transfusion of RBCs (P<0.01) or PLTs (P≒0.01). Conclusions The frequency of FNHTRs, allergic reactions, and "no reactions" were 22.0%, 17.0%, and 60.7%, respectively. Leukocyte-reduction was associated with a lower rate of FNHTRs, but not with that of allergic reactions. The development of an effective electronic reporting system of ATRs is important in quantifying transfusion-related adverse events. This type of reporting system can also accurately identify the underlying problems and risk factors to further the quality of transfusion care for patients. PMID:26522757

  19. Initiation and Regulation of Complement during Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Stowell, Sean R.; Winkler, Anne M.; Maier, Cheryl L.; Arthur, C. Maridith; Smith, Nicole H.; Girard-Pierce, Kathryn R.; Cummings, Richard D.; Zimring, James C.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.

    2012-01-01

    Hemolytic transfusion reactions represent one of the most common causes of transfusion-related mortality. Although many factors influence hemolytic transfusion reactions, complement activation represents one of the most common features associated with fatality. In this paper we will focus on the role of complement in initiating and regulating hemolytic transfusion reactions and will discuss potential strategies aimed at mitigating or favorably modulating complement during incompatible red blood cell transfusions. PMID:23118779

  20. Delayed Serological Transfusion Reaction After Platelet Transfusion Due to Anti-e.

    PubMed

    Sachan, Deepti; Kumar, Aswin; Jothimani, Dinesh; Rela, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Delayed serological transfusion reaction (DSTR) is defined as absence of clinical signs of hemolysis and demonstration of new, clinically-significant antibodies against red blood cells after a transfusion, by either positive direct antiglobulin test or positive antibody screen with newly identified RBC alloantibody. Various delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction cases are reported after red cell transfusions. However, the incidence of DSTR after platelet transfusion due to non-Rh(D) antibodies is not much documented. We report here a case of DSTR due to anti-e Rh antibody in a multiply red cell alloimmunized female patient after single donor platelets transfusion. PMID:27408414

  1. The allergic emergency--management of severe allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Werner-Busse, Alexandra; Zuberbier, Torsten; Worm, Margitta

    2014-05-01

    Anaphylaxis is characterized by the sudden onset of acute allergic symptoms involving two or more organ systems. An acute allergic emergency is a challenge for physicians due to its life-threatening potential. The incidence of anaphylactic reactions has increased in recent years. Most frequent elicitors of mast cell and primarily histamine dependent anaphylactic reactions are food, insect venom or drugs. Allergic -reactions are graded into four groups according to the classification by Ring and Messmer; grade I is defined by the onset of cutaneous symptoms only whereas grade IV is characterized by cardiovascular shock as well as cardiac and/or respiratory arrest. The treatment of allergic reactions should be guided by the severity of the reaction. Initially an intramuscular epinephrine injection into the lateral thigh should be given if cutaneous, mucosal and cardiovascular/respiratory symptoms occur. Additionally, the patient should receive intravenous antihistamines and corticosteroids. For self-treatment in the case of an allergic emergency, oral antihistamines and corticosteroids should be prescribed to the patient. PMID:24673732

  2. Clinical Response and Transfusion Reactions of Sheep Subjected to Single Homologous Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Rejane Santos; Minervino, Antonio Humberto Hamad; Araújo, Carolina Akiko Sato Cabral; Rodrigues, Frederico Augusto Mazzocca Lopes; Oliveira, Francisco Leonardo Costa; Zaminhan, Janaina Larissa Rodrigues; Moreira, Thiago Rocha; Sousa, Isadora Karolina Freitas; Ortolani, Enrico Lippi; Barrêto Júnior, Raimundo Alves

    2014-01-01

    Studies in relation to blood conservation and responses to transfusion are scarce for ruminants. We evaluated the clinical manifestations of sheep that received a single homologous transfusion of whole blood, focusing on transfusion reactions. Eighteen adult sheep were subjected to a single phlebotomy to withdraw 40% of the total blood volume, which was placed into CPDA-1 bags and then divided into G0, animals that received fresh blood, and G15 and G35, animals that received blood stored for 15 or 35 days, respectively. Clinical observations were recorded throughout the transfusion, whereas heart rate, respiratory rate, and rectal temperature were assessed at the following times: 24 hours after phlebotomy and before transfusion; 30 minutes, six, twelve, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours and eight and 16 days after transfusion. All groups presented transfusion reactions, among which hyperthermia was the most frequent (50% of animals). Tachycardia occurred most frequently in the G35 animals (50% of them). During transfusion G35 animals presented more clinical manifestation (P < 0.05). Transfusion of fresh or stored total blood improved the blood volume, but transfusion reactions occurred, demonstrating that a single transfusion of fresh or stored blood can cause inflammatory and febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions in sheep. PMID:25544959

  3. Transfusion reaction identification and management at the bedside.

    PubMed

    Crookston, Kendall P; Koenig, Sara C; Reyes, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Blood product transfusion is one of the most common invasive procedures performed in the health care setting. In contrast to pharmaceuticals, blood is actually a liquid transplant. Transfusion complications consequently encompass complex biological processes and infectious possibilities. Changes in vital signs are regularly seen during transfusion. Knowledge of common transfusion reaction signs and symptoms enables the clinical team to differentiate a normal patient response from a life-threatening reaction. Direct care nurses responsible for this procedure play a vital role in its success. Understanding the possible complications of transfusion and how to quickly recognize reactions at the bedside helps ensure the best patient outcomes. PMID:25723832

  4. Recognition, Investigation and Management of Acute Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Al-Hashmi, Sabria; Al-Arimi, Zainab; Wadsworth, Louis D.; Al-Rawas, Abdulhakim; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Daar, Shahina

    2014-01-01

    The recognition and management of transfusion reactions (TRs) are critical to ensure patient safety during and after a blood transfusion. Transfusion reactions are classified into acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) or delayed transfusion reactions, and each category includes different subtypes. Different ATRs share common signs and symptoms which can make categorisation difficult at the beginning of the reaction. Moreover, TRs are often under-recognised and under-reported. To ensure uniform practice and safety, it is necessary to implement a national haemovigilance system and a set of national guidelines establishing policies for blood transfusion and for the detection and management of TRs. In Oman, there are currently no local TR guidelines to guide physicians and hospital blood banks. This paper summarises the available literature and provides consensus guidelines to be used in the recognition, management and reporting of ATRs. PMID:25097764

  5. Recent Advances in Preventing Adverse Reactions to Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Thomas S; Fung, Mark K; Harm, Sarah K

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of adverse reactions to blood product transfusion ranges from a benign clinical course to serious morbidity and mortality.  There have been many advances in technologies and transfusion strategies to decrease the risk of adverse reactions. Our aim is to address a few of the advancements in increasing the safety of the blood supply, specifically pathogen reduction technologies, bacterial contamination risk reduction, and transfusion associated acute lung injury risk mitigation strategies. PMID:27081471

  6. Recent Advances in Preventing Adverse Reactions to Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Thomas S; Fung, Mark K; Harm, Sarah K

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of adverse reactions to blood product transfusion ranges from a benign clinical course to serious morbidity and mortality.  There have been many advances in technologies and transfusion strategies to decrease the risk of adverse reactions. Our aim is to address a few of the advancements in increasing the safety of the blood supply, specifically pathogen reduction technologies, bacterial contamination risk reduction, and transfusion associated acute lung injury risk mitigation strategies. PMID:27081471

  7. Blood transfusion safety: A study of adverse reactions at the blood bank of a tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Gita; Gaur, Dushyant Singh; Kaur, Rajveer

    2015-01-01

    Background: An adverse transfusion reaction (ATR) is an unfavorable reaction to the transfused unit, the severity of which may be different among individuals depending upon the type of reaction and the patient's susceptibility. Transfusion reactions may be immediate or delayed type depending on the onset and immune or nonimmune type depending on the pathogenesis. A study was conducted to study the frequency of various transfusion reactions and the associated morbidity. Materials and Methods: All ATRs occurring over a period of 3 years at a tertiary care health center were studied in detail according to the institute's protocol. Results: Of 38,013 units of blood and components that had been issued, 101 (0.2%) cases had an ATR. The most common reaction was allergic - 34/101 (33.6%) followed by febrile - 26/101 (25.7%). Other reactions included transfusion-related acute lung injury in 6/101 (5.9%) cases, and immune reactions were seen in 19/101 (18.8%) cases. Conclusion: Allergic and febrile reactions are most common and least harmful, but fatal reactions can also occur, and preventive measures must be taken to avoid such reactions. PMID:26682203

  8. Acute Transfusion Reactions (ATRs) in Intensive Care Unit (ICU): A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Gupta, Manvi; Gupta, Varun; Kaur, Amarjit; Gupta, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Blood transfusion is a frequent and integral part of critical care. Although life saving, it can occasionally be unsafe and result in a spectrum of adverse events. Acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) are probably under diagnosed in critically ill patients due to confusion of the symptoms with the underlying disease. Aim: To analyze the incidence and spectrum of ATRs occuring in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective review conducted from 1st April 2011 till 31st March 2013. The ATRs related to the administration of blood components in the patients admitted in various Intensive Care Units (ICUs) were recorded, analyzed and classified on the basis of their clinical features and laboratory tests. Results: During the study period 98651 blood components were issued. Out of these 21971 were issued to various ICUs. A total of 225 transfusion reactions were reported from the various critical care departments during this period. The most frequent were Febrile Non Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions (FNHTR) 136 (60.4%), allergic reactions 70 (31.2%), hemolytic reactions 1(0.4%) and non specific reactions 18 (8%). The incidence of ATRs in our study was found to be 1.09% in adult ICUs and 0.36% in pediatric ICUs. Conclusions: Blood transfusion is a vital therapeutic procedure with a potential risk to already critical patients. So a strict vigilance has to be kept and each transfusion has to be monitored carefully with prompt recognition and treatment of ATRs. A rational use of these products considering their deleterious effects can decrease transfusion related morbidity and mortality in the critically ill patients. PMID:24701502

  9. Type I allergic hypersensitivity reactions due to ethylene oxide sterilised leucocyte filters in patients with thalassaemia: report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Belen, Burcu; Polat, Meltem

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene oxide (EO) is a highly reactive gas used in sterilisation of heat sensitive medical devices, such as infusion sets, cannulae, intubation materials, ventriculoperitoneal shunts, dialysis catheters and stents. Allergic reactions due to EO have been reported in haemodialysis patients, patients undergoing extracorporeal photopheresis and donors of plasmapheresis. Clinical manifestations vary considerably and generally do not allow differentiation between IgE-mediated anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions. We report four patients with thalassaemia who experienced anaphylaxis during transfusion due to ethylene oxide sterilised leucocyte filters. The aim of this report is to highlight the fact that frequently transfused patients can have allergic reactions due to EO particles left in leucocyte filters. PMID:25725028

  10. Medications and Drug Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just for Kids Library School Tools Videos Virtual Allergist Education & Training Careers in ... reaction to a medication. These include: genetics, body chemistry, frequent drug exposure or the presence of an ...

  11. Allergic reactions associated with pegaspargase in adults.

    PubMed

    Chang, Abraham; Kim, Michelle; Seyer, Maggie; Patel, Samit

    2016-07-01

    One of the severe toxicities of pegaspargase (PEG) is the development of allergic reactions. This study retrospectively assessed 311 PEG doses administered to 139 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients from May 1, 2008 to July 30, 2014 for allergic reactions based on the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.03. Fourteen reactions were recorded in 13 patients (9.4%). The rate of reaction did not differ between patients who received pre-medications and those who did not (p = 0.939). Patients who received only IV PEG doses had a higher rate of reaction compared to only IM PEG (14.0% vs 1.6%; p = 0.010). Six of the seven patients with CTCAE grade 4 reactions received a majority of IV doses, suggesting that severity of reactions may increase with IV administration. Capped doses at 3750 units only had a reaction rate of 2.3%, while uncapped doses over 3750 units were found to have a 6.0% reaction rate (p = 0.194). PMID:26461960

  12. Estimation of the prevalence and rate of acute transfusion reactions occurring in Windhoek, Namibia

    PubMed Central

    Meza, Benjamin P.L.; Lohrke, Britta; Wilkinson, Robert; Pitman, John P.; Shiraishi, Ray W.; Bock, Naomi; Lowrance, David W.; Kuehnert, Matthew J.; Mataranyika, Mary; Basavaraju, Sridhar V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute transfusion reactions are probably common in sub-Saharan Africa, but transfusion reaction surveillance systems have not been widely established. In 2008, the Blood Transfusion Service of Namibia implemented a national acute transfusion reaction surveillance system, but substantial under-reporting was suspected. We estimated the actual prevalence and rate of acute transfusion reactions occurring in Windhoek, Namibia. Methods The percentage of transfusion events resulting in a reported acute transfusion reaction was calculated. Actual percentage and rates of acute transfusion reactions per 1,000 transfused units were estimated by reviewing patients’ records from six hospitals, which transfuse >99% of all blood in Windhoek. Patients’ records for 1,162 transfusion events occurring between 1st January – 31st December 2011 were randomly selected. Clinical and demographic information were abstracted and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network criteria were applied to categorize acute transfusion reactions1. Results From January 1 – December 31, 2011, there were 3,697 transfusion events (involving 10,338 blood units) in the selected hospitals. Eight (0.2%) acute transfusion reactions were reported to the surveillance system. Of the 1,162 transfusion events selected, medical records for 785 transfusion events were analysed, and 28 acute transfusion reactions were detected, of which only one had also been reported to the surveillance system. An estimated 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.3–4.4) of transfusion events in Windhoek resulted in an acute transfusion reaction, with an estimated rate of 11.5 (95% CI: 7.6–14.5) acute transfusion reactions per 1,000 transfused units. Conclusion The estimated actual rate of acute transfusion reactions is higher than the rate reported to the national haemovigilance system. Improved surveillance and interventions to reduce transfusion-related morbidity and mortality

  13. Allergic reactions, "spillover' reactions, and T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Bruynzeel, D P; Nieboer, C; Boorsma, D M; Scheper, R J; van Ketel, W G

    1983-01-01

    A strong positive, allergic patch-test reaction was elicited in 15 patients with an established allergy for a particular allergen. Patches with a marginally irritating concentration of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) were applied at fixed distances. The SLS patch situated adjacent to the allergic reaction was significantly enhanced in 12 of 15 patients (P less than 0.01) compared to more distant SLS reactions ("spillover'). Only quantitative differences were observed in the histologic pictures of the different types of reaction. The infiltrate consisted of lymphocytes and histiocytes, mainly located perivascular in the upper dermis. T-cell subsets were assessed with monoclonal antibodies using an immunoperoxidase technique. The distribution of the different T cells was the same for both reaction types. T cells located outside the perivascular infiltrates (e.g., in the epidermal vesicles) were OKT-8-positive (cytotoxic/suppressor T lymphocytes). Immunofluorescence examination did not show different patterns for the allergic or "enhanced toxic' reactions with regard to the presence of immunoglobulins and complement. The "spillover' phenomenon may cause false-positive patch-test reactions. PMID:6223603

  14. Peripheral neutrophils after allergic asthmatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Asman, B; Strand, V; Bylin, G; Bergström, K

    1997-01-01

    The response of peripheral neutrophils was studied in 16 patients with allergic asthma after challenge with birch/grass pollen allergen, in order to identify inflammatory markers associated with only the early asthmatic reaction and those associated with both early and late asthmatic reactions. The allergen challenge proceeded until the patients had an early asthmatic reaction with 100% increase in specific airway resistance. Bronchoconstriction after allergen challenge was monitored hourly over 9 h and finally after 18 h, by measurement of the forced expiratory volume in 1 s. Seven patients had a late reaction, defined as a decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 s of more than 15%. Blood samples were taken before and 18 h after challenge. After allergen challenge (18 h) the blood concentration of neutrophils in patients with a late asthmatic reaction was 1.4 times higher than before challenge and there was a tendency for increased Fc gamma receptor-mediated chemiluminescence. Lewis X-antigen (CD 15), which is associated with endothelial adhesion and extravasation, significantly decreased at the same time. Neutrophils were incubated with the tetrapeptide arginine-glycine-aspartate-serine before and 18 h after allergen challenge. Both patient groups showed an increased Fc gamma receptor-mediated chemiluminescence and a decreased Fc gamma receptor membrane expression following allergen challenge, suggesting a preactivation. In conclusion, patients with a dual asthmatic reaction show a sustained primed inflammatory response and primed neutrophils compared with patients with only an early reaction when measured after the decline of clinical symptoms provoked by allergen challenge. PMID:9352381

  15. Allergic reaction to mint leads to asthma.

    PubMed

    Szema, Anthony M; Barnett, Tisha

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory and cutaneous adverse reactions to mint can result from several different mechanisms including IgE-mediated hypersensitivity, delayed-type hypersensitivity (contact dermatitis), and nonimmunologic histamine release. Reactions to cross-reacting plants of the Labiatae family, such as oregano and thyme, as well as to the chemical turpentine, may clue the clinician in on the diagnosis of mint allergy. Contact dermatitis can result from menthol in peppermint. Contact allergens have been reported in toothpastes, which often are mint-flavored. Allergic asthma from mint is less well-recognized. A case of a 54-year-old woman with dyspnea on exposure to the scent of peppermint is presented in whom mint exposure, as seemingly innocuous as the breath of others who had consumed Tic Tac candies, exacerbated her underlying asthma. This case highlights the importance of testing with multiple alternative measures of specific IgE to mint, including skin testing with mint extract, and skin testing with fresh mint leaves. Additionally, this cases suggests that asthma can result from inhaling the scent of mint and gives consideration to obtaining confirmatory pre- and postexposure pulmonary function data by both impulse oscillometry and spirometry. PMID:22852115

  16. Allergic reaction to platinum in silicone breast implants.

    PubMed

    Arepalli, Sambasiva R; Bezabeh, Shewit; Brown, S Lori

    2002-01-01

    Platinum is used as a catalyst in the manufacture of silicone breast implants. Because platinum is recognized as a potent sensitizer in certain circumstances, some have expressed concern that women with silicone breast implants are exposed to platinum, which is causing allergic reactions. We searched the literature for information on the level of platinum in breast implants and reports of sensitization that clearly related to platinum in women with breast implants. We found no published report with convincing evidence that platinum causes allergic reactions in women with breast implants or that women with breast implants are any more likely to have allergic reactions than women without breast implants. PMID:12627791

  17. A delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction after partial exchange transfusion for sickle cell disease in pregnancy: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Brumfield, C G; Huddleston, J F; DuBois, L B; Harris, B A

    1984-03-01

    A delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction that occurred after a prophylactic partial exchange transfusion for sickle-cell disease in pregnancy is described. The clinical presentation and laboratory findings of delayed transfusion reactions are discussed, with special emphasis on problems associated in the sickle-cell disease patient. Suggestions on how to minimize the risk of transfusion reactions in the pregnant sickle-cell disease patient are given. PMID:6700873

  18. Allergic and asthmatic reactions to alcoholic drinks.

    PubMed

    Vally, Hassan; Thompson, Philip J

    2003-03-01

    Alcoholic drinks are capable of triggering a wide range of allergic and allergic-like responses, including rhinitis, itching, facial swelling, headache, cough and asthma. Limited epidemiological data suggests that many individuals are affected and that sensitivities occur to a variety of drinks, including wine, beer and spirits. In surveys of asthmatics, over 40% reported the triggering of allergic or allergic-like symptoms following alcoholic drink consumption and 30 - 35% reported worsening of their asthma. Sensitivity to ethanol itself can play a role in triggering adverse responses, particularly in Asians, which is due mainly to a reduced capacity to metabolize acetaldehyde. In Caucasians, specific non-alcohol components are the main cause of sensitivities to alcoholic drinks. Allergic sensitivities to specific components of beer, spirits and distilled liquors have been described. Wine is clearly the most commonly reported trigger for adverse responses. Sensitivities to wine appear to be due mainly to pharmacological intolerances to specific components, such as biogenic amines and the sulphite additives. Histamine in wine has been associated with the triggering of a wide spectrum of adverse symptoms, including sneezing, rhinitis, itching, flushing, headache and asthma. The sulphite additives in wine have been associated with triggering asthmatic responses. Clinical studies have confirmed sensitivities to the sulphites in wine in limited numbers of individuals, but the extent to which the sulphites contribute to wine sensitivity overall is not clear. The aetiology of wine-induced asthmatic responses may be complex and may involve several co-factors. PMID:12745410

  19. Lichenoid Variant of Chronic Cutaneous Graft Versus Host Reaction Post Blood Transfusion: A Rare Event Post Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnaiah, Pushpa Kodipalya; Lakshman, Archana; Aradhya, Sacchidanand Sarvajnamurthy; Veerabhadrappa, Nataraja Holavanahally

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a less frequently seen disease that occurs post solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. Chronic GVHD occurring post blood transfusion is an even more uncommon disease. It can present either as a lichenoid disease or as a sclerodermatous disease involving multiple systems. In this article, we report a case of chronic graft versus host reaction occurring in skin secondary to blood transfusion. PMID:26538747

  20. Early Identification of Acute Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions: Realistic Implications for Best Practice in Patient Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Juliet Battard; Edwards, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Acute hemolytic transfusion reactions can result in severe complications and death. Through early identification and prompt intervention, nurses can reduce the risks associated with these serious reactions. Realistic evidence-based patient monitoring protocols can help guide identification of acute hemolytic transfusion reactions and facilitate lifesaving interventions to avert critical patient situations. PMID:27323466

  1. Post-partum sequential occurrence of two diverse transfusion reactions (transfusion associated circulatory overload and transfusion related acute lung injury).

    PubMed

    Haldar, Rudrashish; Samanta, Sukhen

    2013-10-01

    Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) are two dissimilar pathological conditions associated with transfusion of blood products where the time course of the events and clinical presentation overlap leading to uncertainty in establishing the diagnosis and initiating the treatment, which otherwise differs. We encountered a case where a patient of post-partum hemorrhage developed TACO in the immediate post-operative period due to aggressive resuscitative attempts with blood products. The patient's condition was appropriately diagnosed and was managed according to the clinical scenario, and the condition abated. Subsequently, on the third post-operative day the patient again required blood product transfusions following which the patient developed TRALI, the diagnosis of which was also established and adequate treatment strategy was undertaken. PMID:24339663

  2. Risk of allergic reactions to wine, in milk, egg and fish-allergic patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background European legislators and wine producers still debate on the requirement for labeling of wines fined with potentially allergenic food proteins (casein, egg white or fish-derived isinglass). We investigated whether wines fined with known concentrations of these proteins have the potential to provoke clinical allergic reactions in relevant patients. Methods In-house wines were produced for the study, fined with different concentrations of casein (n = 7), egg albumin (n = 1) and isinglass (n = 3). ELISA and PCR kits specific for the respective proteins were used to identify the fining agents. Skin prick tests and basophil activation tests were performed in patients with confirmed IgE-mediated relevant food allergies (n = 24). A wine consumption questionnaire and detailed history on possible reactions to wine was obtained in a multinational cohort of milk, egg or fish allergic patients (n = 53) and patients allergic to irrelevant foods as controls (n = 13). Results Fining agents were not detectable in wines with the available laboratory methods. Nevertheless, positive skin prick test reactions and basophil activation to the relevant wines were observed in the majority of patients with allergy to milk, egg or fish, correlating with the concentration of the fining agent. Among patients consuming wine, reported reactions were few and mild and similar with the ones reported from the control group. Conclusion Casein, isinglass or egg, remaining in traces in wine after fining, present a very low risk for the respective food allergic consumers. Physician and patient awareness campaigns may be more suitable than generalized labeling to address this issue, as the latter may have negative impact on both non-allergic and allergic consumers. PMID:22409883

  3. Fragrance mix reactions and lime allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Swerdlin, Amy; Rainey, David; Storrs, Frances J

    2010-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis due to citrus fruits is rare, but has been reported in cooks and bartenders. We report an interesting case of a bartender with hand dermatitis who had an allergic contact sensitivity to lime peel, fragrance mix I, and fragrance mix II. Most reported cases of citrus peel allergy are due to d-limonene, which makes up the majority of the peel oil. However, our patient had an allergic reaction to geraniol, which is a minor component of the peel oil and is present in fragrance mix I. It is important to consider a contact sensitivity to citrus in patients who have positive reactions to fragrance mix I and II and who are occupationally exposed to citrus fruits. An initial positive reaction to fragrance mixes should prompt further testing to citrus in these individuals. PMID:20646673

  4. A case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in sickle cell disease patient

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Ashu; Sidhu, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is autosomal recessive, genetically transmitted hemoglobinopathy responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. It is prevalent in many parts of India including Central India, where the prevalence in different communities has ranged from 9.4% to 22%. Perioperative management may include transfusion of red blood cells. Hemolytic transfusion reactions can occur, and these can be either acute or delayed. We present a case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in a patient with SCD. PMID:27605854

  5. A case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in sickle cell disease patient.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Ashu; Sidhu, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is autosomal recessive, genetically transmitted hemoglobinopathy responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. It is prevalent in many parts of India including Central India, where the prevalence in different communities has ranged from 9.4% to 22%. Perioperative management may include transfusion of red blood cells. Hemolytic transfusion reactions can occur, and these can be either acute or delayed. We present a case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in a patient with SCD. PMID:27605854

  6. Noninfectious serious hazards of transfusion.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Hillyer, Christopher D

    2009-03-01

    As infectious complications from blood transfusion have decreased because of improved donor questionnaires and sophisticated infectious disease blood screening, noninfectious serious hazards of transfusion (NISHOTs) have emerged as the most common complications of transfusion. The category of NISHOTs is very broad, including everything from well-described and categorized transfusion reactions (hemolytic, febrile, septic, and allergic/urticarial/anaphylactic) to lesser known complications. These include mistransfusion, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, posttransfusion purpura, transfusion-associated graft versus host disease, microchimerism, transfusion-related immunomodulation, alloimmunization, metabolic derangements, coagulopathic complications of massive transfusion, complications from red cell storage lesions, complications from over or undertransfusion, and iron overload. In recent years, NISHOTs have attracted more attention than ever before, both in the lay press and in the scientific community. As the list of potential complications from blood transfusion grows, investigators have focused on the morbidity and mortality of liberal versus restrictive red blood cell transfusion, as well as the potential dangers of transfusing "older" versus "younger" blood. In this article, we review NISHOTs, focusing on the most recent concerns and literature. PMID:19224780

  7. Transfusion reaction in a case with the rare Bombay blood group.

    PubMed

    Shahshahani, Hayedeh Javadzadeh; Vahidfar, Mohamad Reza; Khodaie, Seyed Ali

    2013-01-01

    Bombay phenotype is extremely rare in Caucasian with an incidence of 1 in 250,000. When individuals with the Bombay phenotype need blood transfusion, they can receive only autologous blood or blood from another Bombay blood group. Transfusing blood group O red cells to them can cause a fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction. In this study, we report a case with the rare Bombay blood group that was misdiagnosed as the O blood group and developed a hemolytic transfusion reaction. This highlights the importance of both forward and reverse typing in ABO blood grouping and standard cross-matching and performing standard pretransfusion laboratory tests in hospital blood banks. PMID:23559776

  8. ALLERGIC REACTIONS TO “KISSING BUG” BITES

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Norman; Green, Thomas W.

    1963-01-01

    In addition to local allergic skin reactions to the bite of the kissing bug, Triatoma protracta, the systemic reactions can vary from a mild urticarial reaction to a severe anaphylactoid reaction consisting of shock, generalized angioneurotic edema and laryngeal edema. The diagnosis can be established by the clinical history, the finding of an engorged kissing bug, the presence of typical local and systemic signs, and finally, a positive reaction to a skin test with an extract of the bug. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:13938346

  9. Allergic Reactions to Dental Materials-A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Radhika; Sachdev, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Utility of various dental materials ranging from diagnosis to rehabilitation for the management of oral diseases are not devoid of posing a potential risk of inducing allergic reactions to the patient, technician and dentist. This review aims to develop a systematic approach for the selection and monitoring of dental materials available in the market thereby giving an insight to predict their risk of inducing allergic reactions. Materials and Methods Our data included 71 relevant articles which included 60 case reports, 8 prospective studies and 3 retrospective studies. The source of these articles was Pub Med search done with the following terms: allergies to impression materials, sodium hypochlorite, Ledermix paste, zinc oxide eugenol, formaldehyde, Latex gloves, Methyl methacrylate, fissure sealant, composites, mercury, Nickel-chromium, Titanium, polishing paste and local anaesthesia. All the relevant articles and their references were analysed. The clinical manifestations of allergy to different dental materials based on different case reports were reviewed. Results After reviewing the literature, we found that the dental material reported to cause most adverse reactions in patients is amalgam and the incidence of oral lichenoid reactions adjacent to amalgam restorations occur more often than other dental materials. Conclusion The most common allergic reactions in dental staff are allergies to latex, acrylates and formaldehyde. While polymethylmethacrylates and latex trigger delayed hypersensitivity reactions, sodium metabisulphite and nickel cause immediate reactions. Over the last few years, due to the rise in number of patients with allergies from different materials, the practicing dentists should have knowledge about documented allergies to known materials and thus avoid such allergic manifestations in the dental clinic. PMID:26557634

  10. Non-infectious complications of transfusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, P L; Snyder, E L

    2001-06-01

    Blood transfusion is considered safe when the infused blood is tested using state of the art viral assays developed over the past several decades. Only rarely are known viruses like HIV and hepatitis C transmitted by transfusion when blood donors are screened using these sensitive laboratory tests. However, there are a variety of transfusion risks which still remain that cannot be entirely eliminated, many of which are non-infectious in nature. Predominantly immune-mediated complications include the rapid intravascular or slow extravascular destruction (hemolysis) of transfused red cells or extravascular removal of platelets by pre-formed antibodies carried by the transfusion recipient. Alternatively, red cells can be damaged when exposed to excessive heat or incompatible intravenous fluids before or during the transfusion. Common complications of blood transfusion that at least partly involve the immune system include febrile non-hemolytic and allergic reactions. While these are usually not life-threatening, they can hamper efforts to transfuse a patient. Other complications include circulatory overload, hypothermia and metabolic disturbances. Profound hypotensive episodes have been described in patients on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors who receive platelet transfusions through bedside leukoreduction filters. These curious reactions appear to involve dysmetabolism of the vasoactive substance bradykinin. Products contaminated by bacteria during blood collection and transfused can cause life-threatening septic reactions. A long-term complication of blood transfusion therapy unique to chronically transfused patients is iron overload. Less common - but serious - reactions more specific to blood transfusion include transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease and transfusion-associated acute lung injury. Many of these complications of transfusion therapy can be prevented by adhering to well-established practice guidelines. In addition, individuals

  11. Blood Transfusion Reactions in Elderly Patients Hospitalized in a Multilevel Geriatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lubart, E.; Segal, R.; Tryhub, N.; Sigler, E.; Leibovitz, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives. Blood transfusion is a critical issue for patients with chronic diseases such as heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and malignancy. However, side effects are not rare. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the frequency of adverse blood transfusion reactions in hospitalized elderly patients during a one-year period. Design/Setting/Participants. Blood transfusion reactions such as fever, chills, dyspnea, and others following blood transfusions in hospitalized geriatric patients during one-year period were examined. Results. 382 blood units (242 patients) were administered during the study period. In 40 (11%) cases, blood transfusion reactions occurred. Fever was the most common reaction in 29 cases (72%), four (10%) had shortness of breath, and 3 (8%) had vomiting and chills each. There were no lethal cases in the 24-hour period following blood transfusions. Conclusion. A relatively low rate of adverse blood transfusion reactions occurred in our geriatric patients. We may speculate that this is related to underreporting of minor symptoms due to the high percentage of demented patients in this population. PMID:24804100

  12. Perioperative blood transfusions in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Karthikeyan E; Kim, Thomas J; Khanuja, Harpal S

    2014-11-01

    Blood transfusion after orthopaedic surgery accounts for 10% of all packed red blood-cell transfusions, but use varies substantially across hospitals and surgeons. Transfusions can cause systemic complications, including allergic reactions, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, graft-versus-host disease, and infections. Tranexamic acid is a new cost-effective blood management tool to reduce blood loss and decrease the risk of transfusion after total joint arthroplasty. Current clinical evidence does not justify transfusions for a hemoglobin level of >8 g/dL in the absence of symptoms. Studies have also supported the use of this trigger in patients with a history or risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25378512

  13. Active Hemovigilance Significantly Improves Reporting of Acute Non-infectious Adverse Reactions to Blood Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Naveen; Agnihotri, Ajju

    2016-09-01

    One of the key purposes of a hemovigilance program is to improve reporting of transfusion related adverse events and subsequent data-driven improvement in blood transfusion (BT) practices. We conducted a study over 3 years to assess the impact of healthcare worker training and an active feedback programme on reporting of adverse reactions to BTs. All hospitalized patients who required a BT were included in the study. Healthcare workers involved in BT to patients were sensitized and trained in adverse reaction reporting by conducting training sessions and meetings. All the transfused patients were 'actively' monitored for any acute adverse reaction by using a uniquely coded blood issue form. A total of 18,914 blood components transfused to 5785 different patients resulted in 61 adverse reaction episodes. This incidence of 0.32 % in our study was found to be significantly higher (p < 0.005) than that reported from the same region in the past. Red blood cell units were the most frequently transfused component and thus most commonly involved in an adverse reaction (42.6 %), however apheresis platelets had the highest chance of reaction per unit transfused (0.66 %). There was no mortality associated with the BT during the study period. An active surveillance program significantly improves reporting and management of adverse reactions to BTs. PMID:27429527

  14. Analysis of selected allergic reactions among psoriatic patients

    PubMed Central

    Filipowska-Grońska, Agata; Kalemba, Michał; Krajewska, Anna; Grzanka, Alicja; Bożek, Andrzej; Jarząb, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Psoriasis is a chronic and recurrent inflammatory skin disease. The aetiology is still unknown in spite of numerous scientific researches. There is very little evidence which does not provide enough knowledge about allergic reactions in psoriatic patients. Based on the fact that the epidermal barrier damage allows different allergen types to penetrate into deep layers of epidermis and skin, we can assume that it may lead to immunological reactions. Aim To investigate the allergic reaction indicators and hypersensitivity assessment about contact, inhalant and food allergens. The results were analysed with regard to clinical disease indicators and progression stage of dermal lesions. Material and methods Eighty patients with psoriasis were examined. The concentration of total IgE antibodies and allergen specific IgE antibodies (asIgE) were analysed. Standard epidermal tests and atopy patch tests were performed. All the patients were estimated for their dermatological condition based on the PASI scale. The control group consisted of 50 patients without psoriasis and allergic history. Results Significantly higher concentration of total E immunoglobulin has been stated in the patients with psoriasis. Higher concentrations of specific allergic IgE antibodies were more often observed in the examined group but the most frequently observed values were present in 1–3 class. The most common airborne allergens were birch, artemisia, timothy and rye pollens. There have not been any significant statistical differences in the case of positive epidermal test results. Conclusions There is slightly expressed hypersensitivity in psoriatic patients. This hypersensitivity degree correlates with the intensification of symptoms. PMID:26985174

  15. ‘Chameleonic’ Serological Findings Leading to Life-Threatening Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Sümnig, Ariane; Mayer, Beate; Kiefel, Volker; Greinacher, Andreas; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The phenomena of co-incidence of transfusion-induced allo- and autoantibodies, blockage and/or loss of red blood cell (RBC) antigens are conspicuous and may result in confusion and misdiagnosis. Case Report A 67-year-old female was transferred to the intensive care unit due to hemolysis which developed 2 days following transfusion of three Rh(D)-negative RBC units in the presence of strongly reactive autoantibodies. Standard serological testing and genotyping were performed. Upon arrival, the patient was typed as Ccddee. Her hemolysis was decompensated, and an immediate blood transfusion was required. In addition, direct and indirect antiglobulin tests (DAT and IAT) as well as the eluate were strongly positive. Emergency transfusion of Rh(D)-negative RBCs resulted in increased hemolysis and renal failure. An exhaustive testing revealed anti-D, anti-c, CCddee phenotype and CCD.ee genotype. Three units of cryopreserved CCddee RBCs were transfused, and the patient's condition immediately improved. The discrepancy between Rh-D phenotyping and genotyping was likely caused by masking of the D-epitopes by the autoantibodies. In fact, further enquiry revealed that the patient had been phenotyped as Rh(D)-positive 6 months ago and had been transfused at that time following hip surgery. Conclusion The phenomena of transfusion-induced autoantibodies, masked alloantibodies, antigen blockage and/or loss are rare but important features which should be considered in patients presenting with autoimmune hemolytic anemia and/or hemolytic transfusion reactions. PMID:26696804

  16. Blood transfusion: friend or foe.

    PubMed

    Katz, Elizabeth A

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of transfusions is often compromised by adverse reactions. Common transfusion reactions (hemolytic transfusion reactions, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, transfusion-related immunomodulation) are reviewed, including pathogenesis, clinical and laboratory manifestations, and treatment. In addition, artificial blood substitutes are discussed as a way to mitigate the risk of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. PMID:19411873

  17. Adverse effects of plasma transfusion.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Suchitra; Vyas, Girish N

    2012-05-01

    Plasma utilization has increased over the past two decades, and there is a growing concern that many plasma transfusions are inappropriate. Plasma transfusion is not without risk, and certain complications are more likely with plasma than other blood components. Clinical and laboratory investigations of the patients suffering reactions after infusion of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) define the etiology and pathogenesis of the panoply of adverse effects. We review here the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of the risks associated with plasma transfusion. Risks commonly associated with FFP include: 1) transfusion-related acute lung injury, 2) transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and 3) allergic and/or anaphylactic reactions. Other less common risks include 1) transmission of infections, 2) febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions, 3) red blood cell alloimmunization, and 4) hemolytic transfusion reactions. The effects of pathogen inactivation or reduction methods on these risks are also discussed. Fortunately, a majority of the adverse effects are not lethal and are adequately treated in clinical practice. PMID:22578374

  18. Allergic Reaction to Ginkgo Nut on FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Han, Eun Ji; Park, Hye Lim; Kim, Sung Hoon

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of a 36-year-old woman who previously underwent total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma. F FDG PET/CT images demonstrated multiple lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake in the neck, chest, and abdomen and diffusely increased FDG uptake in the spleen, which were highly suspicious findings for malignant lymphoma. However, subsequent biopsy of axillary lymph node presented reactive hyperplasia. Detailed history revealed that the patient had a history of generalized edema and severe arthralgia after contact with ginkgo nut one week ago. This case highlights allergic reaction mimicking lymphoma on FDG PET/CT. PMID:27276210

  19. Allergic reactions following contrast material administration: nomenclature, classification, and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Palmiere, Cristian; Comment, Lionel; Mangin, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    In forensic pathology routine, fatal cases of contrast agent exposure can be occasionally encountered. In such situations, beyond the difficulties inherent in establishing the cause of death due to nonspecific or absent autopsy and histology findings as well as limited laboratory investigations, pathologists may face other problems in formulating exhaustive, complete reports, and conclusions that are scientifically accurate. Indeed, terminology concerning adverse drug reactions and allergy nomenclature is confusing. Some terms, still utilized in forensic and radiological reports, are outdated and should be avoided. Additionally, not all forensic pathologists master contrast material classification and pathogenesis of contrast agent reactions. We present a review of the literature covering allergic reactions to contrast material exposure in order to update used terminology, explain the pathophysiology, and list currently available laboratory investigations for diagnosis in the forensic setting. PMID:24061700

  20. Prevalence of allergic reactions to Hymenoptera stings in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, C; Senna, G; Mauro, M; Bonadonna, P; Marconi, I; Asero, R; Nitti, F

    2004-12-01

    The epidemiology of Hymenoptera venom allergy in Europe showed prevalence of systemic reactions of about 3%, but is scantly investigated in Italy. We studied two samples of the general and an at risk population, i.e. the foresters, in northern Italy. A standardized questionnaire dealing with allergic reactions to Hymenoptera stings was submitted to the subjects included in the study, who were factory workers in Milan and Verona and foresters in Lombardy. An overall number of 574 subjects participated to the study, 462 (299 males and 163 females, mean age 40.1 yrs, range 20-63 yrs) were factory workers and 112 (all males, mean age 38.8 yrs, range 24-59 yrs) were foresters. Among factory workers, 302 (65.4%) were stung by Hymenoptera, 49 (10.6%) had had large local reactions, and 13 (2.8%) systemic reactions. Among foresters, 76 (67.8%) were stung, 11 (9.8%) had had large local reactions, and 5 (4.5%) systemic reactions. The systemic reactions were life-threatening in 3 (0.6%) industrial workers and 2 (1.8%) foresters. The prevalence of systemic reaction of 2.8% in the general population agrees with the data reported from a number of countries with temperate climate. The prevalence of 4.5% in foresters attributed to this population a risk only slightly increased. PMID:15662965

  1. Systemic immediate allergic reactions to arthropod stings and bites.

    PubMed

    Bircher, Andreas J

    2005-01-01

    Most of the encounters with biting and stinging insects result in more or less pronounced localized reactions. Typically, urticarial wheals and papular reactions are observed. Less often local bullous or hemorrhagic or disseminated papular reactions, particularly in children and immunologically naive adults, may be seen. With the exception of bee and wasp venom allergies, immediate-type allergic reactions to arthropod stings and bites are rare. Systemic IgE-mediated hypersensitivity has also been reported from additional hymenoptera species, e.g. hornets, bumble bees and ants. Rare are systemic reactions to mosquitoes, flies or kissing bugs and exceptional from ticks, bed bugs, moths, caterpillars and spiders. A major problem is the often lacking standardization of extracts for skin testing and for the determination of specific IgE. Some of the allergens have been characterized and few of them synthesized using recombinant techniques. Most investigations have been made with whole-body extracts or extracts from salivary glands, while desensitization has rarely been attempted. Currently, primary prevention by avoidance of stings and bites, and adequate instruction of sensitized individuals in the use of emergency drugs are mandatory. PMID:15724094

  2. How we treat delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Kate; Hoppe, Carolyn; Mijovic, Aleksandar; Thein, Swee L

    2015-09-01

    Transfusion therapy is effective in the prevention and treatment of many complications of sickle cell disease (SCD). However, its benefits must be balanced against its risks, including delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions (DHTR). Not only is the relative rate of alloimmunization higher in patients with SCD than in other patient populations, but attendant risks associated with DHTR are even greater in SCD. Clinicians' awareness of DHTR events is poor because symptoms of DHTR mimic acute vaso-occlusive pain and immunohaematology findings are often negative. Transfusions delivered in the acute rather than elective setting appear to confer a higher risk of DHTR. Management of DHTR in SCD depends on the clinical severity, ranging from supportive care to immunosuppression, and optimization of erythropoiesis. DHTR must be considered in any recently transfused patient presenting with acute sickle cell pain. Meticulous documentation of transfusion and immunohaematology history is key. We anticipate an increase in DHTR events in SCD patients with the increasing use of red blood cell transfusion therapy. PMID:25967919

  3. Cutaneous allergic reaction to intramuscular vitamin K1.

    PubMed

    Wong, D A; Freeman, S

    1999-08-01

    A 40-year-old woman with no pre-existing hepatic disease developed a cutaneous allergic reaction to intramuscular vitamin K1. She received this medication prophylactically prior to surgery, developed severe localized, and subsequently generalized, dermatitis, beginning 5 days after administration of the Konakion Cremophor-EL form of vitamin K1 by intramuscular injection at four sites on her thighs. Investigation by patch and intradermal testing revealed delayed-type hypersensitivity to Konakion Cremophor-EL, Konakion Mixed Micelles and pure vitamin K1, but not Cremophor-EL vehicle alone. This case is unusual because the patient was also shown to be patch test positive to vitamin K3 sodium bisulfite. PMID:10439527

  4. Accurate Prediction of Severe Allergic Reactions by a Small Set of Environmental Parameters (NDVI, Temperature)

    PubMed Central

    Andrianaki, Maria; Azariadis, Kalliopi; Kampouri, Errika; Theodoropoulou, Katerina; Lavrentaki, Katerina; Kastrinakis, Stelios; Kampa, Marilena; Agouridakis, Panagiotis; Pirintsos, Stergios; Castanas, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Severe allergic reactions of unknown etiology,necessitating a hospital visit, have an important impact in the life of affected individuals and impose a major economic burden to societies. The prediction of clinically severe allergic reactions would be of great importance, but current attempts have been limited by the lack of a well-founded applicable methodology and the wide spatiotemporal distribution of allergic reactions. The valid prediction of severe allergies (and especially those needing hospital treatment) in a region, could alert health authorities and implicated individuals to take appropriate preemptive measures. In the present report we have collecterd visits for serious allergic reactions of unknown etiology from two major hospitals in the island of Crete, for two distinct time periods (validation and test sets). We have used the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), a satellite-based, freely available measurement, which is an indicator of live green vegetation at a given geographic area, and a set of meteorological data to develop a model capable of describing and predicting severe allergic reaction frequency. Our analysis has retained NDVI and temperature as accurate identifiers and predictors of increased hospital severe allergic reactions visits. Our approach may contribute towards the development of satellite-based modules, for the prediction of severe allergic reactions in specific, well-defined geographical areas. It could also probably be used for the prediction of other environment related diseases and conditions. PMID:25794106

  5. Allergic Contact Dermatitis with Diffuse Erythematous Reaction from Diisopropanolamine in a Compress

    PubMed Central

    Rind, Tomoko; Oiso, Naoki; Hirao, Ayaka; Kawada, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Compresses containing a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) are commonly used in Japan. However, this treatment may induce both allergic and photoallergic contact dermatitis from the NSAIDs and their ingredients. Here, we describe a case of allergic contact dermatitis with diffuse erythematous reaction due to diisopropanolamine in the applied compress. The absorption of diisopropanolamine might have been enhanced by the occlusive condition. PMID:21173928

  6. Can we identify patients at risk of life-threatening allergic reactions to food?

    PubMed

    Turner, P J; Baumert, J L; Beyer, K; Boyle, R J; Chan, C-H; Clark, A T; Crevel, R W R; DunnGalvin, A; Fernández-Rivas, M; Gowland, M H; Grabenhenrich, L; Hardy, S; Houben, G F; O'B Hourihane, J; Muraro, A; Poulsen, L K; Pyrz, K; Remington, B C; Schnadt, S; van Ree, R; Venter, C; Worm, M; Mills, E N C; Roberts, G; Ballmer-Weber, B K

    2016-09-01

    Anaphylaxis has been defined as a 'severe, life-threatening generalized or systemic hypersensitivity reaction'. However, data indicate that the vast majority of food-triggered anaphylactic reactions are not life-threatening. Nonetheless, severe life-threatening reactions do occur and are unpredictable. We discuss the concepts surrounding perceptions of severe, life-threatening allergic reactions to food by different stakeholders, with particular reference to the inclusion of clinical severity as a factor in allergy and allergen risk management. We review the evidence regarding factors that might be used to identify those at most risk of severe allergic reactions to food, and the consequences of misinformation in this regard. For example, a significant proportion of food-allergic children also have asthma, yet almost none will experience a fatal food-allergic reaction; asthma is not, in itself, a strong predictor for fatal anaphylaxis. The relationship between dose of allergen exposure and symptom severity is unclear. While dose appears to be a risk factor in at least a subgroup of patients, studies report that individuals with prior anaphylaxis do not have a lower eliciting dose than those reporting previous mild reactions. It is therefore important to consider severity and sensitivity as separate factors, as a highly sensitive individual will not necessarily experience severe symptoms during an allergic reaction. We identify the knowledge gaps that need to be addressed to improve our ability to better identify those most at risk of severe food-induced allergic reactions. PMID:27138061

  7. Skin: Major target organ of allergic reactions to small molecular weight compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Merk, Hans F. Baron, Jens M.; Neis, Mark M.; Obrigkeit, Daniela Hoeller; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2007-11-01

    Skin is a major target organ for allergic reactions to small molecular weight compounds. Drug allergic reactions may be life-threatening such as in the case of anaphylactic reactions or bullous drug reactions and occur in about 5% of all hospitalized patients. Allergic contact dermatitis has an enormous influence on the social life of the patient because it is the most frequent reason for occupational skin diseases and the treatment and prevention of this disease cost approximately Euro 3 billion per year in Germany. The different proposed pathophysiological pathways leading to a drug eruption are discussed in this paper. All major enzymes which are involved in the metabolism of xenobiotica were shown to be present in skin. Evidence supporting the role of metabolism in the development of drug allergy and allergic contact dermatitis is demonstrated in the example of sulphonamides and fragrances.

  8. Hymenopterid bites, stings, allergic reactions, and the impact of hurricanes on hymenopterid-inflicted injuries.

    PubMed

    Diaz, James H

    2007-01-01

    Hymenopterid stings and subsequent allergic reactions are a common indication for emergency department visits worldwide. Unrecognized anaphylactic reactions to hymenopterid stings by apids, or bees, and vespids, or wasps, are a significant cause of sudden and unanticipated deaths outdoors in young people, with and without atopic histories. Insect bites and stings, often complicated by allergic reactions or skin infections, by community-acquired pathogens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, are common sources of morbidity following hurricanes, tropical storms, and prolonged flooding. This article will review and critically analyze the descriptive epidemiology and outcomes of hymenopterid bites, stings, and allergic reactions, especially following hurricanes and prolonged flooding disasters; stratify the immunologic reactions to hymenopterid stings by clinical severity and outcomes; and present current recommendations for management, prophylaxis, and prevention of hymenopterid stings and reactions. PMID:17694935

  9. Fatal Delayed Haemolytic Transfusion Reaction and Hyperhaemolysis Syndrome in a Pregnant Woman with Sickle Cell Anaemia.

    PubMed

    Asnawi, Asral Wirda Ahmad; Sathar, Jameela; Mohamed, Rashidah; Deraman, Rohayu; Kumaran, Sri; Hamid, Shahada Sobah Abd; Zakaria, Muhd Zanapiah

    2016-06-01

    Clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease (SCD) arise from the tendency of the sickle haemoglobin to polymerize and deform red blood cells into the characteristic sickle shape. Sickle cell crisis is a devastating complication that may occur in patients with SCD. If not managed properly permanent organ damage and even death may be the final outcome. A case of a 32-year-old Nigerian lady, Gravida 1 Para 0 in her first trimester, with SCD who developed signs and symptoms of delayed haemolytic transfusion reaction after receiving packed red cell transfusion is demonstrated. Multiple red cell alloantibodies were detected in the patient's plasma; anti-Fy a, anti-Jk b and anti-E. The patient miscarriaged and succumbed to complications of hyperhaemolysis with delayed haemolytic transfusion reaction, acute chest syndrome and renal failure. There is an urgent need for mandatory red cell antibody screen and identification especially in high-risk cases. Prevention of alloimmunization by supplying phenotype-specific red cells is also required. PMID:27408406

  10. Frequency, severity and causes of unexpected allergic reactions to food: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Versluis, A; Knulst, A C; Kruizinga, A G; Michelsen, A; Houben, G F; Baumert, J L; van Os-Medendorp, H

    2015-02-01

    Food allergic patients have to deal with an avoidance diet. Confusing labelling terms or precautionary labels can result in misinterpretation and risk-taking behaviour. Even those patients that strictly adhere to their diet experience (sometimes severe) unexpected allergic reactions to food. The frequency, severity and causes of such reactions are unknown. The objective of this review was to describe the frequency, severity and causes of unexpected allergic reactions to food in food allergic patients aged > 12 years, in order to develop improved strategies to deal with their allergy. A systematic review was carried out by two researchers, in six electronic databases (CINAHL, Cochrane, EMBASE, Medline, Psychinfo and Scopus). The search was performed with keywords relating to the frequency, severity and causes of unexpected allergic reactions to food. This resulted in 24 studies which met the inclusion criteria; 18 observational and six qualitative studies. This review shows that knowledge about the frequency of unexpected reactions is limited. Peanut, nuts, egg, fruit/vegetables and milk are the main causal foods. Severe reactions and even fatalities occur. Most reactions take place at home, but a significant number also take place when eating at friends' houses or in restaurants. Labelling issues, but also attitude and risky behaviour of patients can attribute to unexpected reactions. We conclude that prospective studies are needed to get more insight in the frequency, severity, quantity of unintended allergen ingested and causes of unexpected allergic reactions to food, to be able to optimize strategies to support patients in dealing with their food allergy. Although the exact frequency is not known, unexpected reactions to food occur in a significant number of patients and can be severe. For clinical practice, this means that patient education and dietary instructions are necessary. PMID:24766413

  11. Use of antihistamines after serious allergic reaction to methimazole in pediatric Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Toderian, Amy B; Lawson, Margaret L

    2014-05-01

    Antithyroid drugs are usually considered first-line therapy for management of pediatric Graves' disease because they avoid permanent hypothyroidism, provide a chance for remission, and are less invasive than the alternatives of thyroidectomy or radioactive iodine. Methimazole (MMI) is the only antithyroid drug recommended in pediatrics due to the risk of propylthiouracil-induced liver toxicity. Allergic reactions with MMI occur in up to 10% of patients and, when mild, can be managed with concurrent antihistamine therapy. Guidelines recommend discontinuation of MMI with serious allergic reactions. We present the case of an adolescent girl with Graves' disease and a serious allergic reaction after starting MMI whose family refused radioactive iodine and was reluctant to proceed to surgery. Antihistamine therapy was successfully used to allow continued treatment with MMI. This case demonstrates extension of management guidelines for minor cutaneous allergic reactions to MMI, through the use of antihistamines for a serious allergic reaction, allowing us to continue MMI and provide treatment consistent with the family's preferences and values. PMID:24777217

  12. An Extraordinary Case Associated with an Allergic Reaction to Clopidogrel: Coronary Artery Spasm or Kounis Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Liping, Zhang; Bin, Hui; Qiming, Feng

    2015-11-01

    Kounis syndrome is the concurrence of acute coronary syndrome with allergic reactions, such as anaphylaxis or anaphylactoid reactions. Here, we describe a unique case: CASs (coronary artery spasms) with both non-hypersensitivity and hypersensitivity aetiology (associated with clopidogrel hypersensitivity) were observed in a 61 year-old patient. Herein, the mechanism and clinical implications of this association are discussed. PMID:26138623

  13. Exosomes from bronchoalveolar fluid of tolerized mice prevent allergic reaction.

    PubMed

    Prado, Noela; Marazuela, Eva G; Segura, Elodie; Fernández-García, Héctor; Villalba, Mayte; Théry, Clotilde; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Batanero, Eva

    2008-07-15

    Exosomes are nanovesicles originating from multivesicular bodies that are secreted by a variety of cell types. The dual capability of exosomes to promote immunity or to induce tolerance has prompted their clinical use as vehicles for vaccination against different human diseases. In the present study, the effect of allergen-specific exosomes from tolerized mice on the development of allergen-induced allergic response was determined using a mouse model. Mice were tolerized by respiratory exposure to the olive pollen allergen Ole e 1. Exosome-like vesicles were isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of the animals by the well-established filtration and ultracentrifugation procedure, characterized by electron microscopy, Western blot, and FACS analyses, and assessed in a prophylactic protocol. To this end, BALB/c mice were intranasally treated with tolerogenic exosomes or naive exosomes as control, 1 wk before sensitization/challenge to Ole e 1. Blood, lungs, and spleen were collected and analyzed for immune responses. Intranasal administration of tolerogenic exosomes inhibited the development of IgE response, Th2 cytokine production, and airway inflammation--cardinal features of allergy--and maintained specific long-term protection in vivo. This protective effect was associated with a concomitant increase in the expression of the regulatory cytokine TGF-beta. These observations demonstrate that exosomes can induce tolerance and protection against allergic sensitization in mice. Thus, exosome-based vaccines could represent an alternative to conventional therapy for allergic diseases in humans. PMID:18606707

  14. Acute hemolytic transfusion reactions due to multiple alloantibodies including anti-E, anti-c and anti-Jkb.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Sung; Kim, Ki Uk; Jeong, Woo Jin; Kim, Hyung Hoi; Chang, Chulhun L; Chung, Joo Seop; Cho, Goon Jae; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul

    2003-12-01

    We report a case of two consecutive episodes of acute hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTRs) due to multiple alloantibodies in a 34-yr-old man who suffered from avascular necrosis of left femoral head. He received five units of packed red blood cells (RBCs) during surgery. Then the transfusion of packed RBCs was required nine days after the surgery because of the unexplained drop in hemoglobin level. The transfusion of the first two units resulted in fever and brown-colored urine, but he received the transfusion of another packed RBCs the next day. He experienced even more severe symptoms during the transfusion of the first unit. We performed antibody screening test, and it showed positive results. Multiple alloantibodies including anti-E, anti-c and anti-Jkb were detected by antibody identification study. Acute HTRs due to multiple alloantibodies were diagnosed, and the supportive cares were done for 6 days. We suggest the antibody screening test should be included in the panel of pretransfusion tests for safer transfusion, and it is particularly mandatory for the patients with multiple transfusions, pregnant women, and preoperative patients. PMID:14676451

  15. Hyperhemolytic transfusion reaction attributable to anti-Fy3 in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Reyes, M A; Illoh, O C

    2008-01-01

    A case of hyperhemolytic transfusion reaction attributable to anti-Fy3 in a 30-year-oldAfricanAmerican woman with a history of sickle cell disease is reported. The patient was admitted for vaso-occlusive sickle cell crisis and received 4 units of packed RBCs secondary to worsening symptomatic anemia (Hb 5.0 g/dL). On admission, the patient's antibody screen and identification showed anti-V and anti-E, and her antibody history included anti-E,-C,-Jk(b),-N, -V,-S,-Sl(a), and a cold agglutinin with possible anti-I specificity. A DAT performed on her RBCs was negative. RBC units that lacked E, C, Jk(b), N,V, and S were transfused. Posttransfusion Hb was 8.9 g/dL. On day 10 she developed a fever of 103 degrees F, and on day 11 her Hb decreased to 6.4 g/dL. She complained of severe back pain and dark urine. In addition, she became hypertensive, tachycardic, and jaundiced. The DAT indicated the presence of IgG on the patient's RBCs. Anti-Fy3 was identified in the serum and eluate. During the next 24 hours, her Hb decreased to 2.4 g/dL. The LDH level was 1687 U/L, and her reticulocyte count was 2.6%. A delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with hyperhemolysis secondary to anti-Fy3 was suspected and was successfully treated with IVIG and high-dose prednisone. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published case of hyperhemolysis in sickle cell disease attributable to anti-Fy3. PMID:19852130

  16. Recurrent acute hemolytic transfusion reactions by antibodies against Doa antigens, not detected by cross-matching.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Ruben; van Gelder, Warry; van Wintershoven, Joyce; Maaskant-Van Wijk, Petra A; Beckers, Erik A M

    2006-02-01

    An 81-year-old male patient suffered from recurrent acute hemolytic transfusion reactions after transfusion with phenotyped cross-match-negative red blood cells (RBCs). Extensive posttransfusion workup eventually revealed Dombrock (a) (Do(a)) antibodies. Because commercially available cell panels do not allow for identification of anti-Do(a) and owing to the lack of Do(a) typing serum samples, selection of matched units of RBCs is dependent on negative cross-match results. In this case, selection of Do(a-) units by cross-matching failed, indicating that serologic methods were not reliable. A polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific priming assay was used to detect DOA and DOB alleles, which encode Do(a) and Do(b) antigens, respectively. The patient was confirmed to be DOB/DOB by DNA sequencing. Furthermore, the involved mismatched units in each of the three hemolytic episodes were shown to be Do(a+). In the presenting case, DNA typing appeared to be superior to serologic methods in selecting matched RBC units in the presence of anti-Do(a). PMID:16441602

  17. Eight Years of Severe Allergic Reactions in Finland: A Register-Based Report

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background No data have been available on severe allergic reactions in Finland. Materials and Methods We summarize the data accumulated from 2000 to 2007 in the national register established at the Skin and Allergy Hospital of the Helsinki University Central Hospital, where physicians voluntarily report on patients with severe allergic reactions. Results During the period, the 530 reported cases of severe allergic reactions represented an annual frequency of 0.001%. Of the patients, 66% were adults and 56% were female, with a median age of 27 years. Food was the causative agent in 53% of the cases, drugs in 26%, allergen preparations in 12%, and insects in 8%. Dermatologic symptoms were reported in 85%, respiratory in 76%, cardiovascular in 50%, gastrointestinal in 33%, and eye/nose symptoms in 18%. The reaction was a life-threatening anaphylactic shock in 26% of the cases, with no deaths reported. Patients were treated with intramuscular adrenaline in 75% of the cases. Not only nuts and seeds, but also fruit and vegetables were the most important allergens for the adults. Nuts were also important allergens for children, along with milk, egg, and wheat. In addition, many "exotic" allergens were identified: patent blue, carmine dye, yeast, buckwheat, and macrogol. Conclusions Severe allergic reactions are underreported, but a register reflects the real-life situation and helps to identify new causative agents. It also contributes to improvements in first aid treatment practice. PMID:23282762

  18. Allergic reaction to suxamethonium during emergency caesarean section and pseudocholinesterase deficiency in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Brozović, Gordana; Mazul Sunko, Branka; Hafner, Tomislav; Bekavac, Ivanka

    2014-07-01

    An allergic reaction during the caesarean section can be harmful for mother and foetus. Our patient has undergone an urgent caesarean section due to the imminent threat of foetal hypoxia. After operation, we applied prolonged mechanical ventilation. The anaesthesia was induced with thiopental and suxamethonium. Suxamethonium is associated with the highest incidence of allergic reactions but it is a neuromuscular blocking agent of choice for an emergency operation. During the operation, about 10 min. after induction, the systolic blood pressure dropped suddenly to 67 mmHg, the heart rate increased to 145 beats per minute and the oxygen saturation dropped to 60 %. A small degree of bronchospasm developed but there wasn't any kind of skin reaction. We thought of an allergic reaction, the obstetrical pulmonary embolism and an acute cardiac failure. The baby was delivered promptly in good condition. Within 10 min. all vital signs normalized. The operation continued without problems. Unexpectedly, during waking up from anaesthesia the patient became dyspnoeic, laryngospasm appeared, the oxygen saturation dropped again, strong facial and tongue oedema appeared and an urgent reintubation had to be performed. The laboratory results pointed out elevated mast cell tryptase level and significant pseudocholinesterase deficiency. About 2 months later, immunologist excluded thiopental and latex, and suggested that suxamethonium was the "trigger" factor. In our case the respiratory insufficiency was caused by two different and unrelated pathological mechanisms: biphasic allergic reaction and prolonged neuromuscular block caused by pseudocholinesterase deficiency. PMID:24958651

  19. Suspected acute hemolytic transfusion reaction mediated by anti-Di(a).

    PubMed

    Bennett, Ashwini; Boyapati, Ray K; Hong, Frank S

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Di(a) can mediate hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, but it is unclear if it can cause hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTRs). To date, there has only been one report of a possible immediate HTR attributed to anti-Di(a). Our case report details an immediate HTR due to anti-Di(a) in a patient with pre-existing liver failure. This reaction triggered multi-organ failure, and the patient subsequently died. This case also highlights the importance of considering HTRs even when routine antibody screening has been unremarkable, particularly when electronic crossmatch is used, because of the potential for an alloantibody against a low-prevalence antigen. PMID:27187197

  20. Platelet Transfusion – The New Immunology of an Old Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stolla, Moritz; Refaai, Majed A.; Heal, Joanna M.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Garraud, Olivier; Phipps, Richard P.; Blumberg, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusion has been a vital therapeutic approach in patients with hematologic malignancies for close to half a century. Randomized trials show that prophylactic platelet transfusions mitigate bleeding in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, even with prophylactic transfusions, as many as 75% of patients, experience hemorrhage. While platelet transfusion efficacy is modest, questions and concerns have arisen about the risks of platelet transfusion therapy. The acknowledged serious risks of platelet transfusion include viral transmission, bacterial sepsis, and acute lung injury. Less serious adverse effects include allergic and non-hemolytic febrile reactions. Rare hemolytic reactions have occurred due to a common policy of transfusing without regard to ABO type. In the last decade or so, new concerns have arisen; platelet-derived lipids are implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury after transfusion. With the recognition that platelets are immune cells came the discoveries that supernatant IL-6, IL-27 sCD40L, and OX40L are closely linked to febrile reactions and sCD40L with acute lung injury. Platelet transfusions are pro-inflammatory, and may be pro-thrombotic. Anti-A and anti-B can bind to incompatible recipient or donor platelets and soluble antigens, impair hemostasis and thus increase bleeding. Finally, stored platelet supernatants contain biological mediators such as VEGF and TGF-β1 that may compromise the host versus tumor response. This is particularly of concern in patients receiving many platelet transfusions, as for acute leukemia. New evidence suggests that removing stored supernatant will improve clinical outcomes. This new view of platelets as pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory agents suggests that innovative approaches to improving platelet storage and pre-transfusion manipulations to reduce toxicity could substantially improve the efficacy and safety of this long-employed therapy. PMID:25699046

  1. Platelet transfusion - the new immunology of an old therapy.

    PubMed

    Stolla, Moritz; Refaai, Majed A; Heal, Joanna M; Spinelli, Sherry L; Garraud, Olivier; Phipps, Richard P; Blumberg, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusion has been a vital therapeutic approach in patients with hematologic malignancies for close to half a century. Randomized trials show that prophylactic platelet transfusions mitigate bleeding in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, even with prophylactic transfusions, as many as 75% of patients, experience hemorrhage. While platelet transfusion efficacy is modest, questions and concerns have arisen about the risks of platelet transfusion therapy. The acknowledged serious risks of platelet transfusion include viral transmission, bacterial sepsis, and acute lung injury. Less serious adverse effects include allergic and non-hemolytic febrile reactions. Rare hemolytic reactions have occurred due to a common policy of transfusing without regard to ABO type. In the last decade or so, new concerns have arisen; platelet-derived lipids are implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury after transfusion. With the recognition that platelets are immune cells came the discoveries that supernatant IL-6, IL-27 sCD40L, and OX40L are closely linked to febrile reactions and sCD40L with acute lung injury. Platelet transfusions are pro-inflammatory, and may be pro-thrombotic. Anti-A and anti-B can bind to incompatible recipient or donor platelets and soluble antigens, impair hemostasis and thus increase bleeding. Finally, stored platelet supernatants contain biological mediators such as VEGF and TGF-β1 that may compromise the host versus tumor response. This is particularly of concern in patients receiving many platelet transfusions, as for acute leukemia. New evidence suggests that removing stored supernatant will improve clinical outcomes. This new view of platelets as pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory agents suggests that innovative approaches to improving platelet storage and pre-transfusion manipulations to reduce toxicity could substantially improve the efficacy and safety of this long-employed therapy. PMID:25699046

  2. Making peanut allergens indigestible: a model system for reducing or preventing an allergic reaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut allergens are not totally resistant to digestion as previously known. Creating peanut allergen conjugates that are more resistant to digestion may prevent absorption of the allergens into the bloodstream, and thereby, an allergic reaction. Peanut allergen conjugates were prepared by covalen...

