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Sample records for alleviate neuropathic pain

  1. Statins alleviate experimental nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiang Qun; Lim, Tony K Y; Lee, Seunghwan; Zhao, Yuan Qing; Zhang, Ji

    2011-05-01

    The statins are a well-established class of drugs that lower plasma cholesterol levels by inhibiting HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase. They are widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and for the prevention of coronary heart disease. Recent studies suggest that statins have anti-inflammatory effects beyond their lipid-lowering properties. We sought to investigate whether statins could affect neuropathic pain by mediating nerve injury-associated inflammatory responses. The effects of hydrophilic rosuvastatin and lipophilic simvastatin were examined in the mouse partial sciatic nerve ligation model. Systemic daily administration of either statin from days 0 to 14 completely prevented the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. When administered from days 8 to 14 after injury, both statins dose-dependently reduced established hypersensitivity. After treatment, the effects of the statins were washed out within 2 to 7 days, depending on dose. Effects of both statins in alleviating mechanical allodynia were further confirmed in a different injury-associated neuropathic pain model, mental nerve chronic constriction, in rats. Both statins were able to abolish interleukin-1β expression in sciatic nerve triggered by nerve ligation. Additionally, quantitative analysis with Iba-1 and glial fibrillary acid protein immunoreactivity demonstrated that rosuvastatin and simvastatin significantly reduced the spinal microglial and astrocyte activation produced by sciatic nerve injury. The increase of interleukin-1β mRNA in the ipsilateral side of spinal cords was also reduced by the treatment of either statin. We identified a potential new application of statins in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The pain-alleviating effects of statins are likely attributable to their immunomodulatory effects.

  2. Recombinant neural progenitor transplants in the spinal dorsal horn alleviate chronic central neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Jergova, Stanislava; Gajavelli, Shyam; Pathak, Nirmal; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2016-04-01

    Neuropathic pain induced by spinal cord injury (SCI) is clinically challenging with inadequate long-term treatment options. Partial pain relief offered by pharmacologic treatment is often counterbalanced by adverse effects after prolonged use in chronic pain patients. Cell-based therapy for neuropathic pain using GABAergic neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) has the potential to overcome untoward effects of systemic pharmacotherapy while enhancing analgesic potency due to local activation of GABAergic signaling in the spinal cord. However, multifactorial anomalies underlying chronic pain will likely require simultaneous targeting of multiple mechanisms. Here, we explore the analgesic potential of genetically modified rat embryonic GABAergic NPCs releasing a peptidergic NMDA receptor antagonist, Serine-histogranin (SHG), thus targeting both spinal hyperexcitability and reduced inhibitory processes. Recombinant NPCs were designed using either lentiviral or adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV2/8) encoding single and multimeric (6 copies of SHG) cDNA. Intraspinal injection of recombinant cells elicited enhanced analgesic effects compared with nonrecombinant NPCs in SCI-induced pain in rats. Moreover, potent and sustained antinociception was achieved, even after a 5-week postinjury delay, using recombinant multimeric NPCs. Intrathecal injection of SHG antibody attenuated analgesic effects of the recombinant grafts suggesting active participation of SHG in these antinociceptive effects. Immunoblots and immunocytochemical assays indicated ongoing recombinant peptide production and secretion in the grafted host spinal cords. These results support the potential for engineered NPCs grafted into the spinal dorsal horn to alleviate chronic neuropathic pain.

  3. Neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Colloca, Luana; Ludman, Taylor; Bouhassira, Didier; Baron, Ralf; Dickenson, Anthony H.; Yarnitsky, David; Freeman, Roy; Truini, Andrea; Attal, Nadine; Finnerup, Nanna B.; Eccleston, Christopher; Kalso, Eija; Bennett, David L.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Raja, Srinivasa N.

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory system, including peripheral fibres (Aβ, Aδ and C fibres) and central neurons, and affects 7–10% of the general population. Multiple causes of neuropathic pain have been described and its incidence is likely to increase owing to the ageing global population, increased incidence of diabetes mellitus and improved survival from cancer after chemotherapy. Indeed, imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory somatosensory signalling, alterations in ion channels and variability in the way that pain messages are modulated in the central nervous system all have been implicated in neuropathic pain. The burden of chronic neuropathic pain seems to be related to the complexity of neuropathic symptoms, poor outcomes and difficult treatment decisions. Importantly, quality of life is impaired in patients with neuropathic pain owing to increased drug prescriptions and visits to health care providers, as well as the morbidity from the pain itself and the inciting disease. Despite challenges, progress in the understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain is spurring the development of new diagnostic procedures and personalized interventions, which emphasize the need for a multidisciplinary approach to the management of neuropathic pain. PMID:28205574

  4. Fat Grafting in Burn Scar Alleviates Neuropathic Pain via Anti-Inflammation Effect in Scar and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shu-Hung; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Lee, Su-Shin; Chang, Kao-Ping; Chai, Chee-Yin; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Lin, Sin-Daw; Kwan, Aij-Lie; David Wang, Hui-Min; Lai, Chung-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Burn-induced neuropathic pain is complex, and fat grafting has reportedly improved neuropathic pain. However, the mechanism of fat grafting in improving neuropathic pain is unclear. Previous investigations have found that neuroinflammation causes neuropathic pain, and anti-inflammatory targeting may provide potential therapeutic opportunities in neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that fat grafting in burn scars improves the neuropathic pain through anti-inflammation. Burn-induced scar pain was confirmed using a mechanical response test 4 weeks after burn injuries, and autologous fat grafting in the scar area was performed simultaneously. After 4 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and specimens were collected for the inflammation test, including COX-2, iNOS, and nNOS in the injured skin and spinal cord dorsal horns through immunohistochemistry and Western assays. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 β and TNF-α) in the spinal cord were collected. Double immunofluorescent staining images for measuring p-IκB, p-NFκB, p-JNK, and TUNEL as well as Western blots of AKT, Bax/Bcl-2 for the inflammatory process, and apoptosis were analyzed. Fat grafting significantly reduced COX2, nNOS, and iNOS in the skin and spinal cord dorsal horns, as well as IL-1β and TNF-α, compared with the burn group. Moreover, regarding the anti-inflammatory effect, the apoptosis cells in the spinal cord significantly decreased after the fat grafting in the burn injury group. Fat grafting was effective in treating burn-induced neuropathic pain through the alleviation of neuroinflammation and ameliorated spinal neuronal apoptosis. PMID:26368011

  5. Nitrous oxide persistently alleviates pain hypersensitivity in neuropathic rats: A dose-dependent effect

    PubMed Central

    Ben Boujema, Meric; Laboureyras, Emilie; Pype, Jan; Bessière, Baptiste; Simonnet, Guy

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite numerous pharmacological approaches, there are no common analgesic drugs that produce meaningful relief for the majority of patients with neuropathic pain. Although nitrous oxide (N2O) is a weak analgesic that acts via opioid-dependent mechanisms, it is also an antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). The NMDAR plays a critical role in the development of pain sensitization induced by nerve injury. OBJECTIVE: Using the chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in male rats as a preclinical model of neuropathic pain, the first aim of the present study was to evaluate the lowest N2O concentration and the shortest time of N2O postinjury exposure that would produce persistent relief of neuropathic pain. The second aim was to compare the effects of N2O with gabapentin, a reference drug used in human neuropathic pain relief. METHODS: Changes in the nociceptive threshold were evaluated using the paw pressure vocalization test in rats. RESULTS: Among the various N2O concentrations tested, which ranged from 25% to 50%, only 50% N2O single exposure for 1 h 15 min induced a persistent (minimum of three weeks) and significant (60%) reduction in pain hypersensitivity. A single gabapentin dose (75 mg/kg to 300 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) induced an acute (1 h to 1 h 30 min) dose-dependent effect, but not a persistent effect such as that observed with N2O. CONCLUSIONS: These preclinical results suggest that N2O is advantageous for long-lasting neuropathic pain relief after sciatic nerve injury compared with other drugs used in humans such as gabapentinoids or NMDAR antagonists. The present preclinical study provides a rationale for developing comparative clinical studies. PMID:26371891