  3. WORKSHOP ON STATUS OF TEST METHODS FOR ASSESSING POTENTIAL OF CHEMICALS TO INDUCE RESPIRATORY ALLERGIC REACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the association between allergy and asthma and the increasing incidence of morbidity and mortality due to asthma, there is growing concern over the potential of industrial chemicals to produce allergic reactions in the respiratory tract. Two classes of chemicals have b...

  4. Histamine in foods: its possible role in non-allergic adverse reactions to ingestants.

    PubMed

    Malone, M H; Metcalfe, D D

    1986-01-01

    Histamine is well recognized as a product of both mast cells and basophils. Its release from these sources in IgE-mediated reactions unquestionably contributes to the allergic response. It is often stated that ingestion of foods rich in histamine can result in absorption of sufficient histamine to provoke signs and symptoms reminiscent of an allergic reaction. A review of literature relevant to this issue suggests that certain foods do indeed contain histamine as measured by current methodology. Further, histamine ingestion in excess of 36 to 250 mg may or may not result in a clinical response which includes abdominal complaints, feelings of warmth, flushing and headache. Taken together, this evidence supports the hypothesis that ingestion of large amounts of histamine-containing foods or foods which contain the histamine precursor, histidine, under some circumstances can result in adverse reactions. PMID:3302658

  5. Single doses of local betamethasone do not suppress allergic patch test reactions to nickel sulfate.

    PubMed

    Molander, Gerd; Petman, Leena; Kannas, Liisa; Lauerma, Antti I

    2004-04-01

    Topical corticosteroids are usually banned on test areas prior to patch testing. The previous literature on the effect of topical corticosteroids is conflicting. Patients allergic to nickel sulfate were patch tested on 4 sites with nickel on day (D) 0. Intracutaneous betamethasone was injected to test sites on D-1, D0 and D1. NaCl injection on D-1 was control. The patch test reactions were evaluated clinically and with laser Doppler. There were no differences in patch test reaction intensities on sites treated with intracutaneous betamethasone as compared to control. A single local dose of potent corticosteroid does not suppress allergic patch reactions to nickel. The current practice of avoiding topical corticosteroid use prior to patch testing should be re-evaluated. PMID:15186376

  6. Comparison of allergic reactions to intravenous and intramuscular pegaspargase in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Petersen, William C; Clark, Dana; Senn, Stacy L; Cash, W Thomas; Gillespie, Scott E; McCracken, Courtney E; Keller, Frank G; Lew, Glen

    2014-05-01

    Pegaspargase (PEG) is a standard component of therapy for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Because PEG preparations are bacterially derived, they are highly immunogenic. PEG has traditionally been delivered intramuscularly (IM), but over the last several years, more PEG has been given intravenously (IV) in order to provide a less painful and more convenient means of delivery. However, there are limited data comparing allergic reactions between IV and IM PEG recipients, especially in a large cohort of patients. We reviewed the charts of pediatric ALL patients diagnosed from 2006 to 2011 who received PEG at our institution and compared the incidence, time to onset of symptoms, reaction grade, and hospitalization rate for patients who had allergic reactions to PEG. Of 318 evaluable patients, 159 received IV and 159 received IM PEG. Thirty-one (19.5%) IV patients had an allergic reaction, compared to 17 (10.7%) IM patients (P = .028). Time to onset of symptoms was ≤ 30 minutes for 26 of 27 evaluable IV patients (96.3%) versus only two of 11 evaluable IM patients (18.2%; P < .001). Four of 31 IV patients (12.9%) and six of 17 IM patients (35.5%) required hospitalization (P = .134). There is increased incidence of allergy in patients who received IV PEG compared to IM. Grade of reaction was similar between IV and IM, but allergic reactions to IV PEG had a more rapid onset. While the risk of allergy may be increased, IV delivery appears to have an acceptable safety profile for administration in ALL patients. PMID:24498943

  7. Risk of severe allergic reactions from the use of potassium iodide for radiation emergencies.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H

    2004-12-01

    Potassium iodide (KI) may be prescribed for widespread use in the event of a radiation emergency to prevent the uptake of radioactive iodide by the thyroid gland. The available literature was reviewed and expert opinion sought among members of the Adverse Reactions to Foods and the Adverse Reactions to Drugs and Biologicals Committees of the Academy to assemble evidenced-based conclusions regarding the risks of an allergic reaction to this therapy. This article describes the information leading to the following conclusions: (1) anaphylactoid reactions to radiocontrast media should not be considered evidence of KI allergy, (2) allergic contact dermatitis from iodine-containing antibacterial preparations should not be considered evidence of IgE antibody-mediated KI allergy or sensitivity, (3) IgE antibody-mediated allergy to seafood should not be considered evidence of KI allergy or sensitivity, and (4) physicians should ensure that persons are not allergic to inactive ingredients or components of the KI formulation prescribed. PMID:15577843

  8. Effect of disodium cromoglycate on mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Jung-Sook; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Park, Rae-Kil; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-04-23

    We investigated the effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on mast cell-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity. DSCG inhibited systemic allergic reaction induced by compound 48/80 dose-dependently. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis was inhibited by 71.6% by oral administration of DSCG (1 g/kg). When DSCG was pretreated at concentration rang from 0.01-1000 g/kg, the serum histamine levels were reduced in a dose dependent manner. DSCG also significantly inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cell (RPMC) by compound 48/80. We confirmed that DSCG inhibited compound 48/80-induced degranulation of RPMC by alcian blue/nuclear fast red staining. In addition, DSCG showed a significant inhibitory effect on anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-mediated tumor necrosis factor-alpha production. These results indicate that DSCG inhibits mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction. PMID:15050425

  9. Identification of a mast-cell-specific receptor crucial for pseudo-allergic drug reactions.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Benjamin D; Pundir, Priyanka; Meeker, Sonya; Han, Liang; Undem, Bradley J; Kulka, Marianna; Dong, Xinzhong

    2015-03-12

    Mast cells are primary effectors in allergic reactions, and may have important roles in disease by secreting histamine and various inflammatory and immunomodulatory substances. Although they are classically activated by immunoglobulin (Ig)E antibodies, a unique property of mast cells is their antibody-independent responsiveness to a range of cationic substances, collectively called basic secretagogues, including inflammatory peptides and drugs associated with allergic-type reactions. The pathogenic roles of these substances have prompted a decades-long search for their receptor(s). Here we report that basic secretagogues activate mouse mast cells in vitro and in vivo through a single receptor, Mrgprb2, the orthologue of the human G-protein-coupled receptor MRGPRX2. Secretagogue-induced histamine release, inflammation and airway contraction are abolished in Mrgprb2-null mutant mice. Furthermore, we show that most classes of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved peptidergic drugs associated with allergic-type injection-site reactions also activate Mrgprb2 and MRGPRX2, and that injection-site inflammation is absent in mutant mice. Finally, we determine that Mrgprb2 and MRGPRX2 are targets of many small-molecule drugs associated with systemic pseudo-allergic, or anaphylactoid, reactions; we show that drug-induced symptoms of anaphylactoid responses are significantly reduced in knockout mice; and we identify a common chemical motif in several of these molecules that may help predict side effects of other compounds. These discoveries introduce a mouse model to study mast cell activation by basic secretagogues and identify MRGPRX2 as a potential therapeutic target to reduce a subset of drug-induced adverse effects. PMID:25517090

  10. Identification of a mast cell specific receptor crucial for pseudo-allergic drug reactions

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Benjamin D.; Pundir, Priyanka; Meeker, Sonya; Han, Liang; Undem, Bradley J.; Kulka, Marianna; Dong, Xinzhong

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells are primary effectors in allergic reactions, and may have significant roles in diseases by secreting histamine and various inflammatory and immunomodulatory substances1,2. While classically they are activated by IgE antibodies, a unique property of mast cells is their antibody-independent responsiveness to a range of cationic substances, collectively called basic secretagogues, including inflammatory peptides and drugs associated with allergic-type reactions1,3. Roles for these substances in pathology have prompted a decades-long search for their receptor(s). Here we report that basic secretagogues activate mouse mast cells in vitro and in vivo through a single receptor, MrgprB2, the orthologue of the human G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) MrgprX2. Secretagogue-induced histamine release, inflammation, and airway contraction are abolished in MrgprB2 null mutant mice. Further, we show that most classes of FDA-approved peptidergic drugs associated with allergic-type injection-site reactions also activate MrgprB2 and MrgprX2, and that injection-site inflammation is absent in mutant mice. Finally, we determine that MrgprB2 and MrgprX2 are targets of many small molecule drugs associated with systemic pseudo-allergic, or anaphylactoid, reactions; we show that drug-induced symptoms of anaphylactoid responses are significantly reduced in knockout mice, and we identify a common chemical motif in several of these molecules that may help predict side effects of other compounds. These discoveries introduce a mouse model to study mast cell activation by basic secretagogues and identify MrgprX2 as a potential therapeutic target to reduce a subset of drug-induced adverse effects. PMID:25517090

  11. Severe allergic reaction: management of anaphylaxis in hospital.

    PubMed

    Jevon, Phil

    Anaphylaxis is an acute, severe, hypersensitivity reaction that can lead to asphyxia, cardiovascular collapse and cardiac arrest. This reaction is sudden, severe, and involves the whole body. Common causes include foods such as nuts, shellfish, dairy products and eggs. Non-food causes include bee/wasp stings, latex and drugs, e.g. penicillin. Common clinical features include urticaria, angioedema, respiratory distress and shock. Summoning expert help, reclining the patient flat, administering high concentration oxygen, and administering intramuscular adrenaline are key aspects of the nursing management of anaphylaxis in hospital. The aim of this article is to understand the management of anaphylaxis in hospital, with particular reference to national consensus guidelines. PMID:18414282

  12. Rabies post-exposure prophylaxis for a child with severe allergic reaction to rabies vaccine.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Liu, Man-Qing; Chen, Li; Zhu, Zheng-Gang; Zhu, Ze-Rong; Hu, Quan

    2016-07-01

    Most adverse events (AEs) during the immunization of rabies vaccine were slight, there was little information about the allergic reaction induced by rabies vaccines and had to stop or change the immunization program. Here, we reported a case that a 4-year-old boy had category II exposure to rabies and showed severe allergic reaction after being immunized with lyophilized purified vero cell rabies vaccine (PVRV). After the anti-allergy therapy with hormone, allergy testing indicated medium allergy to egg and milk, and implied the allergic reaction most likely associated with animal-sourced gelatin in lyophilized PVRV. Therefore, a new immunization program with liquid PVRV without stabilizers under the Zegrab regimen (2-1-1) was enrolled at day 7 post-exposure. Although lower than the levels of normal <5 -year population at day 14 and 45, the neutralizing antibody (RVNA) titers of this boy showed adequate protective antibody (≥ 0.5 IU/ml), even after 365 d post-immunization. This study not only highlighted the importance of several types of rabies vaccines co-existing in the market, but also implied the necessary for doctors to fully understand the allergies history of patients prior to immunize rabies vaccine. PMID:26900624

  13. Anaphylactic reaction after autologous blood transfusion: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shailendra; Goyal, Keshav; Dubey, Surya; Bindra, Ashish; Kedia, Shweta

    2015-01-01

    Autologous blood transfusion as a cause of intraoperative anaphylaxis is very rare. We encountered one such life-threatening event in a 72-year-old patient undergoing laminectomy and pedicle screw fixation. The probable cause identified was the floseal mixed autologous blood transfusion. Review of literature has been done, and measures to avoid such an event in the future are discussed. PMID:25972952

  14. Anaphylactic reaction after autologous blood transfusion: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shailendra; Goyal, Keshav; Dubey, Surya; Bindra, Ashish; Kedia, Shweta

    2015-01-01

    Autologous blood transfusion as a cause of intraoperative anaphylaxis is very rare. We encountered one such life-threatening event in a 72-year-old patient undergoing laminectomy and pedicle screw fixation. The probable cause identified was the floseal mixed autologous blood transfusion. Review of literature has been done, and measures to avoid such an event in the future are discussed. PMID:25972952

  15. Allergic Reactions to Foods in Preschool-Aged Children in a Prospective Observational Food Allergy Study

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Tamara T.; Atkins, Dan; Wood, Robert A.; Burks, A. Wesley; Jones, Stacie M.; Henning, Alice K.; Stablein, Donald; Sampson, Hugh A.; Sicherer, Scott H.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine circumstances of allergic reactions to foods in a cohort of preschool-aged children. METHODS: We conducted a prospective, 5-site observational study of 512 infants aged 3 to 15 months with documented or likely allergy to milk or egg, and collected data prospectively examining allergic reactions. RESULTS: Over a median follow-up of 36 months (range: 0–48.4), the annualized reaction rate was 0.81 per year (367/512 subjects reporting 1171 reactions [95% confidence interval: 0.76–0.85]). Overall, 269/512 (52.5%) reported >1 reaction. The majority of reactions (71.2%) were triggered by milk (495 [42.3%]), egg (246 [21.0%]), and peanut (93 [7.9%]), with accidental exposures attributed to unintentional ingestion, label-reading errors, and cross-contact. Foods were provided by persons other than parents in 50.6% of reactions. Of 834 reactions to milk, egg, or peanut, 93 (11.2%) were attributed to purposeful exposures to these avoided foods. A higher number of food allergies (P < .0001) and higher food-specific immunoglobulin E (P < .0001) were associated with reactions. Of the 11.4% of reactions (n = 134) that were severe, 29.9% were treated with epinephrine. Factors resulting in undertreatment included lack of recognition of severity, epinephrine being unavailable, and fears about epinephrine administration. CONCLUSIONS: There was a high frequency of reactions caused by accidental and nonaccidental exposures. Undertreatment of severe reactions with epinephrine was a substantial problem. Areas for improved education include the need for constant vigilance, accurate label reading, avoidance of nonaccidental exposure, prevention of cross-contamination, appropriate epinephrine administration, and education of all caretakers. PMID:22732173

  16. Environmental influences on the immune system and allergic reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Adkinson, N F

    1977-01-01

    Environmental interactions with the immune system may result in two types of adverse outcomes: immunodeficiency and immunopathology. Serious immunodeficiency most commonly results from ionizing radiation or as a recognized side effect of iatrogenic drug therapy, usually cancer chemotherapy. At present there is little basis for believing that biologically significant suppression of immune competence in man results from more subtle interactions with environmental agents. On the other hand, environmentally triggered immunopathology is a source of considerable morbidity and mortality. Additional research is needed in the following areas: (a) basic mechanisms of immunopathological reactions; (b) development of methods for accurately implicating or excluding immunological mechanisms in the etiology of hypersensitivity states; (c) development of methods for assessing in advance the potential immunogenicity of new industrial chemicals and occupational allergens; (d) identification of the risk factors which predispose to immunopathological outcomes when individuals are exposed to sensitizing chemicals or other "natural" allergens. PMID:598354

  17. The role of IgE recognition in allergic reactions to amoxicillin and clavulanic acid.

    PubMed

    Torres, M J; Montañez, M I; Ariza, A; Salas, M; Fernandez, T D; Barbero, N; Mayorga, C; Blanca, M

    2016-02-01

    Betalactam (BL) antibiotics are the drugs most frequently involved in IgE-mediated reactions. The culprit BL varies according to consumption patterns, with amoxicillin (AX) more prevalent in Southern Europe and penicillin V in Scandinavian countries. Nowadays, the combination of AX and clavulanic acid (CLV) is the most highly consumed BL containing medicine worldwide. Both BLs, AX and CLV, can independently be involved in reactions, which poses a diagnostic challenge. In patients with immediate allergic reactions to AX, two patterns of responses have been described, those responding to benzylpenicillin (cross-reactors) and those selective to AX. In addition, selective reactions to CLV account for around 30% of allergic reactions to the combination AX-CLV. These patterns of IgE recognition could be related to differences in the haptenation process, in the immunological response, or in the BL involved in the first sensitization. In this regard, patients with selective responses to CLV are generally younger than those allergic to AX or benzylpenicillin. So far, no evidence of cross-reactivity between CLV and other BLs has been reported. This shows the importance of an accurate diagnosis of CLV allergy, as patients with selective reactions to CLV could take other BLs including AX. Diagnosis can be performed in vivo and in vitro, although no immunoassay currently exists. Research regarding the CLV antigenic determinants and protein conjugates is essential to improve diagnosis. BLs need to covalently bind to a carrier protein to be immunogenic. The antigenic determinant of AX is the amoxicilloyl amide, but CLV leads to unstable structures, many of which are unknown. Moreover, the nature of the BL-protein conjugates plays an important role in IgE recognition. This review aims to summarize current knowledge on the immunochemistry, diagnostic approaches as well as chemical and proteomic studies for both AX and CLV. PMID:26662186

  18. Prophylactic plasma and platelet transfusion in the critically Ill patient: just useless and expensive or even harmful?

    PubMed

    Görlinger, Klaus; Saner, Fuat H

    2015-01-01

    It is still common practice to correct abnormal standard laboratory test results, such as increased INR or low platelet count, prior to invasive interventions, such as tracheostomy, central venous catheter insertion or liver biopsy, in critically ill patients. Data suggest that 30-90 % of plasma transfused for these indications is unnecessary and puts the patient at risk. Plasma transfusion is associated with a high risk of transfusion-associated adverse events such as transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), transfusion-related lung injury (TRALI), transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM), and anaphylaxis/allergic reactions. Therefore, the avoidance of inappropriate plasma transfusion bears a high potential of improving patient outcomes. The prospective study by Durila et al., published recently in BMC Anesthesiology, provides evidence that tracheostomies can be performed without prophylactic plasma transfusion and bleeding complications in critically ill patients despite increased INR in case of normal thromboelastometry (ROTEM) results. Thromboelastometry-based restrictive transfusion management helped avoid unnecessary plasma and platelet transfusion, and should reduce the incidence of transfusion-related adverse events and transfusion-associated hospital costs. Therefore, the authors believe that thromboelastometry-based strategies should be implemented to optimize patient blood management in perioperative medicine. PMID:26054337

  19. The Relationship between Skin Symptoms and Allergic Reactions to Asian Dust

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Shinji; Onishi, Kazunari; Mu, Haosheng; Yokoyama, Yae; Hosoda, Takenobu; Okamoto, Mikizo; Kurozawa, Youichi

    2012-01-01

    Asian dust events result from displacement of atmospheric pollutants from the Chinese and Mongolian deserts, causing associated health issues throughout Northeast Asia. We investigated the relationship between skin symptoms in Asian dust events and contact allergy to Asian dust and associated metals. Increases in atmospheric levels of heavy metals such as Ni, Al, and Fe occurred during the severe Asian dust event on March 21, 2010. We conducted a case–control study (n = 62) with patch testing to compare skin symptoms on an Asian dust day with metal allergic reactions. Skin symptoms were observed in 18/62 subjects. Nine subjects with skin symptoms (group A) and 11 without (group B) were patch tested for six metals and Asian dust particles. Metal and dust samples were applied to the subjects’ backs for 2 days and the reactions were scored according to the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group guidelines. Differences in the positive rates between the groups were analyzed. Skin reactions to ferric chloride (p = 0.015), aluminum chloride (p = 0.047), nickel sulfate (p = 0.008), and Asian dust particles (p = 0.047) were more common in group A than in group B. Skin symptoms during Asian dust events may be allergic reactions to Asian dust particle-bound metals. PMID:23222253

  20. Allergic reaction to patent blue dye in breast surgery - case report.

    PubMed

    Maranhão, Marcius Vinícius M; da Nóbrega, Dyluzia Kelly Amaral; Anunciação, Carlos Eduardo Caiado; Maia, Barbara de Alcântara Brito; Mariano, Paulo Virgílio Dantas

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of allergic reaction to patent blue in a patient who underwent excision of sentinel lymph node associated with segmental breast resection. About 20min after the dye injection, the patient developed hypotension (BP=70×30mmHg) associated with increased heart frequency. The patient was treated successfully with decreased inspired fraction of inhaled anesthetic and fluid replacement. At the end of the procedure, she presented with bluish urticarial-like plaques on the head, neck, upper limbs, and trunk; hydrocortisone was then used. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged from the PACU 2h after the end of surgery without skin changes, and was discharged from hospital on the morning after surgery. The incidence of allergic reactions with the use of patent blue is far superior to the hypersensitivity reactions seen with anesthetic and adjuvant drugs. Therefore, the anesthesiologist must be aware of cardiovascular instability associated with skin changes during the use of patent blue, for early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of this hypersensitivity reaction to this dye. PMID:27343798

  1. [Allergic reaction to patent blue dye in breast surgery - case report].

    PubMed

    Maranhão, Marcius Vinícius M; Nóbrega, Dyluzia Kelly Amaral da; Anunciação, Carlos Eduardo Caiado; Maia, Barbara de Alcântara Brito; Mariano, Paulo Virgílio Dantas

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of allergic reaction to patent blue in a patient who underwent excision of sentinel lymph node associated with segmental breast resection. About 20minutes after the dye injection, the patient developed hypotension (BP=70×30mmHg) associated with increased heart frequency. The patient was treated successfully with decreased inspired fraction of inhaled anesthetic and fluid replacement. At the end of the procedure, she presented with bluish urticarial - like plaques on the head, neck, upper limbs, and trunk; hydrocortisone was then used. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged from the PACU two hours after the end of surgery without skin changes, and was discharged from hospital on the morning after surgery. The incidence of allergic reactions with the use of patent blue is far superior to the hypersensitivity reactions seen with anesthetic and adjuvant drugs. Therefore, the anesthesiologist must be aware of cardiovascular instability associated with skin changes during the use of patent blue, for early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of this hypersensitivity reaction to this dye. PMID:25458838

  2. Allergic reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... something firm, such as a fingernail or plastic credit card. Do not use tweezers. Squeezing the stinger ... something firm (such as a fingernail or plastic credit card). Do not use tweezers -- squeezing the stinger ...

  3. Allergic reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... t bother most people (such as venom from bee stings and certain foods, medicines, and pollens) can ... Common allergens include: Animal dander Bee stings or stings from other insects Foods, especially nuts, fish, and shellfish Insect bites Medicines Plants Pollens

  4. Repeat oral food challenges in peanut and tree nut allergic children with a history of mild/moderate reactions

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Rebecca Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background In peanut and tree nut allergic children a history of anaphylaxis is associated with subsequent severe reactions. Objective We aimed to prospectively rechallenge peanut and tree nut allergic children with a history of mild/moderate reactions to assess their allergy over time. Methods In this cohort study peanut and tree nut allergic children with a history of mild/moderate reactions during a controlled oral challenge were invited to have a follow-up oral challenge to the same food at least 1 year later. Results Twenty-six children participated in the study. The mean time interval between the first and second challenge for all participants was 35.5 months. Peanut or tree nut allergy resolved in 38.5% of participants. Those with persistent peanut or tree nut allergy showed a decrease in their reaction threshold and/or increased severity in 81% of cases. There were no demographic features or skin test results that were predictive of changes in severity over time. Conclusion Peanut and tree nut allergic children with a history of mild/moderate reactions who remained allergic demonstrated a high rate of more severe reactions and/or reduced thresholds upon rechallenge over a year later, however, the rate of resolution of allergy in this group may be higher than previously reported. PMID:26240794

  5. [Consensus position document on the child with an allergic reaction after vaccination or an allergy to vaccine components].

    PubMed

    Echeverría Zudaire, L; Ortigosa Del Castillo, L; Alonso Lebrero, E; Álvarez García, F J; Cortés Álvarez, N; García Sánchez, N; Martorell Aragonés, A

    2015-07-01

    Vaccinations are one of the main public health tools for the control of vaccine-preventable diseases. If a child is labeled to have had an allergic reaction to a vaccine, the next immunizations will probably be suspended in that child, with the risks involved in this decision. The rate of severe allergic reactions is very low, ranging between 0.5-1/100,000 doses. The causes of allergic reactions to vaccines, more than the vaccine itself, are often due to residual protein components in the manufacturing process, such as gelatin or egg, and rarely to yeast or latex. Most of vaccine reactions are mild, localized at the site of injection, but in some circumstances, severe anaphylactic reactions can occur. If an immediate-type allergic reaction is suspected when vaccinating, or a child allergic to some of the vaccine components has to be vaccinated, a correct diagnosis of the possible allergy has to be made. The usual components of each vaccine should be known, in order to determine if vaccination can be performed safely on the child. PMID:25648960

  6. Blood transfusion in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Nigam, A; Prakash, A; Saxena, P

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion of blood and blood components is a common practice in obstetric wards but it is not without risk. The incidence of transfusion reactions varies from 4 in every hundred transfusions for non-haemolytic reactions to one in every 40,000 for haemolytic transfusion reactions. The physiological basis of blood transfusion is outlined in this article. Most of the donated blood is processed into components: packed red cells (PRBCs), platelets, and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) or cryoprecipitate. Various alternatives to blood transfusion exist and include autotransfusion, pre-autologous blood storage, use of oxygen carrying blood substitutes and intraoperative cell salvage. Despite the risks associated with transfusions, obstetricians are frequently too aggressive in transfusing blood and blood products to their patients. Acute blood loss in obstetrics is usually due to placenta praevia, postpartum blood loss and surgery related. An early involvement of a consultant obstetrician, anaesthetist, haematologist and the blood bank is essential. There are no established criteria for initiating red cell transfusions and the decision is purely based on clinical and haematological parameters, which have been discussed along with the general principles of blood transfusion in obstetrics and some practical guidelines. PMID:24899337

  7. Experiencing a first food allergic reaction: a survey of parent and caregiver perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insufficient knowledge of food allergy and anaphylaxis has been identified by caregivers as an important barrier to coping, and a potential cause of fear and anxiety, particularly for those with children newly diagnosed with food allergy. The purpose of the study was to better understand the experiences of caregivers of children with a first allergic reaction to food, and to identify any deficiencies in the information received at diagnosis. Methods A mixed-methods study consisting of an online survey administered to the Anaphylaxis Canada online registry (a patient support group database of approximately 10,000 members), and a follow-up qualitative interview with a subset of survey participants. Analysis consisted of frequency analysis (quantitative and qualitative data) and descriptive statistics to calculate proportions and means with standard deviations. Qualitative analyses were guided by the constant comparative method of grounded theory methodology. Results Of 293 survey respondents, 208 were eligible to complete the survey (first allergic reaction to food within 12 months of the study), and 184 respondents consented. Identified gaps included education about food allergy, anaphylaxis management, for example, how to use epinephrine auto- injectors, and coping strategies for fear and anxiety. The qualitative follow-up study supported these findings, yielding 3 major themes: 1) lack of provision of information following the episode on the recognition and management of food allergy related allergic reactions, 2) prolonged wait times for an allergist, and 3) significant family anxiety. Conclusions The online survey highlighted multiple deficiencies at diagnosis, findings which were supported by the follow up qualitative study. Results will inform the development of educational strategies for patients newly diagnosed with food allergy. PMID:23718700

  8. [Transfusion-associated lung injury (TRALI): obvious and incomprehensible].

    PubMed

    Bulanov, A Iu

    2009-01-01

    Acute transfusion-associated lung injury (TRALI) is an acute lung injury associated with and develops within 6 hours after the transfusion of components and blood preparations. Today there are no uniform views on the pathogenesis of TRALI. The discussion of immune and non-immune mechanisms is relevant. The key link of the former is that the presence of anti-leukocytic antibodies in a donor or a recipient and their interaction during transfusion with the leukocytes of the recipient or the donor, respectively; that of the latter link is the accumulation of biologically active substances in the transfusion media during storage and their passive administration to the recipient during transfusion. In both cases, the total link is drastic increased pulmonary capillary permeability. The clinical presentation of TRALI is nonspecific and generally similar to that of the adult respiratory distress syndrome and lung injuries of another genesis. It is necessary to make its differential diagnosis with allergic reactions, the transfusion of bacterially contaminated media and mainly with circulatory overload. Specific treatments for transfusion-associated lung injury are unavailable. Diferent variants of respiratory therapy are effective. Prevention of TRALI is mainly based on its immune mechanism. The leading direction of its prevention is to select donors. PMID:19938716

  9. What if skin eruption is not caused by allergic reaction to drugs?

    PubMed

    Bobik, O; Bobik, O; Arganova, H

    2010-01-01

    In this case report authors have described a case of a 39 years old Caucasian single man who was unsuccessfully treated for an allergic reaction to drugs by multiple dermatologists, due to two etiologically different diseases. It was a classical second stage syphilitic infection and positive serologic tests for HIV infection, proved by screening and confirmatory tests. Syphilitic infection was treated and followed up by dermatologist and for the treatment of HIV infection, the patient was referred to the Centre for treatment HIV/AIDS in Kosice (Fig. 4, Ref. 3). PMID:20586153

  10. Severe hemolytic transfusion reaction due to anti-D in a D+ patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ipe, Tina S; Wilkes, Jennifer J; Hartung, Helge D; Westhoff, Connie M; Chou, Stella T; Friedman, David F

    2015-03-01

    A 5-year-old male with sickle cell disease presented with pain, dark urine, and fatigue 10 days after a red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Laboratory evaluation demonstrated severe anemia, blood type O+, and anti-D in the serum. Anti-D in a D+ patient led to RH genotyping, which revealed homozygosity for RHD*DAU4 that encodes partial D antigen. Anti-D in this patient whose RBCs exclusively express partial D caused a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction after exposure to D+ RBCs. The finding of anti-D in a D+patient should be investigated by molecular methods to help distinguish an alloantibody from an autoantibody. PMID:25171447

  11. Severe hemolytic transfusion reaction due to anti-D in a D+ patient with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Ipe, Tina S.; Wilkes, Jennifer J.; Hartung, Helge D.; Westhoff, Connie M.; Chou, Stella T.; Friedman, David F.

    2014-01-01

    A 5-year-old male with sickle cell disease presented with pain, dark urine, and fatigue 10 days after a red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Laboratory evaluation demonstrated severe anemia, blood type O+, and anti-D in the serum. Anti-D in a D+ patient led to RH genotyping which revealed homozygosity for RHD*DAU4 that encodes partial D antigen. Anti-D in this patient whose RBCs exclusively express partial D caused a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction after exposure to D+ RBCs. The finding of anti-D in a D+ patient should be investigated by molecular methods to help distinguish an alloantibody from an autoantibody. PMID:25171447

  12. Noninvasive in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy is effective in differentiating allergic from nonallergic equivocal patch test reactions.

    PubMed

    Slodownik, D; Levi, A; Lapidoth, M; Ingber, A; Horev, L; Enk, C D

    2015-04-01

    Patch testing is the gold standard for the validation of contact dermatitis. It relies on the subjective scoring by an evaluator of the inflammatory reaction induced by an allergen applied to the skin. Equivocal reactions imply faint erythema and could represent allergic, irritant, or negative reactions. They constitute approximately 1 % of the positive reactions encountered in patch test practice. Histological evaluation of the equivocal reaction has proven helpful for the correct interpretation but is however time consuming, and its invasive nature is often unacceptable to the patient. In vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a novel, noninvasive imaging technique which permits real-time visualization of skin structures and lesions at a resolution close to that obtained by conventional histology. CLSM has been successfully applied for the differentiation between clinically clear-cut allergic and irritant patch test reactions. The objective of this study is to determine the relevance of CLSM in differentiating between allergic, irritant, and negative equivocal patch test reactions. Fifteen patients who underwent patch testing in our clinic were observed as having 20 equivocal reactions. All 20 reactions were evaluated using in vivo CLSM and compared with adjacent normal skin. In vivo CLSM evaluation revealed that 8 of the 20 equivocal reactions (40 %) showed confocal patterns consistent with the patterns encountered in positive allergic reactions. Anamnestic exposure, i.e., detailed assessment of previous related contact with these allergens, confirmed high relevance rates. In vivo CLSM is useful in differentiating between allergic, irritant, and negative equivocal patch test reactions, a differentiation that cannot be made by conventional clinical patch test reading. PMID:25604734

  13. Blood transfusion risks and alternative strategies in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Josée

    2011-01-01

    Although the safety of the blood supply has been greatly improved, there still remain both infectious and noninfectious risks to the patient. The incidence of noninfectious transfusion reactions is greater than that of infectious complications. Furthermore, the mortality associated with noninfectious risks is significantly higher. In fact, noninfectious risks account for 87-100% of fatal complications of transfusions. It is concerning to note that the majority of pediatric reports relate to human error such as overtransfusion and lack of knowledge of special requirements in the neonatal age group. The second most frequent category is acute transfusion reactions, majority of which are allergic in nature. It is estimated that the incidence of adverse outcome is 18:100,000 red blood cells issued for children aged less than 18 years and 37:100,000 for infants. The comparable adult incidence is 13:100,000. In order to decrease the risks associated with transfusion of blood products, various blood-conservation strategies can be utilized. Modalities such as acute normovolemic hemodilution, hypervolemic hemodilution, deliberate hypotension, antifibrinolytics, intraoperative blood salvage, and autologous blood donation are discussed and the pediatric literature is reviewed. A discussion of transfusion triggers, and algorithms as well as current research into alternatives to blood transfusions concludes this review. PMID:21155923

  14. INCIDENCE OF APNEA ATTACK AS ALLERGIC REACTION AFTER ORAL FOOD CHALLENGE IN PATIENT WITH IgE-MEDIATED WHEAT ALLERGY.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Masayuki

    2016-08-01

    Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that is rapid in onset and might cause death. Although wheezes, dyspnea or loss of consciousness are known to occur with severe allergic reactions with IgE-mediated food allergy, reports of apnea attack associated with IgE-mediated food allergy are rare. In this case, 9-year-old boy with IgE-mediated wheat allergy experienced apnea attack with strong desaturation after an immediate allergic reaction including erythema, abdominal pain, vomiting, and anaphylactic shock. The patient had asphyxia and cyanosis confirmed by medical staff when his oxygen saturation decreased to the 60% level, and he had occasional asphyxia over 10 seconds with no thoracic motion after a desaturation episode. Central apnea attack might be occurred in patient with IgE-mediated food allergy. However, the exact mechanism responsible remains unknown and further research is needed. PMID:27616176

  15. Transfusion treatment at Sestre Milosrdnice University Hospital Center during a twelve-year period.

    PubMed

    Sović, Dragica; Dodig, Javorka; Banović, Miroslav; Jularić, Anamarija

    2014-09-01

    Transfusion treatment is administered according to clinical and laboratory results, with ongoing patient assessments. Decisions on necessary measures to prevent any adverse and unexpected events and reactions are made on the basis ofhemovigilance and ongoing gathering and analysis of relevant data. Information about transfusion treatment at the Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital Center, Vinogradska site, was retrospectively collected for a period of twelve years (2001-2012). In that period, 14137.25 ± 1693.07 units of all blood products were used, where red blood cells (RBC) accounted for 67.34%, fresh frozen plasma (FFP) for 17.55%, and platelet concentrates (PC) for 14.32%. During the study period, the consumption of RBC was even, of FFP decreased by 45% and of PC increased by 58%. RBC transfusions were received by 10.43% of hospitalized patients, 1.46% of them during surgical procedures. Transfusions of all blood products were received by 14.63% of patients. We found 247 adverse reactions to all blood products. Febrile nonhemolytic and allergic reactions were quite equally represented, 49.5% each. As for other reactions (1%), one transfusion associated circulatory overload and one transfusion related acute lung injury were recorded. There were no fatal post-transfusion reactions. PMID:25509245

  16. Oxidized cellulose binding to allergens with a carbohydrate-binding module attenuates allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Shani, Nir; Shani, Ziv; Shoseyov, Oded; Mruwat, Rufayda; Shoseyov, David

    2011-01-15

    Grass and mite allergens are of the main causes of allergy and asthma. A carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) represents a common motif to groups I (β-expansin) and II/III (expansin-like) grass allergens and is suggested to mediate allergen-IgE binding. House dust mite group II allergen (Der p 2 and Der f 2) structures bear strong similarity to expansin's CBM, suggesting their ability to bind carbohydrates. Thus, this study proposes the design of a carbohydrate-based treatment in which allergen binding to carbohydrate particles will promote allergen airway clearance and prevent allergic reactions. The aim of the study was to identify a polysaccharide with high allergen-binding capacities and to explore its ability to prevent allergy. Oxidized cellulose (OC) demonstrated allergen-binding capacities toward grass and mite allergens that surpassed those of any other polysaccharide examined in this study. Furthermore, inhalant preparations of OC microparticles attenuated allergic lung inflammation in rye grass-sensitized Brown Norway rats and OVA-sensitized BALB/c mice. Fluorescently labeled OC efficiently cleared from the mouse airways and body organs. Moreover, long-term administration of OC inhalant to Wistar rats did not result in toxicity. In conclusion, many allergens, such as grass and dust mite, contain a common CBM motif. OC demonstrates a strong and relatively specific allergen-binding capacity to CBM-containing allergens. OC's ability to attenuate allergic inflammation, together with its documented safety record, forms a firm basis for its application as an alternative treatment for prevention and relief of allergy and asthma. PMID:21169552

  17. Booster responses in the study of allergic reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Serrano, M C; Caballero, M T; Barranco, P; Martinez-Alzamora, F

    1996-01-01

    The observation of negative skin and challenge tests to beta-lactams in some patients with prior histories of reactions to these antibiotics led us to develop a protocol ("booster study") which systematically included the performance of skin and challenge tests to beta-lactams ten to thirty days after the study to confirm the negative results. From a total of 430 patients who came to our outpatient clinic because of a reaction to a beta-lactam or unknown antibiotic, 249 completed the study. Out of the patients who completed the second phase, or "booster study," the results were positive in the first phase, or conventional study in 42 patients, and negative in 207. The booster study was negative in 197 patients (95 percent) and positive in ten patients (5 percent). Skin tests were positive in 5 of them (penicilloyl-polylysine: 5; benzylpenicillin: 3; amoxicillin: 2; minor determinant mixture: 1), and 5 patients developed an allergic reaction after rechallenge (benzylpenicillin: 4; amoxicillin: 1). One patient with both negative skin tests and amoxicillin oral challenge in the booster study developed an immediate generalized urticaria with the oral intake of amoxicillin one month later at home; skin tests became positive at that moment. The negative results in the first phase of the study and the development of positive results in the second phase could be due to the existence of an immunological amnestic reaction or to sensitization after reexposure to beta-lactams in the diagnostic procedures. PMID:8833166

  18. Alopecia due to an allergic reaction to metal head-pins used in a neurosurgical operation

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Hajime; Takasuna, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Allergic reactions to the metal head-pins of a head fixation holder are rare. Case Description: A 45-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for the treatment of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. She underwent successful surgical treatment using four head-pins of the Sugita frame. At her first outpatient visit 3 weeks after discharge, redness, sores, and focal hair loss were noted at all four areas where the pinning had been performed. The pin fixation was considered to be responsible for the alopecia because the condition of the scalp lesions was even in all four parts. Six months later, the scalp regained hair. The head-pins were made of stainless steel, containing iron, nickel, chromium, and other components. A previous history of contact dermatitis to metal jewellery was later proven. Conclusion: The history of metal allergy should have been carefully elicited because head fixation with head-pins is essential for neurosurgical procedures. PMID:26862455

  19. Incidence and pattern of 12 years of reported transfusion adverse events in Zimbabwe: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Mvere, David A.; Chitiyo, McLeod E.; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

    2014-01-01

    Background Haemovigilance hinges on a systematically structured reporting system, which unfortunately does not always exist in resource-limited settings. We determined the incidence and pattern of transfusion-related adverse events reported to the National Blood Service Zimbabwe. Materials and methods A retrospective review of the transfusion-event records of the National Blood Service Zimbabwe was conducted covering the period from 1 January 1999 to 31 December 2011. All transfusion-related event reports received during the period were analysed. Results A total of 308 transfusion adverse events (0.046%) were reported for 670,625 blood components distributed. The majority (61.6%) of the patients who experienced an adverse event were female. The median age was 36 years (range, 1–89 years). The majority (68.8%) of the adverse events were acute transfusion reactions consisting of febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions (58.5%), minor allergies (31.6%), haemolytic reactions (5.2%), severe allergic reactions (2.4%), anaphylaxis (1.4%) and hypotension (0.9%). Two-thirds (66.6%) of the adverse events occurred following administration of whole blood, although only 10.6% of the blood was distributed as whole blood. Packed cells, which accounted for 75% of blood components distributed, were associated with 20.1% of the events. Discussion The incidence of suspected transfusion adverse events was generally lower than the incidences reported globally in countries with well-established haemovigilance systems. The administration of whole blood was disproportionately associated with transfusion adverse events. The pattern of the transfusion adverse events reported here highlights the probable differences in practice between different settings. Under-reporting of transfusion events is rife in passive reporting systems. PMID:24887217

  20. Reducing noninfectious risks of blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Gilliss, Brian M; Looney, Mark R; Gropper, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    As screening for transfusion-associated infections has improved, noninfectious complications of transfusion now cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the United States. For example, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and hemolytic transfusion-reactions are the first, second, and third leading causes of death from transfusion, respectively. These complications and others are reviewed, and several controversial methods for prevention of noninfectious complications of transfusion are discussed, including universal leukoreduction of erythrocyte units, use of male-only plasma, and restriction of erythrocyte storage age. PMID:21792054

  1. Variably severe systemic allergic reactions after consuming foods with unlabelled lupin flour: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lupin allergy remains a significant cause of food-induced allergic reactivity and anaphylaxis. Previous work suggests a strong association with legume allergy and peanut allergy in particular. Both doctors and the public have little awareness of lupin as an allergen. Case presentation Case 1 was a 41-year-old Caucasian woman without previous atopy who developed facial swelling, widespread urticaria with asthma and hypotension within minutes of eating a quiche. Her lupin allergy was confirmed by both blood and skin tests. Her lupin sensitivity was so severe that even the miniscule amount of lupin allergen in the skin testing reagent produced a mild reaction. Case 2 was a 42-year-old mildly atopic Caucasian woman with three episodes of worsening urticaria and asthma symptoms over 6 years occurring after the consumption of foods containing lupin flour. Blood and skin tests were positive for lupin allergy. Case 3 was a 38-year-old Caucasian woman with known oral allergy syndrome who had two reactions associated with urticaria and vomiting after consuming foods containing lupin flour. Skin testing confirmed significant responses to a lupin flour extract and to one of the foods inducing her reaction. Case 4 was a 54-year-old mildly atopic Caucasian woman with a 7 year history of three to four episodes each year of unpredictable oral tingling followed by urticaria after consuming a variety of foods. The most recent episode had been associated with vomiting. She had developed oral tingling with lentil and chickpeas over the previous year. Skin and blood tests confirmed lupin allergy with associated sensitivity to several legumes. Conclusions Lupin allergy can occur for the first time in adults without previous atopy or legume sensitivity. Although asymptomatic sensitisation is frequent, clinical reactivity can vary in severity from severe anaphylaxis to urticaria and vomiting. Lupin allergy may be confirmed by skin and specific immunoglobulin E estimation

  2. Mosla dianthera inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic reactions through the inhibition of histamine release and inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Hee; Kim, Sang-Hyun . E-mail: shkim72@knu.ac.kr; Eun, Jae-Soon; Shin, Tae-Yong . E-mail: tyshin@woosuk.ac.kr

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the aqueous extract of Mosla dianthera (Maxim.) (AEMD) on the mast cell-mediated allergy model and studied the possible mechanism of action. Mast cell-mediated allergic disease is involved in many diseases such as asthma, sinusitis and rheumatoid arthritis. The discovery of drugs for the treatment of allergic disease is an important subject in human health. AEMD inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic reactions in mice. AEMD decreased immunoglobulin E-mediated local allergic reactions, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. AEMD attenuated intracellular calcium level and release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80. Furthermore, AEMD attenuated the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated TNF-{alpha}, IL-8 and IL-6 secretion in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of AEMD on the pro-inflammatory cytokines was nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) dependent. AEMD decreased PMA and A23187-induced degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. Our findings provide evidence that AEMD inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and NF-{kappa}B in these effects.

  3. Betalactam antibiotics affect human dendritic cells maturation through MAPK/NF-kB systems. Role in allergic reactions to drugs.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Soledad; Gomez, Enrique; Torres, Maria J; Pozo, David; Fernandez, Tahia D; Ariza, Adriana; Sanz, Maria L; Blanca, Miguel; Mayorga, Cristobalina

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms leading to drug allergy in predisposed patients, especially those related to T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity, are not well understood. A key event in allergic reactions to drugs is the maturation process undergone by dendritic cells (DCs). Although amoxicillin (AX) has been reported to interact and maturate DCs from patients with AX-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity, the cell signaling pathways related to AX-mediated DC maturation have not been elucidated. We sought to determine the role of the MAPK and NF-κΒ pathways on AX-induced DC maturation and functional status. For that purpose, in monocyte-derived-DCs from AX-delayed allergic patients and tolerant subjects, we analyzed the activation pattern of p38MAPK, JNK, and ERK signaling and the NF-κB, maturation markers as well as endocytosis and allostimulatory capacities driven by AX-stimulated-DCs. Our data reveal that AX induces an increase in the phosphorylation levels of the three MAPKs and activated NF-κB in DCs from allergic patients. Moreover, the inhibition of these pathways prevents the up-regulation of surface molecules induced by AX. Additionally, we observed that the allostimulatory capacity and the endocytosis down-regulation in AX-stimulated-DCs from allergic patients depend on JNK and NF-κB activities. Taken together, our data shed light for the first time on the main signaling pathways involved in DC maturation from AX-delayed allergic patient. PMID:26254762

  4. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2009.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2010-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects, as well as advances in allergic skin disease that were reported in the Journal in 2009. Among key epidemiologic observations, several westernized countries report that more than 1% of children have peanut allergy, and there is some evidence that environmental exposure to peanut is a risk factor. The role of regulatory T cells, complement, platelet-activating factor, and effector cells in the development and expression of food allergy were explored in several murine models and human studies. Delayed anaphylaxis to mammalian meats appears to be related to IgE binding to the carbohydrate moiety galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose, which also has implications for hypersensitivity to murine mAb therapeutics containing this oligosaccharide. Oral immunotherapy studies continue to show promise for the treatment of food allergy, but determining whether the treatment causes tolerance (cure) or temporary desensitization remains to be explored. Increased baseline serum tryptase levels might inform the risk of venom anaphylaxis and might indicate a risk for mast cell disorders in persons who have experienced such episodes. Reduced structural and immune barrier function contribute to local and systemic allergen sensitization in patients with atopic dermatitis, as well as increased propensity of skin infections in these patients. The use of increased doses of nonsedating antihistamines and potential usefulness of omalizumab for chronic urticaria was highlighted. These exciting advances reported in the Journal can improve patient care today and provide insights on how we can improve the diagnosis and treatment of these allergic diseases in the future. PMID:20109740

  5. Mediator profiles in tears during the conjunctival response induced by allergic reaction in the nasal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The allergic reaction occurring primarily in the nasal mucosa can induce a secondary conjunctival response of an immediate (SICR), late (SLCR), or delayed (SDYCR) type in some patients with allergic conjunctivitis (AC). Objectives To investigate the concentration changes of histamine, tryptase, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN), leukotrienes (LTB 4, LTC4, LTE4), myeloperoxidase (MPO), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and interleukins (IL-2, IL-4, IL-5) in tears during the SICR, SLCR, and SDYCR. Methods In 32 patients with AC, 11 SICR (p<0.01), 13 SLCR (p<0.001), and eight SDYCR (p<0.01) to nasal challenges with allergens (NPTs), the NPTs and 32 control tests with PBS were repeated and supplemented with the determination of these factors in tears. Results The SICRs were associated with significant concentration changes in tears (p<0.05) of histamine, tryptase, ECP, LTC4, and IL-4. The SLCRs were accompanied by significant changes in concentrations of histamine, ECP, LTB4, LTC4, MPO, IL-4, and IL-5. The SDYCRs were associated with significant concentration changes in tears (p<0.05) of LTB4, MPO, IFN-γ, and IL-2. No significant changes in these factors were recorded in tears during the 32 PBS controls (p>0.1) or in the ten control patients (p>0.1). Conclusions These results provide evidence for causal involvement of nasal allergy in some patients with AC, inducing secondary conjunctival response of immediate (SICR), late SLCR, or delayed SDYCR type, associated with different mediator, cytokine, and cellular profiles in the tears, suggesting involvement of different hypersensitivity mechanisms. These results also emphasize the diagnostic value of nasal allergen challenge combined with monitoring of the conjunctival response in some patients with AC. PMID:23869165

  6. Blood transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... are many reasons you may need a blood transfusion: After knee or hip replacement surgery, or other ... your body cannot make enough blood A blood transfusion is a safe and common procedure during which ...

  7. Neonatal transfusion.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Anne M; Williamson, Lorna M

    2013-11-01

    Neonates and particularly preterm neonates are frequent recipients of large volumes of blood products relative to their size. Good quality evidence for transfusion practice in this patient group has been lacking but is now increasing. Triggers for red cell transfusion are now better defined, with on-going trials of platelet transfusions likely to yield similar evidence. Transfusion is now extremely safe, but complications such as transfusion associated acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) are likely to be under recognised, particularly in the sick extremely preterm neonate with respiratory symptoms. This review summarises the rationale and current practice with regard to blood component therapy. Background data on component specifications and hazards of transfusion are provided. Indications for transfusion of specific products including red cells, platelets, and plasma are discussed, and their use is illustrated by case examples. PMID:24095206

  8. Dissociation of cutaneous vascular permeability and the development of cutaneous late-phase allergic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Keahey, T.M.; Indrisano, J.; Kaliner, M.A.

    1989-03-01

    Cutaneous late-phase allergic reactions (LPR) are characterized by an early, immediate hypersensitivity whealing reaction followed by persistent, localized induration that peaks 6 to 8 hours later. In this study we used rodents to examine the relationship between vascular permeability (VP) and induration during LPR. Efflux of macromolecular tracers from the vasculature into skin was measured with the use of radiolabeled albumin and neutral dextran tracers having large molecular radii. To induce LPR immunologically, we used either intradermal injections of antirat IgE or passive cutaneous sensitization with IgE antidinitrophenyl followed 24 hours later by intravenous injection of albumin-dinitrophenyl. (/sup 125/I)albumin and (/sup 3/H)dextran tracers were injected intravenously before and at various intervals after the induction of LPR. Although a marked increase in VP occurred within the first 30 minutes after induction of mast cell degranulation, analysis of radiolabeled tracer accumulation at 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours failed to demonstrate any further increase in VP. These findings indicate that the induration observed in rodent LPR is not associated with increased VP beyond the immediate hypersensitivity stage and suggest that impairment of lymphatic drainage, cellular infiltration, and/or fibrin deposition are contributing factors.

  9. Late reactions in food-allergic children and adolescents after double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges.

    PubMed

    Saleh-Langenberg, J; Flokstra-de Blok, B M J; AlAgla, N; Kollen, B J; Dubois, A E J

    2016-07-01

    The time during which children are observed following a double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) varies in clinical practice. There are little data on late reactions (LRs) following DBPCFCs. Therefore, we determined the prevalence, severity and clinical characteristics of late reactions in food-allergic children and adolescents after DBPCFC, and ascertained which factors are associated with, and may predict, LRs. Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate which factors were associated with LRs and to develop the association and prediction models. A total of 1142 children underwent DBPCFCs (child-test combinations). Of these 1142 child-test combinations, 400 reported LRs following the DBPCFC. LRs in food-allergic children after DBPCFC are poorly predictable and are generally not severe. All LRs, including those on the placebo day, are more frequently reported in younger children. Children who do not experience severe immediate reactions may be safely discharged home 2 h after a DBPCFC. PMID:27121602

  10. Comparison of acute non-haemolytic transfusion reactions in female and male patients receiving female or male blood components

    PubMed Central

    Imoto, S; Araki, N; Shimada, E; Saigo, K; Nishimura, K; Nose, Y; Bouike, Y; Hashimoto, M; Mito, H; Okazaki, H

    2007-01-01

    To study the relationship between antibodies detected in patients’ and/or donors’ sera and the clinical features of acute non-haemolytic transfusion reactions (ANHTRs), and to determine any gender-related difference. ANHTRs range from urticaria to transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Antibodies to human leukocyte antigen (HLA), granulocytes, platelets, and/or plasma proteins are implicated in some of the ANHTRs. A higher antibody positivity is expected for females than for males. A comparative study of ANHTRs for antibody positivity and their clinical features between females and males for both patients and donors is helpful for characterizing ANHTRs including TRALI more clearly, but such studies are few and outdated. Two hundred and twenty-three ANHTR cases reported by 45 hospitals between October 2000 and July 2005 were analysed. The patients and 196 donors of suspect blood products were screened for antibodies to HLA Class I, HLA Class II, granulocytes, and platelets. The patients were also screened for anti-plasma protein antibodies. The types and severity of ANHTR did not differ significantly between female and male patients. The frequency of the anti-HLA antibodies, but not that of the non-HLA antibodies, was significantly higher in females. Non-HLA antibodies were significantly associated with severe reactions in females. All the TRALI cases had predisposing risk factors for acute lung injury, and 60% of the cases showed anti-leucocyte antibodies. Although the anti-HLA antibodies were detected more frequently in females than males, no significant association of ANHTRs including TRALI with gender, not only for patients, but also for donors, could be shown in this study. PMID:18067650

  11. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  12. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  13. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  14. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  15. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records. PMID:24814817

  16. Misdiagnosis of pulmonary embolism in patients with allergic reaction--the importance of prior probability of disease.

    PubMed

    Janata, Karin; Prokop, Mathias; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Laggner, Anton N

    2003-10-31

    Because pulmonary embolism (PE) and its treatment carry substantial risk of morbidity and mortality, accurate diagnosis is essential. We report two cases with allergic reactions, in which PE was suggested by routine ECG and D-dimer elevation and strengthened by spiral CT. Therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin was initiated and long-term anticoagulation was considered. As their histories did not reveal any predisposing factor to PE, the cases were re-evaluated. Elevation of D-dimer was now attributed to allergic reaction, ECG abnormalities were considered as constitutional, and findings from spiral CT attributed to breathing artifacts and partial-volume effects. The diagnosis of PE was therefore rejected and anticoagulant treatment discontinued without sequelae. These cases show the importance of determining clinical probability before ordering further diagnostic tests and critical interpretation of test results suggestive of PE, based on prior probability of the disease. PMID:14650950

  17. Vcsa1 gene peptides for the treatment of inflammatory and allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Morris, Katherine; Kuo, Byron; Wilkinson, Mark D; Davison, Joseph S; Befus, A Dean; Mathison, Ronald D

    2007-06-01

    The recently emerged Vcsa1 gene is one member of the variable coding sequence (VCS) multigene family of Rattus norvegicus. This gene encodes the precursor prohormone SMR1 (submandibular rat-1), which on enzymatic processing gives rise to several 5 to 11 amino acid peptides that modulate a variety of physiological functions. The analgesic pentapeptide sialorphin and anti-inflammatory heptapeptide submandibular gland peptide-T (TDIFEGG) are the most intensively studied. Although the Vcsa1 gene and its protein product are unique to rats, TDIFEGG or a derivative acts on all species examined to date, including human cells, in functions related to allergic reactions and inflammation. In this review, the patent and academic literature on SMR1 and its natural peptides and their derivatives are reviewed for consideration of biological targets and relevance to the development of novel therapeutic agents. The VCS gene family is discussed and we speculate on possible human homologs of these potent anti-inflammatory rat-derived peptides. The biologically active peptide products of SMR1 are considered and the mechanism of action and structure-activity relationships of the anti-inflammatory submandibular gland peptide-T and its derivatives are discussed. PMID:19075974

  18. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2013.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2014-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2013. Studies on food allergy suggest that (1) 7.6% of the US population is affected, (2) a "healthy" early diet might prevent food allergy, (3) the skin might be an important route of sensitization, (4) allergen component testing might aid diagnosis, (5) the prognosis of milk allergy might be predictable through early testing, (6) oral or sublingual immunotherapy show promise but also have caveats, and (7) preclinical studies show promising alternative modes of immunotherapy and desensitization. Studies on eosinophilic esophagitis show a relationship to connective tissue disorders and that dietary management is an effective treatment for adults. Markers of anaphylaxis severity have been determined and might inform potential diagnostics and therapeutic targets. Insights on serum tests for drug and insect sting allergy might result in improved diagnostics. Genetic and immune-mediated defects in skin epithelial differentiation contribute to the severity of atopic dermatitis. Novel management approaches to treatment of chronic urticaria, including use of omalizumab, are being identified. PMID:24373349

  19. Distinct parameters of the basophil activation test reflect the severity and threshold of allergic reactions to peanut

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Alexandra F.; Du Toit, George; Douiri, Abdel; Radulovic, Suzana; Stephens, Alick; Turcanu, Victor; Lack, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Background The management of peanut allergy relies on allergen avoidance and epinephrine autoinjector for rescue treatment in patients at risk of anaphylaxis. Biomarkers of severity and threshold of allergic reactions to peanut could significantly improve the care for patients with peanut allergy. Objective We sought to assess the utility of the basophil activation test (BAT) to predict the severity and threshold of reactivity to peanut during oral food challenges (OFCs). Methods The severity of the allergic reaction and the threshold dose during OFCs to peanut were determined. Skin prick tests, measurements of specific IgE to peanut and its components, and BATs to peanut were performed on the day of the challenge. Results Of the 124 children submitted to OFCs to peanut, 52 (median age, 5 years) reacted with clinical symptoms that ranged from mild oral symptoms to anaphylaxis. Severe reactions occurred in 41% of cases, and 57% reacted to 0.1 g or less of peanut protein. The ratio of the percentage of CD63+ basophils after stimulation with peanut and after stimulation with anti-IgE (CD63 peanut/anti-IgE) was independently associated with severity (P = .001), whereas the basophil allergen threshold sensitivity CD-sens (1/EC50 × 100, where EC50 is half maximal effective concentration) value was independently associated with the threshold (P = .020) of allergic reactions to peanut during OFCs. Patients with CD63 peanut/anti-IgE levels of 1.3 or greater had an increased risk of severe reactions (relative risk, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.8-6.2). Patients with a CD-sens value of 84 or greater had an increased risk of reacting to 0.1 g or less of peanut protein (relative risk, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.3-2.8). Conclusions Basophil reactivity is associated with severity and basophil sensitivity is associated with the threshold of allergic reactions to peanut. CD63 peanut/anti-IgE and CD-sens values can be used to estimate the severity and threshold of allergic reactions during OFCs. PMID

  20. [Recipients adverse reactions: guidance supports].

    PubMed

    Bazin, A

    2010-12-01

    Since 1994, adverse effects of transfusion transmitted to the French haemovigilance network are registered on "e-fit", the database of the French agency for the safety of health products (Afssaps). In order to improve their analysis, guidance supports have been made by Afssaps working groups. Each support deals with a blood transfusion side effect and is composed of five parts including pathophysiological mechanisms, diagnostic criteria, management recommendations, etiologic investigations and rules of filing the notification form on e-fit. The major characteristics of sheets published or soon-to-be published are presented: transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection, non-haemolytic febrile reaction, allergic reaction, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, hypotensive transfusion reaction, alloimmunization, erythrocyte incompatibility reaction and hemosiderosis. These new supports give relevant guidelines allowing a better analysis and evaluation of recipients' adverse reactions, particularly their diagnosis, gravity and accountability. They could also initiate studies in European and international haemovigilance and transfusion networks. PMID:21051267

  1. Pre-exposure to sulfur dioxide attenuates most allergic reactions upon trimellitic anhydride challenge in sensitized Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Arts, Josje H E; Jacobs, Erik J; Kuper, C Frieke

    2010-02-01

    Irritant-induced inflammation of the airways may aggravate respiratory allergy induced by chemical respiratory allergens. Therefore, it was studied whether airway irritation by sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) would enhance respiratory allergic reactions to trimellitic anhydride (TMA), using a rat model. Brown Norway (BN) rats were topically sensitized, subsequently exposed for a single time or repeatedly to 300 ppm SO(2), and challenged by inhalation to a distinctly irritating or minimally irritating concentration of TMA after the (last) SO(2) exposure. Repeated exposure to SO(2) alone reduced breathing frequency during exposure, and caused epithelial alterations including hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia, and infiltration of polymorphonuclear inflammatory cells into nasal tissues, larynx, trachea, and bronchi/bronchioli. Histopathological changes were less prominent after 1 day of SO(2) exposure. Repeated pre-exposure to SO(2) reduced the number of TMA-induced apnoeas, in an SO(2) exposure duration-dependent manner. This effect of SO(2) on TMA-induced functional allergic reactions (apnoeas) was distinct only when the TMA challenge concentration was not too irritating itself. Repeated pre-exposure to SO(2) reduced TMA-induced laryngeal ulceration, goblet-cell hyperplasia, and inflammation in the lungs in most animals, regardless of the TMA challenge concentration. The SO(2)-induced replacement of normal respiratory epithelium by less sensitive, squamous epithelium may offer an explanation for the, unexpected, reduced allergic manifestation. However in a few animals, SO(2) appeared to facilitate TMA-induced irritation, probably due to incomplete protection. Overall, SO(2) exposure of TMA-sensitized rats reduced TMA-related allergic respiratory responses in most animals. PMID:20067440

  2. Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... might be the red blood cells, platelets or plasma . Rarely is whole blood (red cells, plasma, platelets, and white cells) used for a transfusion. ... of other blood components, such as platelets and plasma , may take less time. After the transfusion, you ...

  3. New roles for mast cells in modulating allergic reactions and immunity against pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Alison M; Abraham, Soman N

    2009-12-01

    Mast cells (MCs) have primarily been associated with mediating the pathological secondary responses to allergens in sensitized hosts. In view of the recent evidence for a MC role in modulating primary immune responses to pathogens, the likelihood for a role of MCs in influencing primary immune response to allergens has grown. New evidence suggests that MCs drive the development of Th2 responses to allergens, particularly when allergen exposure occurs concomitantly with exposure to pathogen products present in the environment. These new roles for MCs in allergy and infection suggest additional drug targets to prevent the development of allergic disease and allergic exacerbations of established disease. PMID:19828301

  4. Contribution of endothelial selectins and alpha 4 integrins to eosinophil trafficking in allergic and nonallergic inflammatory reactions in skin.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, M M; Hellewell, P G

    1998-09-01

    The role of endothelial selectins in mediating eosinophil recruitment was assessed using the trafficking of 111In-labeled blood eosinophils in mouse skin. An intradermal injection of chemoattractants (leukotriene B4, macrophage inflammatory protein-l alpha, and eotaxin) resulted in a rapid accumulation of 111In eosinophils that was reduced 49 to 91% by anti-P-selectin mAb. An anti-E-selectin mAb was ineffective, although a combined E- and P-selectin blockade resulted in >95% inhibition of all responses. The accumulation of a pulse of 111In eosinophils at sites of active cutaneous anaphylaxis (ACA) at 4 to 8 h and at 20 to 24 h after Ag challenge was completely dependent upon E- and P-selectin in combination, but not in isolation. In contrast, at 20 to 24 h after Ag challenge in a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction in skin, 111In eosinophil accumulation was largely independent of endothelial selectins, even when L-selectin was also blocked. An anti-alpha 4 integrin mAb significantly reduced 111In eosinophil trafficking in both allergic reactions but was slightly more effective in the DTH reaction compared with the ACA reaction. These results show that P-selectin and to a lesser extent E-selectin mediate eosinophil recruitment in skin in acute inflammatory reactions. In allergic, late-onset inflammatory reactions, neither P- nor E-selectin alone are sufficient to mediate eosinophil accumulation; when combined, they are essential for trafficking in ACA but are less important in the DTH reaction. Whether alpha 4 integrin-based strategies will be more effective than selectin-based strategies at inhibiting eosinophil recruitment in human disease remains to be determined. PMID:9725251

  5. Allergic Reaction to Drugs—A Survey on Hospital Practices of Soliciting Medical Information from Newly Admitted Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Don Harper

    1964-01-01

    The matter of allergic reaction to drugs is causing serious medicolegal problems in hospitals to both physicians and hospitals. This survey seeks to alert the medical profession and hospitals to the problem, what is being done to cope with it in some hospitals, and to emphasize that the duty to make necessary inquiries belongs primarily to the medical profession. The form described at the end of this report is a suggestion and is not intended to be reproduced and used in all instances. The medical staff and administration of each hospital should develop a form that is appropriate for its use. PMID:14179533

  6. Effects of Sohamhyoong-Tang on Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Reaction in BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Jo, So Hyun; Lee, Yun Jung; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub; Kim, Dae Ki; Park, Min Cheol

    2016-01-01

    IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation and excessive Th2 cells activation are major features of various allergic diseases. Sohamhyoong-tang has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of Sohamhyoong-tang extract (SHHTE) on allergic symptoms and inflammatory responses in ovalbumin- (OVA-) sensitized BALB/c mice. The mice were sensitized with OVA and alum at 2-week intervals and then orally given SHHTE for 13 days followed by intradermal OVA injection. Administration of SHHTE significantly reduced edema formation and inflammatory-cell infiltration in ear tissues. Total and OVA-specific IgEs as well as proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α and Th2-associated cytokine IL-4 levels were lower in the SHHTE-treated group than in the vehicle. SHHTE treatment significantly suppressed both mRNA and protein levels of IL-4 and IL-5 in OVA-stimulated splenocytes. SHHTE decreased Th1 (IFN-γ) and Th17 (IL-17a) cytokine mRNA expression but increased Treg cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β1). Moreover, SHHTE significantly inhibited degranulation of RBL-2H3 cell line in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, SHHTE efficiently inhibited the allergic symptoms in an OVA-sensitized mouse model and its action may correlate with the suppression of IgE production by increasing IL-10 and TGF-β1, which can limit the function of other T helper cells and prevent the release of inflammatory mediators from mast cells. These results suggest that SHHTE could be a therapeutic agent for treating various allergic diseases. PMID:27403198

  7. Effects of Sohamhyoong-Tang on Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Reaction in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jo, So Hyun; Lee, Yun Jung; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub; Kim, Dae Ki; Park, Min Cheol

    2016-01-01

    IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation and excessive Th2 cells activation are major features of various allergic diseases. Sohamhyoong-tang has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of Sohamhyoong-tang extract (SHHTE) on allergic symptoms and inflammatory responses in ovalbumin- (OVA-) sensitized BALB/c mice. The mice were sensitized with OVA and alum at 2-week intervals and then orally given SHHTE for 13 days followed by intradermal OVA injection. Administration of SHHTE significantly reduced edema formation and inflammatory-cell infiltration in ear tissues. Total and OVA-specific IgEs as well as proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α and Th2-associated cytokine IL-4 levels were lower in the SHHTE-treated group than in the vehicle. SHHTE treatment significantly suppressed both mRNA and protein levels of IL-4 and IL-5 in OVA-stimulated splenocytes. SHHTE decreased Th1 (IFN-γ) and Th17 (IL-17a) cytokine mRNA expression but increased Treg cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β1). Moreover, SHHTE significantly inhibited degranulation of RBL-2H3 cell line in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, SHHTE efficiently inhibited the allergic symptoms in an OVA-sensitized mouse model and its action may correlate with the suppression of IgE production by increasing IL-10 and TGF-β1, which can limit the function of other T helper cells and prevent the release of inflammatory mediators from mast cells. These results suggest that SHHTE could be a therapeutic agent for treating various allergic diseases. PMID:27403198

  8. Possible Risks of Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... transfusions are done Possible risks of blood transfusions Alternatives to blood transfusions Donating blood Blood donation by cancer survivors To ... Topic How blood transfusions are done Next Topic Alternatives to blood transfusions Possible risks of blood transfusions Although blood transfusions ...

  9. Contemporary issues in food allergy: seafood toxin-induced disease in the differential diagnosis of allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Chegini, Soheil; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2005-01-01

    Seafood, including fish, shrimp, lobster, crab, crayfish, mussel, and clam are among the most frequent causes of food allergy. Seafood poisoning, including reactions to natural toxins, frequently masquerades as an allergic reaction on presentation. Ingestion of contaminated shellfish results in a wide variety of symptoms, depending on the toxins present, their concentrations in the shellfish, and the amount of contaminated shellfish consumed. Five types of shellfish poisoning have been identified clearly including paralytic, neurotoxic, diarrhetic, amnestic, and azaspiracid shellfish poisonings. Based on the presence or absence of the toxin at the time of capture, fish poisoning can be considered conceptually in two categories. In ciguatera and puffer fish poisoning, the toxin is present in live fish, whereas in scombroid, it is produced only after capture, in the fish flesh, by contaminating bacteria because of improper refrigeration. Most shellfish-associated illness is infectious in nature (bacterial or viral), with the Norwalk virus accounting for most cases of gastroenteritis. PMID:16119031

  10. Problems of multiple transfusions.

    PubMed

    GARDNER, F H

    1958-02-01

    The use of blood infusion in large amounts is increasing sharply. Increased knowledge of blood group antigens has alerted physicians to the possible hazards of hemolytic reactions to subgroups that must be eliminated by proper cross-matching techniques. Multiple transfusions of preserved blood often defeat their purpose in control of bleeding, for thrombocytopenia is enhanced. Careful selection of blood or preparations of plasma concentrates offer increased protection to the recipient.Plastic bag equipment increases the yield of viable platelets and keeps blood in usable condition for longer periods of storage. The use of multiple transfusions has complicated the selection of preserved blood to control pigment metabolism. PMID:13500210

  11. Reducing Non-Infectious Risks of Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.; Gropper, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary As screening for transfusion-associated infections has improved, non-infectious complications of transfusion now cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the United States. For example, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and hemolytic transfusion-reactions are the first, second, and third leading causes of death from transfusion respectively. These complications and others are reviewed here and several controversial methods for prevention of non-infectious complications of transfusion are discussed; universal leukoreduction of red cell units, use of male-only plasma, and restriction of red cell storage age. PMID:21792054

  12. Non Infectious Complications Related to Blood Transfusion: An 11 year Retrospective Analysis in a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Philip, J; Pawar, A; Chatterjee, T; Mallhi, R S; Biswas, A K; Dimri, U

    2016-09-01

    In India transmission of transfusion transmissible infections (TTI) has shown a relative decrease as a result of mandatory screening of donated blood for TTI's. However, reducing the incidence of non infectious complications poses a major challenge, mainly due to the fact that a number of adverse reactions go unreported. Blood transfusion reaction, can be categorized based on the time interval between transfusion of blood products and the presentation of adverse reactions as acute i.e. those presenting during or within 24 h and as delayed i.e. those presenting anytime after 24 h. Transfusion reactions can further be classified as immune and non immune or infectious and non infectious based on the pathophysiology. In this retrospective study which was undertaken with an aim to determine the type and frequency of non infectious complications due to transfusion of blood and blood products recorded the incidence of febrile non hemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTR) 51.40 %, allergic reactions 40.14 %, non immune hemolytic reactions 4.22 %, hypothermia 2.81 %, anaphylaxis 0.70 % and iron overload 0.70 %. FNHTR which was found to be the most common complication in this study can certainly be minimized, if not completely eliminated by adopting a policy of universal leucodepletion, the implementation of which solely depends on the financial and infrastructure resources available. This study also reiterates the importance of hemovigilance as a tool to improve the safety of blood transfusion. PMID:27429521

  13. Pimecrolimus Is a Potent Inhibitor of Allergic Reactions to Hymenopteran Venom Extracts and Birch Pollen Allergen In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Heneberg, Petr; Riegerová, Kamila; Kučera, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Pimecrolimus (Elidel, SDZ ASM 981) is an anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory 33-epichloro-derivative of macrolactam ascomycin, with low potential for affecting systemic immune responses compared with other calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporin A and tacrolimus. Despite numerous studies focused on the mechanism of pimecrolimus action on mast cells, only the single report has addressed pimecrolimus effects on other typical FcεRI-expressing cells, the basophils. Patients allergic to birch pollen (n = 20), hymenopteran venoms (n = 23) and 10 non-allergic volunteers were examined. Primary human basophils pre-treated or not with 0.5-50 μMol pimecrolimus were exposed to various concentrations of recombinant Bet v 1a allergen, bee or wasp venom extracts and anti-IgE for 20 min, and then examined for the expression of CD45, CD193, CD203c, CD63 and CD164 using flow cytometry. The externalization of basophil activation markers (CD63 and CD164) was equally inhibited through pimecrolimus in cells activated by recombinant pollen allergen, hymenopteran venom extracts and anti-IgE. Although the individual response rate was subject to strong variation, importantly, pre-treatment with pimecrolimus lowered the number of activated basophils in response to any of the stimuli in the basophils from all patients. The inhibition was concentration-dependent; approximately half of the basophils were inhibited in the presence of 2.5 mMol pimecrolimus. Pimecrolimus is a valuable new tool for the inhibition of hyper-reactive basophils in patients with pollen allergy and a history of anaphylactic reactions to bee or wasp venoms. Further research should address short-term use of pimecrolimus in vivo in a wide spectrum of allergic diseases. PMID:26562153

  14. Pimecrolimus Is a Potent Inhibitor of Allergic Reactions to Hymenopteran Venom Extracts and Birch Pollen Allergen In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Heneberg, Petr; Riegerová, Kamila; Kučera, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Pimecrolimus (Elidel, SDZ ASM 981) is an anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory 33-epichloro-derivative of macrolactam ascomycin, with low potential for affecting systemic immune responses compared with other calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporin A and tacrolimus. Despite numerous studies focused on the mechanism of pimecrolimus action on mast cells, only the single report has addressed pimecrolimus effects on other typical FcεRI-expressing cells, the basophils. Patients allergic to birch pollen (n = 20), hymenopteran venoms (n = 23) and 10 non-allergic volunteers were examined. Primary human basophils pre-treated or not with 0.5–50 μMol pimecrolimus were exposed to various concentrations of recombinant Bet v 1a allergen, bee or wasp venom extracts and anti-IgE for 20 min, and then examined for the expression of CD45, CD193, CD203c, CD63 and CD164 using flow cytometry. The externalization of basophil activation markers (CD63 and CD164) was equally inhibited through pimecrolimus in cells activated by recombinant pollen allergen, hymenopteran venom extracts and anti-IgE. Although the individual response rate was subject to strong variation, importantly, pre-treatment with pimecrolimus lowered the number of activated basophils in response to any of the stimuli in the basophils from all patients. The inhibition was concentration-dependent; approximately half of the basophils were inhibited in the presence of 2.5 mMol pimecrolimus. Pimecrolimus is a valuable new tool for the inhibition of hyper-reactive basophils in patients with pollen allergy and a history of anaphylactic reactions to bee or wasp venoms. Further research should address short-term use of pimecrolimus in vivo in a wide spectrum of allergic diseases. PMID:26562153

  15. Transfusion issues in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Federici, Augusto B; Vanelli, Chiara; Arrigoni, Luisa

    2012-04-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) therapy plays a major role in the case of patients with cancer. Packed red blood cells (PRBC) are given for increased oxygen-carrying capacity, platelets concentrates (PC) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) for the cessation and prevention of bleeding due to thrombocytopenia and other defects of hemostasis associated with neoplasia. All these blood components can induce complications and/or adverse reactions in cancer patients including transfusion-associated graft versus host disease (TA-GVHD), transfusion transmitted diseases, alloimmunization to blood cell antigens, pulmonary decompensation, immunomodulation. Therefore, specific modifications such as leukocyte-reduction and irradiation of the blood components to be transfused in cancer patients should be introduced to reduce the risk of these complications. Patients undergoing hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation are a unique group and present complex concerns related to transfusion, including major and minor ABO incompatibility and chimeric blood cells. Therefore, transfusion for patients undergoing treatment with cellular therapies requires careful blood component selection. The process of HPC infusion itself carries many risks including DMSO toxicity and hemolytic reactions. In all areas of transfusion therapy, new advances such as pathogen inactivation and synthetic alternatives to blood components should help to increase the safety and tolerance of transfusion in cancer patients. PMID:22682136

  16. Transfusion reaction - hemolytic

    MedlinePlus

    ... way blood cells may be classified is by Rh factors. People who have Rh factors in their blood are called "Rh positive." People ... Rh negative." Rh negative people form antibodies against Rh factor if they receive Rh positive blood. There are ...

  17. The use of transfusion quality indicators as a tool for hemovigilance system implementation at a tertiary care center in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Hindawi, Salwa I.; Badawi, Maha A.; Raj, Edwin T.; Gholam, Kholoud A.; Al-Weail, Seraj O.; Azher, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To report 2-years experience of using transfusion-related quality indicators as a tool in hemovigilance system implementation. Methods: The study was carried out between 2012 and 2013. Blood transfusion service data were prospectively collected at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Donor reactions, transfusion reactions, fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in-date wastage, incidents, and errors pertaining to orders, or requests were collected quarterly and prospectively and forwarded to the Hospital Transfusion Committee (HTC) for review. Results: Donor population consisted of 23,132 donors. One hundred and forty-eight donor reactions were reported, resulting in a rate of 0.6%. Eighty-four transfusion reactions were reported and most were allergic reactions (79.7%). Errors or incidents were reported with approximately 0.3% of the total number of submitted samples/request forms. The FFP in-date wastage was 21.3% of the total FFP wastage. The HTC regularly reviewed the hemovigilance data and reporting; and safety improvements were implemented. Conclusion: The use of quality indicators as a tool for developing and implementing a hemovigilance system provided a better understanding of improvement areas for continuous progress in quality and safety, and is expected to enhance these features along the blood transfusion chain. PMID:27146617

  18. Allergic rhinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic to, such as dust, animal dander, or pollen. Symptoms can also occur when you eat a ... article focuses on allergic rhinitis due to plant pollens. This type of allergic rhinitis is commonly called ...

  19. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Roberts, George H

    2004-01-01

    Transfusion is an inevitable event in the life of many individuals. Transfusion medicine personnel attempt to provide blood products that will result in a safe and harmless transfusion. However, this is not always possible since no laboratory test gives totally accurate and reliable results all the time and testing in routine transfusion services is devoted primarily to the identification of red blood cell problems. Thus, when patients are transfused, several possible adverse effects may occur in the transfused patient even though quality testing indicates no potential problem. These adverse events include infectious complications, hemolytic reactions, anaphylaxis, urticaria, circulatory overload, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, chills and fever, immunomodulation, and transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). PMID:15314887

  20. [Safer and more appropriate blood transfusion therapy].

    PubMed

    Handa, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    The risks associated with transfusion with blood components have been greatly reduced due to the implementation of innovative strategies for donor selection and testing, as well as safety measures such as universal prestorage leukocyte reduction. However, a variety of residual or unsolved risks, such as severe acute reaction of transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload and transfusion-transmitted infections, remain. Patients with hematological disorders are at high risk, since they receive therapeutic interventions frequently requiring transfusion. Thereby, balancing risk and benefit for patients, hematologists should prescribe blood components through evidence-based decision-making, minimize unnecessary transfusions and then conduct safe and error-free transfusion with a standard procedure involving the transfusion process at the bedside. PMID:26458457

  1. TSLP induces mast cell development and aggravates allergic reactions through the activation of MDM2 and STAT6.

    PubMed

    Han, Na-Ra; Oh, Hyun-A; Nam, Sun-Young; Moon, Phil-Dong; Kim, Do-Won; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2014-10-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is known to promote T helper type 2 cell-associated inflammation. Mast cells are major effector cells in allergic inflammatory responses. We noted that the population and maturation of mast cells were reduced in TSLP-deficient mice (TSLP-/-). Thus, we hypothesized that TSLP might affect mast cell development. We found that TSLP induced the proliferation and differentiation of mast cells from bone marrow progenitors. TSLP-induced mast cell proliferation was abolished by depletion of mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 6 (STAT6), as an upstream activator of MDM2. TSLP-/-, in particular, had a considerable deficit in the expression of MDM2 and STAT6. Also, the TSLP deficiency attenuated mast cell-mediated allergic reactions through the downregulation of STAT6 and MDM2. In an antibody microarray chip analysis, MDM2 expression was increased in atopic dermatitis patients. These observations indicate that TSLP is a factor for mast cell development, and that it aggravates mast cell-mediated immune responses. PMID:24751726

  2. Contribution of Basophils to Cutaneous Immune Reactions and Th2-Mediated Allergic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Atsushi; Kabashima, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Basophils are potent effector cells of innate immunity and also play a role in T helper 2 (Th2)-mediated allergic responses. But, although their in vitro functions are well studied, their in vivo functions remain largely unknown. However, several mouse models of basophil depletion have recently been developed and used to investigate basophil functions. For example, in a croton oil-induced model of irritant contact dermatitis in conditionally basophil-depleted transgenic mice, we found that basophils rapidly infiltrate inflamed skin and subsequently induce infiltration of eosinophils. We also showed that basophils induce Th2 skewing upon epicutaneous sensitization with various haptens and peptide antigens. Intriguingly, basophils also promoted Th2 polarization upon protein antigen exposure in the presence of dendritic cells (DCs). The dermal DC subset associated with Th2 skewing was recently identified as CD301b+ DC. Such studies with basophil-deficient mouse models have significantly improved our understanding of the mechanisms involved in human immune-related diseases. In this review, we will focus on the relative contribution of basophils and DCs to Th2-mediated allergic responses. PMID:26284076

  3. [Prevention of ABO-incompatible transfusion].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2011-01-01

    "Identification error between patient and blood product" is the main cause of ABO-incompatible blood transfusion, but "Phlebotomy error" also has serious consequences. In order to prevent ABO-incompatible transfusion, it is important to establish a management system of blood transfusion in the hospital, including a hospital transfusion committee and a responsible medical doctor. In addition, in large hospitals routinely carrying out a considerable number of blood transfusions, it is important to employ specialists in blood banking. More than 50 ml of ABO-incompatible blood transfusion (major ABO mismatch) causes a severe acute hemolytic reaction. Because there is little residual plasma in leukocyte-reduced red cell concentrate (RCC-LR), acute hemolysis is not detected on minor ABO mismatch blood transfusion. In the case of emergent blood transfusion, concerning the risk of acute hemolytic reaction, type-O RCC-LR blood transfusion is safer than ABO-identical RCC-LR when the blood of the patient is tested only once. When red cell antibody screening is not performed, there is a risk of hemolysis due to incompatible blood transfusion irrespective of the ABO blood group system, including a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction. PMID:21348250

  4. Adverse events related to blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Sandeep; Hemlata; Verma, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    The acute blood transfusion reactions are responsible for causing most serious adverse events. Awareness about various clinical features of acute and delayed transfusion reactions with an ability to assess the serious reactions on time can lead to a better prognosis. Evidence-based medicine has changed today's scenario of clinical practice to decrease adverse transfusion reactions. New evidence-based algorithms of transfusion and improved haemovigilance lead to avoidance of unnecessary transfusions perioperatively. The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging. The unnecessary blood transfusions can be avoided with better blood conservation techniques during surgery and with anaesthesia techniques that reduce blood loss. Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels. With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs), selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided. PMID:25535415

  5. Allergic reactions to iodinated contrast media: premedication considerations for patients at risk.

    PubMed

    Schopp, Jennifer G; Iyer, Ramesh S; Wang, Carolyn L; Petscavage, Jonelle M; Paladin, Angelisa M; Bush, William H; Dighe, Manjiri K

    2013-08-01

    The objectives of this article are to review allergy-type reactions to iodinated contrast media and the protocols utilized to prevent or reduce the occurrence of these adverse reactions in high-risk patients. We will begin by discussing the types or classifications of the adverse reactions to iodinated contrast media. We will then discuss reaction mechanisms, identify the patients at highest risk for adverse reactions, and clarify common misperceptions about the risk. Finally, we will discuss the actions of the medications used to help reduce or prevent allergy-type reactions to iodinated contrast media, the protocols used to help reduce or prevent contrast reactions in high-risk patients, and the potential side effects of these medications. We will also discuss the high-risk patient who has received premedication due to a prior index reaction and discuss the risk of having a subsequent reaction, termed "breakthrough reaction." Identifying patient at high risk for an "allergy-type" reaction to contrast media is an essential task of the radiologist. Prevention of or reduction of the risk of an adverse reaction is critical to patient safety. If an examination can be performed without contrast in a patient at high risk for an allergy-type reaction, it may be appropriate to avoid contrast. However, there are situations where contrast media is necessary, and the radiologist plays a vital role in preventing or mitigating an allergy-type reaction. PMID:23430296

  6. [Immunoreaction and blood transfusion--chairmen's introductory remarks].

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Tsutomu; Matsushita, Tadashi

    2013-05-01

    Although blood transfusion is an extremely important therapeutic procedure that usually proceeds without complications, there are some risks associated with donated blood. Investigations into the causes of transfusion reactions and their prevention are important issues for transfusion therapy. In addition to nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT) for infectious diseases and the irradiation of blood to prevent post-transfusion GVHD, prestorage leukocyte reduction and diversion of the first part of the donation of blood were recently introduced into transfusion therapy. This symposium, entitled "Immunoreaction and blood transfusion", reviewed the immune responses associated with blood transfusion, which is probably the most frequent medical procedure performed in allogeneic organ transplantation, with four themes provided by the four featured invited speakers: transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, transfusion-transmitted infectious disease surveillance, and transfusion-related immunomodulation. PMID:23947177

  7. Modification of the late asthmatic reaction by hyposensitization in asthmatic children allergic to house dust mite (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus) or grass pollen.

    PubMed

    Van Bever, H P; Bosmans, J; De Clerck, L S; Stevens, W J

    1988-07-01

    The frequency and severity of the late asthmatic reaction (LAR) was studied in asthmatic children allergic to house dust mite (HDM) or grass pollen (GP) with and without hyposensitization (HS). The four groups were comparable according to their severity of asthma. All children were allergic to HDM (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus) or GP according to history, skin testing and specific IgE determination via the RAST. The LAR occurred less frequently (29% versus 73%) (P less than 0.001) and was less severe in children receiving HS. The difference was significant between the children allergic to HDM as well as between children allergic to GP. The immediate asthmatic reaction (IAR) was also less severe in children allergic to HDM who received HS, compared to those who never received HS, (P = 0.033) although the PD20 of the HDM challenge (PD20HDM) was not different between the two groups. In children allergic to GP, there was no difference in PD20 of the GP challenge (PD20GP) or in severity of the IAR, whether the children received HS or not. There was no difference between the PD20HDM in patients who developed a LAR and in patients who did not. There was no relation between the type of asthmatic reaction following the allergen provocation test and the level of circulating immune complexes (CIC) and the level of house dust mite-specific IgG (IgGHDM) or grass pollen-specific IgE (IgGGP) in the different groups, determined before the challenge. There was a decrease in the level of IgG containing CIC (IgGCIC) during the LAR. It is concluded that the LAR occurs less frequently and is less severe in asthmatic children who receive HS. PMID:3414914

  8. The hazards of blood transfusion in historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Harvey G.

    2008-01-01

    The beginning of the modern era of blood transfusion coincided with World War II and the resultant need for massive blood replacement. Soon thereafter, the hazards of transfusion, particularly hepatitis and hemolytic transfusion reactions, became increasingly evident. The past half century has seen the near eradication of transfusion-associated hepatitis as well as the emergence of multiple new pathogens, most notably HIV. Specific donor screening assays and other interventions have minimized, but not eliminated, infectious disease transmission. Other transfusion hazards persist, including human error resulting in the inadvertent transfusion of incompatible blood, acute and delayed transfusion reactions, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), and transfusion-induced immunomodulation. These infectious and noninfectious hazards are reviewed briefly in the context of their historical evolution. PMID:18809775

  9. [Syphilis and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Serrano, J

    1991-06-01

    Along 17 years (1973-1989), syphilis screening has been performed on 146,355 blood units in the author's blood bank. A total number of 143 positive results (confirmed by MHA-TP) was registered, which means an incidence of 0.097%. Of the total number of blood units, 31,529 came from professional donors, 51 of them (0.16%) being positive, while of the 114,826 blood units from voluntary donors 92 were positive (0.08%). With respect to voluntary donations, the highest incidence of positive reactions was found between 1980 and 1982, but this period registered also the highest number of blood units studied. Along this 17 year period 8 patients have received blood products with positive syphilis test. They were transfused on urgent request with fresh blood or platelet concentrates, the transfusion being performed before knowing the results of the screening for syphilis. No special measures were taken in 2 such cases, who died shortly after the transfusion on account of their disease. Two other were treated with penicillin at the time of transfusion. The remaining four patients received preventive penicillin. Even taking into account that positive screening tests are uncommon amongst blood donors, and that only under special circumstances the patients receiving contaminated blood may develop the illness, it seems advisable for every blood bank to perform the screening for syphilis on every blood donation. PMID:1948541

  10. Transfusion medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, K.; Peetoom, F.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain 24 selections, including papers presented at the conference of American Red Cross held in May 1985, on the Subject of transfusion medicine. Some of the titles are: Fluosol/sup R/-DA in Radiation Therapy; Expression of Cloned Human Factor VIII and the Molecular Basis of Gene Defects that Cause Hemophilia; DNA-Probing Assay in the Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Genome in Human Peripheral Blood Cells; and Monoclonal Antibodies: Convergence of Technology and Application.

  11. Evaluation of Risk Minimisation Measures for Blood Components – Based on Reporting Rates of Transfusion-Transmitted Reactions (1997-2013)

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Markus B.; Heiden, Margarethe; Volkers, Peter; Lohmann, Annette; Keller-Stanislawski, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background To assess the impact of safety measures, we compared reporting rates of transfusion-related reactions before and after the implementation of six measures in 1999, 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2009. Methods Reporting rates of transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection (TTBI), viral infection (TTVI) and immune-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) were calculated on the basis of confirmed annual reports and distributed blood components. Results The introduction of HCV NAT testing caused a significant reduction of HCV reporting rate from 1:0.6 to 1:83.16 million administered blood components (p < 0.0001), donor screening for antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen caused a reduction of HBV reporting rate from 1:2.90 to 1:10.70 million units (p = 0.0168). A significant reduction from 1:0.094 to 1:2.42 million fresh frozen plasma (FFP) units could also be achieved by risk minimisation TRALI measures (p < 0.0001). Implementation of pre-donation sampling did not result in a significant decrease in TTBI, whereas limitation of shelf life for platelet concentrate (PC) minimised the TTBI reporting rate from 1:0.088 to 1:0.19 million PC units (p = 0.041). For HIV NAT pool testing, no significant reduction in HIV transmission was found due to very low reporting rates (1:10 million versus 1:27 million blood components, p = 0.422). Conclusion On the basis of haemovigilance data, a significant benefit could be demonstrated for four of six implemented safety measures. PMID:26557816

  12. Allergic reactions due to glove-lubricant-powder in health-care workers.

    PubMed

    Crippa, M; Pasolini, G

    1997-01-01

    Eight glove-wearing hospital personnel were evaluated for suspected type I-like allergic manifestations due to corn-starch powder. All subjects were clinically examined, the presence of atopy was assessed by administration of a questionnaire, the on-off test was verified (the clinical feature behavior was verified with regard to the beginning and the cessation of the work shift), levels of specific serum IgE for maize and latex were measured, and prick tests for the same allergens were performed. The on-off test was positive for everyone. The symptom associated with glove use was urticaria, which was also associated in one case with intermittent dyspnea and in another with oculorhinitis, angioedema, and asthma. Five workers were atopic. The serum IgE test found three positive responses to maize, three positive responses to both latex and maize, and two negative responses to both. However, in the two patients testing negative to IgE, the prick tests were positive: one for maize and the other for both maize and latex. All workers evaded further relapses by avoiding exposure to powdered gloves. There is general agreement that corn-starch powder may cause irritant dermatitis and that it may be a vehicle for other allergens. This study seems to suggest that corn-starch powder may act as a type I allergen itself. Further studies on a larger number of subjects and further research on the chemical properties of corn-starch powder, in particular on its protein content, are needed to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:9439986

  13. Modulation of neurological related allergic reaction in mice exposed to low-level toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Tin-Tin-Win-Shwe; Yamamoto, Shoji; Nakajima, Daisuke; Furuyama, Akiko; Fukushima, Atsushi; Ahmed, Sohel; Goto, Sumio; Fujimaki, Hidekazu . E-mail: fujimaki@nies.go.jp

    2007-07-01

    The contributing role of indoor air pollution to the development of allergic disease has become increasingly evident in public health problems. It has been reported that extensive communication exists between neurons and immune cells, and neurotrophins are molecules potentially responsible for regulating and controlling this neuroimmune crosstalk. The adverse effects of volatile organic compounds which are main indoor pollutants on induction or augmentation of neuroimmune interaction have not been fully characterized yet. To investigate the effects of low-level toluene inhalation on the airway inflammatory responses, male C3H mice were exposed to filtered air (control), 9 ppm, and 90 ppm toluene for 30 min by nose-only inhalation on Days 0, 1, 2, 7, 14, 21, and 28. Some groups of mice were injected with ovalbumin intraperitoneally before starting exposure schedule and these mice were then challenged with aerosolized ovalbumin as booster dose. For analysis of airway inflammation, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were collected to determine inflammatory cell influx and lung tissue and blood samples were collected to determine cytokine and neurotrophin mRNA and protein expressions and plasma antibody titers using real-time RT-PCR and ELISA methods respectively. Exposure of the ovalbumin-immunized mice to low-level toluene resulted in (1) increased inflammatory cells infiltration in BAL fluid; (2) increased IL-5 mRNA, decreased nerve growth factor receptor tropomyosin-related kinase A and brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNAs in lung; and (3) increased IgE and IgG{sub 1} antibodies and nerve growth factor content in the plasma. These findings suggest that low-level toluene exposure aggravates the airway inflammatory responses in ovalbumin-immunized mice by modulating neuroimmune crosstalk.

  14. [Genetic study of allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Luo

    2012-09-01

    Allergic diseases mentioned in this review is regarding to I type allergic inflammation induced by an IgE-mediated reaction, including asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis and food allergy. It is convinced that allergic diseases belong to multiple genes diseases and are controlled by both genetic and environmental factors. Meanwhile there exists gene-gene as well as gene-environment interactions during the development of the disease. The aim of this review is to summarize the toolkit, advance, inherent difficulties and future clinical application prospect in genetic studies of allergic disease. PMID:23214325

  15. Anti-Allergic Action of Aged Black Garlic Extract in RBL-2H3 Cells and Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis Reaction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jae-Myung; Sok, Dai-Eun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Garlic (Allium sativum) has been used as a food as well as a component of traditional medicine. Aged black garlic (ABG) is known to have various bioactivities. However, the effect of ABG on allergic response is almost unknown. In the present study, we investigated whether ABG can inhibit immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic response in RBL-2H3 cells as well as in vivo passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA). In in vitro tests, ethyl acetate extract (EBG) of ABG significantly inhibited the release of β-hexosaminidase (IC50, 1.53 mg/mL) and TNF-α (IC50, 0.98 mg/mL). Moreover, BG10, an active fraction of EBG, dramatically suppressed the release of β-hexosaminidase (IC50, 53.60 μg/mL) and TNF-α (IC50, 27.80 μg/mL). In addition, BG10 completely blocked the formation of prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4 at ≥25 μg/mL. When the effect of BG10 on FcɛRI receptor cascade was investigated, BG10 significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of Syk, but not Lyn. Furthermore, BG10 dose dependently decreased the phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) as well as the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Consistent with what has been mentioned earlier, BG10 also significantly inhibited the PCA reaction in mice. In conclusion, these results indicate that ABG suppresses the allergic response, and the mechanism for its anti-allergic action may involve suppressions of Syk, cPLA2, 5-LO, and COX-2. The anti-allergic actions of ABG, EBG, or BG10 suggest that they may be useful as functional foods for allergic diseases. PMID:24456359

  16. Anti-allergic action of aged black garlic extract in RBL-2H3 cells and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae-Myung; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2014-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) has been used as a food as well as a component of traditional medicine. Aged black garlic (ABG) is known to have various bioactivities. However, the effect of ABG on allergic response is almost unknown. In the present study, we investigated whether ABG can inhibit immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic response in RBL-2H3 cells as well as in vivo passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA). In in vitro tests, ethyl acetate extract (EBG) of ABG significantly inhibited the release of β-hexosaminidase (IC₅₀, 1.53 mg/mL) and TNF-α (IC₅₀, 0.98 mg/mL). Moreover, BG10, an active fraction of EBG, dramatically suppressed the release of β-hexosaminidase (IC₅₀, 53.60 μg/mL) and TNF-α (IC₅₀, 27.80 μg/mL). In addition, BG10 completely blocked the formation of prostaglandin E₂ and leukotriene B₄ at ≥25 μg/mL. When the effect of BG10 on FcɛRI receptor cascade was investigated, BG10 significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of Syk, but not Lyn. Furthermore, BG10 dose dependently decreased the phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A₂ (cPLA₂) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) as well as the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Consistent with what has been mentioned earlier, BG10 also significantly inhibited the PCA reaction in mice. In conclusion, these results indicate that ABG suppresses the allergic response, and the mechanism for its anti-allergic action may involve suppressions of Syk, cPLA₂, 5-LO, and COX-2. The anti-allergic actions of ABG, EBG, or BG10 suggest that they may be useful as functional foods for allergic diseases. PMID:24456359

  17. Retrosternal mass: An interesting allergic reaction to intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Motamed, Mohammad Reza; Aghaei, Mahboubeh; Badi, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is an important cause of disability and death worldwide, with the majority of strokes occurring in older people. Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA) is the approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke. A major concern of physicians, who treat acute ischemic stroke with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA,) is the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. However, other adverse reactions, including anaphylaxis and angioedema, can also occur. Here we report an interesting soft tissue reaction to intravenous r-TPA in an 80 year-old male who was treated for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:24250917

  18. Retrosternal mass: An interesting allergic reaction to intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Motamed, Mohammad Reza; Aghaei, Mahboubeh; Badi, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is an important cause of disability and death worldwide, with the majority of strokes occurring in older people. Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA) is the approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke. A major concern of physicians, who treat acute ischemic stroke with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA,) is the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. However, other adverse reactions, including anaphylaxis and angioedema, can also occur. Here we report an interesting soft tissue reaction to intravenous r-TPA in an 80 year-old male who was treated for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:24250917

  19. Allergic Conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... water. This is called conjunctivitis, also known as “pink eye.” Causes & Risk Factors What causes allergic conjunctivitis? ... example, if you are allergic to pollen or mold, stay indoors when pollen and mold levels are ...

  20. Immunological complications of blood transfusions.

    PubMed

    Brand, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Most adverse blood transfusion (BT) events are immune-mediated and in the majority of severe reactions antibodies can be identified as causal factors. Alloimmunization not only causes symptomatic reactions, transfused cells can also be (silently) destroyed. Immunization by BT can contribute to hemolytic disease of the newborn as well as to allograft rejection after transplantation. Reversely, pregnancy and transplantation may evoke immunity hampering transfusion therapy. Besides causing mortality and morbidity, alloimmunization has a huge economic impact. Transfusion reactions prolong hospital stay, require diagnostic tests and complex donor selection procedures and create the need for typed donor registries. In the 1970s, Opeltz and colleagues described that pre-transplantation BT impaired rejection of renal transplants. Leukocytes were essential for this immunosuppressive BT effect that raised concern about negative effects on cancer growth and resistance against infections. Studies on the mechanism were however preliminary abandoned when calcineurin inhibitors for prevention of graft rejection became available and since all blood products underwent leukoreduction in most countries as precautionary measure against transmission of variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease. Whether current leukoreduced BT are immunosuppressive and for which patients or circumstances this may contribute to worse outcome, is unknown. The last decades of the previous century, leukoreduction of cellular blood products for leukemia patients significantly reduced the incidence of immunological platelet transfusion refractoriness. The first decade of this century the avoidance of plasma- and platelet-products from females, that may contain donor-derived leukocyte antibodies, decreased transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) by more than 30%. These were major achievements. Challenge for the near future is to further reduce alloimmunization in particular against red blood cells (RBC) as a

  1. Respiratory Allergic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Woloski, Jason Raymond; Heston, Skye; Escobedo Calderon, Sheyla Pamela

    2016-09-01

    Allergic asthma refers to a chronic reversible bronchoconstriction influenced by an allergic trigger, leading to symptoms of cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is a complex hypersensitivity reaction, often in patients with asthma or cystic fibrosis, occurring when bronchi become colonized by Aspergillus species. The clinical picture is dominated by asthma complicated by recurrent episodes of bronchial obstruction, fever, malaise, mucus production, and peripheral blood eosinophilia. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a syndrome associated with lung inflammation from the inhalation of airborne antigens, such as molds and dust. PMID:27545731

  2. Allergic host defences.

    PubMed

    Palm, Noah W; Rosenstein, Rachel K; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2012-04-26

    Allergies are generally thought to be a detrimental outcome of a mistargeted immune response that evolved to provide immunity to macroparasites. Here we present arguments to suggest that allergic immunity has an important role in host defence against noxious environmental substances, including venoms, haematophagous fluids, environmental xenobiotics and irritants. We argue that appropriately targeted allergic reactions are beneficial, although they can become detrimental when excessive. Furthermore, we suggest that allergic hypersensitivity evolved to elicit anticipatory responses and to promote avoidance of suboptimal environments. PMID:22538607

  3. ALLERGIC REACTIONS CAUSED BY VENOM OF HYMENOPTEROUS STINGING INSECTS AND THE ROLE OF HEALTH CARE WORKERS.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, Raafat Zaher; Mohamad, Hanaa Mahmoud; Morsy, Ayman T A; Morsy, Tosson A

    2015-08-01

    The Hymenoptera are the third largest order of insects, comprising the sawflies, wasps, bees and ants. Worldwide, over 150,000 species are recognized, with many more remaining to be described. The name refers to the wings of the insects, but the original derivation is ambiguous. The Ancient Greek υμην (hymen) for membrane provides a pLusible etymology for the term because these insects have membranous wings. However, a key characteristic of this order is that the hind wings are connected to the fore wings by a series of hooks called hamuli. Thus, another plausible etymology involves, Hymen, the Ancient Greek god of marriage, as these insects have "married wings" in flight. Stinging insects and the medical risk associated with their venoms are complex topics, and presentation of information pertaining to them requires the use of technical terms. The most common reactions to these stings are transient pain and redness at the site lasting a few hours (local reaction), and exaggerated swelling lasting a few days (large local reaction). The most dangerous immediate reaction is anaphylaxis, which is potentially fatal. PMID:26485860

  4. Massive transfusion and massive transfusion protocol

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vijaya; Shetmahajan, Madhavi

    2014-01-01

    Haemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Rapid transfusion of large volumes of blood products is required in patients with haemorrhagic shock which may lead to a unique set of complications. Recently, protocol based management of these patients using massive transfusion protocol have shown improved outcomes. This section discusses in detail both management and complications of massive blood transfusion. PMID:25535421

  5. [Alternatives to allogenous blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Cernea, Daniela; Vlădoianu, Alice; Stoica, Maria; Novac, M; Berteanu, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Blood transfusion is usually meant to lower morbidity and mortality rates. Allogenous blood transfusion implies certain risks that can be avoided by autologous blood transfusions techniques including: preoperatory autologous blood donation, acute normovolemic hemodilution, intraoperatory and postoperatory blood salvage. Preoperatory blood donation and acute normovolemic hemodilution are used for planned interventions with an estimated blood loss higher than 20% of blood volume. These methods imply Erythropoietin and iron treatment. Intraoperatory and postoperatory blood salvage is performed by personnel trained in blood donation, handling and storage. Autologous blood transfusions are used for certain surgical procedures that commonly require transfusions: orthopedic surgery, radical prostatectomy, cardiovascular surgery, organ transplantation. An alternative to allogenous blood transfusion is the use of artificial oxygen transporters: human or animal hemoglobin solutions or pefluorocarbonate solutions. These solutions do not require cross reactions, do not carry diseases and are generally well tolerated and easily stored in the operating room, ambulance and other transport means. They have however a slight degree of toxicity. PMID:21495338

  6. [DRESS syndrome. Rare and potentially lethal allergic reaction to carbamazepine - a case report].

    PubMed

    Werber, A; Schiltenwolf, M; Barié, A

    2013-08-01

    A 64-year-old man with chronic low back pain had been treated with tramadol, meloxicam and metamizole for several years. Due to additional neuropathic pain in the lower extremities, the medication was complemented with carbamazepine. After 5 weeks of treatment, the patient developed maculopapulose exanthema and fever, followed by hepatitis, leukocytosis and eosinophilia. The patient was diagnosed with so-called DRESS (drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) syndrome, a severe anaphylactic reaction to carbamazepine treatment. Immunosuppressive therapy was complicated by an additional septic reaction. After recovery, the patient was referred to our clinic for a multimodal pain therapy. Fear, depressive episodes and fear-avoidance behavior were additional social factors responsible for the chronic pain syndrome of the patient. The previously diagnosed neuropathic pain syndrome cannot be verified. After appropriate modification of therapy, the patient's pain perception was significantly reduced, allowing for complete withdrawal of pain-relieving medication. This case report illustrates that merely pharmacological treatment of chronic pain syndromes bears only little prospect of success but increased risk of side effects. PMID:23761029

  7. Absorption of protein and protein fragments in the developing intestine: role in immunologic/allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Walker, W A

    1985-01-01

    An important adaptation of the gastrointestinal tract to the extrauterine environment is its development of a mucosal barrier against the penetration of proteins and protein fragments. To combat the potential danger of invasion across the mucosal barrier the newborn infant must develop within the lumen and on the luminal mucosal surface an elaborate system of defense mechanisms which act to control and maintain the epithelium as an impermeable barrier to the uptake of macromolecular antigens. As a result of a delay in the maturation of the mucosal barrier, newborn infants are particularly vulnerable to pathologic penetration by harmful intraluminal substances. The consequences of altered defense are susceptibility to infection and the potential for hypersensitivity reactions and the formation of immune complexes. With these reactions comes the potential for developing life-threatening diseases such as necrotizing enterocolitis, sepsis, and hepatitis. Fortunately, "nature" has provided a means for passively protecting the "vulnerable" newborn against the dangers of a deficient intestinal defense system, namely human milk. It is now increasingly apparent that human milk contains not only antibodies and viable leukocytes but many other substances that can interfere with bacterial colonization and prevent antigen penetration. PMID:3966050

  8. Transfusion medicine in small animal practice.

    PubMed

    Tocci, Lynel J

    2010-05-01

    Red blood cell transfusions in veterinary medicine have become increasingly more common and are an integral part of lifesaving and advanced treatment of the critically ill. Common situations involving transfusions are life-threatening anemia from acute hemorrhage or surgical blood loss, hemolysis from drugs or toxins, immune-mediated diseases, severe nonregenerative conditions, and neonatal isoerythrolysis. Although transfusions can be lifesaving, they are also associated with adverse events that can be life threatening. This article reviews the principles for pretransfusion blood typing and compatibility testing and the types of transfusion reactions that exist despite test performance. PMID:20471531

  9. Structure and stability of 2S albumin-type peanut allergens: implications for the severity of peanut allergic reactions

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Katrin; Schweimer, Kristian; Reese, Gerald; Randow, Stefanie; Suhr, Martin; Becker, Wolf-Meinhard; Vieths, Stefan; Rösch, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Resistance to proteolytic enzymes and heat is thought to be a prerequisite property of food allergens. Allergens from peanut (Arachis hypogaea) are the most frequent cause of fatal food allergic reactions. The allergenic 2S albumin Ara h 2 and the homologous minor allergen Ara h 6 were studied at the molecular level with regard to allergenic potency of native and protease-treated allergen. A high-resolution solution structure of the protease-resistant core of Ara h 6 was determined by NMR spectroscopy, and homology modelling was applied to generate an Ara h 2 structure. Ara h 2 appeared to be the more potent allergen, even though the two peanut allergens share substantial cross-reactivity. Both allergens contain cores that are highly resistant to proteolytic digestion and to temperatures of up to 100 °C. Even though IgE antibody-binding capacity was reduced by protease treatment, the mediator release from a functional equivalent of a mast cell or basophil, the humanized RBL (rat basophilic leukaemia) cell, demonstrated that this reduction in IgE antibody-binding capacity does not necessarily translate into reduced allergenic potency. Native Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 have virtually identical allergenic potency as compared with the allergens that were treated with digestive enzymes. The folds of the allergenic cores are virtually identical with each other and with the fold of the corresponding regions in the undigested proteins. The extreme immunological stability of the core structures of Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 provides an explanation for the persistence of the allergenic potency even after food processing. PMID:16372900

  10. Transfusion Practices Committee of a public blood bank network in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Ricardo Vilas Freire; Brener, Stela; Ferreira, Angela Melgaço; do Valle, Marcele Cunha Ribeiro; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to verify the performance of blood transfusion committees in transfusion services linked to the public blood bank network of the state of Minas Gerais. Methods A cross-sectional observational study was conducted between 2007 and 2008 using questionnaires and proficiency tests to evaluate the reporting and investigation of transfusion reactions comparing transfusion services with and without transfusion committees in the public transfusion services of the state of Minas Gerais. Results Nineteen of Hemominas own transfusion services and 207 that contracted the services of the foundation located in 178 municipalities were visited between 2007 and 2008. Established transfusion committees were present in 63.4% of the services visited. Transfusion incidents were reported by 53 (36.8%) transfusion services with transfusion committees and by eight (9.6%) without transfusion committees (p < 0.001) with 543 (97.5%) and 14 (2.5%) notifications, respectively. Of the reported transfusion incidents, 40 (75.5%) transfusion services with transfusion committees and only two (25%) of those without transfusion committees investigated the causes. Conclusion The incidence of notification and investigation of the causes of transfusion reactions was higher in transfusion services where a transfusion committee was present. Despite these results, the performance of these committees was found to be incipient and a better organization and more effective operation are required. PMID:23323064

  11. Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) haemovigilance and progress is improving transfusion safety

    PubMed Central

    Bolton-Maggs, Paula H B; Cohen, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) UK confidential haemovigilance reporting scheme began in 1996. Over the 16 years of reporting, the evidence gathered has prompted changes in transfusion practice from the selection and management of donors to changes in hospital practice, particularly better education and training. However, half or more reports relate to errors in the transfusion process despite the introduction of several measures to improve practice. Transfusion in the UK is very safe: 2·9 million components were issued in 2012, and very few deaths are related to transfusion. The risk of death from transfusion as estimated from SHOT data in 2012 is 1 in 322 580 components issued and for major morbidity, 1 in 21 413 components issued; the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection is much lower. Acute transfusion reactions and transfusion-associated circulatory overload carry the highest risk for morbidity and death. The high rate of participation in SHOT by National Health Service organizations, 99·5%, is encouraging. Despite the very useful information gained about transfusion reactions, the main risks remain human factors. The recommendations on reduction of errors through a ‘back to basics’ approach from the first annual SHOT report remain absolutely relevant today. PMID:24032719

  12. Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) haemovigilance and progress is improving transfusion safety.

    PubMed

    Bolton-Maggs, Paula H B; Cohen, Hannah

    2013-11-01

    The Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) UK confidential haemovigilance reporting scheme began in 1996. Over the 16 years of reporting, the evidence gathered has prompted changes in transfusion practice from the selection and management of donors to changes in hospital practice, particularly better education and training. However, half or more reports relate to errors in the transfusion process despite the introduction of several measures to improve practice. Transfusion in the UK is very safe: 2·9 million components were issued in 2012, and very few deaths are related to transfusion. The risk of death from transfusion as estimated from SHOT data in 2012 is 1 in 322,580 components issued and for major morbidity, 1 in 21,413 components issued; the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection is much lower. Acute transfusion reactions and transfusion-associated circulatory overload carry the highest risk for morbidity and death. The high rate of participation in SHOT by National Health Service organizations, 99·5%, is encouraging. Despite the very useful information gained about transfusion reactions, the main risks remain human factors. The recommendations on reduction of errors through a 'back to basics' approach from the first annual SHOT report remain absolutely relevant today. PMID:24032719

  13. Types of Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... January 2012 Previous Next Related Articles: Allergies and Dentistry Ensure You Have an Allergy-Free Dental Visit ... Terms and Conditions © 1996-2016 Academy of General Dentistry. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Serious Allergic Reactions (Anaphylaxis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... more of these body systems: skin digestive system respiratory system cardiovascular system For example, someone may feel tightness or closing in the throat (respiratory system) together with a fast heartbeat (cardiovascular system). Here ...