  6. Feasibility of Human Amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells in Alleviation of Neuropathic Pain in Chronic Constrictive Injury Nerve Model

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chien-Yi; Liu, Shih-An; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chen, Fu-Chou; Chen, Chun-Jung; Su, Hong-Lin; Pan, Hung-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The neurobehavior of neuropathic pain by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve is very similar to that in humans, and it is accompanied by a profound local inflammation response. In this study, we assess the potentiality of human amniotic fluid derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAFMSCs) for alleviating the neuropathic pain in a chronic constriction nerve injury model. Methods and Methods This neuropathic pain animal model was conducted by four 3–0 chromic gut ligatures loosely ligated around the left sciatic nerve in Sprague—Dawley rats. The intravenous administration of hAFMSCs with 5x105 cells was conducted for three consecutive days. Results The expression IL-1β, TNF-α and synaptophysin in dorsal root ganglion cell culture was remarkably attenuated when co-cultured with hAFMSCs. The significant decrease of PGP 9.5 in the skin after CCI was restored by administration of hAFMSCs. Remarkably increased expression of CD 68 and TNF-α and decreased S-100 and neurofilament expression in injured nerve were rescued by hAFMSCs administration. Increases in synaptophysin and TNF-α over the dorsal root ganglion were attenuated by hAFMSCs. Significant expression of TNF-α and OX-42 over the dorsal spinal cord was substantially attenuated by hAFMSCs. The increased amplitude of sensory evoked potential as well as expression of synaptophysin and TNF-α expression was alleviated by hAFMSCs. Human AFMSCs significantly improved the threshold of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia as well as various parameters of CatWalk XT gait analysis. Conclusion Human AFMSCs administration could alleviate the neuropathic pain demonstrated in histomorphological alteration and neurobehavior possibly through the modulation of the inflammatory response. PMID:27441756

  7. Exogenous induction of HO-1 alleviates vincristine-induced neuropathic pain by reducing spinal glial activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Zhu, Ming-Di; Jiang, Bao-Chun; Yang, Tian; Gao, Yong-Jing

    2015-07-01

    Chemotherapy drugs such as vincristine can produce painful peripheral neuropathy for which is still lack of effective treatment. Recent studies have demonstrated that neuroinflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) was shown to mediate the resolution of inflammation. In this study, we investigated the contribution of HO-1 in the modulation of vincristine-induced pain and the mechanisms implicated. Injection of vincristine induced persistent mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in mice. The expression of HO-1 mRNA and protein was increased in 2 weeks in the spinal cord. Immunostaining showed that HO-1 was mainly expressed in neurons of spinal cord dorsal horn in naïve animals, but induced in astrocytes and microglia after vincristine injection. Intraperitoneal injection of HO-1 inducer increased HO-1 expression in the spinal cord and attenuated vincristine-induced pain. Persistent induction of HO-1 by intraspinal injection of HO-1-expressing lentivirus alleviated vincristine-induced pain for more than 2 weeks. Furthermore, vincristine induced activation of glial cells (astrocytes and microglia), phosphorylation of MAPKs (JNK, ERK, and p38), and production of TNF-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the spinal cord, which were all reduced by intrathecal injection of HO-1 inducer. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that induction of HO-1 attenuates vincristine-induced neuropathic pain via inhibition of glia-mediated neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. This suggests that exogenously induced HO-1 may have potential as therapy in chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain.

  8. Cdk5 inhibitor roscovitine alleviates neuropathic pain in the dorsal root ganglia by downregulating N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Gu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Juan; Ma, Zhengliang

    2014-09-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a member of the small proline-directed serine/threonine kinase family. Cdk5 is not involved in cell cycle regulation, but is implicated in neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role of Cdk5 in neuropathic pain remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the possibility that Cdk5 is involved in neuropathic pain in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We injected intrathecally Cdk5 inhibitor roscovitine in rat model of chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion and examined pain behaviors and the expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 2A (NR2A) but not NR2B or NR1 in DRG. We found that roscovitine alleviated neuropathic pain, causing decline in paw withdrawal mechanical threshold and paw withdrawal thermal latency. Furthermore, roscovitine inhibited NR2A expression in DRG. These data suggest that Cdk5-NR2A pathway regulates neuropathic pain in DRG, and intrathecal injection of roscovitine could alleviate neuropathic pain. Our findings provide new insight into the analgesic effects of Roscovitine and identify Cdk5-NR2A pathway as a potential target for effective treatment of neuropathic pain.

  9. Reversal of TRESK Downregulation Alleviates Neuropathic Pain by Inhibiting Activation of Gliocytes in the Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Chen, Hongtao; Yang, Chengxiang; Zhong, Jiying; He, Wanyou; Xiong, Qingming

    2017-02-03

    Despite the consensus that activation of TWIK-related spinal cord K(+) (TRESK) might contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic pain, the specific mechanisms underlying the transfer and development of pain signals still remain obscure. In the present study, we validated that TRESK was expressed in neurons instead of glial cells. Furthermore, in the SNI model of neuropathic pain (NP), downregulation of TRESK in spinal cord neurons resulted in upregulation of connexin 36 (Cx36) and connexin 43 (Cx43), both being subtypes of gap junctions in the spinal cord, with gliocytes in the spinal cord activated ultimately. Compared with SNI rats, intrathecal injection of TRESK gene recombinant adenovirus significantly downregulated the expression levels of Cx36 and Cx43 and suppressed the activation of gliocytes in the spinal cord, with hyperalgesia significantly reduced. In conclusion, TRESK contributes to the pathogenesis of NP by upregulation of synaptic transmission and activation of gliocytes.

  10. Neuropathic Pain After Lung Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-08

    Chronic Neuropathic Pain, Postoperative; Chronic Pain, Postoperative; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Neuropathic Pain; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Pain; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy

  11. Gelsemine alleviates both neuropathic pain and sleep disturbance in partial sciatic nerve ligation mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-er; Li, Ya-dong; Luo, Yan-jia; Wang, Tian-xiao; Wang, Hui-jing; Chen, Shuo-nan; Qu, Wei-min; Huang, Zhi-li

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Gelsemine, an alkaloid from the Chinese herb Gelsemium elegans (Gardn & Champ) Benth., is effective in mitigating chronic pain in rats. In the present study we investigated whether the alkaloid improved sleep disturbance, the most common comorbid symptoms of chronic pain, in a mouse model of neuropathic pain. Methods: Mice were subjected to partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL). After the mice were injected with gelsemine or pregabalin (the positive control) intraperitoneally, mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were assessed, and electroencephalogram (EEG)/electromyogram (EMG) recording was performed. Motor performance of the mice was assessed using rota-rod test. c-Fos expression in the brain was analyzed with immunohistochemical staining. Results: In PSNL mice, gelsemine (2 and 4 mg/kg) increased the mechanical threshold for 4 h and prolonged the thermal latencies for 3 h. Furthermore, gelsemine (4 mg/kg, administered at 6:30 AM) increased non-rapid eye movement (non-REM, NREM) sleep, decreased wakefulness, but did not affect REM sleep during the first 3 h in PSNL mice. Sleep architecture analysis showed that gelsemine decreased the mean duration of wakefulness and increased the total number of episodes of NREM sleep during the first 3 h after the dosing. Gelsemine (4 mg/kg) did not impair motor coordination in PSNL mice. Immunohistochemical study showed that PSNL increased c-Fos expression in the neurons of the anterior cingulate cortex, and gelsemine (4 mg/kg) decreased c-Fos expression by 58%. Gelsemine (4 mg/kg, administered at either 6:30 AM or 8:30 PM) did not produce hypnotic effect in normal mice. Pregabalin produced similar antinociceptive and hypnotic effects, but impaired motor coordination in PSNL mice. Conclusion: Gelsemine is an effective agent for treatment of both neuropathic pain and sleep disturbance in PSNL mice; anterior cingulate cortex might play a role in the hypnotic effects of gelsemine. PMID:26388157

  12. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed.

  13. Implication of Hypothalamus in Alleviating Spinal Cord Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Andrew D.; King, Kevin; Deitermann, Annika; Miranpuri, Gurwattan S.; Resnick, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is common among spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, and there remain clinical difficulties in treating NP due to the lack of understanding of underlying mechanisms. Extracellular proteins, such as matrix metalloproteinase and β-catenin, have been shown to be activated in the spinal cord regions following an injury, and may play a key role in contributing to NP states. While these extracellular proteins have been used as therapeutic targets in the spinal cord, there has also been evidence of up-regulation in the hypothalamus following a SCI. We hypothesize that the hypothalamus is involved in regulating NP following a SCI, and hence should be researched further to determine if it is a viable target for future therapeutic treatments. PMID:27721586

  14. Dual Alleviation of Acute and Neuropathic Pain by Fused Opioid Agonist-Neurokinin 1 Antagonist Peptidomimetics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herein, the synthesis and biological evaluation of dual opioid agonists–neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists is described. In these multitarget ligands, the two pharmacophores do not overlap, and this allowed maintaining high NK1R affinity and antagonist potency in compounds 12 and 13. Although the fusion of the two ligands resulted in slightly diminished opioid agonism at the μ- and δ-opioid receptors (MOR and DOR, respectively), as compared to the opioid parent peptide, balanced MOR/DOR activities were obtained. Compared to morphine, compounds 12 and 13 produced more potent antinociceptive effects in both acute (tail-flick) and neuropathic pain models (von Frey and cold plate). Similarly to morphine, analgesic tolerance developed after repetitive administration of these compounds. To our delight, compound 12 did not produce cross-tolerance with morphine and high antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects could be reinstated after chronic administration of each of the two compounds. PMID:26713106

  15. Dual Alleviation of Acute and Neuropathic Pain by Fused Opioid Agonist-Neurokinin 1 Antagonist Peptidomimetics.

    PubMed

    Betti, Cecilia; Starnowska, Joanna; Mika, Joanna; Dyniewicz, Jolanta; Frankiewicz, Lukasz; Novoa, Alexandre; Bochynska, Marta; Keresztes, Attila; Kosson, Piotr; Makuch, Wioletta; Van Duppen, Joost; Chung, Nga N; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Lipkowski, Andrzej W; Schiller, Peter W; Janssens, Frans; Ceusters, Marc; Sommen, François; Meert, Theo; Przewlocka, Barbara; Tourwé, Dirk; Ballet, Steven

    2015-12-10

    Herein, the synthesis and biological evaluation of dual opioid agonists-neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists is described. In these multitarget ligands, the two pharmacophores do not overlap, and this allowed maintaining high NK1R affinity and antagonist potency in compounds 12 and 13. Although the fusion of the two ligands resulted in slightly diminished opioid agonism at the μ- and δ-opioid receptors (MOR and DOR, respectively), as compared to the opioid parent peptide, balanced MOR/DOR activities were obtained. Compared to morphine, compounds 12 and 13 produced more potent antinociceptive effects in both acute (tail-flick) and neuropathic pain models (von Frey and cold plate). Similarly to morphine, analgesic tolerance developed after repetitive administration of these compounds. To our delight, compound 12 did not produce cross-tolerance with morphine and high antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects could be reinstated after chronic administration of each of the two compounds.

  16. Interleukin-1β pre-treated bone marrow stromal cells alleviate neuropathic pain through CCL7-mediated inhibition of microglial activation in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Deng, Guoying; Wang, Haowei; Yang, Mei; Yang, Rui; Li, Xiangnan; Zhang, Xiaoping; Yuan, Hongbin

    2017-01-01

    Although neuropathic pain is one of the most intractable diseases, recent studies indicate that systemic or local injection of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) decreases pro-inflammatory cytokines release and alleviates neuropathic pain. However, it is still not clear whether pre-treated BMSCs have a strong anti-inflammatory and/or analgesia effect. Using the spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain, IL-1β pre-treated BMSCs (IL-1β-BMSCs) were injected into rats followed by SNL in order to determine possible effects. Results indicated that IL-1β-BMSCs were more efficacious in both amelioration of neuropathic pain and inhibition of microglia activation. Specifically, microglia inhibition was found to be mediated by chemokine C-C motif ligand 7 (CCL7) but not CCL2. Results also showed that IL-1β-BMSCs had a stronger inhibitory effect on astrocyte activation as well as CCL7 release, which was found to be mediated by IL-10 not transforming growth factor-β1. In addition, we also found directional migration of IL-1β-BMSCs was mediated by inceased C-X-C motif chemokine ligand (CXCL) 13 expression following SNL. In conclusion, our results indicated IL-1β-BMSCs could inhibit microglia activation and neuropathic pain by decreasing CCL7 level in spinal cord. PMID:28195183

  17. Duloxetine Inhibits Microglial P2X4 Receptor Function and Alleviates Neuropathic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Shota; Zhang, Jiaming; Kometani, Miho; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Kohno, Keita; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Tsuda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    P2X4 receptors (P2X4R) are a family of ATP-gated non-selective cation channels. We previously demonstrated that activation of P2X4R in spinal microglia is crucial for neuropathic pain, a highly debilitating chronic pain condition, suggesting that P2X4R is a potential therapeutic target for treating neuropathic pain. Thus, the identification of a compound that has a potent inhibitory effect on P2X4R is an important clinical challenge. In the present study, we screened a chemical library of clinically approved drugs and show for the first time that duloxetine, a serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, has an inhibitory effect on rodent and human P2X4R. In primary cultured microglial cells, duloxetine also inhibited P2X4R-, but not P2X7R-, mediated responses. Moreover, intrathecal administration of duloxetine in a model of neuropathic pain produced a reversal of nerve injury-induced mechanical allodynia, a cardinal symptom of neuropathic pain. In rats that were pretreated with a serotonin-depleting agent and a noradrenaline neurotoxin, the antiallodynic effect of duloxetine was reduced, but still remained. Based on these results, we suggest that, in addition to duloxetine’s primary inhibitory action on serotonin and noradrenaline transporters, an inhibitory effect on P2X4R may be involved at least in part in an antiallodynic effect of intrathecal duloxetine in a model of neuropathic pain. PMID:27768754

  18. Neuropathic pain in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Raicher, Irina; Stump, Patrick Raymond Nicolas Andre Ghislain; Baccarelli, Rosemari; Marciano, Lucia H S C; Ura, Somei; Virmond, Marcos C L; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Ciampi de Andrade, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Nerve impairment is a key clinical aspect of leprosy and may present the distribution of mononeuropathy or multiple nerve trunks, small cutaneous nerve fibers, and free nerve endings. The clinical range of leprosy is determined by individual cell-mediated immune response to infection that also may play a role in different types of pain syndromes in leprosy. Previous studies reported a high prevalence of neuropathic pain in leprosy. In an Ethiopian study with 48 patients, pure nociceptive pain was experienced by 43% of patients and pure neuropathic pain (NeP) by 11% of patients. In an Indian study, 21.8% of leprosy patients had pain with neuropathic characteristics. These rates underlie the need to develop tools for the early diagnosis and detection of infection and its complications, such as nerve damage and pain. In a larger sample with leprosy-associated NeP (n = 90), we have applied the Douleur Neuropathique en 4 questions (DN4) and found sensitivity = 97.1% and specificity = 57.9%. The high sensitivity of this tool in leprosy patients suggests that it could be a valuable tool to screen for neuropathic pain in this population and could be used as part of health care programs aimed at detecting, treating, and rehabilitating leprosy in endemic areas.

  19. Neuropathic orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Benoliel, R; Sharav, Y

    1998-11-01

    Neuropathic orofacial pain (NOP) is a challenging diagnostic problem. In some cases, symptomatology may be similar to that seen with dental pathology, resulting in unwarranted dental treatment. Rarely, NOP can herald serious disease or central tumors, and early diagnosis can be life-saving. The following review outlines the classification, clinical presentation, pathophysiology, and treatment of the more common NOP entities.