  15. A study for characterization of IgE-mediated cutaneous immediate and late-phase reactions in non-allergic domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Seals, Shanna L; Kearney, Michael; Del Piero, Fabio; Hammerberg, Bruce; Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M

    2014-05-15

    Immunoglobulin-E (IgE) mediated reactions can be induced by intradermal injection of anti-IgE antibodies in both humans and dogs. These reactions grossly and histologically mimic changes seen in naturally occurring allergic dermatitis in these species. Similar studies have not been conducted in the cat. Purified polyclonal rabbit-origin IgG specific for canine IgE (anti-IgE) and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) were injected intradermally in 7 non-allergic laboratory colony cats. Wheal measurements were obtained and biopsies collected before injection and at injection sites after 20 min, 6, 24, and 48 h. Injection of anti-IgE induced an immediate wheal response which was significantly larger than that seen after injection of rabbit IgG. Anti-IgE injected skin was also significantly thicker than IgG-injected skin. This corresponded with a significant increase in number of visibly degranulated mast cells in anti-IgE samples when compared to IgG samples. Injection of anti-IgE was associated with the rapid recruitment of inflammatory cells to the injected dermis. The number of inflammatory cells and mononuclear cells were significantly elevated after the injection of anti-IgE when compared to IgG-injected skin. Both eosinophils and neutrophils were significantly increased in anti-IgE samples relative to IgG, although neutrophils were only transiently increased. The high eosinophil and relatively low neutrophil cell counts in these samples were consistent with previously documented histologic features of naturally occurring feline allergic skin disease. Immunohistochemistry identified a significantly overall increased CD1a(+) cells after the intradermal injection of anti-IgE when compared to IgG and non-injected skin. CD3(+), CD8(+) and CD4(+) were also significantly increased overall in anti-IgE injected skin relative to IgG injected skin. These data document the gross and cellular response to injection of anti-IgE in the skin of healthy, non-allergic cats and support a

  16. A novel arctigenin-containing latex glove prevents latex allergy by inhibiting type I/IV allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Xin; Xue, Dan-Ting; Liu, Meng; Zhou, Zheng-Min; Shang, Jing

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed at developing a natural compound with anti-allergic effect and stability under latex glove manufacturing conditions and investigating whether its anti-allergic effect is maintained after its addition into the latex. The effects of nine natural compounds on growth of the RBL-2H3 cells and mouse primary spleen lymphocytes were determined using MTT assay. The compounds included glycyrrhizin, osthole, tetrandrine, tea polyphenol, catechin, arctigenin, oleanolic acid, baicalin and oxymatrine. An ELISA assay was used for the in vitro anti-type I/IV allergy screening; in this process β-hexosaminidase, histamine, and IL-4 released from RBL-2H3 cell lines and IFN-γ and IL-2 released from mouse primary spleen lymphocytes were taken as screening indices. The physical stability of eight natural compounds and the dissolubility of arctigenin, selected based on the in vitro pharnacodynamaic screening and the stability evaluation, were detected by HPLC. The in vivo pharmacodynamic confirmation of arctigenin and final latex product was evaluated with a passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) model and an allergen-specific skin response model. Nine natural compounds showed minor growth inhibition on RBL-2H3 cells and mouse primary spleen lymphocytes. Baicalin and arctigenin had the best anti-type I and IV allergic effects among the natural compounds based on the in vitro pharmacodynamic screening. Arctigenin and catechin had the best physical stability under different manufacturing conditions. Arctigenin was the selected for further evaluation and proven to have anti-type I and IV allergic effects in vivo in a dose-dependent manner. The final product of the arctigenin-containing latex glove had anti-type I and IV allergic effects in vivo which were mainly attributed to arctigenin as proved from the dissolubility results. Arctigenin showed anti-type I and IV allergic effects in vitro and in vivo, with a good stability under latex glove manufacturing conditions

  17. Types of Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially in the joints (knees, ankles, and elbows). Plasma Transfusions Plasma is the liquid part of your blood. It's ... or a severe infection, you may need a plasma transfusion. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: January 30, ...

  18. Think You're Allergic to Penicillin? Maybe Not

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_158759.html Think You're Allergic to Penicillin? Maybe Not Only a severe reaction that comes ... Many people who believe they're allergic to penicillin actually aren't, an allergist says. "Hypersensitivity reactions ...

  19. Allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Mygind, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a very frequent disease with a prevalence of 15-20%. Symptoms are most pronounced in young people while, for some unknown reason, the elderly become clinically hyposensitized. Pollen is the cause of seasonal allergic rhinitis, and house dust mite and animals are the main causes of perennial allergic rhinitis. Histamine is the main cause of sneezing and hypersecretion, while other mediators probably also play a role in nasal blockage. In polyposis, a local denervation is an important cause of vascular leakage, edema and polyp formation. Antihistamines have a positive effect on sneezing and hypersecretion, but not on blockage. As they have a quick onset of action they are useful in patients with mild and occasional symptoms. A nasal steroid is preferable in patients with persistent symptoms, since it is more effective on all nasal symptoms. Short-term use of a systemic steroid can be a valuable adjunct to topical treatment, especially in nasal polyposis, when there is a temporary failure of topical treatment in a blocked nose. A nasal vasoconstrictor can be added for short-term treatment, and an ipratropium spray can be beneficial in perennial non-allergic rhinitis, when watery secretion is the dominant symptom. Immunotherapy can be added in allergic rhinitis, when pharmacotherapy is insufficient. This chapter is based on the author's personal experience with allergic rhinitis, as a patient, a doctor and a researcher. Therefore, it is not a balanced review and the references will be highly selected as they largely consist of the author's own publications. As the text is mainly based on personal research, steroids are described in detail, while, with regard to immunotherapy, the reader is referred to another chapter. In addition to allergic rhinitis, nasal polyposis will be described. It was formerly believed to be an allergic disease, but we now know that it is not. However, with regard to histopathology and drug responsiveness this disease is

  20. Allergic rhinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your symptoms. Skin testing is the most common method of allergy testing. If your doctor determines you ... Others cause little or no sleepiness. Antihistamine nasal sprays work well for treating allergic rhinitis. Ask your ...

  1. Low Incidence of Hyperfibrinolysis and Thromboembolism in 195 Primary Liver Transplantations Transfused with Solvent/Detergent-Treated Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Haugaa, Håkon; Taraldsrud, Eli; Nyrerød, Hans Christian; Tønnessen, Tor Inge; Foss, Aksel; Solheim, Bjarte G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Liver transplantation regularly requires transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs), plasma, and platelets. Compared to fresh frozen plasma (FFP) from single blood donors, solvent/detergent-treated plasma (SD-plasma) pooled from several hundred blood donors has advantages with respect to pathogen reduction, standardized content of plasma proteins, and significantly reduced risk of transfusion related lung injury and allergic/immunologic adverse reactions. However, SD-plasma has been suspected to increase the incidence of hyperfibrinolysis and thromboembolic events. Study Design and Methods We investigated the transfusion practices, hyperfibrinolysis parameters, and thrombosis outcomes in 195 consecutive adult primary liver transplants in our center using SD-plasma (Octaplas) as the exclusive source of plasma. Results Perioperatively, median (interquartile range) 4 (1 to 9) RBC-units, 10 (4 to 18) plasma-bags, and 0 (0 to 2) platelet-units were transfused. Hyperfibrinolysis defined as LY30 ≤ 7.5% was detected in 12/138 thrombelastography-monitored patients (9%). These patients received significantly more RBCs, plasma, and platelets than did patients without hyperfibrinolysis. Thrombotic graft complications were observed in three patients (2%). Pulmonary embolism was not observed in any patient. Conclusion SD-plasma is a safe plasma product for liver transplant recipients, and the incidences of hyperfibrinolysis and thromboembolic events are not significantly different from those seen in centers using FFP. PMID:24415744

  2. Transfusion associated circulatory overload: a critical incident.

    PubMed

    Goodall, E

    2014-01-01

    Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) is a serious but under-recognised complication of blood transfusion. While the exact incidence rate is unknown the associated morbidity and mortality make this a transfusion reaction worthy of attention. This article provides details of a critical incident involving TACO followed by a literature review and discussion written from the perspective of a student ODP. The goal of this article is to raise awareness of TACO amongst hospital staff to facilitate faster recognition and earlier intervention in future events. PMID:24516967

  3. 2,4,6-Trihydroxy-alpha-p-methoxyphenylacetophenone (Compound D-58) is a potent inhibitor of allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Malaviya, R; Vassilev, A; Uckun, F M

    2001-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of 2,4,6-trihydroxy-alpha-p-methoxyphenylacetophenone (compound D-58), a potent inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases SYK and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), on IgE receptor/FcepsilonRI-triggered mast cell-mediated acute allergic responses in vitro and in vivo. Compound D-58 abrogated IgE receptor/FcepsilonRI-mediated SYK and BTK activation as well as calcium mobilization in mast cells. Mast-cell degranulation and leukotriene (LT) C(4) release was inhibited by compound D-58 in a concentration-dependent fashion. Notably, compound D-58 prevented the mast cell mediator-induced vascular hyperpermeability in an in vivo murine model of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis as measured by the prevention of extravasation of systemically administered Evans blue dye. The results uniquely indicate that compound D-58 has potent antiallergic properties. Therefore, further development of compound D-58 may provide the basis for new and effective treatment programs for severe allergic disorders. PMID:11704780

  4. Transfusion Associated Graft Versus Host Disease Following Whole Blood Transfusion from an Unrelated Donor in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ketan K.; Ranjan, Rajiv R.; Shah, Apurva P.

    2010-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a well-known complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD) is much less common and nearly uniformly fatal complication of blood transfusion. The risk factors underlying the development of TA- GVHD are incompletely defined, but it is commonly seen in individuals with congenital or acquired immunodeficiency, transfusions from blood relatives, intrauterine transfusions and HLA-matched platelet transfusions. Diagnosis of TA-GVHD may be difficult at a time due to rarity in occurrence and overlapping clinical features with various infections and drug reactions. We describe a case of transfusion-associated GVHD that occurred after transfusion of whole blood from unrelated donor in an immunocompetent patient. PMID:21886390

  5. Allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common disorder that is strongly linked to asthma and conjunctivitis. It is usually a long-standing condition that often goes undetected in the primary-care setting. The classic symptoms of the disorder are nasal congestion, nasal itch, rhinorrhea and sneezing. A thorough history, physical examination and allergen skin testing are important for establishing the diagnosis of allergic rhinitis. Second-generation oral antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment. Allergen immunotherapy is an effective immune-modulating treatment that should be recommended if pharmacologic therapy for allergic rhinitis is not effective or is not tolerated. This article provides an overview of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and appropriate management of this disorder. PMID:22166009

  6. Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Kakli, Hasan A; Riley, Timothy D

    2016-09-01

    Among the atopic disorders, allergic rhinitis is the most prevalent. Patients who suffer from allergic rhinitis sustain significant morbidity and loss of productivity. Cardinal symptoms include nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, sneezing, and nasal itching, although multiple related symptoms may occur. Causes should be ruled out with a thorough history and physical examination, with particular attention to red flag or atypical symptoms. Skin testing or serum sampling can confirm diagnosis and also guide therapy. Therapy is multimodal, tailored to a particular patient's symptom burden and quality of life. PMID:27545735

  7. Precautions surrounding blood transfusion in autoimmune haemolytic anaemias are overestimated

    PubMed Central

    Yürek, Salih; Mayer, Beate; Almahallawi, Mohammed; Pruss, Axel; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-01-01

    Background It is very evident that many precautions are taken regarding transfusion of red blood cells in patients with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. Frequently, considerable efforts are made to examine the indication and serological compatibility prior to transfusion in such patients. However, at times, this may unnecessarily jeopardize patients who urgently require a red blood cell transfusion. Materials and methods Thirty-six patients with warm-type autoimmune haemolytic anaemia were included in this study. All patients had reactive serum autoantibodies and required blood transfusion. Standard serological assays were employed for the detection and characterization of antibodies to red blood cells. Results A positive direct antiglobulin test was observed in all 36 patients, in addition to detectable antibodies in both the eluate and serum. Significant alloantibodies were detected in the serum samples of three patients (anti-c, anti-JKa, and anti-E). In 32 patients, red blood cell transfusion was administered with no significant haemolytic transfusion reactions due to auto- and/or allo-antibodies. Due to overestimation of positive cross-matches three patients received no transfusion or delayed transfusion and died, and one patient died due to unrecognised blood loss and anaemia which was attributed to an ineffective red blood cell transfusion. Discussion Many of the reported recommendations regarding transfusion of red blood cells in autoimmune haemolytic anaemia are highly questionable, and positive serological cross-matches should not result in a delay or refusal of necessary blood transfusions. PMID:26192772

  8. Isolation of a thiol-dependent serine protease in peanut and investigation of its role in the complement and the allergic reaction.

    PubMed

    Javaux, Cédric; Stordeur, Patrick; Azarkan, Mohamed; Mascart, Françoise; Baeyens-Volant, Danielle

    2016-07-01

    A serine protease activity was detected in aqueous peanuts seeds extracts, partially purified and characterized as a thiol-dependent serine protease. The potential role of this proteolytic activity on allergic reaction to peanuts was prospected through complement activation studies in human plasma and serum, and MDCK cells to investigate a possible occludin degradation in tight junctions. The peanut protease activity induced the production of anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, and of the terminal membrane attack complex SC5b-9 whatever the complement activation pathway. The protease activity was also involved in the partial digestion of occludin within tight junctions, with for result, an increase of the epithelial permeability to antigen absorption. PMID:27280846

  9. Dietary Compound Kaempferol Inhibits Airway Thickening Induced by Allergic Reaction in a Bovine Serum Albumin-Induced Model of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Daekeun; Park, Sin-Hye; Choi, Yean-Jung; Kim, Yun-Ho; Antika, Lucia Dwi; Habibah, Nurina Umy; Kang, Min-Kyung; Kang, Young-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by aberrant airways including epithelial thickening, goblet cell hyperplasia, and smooth muscle hypertrophy within the airway wall. The current study examined whether kaempferol inhibited mast cell degranulation and prostaglandin (PG) release leading to the development of aberrant airways, using an in vitro model of dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA)-sensitized rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) mast cells and an in vivo model of BSA-challenged asthmatic mice. Nontoxic kaempferol at 10–20 μM suppressed β-hexosaminidase release and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2)-mediated production of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) in sensitized mast cells. Oral administration of ≤20 mg/kg kaempferol blocked bovine serum albumin (BSA) inhalation-induced epithelial cell excrescence and smooth muscle hypertrophy by attenuating the induction of COX2 and the formation of PGD2 and PGF2α, together with reducing the anti-α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in mouse airways. Kaempferol deterred the antigen-induced mast cell activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) responsive to protein kinase Cμ (PKCμ) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Furthermore, the antigen-challenged activation of Syk-phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) pathway was dampened in kaempferol-supplemented mast cells. These results demonstrated that kaempferol inhibited airway wall thickening through disturbing Syk-PLCγ signaling and PKCμ-ERK-cPLA2-COX2 signaling in antigen-exposed mast cells. Thus, kaempferol may be a potent anti-allergic compound targeting allergic asthma typical of airway hyperplasia and hypertrophy. PMID:26694364

  10. [Pseudotumoral allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Otero González, I; Montero Martínez, C; Blanco Aparicio, M; Valiño López, P; Verea Hernando, H

    2000-06-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) develops as the result of a hypersensitivity reaction to fungi of the genus Aspergillus. Clinical and radiological presentation can be atypical, requiring a high degree of suspicion on the part of the physician who treats such patients. We report the cases of two patients with APBA in whom the form of presentation--with few asthma symptoms, images showing lobar atelectasia and hilar adenopathy--led to an initial suspicion of lung cancer. PMID:10932345

  11. [Transfusions in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Moulias, Sophie; Lesure, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Elderly people are Darticularlv Drone to anaemia and the need for transfusions. However, in response to the known adverse effects of red blood cell transfusions, particularly in the context of chronic anaemia, new recommendations have been issued. it is always necessary to consider this procedure on a case-by-case basis, analysing the risk-benefit ratio. PMID:25966521

  12. Alternatives to Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... in cancer patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal resection: risk factors and impact on survival. Tech Coloproctol. 2013 Oct;17(5):549-554. Hay SN, Scanga L, Brecher ME. Life, death, and the risk of transfusion: a university hospital experience. Transfusion . 2006;46(9):1491-1493. ...

  13. Transfusion-associated dyspnea--shadow or substance?

    PubMed

    Badami, K G; Joliffe, E; Stephens, M

    2015-08-01

    New Zealand Blood Service Haemovigilance uses International Society of Blood Transfusion/International Haemovigilance Network definitions to categorize transfusion reactions (TR). Transfusion-associated dyspnoea (TAD) is a category for TR with respiratory features (TRRF) that do not fit definitive entities. TRRF, including TAD, are clinically significant. TR classified as TAD were reviewed. We found that many TAD may have been transfusion-associated circulatory overload. Better information in TR reports and refining TR diagnostic criteria may result in less misclassification of TRRF. TAD may represent mild, atypical or overlap entities, and there may be a residuum of cases with currently unexplained pathophysiology. PMID:25854631

  14. [A case received pre-exposure immunization against rabies by intradermal injection of rabies vaccine because of allergic reaction to the component of the vaccine].

    PubMed

    Takayama, N; Okuma, K; Sakuma, H

    1999-06-01

    A female, 25 years of age, came to our clinic to receive pre-exposure immunization against rabies. In another hospital she was tested to find out whether she was allergic to the components of rabies vaccine (PCEC) manufactured by the Chemo-Sero-Theraptic Research Institute (Kaketsuken) by cutaneous reaction using a 2,000-fold diluted PCEC. She showed a positive reaction. In our clinic she was again examined by skin test using 0.1 ml of 10-fold diluted PCEC. She showed wheal and flare reaction. Further we tested using 0.05 ml and 0.1 ml of non-diluted PCEC. Her skin reaction did not increase by several mm in diameter. So we decided to immunized her against rabies with intradermal injections of PCEC instead of subcutaneous injections that is indicated by the manufacturer. The second intradermal injections were done to right and left forearms a week later. Then the third shot was given 4 weeks after the second. At 2 weeks after the third injection her blood sample was taken to measure anti-rabies antibody titer by ELISA method with Platelia rabies kit (Diagnostic Pasteur, France). She had 6.7 U/ml of anti-rabies ELISA antibody that was much higher than the protective level (0.5 IU/ml) officially recognized by WHO. Therefore, it is concluded that she had produced sufficiently high level of anti-rabies antibody with intradermal injection of PCEC. It is reasonably recommended to investigate further if the intradermal injection of PCEC will be an effective method as a pre-exposure immunization against rabies. PMID:10423951

  15. Cheonggukjang ethanol extracts inhibit a murine allergic asthma via suppression of mast cell-dependent anaphylactic reactions.

    PubMed

    Bae, Min-Jung; Shin, Hee Soon; See, Hye-Jeong; Chai, Ok Hee; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Cheonggukjang (CGJ), a traditional Korean fermented soybean food, exerts immunomodulatory effects. Asthma is the most common chronic allergic disease to be associated with immune response to environmental allergens. In the pathogenesis of asthma, histamine is one of the important inflammatory mediators released from granules of mast cells. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of CGJ on a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma via the suppression of histamine release. C57BL/6 mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal injection of OVA or a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control and then challenged with OVA inhalation. Mice were treated intraperitoneally with either 70% ethanol-extracted CGJ (CGJE) (100 mg/kg/day) or equivalent PBS. Asthma-related inflammation was assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cell counts and histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis of lung tissues. To elucidate the mechanisms of asthma inhibition by CGJE treatment, we also examined degranulation and histamine release of compound 48/80-induced rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs). Treatment with CGJE downregulated the number of eosinophils and monocytes in the lungs of mice challenged with OVA and suppressed histopathological changes, such as eosinophil infiltration, mucus accumulation, goblet cell hyperplasia, and collagen fiber deposits. Moreover, CGJE alleviated compound 48/80-induced mast cell degranulation and histamine release from RPMCs through inhibition of calcium (Ca²⁺) uptake as well as ear swelling by infiltration of inflammatory cells. These findings demonstrated that CGJE can be used as an antiasthmatic dietary supplements candidate for histamine-mediated asthma. PMID:24456365

  16. Cheonggukjang Ethanol Extracts Inhibit a Murine Allergic Asthma via Suppression of Mast Cell-Dependent Anaphylactic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Min-Jung; Shin, Hee Soon; See, Hye-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cheonggukjang (CGJ), a traditional Korean fermented soybean food, exerts immunomodulatory effects. Asthma is the most common chronic allergic disease to be associated with immune response to environmental allergens. In the pathogenesis of asthma, histamine is one of the important inflammatory mediators released from granules of mast cells. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of CGJ on a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma via the suppression of histamine release. C57BL/6 mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal injection of OVA or a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control and then challenged with OVA inhalation. Mice were treated intraperitoneally with either 70% ethanol-extracted CGJ (CGJE) (100 mg/kg/day) or equivalent PBS. Asthma-related inflammation was assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cell counts and histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis of lung tissues. To elucidate the mechanisms of asthma inhibition by CGJE treatment, we also examined degranulation and histamine release of compound 48/80-induced rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs). Treatment with CGJE downregulated the number of eosinophils and monocytes in the lungs of mice challenged with OVA and suppressed histopathological changes, such as eosinophil infiltration, mucus accumulation, goblet cell hyperplasia, and collagen fiber deposits. Moreover, CGJE alleviated compound 48/80-induced mast cell degranulation and histamine release from RPMCs through inhibition of calcium (Ca2+) uptake as well as ear swelling by infiltration of inflammatory cells. These findings demonstrated that CGJE can be used as an antiasthmatic dietary supplements candidate for histamine-mediated asthma. PMID:24456365

  17. Intraoperative transfusion practices in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Meier, J.; Filipescu, D.; Kozek-Langenecker, S.; Llau Pitarch, J.; Mallett, S.; Martus, P.; Matot, I.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transfusion of allogeneic blood influences outcome after surgery. Despite widespread availability of transfusion guidelines, transfusion practices might vary among physicians, departments, hospitals and countries. Our aim was to determine the amount of packed red blood cells (pRBC) and blood products transfused intraoperatively, and to describe factors determining transfusion throughout Europe. Methods. We did a prospective observational cohort study enrolling 5803 patients in 126 European centres that received at least one pRBC unit intraoperatively, during a continuous three month period in 2013. Results. The overall intraoperative transfusion rate was 1.8%; 59% of transfusions were at least partially initiated as a result of a physiological transfusion trigger- mostly because of hypotension (55.4%) and/or tachycardia (30.7%). Haemoglobin (Hb)- based transfusion trigger alone initiated only 8.5% of transfusions. The Hb concentration [mean (sd)] just before transfusion was 8.1 (1.7) g dl−1 and increased to 9.8 (1.8) g dl−1 after transfusion. The mean number of intraoperatively transfused pRBC units was 2.5 (2.7) units (median 2). Conclusion. Although European Society of Anaesthesiology transfusion guidelines are moderately implemented in Europe with respect to Hb threshold for transfusion (7–9 g dl−1), there is still an urgent need for further educational efforts that focus on the number of pRBC units to be transfused at this threshold. Clinical trial registration. NCT 01604083. PMID:26787795

  18. Blood Transfusion (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... help to clot the blood and control bleeding. Plasma , the pale yellow liquid part of whole blood. ... patients with bleeding problems, transfusions with platelets or plasma can help to control or prevent bleeding complications. ...

  19. Blood Transfusion and Donation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the blood transfusion. To keep blood safe, blood banks carefully screen donated blood. The risk of catching ... or more times before the surgery. A blood bank will store your blood for your use. NIH: ...

  20. Exchange transfusion - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... her back, usually under a radiant warmer. The umbilical vein is catheterized with a fluid-filled catheter. ... plasma is injected. After the exchange transfusion, an umbilical catheter may be left in place in case ...

  1. Effect of diesel exhaust particles on allergic reactions and airway responsiveness in ovalbumin-sensitized brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Dong, Caroline C; Yin, Xuejun J; Ma, Jane Y C; Millecchia, Lyndell; Wu, Zhong-Xin; Barger, Mark W; Roberts, Jenny R; Antonini, James M; Dey, Richard D; Ma, Joseph K H

    2005-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated that exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) prior to ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization in rats reduced OVA-induced airway inflammation. In the present study, Brown Norway rats were first sensitized to OVA (42.3 +/- 5.7 mg/m3) for 30 min on days 1, 8, and 15, then exposed to filtered air or DEP (22.7 +/- 2.5 mg/m3) for 4 h/day on days 24-28, and challenged with OVA on day 29. Airway responsiveness was examined on day 30, and animals were sacrificed on day 31. Ovalbumin sensitization and challenge resulted in a significant infiltration of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils into the lung, elevated presence of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in lung draining lymph nodes, and increased production of serum OVA-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG. Diesel exhaust particles pre-exposure augmented OVA-induced production of allergen-specific IgE and IgG and pulmonary inflammation characterized by marked increases in T lymphocytes and infiltration of eosinophils after OVA challenge, whereas DEP alone did not have these effects. Although OVA-sensitized rats showed modest response to methacholine challenge, it was the combined DEP and OVA exposure that produced significant airway hyperresponsiveness in this animal model. The effect of DEP pre-exposure on OVA-induced immune responses correlated with an interactive effect of DEP with OVA on increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) by alveolar macrophages (AM) and alveolar type II (ATII) cells, NO levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, the induction of inducible NO synthase expression in AM and ATII cells, and a depletion of total intracellular glutathione (GSH) in AM and lymphocytes. These results show that DEP pre-exposure exacerbates the allergic responses to the subsequent challenge with OVA in OVA-sensitized rats. This DEP effect may be, at least partially, attributed to the elevated generation of ROS in AM and ATII cells, a depletion of GSH in AM and

  2. Platelet transfusions: impact on hemostasis, thrombosis, inflammation and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Refaai, Majed A.; Phipps, Richard P.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Blumberg, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Platelet transfusion is one of the most crucial therapeutic approaches in Medicine. However, severe and fatal adverse reactions may develop. In addition to their important function in hemostasis, platelets’ role in inflammation has become more evident. Recently, platelets are also recognized as the main source of circulating soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L, (CD154)), which plays significant roles in hemostasis, platelet activation, clot stability, interactions with other cells, and upregulation of different mediators. In this review, we will briefly highlight the importance of platelet transfusion, its role in inflammatory and thrombotic transfusion reactions, and visit the most recent findings on sCD40L. PMID:21093892

  3. Chimerism in transfusion medicine

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Patricia AR

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion therapy is complicated by the production of alloantibodies to antigens present in the donor and lacking in the recipient through the poorly-understood but likely multi-factorial process of alloimmunization. The low prevalence of alloimmunization in transfused patients (6.1%)1 suggests that processes central to immunologic tolerance may be operating in the vast majority of transfused patients who do not produce alloantibodies. Using RhD as a prototype, evidence is reviewed that the ability to make antibodies to red blood cell (RBC) antigens may result in part from immunologic tolerance acquired in utero. These ideas are extended to other examples of maternal microchimerism (MMc) of other non-inherited maternal antigens (NIMA). An evolutionary argument is offered that multi-generational immunity supports the hypothesis that MMc may partly explain the “non-responder” phenotype in RBC alloimmunization. PMID:24196285

  4. Alternatives to blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Donat R; Goodnough, Lawrence T

    2013-05-25

    The use of alternatives to allogeneic blood continues to rest on the principles that blood transfusions have inherent risks, associated costs, and affect the blood inventory available for health-care delivery. Increasing evidence exists of a fall in the use of blood because of associated costs and adverse outcomes, and suggests that the challenge for the use of alternatives to blood components will similarly be driven by costs and patient outcomes. Additionally, the risk-benefit profiles of alternatives to blood transfusion such as autologous blood procurement, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and haemostatic agents are under investigation. Nevertheless, the inherent risks of blood, along with the continued rise in blood costs are likely to favour the continued development and use of alternatives to blood transfusion. We summarise the current roles of alternatives to blood in the management of medical and surgical anaemias. PMID:23706802

  5. Metabolomics in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Dumont, Larry J; D'Alessandro, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    Biochemical investigations on the regulatory mechanisms of red blood cell (RBC) and platelet (PLT) metabolism have fostered a century of advances in the field of transfusion medicine. Owing to these advances, storage of RBCs and PLT concentrates has become a lifesaving practice in clinical and military settings. There, however, remains room for improvement, especially with regard to the introduction of novel storage and/or rejuvenation solutions, alternative cell processing strategies (e.g., pathogen inactivation technologies), and quality testing (e.g., evaluation of novel containers with alternative plasticizers). Recent advancements in mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and systems biology, the bioinformatics integration of omics data, promise to speed up the design and testing of innovative storage strategies developed to improve the quality, safety, and effectiveness of blood products. Here we review the currently available metabolomics technologies and briefly describe the routine workflow for transfusion medicine-relevant studies. The goal is to provide transfusion medicine experts with adequate tools to navigate through the otherwise overwhelming amount of metabolomics data burgeoning in the field during the past few years. Descriptive metabolomics data have represented the first step omics researchers have taken into the field of transfusion medicine. However, to up the ante, clinical and omics experts will need to merge their expertise to investigate correlative and mechanistic relationships among metabolic variables and transfusion-relevant variables, such as 24-hour in vivo recovery for transfused RBCs. Integration with systems biology models will potentially allow for in silico prediction of metabolic phenotypes, thus streamlining the design and testing of alternative storage strategies and/or solutions. PMID:26662506

  6. Treatment of Allergic Rhinitis with Probiotics: An Alternative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Gui; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a skewed immune reaction to common antigens in the nasal mucosa; current therapy is not satisfactory and can cause a variety of complications. In recent decades, the incidence of allergic rhinitis is increasing every year. Published studies indicate that probiotics are beneficial in treating allergic rhinitis. This review aims to help in understanding the role of probiotics in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. We referred to the PubMed database as data source. This review focuses on the following aspects: The types of probiotics using in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, approaches of administration, its safety, mechanisms of action, treating results, and the perspectives to improve effectiveness of probiotics in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. This review reports the recent findings regarding the role of probiotics in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Probiotics are a useful therapeutic remedy in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, but its underlying mechanisms remain to be further investigated. PMID:24083221

  7. Treatment of allergic rhinitis with probiotics: an alternative approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gui; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2013-08-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a skewed immune reaction to common antigens in the nasal mucosa; current therapy is not satisfactory and can cause a variety of complications. In recent decades, the incidence of allergic rhinitis is increasing every year. Published studies indicate that probiotics are beneficial in treating allergic rhinitis. This review aims to help in understanding the role of probiotics in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. We referred to the PubMed database as data source. This review focuses on the following aspects: The types of probiotics using in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, approaches of administration, its safety, mechanisms of action, treating results, and the perspectives to improve effectiveness of probiotics in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. This review reports the recent findings regarding the role of probiotics in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Probiotics are a useful therapeutic remedy in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, but its underlying mechanisms remain to be further investigated. PMID:24083221

  8. Ensemble Learning Approaches to Predicting Complications of Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Murphree, Dennis; Ngufor, Che; Upadhyaya, Sudhindra; Madde, Nagesh; Clifford, Leanne; Kor, Daryl J.; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2016-01-01

    Of the 21 million blood components transfused in the United States during 2011, approximately 1 in 414 resulted in complication [1]. Two complications in particular, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), are especially concerning. These two alone accounted for 62% of reported transfusion-related fatalities in 2013 [2]. We have previously developed a set of machine learning base models for predicting the likelihood of these adverse reactions, with a goal towards better informing the clinician prior to a transfusion decision. Here we describe recent work incorporating ensemble learning approaches to predicting TACO/TRALI. In particular we describe combining base models via majority voting, stacking of model sets with varying diversity, as well as a resampling/boosting combination algorithm called RUSBoost. We find that while the performance of many models is very good, the ensemble models do not yield significantly better performance in terms of AUC. PMID:26737958

  9. Ensemble learning approaches to predicting complications of blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Murphree, Dennis; Ngufor, Che; Upadhyaya, Sudhindra; Madde, Nagesh; Clifford, Leanne; Kor, Daryl J; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2015-08-01

    Of the 21 million blood components transfused in the United States during 2011, approximately 1 in 414 resulted in complication [1]. Two complications in particular, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), are especially concerning. These two alone accounted for 62% of reported transfusion-related fatalities in 2013 [2]. We have previously developed a set of machine learning base models for predicting the likelihood of these adverse reactions, with a goal towards better informing the clinician prior to a transfusion decision. Here we describe recent work incorporating ensemble learning approaches to predicting TACO/TRALI. In particular we describe combining base models via majority voting, stacking of model sets with varying diversity, as well as a resampling/boosting combination algorithm called RUSBoost. We find that while the performance of many models is very good, the ensemble models do not yield significantly better performance in terms of AUC. PMID:26737958

  10. Recurrent abortions and lymphocyte transfusions.

    PubMed

    Bjercke, S

    1994-05-01

    Normal pregnancies depend on successful implantation of the placenta in the uterus. The trophoblast which forms the ultimate interface between the fetal and maternal tissue seems to lack the foreign (allo) antigens (namely HLA/TLX) required to induce immunological rejection reactions in the mother. It was previously believed that the trophoblast expressed paternal allo antigens and that successful pregnancies were dependent on so called 'kind' (non-cytotoxic or non-complement binding) blocking antibodies in order to protect the fetal unit from maternal cytotoxic T-cells and -antibodies. Blocking antibodies attached to paternal antigens on the trophoblast were assumed to prevent maternal cytotoxic T cell and cytotoxic antibodies from recognising the trophoblast as foreign tissue. On this assumption it was reasoned that transfusions of paternal HLA-expressing lymphocytes would increase maternal antipaternal HLA (TLX) blocking antibodies and thus be beneficial to women who experienced multiple miscarriages. There is, however, no scientific evidence for a specific immune response after lymphocyte transfusions that fulfil this function. Immunological tests, as for example mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC), on peripheral blood lymphocytes do not seem to reflect the local immune state in the uterus, either in the pregnant or the non-pregnant state. Since the trophoblast forms the ultimate interface between fetal and maternal tissue, its structure, secretions, and interaction with the decidua must be of definite importance for implantation of the blastocyst and growth of the embryo. PMID:8009967

  11. Blood Transfusion and Donation

    MedlinePlus

    ... that form clots to control bleeding Plasma - the liquid part of the blood that helps clotting. You may need it if you have been badly burned, have liver failure or a severe infection. Most blood transfusions go very smoothly. Some infectious agents, such as ...

  12. Fetofetal transfusion in triplets.

    PubMed Central

    Rehan, V. K.; Menticoglou, S. M.; Seshia, M. M.; Bowman, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    A case of fetofetal transfusion syndrome (FFTS) in a monochorionic triplet pregnancy, in which all three fetuses shared a common circulation, is reported. All babies were born alive, although two died within two days of delivery. This case highlights the problem of FFTS with accompanying high perinatal morbidity and mortality in naturally occurring monochorionic triplet gestations. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7552596

  13. An Attempt to Induce Transient Immunosuppression Pre-erythrocytapheresis in a Girl With Sickle Cell Disease, a History of Severe Delayed Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions and Need for Hip Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cattoni, Alessandro; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Perseghin, Paolo; Zatti, Giovanni; Gaddi, Diego; Cossio, Andrea; Biondi, Andrea; Corti, Paola; Masera, Nicoletta

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We report on a case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR) occurred 7 days after an erythrocytapheresis or eritroexchange procedure (EEX) treated with rituximab and glucocorticoids in a 15-years old patient with sickle cell disease. EEX was performed despite a previous diagnosis of alloimmunization, in order to reduce hemoglobin S rate before a major surgery for avascular necrosis of the femoral head. A first dose of rituximab was administered before EEX. However, rituximab couldn’t prevent DHTR that occurred with acute hemolysis, hemoglobinuria and hyperbilirubinemia. A further dose of rituximab and three boli of methylprednisolone were given after the onset of the reaction. It is likely that the combined use of rituximab and steroids managed to gradually improve both patient’s general conditions and hemoglobin levels. Nor early or late side effects were registered in a 33-months follow-up period. This report suggests the potential effectiveness and safety of rituximab in combination with steroids in managing and mitigating the symptoms of delayed post-transfusional hemolytic reactions in alloimmunized patients affected by sickle cell disease with absolute need for erythrocytapheresis. PMID:23888247

  14. Ethical issues in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Elhence, Priti

    2006-01-01

    The practice of transfusion medicine involves a number of ethical issues because blood comes from human beings and is a precious resource with a limited shelf life. In 1980 the International Society of Blood Transfusion endorsed its first formal code of ethics, which was adopted by the World Health Organisation and the League of Red Crescent Societies. A revised code of ethics for donation and transfusion was endorsed in 2000. Blood donation as a gift, donor confidentiality, donor notification and donor consent, consent for transfusion, the right to refuse blood transfusion, the right to be informed if harmed, and ethical principles for establishments, are discussed in the international and Indian contexts. PMID:17223681

  15. Transfusion problems associated with transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.

    1981-04-01

    Researchers have reviewed the role of blood transfusions in renal and marrow graft recipients. Striking contrasts are evident: while transfusions may promote successful kidney grafting, any transfusions before initiation of the transplant conditioning regimen may jeopardize the treatment of severe aplastic anemia by marrow transplantation. Researchers have suggested guidelines for the transfusion support of transplant candidates before transplantation and for marrow graft recipients after transplantation. It is important to recognize that after conditioning for marrow transplantation, all patients will be profoundly pancytopenic for a limited period of time, and intensive transfusion support is vital to patient survival.

  16. Investigation of whether the acute hemolysis associated with Rho(D) immune globulin intravenous (human) administration for treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura is consistent with the acute hemolytic transfusion reaction model

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Ann Reed; Lee-Stroka, Hallie; Byrne, Karen; Scott, Dorothy E.; Uhl, Lynne; Lazarus, Ellen; Stroncek, David F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Immune thrombocytopenic purpura and secondary thrombocytopenia patients treated with Rho(D) immune globulin intravenous (human; anti-D IGIV) have experienced acute hemolysis, which is inconsistent with the typical presentation of extravascular hemolysis—the presumed mechanism of action of anti-D IGIV. Although the mechanism of anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis has not been established, the onset, signs/symptoms, and complications appear consistent with the intravascular hemolysis of acute hemolytic transfusion reactions (AHTRs). In transfusion medicine, the red blood cell (RBC) antigen-antibody incompatibility(-ies) that precipitate AHTRs can be detected in vitro with compatibility testing. Under the premise that anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis results from RBC antigen-antibody–mediated complement activation, this study evaluated whether the incompatibility(-ies) could be detected in vitro with a hemolysin assay, which would support the AHTR model as the hemolytic mechanism. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Seven anti-D IGIV lots were tested to determine the RBC antibody identities in those lots, including four lots that had been implicated in acute hemolytic episodes. Hemolysin assays were performed that tested each of 73 RBC specimens against each lot, including the RBCs of one patient who had experienced acute hemolysis after anti-D IGIV administration. RESULTS Only two anti-D IGIV lots contained RBC antibodies beyond those expected. No hemolysis endpoint was observed in any of the hemolysin assays. CONCLUSION Although the findings did not support the AHTR model, the results are reported to contribute knowledge about the mechanism of anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis and to prompt continued investigation into cause(s), prediction, and prevention of this potentially serious adverse event. PMID:19220820

  17. Allergic conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... swollen or inflamed due to a reaction to pollen, dander, mold, or other allergy-causing substances. The ... become red, itchy , and teary very quickly. The pollens that cause symptoms vary from person to person ...

  18. Acute allergic angioedema of upper lip.

    PubMed

    Mahendran, Kavitha; Padmini, Govindasway; Murugesan, Ramesh; Srikumar, Arthiseethalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Mishaps can occur during dental procedures, some owing to inattention to detail and others are totally unpredictable. They usually include anaphylaxis or allergic reactions to materials used for restorative purposes or drugs such as local anesthetics. A patient reported to our department with moderate dental fluorosis, and the treatment was planned with indirect composite veneering. During the procedure while cementation acute allergic reaction occurred, the specific cause could not be identified after allergic testing. During the procedure while cementationacute allergic angioedema of upper lip. Anaphylaxis, urticaria, allergy, hereditary atopic eczema, cellulitis, cheilitis granulomatosa, and cheilitis glandularis. The patient was reassured and given prednisolone 10 mg and cetirizine 10 mg orally, once daily for 3 days after which the symptoms subsided. This paper will discuss the pathogenesis, classification, identification, and management of angioedema during dental procedures. PMID:27217646

  19. Acute allergic angioedema of upper lip

    PubMed Central

    Mahendran, Kavitha; Padmini, Govindasway; Murugesan, Ramesh; Srikumar, Arthiseethalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Mishaps can occur during dental procedures, some owing to inattention to detail and others are totally unpredictable. They usually include anaphylaxis or allergic reactions to materials used for restorative purposes or drugs such as local anesthetics. A patient reported to our department with moderate dental fluorosis, and the treatment was planned with indirect composite veneering. During the procedure while cementation acute allergic reaction occurred, the specific cause could not be identified after allergic testing. During the procedure while cementationacute allergic angioedema of upper lip. Anaphylaxis, urticaria, allergy, hereditary atopic eczema, cellulitis, cheilitis granulomatosa, and cheilitis glandularis. The patient was reassured and given prednisolone 10 mg and cetirizine 10 mg orally, once daily for 3 days after which the symptoms subsided. This paper will discuss the pathogenesis, classification, identification, and management of angioedema during dental procedures. PMID:27217646

  20. [Autologous transfusion in obstetrics and fetal safety].

    PubMed

    Rech, F; Patella, A; Cecchi, A; Ippolito, M; Indraccolo, S R

    1994-06-01

    It is common knowledge that for modern medicine transfusion therapy represents a precious resource and an often mandatory option. It is equally known that autohemotransfusion (or autologous transfusion) provides further advantages: certainty of blood availability when necessary, absence of transfusion reactions, elimination of the risk of infections that is still associated with the traditional homologous transfusions. In its most widespread application, autotransfusion provides for the donation of one or more units of autologous blood, mostly before elective surgery. Even in obstetrics the practice of autologous blood donation with the aim of autotransfusion is finding increasing employment. However, there are still controversial aspects and the need is pointed out for more authoritative verifications as refers to the alleged innocuity to the fetus of acute maternal blood loss. The present study was performed to contribute personal experience to a better definition of the possible interactions between autologous blood donation during pregnancy and unborn child welfare. To this end, 80 term pregnant women underwent fetal heart rate electronic monitoring before, during and after the donation of one unit of autologous blood. Both during and after the phlebotomy there were no cardiotocographic signs of fetal hypo-oxygenation. Even the non stress tests performed at a distance of 24 hours and those that were periodically repeated afterwards were normal, confirming the safety of autologous predonation during pregnancy. However, the authors think that in obstetrics it is still premature to consider the experimental phase of autotransfusion as definitively exhausted. PMID:7936387

  1. Iron and transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Waldvogel-Abramovski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Blood bankers have focused their energy to secure blood transfusion, and only recently have studies been published on the effect of blood donation on iron metabolism. In many facilities, hemoglobin measurement is only performed just before or even during blood donation, but the determination of iron stores is largely ignored. The 2013 paradox of transfusion medicine is due to the fact that blood donation may be harmful and leads to iron deficiency with or without anemia, but for other individuals, it may be a healthy measure preventing type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to discuss iron metabolism in the perspective of blood donation, notably regarding their possible genetic profiles that eventually will discriminate "good" iron absorbers from "bad" iron responders. PMID:24148756

  2. Transfusion associated circulatory overload.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Naveen; Agnihotri, Ajju

    2014-06-01

    Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) is an established, but grossly under diagnosed and underreported complication of blood transfusion. We present the case of a 46-year-old diabetic and hypertensive patient admitted to our hospital for recurrent episodes of urinary retention. Over initial 3 days of the admission, the patient received multiple units of packed red blood cells (RBC) and fresh frozen plasma, uneventfully. However, the patient developed signs and symptoms suggestive of TACO with only small amount of the 4(th) unit of RBC. The patient had to be shifted to the Intensive Care Unit for further management of this complication. Etiology of TACO is more complex than a mere circulatory overload and is still not completely understood. TACO leads to a prolonged hospital stay and morbidity in the patients developing this complication. TACO thus needs to be suspected in patients at risk for this complication. PMID:24987240

  3. Immunologic principles of allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Averbeck, Marco; Gebhardt, Carl; Emmrich, Frank; Treudler, Regina; Simon, Jan C

    2007-11-01

    Allergy either results from a pathological excessive immune reaction, or from the defective induction of tolerance to otherwise harmless antigens. Allergic reactions are mounted by mechanisms of innate and adaptive immunity. The development of an allergic response can be divided in sensitization and elicitation phases. Immediate type allergic reactions (e.g. anaphylaxis, urticaria, rhinoconjunctivitis allergica, allergic asthma) are mediated by IgE antibodies which are produced by B cells stimulated by allergen-specific Th2 cells. Crosslinking of allergen-specific IgE on membrane surfaces of mast cells and basophilic granulocytes leads to release of soluble mediators which may cause systemic symptoms within minutes to hours. The following infiltration of eosinophilic granulocytes and Th2 cells directs chronic inflammation. Humoral cytotoxic immune reactions (e.g. drug induced cytopenia) are mediated by IgG and IgM antibodies which are directed against membrane associated antigens. IgG and IgM antibodies directed against soluble antigens elicit immune complex mediated cytotoxicity (e.g.drug induced vasculitis). Delayed type immune reactions (e.g.contact dermatitis) are based on the activation of antigen specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and need 24 h to 48 h to develop. Upon recurrent contact with identical antigens, recruitment of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells cause inflammation and cytotoxic induced apoptosis in target cells as well as cytokine mediated leukocyte infiltration. Subsequent immigration of CD4(+) Th2 cells provides anti-inflammatory mechanisms leading to resolution of the inflammatory response and tissue repair. PMID:17976144

  4. [Allergic dermatitis caused by pyrogenic silica (aerosol)].

    PubMed

    Liashenko, I N; Lutsiuk, N B; Otkalenko, A K; Odnorogov, Iu V

    1989-01-01

    A case of allergic dermatitis developing after a contact exposure of the skin to aerosil is described. The authors suppose that violated intactness of the skin integument is largely responsible for the allergic reaction. The C-reactive protein, Hoigne's, and leucocyte migration inhibition tests have been all markedly positive. It is recommended that types of aerosil other than powder-forming be utilized and that means protecting the skin and the upper respiratory tract be used. PMID:2543155

  5. Phase II trial of standard versus increased transfusion volume in Ugandan children with acute severe anemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe anemia (SA, hemoglobin <6 g/dl) is a leading cause of pediatric hospital admission in Africa, with significant in-hospital mortality. The underlying etiology is often infectious, but specific pathogens are rarely identified. Guidelines developed to encourage rational blood use recommend a standard volume of whole blood (20 ml/kg) for transfusion, but this is commonly associated with a frequent need for repeat transfusion and poor outcome. Evidence is lacking on what hemoglobin threshold criteria for intervention and volume are associated with the optimal survival outcomes. Methods We evaluated the safety and efficacy of a higher volume of whole blood (30 ml/kg; Tx30: n = 78) against the standard volume (20 ml/kg; Tx20: n = 82) in Ugandan children (median age 36 months (interquartile range (IQR) 13 to 53)) for 24-hour anemia correction (hemoglobin >6 g/dl: primary outcome) and 28-day survival. Results Median admission hemoglobin was 4.2 g/dl (IQR 3.1 to 4.9). Initial volume received followed the randomization strategy in 155 (97%) patients. By 24-hours, 70 (90%) children in the Tx30 arm had corrected SA compared to 61 (74%) in the Tx20 arm; cause-specific hazard ratio = 1.54 (95% confidence interval 1.09 to 2.18, P = 0.01). From admission to day 28 there was a greater hemoglobin increase from enrollment in Tx30 (global P <0.0001). Serious adverse events included one non-fatal allergic reaction and one death in the Tx30 arm. There were six deaths in the Tx20 arm (P = 0.12); three deaths were adjudicated as possibly related to transfusion, but none secondary to volume overload. Conclusion A higher initial transfusion volume prescribed at hospital admission was safe and resulted in an accelerated hematological recovery in Ugandan children with SA. Future testing in a large, pragmatic clinical trial to establish the effect on short and longer-term survival is warranted. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.Gov identifier: NCT01461590

  6. Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury after Cesarean Section in a Patient with HELLP Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Min; Rim, Ch'ang Bum; Kim, So Ri; Shin, Sang Ho; Kang, Min Seok; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Jihye; Kim, Sang Il

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious adverse reaction of transfusion, and presents as hypoxemia and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema within 6 hours of transfusion. A 14-year-old primigravida woman at 34 weeks of gestation presented with upper abdominal pain without dyspnea. Because she showed the syndrome of HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count), an emergency cesarean section delivery was performed, and blood was transfused. In the case of such patients, clinicians should closely observe the patient's condition at least during the 6 hours while the patient receives blood transfusion, and should suspect TRALI if the patient complains of respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea. Furthermore, echocardiography should be performed to distinguish between the different types of transfusion-related adverse reactions. PMID:26885326

  7. Effect of Dangguibohyul-Tang, a Mixed Extract of Astragalus membranaceus and Angelica sinensis, on Allergic and Inflammatory Skin Reaction Compared with Single Extracts of Astragalus membranaceus or Angelica sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, You Yeon; Kim, Mi Hye; Hong, Jongki

    2016-01-01

    Dangguibohyul-tang (DBT), herbal formula composed of Astragalus membranaceus (AM) and Angelica sinensis (AS) at a ratio of 5 : 1, has been used for the treatment of various skin diseases in traditional medicine. We investigated the effect of DBT on allergic and inflammatory skin reaction in atopic dermatitis-like model compared to the single extract of AM or AS. DBT treatment showed the remission of clinical symptoms, including decreased skin thickness and scratching behavior, the total serum IgE level, and the number of mast cells compared to DNCB group as well as the single extract of AM- or AS-treated group. Levels of cytokines (IL-4, IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-1β) and inflammatory mediators (NF-κB, phospho-IκBα, and phospho-MAPKs) were significantly decreased in AM, AS, and DBT groups. These results demonstrated that AM, AS, and DBT may have the therapeutic property on atopic dermatitis by inhibition of allergic and inflammatory mediators and DBT formula; a mixed extract of AM and AS based on the herb pairs theory especially might be more effective on antiallergic reaction as compared with the single extract of AM or AS. PMID:27051450

  8. Nasal hyperreactivity and inflammation in allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Veld, C. de Graaf-in't; Wijk, R. Gerth van; Zijlstra, F. J.

    1996-01-01

    The history of allergic disease goes back to 1819, when Bostock described his own ‘periodical affection of the eyes and chest’, which he called ‘summer catarrh’. Since they thought it was produced by the effluvium of new hay, this condition was also called hay fever. Later, in 1873, Blackley established that pollen played an important role in the causation of hay fever. Nowadays, the definition of allergy is ‘An untoward physiologic event mediated by a variety of different immunologic reactions’. In this review, the term allergy will be restricted to the IgE-dependent reactions. The most important clinical manifestations of IgE-dependent reactions are allergic conjunctivitis, allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma and atopic dermatitis. However, this review will be restricted to allergic rhinitis. The histopathological features of allergic inflammation involve an increase in blood flow and vascular permeability, leading to plasma exudation and the formation of oedema. In addition, a cascade of events occurs which involves a variety of inflammatory cells. These inflammatory cells migrate under the influence of chemotactic agents to the site of injury and induce the process of repair. Several types of inflammatory cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis. After specific or nonspecific stimuli, inflammatory mediators are generated from cells normally found in the nose, such as mast cells, antigen-presenting cells and epithelial cells (primary effector cells) and from cells recruited into the nose, such as basophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes, platelets and neutrophils (secondary effector cells). This review describes the identification of each of the inflammatory cells and their mediators which play a role in the perennial allergic processes in the nose of rhinitis patients. PMID:18475703

  9. [Organ transplantation and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Matignon, M; Bonnefoy, F; Lang, P; Grimbert, P

    2011-04-01

    Pretransplant blood transfusion remains a controversial subject and its history can summarize the last 40 years of transplantation. Until 1971, transfusions were widely used in patients awaiting transplantation, especially due to the anemia induced by the chronic renal dysfunction. Then, a noxious effect of preformed anti-HLA antibodies on renal grafts survival was reported and pretransplant transfusions were stopped. Between 1972 and 1977, improvement of renal graft survival in patients who received pretransplant transfusions was noted. Therefore, from 1978 on, a systematic policy of pretransplant transfusions was adopted by almost all centres of transplantation. During the eighties, it was again abandoned for several reasons: absence of graft survival improvement in patients treated by cyclosporine, HLA immunization leading to an increased incidence of acute graft rejection, risk of viral diseases transmission and human recombinant erythropoietin development. The lack of improvement in graft survival for ten years has been leading the transplant community to look for antigen-specific immunosuppressive strategies to achieve transplantation tolerance. Donor-specific transfusion may have clinical benefits, as long-term grafts survival improvement, through modulation of the recipient's cellular immune system and has been recently reconsidered, especially before living donor transplantation. The immunological mechanisms inducing a tolerance-gaining effect of transfusions are still misunderstood, but the recent discovery of immunomodulatory effects of the apoptotic cells present in cellular products could enlighten our comprehension of pretransplant transfusions benefits and could help to develop specific tolerance induction strategies in solid organ transplantation. PMID:21398160

  10. Investigational drugs for allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Passalacqua, Giovanni; Compalati, Enrico; Canonica, Giorgio Walter

    2010-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a high-prevalence disease, triggered by an IgE-mediated reaction, and sustained by a complex inflammatory network of cells, mediators, and cytokines. When the exposure to allergens persists, the inflammatory process becomes chronic. The current therapeutic strategy is based on allergen avoidance when possible, drugs and allergen immunotherapy. The main drugs are oral and topical antihistamines and nasal steroids. They are overall effective in controlling symptoms, but do not modify the immune background that leads to allergic inflammation. In addition, safety concerns may be present, especially for prolonged treatments. Thus, efforts are currently made to improve the existing molecules and to develop new drugs, in order to achieve greater clinical efficacy with a better tolerability. Also, attempts are made to selectively block relevant signal pathways of the allergic reaction by means of specific anti-mediators. Specific immunotherapy, in addition to the clinical effect, is capable of modifying the Th2-biased immune response. Thus, an intense research activity is presently ongoing with the aim of improving the characteristics and modes of action of this treatment. PMID:20001557

  11. Transfusion-associated bacterial sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, S J; Friedman, L I; Dodd, R Y

    1994-01-01

    The incidence of sepsis caused by transfusion of bacterially contaminated blood components is similar to or less than that of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis C virus infection, yet significantly exceeds those currently estimated for transfusion-associated human immunodeficiency and hepatitis B viruses. Outcomes are serious and may be fatal. In addition, transfusion of sterile allogenic blood can have generalized immunosuppressive effects on recipients, resulting in increased susceptibility to postoperative infection. This review examines the frequency of occurrence of transfusion-associated sepsis, the organisms implicated, and potential sources of bacteria. Approaches to minimize the frequency of sepsis are discussed, including the benefits and disadvantages of altering the storage conditions for blood. In addition, the impact of high levels of bacteria on the gross characteristics of erythrocyte and platelet concentrates is described. The potentials and limitations of current tests for detecting bacteria in blood are also discussed. PMID:7923050

  12. [Infectious-allergic bronchopulmonary paecilomycosis].

    PubMed

    Akhunova, A M

    1991-01-01

    Primary or secondary infection of the lungs with fungi of the Paecilomyces family (P. variotii and P. viridis) gives rise to the development of infectious allergic bronchopulmonary paecilomycosis characterized by the presence of chronic allergic interstitial pneumonia and obstructive bronchitis, bronchial asthma, total and pulmonary eosinophilia, the presence of the tissue parasitic form of the fungus in sputum, blood, pulmonary tissue, the presence of allergen-specific IgE and/or IgG antibodies in patients' sera, immediate or double (20 min and 6 h) reaction of the skin to administration of allergen of Paecilomyces, by not infrequent combination of lung damage and impairment of other organs as well as by chronic relapses. PMID:1805416

  13. Management of hypersensitivity reactions to anti-D immunoglobulin preparations.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, K; Nasser, S M

    2014-11-01

    RhD immunoglobulin G (anti-D) administered to pregnant Rh(-) women prevents Rh isoimmunization. Its use has significantly reduced the incidence of haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn previously responsible for one death in every 2200 births. In pregnancy, acute drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis can have serious deleterious effects on the mother and foetus/neonate. Women can be erroneously labelled as drug allergic as the investigation of hypersensitivity reactions in pregnancy is complex and drug challenges are usually contraindicated. We present three cases of suspected anti-D hypersensitivity clinically presenting as anaphylaxis and delayed transfusion-related reaction. We also propose a new algorithm for the investigations of such reaction. It relies on detailed history, cautious interpretation of skin tests, foetal Rh genotyping from maternal blood and, in some cases, anti-D challenges. This is not to deprive women of anti-D which might put their future pregnancies at risk. PMID:25066207

  14. Beta-escin has potent anti-allergic efficacy and reduces allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Type I hypersensitivity is characterized by the overreaction of the immune system against otherwise innocuous substances. It manifests as allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, allergic asthma or atopic dermatitis if mast cells are activated in the respective organs. In case of systemic mast cell activation, life-threatening anaphylaxis may occur. Currently, type I hypersensitivities are treated either with glucocorticoids, anti-histamines, or mast cell stabilizers. Although these drugs exert a strong anti-allergic effect, their long-term use may be problematic due to their side-effects. Results In the course of a routine in vitro screening process, we identified beta-escin as a potentially anti-allergic compound. Here we tested beta-escin in two mouse models to confirm this anti-allergic effect in vivo. In a model of the early phase of allergic reactions, the murine passive cutaneous anaphylaxis model, beta-escin inhibited the effects of mast cell activation and degranulation in the skin and dose-dependently prevented the extravasation of fluids into the tissue. Beta-escin also significantly inhibited the late response after antigen challenge in a lung allergy model with ovalbumin-sensitized mice. Allergic airway inflammation was suppressed, which was exemplified by the reduction of leucocytes, eosinophils, IL-5 and IL-13 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Histopathological examinations further confirmed the reduced inflammation of the lung tissue. In both models, the inhibitory effect of beta-escin was comparable to the benchmark dexamethasone. Conclusions We demonstrated in two independent murine models of type I hypersensitivity that beta-escin has potent anti-allergic properties. These results and the excellent safety profile of beta-escin suggest a therapeutic potential of this compound for a novel treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:20487574

  15. Teaching transfusion medicine: current situation and proposals for proper medical training

    PubMed Central

    Flausino, Gustavo de Freitas; Nunes, Flávio Ferreira; Cioffi, Júnia Guimarães Mourão; Proietti, Anna Bárbara de Freitas Carneiro

    2014-01-01

    The current curricula in medical schools and hospital residence worldwide lack exposure to blood transfusion medicine, and require the reformulation of academic programs. In many countries, training in blood transfusion is not currently offered to medical students or during residency. Clinical evidence indicates that blood transfusions occur more frequently than recommended, contributing to increased risk due to this procedure. Therefore, the rational use of blood and its components is essential, due to the frequent undesirable reactions, to the increasing demand of blood products and the cost of the process. Significant improvements in knowledge of and skills in transfusion medicine are needed by both students and residents. Improvements are needed in both background knowledge and the practical application of this knowledge to improve safety. Studies prove that hemovigilance has an impact on transfusion safety and helps to prevent the occurrence of transfusion-related adverse effects. To ensure that all these aspects of blood transfusion are being properly addressed, many countries have instituted hospital transfusion committees. From this perspective, the interventions performed during the formation of medical students and residents, even the simplest, have proven effective in the acquisition of knowledge and medical training, thereby leading to a reduction in inappropriate use of blood. Therefore, we would like to emphasize the importance of the exposure of medical students and residents to blood services and transfusion medicine in order for them to acquire adequate medical training, as well as to discuss some changes in the current medical curricula regarding transfusion medicine that we judge critical. PMID:25638770

  16. Platelet Transfusion – the Art and Science of Compromise

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Joan; Harm, Sarah K.; Yazer, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Many modern therapies depend on platelet (PLT) transfusion support. PLTs have a 4- to 7-day shelf life and are frequently in short supply. In order to optimize the inventory PLTs are often transfused to adults without regard for ABO compatibility. Hemolytic reactions are infrequent despite the presence of ‘high titer’ anti-A and anti-B antibodies in some of the units. Despite the low risk for hemolysis, some centers provide only ABO identical PLTs to their recipients; this practice might have other beneficial outcomes that remain to be proven. Strategies to mitigate the risk of hemolysis and the clinical and laboratory outcomes following ABO-matched and mismatched transfusions will be discussed. Although the PLTs themselves do not carry the D antigen, a small number of RBCs are also transfused with every PLT dose. The quantity of RBCs varies by the type of PLT preparation, and even a small quantity of D+ RBCs can alloimmunize a susceptible D− host. Thus PLT units are labeled as D+/–, and most transfusion services try to prevent the transfusion of D+ PLTs to D– females of childbearing age. A similar policy for patients with hematological diseases is controversial, and the elements and mechanisms of anti-D alloimmunization will be discussed. PMID:23922541

  17. [Ethics and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Tissot, J-D; Garraud, O; Danic, B; Cabaud, J-J; Lefrère, J-J

    2013-09-01

    Blood donation is an act of solidarity. Most often, this act is done on a volunteer basis and, depending on countries and circumstances, is not remunerated. The increase in need, the always-greater number of deferral criteria, the safety issues and the changes in the structures of our societies are among the many subjects for ethical debates. Taking these into account, the actors of the transfusion must analyze certain parameters: the value of a donation, the meaning of volunteering, the appropriateness of remunerating the act of giving a part of one's self, no longer as a donation or an expression of altruism and solidarity, but as a commercial act regimented by economic laws. PMID:23916572

  18. Orally-Induced Intestinal CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg Controlled Undesired Responses towards Oral Antigens and Effectively Dampened Food Allergic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Smaldini, Paola Lorena; Orsini Delgado, María Lucía; Fossati, Carlos Alberto; Docena, Guillermo Horacio

    2015-01-01

    The induction of peripheral tolerance may constitute a disease-modifying treatment for allergic patients. We studied how oral immunotherapy (OIT) with milk proteins controlled allergy in sensitized mice (cholera toxin plus milk proteins) upon exposure to the allergen. Symptoms were alleviated, skin test was negativized, serum specific IgE and IgG1 were abrogated, a substantial reduction in the secretion of IL-5 and IL-13 by antigen-stimulated spleen cells was observed, while IL-13 gene expression in jejunum was down-regulated, and IL-10 and TGF-β were increased. In addition, we observed an induction of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ cells and IL-10- and TGF-β-producing regulatory T cells in the lamina propria. Finally, transfer experiments confirmed the central role of these cells in tolerance induction. We demonstrated that the oral administration of milk proteins pre- or post-sensitization controlled the Th2-immune response through the elicitation of mucosal IL-10- and TGF-β-producing Tregs that inhibited hypersensitivity symptoms and the allergic response. PMID:26517875

  19. [Antibodies, human leukocyte antigens, and biomodulators in transfusion-related acute adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Martínez Álvarez, Julio César

    2013-01-01

    With the onset of the AIDS epidemic, major changes occurred in blood banking and transfusion medicine. These changes occurred mainly in donor selection and screening tests for infectious diseases, blood centers modified their organizational philosophy regarding quality. Transfusion of blood products are procedures that allow us to correct the haematology deficiencies for which was indicated. But today, despite the strict controls that precede transfusion,recipients may have undesirable effects, which are known as adverse effects or adverse reactions to transfusion. Antibodies and antigens of the HLA system plays a role in a series of events related to transfusion, such as immunological platelet refractoriness, febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions, transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease. The determination of anti-HLA antibodies is evidence that in most developed countries is used on a daily basis in the regular assessment of patients multitransfused or waiting lists for organs from deceased donors. The biomodulators are able to modify biological responses which act in sequence to lead to the differentiation of T lymphocytes. These agents may subcategorizes those which facilitate a normal immune response, those stimulates the immune response, those are capable of inducing immunosuppression not cytotoxic, and those enhancing the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic treatment (transfusion or transplant). PMID:23435079

  20. A retrospective review of patient factors, transfusion practices, and outcomes in patients with transfusion-associated circulatory overload.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Lani; Maskens, Carolyn; Cserti-Gazdewich, Christine; Hansen, Mark; Lin, Yulia; Pendergrast, Jacob; Yi, Qi Long; Callum, Jeannie

    2013-10-01

    Transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) is a common yet underrecognized and underreported complication of transfusion associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to examine patient and transfusion characteristics in a cohort of TACO cases. A retrospective medical record review of 100 consecutive TACO episodes reported at 2 academic centers was performed. Information related to demographics, medical history, radiologic and echocardiographic investigations, infusion practices, reaction features, management, and outcome were collected. Ninety-eight cases were accessible for review. A history of congestive heart failure (41%), renal dysfunction (44%), and age more than 70 years (56%) were common in TACO patients. Suboptimal fluid status management and inappropriate infusion practices were often seen (eg, verbal orders, double red cell transfusions, rapid infusion rates, lack or improper timing of preemptive diuretics). The median volume of blood ordered was 500 mL, and the median volume of crystalloid or colloid (preceding 24 hours) was 2200 mL. A physician order specifying the infusion rate was documented in 50% of transfusion orders. Preemptive diuretics were ordered in only 29% of cases, most commonly introduced midway or after the transfusion at a dose of furosemide 20 mg intravenously. After TACO, 18% of patients required transfer to the intensive care unit, 8% suffered a major complication, and 2% died. Suboptimal ordering and infusion practices may be contributing to the high incidence and severity of TACO. Research in TACO prevention strategies, such as slow rates of infusion and preemptive diuretics, is warranted. PMID:24075097

  1. [Economic environment and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Durand-Zaleski, I

    2015-08-01

    The increasing pressure on healthcare resources affects blood donation and transfusion. We attempted a survey of the efficiency of different strategies, actual or proposed to improve the management of blood products. We found an important disconnect between the cost effectiveness ratio of strategies and their uptake by policy makers. In other words, the least efficient strategies are those which increase transfusion safety by increasing the number of biological markers and are those preferred by health authorities in developed countries. Other more efficient strategies are more slowly implemented and included a systematic use of transfusion guidelines, reducing blood losses or increasing pre operative blood levels in elective surgeries. PMID:26096190

  2. Halting the allergic march.

    PubMed

    Van Bever, Hugo P; Samuel, Sudesh T; Lee, Bee Wah

    2008-04-01

    The prevalence of childhood allergic diseases, such as allergic asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis, has increased exponentially. In Singapore, the prevalence of asthma at all ages exceeds 20%, and around 50% of Singaporean children show features of an underlying allergy. The exact environmental causes for the increase of allergic diseases have not yet been identified, but most researchers agree that a decreased bacterial load in young children may be one of the reasons for the increase. However, the causes of allergy are multiple, and the development of an allergic disease is the result of complex interactions between genetic constitution and environmental factors. In this review article, different aspects of allergic sensitization are covered, including prenatal and postnatal sensitization. The phenomenon of the "allergic march" (switching from one clinical expression of allergy to another) and its underlying mechanisms are discussed. The last part of this review article is on prevention and treatment of allergic diseases, including the role of bacterial products (probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics) and the role of immunotherapy, including sublingual immunotherapy. PMID:23283392

  3. Allergic contact dermatitis from oxygen cannulas.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, A J

    1980-10-01

    A patient experienced allergic contact dermatitis on two occasions two months apart as a result of wearing the same brand of polyvinyl chloride oxygen cannula. In one instance the cannula was removed and not replaced, as continuing oxygen was unnecessary; on the other occasion the original cannula was replaced by a cannula of another brand. In both cases the dermatitis disappeared after removal of the original cannula. The reaction was probably to a resin remaining in the polyvinyl chloride after the curing process in the manufacture of the plastic from which the cannula was made. Allergic reactions to plastics have been documented in other medical products but have not previously been reported in respiratory therapy plastic appliances. Because of variability in residual resins in different brands and batches of plastics, and because of varying individual sensitivity, therapists and others should be alert to the possibility of allergic contact dermatitis from respiratory therapy devices. PMID:10315103

  4. Epigenomics and allergic disease

    PubMed Central

    Lockett, Gabrielle A; Patil, Veeresh K; Soto-Ramírez, Nelís; Ziyab, Ali H; Holloway, John W; Karmaus, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Allergic disease development is affected by both genes and the environment, and epigenetic mechanisms are hypothesized to mediate these environmental effects. In this article, we discuss the link between the environment, DNA methylation and allergic disease, as well as questions of causality inherent to analyses of DNA methylation. From the practical side, we describe characteristics of allergic phenotypes and contrast different epidemiologic study designs used in epigenetic research. We examine methodological considerations, how best to conduct preprocessing and analysis of DNA methylation data sets, and the latest methods, technologies and discoveries in this rapidly advancing field. DNA methylation and other epigenetic marks are firmly entwined with allergic disease, a link that may hold the basis for future allergic disease diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24283882

  5. Haemovigilance: an effective tool for improving transfusion practice.

    PubMed

    de Vries, R R P; Faber, J-C; Strengers, P F W

    2011-01-01

    Haemovigilance is a tool to improve the quality of the blood transfusion chain, primarily focusing on safety. In this review we discuss the history and present state of this relatively new branch of transfusion medicine as well as some developments that we foresee in the near future. The top 10 results and conclusions are: (1) Haemovigilance systems have shown that blood transfusion is relatively safe compared with the use of medicinal drugs and that at least in Europe blood components have reached a high safety standard. (2) The majority of the serious adverse reactions and events occur in the hospital. (3) The majority of preventable adverse reactions are due to clerical errors. (4) Some adverse reactions such as anaphylactic reactions often are not avoidable and therefore have to be considered as an inherent risk of blood transfusion. (5) Well-functioning haemovigilance systems have not only indicated how safety should be improved, but also documented the success of various measures. (6) The type of organisation of a haemovigilance system is of relative value, and different systems may have the same outcome. (7) International collaboration has been extremely useful. (8) Haemovigilance systems may be used for the vigilance and surveillance of alternatives for allogeneic blood transfusion such as cell savers. (9) Haemovigilance systems and officers may be used to improve the quality of aspects of blood transfusion other than safety, such as appropriate use. (10) Haemovigilance systems will be of benefit also for vigilance and surveillance of the treatment with other human products such as cells, tissues and organs. PMID:21175656

  6. Transfusion practices and infectious risks.

    PubMed

    Shander, Aryeh; Lobel, Gregg P; Javidroozi, Mazyar

    2016-06-01

    Transfusion-transmitted infections remain among the most-feared complications of allogeneic blood transfusion. Thanks to several strategies including donor screening and deferral, blood testing and pathogen inactivation, their risks have reached all-time low levels, particularly in developed nations. Nonetheless, new and emerging infections remain a threat that is likely to exacerbate in the coming years with continued globalization and climate change. More effective strategies of pathogen inactivation and more vigilant horizon screening are hoped to abate the risk. Additionally, allogeneic transfusion has repeatedly been shown to be associated with worsening of outcomes in patients, including the documented increased risk of infections (often nosocomial) in recipients of transfusions. The underlying mechanism is likely to be related to immunosuppressive effects of allogeneic blood, iron content, and bacterial contamination. This issue is best addressed by more judicious and evidence-based use of allogeneic blood components to ensure the potential benefits outweigh the risks. PMID:26959944

  7. Transfusion management of trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Shaz, Beth H; Dente, Christopher J; Harris, Robert S; MacLeod, Jana B; Hillyer, Christopher D

    2009-06-01

    The management of massively transfused trauma patients has improved with a better understanding of trauma-induced coagulopathy, the limitations of crystalloid infusion, and the implementation of massive transfusion protocols (MTPs), which encompass transfusion management and other patient care needs to mitigate the "lethal triad" of acidosis, hypothermia, and coagulopathy. MTPs are currently changing in the United States and worldwide because of recent data showing that earlier and more aggressive transfusion intervention and resuscitation with blood components that approximate whole blood significantly decrease mortality. In this context, MTPs are a key element of "damage control resuscitation," which is defined as the systematic approach to major trauma that addresses the lethal triad mentioned above. MTPs using adequate volumes of plasma, and thus coagulation factors, improve patient outcome. The ideal amounts of plasma, platelet, cryoprecipitate and other coagulation factors given in MTPs in relationship to the red blood cell transfusion volume are not known precisely, but until prospective, randomized, clinical trials are performed and more clinical data are obtained, current data support a target ratio of plasma:red blood cell:platelet transfusions of 1:1:1. Future prospective clinical trials will allow continued improvement in MTPs and thus in the overall management of patients with trauma. PMID:19448199

  8. Massive Bleeding and Massive Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Meißner, Andreas; Schlenke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Massive bleeding in trauma patients is a serious challenge for all clinicians, and an interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach is warranted within a limited time frame. Massive transfusion usually is defined as the transfusion of more than 10 units of packed red blood cells (RBCs) within 24 h or a corresponding blood loss of more than 1- to 1.5-fold of the body's entire blood volume. Especially male trauma patients experience this life-threatening condition within their productive years of life. An important parameter for clinical outcome is to succeed in stopping the bleeding preferentially within the first 12 h of hospital admission. Additional coagulopathy in the initial phase is induced by trauma itself and aggravated by consumption and dilution of clotting factors. Although different aspects have to be taken into consideration when viewing at bleedings induced by trauma compared to those caused by major surgery, the basic strategy is similar. Here, we will focus on trauma-induced massive hemorrhage. Currently there are no definite, worldwide accepted algorithms for blood transfusion and strategies for optimal coagulation management. There is increasing evidence that a higher ratio of plasma and RBCs (e.g. 1:1) endorsed by platelet transfusion might result in a superior survival of patients at risk for trauma-induced coagulopathy. Several strategies have been evolved in the military environment, although not all strategies should be transferred unproven to civilian practice, e.g. the transfusion of whole blood. Several agents have been proposed to support the restoration of coagulation. Some have been used for years without any doubt on their benefit-to-risk profile, whereas great enthusiasm of other products has been discouraged by inefficacy in terms of blood transfusion requirements and mortality or significant severe side effects. This review surveys current literature on fluid resuscitation, blood transfusion, and hemostatic agents currently

  9. Concomitant sensitization to inhaled budesonide and oral nystatin presenting as allergic contact stomatitis and systemic allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Vega, Francisco; Ramos, Tania; Las Heras, Paloma; Blanco, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Concomitant allergic reactions to multiple drugs are uncommon. We report the case of a 66-year-old woman who presented with concomitant sensitization to inhaled budesonide and oral nystatin presenting as allergic contact stomatitis and systemic allergic contact dermatitis. It is notable that one of the reactions was caused by oral nystatin, which generally is not considered to be allergenic due to its poor intestinal absorption. Diagnoses were confirmed on patch testing with histologic examination along with oral challenge testing. We also used challenge testing to rule out cross-reactivity among nystatin and other macrolide drugs, both antifungals and antibiotics. PMID:26919353

  10. Management of Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Sausen, Verra O.; Marks, Katherine E.; Sausen, Kenneth P.; Self, Timothy H.

    2005-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is the most common chronic childhood disease. Reduced quality of life is frequently caused by this IgE-mediated disease, including sleep disturbance with subsequent decreased school performance. Asthma and exercise-induced bronchospasm are commonly seen concurrently with allergic rhinitis, and poorly controlled allergic rhinitis negatively affects asthma outcomes. Nonsedating antihistamines or intranasal azelastine are effective agents to manage allergic rhinitis, often in combination with oral decongestants. For moderate to severe persistent disease, intranasal corticosteroids are the most effiective agents. Some patients require concomitant intranasal corticosteroids and nonsedating antihistamines for optimal management. Other available agents include leukotriene receptor antagonists, intranasal cromolyn, intranasal ipratropium, specific immunotherapy, and anti-IgE therapy. PMID:23118635

  11. Allergic Rhinitis Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic conjunctivitis (eye allergy). Is it true that mold spores can trigger eye allergy symptoms? True False ... allergy) are seasonal allergens such as pollen and mold spores. Indoor allergens such as dust mites and ...

  12. Allergic rhinitis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    During pregnancy, the first-choice drugs for allergic rhinitis are nasal or oral "non-sedating" antihistamines without antimuscarinic activity, in particular cetirizine, or loratadine after the first trimester. PMID:27186624

  13. Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes of allergic contact dermatitis include nickel, chromates, rubber chemicals, and topical antibiotic ointments and creams. Frequent ... construction workers who are in contact with cement. Rubber chemicals are found in gloves, balloons, elastic in ...

  14. Allergic Rhinitis: Antihistamines

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Allergic Rhinitis | Antihistamines What are antihistamines? Antihistamines are medicines that help stop allergy symptoms, such as itchy eyes, sneezing and a runny nose. Sometimes, an antihistamine ...

  15. [Antihistamines in allergic rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Kruszewski, Jerzy

    2007-01-01

    Antihistamines are the first line of pharmacotherapy in allergic diseases, especially in allergic rhinitis. The article also presents the interesting 2005-2007 publications on the use of antihistamine in practical point of view, especially the newly introduced ones (desloratadine, fexofenadine, levocetirizine) and those which are to be introduced soon (rupatadine). The efficacy in skin histamine provocation model and various clinical model were discussed. PMID:18260244

  16. [Therapy of allergic rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Klimek, Ludger; Sperl, Annette

    2016-03-01

    If the avoidance of the provoking allergen is insufficient or not possible, medical treatment can be tried. Therapeutics of the first choice for the treatment of the seasonal and persistent allergic rhinitis are antihistamines and topical glucocorticoids. Chromones are less effective so they should only be used for adults with a special indication, for example during pregnancy. Beside the avoidance of the allergen the immunotherapy is the only causal treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:27120870

  17. Granulocyte transfusions in children using filter-collected cells.

    PubMed

    Higby, D J; Freeman, A; Henderson, E S; Sinks, L; Cohen, E

    1976-09-01

    Twenty-three children with various stages and morphologic types of leukemia were treated with multiple granulocyte transfusions obtained by filtration leukapheresis when neutropenia-associated infection appeared unresponsive to antibiotics. All children meeting the above qualifications were given granulocyte transfusions during this time period. Twenty-one of 23 became afebrile during or shortly after the transfusions; one died with disseminated Herpes simplex; and one became well enough to be discharged, although he was never free of fever. Frequent mild to moderate fever and chills were noted. One child developed a severe pulmonary reaction followed by resolution of pneumonia. Filtration leukapheresis is a useful adjunct in controlling severe infections in neutropenic children. PMID:821603

  18. Genetics of Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Romina A.; Barnes, Kathleen C.

    2015-01-01

    The allergic diseases are complex phenotypes for which a strong genetic basis has been firmly established. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has been widely employed in the field of allergic disease, and to date significant associations have been published for nearly 100 asthma genes/loci, in addition to multiple genes/loci for AD, AR and IgE levels, for which the overwhelming number of candidates are novel and have given a new appreciation for the role of innate as well as adaptive immune-response genes in allergic disease. A major outcome of GWAS in allergic disease has been the formation of national and international collaborations leading to consortia meta-analyses, and an appreciation for the specificity of genetic associations to sub-phenotypes of allergic disease. Molecular genetics has undergone a technological revolution, leading to next generation sequencing (NGS) strategies that are increasingly employed to hone in on the causal variants associated with allergic diseases. Unmet needs in the field include the inclusion of ethnically and racially diverse cohorts, and strategies for managing ‘big data’ that is an outcome of technological advances such as sequencing. PMID:25459575

  19. Severe systemic allergic reaction induced by accidental skin contact with cow milk in a 16-year-old boy. A case report.

    PubMed

    Liccardi, G; De Falco, F; Gilder, J A; D'Amato, M; D'Amato, G

    2004-01-01

    The symptoms of food allergy are rarely induced by skin contact. A 16-year-old boy was referred to our Allergology Centre after an episode of systemic symptoms triggered by accidental skin contact with a drop of cow milk (CM) dripped from a sandwich containing fresh cheese. The patient had been allergic to CM from the age of 24 months and had experienced several episodes of urticaria-angioedema after the ingestion of tiny or "hidden" amounts of CM proteins. In vivo and in vitro diagnostic procedures showed intense sensitisation to all CM proteins (1/100 dilutions of allergenic extracts produced large wheals, and class 4 specific IgE antibodies. Total IgE antibodies were elevate (770.0 UI/). A moderate degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness was found (PC20 metacholine: 3.90 milligrams). This case report suggests that patients with a high degree of sensitisation to CM proteins should be alert to the danger of skin contact and should beware of "hidden" CM allergens. PMID:15301310

  20. Non-transfusion-dependent thalassemias

    PubMed Central

    Musallam, Khaled M.; Rivella, Stefano; Vichinsky, Elliott; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer A.

    2013-01-01

    Non-transfusion-dependent thalassemias include a variety of phenotypes that, unlike patients with beta (β)-thalassemia major, do not require regular transfusion therapy for survival. The most commonly investigated forms are β-thalassemia intermedia, hemoglobin E/β-thalassemia, and α-thalassemia intermedia (hemoglobin H disease). However, transfusion-independence in such patients is not without side effects. Ineffective erythropoiesis and peripheral hemolysis, the hallmarks of disease process, lead to a variety of subsequent pathophysiologies including iron overload and hypercoagulability that ultimately lead to a number of serious clinical morbidities. Thus, prompt and accurate diagnosis of non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia is essential to ensure early intervention. Although several management options are currently available, the need to develop more novel therapeutics is justified by recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of disease. Such efforts require wide international collaboration, especially since non-transfusion-dependent thalassemias are no longer bound to low- and middle-income countries but have spread to large multiethnic cities in Europe and the Americas due to continued migration. PMID:23729725

  1. Novel delivery systems for anti-allergic agents: allergic disease and innovative treatments.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Carla M; Coelho, Pedro B; Oliveira, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Anti-allergic agents are used to treat a great variety of diseases which usually involve an inflammation reaction. These compounds act by inhibiting the release and the effects of inflammatory mediators (e.g. histamine) in the target tissue. The purpose of anti-allergy therapy is to deliver the drug to its local of action in a therapeutic concentration, minimizing the undesired side effects. In order to solve some of the anti-allergic agents' physicochemical drawbacks and the limitations associated to conventional pharmaceutical formulations (e.g. poor solubility and absorption, skin permeation, stability), novel drug delivery systems, such as cyclodextrins, liposomes, micelles, microemulsions, nano and microparticles, have been developed. Depending on the allergic condition, several administration routes are used to deliver anti-allergic agents, each with its own disadvantages to overcome. In the literature, there are a vast number of papers concerning novel delivery systems for anti-allergic agents, making it difficult to evaluate the information and the promising outcomes. The aim of the present review article is to compile the recent (i.e. in the new millennium) improvements of novel drug delivery technology focusing on the achievement of anti-allergic therapeutic delivery. The potential intrinsic benefits of these systems will reflect an increased therapeutic adherence and better patients' life quality. A critical prospect of future clinical trial directions will also be discussed. PMID:25895551

  2. Blood transfusion practices in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, TVSP

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome characterised by systemic inflammation due to infection. There is a spectrum with severity ranging from sepsis to severe sepsis and septic shock. Even with optimal treatment, mortality due to severe sepsis or septic shock is significant and poses a challenge to management. Antibiotics, source control, resuscitation with fluids, vasopressor and inotropic agents are the main-stay of treatment for septic shock. These may be supplemented with transfusion of red blood cells and or blood products, in the case of anaemia to sustain sufficient oxygen delivery[1] or to manage associated haematological issues. Transfusion in sepsis has always been a debatable issue, especially in relation to choice of the fluid and the role of blood or blood product transfusion. PMID:25535429

  3. Benchmarking: applications to transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Apelseth, Torunn Oveland; Molnar, Laura; Arnold, Emmy; Heddle, Nancy M

    2012-10-01

    Benchmarking is as a structured continuous collaborative process in which comparisons for selected indicators are used to identify factors that, when implemented, will improve transfusion practices. This study aimed to identify transfusion medicine studies reporting on benchmarking, summarize the benchmarking approaches used, and identify important considerations to move the concept of benchmarking forward in the field of transfusion medicine. A systematic review of published literature was performed to identify transfusion medicine-related studies that compared at least 2 separate institutions or regions with the intention of benchmarking focusing on 4 areas: blood utilization, safety, operational aspects, and blood donation. Forty-five studies were included: blood utilization (n = 35), safety (n = 5), operational aspects of transfusion medicine (n = 5), and blood donation (n = 0). Based on predefined criteria, 7 publications were classified as benchmarking, 2 as trending, and 36 as single-event studies. Three models of benchmarking are described: (1) a regional benchmarking program that collects and links relevant data from existing electronic sources, (2) a sentinel site model where data from a limited number of sites are collected, and (3) an institutional-initiated model where a site identifies indicators of interest and approaches other institutions. Benchmarking approaches are needed in the field of transfusion medicine. Major challenges include defining best practices and developing cost-effective methods of data collection. For those interested in initiating a benchmarking program, the sentinel site model may be most effective and sustainable as a starting point, although the regional model would be the ideal goal. PMID:22237134

  4. Adelmidrol increases the endogenous concentrations of palmitoylethanolamide in canine keratinocytes and down-regulates an inflammatory reaction in an in vitro model of contact allergic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Petrosino, S; Puigdemont, A; Della Valle, M F; Fusco, M; Verde, R; Allarà, M; Aveta, T; Orlando, P; Di Marzo, V

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate potential new target(s)/mechanism(s) for the palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) analogue, adelmidrol, and its role in an in vitro model of contact allergic dermatitis. Freshly isolated canine keratinocytes, human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells and human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells, wild-type or transfected with cDNA encoding for N-acylethanolamine-hydrolysing acid amidase (NAAA), were treated with adelmidrol or azelaic acid, and the concentrations of endocannabinoids (anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol) and related mediators (PEA and oleoylethanolamide) were measured. The mRNA expression of PEA catabolic enzymes (NAAA and fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH), and biosynthetic enzymes (N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D, NAPE-PLD) and glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase 1, was also measured. Brain or HEK-293 cell membrane fractions were used to assess the ability of adelmidrol to inhibit FAAH and NAAA activity, respectively. HaCaT cells were stimulated with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid and the release of the pro-inflammatory chemokine, monocyte chemotactic protein-2 (MCP-2), was measured in the presence of adelmidrol. Adelmidrol increased PEA concentrations in canine keratinocytes and in the other cellular systems studied. It did not inhibit the activity of PEA catabolic enzymes, although it reduced their mRNA expression in some cell types. Adelmidrol modulated the expression of PEA biosynthetic enzyme, NAPE-PLD, in HaCaT cells, and inhibited the release of the pro-inflammatory chemokine MCP-2 from stimulated HaCaT cells. This study demonstrates for the first time an 'entourage effect' of adelmidrol on PEA concentrations in keratinocytes and suggests that this effect might mediate, at least in part, the anti-inflammatory effects of this compound in veterinary practice. PMID:26639824

  5. Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome is a rare condition that occurs only in identical twins while they are in the womb. ... Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) occurs when the blood supply of 1 twin moves to the ...

  6. Feline transfusion practice in South Africa: current status and practical solutions.

    PubMed

    Dippenaar, T

    1999-09-01

    Blood transfusion therapy is often under-utilised in feline practice in South Africa. However, it is a technique that can be safely and effectively introduced in practice. Cats have naturally occurring allo-antibodies against the blood type that they lack, which makes blood typing, or alternatively cross-matching, essential before transfusions. Feline blood donors must be carefully selected, be disease free and should be sedated before blood collection. The preferred anticoagulant for feline blood collection is citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine. Blood can either be administered intravenously or into the medullary cavity, with the transfusion rate depending on the cat's hydration status and cardiac function. Transfusion reactions can be immediate or delayed and they are classified as immunological or non-immunological. Indications, methods and techniques to do feline blood transfusions in a safe and economical way are highlighted. PMID:10852686

  7. Prolongation of rat heart allografts by donor-specific blood transfusion treated with ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.F.; Iga, C.; Lau, H.; Hardy, M.A.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of donor-specific blood transfusion was compared to that of UVB-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion on heart allograft survival in inbred rats with major histocompatibility differences. In one series ACI rats received heterotopic heart grafts from Lewis rats and 1 mL transfusion of donor-type blood at 1, 2, and 3 weeks prior to the transplantation. Fifty percent of the grafts were permanently accepted (survival greater than 200 days). Following UVB-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion, 55% of the grafts survived indefinitely. In a mixed lymphocyte reaction ACI lymphocytes are weak responders to Lewis lymphocytes. In another series, Lewis rats received ACI hearts. Donor-specific transfusions at 1, 2, and 3 weeks prior to transplantation did not significantly alter the survival of heart allografts. Lewis lymphocytes react strongly to ACI stimulator cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. However, when the donor blood was UVB-irradiated prior to transfusion, the ACI allograft survival was significantly prolonged in this ACI-to-Lewis strain combination. When Lewis rats received W/F hearts following either donor-specific or UVB-irradiated donor-specific transfusions, the hearts' survival was similarly and significantly prolonged, but did not become permanent. Mixed lymphocyte reaction reveals that the stimulation index of Lewis lymphocytes against W/F lymphocytes is greater than that of ACI versus Lewis, but is less than that between Lewis responder cells against ACI stimulators.

  8. Evaluation of allergic response using dynamic thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, E.; Rok, T.; Tatoń, G.

    2015-03-01

    Skin dynamic termography supplemented by a mathematical model is presented as an objective and sensitive indicator of the skin prick test result. Termographic measurements were performed simultaneously with routine skin prick tests. The IR images were acquired every 70 s up to 910 s after skin prick. In the model histamine is treated as the principal mediator of the allergic reaction. Histamine produces vasolidation and the engorged vessels are responsible for an increase in skin temperature. The model parameters were determined by fitting the analytical solutions to the spatio-temporal distributions of the differences between measured and baseline temperatures. The model reproduces experimental data very well (coefficient of determination = 0.805÷0.995). The method offers a set of parameters to describe separately skin allergic reaction and skin reactivity. The release of histamine after allergen injection is the best indicator of allergic response. The diagnostic parameter better correlates with the standard evaluation of a skin prick test (correlation coefficient = 0.98) than the result of the thermographic planimetric method based on temperature and heated area determination (0.81). The high sensitivity of the method allows for determination of the allergic response in patients with the reduced skin reactivity.

  9. PATTERN, INDICATIONS AND REVIEW OF COMPLICATIONS OF NEONATAL BLOOD TRANSFUSION IN IBADAN, SOUTHWEST NIGERIA

    PubMed Central

    Ayede, A.I.; Akingbola, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    Background and objectives: There is a huge need for blood transfusion in the newborn particularly due to the reduced marrow activity in the neonatal period. Despite widely use of blood products in the neonatal period, there is paucity of local data on the pattern, indications and reactions to blood transfusions in Nigerian newborns. This study evaluates the blood transfusion indications and patterns in special care baby unit and C12nd of University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Methodology: A cross sectional study was carried on the recruited newborns and structured questionnaires were used to obtain bio data, medical problems, indications for blood transfusion, type of blood products transfused and clinical signs. Urinalysis was performed out before and after the transfusion. Results: A total of 100 neonates were recruited into the study with a male: female ratio of (M: F= 1:1). The age range was 2–34 days and their weight ranged between 0.8kg to 3.6 kg with a mean weight of 1.64 kg. The main indications for transfusion were anaemia from prematurity & neonatal sepsis(NNS) 46%; (red cell replacement), NNS, Disseminated intravascular coagulation(DIC) & anaemia 24%; (partial exchange + top up + Fresh frozen plasma), neonatal jaundice(NNJ) & anaemia 14%; (whole blood), NNJ, NNS + anaemia 6%(Blood transfusion + Fresh frozen plasma), NNS + anaemia 10% (whole blood). Conclusion: Blood transfusion is still frequent in the study area and prematurity, neonatal sepsis and jaundice rank high in the indications. Transfusion reactions are rare in the evaluated neonates. PMID:25161485

  10. Allergic rhinitis - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... in something you are allergic to, such as dust mites, animal dander, or pollen. Allergic rhinitis is ... your or your child's exposure to them. Reduce dust and dust mites in the home. Control molds ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: allergic asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions allergic asthma allergic asthma Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Asthma is a breathing disorder characterized by inflammation of ...

  12. What Is a Blood Transfusion?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells, white blood cells, platelets (PLATE-lets), and plasma. Blood is transfused either as whole blood (with all its parts) or, more often, as individual parts. Blood Types Every person has one of the following blood types: A, B, AB, ...

  13. [Transfusion-associated circulatory overload].

    PubMed

    Ozier, Y; Mouquet, F; Rieux, C; Mertes, P-M; Muller, J-Y; Caldani, C; Boudjedir, K; Carlier, M

    2012-11-01

    A working group of the French National Hemovigilance Committee has been in charge of heightening awareness of Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) among physicians and nurses. This multidisciplinary group has produced the present document that focuses on epidemiological data provided by the French haemovigilance network, physiopathology, diagnosis, treatment and specific actions that could prevent or minimize the risk of TACO. PMID:23039960

  14. Allergic Fungal Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Alice E W; Borish, Larry; Gurrola, José; Payne, Spencer

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the history of allergic fungal rhinosinusitis and the clinical, pathologic, and radiographic criteria necessary to establish its diagnosis and differentiate this disease from other types of chronic rhinosinusitis. Allergic fungal rhinosinusitis is a noninvasive fungal form of sinus inflammation characterized by an often times unilateral, expansile process in which the typical allergic "peanut-butter-like" mucin contributes to the formation of nasal polyps, hyposmia/anosmia, and structural changes of the face. IgE sensitization to fungi is a necessary, but not sufficient, pathophysiologic component of the disease process that is also defined by microscopic visualization of mucin-containing fungus and characteristic radiological imaging. This article expounds on these details and others including the key clinical and scientific distinctions of this diagnosis, the pathophysiologic mechanisms beyond IgE-mediated hypersensitivity that must be at play, and areas of current and future research. PMID:27393774

  15. Local Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Campo, Paloma; Salas, María; Blanca-López, Natalia; Rondón, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    This review focuses on local allergic rhinitis, a new phenotype of allergic rhinitis, commonly misdiagnosed as nonallergic rhinitis. It has gained attention over last decade and can affect patients from all countries, ethnic groups and ages, impairing their quality of life, and is frequently associated with conjunctivitis and asthma. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, the demonstration of a positive response to nasal allergen provocation test and/or the detection of nasal sIgE. A positive basophil activation test may support the diagnosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that allergen immunotherapy is an effective immune-modifying treatment, highlighting the importance of early diagnosis. PMID:27083105

  16. Allergic contact dermatitis to propolis in a violin maker.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Heather D; Fogelman, Joshua P; Ramsay, David L; Cohen, David E

    2002-02-01

    Allergy to colophony is well noted in the literature, however, there have been few case reports of allergic contact dermatitis to propolis in musicians and instrument makers. We report a case of a stringed instrument craftsman who developed allergic contact dermatitis to propolis, a component of Italian varnish. A review of the components, applications, and the clinical manifestations of hypersensitivity reactions to propolis are presented. PMID:11807465

  17. Oleanolic Acid Controls Allergic and Inflammatory Responses in Experimental Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Carmen; Martín, Rubén; Gallego-Muñoz, Patricia; Hernández, Marita; Nieto, María L.

    2014-01-01

    Pollen is the most common aeroallergen to cause seasonal conjunctivitis. The result of allergen exposure is a strong Th2-mediated response along with conjunctival mast cell degranulation and eosinophilic infiltration. Oleanolic acid (OA) is natural a triterpene that displays strong anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties being an active anti-allergic molecule on hypersensitivity reaction models. However, its effect on inflammatory ocular disorders including conjunctivits, has not yet been addressed. Hence, using a Ragweed pollen (RWP)-specific allergic conjunctivitis (EAC) mouse model we study here whether OA could modify responses associated to allergic processes. We found that OA treatment restricted mast cell degranulation and infiltration of eosinophils in conjunctival tissue and decreased allergen-specific Igs levels in EAC mice. Th2-type cytokines, secreted phospholipase A2 type-IIA (sPLA2-IIA), and chemokines levels were also significantly diminished in the conjunctiva and serum of OA-treated EAC mice. Moreover, OA treatment also suppressed RWP-specific T-cell proliferation. In vitro studies, on relevant cells of the allergic process, revealed that OA reduced the proliferative and migratory response, as well as the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators on EoL-1 eosinophils and RBL-2H3 mast cells exposed to allergic and/or crucial inflammatory stimuli such as RWP, sPLA2-IIA or eotaxin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the beneficial activity of OA in ocular allergic processes and may provide a new intervention strategy and potential therapy for allergic diseases. PMID:24699261

  18. A prospective, active haemovigilance study with combined cohort analysis of 19 175 transfusions of platelet components prepared with amotosalen–UVA photochemical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, F; Osselaer, J; Pierelli, L; Lozano, M; Cid, J; Tardivel, R; Garraud, O; Hervig, T; Domanovic, D; Cukjati, M; Gudmundson, S; Hjalmarsdottir, I B; Castrillo, A; Gonzalez, R; Brihante, D; Santos, M; Schlenke, P; Elliott, A; Lin, J-S; Tappe, D; Stassinopoulos, A; Green, J; Corash, L

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives A photochemical treatment process (PCT) utilizing amotosalen and UVA light (INTERCEPT™ Blood System) has been developed for inactivation of viruses, bacteria, parasites and leucocytes that can contaminate blood components intended for transfusion. The objective of this study was to further characterize the safety profile of INTERCEPT-treated platelet components (PCT-PLT) administered across a broad patient population. Materials and Methods This open-label, observational haemovigilance programme of PCT-PLT transfusions was conducted in 21 centres in 11 countries. All transfusions were monitored for adverse events within 24 h post-transfusion and for serious adverse events (SAEs) up to 7 days post-transfusion. All adverse events were assessed for severity (Grade 0–4), and causal relationship to PCT-PLT transfusion. Results Over the course of 7 years in the study centres, 4067 patients received 19 175 PCT-PLT transfusions. Adverse events were infrequent, and most were of Grade 1 severity. On a per-transfusion basis, 123 (0·6%) were classified an acute transfusion reaction (ATR) defined as an adverse event related to the transfusion. Among these ATRs, the most common were chills (77, 0·4%) and urticaria (41, 0·2%). Fourteen SAEs were reported, of which 2 were attributed to platelet transfusion (<0·1%). No case of transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, transfusion-transmitted infection or death was attributed to the transfusion of PCT-PLT. Conclusion This longitudinal haemovigilance safety programme to monitor PCT-PLT transfusions demonstrated a low rate of ATRs, and a safety profile consistent with that previously reported for conventional platelet components. PMID:25981525

  19. Diagnosing Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Scadding, Glenis K; Scadding, Guy W

    2016-05-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is the most common immunologic disease in industrialized societies and has a significant impact on quality of life. Most asthmatics also have rhinitis. AR may present with comorbidities, including chronic otitis media with effusion, cough, and pollen-food cross-reactivity. AR may occur in isolation or be part of a mixed rhinitis. PMID:27083100

  20. Religious Allergic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Alina; Matiz, Catalina; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-01-01

    Henna, derived from a combination of natural leaves and coloring additives, is a common decorative dye traditionally used in many Islamic religious celebrations. Para-phenylenediamine (PPD), a major component of black henna tattoo, is a strong sensitizer and common allergen. We report a case of severe connubial allergic contact dermatitis after black henna heterotransfer in a girl. PMID:25968562

  1. Risk Factors for Alloimmunisation after red blood Cell Transfusions (R-FACT): a case cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zwaginga, Jaap Jan; van der Bom, J G

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Individuals exposed to red blood cell alloantigens through transfusion, pregnancy or transplantation may produce antibodies against the alloantigens. Alloantibodies can pose serious clinical problems such as delayed haemolytic reactions and logistic problems, for example, to obtain timely and properly matched transfusion blood for patients in which new alloantibodies are detected. Objective The authors hypothesise that the particular clinical conditions (eg, used medication, concomitant infection, cellular immunity) during which transfusions are given may contribute to the risk of immunisation. The aim of this research was to examine the association between clinical, environmental and genetic characteristics of the recipient of erythrocyte transfusions and the risk against erythrocyte alloimmunisation during that transfusion episode. Methods and analysis Study design Incident case–cohort study. Setting Secondary care, nationwide study (within the Netherlands) including seven hospitals, from January 2005 to December 2011. Study population Consecutive red cell transfused patients at the study centres. Inclusion The study cohort comprises of consecutive red blood cell transfused patients at the study centre. Exclusion Patients with transfusions before the study period and/or pre-existing alloantibodies.Cases defined as first time alloantibody formers; Controls defined as transfused individuals matched (on number of transfusions) to cases and have not formed an alloantibody. Statistical analysis Logistic regression models will be used to assess the association between the risk to develop antibodies and potential risk factors, adjusted for other risk factors. Ethics and dissemination Approval at each local ethics regulatory committee will be obtained. Data will be coded for privacy reasons. Patients will be sent a letter and an information brochure explaining the purpose of the study. A consent form in presence of the study coordinator will be signed

  2. Transfusion of murine RBCs expressing the human KEL glycoprotein induces clinically significant alloantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Stowell, Sean R.; Girard-Pierce, Kathryn R.; Smith, Nicole H.; Henry, Kate L.; Arthur, C. Maridith; Zimring, James C.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Red blood cell (RBC) alloantibodies to non-self antigens may develop following transfusion or pregnancy, leading to morbidity and mortality in the form of hemolytic transfusion reactions or hemolytic disease of the newborn. A better understanding of the mechanisms of RBC alloantibody induction, or strategies to mitigate the consequences of such antibodies, may ultimately improve transfusion safety. However, such studies are inherently difficult in humans. Study Design and Methods We recently generated transgenic mice with RBC specific expression of the human KEL glycoprotein, with the KEL2 or KEL1 antigens. Herein, we investigate recipient alloimmune responses to transfused RBCs in this system. Results Transfusion of RBCs from KEL2 donors into wild type recipients (lacking the human KEL protein but expressing the murine KEL orthologue) resulted in dose dependent anti-KEL glycoprotein IgM and IgG antibody responses, enhanced by recipient inflammation with poly (I:C). Boostable responses were evident upon repeat transfusion, with morbid appearing alloimmunized recipients experiencing rapid clearance of transfused KEL2 but not control RBCs. Although KEL1 RBCs were also immunogenic following transfusion into wild type recipients, transfusion of KEL1 RBCs into KEL2 recipients or vice versa failed to lead to detectable anti-KEL1 or anti-KEL2 responses. Conclusions This murine model, with reproducible and clinically significant KEL glycoprotein alloantibody responses, provides a platform for future mechanistic studies of RBC alloantibody induction and consequences. Long term translational goals of these studies include improving transfusion safety for at risk patients. PMID:23621760

  3. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  4. Impaired basophil histamine release from allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Stahl Skov, P; Norn, S; Weeke, B; Nolte, H

    1987-04-01

    A few patients (6-7%) with a verified type I allergic reaction do not respond with histamine release after challenge of their basophils with specific antigen (non-responding basophils from allergic patients). Sera from these non-responding patients were used for passive sensitization of responding cells from healthy controls. When these sensitized cells were challenged with specific antigen, histamine release was observed indicating that the non-responding allergic patients have circulating antigen-specific IgE capable of binding to Fc-receptors on the basophils. These findings suggest the possibility that non-responding basophils have impaired cell functions. We therefore examined the influence of enhanced IgE receptor stimulation on histamine release in non-responding basophils. This was made by stimulating protein kinase C activity by a phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate). When the non-responding cells were incubated with the phorbol ester and challenged with either anti-IgE or specific antigen, the cells released histamine. These findings support the hypothesis that the unresponsiveness of basophils in some allergic patients is associated with impaired IgE receptor complex activation or subcellular functioning and not with a lack of cell-bound IgE. PMID:2440283

  5. Transfusion-transmitted parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gagandeep; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2010-07-01

    The transmission of parasitic organisms through transfusion is relatively rare. Of the major transfusion-transmitted diseases, malaria is a major cause of TTIP in tropical countries whereas babesiosis and Chagas' disease pose the greatest threat to donors in the USA In both cases, this is due to the increased number of potentially infected donors. There are no reliable serologic tests available to screen donors for any of these organisms and the focus for prevention remains on adherence to donor screening guidelines that address travel history and previous infection with the etiologic agent. One goal is the development of tests that are able to screen for and identify donors potentially infectious for parasitic infections without causing the deferral of a large number of non-infectious donors or significantly increasing costs. Ideally, methods to inactivate the infectious organism will provide an element of added safety to the blood supply. PMID:20859503

  6. Transfusion-transmitted parasitic infections

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gagandeep; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    The transmission of parasitic organisms through transfusion is relatively rare. Of the major transfusion-transmitted diseases, malaria is a major cause of TTIP in tropical countries whereas babesiosis and Chagas’ disease pose the greatest threat to donors in the USA In both cases, this is due to the increased number of potentially infected donors. There are no reliable serologic tests available to screen donors for any of these organisms and the focus for prevention remains on adherence to donor screening guidelines that address travel history and previous infection with the etiologic agent. One goal is the development of tests that are able to screen for and identify donors potentially infectious for parasitic infections without causing the deferral of a large number of non-infectious donors or significantly increasing costs. Ideally, methods to inactivate the infectious organism will provide an element of added safety to the blood supply. PMID:20859503

  7. Transfusion medicine in trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Murthi, Sarah B; Dutton, Richard P; Edelman, Bennett B; Scalea, Thomas M; Hess, John R

    2011-01-01

    Injured patients stress the transfusion service with frequent demands for uncrossmatched red cells and plasma, occasional requirements for large amounts of blood products and the need for new and better blood products. Transfusion services stress trauma centers with demands for strict accountability for individual blood component units and adherence to indications in a clinical field where research has been difficult, and guidance opinion-based. New data suggest that the most severely injured patients arrive at the trauma center already coagulopathic and that these patients benefit from prompt, specific, corrective treatment. This research is clarifying trauma system requirements for new blood products and blood-product usage patterns, but the inability to obtain informed consent from severely injured patients remains an obstacle to further research. PMID:21083009

  8. Blood transfusion for the treatment of acute anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease and other digestive diseases

    PubMed Central

    García-Erce, José Antonio; Gomollón, Fernando; Muñoz, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) is frequently used as the first therapeutic option for the treatment of acute anaemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially when it developed due to gastrointestinal or perioperative blood loss, but is not risk-free. Adverse effects of ABT include, but are not limited to, acute hemolytic reaction (wrong blood or wrong patient), febrile non-hemolytic transfusional reaction, bacterial contamination, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion associated circulatory overload, transfusion-related immuno-modulation, and transmission of almost all infectious diseases (bacteria, virus, protozoa and prion), which might result in increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the main physiological goal of ABT, i.e. to increase oxygen consumption by the hypoxic tissues, has not been well documented. In contrast, the ABT is usually misused only to increase the haemoglobin level within a fixed protocol [mostly two by two packed red blood cell (PRC) units] independently of the patient’s tolerance to normovolemic anaemia or his clinical response to the transfusion of PRC units according to a “one-by-one” administration schedule. Evidence-based clinical guidelines may promote best transfusion practices by implementing restrictive transfusion protocols, thus reducing variability and minimizing the avoidable risks of transfusion, and the use of autologous blood and pharmacologic alternatives. In this regard, preoperative autologous blood donation (PABD) consistently diminished the frequency of ABT, although its contribution to ABT avoidance is reduced when performed under a transfusion protocol. In addition, interpretation of utility of PABD in surgical IBD patients is hampered by scarcity of published data. However, the role of autologous red blood cells as drug carriers is promising. Finally, it must be stressed that a combination of methods used within well-constructed protocols will offer better

  9. Blood transfusion for the treatment of acute anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease and other digestive diseases.

    PubMed

    García-Erce, José Antonio; Gomollón, Fernando; Muñoz, Manuel

    2009-10-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) is frequently used as the first therapeutic option for the treatment of acute anaemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially when it developed due to gastrointestinal or perioperative blood loss, but is not risk-free. Adverse effects of ABT include, but are not limited to, acute hemolytic reaction (wrong blood or wrong patient), febrile non-hemolytic transfusional reaction, bacterial contamination, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion associated circulatory overload, transfusion-related immuno-modulation, and transmission of almost all infectious diseases (bacteria, virus, protozoa and prion), which might result in increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the main physiological goal of ABT, i.e. to increase oxygen consumption by the hypoxic tissues, has not been well documented. In contrast, the ABT is usually misused only to increase the haemoglobin level within a fixed protocol [mostly two by two packed red blood cell (PRC) units] independently of the patient's tolerance to normovolemic anaemia or his clinical response to the transfusion of PRC units according to a "one-by-one" administration schedule. Evidence-based clinical guidelines may promote best transfusion practices by implementing restrictive transfusion protocols, thus reducing variability and minimizing the avoidable risks of transfusion, and the use of autologous blood and pharmacologic alternatives. In this regard, preoperative autologous blood donation (PABD) consistently diminished the frequency of ABT, although its contribution to ABT avoidance is reduced when performed under a transfusion protocol. In addition, interpretation of utility of PABD in surgical IBD patients is hampered by scarcity of published data. However, the role of autologous red blood cells as drug carriers is promising. Finally, it must be stressed that a combination of methods used within well-constructed protocols will offer better

  10. Blood transfusion economics in Greece.

    PubMed

    Kyriopoulos, J E; Michail-Merianou, V; Gitona, M

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the organizational structure and the economic impact of blood donation and transfusion in Greece and discusses some alternative aspects of its financing and its costing policy. The cost of blood transfusion is rising in Greece and amounts to nearly 15 billion drachmas per year due to the constant increase in demand and consequently, the price of each unit of blood. The production and distribution of blood on national scale involves meeting the demand for 500.000 units. Blood is mostly given by the friends and relatives of patients (55%) and by voluntary blood donation (30%). Approximately 50% of the blood produced is used in surgery, 20% for cases of beta-thalassaemia, 10% for emergencies and 20% for internal medicine cases. The blood transfusion system is totally funded by the state budget and the value to users is free of charge. The way in which blood is collected and processed differs from one geographical area to another and the unit cost depends on the size of the department concerned, ranging from 60-150 $. The need to control costs and restrain expenditure, in conjunction with guarantees of sufficiency and quality, makes it essential that measures should be taken to introduce economies of scale and encourage competition among blood providers, for increased production, components preparation and rational usage of blood. The introduction of a costing policy becomes necessary in this effort to achieve cost-containment techniques. PMID:8581182

  11. [Results of Training for Personnel Involved in Blood-Transfusion Testing Outside of Regular Work Hours at Saga University Hospital].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Marie; Yamada, Naotomo; Higashitani, Takanori; Ohta, Shoichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory testing prior to blood transfusion outside of regular hours in many hospitals and clinics is frequently conducted by technicians without sufficient experience in such testing work. To obtain consistent test results regardless of the degree of laboratory experience with blood transfusion testing, the number of facilities introducing automated equipment for testing prior to blood transfusion is increasing. Our hospital's blood transfusion department introduced fully automated test equipment in October of 2010 for use when blood transfusions are conducted outside of regular hours. However, excessive dependence on automated testing can lead to an inability to do manual blood typing or cross-match testing when necessitated by breakdowns in the automated test equipment, in the case of abnormal specimen reactions, or other such case. In addition, even outside of normal working hours there are more than a few instances in which transfusion must take place based on urgent communications from clinical staff, with the need for prompt and flexible timing of blood transfusion test and delivery of blood products. To address this situation, in 2010 we began training after-hours laboratory personnel in blood transfusion testing to provide practice using test tubes manually and to achieve greater understanding of blood transfusion test work (especially in cases of critical blood loss). Results of the training and difficulties in its implementation for such after-hours laboratory personnel at our hospital are presented and discussed in this paper. [Original] PMID:26995870

  12. Pulmonary consequences of transfusion: TRALI and TACO.

    PubMed

    Popovsky, Mark A

    2006-06-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury and transfusion-associated circulatory overload are important, life-threatening complications of transfusion. Each adversely impact hospital length of stay and cost of healthcare. TRALI is clinically indistinguishable from the adult respiratory distress syndrome but it has a more favorable prognosis. Approximately 10% of TRALI patients die from this complication. The at-risk patient for TRALI has not been identified. The most commonly cited incidence is 1:5000 plasma-containing blood component transfusions. Although several pathways may lead to TRALI, passive transfusion of leukocyte antibodies is currently the most important association. TACO occurs in 1-8% of patients undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty. It is precipitated by positive fluid balance and high transfusion flow rates. TACO is characterized by respiratory distress and acute pulmonary edema. PMID:16872902

  13. DEL RBC transfusion should be avoided in particular blood recipient in East Asia due to allosensitization and ineffectiveness*

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chao-peng; Wang, Bao-yan; Ye, Shi-hui; Zhang, Wen-li; Xu, Hua; Zhuang, Nai-bao; Wu, Xiao-ying; Xu, Heng-gui

    2012-01-01

    Previously, both primary and secondary anti-D alloimmunizations induced by “Asian type” DEL (RHD1227A allele) were observed in two incidents. We investigated how often these alloimmunization events occur. The transfusions of any D-negative patients were investigated in the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University Medical College, China, during the entire 2009. The antigens of D, C, c, E, and e were routinely serotyped. The “Asian type” DEL variant was genotyped and the RHD heterozygote was determined through two published methods. The changes in anti-D levels were monitored by the indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) and flow cytometry. Thirty D-negative transfused patients were included in the study. We focused on 11 recipients who were transfused with packed red blood cells (RBCs) from DEL donors at least one time. Of those 11 recipients, seven were anti-D negative before transfusion and four were anti-D positive (one patient with an autoantibody). One of the seven pre-transfusion anti-D negative patients produced a primary-response anti-D after being transfused with 400 ml of DEL blood twice. All four pre-transfusion antibody positive patients were not observed hemoglobin (Hb) levels increased, as expected after transfusions. Two patients had an increase in anti-D from 1:8 to 1:64 by IAT, which was also shown by flow cytometry. None of the patients experienced an acute hemolytic episode. Our data indicated that the primary anti-D induced by DEL transfusion or the secondary anti-D elevated by DEL in a truly D-negative patient might not be unusual. We suggest that a truly D-negative childbearing-aged woman should avoid DEL transfusion to protect her from primary anti-D allosensitization. In addition, anti-D positive recipients should also avoid DEL red cell transfusion due to the delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR). PMID:23125084

  14. Shoe allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Matthys, Erin; Zahir, Amir; Ehrlich, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Foot dermatitis is a widespread condition, affecting men and women of all ages. Because of the location, this condition may present as a debilitating problem to those who have it. Allergic contact dermatitis involving the feet is frequently due to shoes or socks. The allergens that cause shoe dermatitis can be found in any constituent of footwear, including rubber, adhesives, leather, dyes, metals, and medicaments. The goal of treatment is to identify and minimize contact with the offending allergen(s). The lack of product information released from shoe manufacturers and the continually changing trends in footwear present a challenge in treating this condition. The aim of this study is to review the current literature on allergic contact shoe dermatitis; clinical presentation, allergens, patch testing, and management will be discussed. PubMed and MEDLINE databases were used for the search, with a focus on literature updates from the last 15 years. PMID:25000234

  15. A comparative assessment of nursing students' cognitive knowledge of blood transfusion using lecture and simulation.

    PubMed

    Flood, Lisa S; Higbie, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Professional nurses must have the knowledge and skills to safely administer blood products and monitor for life-threatening complications. Nurse educators should ensure that student nurses also learn how to safely administer blood products; however students rarely have the opportunity to witness and manage adverse transfusion reactions. Despite the low incidence of rare adverse transfusion reactions, nursing students must be able to immediately recognize transfusion reactions, implement appropriate interventions, and communicate effectively with health care providers. To reinforce blood transfusion knowledge, practice technical skills, and promote management of adverse reactions, a human patient simulation experience was created for baccalaureate nursing students to provide application of related classroom content. Using a quasi-experimental design, students who received a related didactic lecture preceding the simulation were compared with students who did not receive the lecture. The lecture group's pre/posttest mean scores (n = 42) were significantly higher than the no lecture group's mean scores (n = 44). This simulation design included proper blood administration procedures, patient monitoring, management of transfusion reactions, and practice with interdisciplinary communication. Participation in a human patient simulation following a related didactic lecture may be useful to strengthen cognitive learning and help bridge the didactic-clinic gap. PMID:26073762

  16. Basophils and allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Siracusa, Mark C; Kim, Brian S; Spergel, Jonathan M; Artis, David

    2013-10-01

    Basophils were discovered by Paul Ehrlich in 1879 and represent the least abundant granulocyte population in mammals. The relative rarity of basophils and their phenotypic similarities with mast cells resulted in this cell lineage being historically overlooked, both clinically and experimentally. However, recent studies in human subjects and murine systems have shown that basophils perform nonredundant effector functions and significantly contribute to the development and progression of TH2 cytokine-mediated inflammation. Although the potential functions of murine and human basophils have provoked some controversy, recent genetic approaches indicate that basophils can migrate into lymphoid tissues and, in some circumstances, cooperate with other immune cells to promote optimal TH2 cytokine responses in vivo. This article provides a brief historical perspective on basophil-related research and discusses recent studies that have identified previously unappreciated molecules and pathways that regulate basophil development, activation, and function in the context of allergic inflammation. Furthermore, we highlight the unique effector functions of basophils and discuss their contributions to the development and pathogenesis of allergic inflammation in human disease. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting basophils in preventing or alleviating the development and progression of allergic inflammation. PMID:24075190

  17. [Pulmonary complications of transfusion (TACO-TRALI)].