  20. New therapy for neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Chizuko; Yonezawa, Akihiko; Sakurada, Shinobu

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is one of the worst painful symptoms in clinic. It contains nerve-injured neuropathy, diabetic neuropathy, chronic inflammatory pain, cancer pain, and postherpes pain, and is characterized by a tactile allodynia and hyperalgesia. Neuropathic pain, especially the nerve-injured neuropathy, the diabetic neuropathy, and the cancer pain, is opioid resistant pain. Since the downregulation of mu-opioid receptors is observed in dorsal spinal cord, morphine and fentanyl could not provide marked antihyperalgesic/antiallodynic effects in the course neuropathic pain states. The downregulation of mu-opioid receptors is suggested to be mediated through the activation of NMDA receptors. Moreover, at the neuropathic pain states, the increased expression of voltage-dependent Na+ channels and Ca2+ channels are observed. Based on the above information concerned with the pathophysiology of neural changes in neuropathic pain states, new drug treatments for neuropathic pain, using ketamine, methadone, and gabapentin, have been developed. These drugs show remarkable effectiveness against hyperalgesia and allodynia during neuropathic pain states. Oxycodone is a mu-opioid receptor agonist, which has different pharmacological profiles with morphine. The remarkable effectiveness of oxycodone for neuropathic pain provides the possibility that mu-opioid receptor agonists, which have different pharmacological profile with morphine, can be used for the management of neuropathic pain.

  1. Ocular neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Perry; Borsook, David

    2016-01-01

    As the biological alarm of impending or actual tissue damage, pain is essential for our survival. However, when it is initiated and/or sustained by dysfunctional elements in the nociceptive system, it is itself a disease known as neuropathic pain. While the critical nociceptive system provides a number of protective functions, it is unique in its central role of monitoring, preserving and restoring the optical tear film in the face of evaporative attrition without which our vision would be non-functional. Meeting this existential need resulted in the evolution of the highly complex, powerful and sensitive dry eye alarm system integrated in the peripheral and central trigeminal sensory network. The clinical consequences of corneal damage to these nociceptive pathways are determined by the type and location of its pathological elements and can range from the spectrum known as dry eye disease to the centalised oculofacial neuropathic pain syndrome characterised by a striking disparity between the high intensity of symptoms and paucity of external signs. These changes parallel those observed in somatic neuropathic pain. When seen through the neuroscience lens, diseases responsible for inadequately explained chronic eye pain (including those described as dry eye) can take on new meanings that may clarify long-standing enigmas and point to new approaches for developing preventive, symptomatic and disease-modifying interventions for these currently refractory disorders. PMID:25943558

  2. Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling in the Insular Cortex Alleviates Neuropathic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Minjee; Han, Jeongsoo; Kim, Un Jeng; Cha, Myeounghoon; Um, Sun Woo; Bai, Sun Joon; Hong, Seong-Karp; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Injury of peripheral nerves can trigger neuropathic pain, producing allodynia and hyperalgesia via peripheral and central sensitization. Recent studies have focused on the role of the insular cortex (IC) in neuropathic pain. Because the IC is thought to store pain-related memories, translational regulation in this structure may reveal novel targets for controlling chronic pain. Signaling via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which is known to control mRNA translation and influence synaptic plasticity, has been studied at the spinal level in neuropathic pain, but its role in the IC under these conditions remains elusive. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the role of mTOR signaling in neuropathic pain and to assess the potential therapeutic effects of rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, in the IC of rats with neuropathic pain. Mechanical allodynia was assessed in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats after neuropathic surgery and following microinjections of rapamycin into the IC on postoperative days (PODs) 3 and 7. Optical recording was conducted to observe the neural responses of the IC to peripheral stimulation. Rapamycin reduced mechanical allodynia and downregulated the expression of postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), decreased neural excitability in the IC, thereby inhibiting neuropathic pain-induced synaptic plasticity. These findings suggest that mTOR signaling in the IC may be a critical molecular mechanism modulating neuropathic pain. PMID:28377693

  3. Managing Neuropathic Pain in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Disorders of the somatosensory system such as neuropathic pain are common in people with chronic neurologic and musculoskeletal diseases, yet these conditions remain an underappreciated morbidity in veterinary patients. This is likely because assessment of neuropathic pain in people relies heavily on self-reporting, something our veterinary patients are not able to do. The development of neuropathic pain is a complex phenomenon, and concepts related to it are frequently not addressed in the standard veterinary medical curriculum such that veterinarians may not recognize this as a potential problem in patients. The goals of this review are to discuss basic concepts in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, provide definitions for common clinical terms used in association with the condition, and discuss pharmacological treatment options for dogs with neuropathic pain. The development of neuropathic pain involves key mechanisms such as ectopic afferent nerve activity, peripheral sensitization, central sensitization, impaired inhibitory modulation, and pathologic activation of microglia. Treatments aimed at reducing neuropathic pain are targeted at one or more of these mechanisms. Several drugs are commonly used in the veterinary clinical setting to treat neuropathic pain. These include gabapentin, pregabalin, amantadine, and amitriptyline. Proposed mechanisms of action for each drug, and known pharmacokinetic profiles in dogs are discussed. Strong evidence exists in the human literature for the utility of most of these treatments, but clinical veterinary-specific literature is currently limited. Future studies should focus on objective methods to document neuropathic pain and monitor response to therapy in veterinary patients. PMID:26942185

  4. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andrew M; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-08-05

    Neuropathic pain is a significant unmet medical need in patients with variety of injury or disease insults to the nervous system. Neuropathic pain often presents as a painful sensation described as electrical, burning, or tingling. Currently available treatments have limited effectiveness and narrow therapeutic windows for safety. More powerful analgesics, e.g., opioids, carry a high risk for chemical dependence. Thus, a major challenge for pain research is the elucidation of the mechanisms that underlie neuropathic pain and developing targeted strategies to alleviate pathological pain. The mechanistic link between dendritic spine structure and circuit function could explain why neuropathic pain is difficult to treat, since nociceptive processing pathways are adversely "hard-wired" through the reorganization of dendritic spines. Several studies in animal models of neuropathic pain have begun to reveal the functional contribution of dendritic spine dysgenesis in neuropathic pain. Previous reports have demonstrated three primary changes in dendritic spine structure on nociceptive dorsal horn neurons following injury or disease, which accompany chronic intractable pain: (I) increased density of dendritic spines, particularly mature mushroom-spine spines, (II) redistribution of spines toward dendritic branch locations close to the cell body, and (III) enlargement of the spine head diameter, which generally presents as a mushroom-shaped spine. Given the important functional implications of spine distribution, density, and shape for synaptic and neuronal function, the study of dendritic spine abnormality may provide a new perspective for investigating pain, and the identification of specific molecular players that regulate spine morphology may guide the development of more effective and long-lasting therapies.

  5. Sodium channel blockers in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Kalso, Eija

    2005-01-01

    Subtypes of tetrodotoxin resistant voltage-gated sodium channels are involved in the development of certain types of neuropathic pains. After nerve injury hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing develop at the site of injury and also in the dorsal root ganglion cell bodies. This hyperexcitability results at least partly from accumulation of sodium channels at the site of injury. The facts that these sodium channels seem to exist in peripheral nerves only and that they can be blocked at the resting state (use-dependent block) offer the possibility to develop drugs, which selectively block these damaged, overexcited nerves. At the moment no such drugs are available. However, some of the most potent drugs that are currently used to manage neuropathic pain e.g. amitriptyline and other tricyclic antidepressants, also block these channels in addition to having several other mechanisms of action. Also most anticonvulsants that are used to alleviate neuropathic pain are sodium channel blockers. Lidocaine, the prototype drug, has been shown to be effective in peripheral neuropathic pain. Its use is limited by the fact that it cannot be administered orally. An oral local anesthetic type sodium channel blocker, mexiletine is an antiarrhythmic agent that is effective in neuropathic pain. However, effective doses may be difficult to achieve because of adverse effects.