    PubMed

    Renaudier, P; Rebibo, D; Waller, C; Schlanger, S; Vo Mai, M-P; Ounnoughene, N; Breton, P; Cheze, S; Girard, A; Hauser, L; Legras, J-F; Saillol, A; Willaert, B; Caldani, C

    2009-05-01

    Pulmonary oedemas occurring during or after a blood transfusion appear as the most frequent serious immediate incidents in the French hemovigilance database. They include transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). TACO are a major cause of transfusion-related death in France. TRALI are more and more recognized and notified. In no case, pooled fresh frozen plasma (100 donations) treated with solvent-detergent were involved in French TRALI cases. A logigrame will allow hemovigilance officers to better classify pulmonary oedemas in e-fit, the French hemovigilance database. PMID:19446484

  18. Allergic inflammation--innately homeostatic.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Laurence E; Locksley, Richard M

    2015-03-01

    Allergic inflammation is associated closely with parasite infection but also asthma and other common allergic diseases. Despite the engagement of similar immunologic pathways, parasitized individuals often show no outward manifestations of allergic disease. In this perspective, we present the thesis that allergic inflammatory responses play a primary role in regulating circadian and environmental inputs involved with tissue homeostasis and metabolic needs. Parasites feed into these pathways and thus engage allergic inflammation to sustain aspects of the parasitic life cycle. In response to parasite infection, an adaptive and regulated immune response is layered on the host effector response, but in the setting of allergy, the effector response remains unregulated, thus leading to the cardinal features of disease. Further understanding of the homeostatic pressures driving allergic inflammation holds promise to further our understanding of human health and the treatment of these common afflictions. PMID:25414367

  19. Transfusion-Transmitted Babesia microti.

    PubMed

    Fang, Deanna C; McCullough, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    Because testing of donors for Babesia microti has become available, it is important to determine the kinds of patients who should receive B microti-tested blood. We searched PubMed, AABB abstracts, and FDA Web site to identify all cases of transfusion-transmitted babesiosis (TTB). Cases were analyzed for underlying medical condition, age, presence of spleen, and reason for transfusion in relation to 5 classes of recipient outcome severity. Sixty-seven reports included 256 transfusion cases where donor tested positive for B microti, 165 of which resulted in TTB. Sixty recipients did not develop disease or become test positive, and test results were not known for 31 more. The 165 cases of TTB involved hematologic (19%), neonate (10%), cardiovascular (8%), and gastrointestinal (6%) patients. Thirty-two (19%) of the 165 infected patients died with death attributed to babesiosis in 25 of the cases. Nine (5%) were asymptomatic, 27 (16%) were symptomatic but had uncomplicated disease, and 16 (10%) had complicated disease. The severity of disease was mixed among many disease categories. Patients >65 years of age included the largest number of recipients (59/165, 36%) and deaths (11/32, 34%), although deaths occurred in other age groups as well. TTB cases were predominantly due to red cells (133 of 140 specified units), with red blood cell units processed in a variety of ways and at all storage duration. TTB with complicated babesiosis and/or death occurred in patients of all age groups and with a variety of underlying medical conditions. PMID:27260107

  20. Rhesus Negative Woman Transfused With Rhesus Positive Blood: Subsequent Normal Pregnancy Without Anti D production.

    PubMed

    Maya, E T; Buntugu, K A; Pobee, F; Srofenyoh, E K

    2015-03-01

    Clinicians sometimes are confronted with the challenge of transfusing haemorrhaging Rhesus (Rh) D negative patients with Rh D positive blood to save their lives. There are concerns about alloimmunization and future haemolytic disease of the newborn in women of the reproductive age. Another fear is transfusion reaction if they receive another Rh D positive blood in future. We present a 32-year-old Rh D negative woman, who had postpartum haemorrhage in her first pregnancy and was transfused with Rh D positive blood because of unavailability of Rh D negative blood. She did not receive anti D immunoglobin but subsequently had a normal term pregnancy of an Rh positive fetus without any detectable anti D antibodies throughout the pregnancy. In life threatening situations from obstetric haemorrhage, transfusion of Rh D negative women with Rh D positive blood should be considered as the last resort. PMID:26339087

  1. Operative blood transfusion quality improvement audit

    PubMed Central

    Al Sohaibani, Mazen; Al Malki, Assaf; Pogaku, Venumadhav; Al Dossary, Saad; Al Bernawi, Hanan

    2014-01-01

    Context: To determine how current anesthesia team handless the identification of surgical anaesthetized patient (right patient). And the check of blood unit before collecting and immediately before blood administration (right blood) in operating rooms where nurses have minimal duties and responsibility to handle blood for transfusion in anaesthetized patients. Aims: To elicit the degree of anesthesia staff compliance with new policies and procedures for anaesthetized surgical patient the blood transfusion administration. Settings and Design: Setting: A large tertiary care reference and teaching hospital. Design: A prospective quality improvement. Elaboration on steps for administration of transfusion from policies and procedures to anaesthetized patients; and analysis of the audit forms for conducted transfusions. Subjects and Methods: An audit form was used to get key performance indicators (KPIs) observed in all procedures involve blood transfusion and was ticked as item was met, partially met, not met or not applicable. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics as number and percentage Microsoft excel 2003. Central quality improvement committee presented the results in number percentage and graphs. Results: The degree of compliance in performing the phases of blood transfusion by anesthesia staff reached high percentage which let us feel certain that the quality is assured that the internal policy and procedures (IPP) are followed in the great majority of all types of red cells and other blood products transfusion from the start of requesting the blood or blood product to the prescript of checking the patient in the immediate post-transfusion period. Conclusions: Specific problem area of giving blood transfusion to anaesthetized patient was checking KPI concerning the phases of blood transfusion was audited and assured the investigators of high quality performance in procedures of transfusion. PMID:25886107

  2. Hemostatic Function and Transfusion Efficacy of Apheresis Platelet Concentrates Treated with Gamma Irradiation in Use for Thrombocytopenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mei; Xu, Wei; Wang, Bao-Long; Su, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background During the transfusion of blood components, the transfer of allogeneic donor white blood cells (WBCs) can mediate transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD). To minimize the reaction, exposure of blood products to gamma irradiation is currently the standard of care. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare hemostatic function, transfusion efficacy, and safety of gamma-irradiated single-donor apheresis platelet concentrates (PCs) and of conventional non-irradiated PCs in patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. Methods 20 double-dose single-donor leukoreduced PCs were split in two identical units; one was gamma-irradiated with 25 Gy (study arm A) and the other remains non-irradiated (study arm B). Both units were stored under equal conditions. Hematologic patients were randomly assigned to receive gamma-irradiated or conventional non-irradiated PCs. Hemostatic function was evaluated by thrombelastography (TEG). TEG measurements were taken pre transfusion and 1 and 24 h post transfusion. TEG profiles were measured, noting the time to initiate clotting (R), the angle of clot formation (α), and the maximum amplitude (clot strength (MA)). Whole blood samples were collected from these thrombocytopenic patients at 1 and 24 h for PLT count increments (CIs) and corrected count increments (CCIs) with assessments of transfusion efficacy. Time to next PLT transfusion, transfusion requirement of RBCs, active bleeding, and adverse events (AEs), were analyzed. Results No differences could be found in hemostatic function parameters (MA, R, and α) between study arms A and B (all p values > 0.096) pre transfusion as well as 1 and 24 h post transfusion. No differences between study arms A and B were observed for mean (± standard deviation (SD)) 1-hour CCI (12.83 ± 6.33 vs. 11.59 ± 5.97) and 24-hour CCI (6.56 ± 4.10 vs. 5.76 ± 4.05). Mean 1-hour CI and 24-hour CI were not significantly different in both study arms (p = 0

  3. Haemovigilance and transfusion safety in France.

    PubMed

    Rouger, P; Noizat-Pirenne, F; Le Pennec, P Y

    2000-01-01

    The risks associated to red cell and platelet transfusions are essentially bound to the polymorphism of blood group antigens and to transfusion transmitted agents including virus, bacterias.... In France, the haemovigilance system and several investigations allowed to measure these different kinds of risks. We also developed analysis of failures in order to prevent errors and accidents to increase blood safety. PMID:10938971

  4. Reducing transfusion requirements in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, Ciara I; Mallett, Susan V

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) was historically associated with massive blood loss and transfusion. Over the past two decades transfusion requirements have reduced dramatically and increasingly transfusion-free transplantation is a reality. Both bleeding and transfusion are associated with adverse outcomes in LT. Minimising bleeding and reducing unnecessary transfusions are therefore key goals in the perioperative period. As the understanding of the causes of bleeding has evolved so too have techniques to minimize or reduce the impact of blood loss. Surgical “piggyback” techniques, anaesthetic low central venous pressure and haemodilution strategies and the use of autologous cell salvage, point of care monitoring and targeted correction of coagulopathy, particularly through use of factor concentrates, have all contributed to declining reliance on allogenic blood products. Pre-emptive management of preoperative anaemia and adoption of more restrictive transfusion thresholds is increasingly common as patient blood management (PBM) gains momentum. Despite progress, increasing use of marginal grafts and transplantation of sicker recipients will continue to present new challenges in bleeding and transfusion management. Variation in practice across different centres and within the literature demonstrates the current lack of clear transfusion guidance. In this article we summarise the causes and predictors of bleeding and present the evidence for a variety of PBM strategies in LT. PMID:26722645

  5. Transfusion-related sepsis: a silent epidemic.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Richard J

    2016-01-28

    In this issue of Blood, Hong et al advocate for use of additional US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved safety measures for transfusion. Most patients transfused with contaminated platelets do not show immediate clinical signs. Active surveillance suggests patient risk 10- to 40-fold higher than passive hemovigilance. PMID:26823510

  6. Red blood cell transfusion in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Robin K; Jefferies, Ann L

    2014-04-01

    Red blood cell transfusion is an important and frequent component of neonatal intensive care. The present position statement addresses the methods and indications for red blood cell transfusion of the newborn, based on a review of the current literature. The most frequent indications for blood transfusion in the newborn are the acute treatment of perinatal hemorrhagic shock and the recurrent correction of anemia of prematurity. Perinatal hemorrhagic shock requires immediate treatment with large quantities of red blood cells; the effects of massive transfusion on other blood components must be considered. Some guidelines are now available from clinical trials investigating transfusion in anemia of prematurity; however, considerable uncertainty remains. There is weak evidence that cognitive impairment may be more severe at follow-up in extremely low birth weight infants transfused at lower hemoglobin thresholds; therefore, these thresholds should be maintained by transfusion therapy. Although the risks of transfusion have declined considerably in recent years, they can be minimized further by carefully restricting neonatal blood sampling. PMID:24855419

  7. [Blood transfusion: the challenges for tomorrow?].

    PubMed

    Folléa, Gilles; Garraud, Olivier; Tiberghien, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    As any therapeutic means, blood transfusion requires regular evaluation, particularly for its indications, effectiveness and risks. The availability of randomized clinical trials, the evolution of the quality of blood components, and the economic constraints shared by all countries, all lead to rethink both transfusion therapy as a whole and the organization of the transfusion chain from donor to recipient. The main tools available to improve transfusion and the transfusion chain management are the following: programs of patient blood management (PBM) to optimize the use of blood products with a patient centred approach, blood supply management tools to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the transfusion chain, donor management tools to adapt donor collections to the patients' needs in compliance with safety requirements for patients and donors, and coordination of these activities. A better understanding of these tools and their implementation will certainly be major challenges for transfusion medicine in the near future. Integrating these evolutions in regulations through the revision of the European Directives on blood and blood components (the review process is expected to be launched in 2015) should enroll them in the long term, for the benefit of patients, donors and all other stakeholders involved in the transfusion chain. PMID:25578549

  8. Emerging concepts: mast cell involvement in allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Modena, Brian D; Dazy, Kristen; White, Andrew A

    2016-08-01

    In a process known as overt degranulation, mast cells can release all at once a diverse array of products that are preformed and present within cytoplasmic granules. This occurs typically within seconds of stimulation by environmental factors and allergens. These potent, preformed mediators (ie, histamine, heparin, serotonin, and serine proteases) are responsible for the acute symptoms experienced in allergic conditions such as allergic conjunctivitis, allergic rhinitis, allergy-induced asthma, urticaria, and anaphylaxis. Yet, there is reason to believe that the actions of mast cells are important when they are not degranulating. Mast cells release preformed mediators and inflammatory cytokines for periods after degranulation and even without degranulating at all. Mast cells are consistently seen at sites of chronic inflammation, including nonallergic inflammation, where they have the ability to temper inflammatory processes and shape tissue morphology. Mast cells can trigger actions and chemotaxis in other important immune cells (eg, eosinophils and the newly discovered type 2 innate lymphocytes) that then make their own contributions to inflammation and disease. In this review, we will discuss the many known and theorized contributions of mast cells to allergic diseases, focusing on several prototypical allergic respiratory and skin conditions: asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis, aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, allergic conjunctivitis, atopic dermatitis, and some of the more common medication hypersensitivity reactions. We discuss traditionally accepted roles that mast cells play in the pathogenesis of each of these conditions, but we also delve into new areas of discovery and research that challenge traditionally accepted paradigms. PMID:26976119

  9. Immunoregulatory Role of HLA-G in Allergic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Murdaca, Giuseppe; Contini, Paola; Negrini, Simone; Ciprandi, Giorgio; Puppo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases are sustained by a T-helper 2 polarization leading to interleukin-4 secretion, IgE-dependent inflammation, and mast cell and eosinophil activation. HLA-G molecules, both in membrane-bound and in soluble forms, play a central role in modulation of immune responses. Elevated levels of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) molecules are detected in serum of patients with allergic rhinitis to seasonal and perennial allergens and correlate with allergen-specific IgE levels, clinical severity, drug consumption, and response to allergen-specific immunotherapy. sHLA-G molecules are also found in airway epithelium of patients with allergic asthma and high levels of sHLA-G molecules are detectable in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage of asthmatic patients correlating with allergen-specific IgE levels. Finally, HLA-G molecules are expressed by T cells, monocytes-macrophages, and Langerhans cells infiltrating the dermis of atopic dermatitis patients. Collectively, although at present it is difficult to completely define the role of HLA-G molecules in allergic diseases, it may be suggested that they are expressed and secreted by immune cells during the allergic reaction in an attempt to suppress allergic inflammation. PMID:27413762

  10. Immunoregulatory Role of HLA-G in Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Contini, Paola; Negrini, Simone; Ciprandi, Giorgio; Puppo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases are sustained by a T-helper 2 polarization leading to interleukin-4 secretion, IgE-dependent inflammation, and mast cell and eosinophil activation. HLA-G molecules, both in membrane-bound and in soluble forms, play a central role in modulation of immune responses. Elevated levels of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) molecules are detected in serum of patients with allergic rhinitis to seasonal and perennial allergens and correlate with allergen-specific IgE levels, clinical severity, drug consumption, and response to allergen-specific immunotherapy. sHLA-G molecules are also found in airway epithelium of patients with allergic asthma and high levels of sHLA-G molecules are detectable in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage of asthmatic patients correlating with allergen-specific IgE levels. Finally, HLA-G molecules are expressed by T cells, monocytes-macrophages, and Langerhans cells infiltrating the dermis of atopic dermatitis patients. Collectively, although at present it is difficult to completely define the role of HLA-G molecules in allergic diseases, it may be suggested that they are expressed and secreted by immune cells during the allergic reaction in an attempt to suppress allergic inflammation. PMID:27413762

  11. Acetaminophen and diphenhydramine as premedication for platelet transfusions: a prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Stephen E; Lara, Primo N; Lee-Ow, Angie; Reed, Jeanne; Wang, Lori R; Palmer, Patti; Tuscano, Joseph M; Richman, Carol M; Beckett, Laurel; Wun, Ted

    2002-07-01

    Non-hemolytic transfusion reactions (NHTR) occur in up to 30% of patients receiving platelet transfusions. Premedication with acetaminophen and diphenhydramine is a common strategy to prevent NHTR, but its efficacy has not been studied. In this prospective trial, transfusions in patients receiving pre-storage leukocyte-reduced single-donor apheresis platelets (SDP) were randomized to premedication with either acetaminophen 650 mg PO and diphenhydramine 25 mg IV, or placebo. Fifty-one patients received 98 transfusions. Thirteen patients had 15 NHTR: 15.4% (8/52) in the treatment arm and 15.2% (7/46) in the placebo arm. Premedication prior to transfusion of pre-storage leukocyte reduced SDP does not significantly lower the incidence of NHTR as compared to placebo. PMID:12111764

  12. Adverse blood transfusion outcomes: establishing causation.

    PubMed

    Isbister, James P; Shander, Aryeh; Spahn, Donat R; Erhard, Jochen; Farmer, Shannon L; Hofmann, Axel

    2011-04-01

    The transfusion of allogeneic red blood cells (RBCs) and other blood components is ingrained in modern medical practice. The rationale for administering transfusions is based on key assumptions that efficacy is established and risks are acceptable and minimized. Despite the cliché that, "the blood supply is safer than ever," data about risks and lack of efficacy of RBC transfusions in several clinical settings have steadily accumulated. Frequentist statisticians and clinicians demand evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs); however, causation for the recognized serious hazards of allogeneic transfusion has never been established in this manner. On the other hand, the preponderance of evidence implicating RBC transfusions in adverse clinical outcomes related to immunomodulation and the storage lesion comes from observational studies, and a broad and critical analysis to evaluate causation is overdue. It is suggested in several circumstances that this cannot wait for the design, execution, and conduct of rigorous RCTs. We begin by examining the nature and definition of causation with relevant examples from transfusion medicine. Deductive deterministic methods may be applied to most of the well-accepted and understood serious hazards of transfusion, with modified Koch's postulates being fulfilled in most circumstances. On the other hand, when several possible interacting risk factors exist and RBC transfusions are associated with adverse clinical outcomes, establishing causation requires inferential probabilistic methodology. In the latter circumstances, the case for RBC transfusions being causal for adverse clinical outcomes can be strengthened by applying modified Bradford Hill criteria to the plethora of existing observational studies. This being the case, a greater precautionary approach to RBC transfusion is necessary and equipoise that justifying RCTs may become problematic. PMID:21345639

  13. Houseplants, Indoor Air Pollutants, and Allergic Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, B. C.

    1986-01-01

    The technology of using houseplant leaves for reducing volatile organics inside closed facilities has been demonstrated with formaldehyde and benzene. Philodendrons are among the most effective plants tested to date. Philodendron domesticum had demonstrated the ability to remove formaldehyde from small experimental chambers at a rate of 4.31 micro-g/sq cm leaf surface area with initial starting concentrations of 22 ppm. At initial starting concentrations of 2.3 ppm a formaldehyde removal rate of 0.57 micro-g/sq cm was achieved during a 24 hour test. Aleo vera demonstrated a much higher formaldehyde efficiency removal rate than Philodendron domesticum at low formaldehyde concentrations. During a 24 hour exposure period 5 ppm of formaldehyde were reduced to 0.5 ppm demonstrating a removal efficiency rate of 3.27 micro-g/sq cm. Removal efficiency rates can be expected to decrease with concentration levels because fewer molecules of chemicals come in contact with the leaf surface area. Several centimeters of small washed gravel should be used to cover the surface of pot plants when large numbers of plants are kept in the home. The reason for this is to reduce the exposed area of damp potting soil which encourages the growth of molds (fungi). The leaves of Philodendron domesticum and golden pothos (Scindapsus aureus) have also demonstrated their ability to remove benzene and carbon monoxide from closed chambers. A combination of activated carbon and plant roots have demonstrated the greatest potential for removing large volumes of volatile organics along with smoke and possible radon from closed systems. Although fewer plants are required for this concept a mechanical blower motor must be used to pull or push the air through the carbon-root filter. NASA studies on motor sizes and bioregeneration rates should be completed by 1988.

  14. [Advice for allergic travellers].

    PubMed

    Sonneville, A

    1999-09-01

    Business and tourist journeys by air contribute to exposure of the body to multiple environments. The allergic patient, considered rightly to be a sentry of the environment, has many reasons to care about his journeys and to take precautions that are adapted to his case under the impetus of advice and information from his physician and his specialist. Some advice falls within a simple logic that is enough to remember when planning the journey while the others measures must follow a correct preventative strategy for allergy risks as much as those that concern the modalities before leaving as a drive taken on the ground. It is important therefore to know how to give advice and information on the different risks linked to the allergic condition and to the field of allergy and help the patient to orientate his choice of place of the journey, the methods of lodging, of transport and the programme of the journey. The advice should also include the preventative measures as a function of the known pathology under the form of medical equipment before, during the stay and on return. Finally some advice relative to medical equipment for prevention and cure would appear to be judicious. PMID:10524269

  15. Positive reaction to allergen (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  16. Transfusion Induced Bone Marrow Transplant Rejection Due to Minor Histocompatibility Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Seema R; Zimring, James C

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, alloimmunization to transfused blood products has focused exclusively upon recipient antibodies recognizing donor alloantigens present on the cell surface. Accordingly, the immunological sequelae of alloimmunization have been antibody mediated effects (i.e. hemolytic transfusion reactions, platelet refractoriness, anti-HLA and anti-HNA effects, etc.). However, in addition to the above sequelae, there is also a correlation between the number of antecedent transfusions in humans and the rate of bone marrow transplant (BMT) rejection - under reduced intensity conditioning with HLA matched or HLA identical marrow. BMT of this nature is the only existing cure for a series of non-malignant hematological diseases (e.g. sickle cell disease, thalassemias, etc.); however, rejection remains a clinical problem. It has been hypothesized that transfusion induces subsequent BMT rejection through immunization. Studies in animal models have observed the same effect and have demonstrated that transfusion induced BMT rejection can occur in response to alloimmunization. However, unlike traditional antibody responses, sensitization in this case results in cellular immune effects, involving populations such as T cell or NK cells. In this case, rejection occurs in the absence of alloantibodies, and would not be detected by existing immune-hematological methods. We review human and animal studies in light of the hypothesis that, for distinct clinical populations, enhanced rejection of BMT may be an unappreciated adverse consequence of transfusion which current blood bank methodologies are unable to detect. PMID:24090731

  17. The transfusion medicine we want

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Associação Brasileira de Hematologia e Hemoterapia (ABHH), through its Board of Directors, hosted a national symposium called "Forum: The Transfusion Medicine we want", to discuss proposed policies and techniques related to the area. This meeting was held in São Paulo on August 19 and 20, 2010, with the participation of experts, authorities and representatives of organized groups of patients and users. The discussions were organized around three specific issues selected from over 100 suggestions sent to the ABHH through public consultation on the web: 1. Strategies; 2. Financing; 3. Blood products. A plenary session, held at the end of the meeting, adopted recommendations that are relevant to the different discussion topics. This document contains actions proposed by the ABHH to meet the demands discussed. PMID:23284248

  18. Improving platelet transfusion safety: biomedical and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Chavarin, Patricia; Laperche, Syria; Morel, Pascal; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Pozzetto, Bruno; Lozano, Miguel; Blumberg, Neil; Osselaer, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-01

    Platelet concentrates account for near 10% of all labile blood components but are responsible for more than 25% of the reported adverse events. Besides factors related to patients themselves, who may be particularly at risk of side effects because of their underlying illness, there are aspects of platelet collection and storage that predispose to adverse events. Platelets for transfusion are strongly activated by collection through disposal equipment, which can stress the cells, and by preservation at 22 °C with rotation or rocking, which likewise leads to platelet activation, perhaps more so than storage at 4 °C. Lastly, platelets constitutively possess a very large number of bioactive components that may elicit pro-inflammatory reactions when infused into a patient. This review aims to describe approaches that may be crucial to minimising side effects while optimising safety and quality. We suggest that platelet transfusion is complex, in part because of the complexity of the "material" itself: platelets are highly versatile cells and the transfusion process adds a myriad of variables that present many challenges for preserving basal platelet function and preventing dysfunctional activation of the platelets. The review also presents information showing--after years of exhaustive haemovigilance--that whole blood buffy coat pooled platelet components are extremely safe compared to the gold standard (i.e. apheresis platelet components), both in terms of acquired infections and of immunological/inflammatory hazards. PMID:26674828

  19. Improving platelet transfusion safety: biomedical and technical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Chavarin, Patricia; Laperche, Syria; Morel, Pascal; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Pozzetto, Bruno; Lozano, Miguel; Blumberg, Neil; Osselaer, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Platelet concentrates account for near 10% of all labile blood components but are responsible for more than 25% of the reported adverse events. Besides factors related to patients themselves, who may be particularly at risk of side effects because of their underlying illness, there are aspects of platelet collection and storage that predispose to adverse events. Platelets for transfusion are strongly activated by collection through disposal equipment, which can stress the cells, and by preservation at 22 °C with rotation or rocking, which likewise leads to platelet activation, perhaps more so than storage at 4 °C. Lastly, platelets constitutively possess a very large number of bioactive components that may elicit pro-inflammatory reactions when infused into a patient. This review aims to describe approaches that may be crucial to minimising side effects while optimising safety and quality. We suggest that platelet transfusion is complex, in part because of the complexity of the “material” itself: platelets are highly versatile cells and the transfusion process adds a myriad of variables that present many challenges for preserving basal platelet function and preventing dysfunctional activation of the platelets. The review also presents information showing - after years of exhaustive haemovigilance - that whole blood buffy coat pooled platelet components are extremely safe compared to the gold standard (i.e. apheresis platelet components), both in terms of acquired infections and of immunological/inflammatory hazards. PMID:26674828

  20. Adverse effects of small-volume red blood cell transfusions in the neonatal population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adverse transfusion reactions in the neonatal population are poorly understood and defined. The incidence and pattern of adverse effects due to red blood cell (RBC) transfusion are not well known, and there has been no systematic review of published adverse events. RBC transfusions continue to be linked to the development of morbidities unique to neonates, including chronic lung disease, retinopathy of prematurity, intraventricular haemorrhage and necrotising enterocolitis. Uncertainties about the exact nature of risks alongside benefits of RBC transfusion may contribute to evidence of widespread variation in neonatal RBC transfusion practice. Our review aims to describe clinical adverse effects attributed to small-volume (10–20 mL/kg) RBC transfusions and, where possible, their incidence rates in the neonatal population through the systematic identification of all relevant studies. Methods A comprehensive search of the following bibliographic databases will be performed: MEDLINE (PubMed/OVID which includes the Cochrane Library) and EMBASE (OVID). The intervention of interest is small-volume (10–20 mL/kg) RBC transfusions in the neonatal population. We will undertake a narrative synthesis of the evidence. If clinical similarity and data quantity and quality permit, we will also carry out meta-analyses on the listed outcomes. Discussion This systematic review will identify and synthesise the reported adverse effects and associations of RBC transfusions in the neonatal population. We believe that this systematic review is timely and will make a valuable contribution to highlight an existing research gap. Trial Registration PROSPERO, CRD42013005107 http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/display_record.asp?ID=CRD42013005107 PMID:25143009

  1. Nurses' perceptions of transfusion training: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Stout, Lynn

    Within Scottish hospitals transfusion education is mandatory for all staff involved in the process of transfusion. Currently two modes of delivery exist, face-to-face and e-learning. The researcher,a transfusion practitioner, wished to evaluate the perceptions of registered nurses within her local children's hospital to the transfusion education available. The aim of the evaluation was to ascertain whether there were perceived benefits, whether expectations were met and whether nurses perceived that there were any barriers to undertaking the education. Both quantitative and qualitative data were obtained by means of a questionnaire; all registered nurses in the hospital were invited to participate. The study indicates a high level of compliance with mandatory transfusion education and suggests both satisfaction and perceived benefits with transfusion education among those who responded. Some barriers were highlighted, but it was noted that these were not exclusive to transfusion education and in the current challenging environment with conflicting priorities on time, resolution may be complex. PMID:23634461

  2. [Transfusion-related acute lung injury].

    PubMed

    Tank, S; Sputtek, A; Kiefmann, R

    2013-04-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) developed into the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality after the first description by Popovsky et al. approximately three decades ago. It was the most frequent reason for transfusion-related fatalities worldwide before implementation of risk minimization strategies by donor selection. Plasma-rich blood products, such as fresh frozen plasma and apheresis platelets seem to be the leading triggers of TRALI. Hypoxemia and development of pulmonary edema within 6 h of transfusion are the diagnostic criteria for TRALI. The differentiation between cardiac failure and other transfusion-related lung injuries, such astransfusion-associated circulatory overload ( TACO) is difficult and causal treatment is not available. Therapy is based on supportive measures, such as oxygen insufflationor mechanical ventilation. The exactly pathogenesis is still unknown but the most propagated hypothesis is the two-event-model. Neutrophils are primed by the underlying condition, e.g. sepsis or trauma during the first event and these primed neutrophils are activated by transfused leukoagglutinating antibodies (immunogen) or bioreactive mediators (non-immunogen) during the second-event. Transfusion of leukoagglutinating antibodies from female donors with one or more previous pregnancies is the most frequent reason. No more TRALI fatalities were reported after implementation of the donor selection in Germany in 2009. PMID:23558721

  3. Role of National Accreditation Board of Hospitals and Healthcare Providers (NABH) core indicators monitoring in quality and safety of blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anshu; Gupta, Chhavi

    2016-01-01

    Context: Certain quality indicators are mandatory in the maintenance and improvement of quality in blood transfusion. Monitoring of such indicators should be done regularly and deficiencies are to be corrected for effective blood transfusion services. Aims: To study the usefulness of monitoring of the National Accreditation Board for Hospitals and Healthcare Providers (NABH) core indicators in blood transfusion and in the maintenance of hemovigilance. Settings and Design: Hemovigilance is a quality process to improve quality and increase the safety of blood transfusion. It covers and surveys all activities of the blood transfusion chain from donors to recipients. Core indicators’ monitoring is a part of the hemovigilance process. Materials and Methods: A 2-year retrospective study was conducted in a blood storage unit of a NABH accredited tertiary care hospital of a metropolitan city. Four NABH core indicators in blood transfusion were observed and monitored by the clinical and blood storage unit staff of different levels. Results: It was observed that there was an improvement in quality by core indicators monitoring with decreased wastage of blood and blood components, decreased average turnaround time for issue of blood and blood components, and lesser number of transfusion reactions. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that monitoring of NABH core indicators results in the enhancement of quality and safety in blood transfusion services, reducing the incidence of transfusion reactions. PMID:27011668

  4. Think You're Allergic to Penicillin? Maybe Not

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem in the use of penicillin," said Dr. Thomas Leath, an allergist with the Texas A&M College of Medicine. "Many people who report a penicillin allergy don't even know why. It could be because they had a reaction when they were very young, or because a family member had an allergic ...

  5. Immune Regulatory Mechanisms in Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review This review highlights recent findings regarding the immune regulation of allergic conjunctivitis (AC). Mouse models have facilitated prospective studies that have not been possible in patients. The availability of gene knockout mice and the wealth of monoclonal antibodies have permitted exquisite dissection of the pathophysiology and immune regulation of AC. Recent findings New insights have emerged in three areas: a) role of costimulatory molecules in the induction of Th2 immune responses; b) crucial role of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in the expression of AC; and c) the function of T regulatory cells in shaping conjunctival inflammation once the immune response has been initiated. Summary Allergic conjunctivitis involves early phase and late phase reactions. The early phase reaction (EPR) is IgE antibody-dependent, while the late phase reaction (LPR) is IgE-independent and is mediated by inflammatory cells, especially eosinophils. Recent studies in mouse models of AC have provided important insights into the immune regulation of both the EPR and LPR of AC. Mounting evidence suggests that IFN-γ is crucial for optimum expression of AC. Costimulatory molecules influence the induction of Th2 immune responses and the EPR while regulatory T cells shape the expression of the LPR of AC. PMID:18769204

  6. Quality of transfusion products in blood banking.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Capuzzo, Enrico; Turdo, Rosalia; Glingani, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    The primary goal in transfusion medicine and cellular therapies is to promote high standards of quality and produce ever safer and more efficacious products. The establishment of a transfusion service quality management system, which includes several organizational structures, responsibilities, policies, processes, procedures, and resources, is now mandatory and widely regulated worldwide. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the quality system in transfusion medicine as applied to the production of blood components, including red blood cells, platelets, and fresh frozen plasma. PMID:24474089

  7. [Blood transfusion and supply chain management safety].

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Jean-François; Caldani, Cyril; Cabaud, Jean-Jacques; Chavarin, Patricia; Rochette-Eribon, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    The level of safety attained in blood transfusion now makes this a discipline better managed care activities. This was achieved both by scientific advances and policy decisions regulating and supervising the activity, as well as by the quality system, which we recall that affects the entire organizational structure, responsibilities, procedures, processes and resources in place to achieve quality management. So, an effective quality system provides a framework within which activities are established, performed in a quality-focused way and continuously monitored to improve outcomes. This system quality has to irrigate all the actors of the transfusion, just as much the establishments of blood transfusion than the health establishments. PMID:25578550

  8. Blood Donation and Transfusion: A Primer for Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felts, W. Michael; Glascoff, Mary A.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a primer for health educators about blood donation and transfusion, examining the nature of human blood, the background of blood transfusion, blood donation criteria, risks related to homologous blood transfusion, directed blood donation, potential alternatives to homologous transfusion, and resources for education on the subject. (SM)

  9. Food and Natural Materials Target Mechanisms to Effectively Regulate Allergic Responses.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee Soon; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    An immune hypersensitivity disorder called allergy is caused by diverse allergens entering the body via skin contact, injection, ingestion, and/or inhalation. These allergic responses may develop into allergic disorders, including inflammations such as atopic dermatitis, asthma, anaphylaxis, food allergies, and allergic rhinitis. Several drugs have been developed to treat these allergic disorders; however, long-term intake of these drugs could have adverse effects. As an alternative to these medicines, food and natural materials that ameliorate allergic disorder symptoms without producing any side effects can be consumed. Food and natural materials can effectively regulate successive allergic responses in an allergic chain-reaction mechanism in the following ways: [1] Inhibition of allergen permeation via paracellular diffusion into epithelial cells, [2] suppression of type 2 T-helper (Th) cell-related cytokine production by regulating Th1/Th2 balance, [3] inhibition of pathogenic effector CD4(+) T cell differentiation by inducing regulatory T cells (Treg), and [4] inhibition of degranulation in mast cells. The immunomodulatory effects of food and natural materials on each target mechanism were scientifically verified and shown to alleviate allergic disorder symptoms. Furthermore, consumption of certain food and natural materials such as fenugreek, skullcap, chitin/chitosan, and cheonggukjang as anti-allergics have merits such as safety (no adverse side effects), multiple suppressive effects (as a mixture would contain various components that are active against allergic responses), and ease of consumption when required. These merits and anti-allergic properties of food and natural materials help control various allergic disorders. PMID:26598817

  10. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis from ethyl cyanoacrylate.

    PubMed

    Bruze, M; Björkner, B; Lepoittevin, J P

    1995-03-01

    Glues based on cyanoacrylates are widely used as contact adhesives for metal, glass, rubber, plastics and textiles, as well for biological materials, including binding tissues and sealing wounds in surgery. In this paper, an apprentice cobbler with an occupational allergic contact dermatitis from an ethyl cyanoacrylate glue, in which the major monomer was shown to be the sensitizer, is reported. Initial patch testing with the cyanoacrylate glue dissolved in acetone with the Finn Chamber (aluminium) technique yielded false-negative reactions. Positive test reactions were obtained with the same preparations using Van der Bend chambers. With petrolatum as vehicle for the glue, there was no difference between Finn Chamber technique and Van der Bend chamber technique. The role of aluminium in the false-negative reactions is discussed. PMID:7774187

  11. Steroids in allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Webb, D R

    1981-09-01

    From the experience above, it may be concluded that corticosteroid therapy in allergic disease has become more effective than ever before. The expected variations in usage of new important pharmacologic agents is seen with special clarity in the use of corticosteroids. The wide acclaim for the "miracle drug of the 1950's", which followed penicillin of the 1940's, soon gave away to anguish about side-effects that threatened to abolish its use entirely in the late 1950's. The 1960's brought alternate day therapy for chronic usage and recognition that short term usage was relatively safe. The 1970's saw proliferation of topically active steroids similar to those so important to the practice of Dermatology in the previous decade. Results in treating asthma and nasal diseases have been excellent and extensive research for adverse effects has been largely unrevealing. PMID:6793795

  12. [Allergic inflammation in respiratory system].

    PubMed

    An, Lifeng; Wang, Yanshu; Li, Lin

    2015-02-01

    The pathophysiology of allergic disease such as asthma and allergic rhinitis tell the similar story: when the endogenous and exogenous inflammatory mechanisms occur disorder, the body may begin with inflammatory cell activation, namely through the release of cytokine and inflammatory mediator role in the corresponding target cells, activate the sensory nerve fiber, acting on the cell organ specificity effect, clinical symptoms. This article is divided into the following five parts focused on the research progress of allergic inflammatory diseases: (1) inflammatory cells; (2) staphylococcus aureus superantigen; (3) small molecules (cytokines, inflammatory mediators, lipid classes medium); (4) nerve fibers and effect cells; (5) genetic and epigenetic factors. PMID:26012309

  13. Transfusion transmitted diseases in perioperative and intensive care settings.

    PubMed

    Das, Rekha; Hansda, Upendra

    2014-09-01

    Patients in the perioperative period and intensive care unit are commonly exposed to blood transfusion (BT). They are at increased risk of transfusion transmitted bacterial, viral and protozoal diseases. The risk of viral transmission has decreased steadily, but the risk of bacterial transmission remains same. Bacterial contamination is more in platelet concentrates than in red cells and least in plasma. The chances of sepsis, morbidity and mortality depend on the number of transfusions and underlying condition of the patient. Challenges to safe BT continue due to new emerging pathogens and various management problems. Strategies to restrict BT, optimal surgical and anaesthetic techniques to reduce blood loss and efforts to develop transfusion alternatives should be made. Literature search was performed using search words/phrases blood transfusion, transfusion, transfusion transmitted diseases, transfusion transmitted bacterial diseases, transfusion transmitted viral diseases, transfusion transmitted protozoal diseases or combinations, on PubMed and Google Scholar from 1990 to 2014. PMID:25535416

  14. Blood doping: the flip side of transfusion and transfusion alternatives.

    PubMed

    Cacic, Daniel Limi; Hervig, Tor; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2013-08-01

    Blood doping in sports has been a hot topic of present. Longitudinal follow up of hematological parameters in different endurance sports, during the 1990s and early 2000s, has provided considerable suspicions about extensive blood manipulation, with performance enhancing effects. Recent doping revelations in the media also prove that blood doping is not an anticipated myth but it is, in fact, real. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents and autologous blood transfusions are used in synergy with substantial effect on the maximum oxygen uptake and delivery to muscles. Whilst both methods of blood manipulation represent a potential health hazard, in the context of an elevated hematocrit, nevertheless despite a number of suspicious deaths amongst athletes, this has not yet been fully documented. A reliable test for detection of recombinant human erythropoietin was implemented in 2000, but this is probably circumvented by microdose regimens. The Athlete's Biological Passport represents the progeny of the idea of an indirect approach based on long term monitoring of hematological parameters, thus making it possible to detect autologous blood doping and erythropoietin use after the substance is excreted. Nevertheless with advances in anti-doping measures it is possible that the levels of excretion of substances used can be masked. Clearly more sensitive and specific diagnostic tools and research/development in these areas of major concern are warranted, which, combined with changes in the athlete's attitude, will help in reaching the vision of fair play. PMID:23791798

  15. Association of Prehospital Shock Index and Trauma Bay Uncrossmatched Red Blood Cell Transfusion With Multiple Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Day, Darcy L; Anzelon, Kathleen M; Conde, Franscisco A

    2016-01-01

    Early resuscitation of bleeding trauma patients with multiple blood products improves outcome, yet transfusion initiation is not standardized. Shock index (heart rate/systolic blood pressure) and trauma bay uncrossmatched red blood cell (RBC) transfusion were evaluated for association with multiple transfusions, defined as 6 or more RBCs during the first 6 hrs of hospital presentation. A prehospital shock index of 1 was significantly associated with multiple transfusions (p = .02). Subjects receiving uncrossmatched RBCs required more RBCs during the first 6 hrs (10.3 units, p < .01). Consideration of these simple variables may help trauma nurses anticipate the potentially bleeding patient. PMID:26953537

  16. [Correct preparation of a transfusion: Part 1].

    PubMed

    Strobel, E; Henschler, R

    2014-09-01

    The administration of blood products is strictly regulated. Several weeks before the operation the preparation for transfusion begins with optimizing the patient's hematological and hemostaseological situation. In elective surgery blood group testing and antibody screening are performed soon after admission of the patient. The identification of the blood sample is important. Informed consent of the recipient has to be obtained. On the day before the operation a further blood sample is necessary for cross-matching if red blood cells are to be transfused. Usually blood products are issued for immediate administration. Before transfusion begins the blood product has to be checked, the identity of the patient must be controlled and in the case of red blood cell transfusions the AB0 bedside test has to be performed. PMID:25085082

  17. Why an alternative to blood transfusion?

    PubMed

    Shander, Aryeh; Goodnough, Lawrence Tim

    2009-04-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusions have been associated with several risks and complications and with worse outcomes in a substantial number of patient populations and clinical scenarios. Allogeneic blood is costly and difficult to procure, transport, and store. Global and local shortages are imminent. Alternatives to transfusion provide many advantages, and their use is likely to improve outcomes as safer and more effective agents are developed. PMID:19341908

  18. Allergic diseases and air pollution

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suh-Young; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of allergic diseases has been increasing rapidly, especially in developing countries. Various adverse health outcomes such as allergic disease can be attributed to rapidly increasing air pollution levels. Rapid urbanization and increased energy consumption worldwide have exposed the human body to not only increased quantities of ambient air pollution, but also a greater variety of pollutants. Many studies clearly demonstrate that air pollutants potently trigger asthma exacerbation. Evidence that transportation-related pollutants contribute to the development of allergies is also emerging. Moreover, exposure to particulate matter, ozone, and nitrogen dioxide contributes to the increased susceptibility to respiratory infections. This article focuses on the current understanding of the detrimental effects of air pollutants on allergic disease including exacerbation to the development of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema as well as epigenetic regulation. PMID:23956961

  19. Allergic Mechanisms in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, Joshua B; Bryce, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Paralleling the overall trend in allergic diseases, Eosinophilic Esophagitis is rapidly increasing in incidence. It is associated with food antigen-triggered, eosinophil-predominant inflammation and the pathogenic mechanisms have many similarities to other chronic atopic diseases, such as eczema and allergic asthma. Studies in animal models and from patients over the last 15 years have suggested that allergic sensitization leads to food-specific IgE and T-helper lymphocyte type 2 cells, both of which appear to contribute to the pathogenesis along with basophils, mast cells, and antigen-presenting cells. This review will outline our current understandings of the allergic mechanisms that drive eosinophilic esophagitis, drawing from clinical and translational studies in humans as well as experimental animal models. PMID:24813516

  20. Transfusion and coagulation management in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, Ben; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-05-28

    There is wide variation in the management of coagulation and blood transfusion practice in liver transplantation. The use of blood products intraoperatively is declining and transfusion free transplantations take place ever more frequently. Allogenic blood products have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. Primary haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis are altered by liver disease. This, combined with intraoperative disturbances of coagulation, increases the risk of bleeding. Meanwhile, the rebalancing of coagulation homeostasis can put patients at risk of hypercoagulability and thrombosis. The application of the principles of patient blood management to transplantation can reduce the risk of transfusion. This includes: preoperative recognition and treatment of anaemia, reduction of perioperative blood loss and the use of restrictive haemoglobin based transfusion triggers. The use of point of care coagulation monitoring using whole blood viscoelastic testing provides a picture of the complete coagulation process by which to guide and direct coagulation management. Pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce fibrinolysis, and rarely, the use of recombinant factor VIIa. Factor concentrates are increasingly used; fibrinogen concentrates to improve clot strength and stability, and prothrombin complex concentrates to improve thrombin generation. Non-pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include surgical utilisation of the piggyback technique and maintenance of a low central venous pressure. The use of intraoperative cell salvage and normovolaemic haemodilution reduces allogenic blood transfusion. Further research into methods of decreasing blood loss and alternatives to blood transfusion remains necessary to continue to improve outcomes after transplantation. PMID:24876736

  1. Blood transfusion costs: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Forbes, J M; Anderson, M D; Anderson, G F; Bleecker, G C; Rossi, E C; Moss, G S

    1991-05-01

    The cost of delivering a unit of blood (whole blood or red cells) to a hospitalized patient was examined in 19 United States teaching hospitals. The average hospital acquisition cost was calculated by using the prices charged by regional blood centers for blood products. To this cost was added an estimate of costs incurred by hospitals for handling, testing, and administering blood. Across study sites, the average hospital cost per unit transfused was $155 and the average charge to the patient was $219. Acquisition cost, the price that hospitals pay for blood, was 37 percent of the total cost to the hospital; the other 63 percent of the hospital cost included costs for blood bank handling (13%), laboratory tests (43%), and blood administration (7%). Significant variations in blood transfusion cost were found within our sample. Most of the variability can be attributed to geographic location of the blood supply source, type of red cell product transfused, prices charged by blood transfusion services, and the frequency of laboratory tests. The results of this transfusion cost study may be helpful in determining the costs of health care delivery, especially when blood transfusions are indicated. PMID:2020994

  2. Evolution in a centralized transfusion service.

    PubMed

    AuBuchon, James P; Linauts, Sandra; Vaughan, Mimi; Wagner, Jeffrey; Delaney, Meghan; Nester, Theresa

    2011-12-01

    The metropolitan Seattle area has utilized a centralized transfusion service model throughout the modern era of blood banking. This approach has used four laboratories to serve over 20 hospitals and clinics, providing greater capabilities for all at a lower consumption of resources than if each depended on its own laboratory and staff for these functions. In addition, this centralized model has facilitated wider use of the medical capabilities of the blood center's physicians, and a county-wide network of transfusion safety officers is now being developed to increase the impact of the blood center's transfusion expertise at the patient's bedside. Medical expectations and traffic have led the blood center to evolve the centralized model to include on-site laboratories at facilities with complex transfusion requirements (e.g., a children's hospital) and to implement in all the others a system of remote allocation. This new capability places a refrigerator stocked with uncrossmatched units in the hospital but retains control over the dispensing of these through the blood center's computer system; the correct unit can be electronically cross-matched and released on demand, obviating the need for transportation to the hospital and thus speeding transfusion. This centralized transfusion model has withstood the test of time and continues to evolve to meet new situations and ensure optimal patient care. PMID:22150685

  3. Randomised, double blind, crossover challenge study of allergenicity of peanut oils in subjects allergic to peanuts.

    PubMed Central

    Hourihane, J. O.; Bedwani, S. J.; Dean, T. P.; Warner, J. O.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the in vivo allergenicity of two grades of peanut oil for a large group of subjects with proved allergy to peanuts. DESIGN: Double blind, crossover food challenge with crude peanut oil and refined peanut oil. SETTING: Dedicated clinical investigation unit in a university hospital. SUBJECTS: 60 subjects allergic to peanuts; allergy was confirmed by challenge tests. OUTCOME MEASURES: Allergic reaction to the tested peanut oils. RESULTS: None of the 60 subjects reacted to the refined oil; six (10%) reacted to the crude oil. Supervised peanut challenge caused considerably less severe reactions than subjects had reported previously. CONCLUSIONS: Crude peanut oil caused allergic reactions in 10% of allergic subjects studied and should continue to be avoided. Refined peanut oil did not pose a risk to any of the subjects. It would be reasonable to recommend a change in labelling to distinguish refined from crude peanut oil. PMID:9133891

  4. Hyperresponsiveness in the human nasal airway: new targets for the treatment of allergic airway disease.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, P J; Foreman, J C

    1999-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a condition which affects over 15% of the population in the United Kingdom. The pathological process involves two stages: nasal inflammation, and the development of nasal airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to allergen and a number of other stimuli. This results in the amplification of any subsequent allergic reaction, contributing to the chronic allergic state. A number of different hypotheses have been proposed to explain the underlying mechanism of AHR, including a role for eosinophil-derived proteins, free radicals and neuropeptides. While there may be a number of independent pathways which can result in AHR, evidence obtained from both animal models and in vivo experiments in humans indicate that some mediators may interact with one another, resulting in AHR. Further research into these interactions may open new avenues for the pharmacological treatment of chronic allergic rhinitis, and possibly other allergic airway diseases. PMID:10704051

  5. Perceived history of anaphylaxis and parental overprotection, autonomy, anxiety, and depression in food allergic young adults.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Linda J; Dahlquist, Lynnda M

    2008-12-01

    This study examined autonomy, anxiety, depression, and perceptions of parental behavior in 86 food allergic young adults and 344 healthy young adults between the ages of 18 and 22. Participants completed an online survey measuring self-reported autonomy, anxiety, depression, and perceptions of parental behavior. Results indicated that, as a group, food allergic young adults did not differ from healthy peers. However, food allergic young adults who reported having experienced an anaphylactic reaction described their disease as more severe, reported more worry about their disease, and rated their parents as more overprotective than food allergic young adults who reported never having experienced anaphylaxis. The experience of anaphylaxis may be a reliable indicator of food allergic individuals who are at risk for psychological distress. PMID:19104982

  6. Prehospital blood product transfusion by U.S. army MEDEVAC during combat operations in Afghanistan: a process improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Malsby, Robert F; Quesada, Jose; Powell-Dunford, Nicole; Kinoshita, Ren; Kurtz, John; Gehlen, William; Adams, Colleen; Martin, Dustin; Shackelford, Stacy

    2013-07-01

    U.S. Army flight medics performed a process improvement initiative of 15 blood product transfusions on select Category A (Urgent) helicopter evacuation casualties meeting approved clinical indications for transfusion. These transfusions were initiated from point of injury locations aboard MEDEVAC aircraft originating from one of two locations in southern Afghanistan. All flight medics executing the transfusions were qualified through a standardized and approved program of instruction, which included day and night skills validation, and a 90% or higher written examination score. There was no adverse reaction or out-of-standard blood product temperature despite hazardous conditions and elevated cabin temperatures. All casualties within a 10-minute flight time who met clinical indications were transfused. Utilization of a standard operating procedure with strict handling and administration parameters, a rigorous training and qualification program, an elaborate cold chain system, and redundant documentation of blood product units ensured that flight medic initiated transfusions were safe and effective. Research study is needed to refine the indications for prehospital blood transfusion and to determine the effect on outcomes in severely injured trauma patients. PMID:23820353

  7. The hospital cost (fiscal year 1991/1992) of a simple perioperative allogeneic red blood cell transfusion during elective surgery at Duke University.

    PubMed

    Lubarsky, D A; Hahn, C; Bennett, D H; Smith, L R; Bredehoeft, S J; Klein, H G; Reves, J G

    1994-10-01

    We sought to determine the actual cost to Duke University Medical Center of a perioperative red blood cell transfusion. A recent audit at Duke University Medical Center determined the base average direct and indirect hospital costs for providing a unit of red blood cells. The Transfusion Service's base cost for providing an allogeneic unit of red blood cells was $113.58. To obtain the actual hospital cost of transfusing a unit of red blood cells in the perioperative period, associated costs were calculated and added to the Transfusion Service's base cost. These associated costs included compatibility tests on multiple units per each unit transfused in the perioperative period, performing ABO and Rh typing and antibody screening on samples from patients who were not subsequently transfused, compatibility tests on units not issued, handling costs of units issued but not used, physically administering the blood, and the cost of the recipient contracting an infectious disease or developing a transfusion reaction. These associated costs increased the cost of transfusing an allogeneic unit of red blood cells in the perioperative period to $151.20. Perhaps the techniques described in the study can be used to quantify cost/benefit ratios associated with future changes in transfusion practice. PMID:7943767

  8. [Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO)].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Hitoshi

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, much attention has been paid to respiratory complications of transfusion. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined as an acute lung injury that is temporally associated with blood transfusion. TRALI is one of the leading causes of mortality. Although the etiology of TRALI is not fully understood, one of its main causes is thought to be anti-leukocyte antibodies, such as HLA antibody or HNA antibody. A precautionary male-predominant plasma strategy has been implemented in many developed countries, which has resulted in considerable achievements in reducing the incidence of TRALI. Meanwhile, transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) has emerged as a major differential diagnosis of TRALI. TACO is a well-known complication of transfusion, which has been considered not as a side effect of transfusion but a result of erroneous medical practice. It has long been an under-reported complication of transfusion and has not been investigated scientifically. Recent data on transfusion mortality from the Food and Drug Administration revealed that TACO was the second highest cause of death in the United States. Our data also suggested a steep increase in the reported cases of TACO in Japan. Precautionary measures should also be implemented for this emerging complication. PMID:23947178

  9. Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jenny L.

    2010-01-01

    Epicutaneous patch testing is the gold standard method for the diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis. Despite this knowledge, many clinical dermatologists do not offer patch testing in their offices or offer testing with only a limited number of allergens. Introduced in 1995, the Thin-Layer Rapid Use Epicutaneous Test originally contained 23 allergens and one control. In 2007, five additional allergens were added. This United States Food and Drug Administration-approved patch testing system made patch testing more convenient, and after its introduction, more dermatologists offered patch testing services. However, the number of allergens in the Thin-Layer Rapid Use Epicutaneous Test remains relatively low. Every two years, the North American Contact Dermatitis Group collects and reports the data from patch testing among its members to a standardized series of allergens. In 2005-2006, the Group used a series of 65 allergens. Of the top 30 allergens reported in 2005-2006, 10 were not included in the Thin-Layer Rapid Use Epicutaneous Test. Knowledge of and testing for additional allergens such as these may increase patch testing yield. PMID:20967194

  10. Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Greenberger, Paul A.; Bush, Robert K.; Demain, Jeffrey G.; Luong, Amber; Slavin, Raymond G.; Knutsen, Alan P.

    2014-01-01

    There remains lack of agreement on diagnostic criteria and approaches to treatment of patients with Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis (ABPA). The results of a survey of AAAAI members regarding these 2 issues are presented and compared for concordance with published recommendations. The literature was reviewed for pertinent reports and an electronic survey was conducted of AAAAI members and fellows regarding diagnostic criteria, numbers of patients evaluated for ABPA, and treatment approaches. From 508 respondents to the survey sent to 5155 U. S. physicians in the AAAAI database of members and fellows, 245 (48%) health professionals had treated at least 1 patient with ABPA in the previous year. For the diagnosis of ABPA, there was a difference in the threshold concentration of total serum IgE as 44.9% used ≥ 417 kU/L whereas 42.0% used ≥ 1000 kU/L. These findings suggest that ABPA might be underdiagnosed. Regarding pharmacotherapy, oral steroids were recommended for 97.1% of patients and oral steroids + inhaled corticosteroids + anti-fungal agent were utilized in 41.2% of patients. The armamentarium for treatment of ABPA includes oral corticosteroids as the initial treatment with inhaled corticosteroids used for management of persistent asthma. Azoles remain adjunctive. Published experience with omalizumab has been limited. PMID:25439360

  11. Alloimmunization is associated with older age of transfused red blood cells in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Payal C.; Deal, Allison M.; Pfaff, Emily R.; Qaqish, Bahjat; Hebden, Leyna M.; Park, Yara A.; Ataga, Kenneth I.

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization is a significant clinical complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). It can lead to difficulty with cross-matching for future transfusions and may sometimes trigger life-threatening delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions. We conducted a retrospective study to explore the association of clinical complications and age of RBC with alloimmunization in patients with SCD followed at a single institution from 2005 to 2012. One hundred and sixty six patients with a total of 488 RBC transfusions were evaluated. Nineteen patients (11%) developed new alloantibodies following blood transfusions during the period of review. The median age of RBC units was 20 days (interquartile range: 14–27 days). RBC antibody formation was significantly associated with the age of RBC units (P = 0.002), with a hazard ratio of 3.5 (95% CI: 1.71–7.11) for a RBC unit that was 7 days old and 9.8 (95% CI: 2.66–35.97) for a unit that was 35 days old, 28 days after the blood transfusion. No association was observed between RBC alloimmunization and acute vaso-occlusive complications. Although increased echocardiography-derived tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) was associated with the presence of RBC alloantibodies (P = 0.02), TRV was not significantly associated with alloimmunization when adjusted for patient age and number of transfused RBC units. Our study suggests that RBC antibody formation is significantly associated with older age of RBCs at the time of transfusion. Prospective studies in patients with SCD are required to confirm this finding. PMID:25963831

  12. Age-Related Changes in Immunological Factors and Their Relevance in Allergic Disease Development During Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Woo-Sung; Kim, Eun-Jin; Lim, Yeon-Mi; Yoon, Dankyu; Son, Jo-Young; Park, Jung-Won; Hong, Soo-Jong; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Allergic diseases are triggered by Th2-mediated immune reactions to allergens and orchestrated by various immunological factors, including immune cells and cytokines. Although many reports have suggested that childhood is the critical period in the onset of allergic diseases and aging leads to alter the susceptibility of an individual to allergic diseases, age-related changes in various immunological factors in healthy individuals as well as their difference between healthy and allergic children have not yet been established. Methods We investigated the ratio of Th1/Th2 cells and the levels of 22 allergy-related cytokines across all age groups in individuals who were classified as clinically non-atopic and healthy. We also examined their differences between healthy and allergic children to evaluate immunological changes induced by the development of allergic diseases during childhood. Results The Th1/Th2 ratio rose gradually during the growth period including childhood, reaching peak values in the twenties-thirties age group. Th1/Th2 ratios were significantly lower in allergic children than in healthy controls, whereas 14 of 22 cytokines were significantly higher in allergic children than in healthy controls. On the other hand, there were no differences in Th1/Th2 ratios and cytokines between healthy and allergic adolescents. Conclusions In this study, age-related changes in Th1/Th2 ratios were found in normal controls across all age groups, and decreases in Th1/Th2 ratio were observed with increasing of 14 cytokines in allergic children. The results of this study may be helpful as reference values for both monitoring immunological changes according to aging in healthy individuals and distinguishing between normal and allergic subjects in terms of immune cells and soluble factors. PMID:27126727

  13. Local Effect of Neurotrophin-3 in Neuronal Inflammation of Allergic Rhinitis: Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    İsmi, Onur; Özcan, Cengiz; Karabacak, Tuba; Polat, Gürbüz; Vayisoğlu, Yusuf; Güçlütürk, Taylan; Görür, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Allergic rhinitis is a common inflammatory nasal mucosal disease characterized by sneezing, watery nasal discharge, nasal obstruction and itching. Although allergen-specific antibodies play a main role in the allergic airway inflammation, neuronal inflammation may also contribute to the symptoms of allergic rhinitis. Neuronal inflammation is primarily caused by the stimulation of sensory nerve endings with histamine. It has been shown that neurotrophins may also have a role in allergic reactions and neuronal inflammation. Nerve growth factor, neurotrophin 3 (NT-3), neurotrophin 4/5 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are members of the neurotrophin family. Although nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are well studied in allergic rhinitis patients, the exact role of Neurotrophin-3 is not known. Aims: To investigate the possible roles of neurotrophin-3 in allergic rhinitis patients. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: Neurotrophin-3 levels were studied in the inferior turbinate and serum samples of 20 allergic rhinitis and 13 control patients. Neurotrophin-3 staining of nasal tissues was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and ELISA was used for the determination of serum Neurotrophin-3 levels. Results: Neurotrophin-3 staining scores were statistically higher in the study group than in the control patients (p=0.001). Regarding serum Neurotrophin-3 levels, no statistically significant difference could be determined between allergic rhinitis and control patients (p=0.156). When comparing the serum NT-3 levels with tissue staining scores, there were no statistically significant differences in the allergic rhinitis and control groups (p=0.254 for allergic rhinitis and p=0.624 for control groups). Conclusion: We suggest that Neurotrophin-3 might affect the nasal mucosa locally without being released into the systemic circulation in allergic rhinitis patients. PMID:26740895

  14. [Single-donor protocol: Transfusion practices and multiple transfusion risk factors in neonatal intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Dollat, C; Pierron, C; Keslick, A; Billoir, E; François, A; Jarreau, P-H

    2016-09-01

    In France since 2002, the single-donor transfusion protocol, using four pediatric units from the same adult donor's packed red blood cells (PRBCs) in multiply transfused newborns, is recommended in preterm neonates to reduce the risks of infection and alloimmunization. This protocol is controversial, however, because it causes the transfusion of stored blood, which could have adverse consequences. Before the new recommendations of the French Haute Autorité de santé (National authority for health) in 2015, we conducted a national practice survey in 63 neonatal intensive care units (NICU) and a retrospective study of the characteristics of 103 children transfused within our unit, to better target beneficiaries. The practice survey showed that 30 % of French NICUs no longer used the protocol in 2014, due to logistical or financial problems, or concerns about the transfusion of stored blood. The practices were heterogeneous. Few NICUs used a written protocol. In our NICU, the use of single-donor protocol involved the use of units stored for more than 20 days in half of the cases beginning with the third unit used. Six-term newborns were mainly transfused once, which does not seem to warrant the single-donor transfusion protocol. The use of this protocol caused the loss of 50 % of the manufactured units, which go unused. In multivariate analysis, two factors were predictive of multiple transfusion within our population of 95 premature neonates undergoing transfusion: low-term and a high Clinical Risk Index for Babies (CRIB) score. The risk of multiple transfusions would be reduced by about 15 % for each additional week of gestation and approximately 16 % per point within the CRIB score. These variables integrated into a statistical model predict the risk of multiplying transfusions. According to the ROC curve, a calculated risk higher than 50 % is the appropriate cut-off value to transfuse with the single-donor transfusion protocol. This would limit its

  15. Allergic fungal otomastoiditis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiung-Ming; Chiang, Ching-Wen

    2013-04-01

    Allergic mucin is described as thick, peanut butter-like mucus impacted in the paranasal sinuses of patients with allergic fungal rhinosinusitis. The presence of allergic mucin in the middle ear has never been reported. We encountered a 65-year-old female with allergic mucin found impacted in her left middle ear and mastoid cavity during revised tympanoplasty surgery at our institute. Bilateral endoscopic sinus surgery performed 3 months later showed no evidence of fungal infection or allergic mucin in her paranasal sinuses. We report the case herein and propose the term allergic fungal otomastoiditis for this disease entity. PMID:22825725

  16. The activity of recent anti-allergic drugs in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Clement, P; Smitz, J; De Waele, M

    1996-01-01

    Two experiments were performed during the pollen season to study the activity of different antiallergic drugs in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis. Nasal allergen challenge (NAC) was performed to mimic an acute attack of allergic rhinitis and to objectively evaluate the effect of the drugs on the early-phase reaction during the season. The first study assessed the effect of H1 (Cetirizine 10 mg a day) and of a combination of H1 (Cetirizine 10 mg) plus H2 (Cimetidine 800 mg a day) antagonists on nasal symptoms, mediator release and eosinophil count in a group of 16 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis. During the same season a second study compared in a randomized way (2 parallel groups) the effect of Budesonide (Rhinocort Aqua) and Azelastine (Allergodil nasal spray) in a group of 14 patients. Results showed that both antihistamines, applied topically of dosed orally, reduced sneezing even when significant increases of histamine concentration in nasal secretions were evidenced immediately after NAC. When a combination of Cetirizine and Cimetidine was administered, a significant (p < 0.01) reduction of nasal airway resistance and increase of nasal airflow after NAC were demonstrated as well. In addition, topical application of Budesonide showed a strong (p < 0.01) effect on the infiltration and activation of eosinophils during the season, and on tryptase release after NAC. These effects lasted at least for one week after therapy. PMID:8669268

  17. Retroviral infections transmitted by blood transfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, S. G.; Fang, C.; Williams, A.

    1990-01-01

    Modifications in donor screening and the introduction of laboratory testing of donated blood for anti-HIV-1 and anti-HTLV-I have resulted in a significant reduction in the risks of retroviral infections from blood transfusion. Presently, the American Red Cross detects an average of eight carriers of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) per 100,000 otherwise acceptable blood donors (0.008 percent), compared with an average of 35 per 100,000 (0.035 percent) when testing for HIV-1 antibodies began in 1985. Surveillance studies in the United States indicate a small likelihood that HIV-2 carriers will pass current screening procedures and be accepted as blood donors. Even if an HIV-2-infected person were to be accepted as a blood donor, there is a 42-92 percent likelihood that this person's blood would be detected as infective for HIV-2 and excluded because of serological cross-reactions that occur in the EIA for HIV-1 antibodies. During 1989, which was the first year that donated blood was routinely tested for antibodies to human T-lymphotropic virus, type I (HTLV-I) in the United States, approximately nine in 100,000 donors (0.009 percent) were confirmed positive for antibodies to HTLV-I, and their donated blood was excluded. Subsequent testing has revealed that a significant number of these persons whose sera was reactive by the HTLV-I EIA were, in fact, infected by HTLV-II. Epidemiological studies of human retroviral infections (HIV-1, HIV-2, HTLV-I, and HTLV-II) continue to provide important data and direction for improving criteria for qualifying blood donors. PMID:1981409

  18. Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis: A Perplexing Clinical Entity

    PubMed Central

    Panjabi, Chandramani

    2016-01-01

    In susceptible individuals, inhalation of Aspergillus spores can affect the respiratory tract in many ways. These spores get trapped in the viscid sputum of asthmatic subjects which triggers a cascade of inflammatory reactions that can result in Aspergillus-induced asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), and allergic Aspergillus sinusitis (AAS). An immunologically mediated disease, ABPA, occurs predominantly in patients with asthma and cystic fibrosis (CF). A set of criteria, which is still evolving, is required for diagnosis. Imaging plays a compelling role in the diagnosis and monitoring of the disease. Demonstration of central bronchiectasis with normal tapering bronchi is still considered pathognomonic in patients without CF. Elevated serum IgE levels and Aspergillus-specific IgE and/or IgG are also vital for the diagnosis. Mucoid impaction occurring in the paranasal sinuses results in AAS, which also requires a set of diagnostic criteria. Demonstration of fungal elements in sinus material is the hallmark of AAS. In spite of similar histopathologic features, co-existence of ABPA and AAS is still uncommon. Oral corticosteroids continue to be the mainstay of management of allergic aspergillosis. Antifungal agents play an adjunctive role in ABPA as they help reduce the fungal load. Saprophytic colonization in cavitary ABPA may lead to aspergilloma formation, which could increase the severity of the disease. The presence of ABPA, AAS, and aspergilloma in the same patient has also been documented. All patients with Aspergillus-sensitized asthma must be screened for ABPA, and AAS should always be looked for. PMID:27126721

  19. Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis: A Perplexing Clinical Entity.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok; Panjabi, Chandramani

    2016-07-01

    In susceptible individuals, inhalation of Aspergillus spores can affect the respiratory tract in many ways. These spores get trapped in the viscid sputum of asthmatic subjects which triggers a cascade of inflammatory reactions that can result in Aspergillus-induced asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), and allergic Aspergillus sinusitis (AAS). An immunologically mediated disease, ABPA, occurs predominantly in patients with asthma and cystic fibrosis (CF). A set of criteria, which is still evolving, is required for diagnosis. Imaging plays a compelling role in the diagnosis and monitoring of the disease. Demonstration of central bronchiectasis with normal tapering bronchi is still considered pathognomonic in patients without CF. Elevated serum IgE levels and Aspergillus-specific IgE and/or IgG are also vital for the diagnosis. Mucoid impaction occurring in the paranasal sinuses results in AAS, which also requires a set of diagnostic criteria. Demonstration of fungal elements in sinus material is the hallmark of AAS. In spite of similar histopathologic features, co-existence of ABPA and AAS is still uncommon. Oral corticosteroids continue to be the mainstay of management of allergic aspergillosis. Antifungal agents play an adjunctive role in ABPA as they help reduce the fungal load. Saprophytic colonization in cavitary ABPA may lead to aspergilloma formation, which could increase the severity of the disease. The presence of ABPA, AAS, and aspergilloma in the same patient has also been documented. All patients with Aspergillus-sensitized asthma must be screened for ABPA, and AAS should always be looked for. PMID:27126721

  20. Perioperative Red Blood Cell Transfusion: Harmful or Beneficial to the Patient?

    PubMed

    Meier, Jens; Müller, Markus M; Lauscher, Patrick; Sireis, Walid; Seifried, Erhard; Zacharowski, Kai

    2012-04-01

    Although the transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) is safer than ever regarding infections, it is still associated with several adverse reactions and therefore should only be used on the basis of evidence-based triggers. However, prevention of RBC transfusion and subsequent substitution of blood losses with acellular solutions will inevitably result in dilutional anemia. Acute dilutional anemia can be compensated by the body over a wide range of hemoglobin concentrations without a critical restriction of tissue oxygenation. On the other hand, chronic anemia is known to be a potent cause of morbidity and mortality. As a consequence, the impact of perioperative anemia on mortality is difficult to describe, because anemia, as well as the transfusion of RBCs, can influence the clinical outcome. The resulting 'Gordian knot' cannot be cut easily, and this circumstance forces clinical physicians to make a daily trade-off between transfusion-associated and anemia-associated risks. This review focuses on the physiology of oxygen transport, the hazards of acute anemia, the hazards of RBC transfusion, and the literature putting these problems into perspective. PMID:22670127

  1. Transfusion and blood donation in comic strips.

    PubMed

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Danic, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    The representation of blood transfusion and donation of blood in the comic strip has never been studied. The comic strip, which is a relatively recent art, emerged in the 19th century before becoming a mass medium during the 20th century. We have sought, by calling on collectors and using the resources of Internet, comic strips devoted, wholly or in part, to the themes of transfusion and blood donation. We present some of them here in chronologic order, indicating the title, country of origin, year of publication, and names of authors. The theme of the superhero using transfusion to transmit his virtues or his powers is repeated throughout the 20th century in North American comic strips. More recently, comic strips have been conceived from the outset with a promotional aim. They perpetuate positive images and are directed toward a young readership, wielding humor to reduce the fear of venipuncture. Few comic strips denounce the abuse of the commercialization of products derived from the human body. The image of transfusion and blood donation given by the comic strips is not to be underestimated because their readership is primarily children, some of whom will become blood donors. Furthermore, if some readers are transfused during their lives, the impact of a memory more or less conscious of these childhood readings may resurface, both in hopes and in fears. PMID:23643789

  2. New therapies for allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Braido, Fulvio; Sclifò, Francesca; Ferrando, Matteo; Canonica, Giorgio Walter

    2014-04-01

    Because of its burden on patient's lives and its impact on asthma, allergic rhinitis must be treated properly with more effective and safer treatments. According to guidelines by Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA), the classification, pathogenesis, and treatment of allergic rhinitis are well defined. Currently, second-generation antihistamines and inhaled steroids are considered the cornerstone of first-line therapy. However, new formulations of available drugs (e.g., loratadine and rupatadine oral solution, ebastine fast-dissolving tablets, and the combination of intranasal fluticasone propionate and azelastine hydrochloride), recently discovered molecules (e.g., ciclesonide, bilastine, and phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors), immunologic targets (e.g., omalizumab), and unconventional treatments (e.g., homeopathic treatments) are currently under investigation and represent a new frontier in modern medicine and in allergic rhinitis management. The aim of this review is to provide an update on allergic rhinitis treatment, paying particular attention to clinical trials published within the past 20 months that assessed the efficacy and safety of new formulations of available drugs or new molecules. PMID:24504526

  3. Elongation factor 1 β/δ of Echinococcus granulosus and allergic manifestations in human cystic echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Ortona, E; Margutti, P; Vaccari, S; Riganò, R; Profumo, E; Buttari, B; Chersi, A; Teggi, A; Siracusano, A

    2001-01-01

    Allergic reactions, such as urticaria, itching and anaphylactic shock, often complicate the course of cystic echinococcosis (CE). To investigate the role of the IgE-immunoreactive recombinant Echinococcus granulosus elongation factor-1 β/δ (EgEF-1 β/δ) in the allergic disorders during CE we determined humoral and cell-mediated responses to this antigen in patients with CE grouped according to the clinical presence or absence of allergic reactions. Immunoblotting analysis showed that serum IgE-binding reactivity to EgEF-1 β/δ differed significantly in patients with and without allergic reactions (38 of 42, 90% vs. 31 of 56, 56%; P < 10−4). EgEF-1 β/δ induced a proliferative response in 14 of 19 (74%) patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) irrespective of the allergic manifestations and skewed Th1/Th2 cytokine activation towards a preferentially Th2 polarization. Epitope mapping identified an immunodominant epitope of 18 residues with 78% identity and 89% similarity with an IgE-immunoreactive Strongyloides stercoralis antigen. Overall these findings suggest that EgEF-1 β/δ is an allergenic molecule that may be a general marker of the intensity of CE immune response and that could lead to a deeper understanding of the specific antigen-induced mechanisms underlying allergic reactions in the human host. PMID:11472433

  4. Cardiac autonomic imbalance in children with allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Tascilar, Emre; Yokusoglu, Mehmet; Dundaroz, Rusen; Baysan, Oben; Ozturk, Sami; Yozgat, Yilmaz; Kilic, Ayhan

    2009-11-01

    The involvement of autonomic imbalance has been reported in the pathogenesis of hypersensitivity reactions. Allergic diseases are more frequent in children and some of predisposing factors may be changed according to the increasing age, but the involvement of autonomic imbalance has not been investigated in pediatric population. In this cross-sectional, case-control study, we evaluated the autonomic system by measuring heart rate variability (HRV) in pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis. Thirty-five pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis and 36 healthy children (mean age 11 +/- 2.7, and 12 +/- 3 years, respectively) were enrolled in the study. Age and gender were not different between the groups. The diagnosis of allergic rhinitis was based on the history, symptoms, and skin prick tests. Participants with acute infection, nasal polyposis, bronchial asthma, and any other medical problems, assessed by history, physical examination and routine laboratory tests, were excluded. Twenty-four hour ambulatory electrocardiographic recordings were obtained, and the time domain and frequency domain indices of HRV were analyzed. We found significant increase in calculated HRV variables in children with allergic rhinitis compared to controls, which reflect parasympathetic tones, such as number of R-R intervals exceeding 50 ms, root mean square of successive differences between normal sinus R-R intervals, the percentage of difference between adjacent normal R-R intervals, and high frequency. These results indicate that HRV is increased, which implies sympathetic withdrawal and parasympathetic predominance. We propose that autonomic imbalance may be involved in the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis in pediatric patients. PMID:19851046

  5. Platelet transfusion therapy: from 1973 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Brand, Anneke; Novotny, Vera; Tomson, Bert

    2006-06-01

    Platelet transfusions are indispensable for supportive care of patients with hematological diseases. We describe the developments in platelet products for transfusion since the 1970s, when, in particular, support for patients with allo-antibodies against human leukocyte antigens was a laborious exercise with a high failure rate. Currently, due to many stepwise innovations, platelet transfusions are of low immunogenicity and sufficiently available, they have a shelf life up to 7 days, and even matched platelets can often be routinely delivered, provided that there is good communication between all partners in the chain. Future improvements can be expected from uniform type and screen approaches for immunized patients and cross-matching by computer. For efficient use of health care resources, blood banks and stem cell donor banks could share their typed donor files. PMID:16728262

  6. Update on local allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Altıntoprak, Niyazi; Kar, Murat; Bayar Muluk, Nuray; Oktemer, Tugba; Ipci, Kagan; Birdane, Leman; Aricigil, Mitat; Senturk, Mehmet; Bafaqeeh, Sameer Ali; Cingi, Cemal

    2016-08-01

    We here provide an update on the literature regarding local allergic rhinitis (LAR). In reviewing LAR, we have included an updated definition, classifications, mechanisms, comorbidities, and recommendations for diagnosis and treatment for LAR, as well as the defined research areas for future evidence-based studies. LAR is a localised nasal allergic response in the absence of systemic atopy characterised by local production of specific IgE (sIgE) antibodies, a TH2 pattern of mucosal cell infiltration during natural exposure to aeroallergens, and a positive nasal allergen provocation test response, with the release of inflammatory mediators. The localised allergic response of LAR is an important topic for the study of allergies. This review provides an update on the current knowledge of LAR. PMID:27368453

  7. Complementary Therapies in Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Ibrahim; Cingi, Cemal; Baykal, Bahadir

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of herbal treatment of allergic rhinitis. Methods. In this prospective study, patients who were diagnosed with perennial allergic rhinitis were questioned about their use of natural products/herbal therapies for their symptoms. Results. In total, 230 patients were enrolled. Overall, 37.3% of the patients stated that they had used natural products/herbal therapies at least once. Women were more likely than men to use herbal supplements (38.3% versus 32.4%). Ten different types of herbal supplements were identified, with stinging nettle (Urtica dioicath), black elderberry (Sambucus nigra), and Spirulina being the most common (12.6%, 6.1%, and 5.7%, resp.). Conclusion. This study found a high prevalence of herbal treatment usage for the relief of allergic rhinitis symptoms in Turkey. The herbal products identified in this study and in the literature are discussed. PMID:24324897

  8. Eosinophilic Inflammation in Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Possa, Samantha S.; Leick, Edna A.; Prado, Carla M.; Martins, Mílton A.; Tibério, Iolanda F. L. C.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils are circulating granulocytes involved in pathogenesis of asthma. A cascade of processes directed by Th2 cytokine producing T-cells influence the recruitment of eosinophils into the lungs. Furthermore, multiple elements including interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, chemoattractants such as eotaxin, Clara cells, and CC chemokine receptor (CCR)3 are already directly involved in recruiting eosinophils to the lung during allergic inflammation. Once recruited, eosinophils participate in the modulation of immune response, induction of airway hyperresponsiveness and remodeling, characteristic features of asthma. Various types of promising treatments for reducing asthmatic response are related to reduction in eosinophil counts both in human and experimental models of pulmonary allergic inflammation, showing that the recruitment of these cells really plays an important role in the pathophysiology of allergic diseases such asthma. PMID:23616768

  9. When to consider transfusion therapy for patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Taher, A T; Radwan, A; Viprakasit, V

    2015-01-01

    Non-transfusion-dependent thalassaemia (NTDT) refers to all thalassaemia disease phenotypes that do not require regular blood transfusions for survival. Thalassaemia disorders were traditionally concentrated along the tropical belt stretching from sub-Saharan Africa through the Mediterranean region and the Middle East to South and South-East Asia, but global migration has led to increased incidence in North America and Northern Europe. Transfusionists may be familiar with β-thalassaemia major because of the lifelong transfusions needed by these patients. Although patients with NTDT do not require regular transfusions for survival, they may require transfusions in some instances such as pregnancy, infection or growth failure. The complications associated with NTDT can be severe if not properly managed, and many are directly related to chronic anaemia. Awareness of NTDT is important, and this review will outline the factors that should be taken into consideration when deciding whether to initiate and properly plan for transfusion therapy in these patients in terms of transfusion interval and duration of treatment. PMID:25286743

  10. Appropriateness of allogeneic red blood cell transfusion: the international consensus conference on transfusion outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shander, Aryeh; Fink, Arlene; Javidroozi, Mazyar; Erhard, Jochen; Farmer, Shannon L; Corwin, Howard; Goodnough, Lawrence Tim; Hofmann, Axel; Isbister, James; Ozawa, Sherri; Spahn, Donat R

    2011-07-01

    An international multidisciplinary panel of 15 experts reviewed 494 published articles and used the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method to determine the appropriateness of allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion based on its expected impact on outcomes of stable nonbleeding patients in 450 typical inpatient medical, surgical, or trauma scenarios. Panelists rated allogeneic RBC transfusion as appropriate in 53 of the scenarios (11.8%), inappropriate in 267 (59.3%), and uncertain in 130 (28.9%). Red blood cell transfusion was most often rated appropriate (81%) in scenarios featuring patients with hemoglobin (Hb) level 7.9 g/dL or less, associated comorbidities, and age older than 65 years. Red blood cell transfusion was rated inappropriate in all scenarios featuring patients with Hb level 10 g/dL or more and in 71.3% of scenarios featuring patients with Hb level 8 to 9.9 g/dL. Conversely, no scenario with patient's Hb level of 8 g/dL or more was rated as appropriate. Nearly one third of all scenarios were rated uncertain, indicating the need for more research. The observation that allogeneic RBC transfusions were rated as either inappropriate or uncertain in most scenarios in this study supports a more judicious transfusion strategy. In addition, the large number of scenarios in which RBC transfusions were rated as uncertain can serve as a road map to identify areas in need of further investigation. PMID:21498040

  11. Where are the systematic reviews in transfusion medicine? A study of the transfusion evidence base.

    PubMed

    Dorée, Carolyn; Stanworth, Simon; Brunskill, Susan J; Hopewell, Sally; Hyde, Chris J; Murphy, Mike F

    2010-10-01

    Transfusion medicine has become a large and complex specialty. Although there are now systematic reviews covering many aspects of transfusion, these span a large number of clinical areas and are published across more than a hundred different medical journals, making it difficult for transfusion medicine practitioners and researchers to keep abreast of the current high-level evidence. In response to this problem, NHS Blood and Transplant's Systematic Review Initiative (SRI) has produced a comprehensive overview of systematic reviews in transfusion medicine. A systematic search (to December 2009) and screening procedure were followed by the appraisal of systematic reviews according to predefined inclusion criteria. The 340 eligible systematic reviews were mapped to 10 transfusion intervention groups and 14 topic groups within clinical medicine. Trends in the systematic review literature were examined and gaps in the literature described. The spread of systematic reviews across clinical areas was found to be very uneven, with some areas underreviewed and others with multiple systematic reviews on the same topic, making the identification of the best evidence for current transfusion practice a continuing challenge. References and links to all systematic reviews included in this overview can be freely accessed via the SRI's new online database, the Transfusion Evidence Library (www.transfusionguidelines.org). PMID:20851331

  12. Therapeutic strategies for allergic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter J.

    1999-11-01

    Many drugs are now in development for the treatment of atopic diseases, including asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. These treatments are based on improvements in existing therapies or on a better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in atopic diseases. Although most attention has been focused on asthma, treatments that inhibit the atopic disease process would have application to all atopic diseases, as they often coincide. Most of the many new therapies in development are aimed at inhibiting components of the allergic inflammatory response, but in the future there are real possibilities for the development of preventative and even curative treatments.

  13. [Preventing deficiencies in the transfusion process].

    PubMed

    Hergon, E; Rouger, P; Garnerin, P

    1994-01-01

    The methods of system reliability analysis represent an interesting set of tools used to follow the so-called "transfusion process", defined as all the steps from donors sensitization to recipients follow-up. FMECA, (Failure Mode Effects and Criticality Analysis), can be used as a prevention tool, independently of any dysfunction in the process. Of course, it can equally be used following a failure, in order to analyse the causes and to apply the specific corrections. Quality insurance, system reliability analysis, epidemiologic surveillance and safety monitoring operate in synergy. These three issues pertaining to transfusion safety constitute a dynamic system. PMID:7881591

  14. Exchange Transfusion in Severe Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Khatib, Khalid Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is endemic in India with the incidence of P. falciparum Malaria increasing gradually over the last decade. Severe malaria is an acute disease, caused by P. falciparum, but increasingly also by P. vivax with major signs of organ dysfunction and/or high levels of parasitaemia (>10%) in blood smear. Use of exchange transfusion with antimalarial drug therapy as an additional modality of treatment in severe Falciparum malaria is controversial and is unclear. We report a case of severe malaria complicated by multiorgan failure and ARDS. Patient responded well to manual exchange transfusion with standard artesunate-based chemotherapy. PMID:27042503

  15. Platelet Transfusion and Thrombosis: More Questions than Answers.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Amy E; Refaai, Majed A; Blumberg, Neil

    2016-03-01

    Platelets perform a vital role in hemostasis and their role in inflammation is becoming increasingly evident. Blood transfusion is the most common procedure performed in hospitals and platelet transfusions comprise a significant proportion. Over the past few decades, retrospective studies and randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that blood transfusion is more harmful than previously thought and is associated with numerous complications, such as transfusion-associated lung injury, transfusion-associated cardiac overload, transfusion-associated immune modulation, and infectious diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, and hepatitis B virus. Recent data suggest an association between platelet transfusion and thrombosis. This review will highlight the mechanistic issues that may be relevant to the epidemiologic associations of platelet transfusion with thrombosis and mortality in critically ill patients. PMID:26716501

  16. [Indications and surveillance of platelet transfusions in surgery].

    PubMed

    Coffe, C; Bardiaux, L; Couteret, Y; Devillers, M; Leroy, M; Morel, P; Pouthier-Stein, F; Hervé, P

    1995-01-01

    Surgery, after hematology, is the biggest consumer of homologous platelet concentrates. Platelet transfusion is indicated to prevent or control bleeding associated with deficiencies in platelet number or function. In surgery, general patterns (in function of pre-surgery platelet count) can be adopted in most of the indications for platelets. In emergency situations, and in some particular cases (related to the patient, the type of operation, etc.), the transfusion procedure depends on the team's experience, the results of the available clinical and biological tests, and the drugs. Strict monitoring is required during the transfusion procedure. The efficacy of the transfusion must be controlled 1 h and 24 hours after the transfusion, and a number of factors must be assessed, namely the immunological impact of the transfusion (on red blood cells, leukocytes and platelets) and the occurrence of infectious diseases transmitted via transfusion. In addition, for a possible future transfusion, a strategy must be proposed. PMID:7767484

  17. Transfusion strategies in patients undergoing stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Radia, Rohini; Pamphilon, Derwood

    2011-04-01

    Hemopoietic stem-cell transplant patients may require intensive blood component support. Complications of transfusions include transmission of viral and bacterial infections, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease and transfusion-related acute lung injury. Alloimmunization to red cell antigens may cause difficulties in selecting compatible blood, while alloimmunization to HLA expressed on platelets may cause subsequent platelet transfusion refractoriness. It is essential to define robust transfusion policies and procedures and these should be regularly audited. This article reviews blood component transfusion in the setting of hemopoietic stem-cell transplant and specifically discusses the management of ABO-mismatched transplants, the prevention of cytomegalovirus transmission, the prevention of transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease and the use of granulocyte transfusions. PMID:21495930

  18. Management of Rhinitis: Allergic and Non-Allergic

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Nguyen P; Vickery, John

    2011-01-01

    Rhinitis is a global problem and is defined as the presence of at least one of the following: congestion, rhinorrhea, sneezing, nasal itching, and nasal obstruction. The two major classifications are allergic and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR). Allergic rhinitis occurs when an allergen is the trigger for the nasal symptoms. NAR is when obstruction and rhinorrhea occurs in relation to nonallergic, noninfectious triggers such as change in the weather, exposure to caustic odors or cigarette smoke, barometric pressure differences, etc. There is a lack of concomitant allergic disease, determined by negative skin prick test for relevant allergens and/or negative allergen-specific antibody tests. Both are highly prevalent diseases that have a significant economic burden on society and negative impact on patient quality of life. Treatment of allergic rhinitis includes allergen avoidance, antihistamines (oral and intranasal), intranasal corticosteroids, intranasal cromones, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and immunotherapy. Occasional systemic corticosteroids and decongestants (oral and topical) are also used. NAR has 8 major subtypes which includes nonallergic rhinopathy (previously known as vasomotor rhinitis), nonallergic rhinitis with eosinophilia, atrophic rhinitis, senile rhinitis, gustatory rhinitis, drug-induced rhinitis, hormonal-induced rhinitis, and cerebral spinal fluid leak. The mainstay of treatment for NAR are intranasal corticosteroids. Topical antihistamines have also been found to be efficacious. Topical anticholinergics such as ipratropium bromide (0.03%) nasal spray are effective in treating rhinorrhea symptoms. Adjunct therapy includes decongestants and nasal saline. Investigational therapies in the treatment of NAR discussed include capsaicin, silver nitrate, and acupuncture. PMID:21738880

  19. Transfusion-related acute lung injury; clinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongmin

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) was introduced in 1983 to describe a clinical syndrome seen within 6 h of a plasma-containing blood products transfusion. TRALI is a rare transfusion complication; however, the FDA has suggested that TRALI is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. Understanding the pathogenesis of TRALI will facilitate adopting preventive strategies, such as deferring high plasma volume female product donors. This review outlines the clinical features, pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of TRALI. PMID:25844126

  20. Transfusion requirements in septic shock (TRISS) trial - comparing the effects and safety of liberal versus restrictive red blood cell transfusion in septic shock patients in the ICU: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transfusion of red blood cells (RBC) is recommended in septic shock and the majority of these patients receive RBC transfusion in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, benefit and harm of RBCs have not been established in this group of high-risk patients. Methods/Design The Transfusion Requirements in Septic Shock (TRISS) trial is a multicenter trial with assessor-blinded outcome assessment, randomising 1,000 patients with septic shock in 30 Scandinavian ICUs to receive transfusion with pre-storage leuko-depleted RBC suspended in saline-adenine-glucose and mannitol (SAGM) at haemoglobin level (Hb) of 7 g/dl or 9 g/dl, stratified by the presence of haematological malignancy and centre. The primary outcome measure is 90-day mortality. Secondary outcome measures are organ failure, ischaemic events, severe adverse reactions (SARs: anaphylactic reaction, acute haemolytic reaction and transfusion-related circulatory overload, and acute lung injury) and mortality at 28 days, 6 months and 1 year. The sample size will enable us to detect a 9% absolute difference in 90-day mortality assuming a 45% event rate with a type 1 error rate of 5% and power of 80%. An interim analysis will be performed after 500 patients, and the Data Monitoring and Safety Committee will recommend the trial be stopped if a group difference in 90-day mortality with P ≤0.001 is present at this point. Discussion The TRISS trial may bridge the gap between clinical practice and the lack of efficacy and safety data on RBC transfusion in septic shock patients. The effect of restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion strategy on mortality, organ failure, ischaemic events and SARs will be evaluated. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01485315. Registration date 30 November 2011. First patient was randomised 3 December 2011. PMID:23702006

  1. Why People with Cancer Might Need Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Blood Transfusion and Donation + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » TOPICS Document ... Possible risks of blood transfusions Alternatives to blood transfusions Donating blood Blood donation by cancer survivors To learn more References Previous ...

  2. Allergic inhalant dermatitis attributable to marijuana exposure in a dog.

    PubMed

    Evans, A G

    1989-12-01

    Exposure to marijuana was believed to be responsible for clinical signs consistent with allergic inhalant dermatitis in a dog. The dog had facial and pedal pruritus associated with bilateral ocular discharge. Clinical signs resolved when the dog was kenneled, but returned when the dog was returned to its home. The results of intradermal skin testing, using a standard tray of 51 inhalant extracts, did not adequately account for the dog's clinical signs. Later, the owners indicated that previous residents of the owners' home had cultivated marijuana intensively inside and outside of the home. Intradermal skin testing with a source of marijuana pollen extract was performed, yielding a positive reaction in the dog and a negative reaction in another dog without clinical or historical evidence of allergic inhalant dermatitis. The affected dog was treated successfully and exclusively by hyposensitization with marijuana pollen extract. PMID:2599943

  3. ALLERGIC POTENTIAL OF INDOOR MOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many fungi have been associated with allergic lung disease, but few are well studied and even fewer allergens of fungal origin are well characterized. Exposure to damp moldy environments has been associated with the exacerbation of asthma, but the role of molds in the induction o...

  4. Asthma and Respiratory Allergic Disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases such as allergy is complex and poorly understood. The causes of chronic allergic diseases including asthma involve to a large extent, immunomodulation of the adaptive and particularly the innate immune systems and are markedly influen...

  5. INDOOR MOLDS AND ALLERGIC POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Damp/moldy environments have been associated with asthma exacerbation, but mold¿s role in allergic asthma induction is less clear. Recently, 5 molds were statistically associated with water-damaged asthmatic homes in the Cleveland area. The asthma exacerbation...

  6. Allergic contact dermatitis from a wooden necklace.

    PubMed

    Hausen, B M

    1997-09-01

    A 36-year-old female kitchenworker twice developed eczematous lesions corresponding exactly to the area around her neck where she had worn a wooden necklace. Contact dermatitis lasted longer than 1 week. The necklace consisted of 42 brown wooden beads and 63 other wooden parts, 0.5 to 3 cm diameter. Most parts could be identified as Cocobolo wood, Brazilian and East Indian rosewood, and teak. Patch tests with the pure constituents gave +3-reactions to three dalbergions and obtusaquinone, which are known to be the sensitizers of Cocobolo and the above-mentioned rosewoods. Because of these test results, the identification of the species by eye examination could be corroborated. Further detailed questioning revealed that the patient had played a recorder, probably made from Cocobolo (Dalbergia retusa), when a child, to which she unknowingly became allergic. PMID:9249295

  7. Langerhans cells in allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Tuchinda, P; Gaspari, A A

    2010-12-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a common skin disease that has significant socio-economic impact. ACD is mediated by a T-cell mediated inflammatory reaction. Langerhans cells (LCs) are an epidermal DCs subset specialized in antigen presentation. After hapten exposure, LCs play a major role as in induction adaptive immune response against allergens. LCs recognize, take up and process haptens and migrate to the local draining lymph nodes. However, LCs specific functions and the LCs migration to local draining lymph nodes are not yet clearly defined. Recent advance in the knowledge of LCs function has increased in the past decades including the evidence for a tolerogenic function of LCs. The present review will focus on the role for LCs response to contact allergens. PMID:21139551

  8. Red Blood Cell Transfusion and Transfusion Alternatives in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Andreas H; Le Roux, Peter

    2012-02-01

    OPINION STATEMENT: Anemia develops in about 50% of patients hospitalized with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and is recognized as a cause of secondary brain injury. This review examines the effects of anemia and transfusion on TBI patients through a literature search to identify original research on anemia and transfusion in TBI, the effects of transfusion on brain physiology, and the role of erythropoietin or hemoglobin-based blood substitutes (HBBSs). However, the amount of high-quality, prospective data available to help make decisions about when TBI patients should be transfused is very small. Randomized transfusion trials have involved far too few TBI patients to reach definitive conclusions. Thus, it is hardly surprising that there is widespread practice variation. In our opinion, a hemoglobin transfusion threshold of 7 g/dL cannot yet be considered safe for TBI patients admitted to hospital, and in particular to the ICU, as it is for other critically ill patients. Red blood cell transfusions often have immediate, seemingly beneficial effects on cerebral physiology, but the magnitude of this effect may depend in part upon how long the cells have been stored before administration. In light of existing physiological data, we generally aim to keep hemoglobin concentrations greater than 9 g/dL during the first several days after TBI. In part, the decision is based on the patient's risk of or development of secondary ischemia or brain injury. An increasing number of centers use multimodal neurologic monitoring, which may help to individualize transfusion goals based on the degree of cerebral hypoxia or metabolic distress. When available, brain tissue oxygen tension values less than 15-20 mm Hg or a lactate:pyruvate ratio greater than 30-40 would influence us to use more aggressive hemoglobin correction (e.g., a transfusion threshold of 10 g/dL). Clinicians can attempt to reduce transfusion requirements by limiting phlebotomy, minimizing hemodilution, and

  9. [Transfusion safety. Introduction and identifying the problem].

    PubMed

    Ambriz Fernández, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    The problems that exist in our country in the security of the transfusion chain affect every step in the recruitment, donor selection, and aseptic collection, screening tests, production of blood components, storage, transportation and transfusion to recipient. Some of which can lead to fatal cases or moving slowly because of the fragmentation of our health system.With the principles of ethics, we must move towards a unified national blood system overcoming the conflicts of interest that affect the impact on administrative certifications; decrease the irrational use of resources, optimize costs and achieve a transfusion medicine security system and haemovigilance of the at the hospital. There has to be some regional blood banks well-coordinated in health institutions, with central management systems of quality and more specialized procedures,the latter can be achieved with more than 150 public blood banks, transforming them into positions of blood collection of voluntary donation of repetition. The resources would be released equip regional banks. Also required to provide education and legislation ad hoc for goals in voluntary blood donation and focused mainly the university population and centralize information for haemovigilance based computer systems specific hospitals, that reduce errors and restrict risk blood components involved in fatal cases, and reduce the possibility of punitive actions. It has international advice of the whole transfusion chain. PMID:23435078

  10. Report on errors in pretransfusion testing from a tertiary care center: A step toward transfusion safety

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Meena; Meenia, Renu; Akhter, Naveen; Sawhney, Vijay; Irm, Yasmeen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Errors in the process of pretransfusion testing for blood transfusion can occur at any stage from collection of the sample to administration of the blood component. The present study was conducted to analyze the errors that threaten patients’ transfusion safety and actual harm/serious adverse events that occurred to the patients due to these errors. Materials and Methods: The prospective study was conducted in the Department Of Transfusion Medicine, Shri Maharaja Gulab Singh Hospital, Government Medical College, Jammu, India from January 2014 to December 2014 for a period of 1 year. Errors were defined as any deviation from established policies and standard operating procedures. A near-miss event was defined as those errors, which did not reach the patient. Location and time of occurrence of the events/errors were also noted. Results: A total of 32,672 requisitions for the transfusion of blood and blood components were received for typing and cross-matching. Out of these, 26,683 products were issued to the various clinical departments. A total of 2,229 errors were detected over a period of 1 year. Near-miss events constituted 53% of the errors and actual harmful events due to errors occurred in 0.26% of the patients. Sample labeling errors were 2.4%, inappropriate request for blood components 2%, and information on requisition forms not matching with that on the sample 1.5% of all the requisitions received were the most frequent errors in clinical services. In transfusion services, the most common event was accepting sample in error with the frequency of 0.5% of all requisitions. ABO incompatible hemolytic reactions were the most frequent harmful event with the frequency of 2.2/10,000 transfusions. Conclusion: Sample labeling, inappropriate request, and sample received in error were the most frequent high-risk errors. PMID:27011670

  11. Predictors of Red Cell Alloimmunization in Kurdish Multi Transfused Patients with Hemoglobinopathies in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Mousawi, Muqdad M N; Al-Allawi, Nasir A S; Alnaqshabandi, Rubad

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies are significant health problems in Iraq, including its Northern Kurdistan region. One of the essential components of management of these disorders is regular lifelong blood transfusions. The latter is associated with several complications including red cell alloimmunization. No study has looked at the frequency of alloimmunization and its associations in the country. To address the latter issue, 401 multi transfused patients [311 with β-thalassemia (β-thal) syndrome and 90 with sickle cell disease], registered at a large thalassemia care center in Iraqi Kurdistan had their records reviewed, and their sera tested for atypical antibodies using screening and extended red cell panels. Red cell alloimmunization was detected in 18 patients (4.5%) with a total of 20 alloantibodies, while no autoantibodies were detected. The most frequent alloantibody was anti-E, followed by anti-D, anti-K, anti-C(w), anti-C, anti-c and anti-Le(a). Ethnicity was an important predictor of alloimmunization, while age at start of transfusion (>2 vs. ≤2 years) (p = 0.005), Rhesus D (RhD) negative status (p = 0.0017) and history of previous transfusion reactions (p = 0.007) showed a statistically significant higher rate of alloimmunization. However, patients' age, gender, number of units transfused, underlying diagnosis and splenectomy were not significantly associated with alloimmunization. Based on our observations, measures to reduce alloimmunization rates may include extended matching for Rhesus and Kell antigens and early initiation of blood transfusions. PMID:26327166

  12. Blood donors’ positivity for transfusion-transmissible infections: the Serbian Military Medical Academy experience

    PubMed Central

    Vučetić, Dušan; Kecman, Gorica; Ilić, Vesna; Balint, Bela

    2015-01-01

    Background Members of armed forces worldwide are considered to be very susceptible to sexually transmitted infections, thus falling into a high-risk group of blood donors regarding transfusion-transmissible infections. In the Serbian Military Medical Academy a significant number (44% for the period 2005–2013) of blood donations were from members of the Serbian Army. The aim of this study was to determine the significance of military blood donors for the safety of blood transfusion. Material and methods Between January 2005 and December 2013, a total of 155,479 blood donations were tested for hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and syphilis using serological assays (enzyme immunoassays, chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay and western blot) and molecular testing (polymerase chain reaction analysis). Results The percentage of blood donations positive for transfusion-transmissible infections in the estimated period was 0.38%, and the percentage of HBV, HCV, HIV and syphilis positive blood donations was 0.20%, 0.12%, 0.005% and 0.06%, respectively. During that period, the percentage of all transfusion-transmissible infections, and in particular of HBV and HCV, declined significantly. In contrast, the percentage of HIV and syphilis positive blood donations remained unchanged. Higher rates of positivity for transfusion-transmissible infections in blood donations from members of the Serbian Army were not found, especially after mandatory military service was abolished in 2009. Discussion The reported rate of positivity for transfusion-transmissible infections in blood donations from the Military Medical Academy was considered low. This information is of great significance for further implementation of public health measures. PMID:26057495

  13. Local allergic rhinitis: A critical reappraisal from a paediatric perspective.

    PubMed

    Arasi, Stefania; Pajno, Giovanni Battista; Lau, Susanne; Matricardi, Paolo Maria

    2016-09-01

    The so-called local allergic rhinitis (LAR) has been proposed as a phenotype of rhinitis with Th2-driven prominent local allergic inflammation, nasal synthesis of specific IgE and a positive response to a nasal allergen provocation test, in the absence of 'systemic' atopy (negative skin prick test and serum allergen-specific IgE antibodies). To date, available data on LAR are mostly focused on adults. The purpose of this 'Rostrum' was to critically discuss data and implications of the 'LAR concept' in paediatrics. In the natural history of rhinitis due to IgE-mediated reactions triggered by exposure to allergens, a 'LAR' can be either the initial, transient stage of classical allergic rhinitis or a stable phenotype never evolving to 'systemic' IgE sensitization. Given the present difficulties in performing routinely nasal allergen provocation test in children, the development of sensitive and specific tests to detect IgE in the child's nasal secretions is a research priority. We suggest also the hypothetical role of allergen immunoprophylaxis or immunotherapy in LAR. Last, the term 'local allergic rhinitis' may be inappropriate, as rhinitis is always 'local', while IgE sensitization can be either 'local' or 'systemic'. PMID:27098888

  14. Quercetin and Its Anti-Allergic Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Mlcek, Jiri; Jurikova, Tunde; Skrovankova, Sona; Sochor, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin is the great representative of polyphenols, flavonoids subgroup, flavonols. Its main natural sources in foods are vegetables such as onions, the most studied quercetin containing foods, and broccoli; fruits (apples, berry crops, and grapes); some herbs; tea; and wine. Quercetin is known for its antioxidant activity in radical scavenging and anti-allergic properties characterized by stimulation of immune system, antiviral activity, inhibition of histamine release, decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokines, leukotrienes creation, and suppresses interleukin IL-4 production. It can improve the Th1/Th2 balance, and restrain antigen-specific IgE antibody formation. It is also effective in the inhibition of enzymes such as lipoxygenase, eosinophil and peroxidase and the suppression of inflammatory mediators. All mentioned mechanisms of action contribute to the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties of quercetin that can be effectively utilized in treatment of late-phase, and late-late-phase bronchial asthma responses, allergic rhinitis and restricted peanut-induced anaphylactic reactions. Plant extract of quercetin is the main ingredient of many potential anti-allergic drugs, supplements and enriched products, which is more competent in inhibiting of IL-8 than cromolyn (anti-allergic drug disodium cromoglycate) and suppresses IL-6 and cytosolic calcium level increase. PMID:27187333

  15. [The incidence of occupationally-induced allergic skin diseases in a large flower market].

    PubMed

    Hausen, B M; Oestmann, G

    1988-01-01

    150 questionnaires as well as epicutaneous tests in 56 individuals from a total of 675 persons cultivating and selling ornamental plants at the largest German flower market revealed that half of those investigated were suffering from allergic contact dermatitis. The leading plant species with sensitizing properties was found to be the chrysanthemum, followed by tulips and Alstroemeria cultivars. Allergic reactions to daffodils and primulas were rarely observed. Most of the reactions obtained with other Compositae species such as arnica, marguerite, sunflower, tansy and yarrow must be interpreted as cross-reactions due to the fact that cross-reactivity predominates within the sesquiterpene lactone constituents of the various Compositae species. PMID:2971519

  16. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Valsami, Serena; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Gialeraki, Argyri; Chimonidou, Maria; Politou, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility) have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT) count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization. PMID:26420927

  17. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Valsami, Serena; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Gialeraki, Argyri; Chimonidou, Maria; Politou, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility) have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT) count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization. PMID:26420927

  18. Economic impact of blood transfusions: balancing cost and benefits.

    PubMed

    Oge, Tufan; Kilic, Cemil Hakan; Kilic, Gokhan Sami

    2014-02-01

    Blood transfusions may be lifesaving, but they inherit their own risks. Risk of transfusion to benefit is a delicate balance. In addition, blood product transfusions purchases are one of the largest line items among the hospital and laboratory charges. In this review, we aimed to discuss the transfusion strategies and share our transfusion protocol as well as the steps for hospitals to build-up a blood management program while all these factors weight in. Moreover, we evaluate the financial burden to the health care system. PMID:25610294

  19. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    van der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Furthermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfusion of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion or irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  20. Transfusion monitoring: care practice analysis in a public teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Valesca Nunes; Paixão, Isabella Bertolin; Perrone, Ana Carolina Amaral de São José; Monteiro, Maria Inês; dos Santos, Kelli Borges

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To analyze the process of recording transfusion monitoring at a public teaching hospital. Methods A descriptive and retrospective study with a quantitative approach, analyzing the instruments to record transfusion monitoring at a public hospital in a city in the State of Minas Gerais (MG). Data were collected on the correct completion of the instrument, time elapsed from transfusions, records of vital signs, type of blood component more frequently transfused, and hospital unit where transfusion was performed. Results A total of 1,012 records were analyzed, and 53.4% of them had errors in filling in the instruments, 6% of transfusions started after the recommended time, and 9.3% of patients had no vital signs registered. Conclusion Failures were identified in the process of recording transfusion monitoring, and they could result in more adverse events related to the administration of blood components. Planning and implementing strategies to enhance recording and to improve care delivered are challenging. PMID:27074233

  1. Bar code technology improves positive patient identification and transfusion safety.

    PubMed

    Sandler, S G; Langeberg, A; Dohnalek, L

    2005-01-01

    As a result of human error, an estimated 1 in 12,000 blood transfusions is given to the wrong patient. The cause of nearly all of these errors is failure of hospital personnel to identify positively intended transfusion recipients, their blood samples for cross-matching, or their correct blood components. We describe our experience using a point-of-care bar code transfusion safety system that links patients' bar-coded wristbands, with bar-coded labels on blood sample tubes, blood component bags, and nurses' identification badges. The result was 100 % accuracy of matching patients, their blood samples, and components for transfusions. For verifying information before starting blood transfusions, nurses preferred bar code "double checks" to conventional visual "double checks" by a second nurse. Methods are needed to reinforce nurses' proficiency with technological approaches to transfusion safety, such as software-driven bar code scanning, in situations where transfusions are administered infrequently. PMID:16050151

  2. Allergic Aspergillus sinusitis and its association with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Panjabi, Chandramani

    2011-01-01

    Allergic Aspergillus sinusitis (AAS) is a three decade old clinicopathologic entity in which mucoid impaction akin to that of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) occurs in the paranasal sinuses. Features such as radiographic evidence of pansinusitis, passage of nasal plugs and recurrent nasal polyposis in patients with an atopic background is suggestive of AAS. Histopathlogic confirmation from the inspissated mucus is a sine qua non for the diagnosis. Heterogeneous densities on computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses are caused by the 'allergic mucin' in the sinuses. Many patients give a history of having undergone multiple surgical procedures for symptomatic relief. The current approach to treatment appears to include an initial surgical debridement followed by postoperative oral corticosteroids for long durations. Although both ABPA and AAS are classified as Aspergillus-related hypersensitivity respiratory disorders, their co-occurrence appears to be an infrequently recognised phenomenon. This could perhaps be attributed to the fact that these two diseases are often treated by two different specialties. A high index of suspicion is required to establish the diagnoses of ABPA and AAS. All patients with asthma and/or rhinosinusitis along with sensitisation to Aspergillus antigens are at an increased risk of developing ABPA and/or AAS. ABPA must be excluded in all patients with AAS and vice versa. Early diagnosis and initiation of appropriate therapy could plausibly alter the course of the disease processes and prevent the possible development of long term sequelae. PMID:22053309

  3. Ripe fruit of Rubus coreanus inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hui-Hun; Choi, Phil Hyung; Yoo, Jin-Su; Jeon, Hoon; Chae, Byeong-Suk; Park, Jeong-Suk; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Shin, Tae-Yong

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of a water extract of the ripe fruits of Rubus coreanus Miq. (Rosaceae) (RFRC) on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation and studied the possible mechanism of action. Mast cell-mediated allergic disease is involved in many diseases such as anaphylaxis, rhinitis, asthma and atopic dermatitis. RFRC dose-dependently inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis and serum histamine release in mice. RFRC reduced the immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated local allergic reaction, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. RFRC attenuated histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and human mast cells by the reduction of intracellular calcium. RFRC decreased the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and the calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-stimulated expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of RFRC on cytokine production was nuclear factor (NF)-κB- and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent. In addition, RFRC suppressed the activation of caspase-1. Our findings provide evidence that RFRC inhibits mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory reactions, and for the involvement of calcium, NF-κB, MAPKs and caspase-1 in these effects. Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro anti-allergic inflammatory effects of RFRC provide affirmative proof of a possible therapeutic application of this agent in allergic inflammatory diseases. PMID:22075758

  4. Allergic contact dermatitis to Alstroemeria.

    PubMed

    Marks, J G

    1988-06-01

    Two female florists developed dermatitis of the fingertips. Patch testing revealed allergic contact dermatitis to the flower, Alstroemeria, used in floral arrangements. They had positive patch tests to portions of Alstroemeria, and to tuliposide A, the allergen in this plant. Vinyl gloves were not helpful since tuliposide A readily penetrates through these gloves. Nitrile gloves may be protective since they prevented positive patch test to tuliposide A. PMID:2967676

  5. [Recent advances in allergic rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Liang, Meijun; Xu, Rui; Xu, Geng

    2015-02-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) clinically expressed by sneezing, rhinorrhea, nasal itching and congestion is an allergen-driven mucosal inflammatory disease which is modulated by immunoglobulin E. Epidemiological studies have indicated that prevalence of AR continues to increase, and it has been a worldwide health problem that places a significant healthcare burden on individuals and society. Given the evolving understanding of the process by which an allergen is recognized and the roles of mediators which account for AR progress, the pathogenesis of AR has become clearer. Current studies have demonstrated local allergic rhinitis (LAR) that patients with both sug- gestive symptoms of AR and a negative diagnostic test for atopy may have local allergic inflammation is a prevalent entity in patients evaluated with rhinitis, but further research remains needed. Management of AR includes aller- gen avoidance, pharmacological treatment and allergen-specific immunotherapy. Recently montelukast has exhibited previously undocumented anti-inflammatory properties, leukotriene receptor antagonists therefore may serve a more important role in the treatment of AR. Not only has immunotherapy proved its efficacy, but also been able to alter disease course and thereby mitigate progression to asthma. Thus immunotherapy can be initiated while receiving pharmacotherapy, especially in children with AR. As clinical guidelines, the ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma) provides basic principles of effective treatment of AR. Besides, choosing an appropriate treatment strategy should be based on the severity and chronicity of patient's symptom. The aim of this review was to provide an update mainly on the pathophysiology, epidemiology, and management of AR. PMID:26012287

  6. Tryptophan Metabolism in Allergic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Gostner, Johanna M; Becker, Katrin; Kofler, Heinz; Strasser, Barbara; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis, as well the early phase of atopic dermatitis, are characterized by a Th2-skewed immune environment. Th2-type cytokines are upregulated in allergic inflammation, whereas there is downregulation of the Th1-type immune response and related cytokines, such as interferon-x03B3; (IFN-x03B3;). The latter is a strong inducer of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO-1), which degrades the essential amino acid tryptophan, as part of an antiproliferative strategy of immunocompetent cells to halt the growth of infected and malignant cells, and also of T cells - an immunoregulatory intervention to avoid overactivation of the immune system. Raised serum tryptophan concentrations have been reported in patients with pollen allergy compared to healthy blood donors. Moreover, higher baseline tryptophan concentrations have been associated with a poor response to specific immunotherapy. It has been shown that the increase in tryptophan concentrations in patients with pollen allergy only exists outside the pollen season, and not during the season. Interestingly, there is only a minor alteration of the kynurenine to tryptophan ratio (Kyn/Trp, an index of tryptophan breakdown). The reason for the higher tryptophan concentrations in patients with pollen allergy outside the season remains a matter of discussion. To this regard, the specific interaction of nitric oxide (NO∙) with the tryptophan-degrading enzyme IDO-1 could be important, because an enhanced formation of NO∙ has been reported in patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis. Importantly, NO∙ suppresses the activity of the heme enzyme IDO-1, which could explain the higher tryptophan levels. Thus, inhibitors of inducible NO∙ synthase should be reconsidered as candidates for antiallergic therapy out of season that may abrogate the arrest of IDO-1 by decreasing the production of NO∙. Considering its association with the pathophysiology of atopic disease, tryptophan metabolism may

  7. [Platelet transfusion and immunization anti-Rh1: implication for immunoprophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Chambost, H

    2014-11-01

    Rhesus (Rh) antigens are not expressed on platelets but residual red cells carry the risk of anti-D iso-immunization in transfusion recipients of platelet concentrates (PC). The main theoretical risk associated with this reaction relates to female subjects due to potential obstetrical situations of maternal-foetal Rh incompatibility. Isogroup PC transfusion in this system is therefore advised. However, logistical constraints impose frequent Rh-incompatible transfusions that require the recommendation of anti-Rh immunoglobulin in a girl of childbearing age in this situation. This recommendation, already restricted to a group of patients deserves to be questioned over a decade after being issued. Data from published reports are difficult to interpret because of the heterogeneity of the few series (CP type, immune status, timing of biological tests) but the current techniques for preparing products and most common use of CP apheresis limited the risk of immunization. Moreover, platelet transfusions are particularly relevant to immunocompromised populations which, to what extent (heavy chemotherapy and/or hematopoietic stem cells recipients) seems to be protected from this risk. It is noteworthy that the clinical consequences that may be expected from such immunization are not reported. Although some authors emphasize significant isoimmunization rates (maximum 19%), the heterogeneous conditions and the lack of evidence of clinical consequence suggest evaluating the recommendations or revising them towards more targeted indications of seroprophylaxis. PMID:25282489

  8. Role of parenteral iron in transfusion requirements after total hip replacement. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M; Naveira, E; Seara, J; Palmer, J H; Cuenca, J; García-Erce, J A

    2006-04-01

    An important percentage of patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR) receive allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) to avoid the risks of acute anaemia. However, concerns about the risks of ABT have led to the search for alternatives, such as stimulation of erythropoiesis. We prospectively investigated the effect of postoperative administration of 300 mg of intravenous iron sucrose on ABT requirements in THR patients (group 2; n = 24). A previous series of 22 THR patients served as the control group (group 1). All patients were operated on by the same surgeon, using the same implant, and a set of clinical data was gathered. No adverse reactions to iron administration were observed. The group-given iron showed a trend to a lower transfusion rate (46 vs. 73%; P = 0.067) and lower transfusion index (0.96 vs. 1.68 units/patient; P = 0.038). Moreover, amongst the non-transfused patients, admission haemoglobin levels were lower in those coming from the iron group than those from the control group (12.7 +/- 0.9 vs. 14.0 +/- 1.2 g dL(-1), respectively; P = 0.017). Postoperative parenteral iron administration could be a safe and effective way to reduce ABT requirements in the THR patients. A large, randomized controlled trial to confirm these results is warranted. PMID:16623920

  9. Prevalence and specificities of red cell alloantibodies in transfusion-dependent beta thalassemia patients in Yazd

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, M; JavadzadehShahshahani, H; Moghaddam, M; Taghvaee, N

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple transfusions in thalassemia patients may lead to antibody production against blood group antigens and hemolytic transfusion reaction might occur. In this study, antibody screening test was performed by tube and gel methods to determine the prevalence and specificity of alloantibodies in thalassemia patients. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, overall of 100 thalassemia patients from Yazd thalassemia clinic were recruited from July to September 2013. Two blood samples with volume of 6 ml were collected from each patient for standard tube and gel method antibody screening tests and a questionnaire consisting of demographic, health and blood transfusion status was completed. Results Out of 100 cases, 54 were female (54%) and 46 male (46%). The patients' age mean was 14.97±7.91 years with 2 to 33 years age range. Only 4% (n=4) had developed alloantibodies. (One patient developed dual alloantibody (Anti-C and Anti-D) and three patients developed single alloantibody (Anti-K)).Gel method detected 4 patients with alloantibody but in two patients not detected by the standard tube method. Conclusion The prevalence of RBC alloantibody production in this study was less than most previous studies. Anti-K was the most prevalent alloantibody in thalassemia patients in Yazd. It seems Rh and Kell blood group phenotyping in a newly diagnosed thalassemia patient and selection of matched blood for transfusion is very important. PMID:26131348

  10. [Anemia and transfusion therapy: an update].

    PubMed

    Madrazo-González, Z; García-Barrasa, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, L; Rafecas-Renau, A; Alonso-Fernández, G

    2011-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most prevalent diseases in the general population and is a very frequently found condition in medical and surgical patients in all medical specialties. A good evaluation of its clinical impact and its therapeutic possibilities is essential. Allogenic blood transfusion is a useful procedure in anemia management, although it has important adverse effects. It is the responsibility of the clinician to know and to take into account all the available alternatives for the treatment of anemia. Blood transfusions, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, iron therapy (oral and endovenous) and other therapeutic alternatives must be rationally used, in accordance with the currently available clinical evidence. This review article summarizes some epidemiological characteristics of anemia, its clinical evaluation and the main therapeutic possibilities based on the present knowledge, placing special emphasis on the critically ill patient. PMID:20483506

  11. Blood transfusion: patient identification and empowerment.

    PubMed

    Stout, Lynn; Joseph, Sundari

    Positive patient identification is pivotal to several steps of the transfusion process; it is integral to ensuring that the correct blood is given to the correct patient. If patient misidentification occurs, this has potentially fatal consequences for patients. Historically patient involvement in healthcare has focused on clinical decision making, where the patient, having been provided with medical information, is encouraged to become involved in the decisions related to their individualised treatment. This article explores the aspects of patient contribution to patient safety relating to positive patient identification in transfusion. When involving patients in their care, however, clinicians must recognise the diversity of patients and the capacity of the patient to be involved. It must not be assumed that all patients will be willing or indeed able to participate. Additionally, clinicians' attitudes to patient involvement in patient safety can determine whether cultural change is successful. PMID:26878405

  12. Photodynamic decontamination of blood for transfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Hur, Ehud; Margolis-Nunno, H.; Gottlieb, P.; Lustigman, S.; Horowitz, Bernard

    1995-01-01

    Currently transfused cellular components of blood are not available in a sterile form and carry a small risk of transmitting viral and parasite diseases. Using phthalocyanines and red light, lipid enveloped viruses, e.g., HIV-1, can be inactivated in red blood cell concentrates (RBCC). Under conditions leading to virus sterilization the blood borne parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease) and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria) could be eliminated to undetectable levels (> 4 log10 kill). RBC damage during treatment could be avoided by increasing the light fluence rate to 80 mW/cm2, and by including the free radical scavenger glutathione and the vitamin E derivative Trolox during light exposure. Similar sterilization of platelet concentrates was achieved with the psoralen derivative AMT and UVA light. Platelet damage due to PUVA treatment was avoided by including the plant flavonoid rutin during irradiation. It is concluded that elimination of the risk of transmitting pathogens during blood transfusion is feasible with photochemical treatments.

  13. Management of allergic Olympic athletes.

    PubMed

    Fitch, K D

    1984-05-01

    Twenty percent of the recent Australian Olympic athletes have had an allergic disorder. Because of the ban on all sympathomimetic drugs except some beta 2-agonists. Olympic team physicians have a major responsibility to ensure that no competitor is disqualified for infringing on the antidoping rules of the Medical Commission of the International Olympic Committee. Inadvertent contravention of these regulations may occur because numerous banned sympathomimetics are available to athletes and their coaches without medical prescription and are frequently contained in combination preparations. The unbroken 24 yr in which asthmatics have won Olympic medals have been both before and after the introduction of drug tests. Currently a comprehensive range of preventive and therapeutic medications are available for asthmatics to compete with minimal respiratory disadvantage. It was, however, during a period of unnecessary restriction that an American swimmer forfeited his gold medal because of prerace ingestion of a banned sympathomimetic agent. Should adverse air quality be encountered during the Los Angeles Olympics, allergic competitors will be among the most inconvenienced . Athletes with allergic rhinitis and sinusitis will be the most disadvantaged because sympathomimetic vasoconstrictors remain banned. It is strongly recommended that the Medical Commission of the International Olympic Committee meet with an appropriate body of experts (i.e., the American Academy of Allergy and Immunology) to review this ban on vasoconstrictor agents. PMID:6715736

  14. Autologous Blood Transfusion in Sports: Emerging Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Salamin, Olivier; De Angelis, Sara; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Saugy, Martial; Leuenberger, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Despite being prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency, blood doping through erythropoietin injection or blood transfusion is frequently used by athletes to increase oxygen delivery to muscles and enhance performance. In contrast with allogeneic blood transfusion and erythropoietic stimulants, there is presently no direct method of detection for autologous blood transfusion (ABT) doping. Blood reinfusion is currently monitored with individual follow-up of hematological variables via the athlete biological passport, which requires further improvement. Microdosage is undetectable, and suspicious profiles in athletes are often attributed to exposure to altitude, heat stress, or illness. Additional indirect biomarkers may increase the sensitivity and specificity of the longitudinal approach. The emergence of "-omics" strategies provides new opportunities to discover biomarkers for the indirect detection of ABT. With the development of direct quantitative methods, transcriptomics based on microRNA or messenger RNA expression is a promising approach. Because blood donation and blood reinfusion alter iron metabolism, quantification of proteins involved in metal metabolism, such as hepcidin, may be applied in an "ironomics" strategy to improve the detection of ABT. As red blood cell (RBC) storage triggers changes in membrane proteins, proteomic methods have the potential to identify the presence of stored RBCs in blood. Alternatively, urine matrix can be used for the quantification of the plasticizer di(2-ethyhexyl)phthalate and its metabolites that originate from blood storage bags, suggesting recent blood transfusion, and have an important degree of sensitivity and specificity. This review proposes that various indirect biomarkers should be applied in combination with mathematical approaches for longitudinal monitoring aimed at improving ABT detection. PMID:27260108

  15. Factors Affecting Tissue Oxygenation in Erythrocyte Transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Aykut, Güçlü; Yürük, Koray; İnce, Can

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell transfusions are used to increase the oxygen-carrying capacity of blood in anemic states. But, because of the changes during storage of blood components and the specifics of preparation, erythrocytes may have controversial effects on tissue oxygenation and microcirculation. Also, the patient situation may play a role in the differing responses in oxygenation and microcirculation. In this review, the studies concerning the effects of banked blood and patient characteristics on microcirculation and tissue oxygenation are summarized. PMID:27366403

  16. Blood transfusion before radiation for malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, T.K. )

    1989-10-27

    This editorial discusses the situation of administering blood to patients prior to radiotherapy in an attempt to increase tissue/tumor oxygen tension. The author believes that since the rate at which tumor cells consume oxygen is highly variable, the aim of achieving high cellular oxygen tension may be met better by maintaining a high blood perfusion rate. Blood volume can be maintained without relying on transfusion, and safer alternatives are available.

  17. Facial swelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... Allergic reaction ( allergic rhinitis , hay fever, or a bee sting ) Angioedema Blood transfusion reaction Cellulitis Conjunctivitis (inflammation ... Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of ...

  18. Induction of Allergic Responses to Peanut Allergen in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Van Gramberg, Jenna L.; de Veer, Michael J.; O'Hehir, Robyn E.; Meeusen, Els N. T.; Bischof, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Peanut allergy is the leading cause of deaths due to food-induced anaphylaxis but despite continued research, there are currently no specific treatments available. Challenge testing is limited in patients due to the high risk of adverse reactions, emphasising the need for an appropriate animal model. In the present study we examine the induction of allergic responses in a sheep model for peanut allergy. Sheep were sensitised with peanut (PN) extract and in separate injections with ovalbumin (OVA) or house dust mite (HDM) extract. Serum PN-specific IgE responses were detected in 40–50% of immunised sheep, while only 10% (1 of 10 sheep) showed detectable OVA-specific IgE. All PN-allergic sheep tested showed an Ara h 1-specific IgE response, while four out of five allergic sheep showed an Ara h 2-specific IgE response. Animals with high serum IgE levels to HDM were also PN IgE-positive. Of the PN-sensitised animals with high PN-specific IgE, 80% also showed an immediate hypersensitivity reaction following an intradermal PN injection. This new large animal model of peanut allergy may provide a useful tool for future investigations of allergen-associated immune mechanisms and specific immunotherapy. PMID:23284686

  19. [Necessity of a 24-hour system of blood transfusion testing].