  6. Memantine (Namenda) for neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Mailien; Rasheed, Atif; Moradimehr, Abdolali; Baumrucker, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is common in the palliative care population; unless adequately treated, the pain can lead to chronic anxiety, depression, and social impairment. Many treatments have been proposed for neuropathic pain; however, it remains underdiagnosed, under-treated, and often requires long-term therapy with risk of adverse effects. Memantine (Namenda), an N-Methyl, D-aspartate receptor inhibitor currently marketed for the treatment of dementia, has been proposed as a medication for the treatment of neuropathic pain for its mechanism, safety, lack of serious adverse effects, and relatively rapid onset of action. However, clinical trials have not been promising so far and its routine use in neuropathic pain is not currently recommended.

  7. Placebo, nocebo, and neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Vase, Lene; Skyt, Ina; Hall, Kathryn T.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, the apparent increase in placebo responses in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of neuropathic pain have complicated and potentially limited development and availability of new effective pain medication. Placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia effects are well described in nociceptive and idiopathic pain conditions, but less is known about the magnitude and mechanisms of placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain. In neuropathic pain, placebo treatments have primarily been used as control conditions for active agents under investigation in RCTs and these placebo responses are typically not controlled for the natural history of pain and other confounding factors. Recently, mechanistic studies that control for the natural history of pain have investigated placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain in their own right. Large placebo analgesia but no nocebo hyperalgesic effects have been found, and the underlying mechanisms are beginning to be elucidated. Here we review placebo and nocebo effects and the underlying mechanisms in neuropathic pain and compare them with those of nociceptive and idiopathic pain. This allows for a novel discussion on how knowledge of psychological, neurobiological, and genetic factors underlying well-controlled placebo effects may help improve the information that can be obtained from and potentially restore the utility of RCTs. PMID:26785162

  8. Placebo, nocebo, and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Vase, Lene; Skyt, Ina; Hall, Kathryn T

    2016-02-01

    Over the last decade, the apparent increase in placebo responses in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of neuropathic pain have complicated and potentially limited development and availability of new effective pain medication. Placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia effects are well described in nociceptive and idiopathic pain conditions, but less is known about the magnitude and mechanisms of placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain. In neuropathic pain, placebo treatments have primarily been used as control conditions for active agents under investigation in RCTs and these placebo responses are typically not controlled for the natural history of pain and other confounding factors. Recently, mechanistic studies that control for the natural history of pain have investigated placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain in their own right. Large placebo analgesia but no nocebo hyperalgesic effects have been found, and the underlying mechanisms are beginning to be elucidated. Here we review placebo and nocebo effects and the underlying mechanisms in neuropathic pain and compare them with those of nociceptive and idiopathic pain. This allows for a novel discussion on how knowledge of psychological, neurobiological, and genetic factors underlying well-controlled placebo effects may help improve the information that can be obtained from and potentially restore the utility of RCTs.

  9. Diabetic neuropathic pain: Physiopathology and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Anne K; Nones, Carina FM; Reis, Renata C; Chichorro, Juliana G; Cunha, Joice M

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, which affects over 90% of the diabetic patients. Although pain is one of the main symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, its pathophysiological mechanisms are not yet fully known. It is widely accepted that the toxic effects of hyperglycemia play an important role in the development of this complication, but several other hypotheses have been postulated. The management of diabetic neuropathic pain consists basically in excluding other causes of painful peripheral neuropathy, improving glycemic control as a prophylactic therapy and using medications to alleviate pain. First line drugs for pain relief include anticonvulsants, such as pregabalin and gabapentin and antidepressants, especially those that act to inhibit the reuptake of serotonin and noradrenaline. In addition, there is experimental and clinical evidence that opioids can be helpful in pain control, mainly if associated with first line drugs. Other agents, including for topical application, such as capsaicin cream and lidocaine patches, have also been proposed to be useful as adjuvants in the control of diabetic neuropathic pain, but the clinical evidence is insufficient to support their use. In conclusion, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying diabetic neuropathic pain will contribute to the search of new therapies, but also to the improvement of the guidelines to optimize pain control with the drugs currently available. PMID:25897354

  10. Gynecological Management of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    TU, Frank F.; HELLMAN, Kevin; BACKONJA, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Obstetrician/gynecologists often are the initial management clinicians for pelvic neuropathic pain. While treatment may require comprehensive team management and consultation with other specialists, there a few critical and basic steps that can be performed on an office visit that offer the opportunity to significantly improve quality of life in this patient population. A key first step is a thorough clinical examination to physically map the pain site and identify potentially involved nerves. Only limited evidence exists on how best to manage neuropathic pain, but generally a combination of surgical, manipulative or pharmacological methods should be considered. Experimental methods for more precisely characterizing the nature of the nerve dysfunction exist to diagnose and treat neuropathic pain, but additional scientific evidence is needed to unanimously recommend these options. In the meantime, an approach adopted from guidelines of the International Association for Study of Pain tailored for gynecological pain is suggested. PMID:21777899

  11. Food-Derived Natural Compounds for Pain Relief in Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Lim, Eun Yeong; Kim, Yun Tai

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, defined as pain caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system, is characterized by dysesthesia, hyperalgesia, and allodynia. The number of patients with this type of pain has increased rapidly in recent years. Yet, available neuropathic pain medicines have undesired side effects, such as tolerance and physical dependence, and do not fully alleviate the pain. The mechanisms of neuropathic pain are still not fully understood. Injury causes inflammation and immune responses and changed expression and activity of receptors and ion channels in peripheral nerve terminals. Additionally, neuroinflammation is a known factor in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. During neuropathic pain development, the C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) acts as an important signaling mediator. Traditional plant treatments have been used throughout the world for treating diseases. We and others have identified food-derived compounds that alleviate neuropathic pain. Here, we review the natural compounds for neuropathic pain relief, their mechanisms of action, and the potential benefits of natural compounds with antagonistic effects on GPCRs, especially those containing CCR2, for neuropathic pain treatment.

  12. Food-Derived Natural Compounds for Pain Relief in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Eun Yeong

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, defined as pain caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system, is characterized by dysesthesia, hyperalgesia, and allodynia. The number of patients with this type of pain has increased rapidly in recent years. Yet, available neuropathic pain medicines have undesired side effects, such as tolerance and physical dependence, and do not fully alleviate the pain. The mechanisms of neuropathic pain are still not fully understood. Injury causes inflammation and immune responses and changed expression and activity of receptors and ion channels in peripheral nerve terminals. Additionally, neuroinflammation is a known factor in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. During neuropathic pain development, the C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) acts as an important signaling mediator. Traditional plant treatments have been used throughout the world for treating diseases. We and others have identified food-derived compounds that alleviate neuropathic pain. Here, we review the natural compounds for neuropathic pain relief, their mechanisms of action, and the potential benefits of natural compounds with antagonistic effects on GPCRs, especially those containing CCR2, for neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:27891521

  13. The endocannabinoid system and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Rafael; Baños, Josep Eladi; Cabañero, David

    2016-02-01

    The research of new therapeutic strategies for neuropathic pain represents a major current priority. Important drawbacks to advance in the development of these therapies are the limited translational value of the animal models now available and the elucidation of the complex neuronal and immune pathophysiological mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain. One of the neurotransmitter systems participating in neuropathic pain control that has recently raised a particular interest is the endocannabinoid system. This system is highly expressed in neurons and immune cells, and it plays a crucial role in the development of neuropathic pain. Preclinical studies have provided important findings, revealing the potential interest of the endocannabinoid system for the treatment of neuropathic pain. These studies have reported the analgesic effects of cannabinoid agonists in multiple neuropathic pain models, and they have identified specific targets within this system to develop more effective and safe analgesic compounds. However, further studies using more relevant neuropathic pain animal models are required to confirm these interesting results. Several clinical studies suggest that cannabinoids significantly reduced neuropathic pain, although most of these trials fail the required standards of quality. The different pain patient populations included in the systematic reviews also make it difficult to get adequate conclusions. Therefore, additional clinical trials that consider an adequate number of patients, the use active treatments as controls, and longer duration of administration are required to have an adequate profile of the effectiveness and safety of cannabinoids in neuropathic pain.

  14. Pregabalin in Neuropathic Pain: Evidences and Possible Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek; Singh, Nirmal; Singh Jaggi, Amteshwar

    2014-01-01

    Pregabalin is an antagonist of voltage gated Ca2+ channels and specifically binds to alpha-2-delta subunit to produce antiepileptic and analgesic actions. It successfully alleviates the symptoms of various types of neuropathic pain and presents itself as a first line therapeutic agent with remarkable safety and efficacy. Preclinical studies in various animal models of neuropathic pain have shown its effectiveness in treating the symptoms like allodynia and hyperalgesia. Clinical studies in different age groups and in different types of neuropathic pain (peripheral diabetic neuropathy, fibromyalgia, post-herpetic neuralgia, cancer chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain) have projected it as the most effective agent either as monotherapy or in combined regimens in terms of cost effectiveness, tolerability and overall improvement in neuropathic pain states. Preclinical studies employing pregabalin in different neuropathic pain models have explored various molecular targets and the signaling systems including Ca2+ channel-mediated neurotransmitter release, activation of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), potassium channels and inhibition of pathways involving inflammatory mediators. The present review summarizes the important aspects of pregabalin as analgesic in preclinical and clinical studies as well as focuses on the possible mechanisms. PMID:24533015

  15. Intrathecal ziconotide for neuropathic pain: a review.

    PubMed

    Rauck, Richard L; Wallace, Mark S; Burton, Allen W; Kapural, Leonardo; North, James M

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a considerable burden that affects activities of daily living. The management of neuropathic pain can be challenging because of multiple etiologies and complex manifestations. Ziconotide is a nonopioid intrathecal (IT) analgesic option for patients with neuropathic pain refractory to conventional treatments. The objective of this article is to review the published literature on ziconotide for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Relevant publications were identified through searches of all years of 6 databases, which included PubMed, EMBASE, and CINAHL. Search terms used were ziconotide, SNX-111, MVIIA, Prialt, and neuropathic pain. Publications were included if ziconotide was intrathecally administered (either alone or in combination with other IT agents) to treat neuropathic pain of any etiology and if pain assessment was an outcome measure. Data extracted included study design, IT drug doses, pain outcome measures, and adverse events (AEs). Twenty-eight articles met the inclusion criteria: 5 were preclinical studies and 23 were clinical studies. In the preclinical studies, ziconotide demonstrated antiallodynic effects on neuropathic pain. Data from double-blind, placebo-controlled (DBPC) trials indicated that patients with neuropathic pain reported a mean percent improvement in pain score with ziconotide monotherapy that ranged from 15.7% to 31.6%. A low starting dose and slow titration of ziconotide resulted in an improved safety profile in the aforementioned trials. Common AEs associated with ziconotide include nausea and/or vomiting, dizziness, confusion, urinary retention, and somnolence. Evidence from DBPC trials, open-label studies, case series, and case studies suggests that ziconotide, as either monotherapy or in combination with other IT drugs, is a potential therapeutic option for patients with refractory neuropathic pain. Additional studies are needed to establish the long-term efficacy and safety of ziconotide for neuropathic pain.

  16. A novel substituted aminoquinoline selectively targets voltage-sensitive sodium channel isoforms and NMDA receptor subtypes and alleviates chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tabakoff, Boris; Ren, Wenhua; Vanderlinden, Lauren; Snell, Lawrence D; Matheson, Christopher J; Wang, Ze-Jun; Levinson, Rock; Smothers, C Thetford; Woodward, John J; Honse, Yumiko; Lovinger, David; Rush, Anthony M; Sather, William A; Gustafson, Daniel L; Hoffman, Paula L

    2016-08-05

    Recent understanding of the systems that mediate complex disease states, has generated a search for molecules that simultaneously modulate more than one component of a pathologic pathway. Chronic pain syndromes are etiologically connected to functional changes (sensitization) in both peripheral sensory neurons and in the central nervous system (CNS). These functional changes involve modifications of a significant number of components of signal generating, signal transducing and signal propagating pathways. Our analysis of disease-related changes which take place in sensory neurons during sensitization led to the design of a molecule that would simultaneously inhibit peripheral NMDA receptors and voltage sensitive sodium channels. In the current report, we detail the selectivity of N,N-(diphenyl)-4-ureido-5,7-dichloro-2-carboxy-quinoline (DCUKA) for action at NMDA receptors composed of different subunit combinations and voltage sensitive sodium channels having different α subunits. We show that DCUKA is restricted to the periphery after oral administration, and that circulating blood levels are compatible with its necessary concentrations for effects at the peripheral cognate receptors/channels that were assayed in vitro. Our results demonstrate that DCUKA, at concentrations circulating in the blood after oral administration, can modulate systems which are upregulated during peripheral sensitization, and are important for generating and conducting pain information to the CNS. Furthermore, we demonstrate that DCUKA ameliorates the hyperalgesia of chronic pain without affecting normal pain responses in neuropathic and inflammation-induced chronic pain models.

  17. Chronic Neuropathic Pain: It's about the Rhythm.

    PubMed

    Alshelh, Zeynab; Di Pietro, Flavia; Youssef, Andrew M; Reeves, Jenna M; Macey, Paul M; Vickers, E Russell; Peck, Christopher C; Murray, Greg M; Henderson, Luke A

    2016-01-20

    The neural mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of chronic neuropathic pain remain unclear. Evidence from human investigations suggests that neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic burst firing and thalamocortical dysrhythmia. Additionally, experimental animal investigations show that neuropathic pain is associated with altered infra-slow (<0.1 Hz) frequency oscillations within the dorsal horn and somatosensory thalamus. The aim of this investigation was to determine whether, in humans, neuropathic pain was also associated with altered infra-slow oscillations within the ascending "pain" pathway. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that individuals with orofacial neuropathic pain have increased infra-slow oscillatory activity throughout the ascending pain pathway, including within the spinal trigeminal nucleus, somatosensory thalamus, thalamic reticular nucleus, and primary somatosensory cortex. Furthermore, these infra-slow oscillations were temporally coupled across these multiple sites and occurred at frequencies similar to calcium waves in activated astrocytes. The region encompassing the spinal trigeminal nucleus also displayed increased regional homogeneity, consistent with a local spread of neural activity by astrocyte activation. In contrast, no increase in oscillatory behavior within the ascending pain pathway occurred during acute noxious stimuli in healthy individuals. These data reveal increased oscillatory activity within the ascending pain pathway that likely underpins increased thalamocortical oscillatory activity, a self-sustaining thalamocortical dysrhythmia, and the constant perception of pain. Significance statement: Chronic neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic firing and thalamocortical dysrhythmia. The mechanisms responsible for these changes remain unknown. In this study, we report in individuals with neuropathic pain increased oscillatory neural activity within the

  18. Analgesic Microneedle Patch for Neuropathic Pain Therapy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xi; Pascual, Conrado; Lieu, Christopher; Oh, Seajin; Wang, Ji; Zou, Bende; Xie, Julian; Li, Zhaohui; Xie, James; Yeomans, David C; Wu, Mei X; Xie, Xinmin Simon

    2017-01-24

    Neuropathic pain caused by nerve injury is debilitating and difficult to treat. Current systemic pharmacological therapeutics for neuropathic pain produce limited pain relief and have undesirable side effects, while current local anesthetics tend to nonspecifically block both sensory and motor functions. Calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide released from sensory nerve endings, appears to play a significant role in chronic neuropathic pain. In this study, an analgesic microneedle (AMN) patch was developed using dissolvable microneedles to transdermally deliver selective CGRP antagonist peptide in a painless manner for the treatment of localized neuropathic pain. Local analgesic effects were evaluated in rats by testing behavioral pain sensitivity in response to thermal and mechanical stimuli using neuropathic pain models such as spared-nerve injury and diabetic neuropathy pain, as well as neurogenic inflammatory pain model induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. Unlike several conventional therapies, the AMN patches produced effective analgesia on neuropathic pain without disturbing the normal nociception and motor function of the rat, resulting from the high specificity of the delivered peptide against CGRP receptors. The AMN patches did not cause skin irritation or systemic side effects. These results demonstrate that dissolvable microneedle patches delivering CGRP antagonist peptide provide an effective, safe, and simple approach to mitigate neuropathic pain with significant advantages over current treatments.