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yuji

    2003-01-01

    The preventive effects of a 24-hour system of blood transfusion testing on mistyping of transfused blood was examined. Blood transfusion tests have been performed by blood transfusion technologists during working hours and by physicians at other times. In March 2000, we introduced a system in which technologists perform blood transfusion tests after working hours. Technologists of the Blood Transfusion Unit and Central Clinical Laboratory perform the test jointly, and column agglutination technology was introduced as the test method. A computer system setup exclusively for the testing was also introduced to perform computer cross-matching. Since transfusion error is likely to occur during emergency blood transfusion, a manual was established to prioritize safety. After introduction of the system, mistyping that may have been caused by inaccurate blood test results markedly decreased, confirming the usefulness of this system for prevention of mistyping. In addition, transfusion errors also decreased in wards and the improved system increased the safety of the entire medical care system. The frequency of mistyping was about 1% when physicians performed blood typing, showing the importance of clinical technologists for blood transfusion tests. PMID:12652691

  20. How we decide when a neonate needs a transfusion.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Vidheya; Khan, Rizwan; Curley, Anna; New, Helen; Stanworth, Simon

    2013-02-01

    The decision to transfuse a neonate can be approached by addressing a series of questions that cover the cause of anaemia, alternatives to transfusion, the need for transfusion and the risks. Recent clinical trials of red cell transfusions have started to inform evidence-based transfusion practice, but have raised uncertainties about neurological outcomes when policies advocating use of fewer red cell transfusions at lower haemoglobin concentration (Hb) thresholds were tested. Red cell transfusions should be considered when the Hb <120 g/l for premature neonates requiring mechanical ventilation support, with lower thresholds applying for oxygen-dependent neonates not requiring ventilation or for late anaemia (Hb <70-100 g/l, depending on gestational and post-natal age). There is no recent high quality evidence to inform thresholds for prophylactic platelet transfusions in stable non-bleeding premature neonates with platelet count levels of 50 × 10(9) /l, although common practice has become more restrictive, using lower safe thresholds for platelet transfusion between 20 and 30 × 10(9) /l. A more appropriate transfusion strategy for fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in neonates is one that emphasizes the therapeutic use of FFP in the face of bleeding, rather than prophylactic use in stable non-bleeding neonates who often have mild to moderate apparent abnormalities of standard coagulation tests, after allowing for appropriate reference ranges. PMID:23094805

  1. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Futhermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfuson of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion of irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  2. Successful implementation of strategies to transform Emergency Department transfusion practice.

    PubMed

    Reed, Matthew J; Kelly, Sarah-Louise; Beckwith, Hannah; Innes, Catherine J; Manson, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Blood component transfusion is an important and lifesaving Emergency Department (ED) procedure. It is not however risk-free and careful consideration of its clinical benefit for each individual patient is therefore essential. In 2008, we audited the patterns of blood component usage in 2007 within our ED. This work revealed that whilst 3209 units of blood component were ordered only 39.5% were transfused, and 9.5% were unaccounted for. This was the first and only published detailed look at ED blood transfusion practices. We had to address our poor traceability (i.e. unaccounted for units), our high blood usage, and our ordering of units which were then not transfused as this can lead to wastage. Firstly, better links between the ED and the Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service (SNBTS) were established. A set of improvement measures were then implemented including better ED medical and nursing staff education, monthly traceability reports sent to the ED clinical management teams, the introduction of an ED transfusion guideline, moving our blood fridge into the resuscitation room, having a named ED transfusion consultant and ED transfusion link nurse, ED consultant representation on the Hospital Transfusion Group and finally increasing awareness of ED emergency transfusion with a rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) research programme. In 2012, we re-audited our practice looking at our blood component usage in 2011. There was a 64% reduction in blood component ordering (3209 vs. 1034 units), a 39% reduction in blood component transfusion (1131 vs. 687 units), a 68% increase in the proportion of ordered units that were transfused and a 96% reduction in unaccounted units (289 vs. 9 units) between 2007 and 2011. In attempting to cost the savings resulting from our changes we showed that SNBTS spent £306,437 less in 2011 compared to 2007 on handling and issuing ED transfusion requests. Our improvements are immediately generalizable across the UK and the potential

  3. Blood transfusion safety: a new philosophy.

    PubMed

    Franklin, I M

    2012-12-01

    Blood transfusion safety has had a chequered history, and there are current and future challenges. Internationally, there is no clear consensus for many aspects of the provision of safe blood, although pan-national legislation does provide a baseline framework in the European Union. Costs are rising, and new safety measures can appear expensive, especially when tested against some other medical interventions, such as cancer treatment and vaccination programmes. In this article, it is proposed that a comprehensive approach is taken to the issue of blood transfusion safety that considers all aspects of the process rather than considering only new measures. The need for an agreed level of safety for specified and unknown risks is also suggested. The importance of providing care and support for those inadvertently injured as a result of transfusion problems is also made. Given that the current blood safety decision process often uses a utilitarian principle for decision making--through the calculation of Quality Adjusted Life Years--an alternative philosophy is proposed. A social contract for blood safety, based on the principles of 'justice as fairness' developed by John Rawls, is recommended as a means of providing an agreed level of safety, containing costs and providing support for any adverse outcomes. PMID:23171300

  4. [Flow cytometry: applications in transfusion medicine].

    PubMed

    Boval, B

    2000-06-01

    In transfusion medicine, flow cytometry (FCM) is a methodology combining laser radiation, optics and a computerized treatment of numerous results. We can measure size, cellularity and fluorescence intensity of cells or particles in suspension after the binding of appropriate fluorescent antibodies or fluorescent dyes. The main utilisation of FCM in transfusion medicine is for quality control of the process of leukocyte reduction in red cell concentrates or in platelet units, using commercial kits. In addition, it is used for the enumeration of CD 34 positive cells before bone marrow transplantation and for control of platelet function in platelet units. For clinical investigations, FCM may be used for red cell phenotyping, essentially to detect minor populations (chimerism), for the estimation of red cell survival, or for the detection of fetal erythrocytes. In the field of platelet immunology, FCM is an essential tool for detecting platelet antibodies (auto or allo), for platelet phenotyping or for cross-matching. In the future perhaps, FCM will permit us to detect bacterial contamination or prion protein in transfused blood cells. PMID:10919227

  5. [Methologic contribution to blood transfusion materials surveillance].

    PubMed

    Roussel, P; Pujol-Rey, A; Arzur, C

    2001-08-01

    To reduce seriousness and frequency of iatrogenic risk implies prevention policies and efficient operational systems for vigilance. This risk management implies definition of precise organizations and procedures able to locate and to notify quickly undesirable events. This is the case about single use medical devices (SUMD) used in blood transfusion. This article is a contribution to the organisation of the implemented material vigilance in blood transfusion, collectively carried out with actors concerned (users, manufacturers, National Commission for Material Vigilance). It presents a lot of tools and methods to favour practices harmonization, as well as preventive a curative (specifications before purchase, main part of the quality contract between customer and supplier; internal control plan; index for medical device used in transfusion; illustrated glossaries for three main families of medical devices; index about symptomatic events; definitions of seriousness levels with their operational consequences; methods to manage a single use medical device judged as defective; tool for the review of incidents according to reference and batch). Then, the management of incidents about SUMD is presented within a material vigilance system integrated into the quality system of the institution, for user as for manufacturer. This is done in a chronological order with successively description of the incident, the assessment of the impact, the management of the associated risk, the periodical review of incidents and management of matters in dispute. PMID:11642028

  6. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by dorzolamide eyedrops.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Jun; Kim, Moosang

    2015-01-01

    The side effects of topical dorzolamide hydrochloride, such as conjunctivitis, eyelid edema, and eye lid irritation, are well known. However, allergic contact dermatitis due to dorzolamide is rare, although the product has been commonly used worldwide in patients with glaucoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of allergic contact dermatitis caused by topical dorzolamide hydrochloride in Korea. Herein we report a case of allergic contact dermatitis due to topical dorzolamide eyedrops. PMID:25897195

  7. A bug's view of allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Peter S; Campbell, Dianne E

    2016-06-01

    The increase in allergic airways disease has been linked to modern urbanization and lifestyle. Recent evidence suggests that the associated reduction in microbial exposure, reduction in dietary fibre intake and increased antibiotic use may cause early dysbiosis in infancy, which predisposes to immune dysregulation and allergic airways disease later in life. This implies that there may be a window of opportunity for primary prevention strategies aimed to protect or restore the microbiome early in life and thereby decrease the risk of developing allergic airways disease. Alternatively, strategies that correct dysbiosis may aid in the treatment of established allergic airways disease. PMID:27012478

  8. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: transfusion, platelets and biological response modifiers.

    PubMed

    Tariket, Sofiane; Sut, Caroline; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Laradi, Sandrine; Pozzetto, Bruno; Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2016-05-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) may be induced by plasma, platelet concentrates and red blood cell concentrates. The mechanism leading to TRALI is thought to involve two steps. The priming step consists of previous inflammatory pathological conditions or external factors attracting leukocytes to lung vessels and creating conditions favorable for the second step, in which anti-HLA or anti-HNA antibodies or biologically active lipids, usually in transfused blood products, stress leukocytes and inflame lung epithelia. Platelets may be involved in the pathogenesis of TRALI because of their secretory potential and capacity to interact with other immune cells. There is no drug based-prophylaxis, but transfusion strategies are used to mitigate the risk of TRALI. PMID:26855042

  9. Transfusion practice and safety: current status and possibilities for improvement.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M F; Stanworth, S J; Yazer, M

    2011-01-01

    Audits of practice and incident reporting, most notably to national haemovigilance schemes, indicate that poor hospital transfusion practice is frequent and occasionally results in catastrophic consequences for patients. Improvements in practice are needed and depend on a combined approach including a better understanding of the causes of errors; a reduction in the complexity of routine procedures taking advantage of new technology systems, which enforce agreed guidelines and policies; the setting and regular monitoring of performance standards for key aspects of the hospital transfusion process, improved organisation of transfusion in hospitals and staff training; and further research on the safe and effective use of blood and alternatives to donor blood. There needs to be a greater recognition that 'transfusion safety' applies to the hospital transfusion process as well as the contents of blood bags and that resources need to be provided for the improvement of transfusion safety and management in hospitals commensurate to their importance. PMID:21175655

  10. Inhibitory effect of putranjivain A on allergic inflammation through suppression of mast cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hui-Hun; Park, Seung-Bin; Lee, Soyoung; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Shin, Tae-Yong; Park, Pil-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Ho; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2014-02-01

    A great number of people are suffering from allergic inflammatory disease such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and sinusitis. Therefore discovery of drugs for the treatment of these diseases is an important subject in human health. Putranjivain A (PJA), member of ellagitannin, is known to possess beneficial effects including anti-cancer and anti-viral activities. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether PJA modulates the allergic inflammatory reaction and to study its possible mechanisms of action using mast cell-based in vitro and in vivo models. The study was performed in anaphylaxis mouse model and cultured mast cells. PJA inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in immunoglobulin E-stimulated mast cells. PJA reduced this expression by inhibiting nuclear factor (NF)-κB and nuclear factor of activated T cell. The oral administration of PJA reduced systemic and cutaneous anaphylaxis, the release of serum histamine, and the expression of the histamine H{sub 1} receptor. In addition, PJA attenuated the activation of mast cells. PJA inhibited the release of histamine from various types of mast cells by the suppression of intracellular calcium. The inhibitory activity of PJA on the allergic reaction was similar to that of disodium cromoglycate, a known anti-allergic drug. These results suggest that PJA can facilitate the prevention or treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases mediated by mast cells. - Highlights: • PJA reduced the degranulation of mast cells. • PJA inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines. • The effect of PJA on allergic reaction was comparable to the DSCG. • PJA might be a candidate for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases.

  11. [Skin reactions to tattoo ink].

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Hermanns, J-F; Piérard, G E

    2011-01-01

    Ritual and artistic tattoos rely on the use of numerous pigments which are not all entirely inert once placed in the dermis. The compositions of some tattoo inks are identified. However, new but less well identified compounds appear on the market. Allergic reactions can be present under different aspects. They may correspond to allergic contact dermatitis or to photodermatitis. Other reactions include allergic hypersensitivity reactions as well as lichenoid, granulomatous or pseudolymphoma reactions. Pulsed light and laser are typically used for regular tattoo removal. These procedures are not indicated in inflamed tattoos. Indeed, the pigment dispersed during photolysis may perpetuate the reaction. Pseudotattoos due to the stratum corneum staining are frequently responsible for photoeczema. PMID:21942077

  12. A therapeutic-only versus prophylactic platelet transfusion strategy for preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Crighton, Gemma L; Estcourt, Lise J; Wood, Erica M; Trivella, Marialena; Doree, Carolyn; Stanworth, Simon

    2015-01-01

    whether there was any difference in the number of participants with severe or life-threatening bleeding between a therapeutic-only transfusion policy and a prophylactic platelet transfusion policy (two RCTs; 801 participants; risk ratio (RR) 4.91, 95% CI 0.86 to 28.12; low-quality evidence). Two RCTs (801 participants) reported time to first bleeding episode. As there was considerable heterogeneity between the studies, we were unable to perform a meta-analysis. Both studies individually found that time to first bleeding episode was shorter in the therapeutic-only group compared with the prophylactic platelet transfusion group. There was insufficient evidence to determine any difference in all-cause mortality within 30 days of the start of the study using a therapeutic-only platelet transfusion policy compared with a prophylactic platelet transfusion policy (two RCTs; 629 participants). Mortality was a rare event, and therefore larger studies would be needed to establish the effect of these alternative strategies. There was a clear reduction in the number of platelet transfusions per participant in the therapeutic-only arm (two RCTs, 991 participants; standardised mean reduction of 0.50 platelet transfusions per participant, 95% CI −0.63 to −0.37; moderate-quality evidence). None of the studies reported quality of life. There was no evidence of any difference in the frequency of adverse events, such as transfusion reactions, between a therapeutic-only and prophylactic platelet transfusion policy (two RCTs; 991 participants; RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.68), although the confidence intervals were wide. Authors’ conclusions We found low- to moderate-grade evidence that a therapeutic-only platelet transfusion policy is associated with increased risk of bleeding when compared with a prophylactic platelet transfusion policy in haematology patients who are thrombocytopenic due to myelosuppressive chemotherapy or HSCT. There is insufficient evidence to determine any difference

  13. Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI): A Single Institution Experience of 15 Years.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramesh; Sedky, Mohammed Jaber; Varghese, Sunny Joseph; Sharawy, Osama Ebrahim

    2016-09-01

    Transfusion related acute Lung injury (TRALI) though a serious blood transfusion reaction with a fatality rate of 5-25 % presents with acute respiratory distress with hypoxaemia and noncardiac pulmonary oedema within 6 h of transfusion. In non fatal cases, it may resolve within 72 h or earlier. Although reported with an incidence of 1:5000, its true occurrence is rather unknown. Pathogenesis is believed to be related to sequestration and adhesion of neutrophils to the pulmonary capillary endothelium and its activation leading to its destruction and leaks. The patient's underlying condition, anti-neutrophil antibody in the transfused donor plasma and certain lipids that accumulate in routinely stores blood and components are important in its aetiopathogenesis. Patient's predisposing conditions include haematological malignancy, major surgery (especially cardiac), trauma and infections. The more commonly incriminated products include fresh frozen plasma (FFP), platelets (whole blood derived and apheresis), whole blood and Packed RBC. Occasional cases involving cryoprecipitate and Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVig) have also been reported. We present a 15 year single institution experience of TRALI, during which we observed 9 cases among 170,871 transfusions, giving an incidence of 1:19,000. We did not encounter cases of haematological malignancy or cardiac surgery in our TRALI patients. Among the blood products, that could be related to TRALI in our patients included solitary cases receiving cryoprecipitate, IVIg, and recombinant Factor VII apart from platelets and FFP. All patients were treated with oxygen support. Six patients required mechanical ventilation. Off label hydrocortisone was given to all patients. There were no cases of fatality among our patients. PMID:27429525

  14. Anti-allergic effect of a Korean traditional medicine, Biyeom-Tang on mast cells and allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biyeom-Tang, a medicine prescribed by oriental clinics, has been used for the treatment of the allergic rhinitis (AR). In the present study, an ethanol extract of Biyeom-Tang (EBT) was investigated for anti-allergic properties on bone-marrow derived mast cells (BMMC) and in vivo models. Methods The anti-allergic properties of EBT were evaluated by measuring β-Hex release and the production of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and leukotriene C4 (LTC4) on BMMC in vitro and PCA and OVA-induced AR models in vivo. Results EBT strongly inhibited a degranulation reaction in a dose dependent manner with an IC50 value of 35.6 μg/ml. In addition, the generation of PGD2 and LTC4 was inhibited in BMMC in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of 7.0 μg/ml and 10.9 μg/ml, respectively. When administrated orally, EBT ameliorated the mast cell-mediated PCA reaction. In the OVA-induced AR model, the increased levels of IgE were reduced by EBT. The levels of cytokines, such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13 decreased in the splenocytes of EBT-treated mice. The histological analysis shows that the infiltration of inflammatory cells increased by OVA-sensitization was also reduced. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggested that EBT has anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo models. PMID:24521096

  15. Anti-allergic effects of Lycopus lucidus on mast cell-mediated allergy model

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Tae-Yong . E-mail: tyshin@woosuk.ac.kr; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Suk, Kyoungho; Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Kim, InKyeom; Lee, Maan-Gee; Jun, Chang-Duk; Kim, Sang-Yong; Lim, Jong-Pil; Eun, Jae-Soon; Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2005-12-15

    The current study characterizes the mechanism by which the aqueous extract of Lycopus lucidus Turcz. (Labiatae) (LAE) decreases mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction. The immediate-type allergic reaction is involved in many allergic diseases such as asthma and allergic rhinitis. LAE has been used as a traditional medicine in Korea and is known to have an anti-inflammatory effect. However, its specific mechanism of action is still unknown. LAE was anally administered to mice for high and fast absorption. LAE inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic reactions in mice. LAE decreased the local allergic reaction, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, activated by anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE antibody. LAE dose-dependently reduced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80 or anti-DNP IgE. Furthermore, LAE decreased the secretion of TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of LAE on the pro-inflammatory cytokine was p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) dependent. LAE attenuated PMA plus A23187-induced degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, and specifically blocked activation of p38 MAPK, but not that of c-jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Our findings provide evidence that LAE inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines, p38 MAPK, and NF-{kappa}B in these effects.

  16. Reducing donor exposure in preterm infants requiring multiple blood transfusions.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, A.; Wilson, N.; Skacel, P.; Thomas, R.; Tidmarsh, E.; Yale, C.; de Silva, M.

    1995-01-01

    Preterm infants frequently require multiple blood transfusions. Traditionally, 'fresh' (less than seven days old) blood has been used but this often results in transfusions from multiple donors. To reduce donor exposure the policy for top-up transfusions was changed. A unit of blood under five days old with additional satellite packs was ordered for each infant and used up to its expiry date, allowing up to eight transfusions from a single donation to be given. The mean (SD) number of transfusions per infant in 43 infants transfused according to previous policy and in 29 transfused according to the new policy was similar at 5.6 (4.0) and 5.3 (3.1), respectively. However, donor exposure fell following the change in policy from 4.9 (3.5) to only 2.0 (0.9). Only one infant was exposed to more than three donors compared with 24 infants in the control group. Plasma potassium concentrations were not significantly different following transfusion of blood stored for up to 33 days. This simple change in policy has reduced donor exposure in infants requiring multiple top-up transfusions. PMID:7743280

  17. Potential Harm of Prophylactic Platelet Transfusion in Adult Dengue Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tau-Hong; Wong, Joshua G. X.; Leo, Yee-Sin; Thein, Tun-Linn; Ng, Ee-Ling; Lee, Linda K.; Lye, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Thrombocytopenia is a hallmark of dengue infection, and bleeding is a dreaded complication of dengue fever. Prophylactic platelet transfusion has been used to prevent bleeding in the management of dengue fever, although the evidence for its benefit is lacking. In adult dengue patients with platelet count <20,000/mm3 without bleeding, we aimed to assess if prophylactic platelet transfusion was effective in reducing clinical bleeding and other outcomes. Method We conducted a retrospective non-randomised observational study of dengue patients with platelet count < 20,000/mm3 without bleeding (except petechiae) admitted to Tan Tock Seng Hospital from January 2005 to December 2008. Baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes were compared between the non-transfused vs. transfused groups. Outcomes studied were clinical bleeding, platelet increment, hospital length of stay, intensive care unit admission and death. Results Of the 788 patients included, 486 received prophylactic platelet transfusion. There was no significant difference in the presence of clinical bleeding in the two groups (18.2% in non-transfused group vs. 23.5% in transfused group; P = 0.08). Patients in the transfused group took a median of 1 day longer than the non-transfused group to increase their platelet count to 50,000/mm3 or more (3 days vs. 2 days, P <0.0001). The median duration of hospital stay in the non-transfused group was 5 days vs. 6 days in the transfused group (P< 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the proportion requiring ICU admission (non-transfused 0.66% vs. transfused 1.23%, P = 0.44) and death (non-transfused 0% vs. transfused 0.2%, P = 0.43). Conclusion Platelet transfusion in absence of bleeding in adult dengue with platelet count <20,000/mm3 did not reduce bleeding or expedite platelet recovery. There was potential harm by slowing recovery of platelet count to >50,000/mm3 and increasing length of hospitalization. PMID:27015272

  18. Feeding during Blood Transfusions and the Association with Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Doty, Megan; Wade, Christine; Farr, Julie; Gomezcoello, Vanessa Celleri; Martin, Gregory; Nasr, Tala

    2016-07-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine whether very low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants who had feedings withheld during all blood transfusions had a lower incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) compared with infants who were fed during transfusions. Study Design A retrospective chart review over a 3-year period in a level-3 neonatal intensive care unit was conducted. A total of 108 inborn VLBW infants (weight range: 500-1,500 g) who had received a transfusion before 36 weeks were reviewed. Diagnosis of NEC (≥ Bell stage II), demographics, feeds, transfusions, outcomes, and variables associated with NEC were collected. Results The percentage of NEC cases was lower in infants who had feeds withheld during transfusions: 5/64 (7.8%) compared with 16/116 (13.8%) infants who were fed during transfusions. While potentially clinically important (6% absolute difference), this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.33 by two-tailed Fisher exact test). Conclusions No significant decrease in the incidence of NEC was found when feeds were withheld during blood transfusions. Holding feeds during transfusions is not without consequences such as the need for intravenous access, additional fluids, and the disruption of optimum nutrition. Further studies are needed to establish the relationship between blood transfusions, feeds, and NEC. PMID:27031053

  19. Transfusion Considerations in Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Bercovitz, Rachel S; Josephson, Cassandra D

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric patients with malignancies or benign hematologic diseases are a heterogeneous group with complicated underlying pathophysiologies leading to their requirements for transfusion therapy. Common practice among pediatric hematologists, oncologists, and transplant physicians is to transfuse stable patients red cells to maintain a hemoglobin greater than 7 or 8 g/dL and transfuse platelets to maintain a count greater than 10,000 or 20,000 platelets/μL. This review compiles data from myriad studies performed in pediatric patients to give readers the knowledge needed to make an informed choice when considering different management strategies for the transfusion of red blood cells, platelets, plasma, and granulocytes. PMID:27113005

  20. Tap water nasal irrigation in adults with seasonal allergic rhinitis: a randomized double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Min; Fu, Xiaoyan; Deng, Wenting; Lai, Huangwen; Yang, Chuanhong

    2014-06-01

    Saline nasal irrigation is effective in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis, and sodium chloride itself has no antiallergic effects. The mechanism of saline nasal irrigation depends mainly on washing away allergens and inflammatory mediators induced by allergic reactions. Tap water has the same washing effects as saline. In this study, it was investigated if tap water nasal irrigation was effective in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis. Sixty-four patients diagnosed with seasonal allergic rhinitis were enrolled. Patients were randomized to tap water nasal irrigation group and non-tap water nasal irrigation group for treatment. Patients of both groups were treated with desloratadine. Treatment outcomes were measured using allergic rhinitis Quality of Life (QoL) survey was completed at baseline and after 3 weeks of therapy. There were statistically significant differences in QoL scores between tap water nasal irrigation group and non-tap water nasal irrigation group. The tap water nasal irrigation group had better QoL scores than the non-tap water nasal irrigation group. Tap water nasal irrigation can be a valuable adjuvant therapy for patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis. PMID:24091560

  1. [Clinical course and characteristics of cellular and humoral immunity in patients with allergic rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Sakevych, V D; Kutsenko, N L; Mykytiuk, M V; Kaĭdashev, I P

    2014-01-01

    In research the condition cellular and humoral immunity is defined at allergic rhinitis--AR (n = 45) for an estimation of mechanisms pathogeny this disease. The AR in 76% of cases has the hereditary nature mainly from outside mothers (36%), begins more often at children's and teenage age (88%) and in 44% is accompanied by other allergic pathology. In structure of a sensibilization of patients the allergic rhinitis the basic place is occupied with pollen, household, fungoid and epidermal allergens, allergic reaction (83% of cases) thus prevailed. As a result of the spent researches rising of relative quantity CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells is taped, at the same time rising of an average level of the general IgE--(198,20 +/- 11,42) IU/ml is noted. In cytokine regulations at patients an allergic rhinitis rising IL-4 and depression IL-10 is noted. Thus, the conducted research suggests that an allergic rhinitis--disease with involving in process of regulation of the immune answer of certain type regulatory T of cells. PMID:24908954

  2. Allergic Rhinitis: Mechanisms and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, David I; Schwartz, Gene; Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of allergic rhinitis (AR) has been estimated at 10% to 40%, and its economic burden is substantial. AR patients develop specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody responses to indoor and outdoor environmental allergens with exposure over time. These specific IgE antibodies bind to high-affinity IgE receptors on mast cells and basophils. Key outcome measures of therapeutic interventions include rhinitis symptom control, rescue medication requirements, and quality-of-life measures. A comprehensive multiple modality treatment plan customized to the individual patient can optimize outcomes. PMID:27083101

  3. [The allergic child at school. What do we need to know?].

    PubMed

    Urrutia-Pereira, Marilyn; Solé, Dirceu

    2016-01-01

    Allergy is a multisystem disease in children that often occurs with the coexistence of diverse clinical manifestations that cause great impact on quality of life and academic performance due to sleep disorders arising from the disease or treatment, and absenteeism that children may experience. Because of the time spent in school, there is a possibility that allergic reactions may occur first in these facilities, where a lack of staff knowledge has been found regarding how to proceed in allergy crisis situations. Cooperative action among health teams, community, parents, and school authorities is essential to ensure that the school can prevent, recognize, and ensure quick access to emergency services (if needed) and treatment protocols for allergic reactions, thus allowing allergic children to be better protected in the school environment, which should be considered an extension of the home environment and an important arm in proper management to control the disease. PMID:27560916

  4. Environmental Changes, Microbiota, and Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byoung-Ju; Lee, So-Yeon; Kim, Hyo-Bin; Lee, Eun

    2014-01-01

    During the last few decades, the prevalence of allergic disease has increased dramatically. The development of allergic diseases has been attributed to complex interactions between environmental factors and genetic factors. Of the many possible environmental factors, most research has focused on the most commonly encountered environmental factors, such as air pollution and environmental microbiota in combination with climate change. There is increasing evidence that such environmental factors play a critical role in the regulation of the immune response that is associated with allergic diseases, especially in genetically susceptible individuals. This review deals with not only these environmental factors and genetic factors but also their interactions in the development of allergic diseases. It will also emphasize the need for early interventions that can prevent the development of allergic diseases in susceptible populations and how these interventions can be identified. PMID:25228995

  5. Epithelial Cell Regulation of Allergic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Gour, Naina; Lajoie, Stephane

    2016-09-01

    Allergic diseases, which have escalated in prevalence in recent years, arise as a result of maladaptive immune responses to ubiquitous environmental stimuli. Why only certain individuals mount inappropriate type 2 immune responses to these otherwise harmless allergens has remained an unanswered question. Mounting evidence suggests that the epithelium, by sensing its environment, is the central regulator of allergic diseases. Once considered to be a passive barrier to allergens, epithelial cells at mucosal surfaces are now considered to be the cornerstone of the allergic diathesis. Beyond their function as maintaining barrier at mucosal surfaces, mucosal epithelial cells through the secretion of mediators like IL-25, IL-33, and TSLP control the fate of downstream allergic immune responses. In this review, we will discuss the advances in recent years regarding the process of allergen recognition and secretion of soluble mediators by epithelial cells that shape the development of the allergic response. PMID:27534656

  6. Internet-based transfusion audit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitan, Jacek; Haley, Rebecca

    1995-03-01

    This project is aimed at developing a cost-effective working environment for the transfusion medicine specialists of American Red Cross (ARC). In this project we are developing a multimedia-based consultation environment that uses Internet and teleconferencing to increase the quality of services and to replace currently used 800 telephone lines. Through the use of Internet/LAN/ISDN the physicians can share information and references while they discuss patient cases. A multimedia interface allows the physician to access data from the office and from the house. This paper discusses the approach, current status of the project and future plans to extend the approach to other areas of medicine.

  7. To Transfuse or not to Transfuse in Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage? That is the Question

    PubMed Central

    Rockey, Don C.

    2014-01-01

    Background The hemoglobin threshold for transfusion of red cells in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding is controversial. We compared the efficacy and safety of a restrictive transfusion strategy with those of a liberal transfusion strategy. Methods We enrolled 921 patients with severe acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding and randomly assigned 461 of them to a restrictive strategy (transfusion when the hemoglobin level fell below 7 g per deciliter) and 460 to a liberal strategy (transfusion when the hemoglobin fell below 9 g per deciliter). Randomization was stratified according to the presence or absence of liver cirrhosis. Results A total of 225 patients assigned to the restrictive strategy (51%), as compared with 65 assigned to the liberal strategy (15%), did not receive transfusions (P<0.001). The probability of survival at 6 weeks was higher in the restrictive-strategy group than in the liberal-strategy group (95% vs. 91%; hazard ratio for death with restrictive strategy, 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.33 to 0.92; P = 0.02). Further bleeding occurred in 10% of the patients in the restrictive-strategy group as compared with 16% of the patients in the liberal-strategy group (P = 0.01), and adverse events occurred in 40% as compared with 48% (P = 0.02). The probability of survival was slightly higher with the restrictive strategy than with the liberal strategy in the subgroup of patients who had bleeding associated with a peptic ulcer (hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.26 to 1.25) and was significantly higher in the subgroup of patients with cirrhosis and Child–Pugh class A or B disease (hazard ratio, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.11 to 0.85), but not in those with cirrhosis and Child–Pugh class C disease (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.45 to 2.37). Within the first 5 days, the portal-pressure gradient increased significantly in patients assigned to the liberal strategy (P = 0.03) but not in those assigned to the restrictive strategy. Conclusions As compared

  8. PULMONARY MYCOTIC INFECTIONS—Allergic and Immunologic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Keeney, Edmund L.

    1954-01-01

    The mechanisms of immunity and allergy, at play in every infectious disease, must be comprehended before the pathogenesis of an infection can be appreciated. Immunity, allergy and serology are concerned with specific antigen-antibody reactions. In immunity the principal concern is with the final disposition of antigen (agglutination, lysis, and phagocytosis). In allergy attention is focused upon tissue damage resulting from antigen-antibody union. In serology interest is devoted to the presence of antibody as evaluated by certain visible in vitro reactions—precipitin, agglutination, opsonization and complement fixation tests. There are two types of allergic reaction—the immediate or anaphylactic type and the delayed type or the allergic disease of infection. Neither kind takes part in the mechanism of immunity. At this time the allergic antibody and the immune antibody must be considered as two different and distinct antibodies. Skin and serologic tests are important diagnostic aids in certain pulmonary mycotic infections—for example, coccidioidomycosis, blastomycosis, histoplasmosis and moniliasis. Clinical expressions of allergy may appear in coccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis and moniliasis. Pulmonary mycoses are divided into three groups, that is, the endogenous mycoses (actinomycosis, moniliasis, geotrichosis), the endogenous-exogenous mycoses (cryptococcosis, aspergillosis, mucormycosis) and the exogenous mycoses (nocardiosis, coccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis, North American blastomycosis). The diagnosis and treatment of the important mycotic infections that invade lung tissue are discussed. PMID:13209369

  9. Personalized symptoms forecasting for pollen-induced allergic rhinitis sufferers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voukantsis, D.; Berger, U.; Tzima, F.; Karatzas, K.; Jaeger, S.; Bergmann, K. C.

    2015-07-01

    Hay fever is a pollen-induced allergic reaction that strongly affects the overall quality of life of many individuals. The disorder may vary in severity and symptoms depending on patient-specific factors such as genetic disposition, individual threshold of pollen concentration levels, medication, former immunotherapy, and others. Thus, information services that improve the quality of life of hay fever sufferers must address the needs of each individual separately. In this paper, we demonstrate the development of information services that offer personalized pollen-induced symptoms forecasts. The backbone of these services consists of data of allergic symptoms reported by the users of the Personal Hay Fever Diary system and pollen concentration levels (European Aeroallergen Network) in several sampling sites. Data were analyzed using computational intelligence methods, resulting in highly customizable forecasting models that offer personalized warnings to users of the Patient Hay Fever Diary system. The overall system performance for the pilot area (Vienna and Lower Austria) reached a correlation coefficient of r = 0.71 ± 0.17 (average ± standard deviation) in a sample of 219 users with major contribution to the Pollen Hay Fever Diary system and an overall performance of r = 0.66 ± 0.18 in a second sample of 393 users, with minor contribution to the system. These findings provide an example of combining data from different sources using advanced data engineering in order to develop innovative e-health services with the capacity to provide more direct and personalized information to allergic rhinitis sufferers.

  10. Fexofenadine hydrochloride in the treatment of allergic disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, David; Bielory, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    Fexofenadine is a selective, non-sedating H1 receptor antagonist, marketed in the United States since 2000. The FDA approved an oral suspension in 2006, for the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis and chronic idiopathic urticaria in children. The tablet, capsule, and oral suspension are bioequivalent. Although fexofenadine does not use P450 CYP 3A4 it does interact with a number of drugs at P-glycoprotein and organic anion transporter polypeptides. The risk of toxicity from other drugs may increase with the administration of fexofenadine. Orange and grapefruit juices reduce the bioavailability of fexofenadine. Fexofenadine has been shown to have an impact on inflammatory mediators, other than histamine, such as decreasing the production of LTC4, LTD4, LTE4, PGE2, and PGF2α; inhibiting cyclo-oxygenase 2, thromboxane; limiting iNOS generation of NO; decreasing cytokine levels (ICAM-1, ELAM-1, VCAM-1, RANTES, I-TAC, MDC, TARC, MMP-2, MMP-9, tryptase); and diminishing eosinophil adherence, chemotaxis, and opsonization of particles. These effects may provide benefit to some of the inflammatory responses of an acute allergic reaction and provide a basis for future development of H1 antagonists with stronger anti-inflammatory effects. These studies also support the contention that fexofenadine is effective for the treatment of allergic rhinits and chronic idiopathic urticaria. PMID:21436982

  11. Transfusion interventions in critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    McQuilten, Zoe K; Crighton, Gemma; Engelbrecht, Sunelle; Gotmaker, Robert; Brunskill, Susan J; Murphy, Michael F; Wood, Erica M

    2015-04-01

    Critical bleeding (CB) requiring massive transfusion (MT) can occur in a variety of clinical contexts and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. In 2011, the Australian National Blood Authority (NBA) published patient blood management guidelines for CB and MT, which found limited high-quality evidence from which only 2 recommendations could be made. The aim of this systematic review (SR) was to update these guidelines and identify evidence gaps still to be addressed. A comprehensive search was performed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and SRs using MeSH index and free text terms in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library (Issue 11, 2012), EMBASE, CINHAL, PUBMED, and the Transfusion Evidence Library up to July 15, 2014. The evidence was grouped according to 4 questions based on the original guideline relating to transfusion interventions: (1) effect of dose, timing, and ratio of red blood cells (RBCs) to component therapy on patient outcomes; (2) effect of RBC transfusion on patient outcomes; (3) effect of fresh frozen plasma, platelet, cryoprecipitate, fibrinogen concentrate, and prothrombin complex concentrate on patient outcomes; and (4) effect of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) on patient outcomes. From this search, 19 studies were identified: 6 RCTs and 13 SRs. Two of the RCTs were pilot/feasibility studies, 3 were investigating rFVIIa, and 1 compared restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion in upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Overall, limited new evidence was identified and substantial evidence gaps remain, particularly with regard to the effect of component therapies, including ratio of RBC to component therapies, on patient outcomes. Clinical trials to address these questions are required. PMID:25716645

  12. Skin Prick Test in Patients with Chronic Allergic Skin Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Pooja; Dogra, Alka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic allergic skin disorders are the inflammatory and proliferative conditions in which both genetic and environmental factors play important roles. Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and atopic dermatitis (AD) are among the most common chronic allergic skin disorders. These can be provoked by various food and aeroallergens. Skin prick tests (SPTs) represent the cheapest and most effective method to diagnose type I hypersensitivity. Positive skin tests with a history suggestive of clinical sensitivity strongly incriminate the allergen as a contributor to the disease process. Aims and Objectives: To determine the incidence of positive SPT in patients with chronic allergic skin disorders and to identify the various allergens implicated in positive SPT. Methods: Fifty patients of chronic allergic disorders were recruited in this study. They were evaluated by SPT with both food and aeroallergens. Results: In our study, SPT positivity in patients of CIU was 63.41% and in AD was 77.78%. Out of the 41 patients of CIU, the most common allergen groups showing SPT positivity were dust and pollen, each comprising 26.83% patients. SPT reaction was positive with food items (21.6%), insects (17.07%), fungus (12.20%), and Dermatophagoides farinae, that is, house dust mite (HDM) (7.32%). The allergen which showed maximum positivity was grain dust wheat (19.51%). Among nine patients of AD, maximum SPT positivity was seen with Dermatophagoides farinae, pollen Amaranthus spinosus, grain dust wheat, and cotton mill dust; each comprising 22.22% of patients. Conclusion: Our study showed that a significant number of patients of CIU and AD showed sensitivity to dust, pollen, insects, Dermatophagoides farinae, and fungi on SPT. Thus, it is an important tool in the diagnosis of CIU and AD. PMID:25814704

  13. Update on rupatadine in the management of allergic disorders.

    PubMed

    Mullol, J; Bousquet, J; Bachert, C; Canonica, G W; Giménez-Arnau, A; Kowalski, M L; Simons, F E R; Maurer, M; Ryan, D; Scadding, G

    2015-01-01

    In a review of rupatadine published in 2008, the primary focus was on its role as an antihistamine, with a thorough evaluation of its pharmacology and interaction with histamine H1 -receptors. At the time, however, evidence was already emerging of a broader mechanism of action for rupatadine involving other mediators implicated in the inflammatory cascade. Over the past few years, the role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) as a potent mediator involved in the hypersensitivity-type allergic reaction has gained greater recognition. Rupatadine has dual affinity for histamine H1 -receptors and PAF receptors. In view of the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma group's call for oral antihistamines to exhibit additive anti-allergic/anti-inflammatory properties, further exploration of rupatadine's anti-PAF effects was a logical step forward. New studies have demonstrated that rupatadine inhibits PAF effects in nasal airways and produces a greater reduction in nasal symptoms than levocetirizine. A meta-analysis involving more than 2500 patients has consolidated the clinical evidence for rupatadine in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in adults and children (level of evidence Ia, recommendation A). Other recent advances include observational studies of rupatadine in everyday clinical practice situations and approval of a new formulation (1 mg/ml oral solution) for use in children. In this reappraisal, we revisit some key properties and pivotal clinical studies of rupatadine and examine new clinical data in more detail including studies that measured health-related quality of life and studies that investigated the efficacy and safety of rupatadine in other indications such as acquired cold urticaria, mosquito bite allergy and mastocytosis. PMID:25491409

  14. Foxp3 expressing regulatory T-cells in allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Nouri-Aria, Kayhan T

    2009-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma, rhinitis and eczema are increasing in prevalence worldwide, in particular in industrialised countries affecting up to 20% of the population. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) have been shown to be critical in T-cell homeostasis and in the maintenance of immune responses, such as prevention of autoimmunity and hampering allergic diseases. The so-called 'natural' CD4+CD25+ Tregs and/or IL-10-producing Tr1 cells have been shown to be responsible for the protection of immune tolerance and intact immune reactions following exposure to allergens such as aeroallergens or food allergens. In this regard, both cell-cell contact (through membrane bound TGF-beta or via suppressive molecules such as CLTA-4) and soluble cytokine-(TGF-beta and IL-10) dependent mechanisms have been shown to contribute to the ability of Tregs to operate effectively. The transcription factor Foxp3, a member of the forkhead-winged helix family, appears to be critical in the suppressive abilities of regulatory T-cells. Adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+ Tregs from healthy to diseased animals corroborated and provided further evidence of the vital role of these populations in the prevention or cure of certain autoimmune conditions. Clinical improvement seen after allergen immunotherapy for allergic diseases such as rhinitis and asthma has also been associated with the induction of IL-10 and TGF-beta producing Trl cells as well as Foxp3 expressing CD4+CD25+ T-cells, resulting in the suppression ofTh2 cytokine milieu. Activation and expansion ofantigen-specific CD4+CD25+ Tregs in vivo using adjuvants such as IL-10 or pharmacological agents such as low dose steroids or vitamin D3 could represent novel approaches to induce antigen-specific tolerance in immune-mediated conditions such as allergic asthma, autoimmune disease and the rejection of transplanted organs in man. PMID:20429425

  15. Adverse Drug Reactions in Dental Practice

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Adverse reactions may occur with any of the medications prescribed or administered in dental practice. Most of these reactions are somewhat predictable based on the pharmacodynamic properties of the drug. Others, such as allergic and pseudoallergic reactions, are less common and unrelated to normal drug action. This article will review the most common adverse reactions that are unrelated to drug allergy. PMID:24697823

  16. Management of patients who refuse blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Chand, N Kiran; Subramanya, H Bala; Rao, G Venkateswara

    2014-01-01

    A small group of people belonging to a certain religion, called Jehovah's witness do not accept blood transfusion or blood products, based on biblical readings. When such group of people are in need of health care, their faith and belief is an obstacle for their proper treatment, and poses legal, ethical and medical challenges for attending health care provider. Due to the rapid growth in the membership of this group worldwide, physicians attending hospitals should be prepared to manage such patients. Appropriate management of such patients entails understanding of ethical and legal issues involved, providing meticulous medical management, use of prohaemostatic agents, essential interventions and techniques to reduce blood loss and hence, reduce the risk of subsequent need for blood transfusion. An extensive literature search was performed using search engines such as Google scholar, PubMed, MEDLINE, science journals and textbooks using keywords like ‘Jehovah's witness’, ‘blood haemodilution’, ‘blood salvage’ and ‘blood substitutes’. PMID:25535432

  17. Total quality management in blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Smit-Sibinga, C T

    2000-01-01

    Quality management is an ongoing development resulting in consistency products and services and ever increasing customer satisfaction. The ultimum is Total Quality Management. Quality systems and quality management in transfusion medicine have gained considerable attention since the outbreak of the AIDS epidemic. Where product orientation has long been applied through quality control, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) principles were introduced, shifting the developments in the direction of process orientation. Globally, and particularly in the more industrialised world people and system orientation has come along with the introduction of the ISO9001 concept. Harmonisation and a degree of uniformity are needed to implement a universally applicable Quality System and related Quality Management. Where the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB) is the professional organisation with the most extensive experience in quality systems in blood transfusion, the European Union and the Council of Europe now are in the process to design a quality system and management applicable to a larger variety of countries, based on a hybrid of current GMP and ISO9001 principles. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies has developed a more universally to implement Quality Manual, with a pilot project in Honduras. It is recommendable to harmonise the various designs and bring the approaches under one common denominator. PMID:10938970

  18. [Hepatitis E virus: Blood transfusion implications].

    PubMed

    Gallian, P; Piquet, Y; Assal, A; Djoudi, R; Chiaroni, J; Izopet, J; Tiberghien, P

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a non-enveloped RNA virus transmitted by the fecal-oral route. Autochthonous hepatitis E occurring in developed countries is caused by genotypes 3 and 4 and is a zoonotic infection. Humans are infected mostly after ingestion of undercooked meat from infected animals. Most HEV 3 and 4 infections are clinically inapparent. However, genotype 3 (HEV 3) can lead to chronic hepatitis in immuno-compromised patients such as organ-transplant recipients and patients with haematological malignancies. In Europe, HEV 3 is implicated in transfusion-transmitted HEV infection. In France, as observed in several European countries, prevalence of HEV RNA and specific IgG antibodies are high indicating that viral circulation is important. The systematic HEV NAT screening of blood donations used for preparation of solvent detergent plasma indicate that 1 to 2218 donation is infected by HEV RNA. The need or implementation's impacts of safety measures to prevent HEV transmission by blood transfusion are under reflexion by French's health authorities. The HEV NAT screening is the only available tool of prevention. Alternative strategies are under investigation including individual or mini pool NAT testing all or part of blood donations. PMID:25267201

  19. First Implementation of Transfusion Consent Policy in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Al-Ghafri, Naif; Zia, Fehmida; Al-Huneini, Mohammed; Al-Rawas, Abdul-Hakeem; Al-Kindi, Salam; Jose, Sachin; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Al-Sabti, Hilal; Daar, Shahina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Transfusions are a common medical intervention. Discussion of the benefits, risks and alternatives with the patient is mandated by many legislations prior to planned transfusions. At the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman, a written transfusion consent policy was introduced in March 2014. This was the first time such a policy was implemented in Oman. This study therefore aimed to assess adherence to this policy among different specialties within SQUH. Methods: The medical records of patients who underwent elective transfusions between June and August 2014 were reviewed to assess the presence of transfusion consent forms. If present, the consent forms were examined for completeness of patient, physician and witness information. Results: In total, the records of 446 transfused patients (299 adult and 147 paediatric patients) were assessed. Haematology patients accounted for 50% of adult patients and 71% of paediatric patients. Consent was obtained for 75% of adult and 91% of paediatric patients. The highest adherence rate was observed among adult and paediatric haematology specialists (95% and 97%, respectively). Consent forms were correctly filled out with all details provided for 51% and 52% of adult and paediatric patients, respectively. Among inadequately completed forms, the most common error was a lack of witness details (20–25%). Conclusion: In most cases, the pre-transfusion consent policy was successfully adhered to at SQUH. However, further work is required to ensure full compliance with the consent procedure within different specialties. Implementation of transfusion consent in other hospitals in the country is recommended. PMID:27606107

  20. What Are the Risks of a Blood Transfusion?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the transfusion can safely be restarted. Viruses and Infectious Diseases Some infectious agents, such as HIV, can survive in blood and infect the person receiving the blood transfusion. To keep blood safe, blood ... Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). This disease is the human version of ...

  1. Blood transfusion in obstetrics: the pregnant women's point of view.

    PubMed

    Abu-Salem, A N; Qublan, H S

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the views and compliance of a group of pregnant women regarding obstetric-related blood transfusion. In this prospective questionnaire-based analysis, a total of 300 pregnant women who attended the antenatal care clinic were included. The mean age and gestational age of patients were 31.6 years and 27.4 weeks, respectively. All demographic and questionnaire data were recorded and analysed. A total of 41% of participants were aware of the possible need for blood transfusion in pregnancy and 88% of all women would accept blood transfusion when necessary. The remaining 12% would refuse blood transfusion, even if it was life-saving, because of the fear of blood transfusion complications. It is concluded that counselling and a management plan should be scheduled for pregnancy, and management protocols should be developed for women who refuse blood transfusion. Transfusion alternatives should be discussed with women who will not accept the allogenic blood transfusion. PMID:19358029

  2. The Efficacy and Safety of Autologous Transfusion in Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Moon-Jib; Ryu, Jee-Won; Kim, Jeong-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although allogeneic blood transfusion is the most common method of transfusion in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), there are reports showing significant decrease in the amount of allogeneic transfusion and incidence of side effects after combined use of autologous transfusion. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of using an autologous transfusion device in TKA. Materials and Methods Patients who underwent TKA at our institution from January 2003 to January 2014 were divided into two groups: group A (n=127) who received allogeneic transfusion only in TKA and group B (n=118) who received autologous transfusion via an autologous transfusion device and allogeneic transfusion. In both groups, the patients were transfused when the hemoglobin level was below 9 g/dL. In group B, blood collected by the autologous transfusion device was transfused only once after surgery. The total blood loss volume, total transfusion volume, and the presence of side effects were assessed based on medical records. Results Group A received 294.6 mL more allogeneic transfusion than group B (p<0.001). There were no significant differences with regard to the development of side effects between groups. Conclusions Application of an autologous transfusion device during TKA can be effective in reducing the allogeneic transfusion volume. Moreover, allogeneic transfusion was not necessary after autologous transfusion in some patients. PMID:26389070

  3. [Tattoo skin reactions: Management and treatment algorithm].

    PubMed

    Kluger, N

    2016-01-01

    So-called "allergic" reactions to ink or colouring agents constitute the main current complication associated with tattoos that lead individuals to consult. However, general practitioners are frequently at a loss about how to manage such complications. In order to assist clinicians in their daily practice, we propose an update of the modes of managing allergic reactions to tattoos, and we offer a therapeutic scale and a decision-making algorithm. PMID:27181822

  4. Fresh whole blood transfusion capability for Special Operations Forces.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Andrew; Callum, Jeannie; da Luz, Luis Teodoro; Schmid, Joanne; Funk, Christopher; Glassberg, Elon; Tien, Homer

    2015-06-01

    Fresh whole blood (FWB) transfusion is an option for providing volume and oxygen carrying capacity to bleeding Special Operations soldiers who are injured in an austere environment and who are far from a regular blood bank. Retrospective data from recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan show an association between the use of FWB and survival. We reviewed the literature to document the issues surrounding FWB transfusion to Special Operations soldiers in the austere environment and surveyed the literature regarding best practice guidelines for and patient outcomes after FWB transfusions. Most literature regarding FWB transfusion is retrospective or historical. There is limited prospective evidence currently to change transfusion practice in tertiary care facilities, but FWB remains an option in the austere setting. PMID:26100776

  5. Fresh whole blood transfusion capability for Special Operations Forces

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Maj Andrew; Callum, Jeannie; da Luz, Luis Teodoro; Schmid, Joanne; Funk, Christopher; Glassberg, Col Elon; Tien, Col Homer

    2015-01-01

    Summary Fresh whole blood (FWB) transfusion is an option for providing volume and oxygen carrying capacity to bleeding Special Operations soldiers who are injured in an austere environment and who are far from a regular blood bank. Retrospective data from recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan show an association between the use of FWB and survival. We reviewed the literature to document the issues surrounding FWB transfusion to Special Operations soldiers in the austere environment and surveyed the literature regarding best practice guidelines for and patient outcomes after FWB transfusions. Most literature regarding FWB transfusion is retrospective or historical. There is limited prospective evidence currently to change transfusion practice in tertiary care facilities, but FWB remains an option in the austere setting. PMID:26100776

  6. Transfusions for anemia in adult and pediatric patients with malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neil; Andrews, Jennifer; Goodnough, Lawrence Tim

    2015-09-01

    Anemia is present in over two-thirds of patients with malignant hematological disorders. The etiology of anemia predominates from ineffective erythropoiesis from marrow infiltration, cytokine related suppression, erythropoietin suppression, and vitamin deficiency; ineffective erythropoiesis is further exacerbated by accelerated clearance due to antibody mediated hemolysis and thrombotic microangiopathy. As the anemia is chronic in nature, symptoms are generally well tolerated and often non-specific. Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) is a balance between providing benefit for patients while avoiding risks of transfusion. Conservative/restrictive RBC transfusion practices have shown equivalent patient outcomes compared to liberal transfusion practices, and meta-analysis has shown improved in-hospital mortality, reduced cardiac events, re-bleeding, and bacterial infections. The implications for a lower threshold for transfusion in patients with malignancies are therefore increasingly being scrutinized. Alternative management strategies for anemia with IV iron and erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESAs) should be considered in the appropriate settings. PMID:25796130

  7. The prevention of transfusion-associated circulatory overload.

    PubMed

    Alam, Asim; Lin, Yulia; Lima, Ana; Hansen, Mark; Callum, Jeannie L

    2013-04-01

    Transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) is an important and potentially injurious complication of transfusion that is underappreciated by clinicians. Risk factors for TACO include being at an extreme of age, having preexisting cardiac and/or (potentially) renal dysfunction, acute myocardial infarction, and individuals receiving plasma. Keys to preventing TACO, aside from identifying high-risk individuals, should be multifaceted. We advocate for the widespread use of pretransfusion checklists and implementation of nonemergent transfusion protocols. We suggest the regular use of pretransfusion diuretics in high-risk individuals. When a transfusion is required, we believe that "critical" nursing supervision and leadership are instrumental in the coordination of slow transfusion rates on computerized infusion pumps and ensuring patients are appropriately monitored. We believe that using these methodologies on a global scale will prevent many TACO events and minimize the severity when it does occur. PMID:23465703

  8. Allergic contact dermatitis to acrylates in disposable blue diathermy pads.

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, S. K.; Shaw, S.

    1999-01-01

    We report 2 cases of elicitation of allergic contact dermatitis to acrylates from disposable blue diathermy pads used on patients who underwent routine surgery. Their reactions were severe, and took approximately 5 weeks to resolve. Both patients gave a prior history of finger tip dermatitis following the use of artificial sculptured acrylic nails, which is a common, but poorly reported, cause of acrylate allergy. Patch testing subsequently confirmed allergies to multiple acrylates present in both the conducting gel of disposable blue diathermy pads, and artificial sculptured acrylic nails. We advocate careful history taking prior to surgery to avoid unnecessary exposure to acrylates in patients already sensitized. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10364952

  9. Allergic contact dermatitis to temporary tattoo by p-phenylenediamine.

    PubMed

    Pegas, J R P; Criado, P R; Criado, R F J; Vasconcellos, C; Pires, M C

    2002-01-01

    Temporary tattoos are widely applied today all over the world. The tattoo makers explain that they use "natural henna paint," although in fact they use "black henna," which includes a mixture of many substances, among them p-phenylenediamine (PPD). There have recently been many reports of allergic contact dermatitis because of temporary tattoo with PPD sensitization. We are adding a new case of temporary tattoo with black henna with an extensive reaction, in which a 12-year-old white boy showed contact dermatitis from PPD, followed by cutaneous eruption after corticosteroid topical treatment. PMID:12109535

  10. Skin testing for allergic diseases: techniques, indications and interpretations.

    PubMed

    Villacorte, G V

    1978-01-01

    Despite significant strides in serologic methodologies, the skin test, when properly done, has remained the single most sensitive and practical assay for specific dermal-bound reaginic antibody. Its value could further be enhanced if and when characterization and standardization of the allergen extracts become a reality. While the technique is simple, the indications and interpretations of allergy skin tests required the expertise of well-trained allergists. A positive skin reaction is no more than a mere supportive laboratory aid in the diagnosis of allergic disease, which is arrived at through a carefully taken detailed history and a meticulously done physical examination. PMID:748833

  11. 38 CFR 3.380 - Diseases of allergic etiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Diseases of allergic... Specific Diseases § 3.380 Diseases of allergic etiology. Diseases of allergic etiology, including bronchial... progress nor as due to the inherent nature of the disease. Seasonal and other acute allergic...

  12. 38 CFR 3.380 - Diseases of allergic etiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Diseases of allergic... Specific Diseases § 3.380 Diseases of allergic etiology. Diseases of allergic etiology, including bronchial... progress nor as due to the inherent nature of the disease. Seasonal and other acute allergic...

  13. 38 CFR 3.380 - Diseases of allergic etiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Diseases of allergic... Specific Diseases § 3.380 Diseases of allergic etiology. Diseases of allergic etiology, including bronchial... progress nor as due to the inherent nature of the disease. Seasonal and other acute allergic...

  14. 38 CFR 3.380 - Diseases of allergic etiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Diseases of allergic... Specific Diseases § 3.380 Diseases of allergic etiology. Diseases of allergic etiology, including bronchial... progress nor as due to the inherent nature of the disease. Seasonal and other acute allergic...

  15. 38 CFR 3.380 - Diseases of allergic etiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diseases of allergic... Specific Diseases § 3.380 Diseases of allergic etiology. Diseases of allergic etiology, including bronchial... progress nor as due to the inherent nature of the disease. Seasonal and other acute allergic...

  16. Mitigating the allergic effects of fire ant envenomation with biologically-based population reduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this review is to describe current efforts to use biological control agents to reduce fire ant population levels, thus, ultimately reducing the number of human sting and allergic reaction incidents. Climate change and worldwide fire ant expansion will increase the frequency of human e...

  17. A review of food allergy and nutritional considerations in the food-allergic adult

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the United States, the prevalence of adults with food allergies is approximately 2 percent to 3 percent. Theoretically, any food can cause an allergic reaction; however, some foods are clearly more allergenic than others are. In adults, peanuts, tree nuts, finned fish, crustaceans, fruit, and veg...

  18. Transfusion of granulocyte rich buffy coats to neutropenic patients.

    PubMed

    Reiss, R F; Pindyck, J; Waldman, A A; Raju, M; Kulpa, J

    1982-01-01

    Granulocyte rich buffy coats were transfused to infected neutropenic patients when leukapheresis donors were not available. Efficacy of transfusions was evaluated from data supplied by hospitals administering them. Buffy coats separated from ACD blood contained a mean of 4.9 X 10(8) granulocytes. Fifty-seven patients received a course consisting of a mean of 3.8 transfusions. Of these, 27 received a mean of 17.5 units per transfusion and had a survival rate of 44.4%, which was not significantly different from the 50.0% found in 30 who received a mean of 11.1 units per transfusion. No significant difference in survival rate was found between 31 patients with acute leukemia and 26 with other disorders or 38 patients with positive and 19 with negative cultures. Finally, no significant difference in survival rate was noted between patients who received a course of greater than or equal to four transfusions or less than or equal to three transfusions in any of the above groups. Survival rates were less than those generally reported following similar courses of leukapheresis units. Buffy coat transfusions consisting of a mean of approximately 17.5 units as produced during this study have therefore been shown to be not generally beneficial. The increased survival seen in some studies utilizing leukapheresis products may relate in part to the larger number of granulocytes they contained. Greater benefit from buffy coat transfusions might result if the number of granulocytes infused were increased. Evaluation of possible efficacy associated with transfusions of increased numbers of buffy coat units further enriched with granulocytes may be justified when leukapheresis donors are not available. PMID:7144696

  19. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis caused by a cold water humidifier.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, A S; Burge, P S; Wieland, G A; Carmalt, M H

    1987-01-01

    Three workers developed classical extrinsic allergic alveolitis while working in a printing works that had a contaminated cold water humidifier. All had nodular shadows on their chest radiographs, reduced gas transfer measurements, and lung biopsy specimens that showed an alveolitis with giant cells and cholesterol clefts. In two subjects bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and the lavage fluid contained more than 70% lymphocytes in each case. Bronchial provocation tests with the humidifier antigen in these two workers reproduced their symptoms. Unlike previously reported cases, where exposure was to humidifiers working at generally higher temperatures, challenge with thermophilic actinomycetes in our two patients produced no reaction. Tests for precipitins to the humidifier antigen gave strongly positive reactions in the three workers but no single organism isolated from the humidifier produced a significantly positive reaction. Images PMID:3616972

  20. [Allergic and irritative textile dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Elsner, P

    1994-01-22

    Textile dermatitis is only one example of adverse health effects due to clothing. It may present with a wide spectrum of clinical features, but the main mechanisms are irritant dermatitis, often observed in atopics intolerant to wool and synthetic fibers, and allergic contact dermatitis, usually caused by textile finishes and dyes. The newer azo dyes Disperse Blue 106 and 124 in particular are potent sensitizers that have caused significant problems, most recently in the form of "leggins dermatitis". Although severe textile dermatitis appears to be a rare event, more systematic population-based research is needed since many oligosymptomatic cases are probably overlooked. Criteria for healthy textiles are an optimum combination of efficacy (regulation of skin temperature and humidity and protection from environmental damage) and safety (lack of carcinogenicity, toxicity and allergenicity). If potentially allergenic substances are used in textiles, they should be declared as in the case of cosmetics. PMID:8115841