  19. Neuropathic Pain in Children: Special Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Walco, Gary A.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Krane, Elliot J.; LeBel, Alyssa A.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is relatively uncommon in children. Although some syndromes closely resemble those found in adults, the incidence and course of the condition can vary substantially in children, depending on developmental status and contextual factors. There are some neuropathic pain syndromes that are rare and relatively unique to the pediatric population. This article discusses the array of neuropathic pain conditions in children and available treatment strategies. Data are limited by small numbers and few randomized controlled trials. Research and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:20194147

  20. Ranolazine attenuates behavioral signs of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Gould, Harry J; Garrett, Colleen; Donahue, Renee R; Paul, Dennis; Diamond, Ivan; Taylor, Bradley K

    2009-12-01

    Ranolazine modulates the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV 1.5) and is approved by the FDA in the treatment of ischemic heart disease. Ranolazine also targets neuronal (NaV 1.7, 1.8) isoforms that are implicated in neuropathic pain. Therefore, we determined the analgesic efficacy of ranolazine in a preclinical animal model of neuropathic pain. Both intraperitoneal and oral administration of ranolazine dose-dependently inhibited the mechanical and cold allodynia associated with spared nerve injury, without producing ataxia or other behavioral side effects. These data warrant clinical investigation of the potential use of ranolazine in the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  1. P2X4R+ microglia drive neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Simon; Trang, Tuan; Salter, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, the most debilitating of all clinical pain syndromes, may be a consequence of trauma, infection or pathology from diseases that affect peripheral nerves. Here we provide a framework for understanding the spinal mechanisms of neuropathic pain as distinct from those of acute pain or inflammatory pain. Recent work suggests that a specific microglia response phenotype characterized by de novo expression of the purinergic receptor P2X4 is critical for the pathogenesis of pain hypersensitivity caused by injury to peripheral nerves. Stimulating P2X4 receptors initiates a core pain signaling pathway mediated by release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which produces a disinhibitory increase in intracellular chloride in nociceptive (pain-transmitting) neurons in the spinal dorsal horn. The changes caused by signaling from P2X4R+ microglia to nociceptive transmission neurons may account for the main symptoms of neuropathic pain in humans, and they point to specific interventions to alleviate this debilitating condition. PMID:22837036

  2. Cytokines in Neuropathic Pain and Associated Depression.

    PubMed

    Lees, Justin G; Fivelman, Brett; Duffy, Samuel S; Makker, Preet G S; Perera, Chamini J; Moalem-Taylor, Gila

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain occurs as a result of lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory nervous system and is present in a diverse set of peripheral and central pathologies such as nerve trauma, diabetic neuropathy, post-herpetic neuralgia, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis. Debilitating symptoms including allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain have a substantial negative impact on patients' quality of life. The currently available therapeutic treatments are generally ineffective and characterised by poor response rates. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuroinflammation and cytokine signalling play a critical role in neuropathic pain. Numerous experimental studies have demonstrated that certain pro-inflammatory cytokines are elevated in neuropathic pain conditions, and administration of these cytokines can elicit pain hypersensitivity in the absence of injury or disease. This phenomenon is also apparent in the 'sickness response', which encompasses a broad inflammatory response to disease and injury and involves a series of physiological and behavioural changes including pain hypersensitivity. Interestingly, the 'sickness response' is also similar in nature to some of the defining characteristics of the depressed state of affective disorder. In this review, we explore links that may relate the co-existence of depression in neuropathic pain patients with the activity of cytokines and discuss the role of several key pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in neuropathic pain.

  3. Stem cell therapy for neuropathic pain treatment

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalco, D; Rossi, F; Maione, S

    2007-01-01

    Pain initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction in the nervous system is defined as neuropathic pain. About 75 -150 million people in the United States are suffering for chronic pain disorder. Neuropathic pain has a great impact on the human wellbeing. It is very debilitating and often has an associated degree of depression that contributes to decreasing the quality of life. Moreover, the management of chronic pain is costly to the health care system. Pain is a national healthcare priority in US: the United States Congress has declared the present decade (2001-2010) as the “Decade of Pain Control and Research”. Neuropathic pain is a very complex disease, involving several molecular pathways. Due to its individual character, its treatment is extremely difficult. Current available drugs are usually not acting on the several mechanisms underlying the generation and propagation of pain. Nowadays, pain research is focusing on newer molecular ways, such as stem cell therapy, gene therapy, and viral vectors for delivery of biologic anti-nociceptive molecules. These methods could provide a new therapeutic approach to neuropathic pain relief. PMID:24693013

  4. [Non pharmacologic treatment of neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Guastella, Virginie; Mick, Gérard; Laurent, Bernard

    2008-02-01

    Nondrug treatments of neuropathic pain should always begin at the same time as pharmacologic treatment. There are three types of nondrug treatment for neuropathic pain: physical, surgical, and "psychocorporal" and psychotherapeutic treatment. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a simple physical treatment that strengthens local inhibitory controls and is indicated in focal neuropathic pain when upstream stimulation is possible for a superficial sensitive nerve trunk. Destructive surgery is represented today by "DREZotomy", destruction of nociceptive fibers and their dorsal root entry zones. It is indicated essentially in intractable pain due to plexus avulsion. Functional surgery is implanted electric stimulation--either spinal or central (encephalic)--of structures that exert inhibitory control on the pain pathways. Spinal stimulation is performed at the level of the posterior spinal cord and is indicated essentially in segmental mononeuropathies refractory to drug treatment. Central stimulation is performed at the motor cortex and is indicated for refractory central pain. "Psychocorporal" techniques (relaxation, sophrology, hypnosis) are useful to reduce anxiety and neurovegetative hypertonicity, both factors that aggravate neuropathic pain.

  5. Emerging Relationships between Exercise, Sensory Nerves, and Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Michael A.; Kluding, Patricia M.; Wright, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of physical activity as a therapeutic tool is rapidly growing in the medical community and the role exercise may offer in the alleviation of painful disease states is an emerging research area. The development of neuropathic pain is a complex mechanism, which clinicians and researchers are continually working to better understand. The limited therapies available for alleviation of these pain states are still focused on pain abatement and as opposed to treating underlying mechanisms. The continued research into exercise and pain may address these underlying mechanisms, but the mechanisms which exercise acts through are still poorly understood. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of how the peripheral nervous system responds to exercise, the relationship of inflammation and exercise, and experimental and clinical use of exercise to treat pain. Although pain is associated with many conditions, this review highlights pain associated with diabetes as well as experimental studies on nerve damages-associated pain. Because of the global effects of exercise across multiple organ systems, exercise intervention can address multiple problems across the entire nervous system through a single intervention. This is a double-edged sword however, as the global interactions of exercise also require in depth investigations to include and identify the many changes that can occur after physical activity. A continued investment into research is necessary to advance the adoption of physical activity as a beneficial remedy for neuropathic pain. The following highlights our current understanding of how exercise alters pain, the varied pain models used to explore exercise intervention, and the molecular pathways leading to the physiological and pathological changes following exercise intervention. PMID:27601974

  6. Imaging Biomarkers and the Role of Neuroinflammation in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Linda; Cooper, Mark S.; Clark, Vincent P.

    2013-01-01

    The papers from this thematic issue followed a translational research workshop, Imaging Neuroinflammation and Neuropathic Pain, that focused on the search for neuroimaging biomarkers to assess neuroinflammation associated with neuropathic pain. The topics covered in this issue include overviews of the historical and current knowledge regarding neuropathic pain, the potential mechanisms involved, the often under-recognized clinical presentations that can delay diagnosis, the various neuroimaging techniques that have been applied to evaluate neuropathic pain and neuroinflammation, to case series illustrating novel treatments of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, the use of telemedicine to disseminate knowledge and improve the diagnosis and treatment of pain syndromes is also discussed. PMID:23666404

  7. Concise Review: Stem Cell Therapies for Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Fortino, Veronica R.; Pelaez, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic condition that is heterogeneous in nature and has different causes. Different from and more burdensome than nociceptive pain, neuropathic pain more severely affects people's quality of life. Understanding the various mechanisms of the onset and progression of neuropathic pain is important in the development of an effective treatment. Research is being done to replace current pharmacological treatments with cellular therapies that will have longer lasting effects. Stem cells present an exciting potential therapy for neuropathic pain. In this review, we describe the neuroprotective effects of stem cells along with special emphasis on the current translational research using stem cells to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:23572051

  8. Update on pharmacotherapy guidelines for treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J Mark

    2007-06-01

    Neuropathic pain encompasses a myriad of painful disease states that are often hard to treat, especially with one single medication. In the comprehensive treatment of neuropathic pain, the concept of complex polypharmacy is a rational approach, accompanied by physical and mental health therapies. Medications primarily used for neuropathic pain generally fall into the categories of anticonvulsants, antidepressants, opioids, and topical agents. Generally, most first-line medications used today show a response rate of approximately 30% to 50% reduction in pain in up to 50% of patients treated. There is no "gold standard" in regard to one medication for neuropathic pain. Some new medications have emerged during the past few years that help to augment the armamentarium of medications used in neuropathic pain. This paper reviews the definition of neuropathic pain and introduces the reader to the evidence-based literature on these new medications available for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  9. CXCL13 drives spinal astrocyte activation and neuropathic pain via CXCR5.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bao-Chun; Cao, De-Li; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; He, Li-Na; Li, Chun-Hua; Zhang, Wen-Wen; Wu, Xiao-Bo; Berta, Temugin; Ji, Ru-Rong; Gao, Yong-Jing

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have implicated chemokines in microglial activation and pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. C-X-C motif chemokine 13 (CXCL13) is a B lymphocyte chemoattractant that activates CXCR5. Using the spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model of neuropathic pain, we found that CXCL13 was persistently upregulated in spinal cord neurons after SNL, resulting in spinal astrocyte activation via CXCR5 in mice. shRNA-mediated inhibition of CXCL13 in the spinal cord persistently attenuated SNL-induced neuropathic pain. Interestingly, CXCL13 expression was suppressed by miR-186-5p, a microRNA that colocalized with CXCL13 and was downregulated after SNL. Spinal overexpression of miR-186-5p decreased CXCL13 expression, alleviating neuropathic pain. Furthermore, SNL induced CXCR5 expression in spinal astrocytes, and neuropathic pain was abrogated in Cxcr5-/- mice. CXCR5 expression induced by SNL was required for the SNL-induced activation of spinal astrocytes and microglia. Intrathecal injection of CXCL13 was sufficient to induce pain hypersensitivity and astrocyte activation via CXCR5 and ERK. Finally, intrathecal injection of CXCL13-activated astrocytes induced mechanical allodynia in naive mice. Collectively, our findings reveal a neuronal/astrocytic interaction in the spinal cord by which neuronally produced CXCL13 activates astrocytes via CXCR5 to facilitate neuropathic pain. Thus, miR-186-5p and CXCL13/CXCR5-mediated astrocyte signaling may be suitable therapeutic targets for neuropathic pain.

  10. Anticytokine therapy in neuropathic pain management.

    PubMed

    Schäfers, Maria; Sommer, Claudia

    2007-11-01

    Cytokine activation or dysregulation is implied in a variety of painful disease states. Numerous experimental studies provide evidence that proinflammatory cytokines induce or facilitate neuropathic pain. Cytokine levels are rapidly and markedly upregulated in the peripheral nerves, dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord and in particular regions of the brain, after peripheral nerve injuries. Direct receptor-mediated actions on afferent nerve fibers as well as cytokine effects involving further mediators have been reported. Whereas direct application of exogenous proinflammatory cytokines induces pain, blockade of these cytokines or application of anti-inflammatory cytokines reduces pain behavior in most experimental paradigms. Cytokine measurements may identify patients at risk of developing chronic pain associated with their neuropathic conditions, as in the examples of peripheral neuropathies and postherpetic neuralgia. Anticytokine agents currently on the market are effective for the treatment of mostly inflammatory pain conditions, and are starting to be introduced for neuropathic pain states; however, their use is limited by potential life-threatening complications. Owing to the pleiotropy and redundancy of the cytokine system, the successful approach may not be inhibition of one particular cytokine but strategies shifting the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in properly selected patients. Agents that specifically target downstream signaling molecules may provide hope for safer and more specific therapies.

  11. Role of Nucleus Accumbens in Neuropathic Pain: Linked Multi-Scale Evidence in the Rat Transitioning to Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pei-Ching; Pollema-Mays, Sarah Lynn; Centeno, Maria Virginia; Procissi, Daniel; Contini, Massimos; Baria, Alex Tomas; Martina, Macro; Apkarian, Apkar Vania

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent evidence implicating the nucleus accumbens (NAc) as causally involved in the transition to chronic pain in humans, underlying mechanisms of this involvement remain entirely unknown. Here we elucidate mechanisms of NAc reorganizational properties (longitudinally and cross-sectionally), in an animal model of neuropathic pain (spared nerve injury, SNI). We observed inter-related changes: 1) In resting-state fMRI, functional connectivity of the NAc to dorsal striatum and cortex was reduced 28 days (but not 5 days) after SNI; 2) contralateral to SNI injury, gene expression of NAc dopamine 1A, 2, and κ-opioid receptors decreased 28 days after SNI; 3) In SNI (but not sham) covariance of gene expression was upregulated at 5 days and settled to a new state at 28 days; and 4) NAc functional connectivity correlated with dopamine receptor gene expression and with tactile allodynia. Moreover, interruption of NAc activity (via lidocaine infusion) reversibly alleviated neuropathic pain in SNI animals. Together, these results demonstrate macroscopic (fMRI) and molecular reorganization of NAc and indicate that NAc neuronal activity is necessary for full expression of neuropathic pain-like behavior. PMID:24607959

  12. Role of nucleus accumbens in neuropathic pain: linked multi-scale evidence in the rat transitioning to neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pei-Ching; Pollema-Mays, Sarah Lynn; Centeno, Maria Virginia; Procissi, Daniel; Contini, Massimo; Baria, Alex Tomas; Martina, Marco; Apkarian, Apkar Vania

    2014-06-01

    Despite recent evidence implicating the nucleus accumbens (NAc) as causally involved in the transition to chronic pain in humans, underlying mechanisms of this involvement remain entirely unknown. Here we elucidate mechanisms of NAc reorganizational properties (longitudinally and cross-sectionally), in an animal model of neuropathic pain (spared nerve injury [SNI]). We observed interrelated changes: (1) In resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), functional connectivity of the NAc to dorsal striatum and cortex was reduced 28days (but not 5days) after SNI; (2) Contralateral to SNI injury, gene expression of NAc dopamine 1A, 2, and κ-opioid receptors decreased 28days after SNI; (3) In SNI (but not sham), covariance of gene expression was upregulated at 5days and settled to a new state at 28days; and (4) NAc functional connectivity correlated with dopamine receptor gene expression and with tactile allodynia. Moreover, interruption of NAc activity (via lidocaine infusion) reversibly alleviated neuropathic pain in SNI animals. Together, these results demonstrate macroscopic (fMRI) and molecular reorganization of NAc and indicate that NAc neuronal activity is necessary for full expression of neuropathic pain-like behavior.

  13. Spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wolter, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain constitutes a significant portion of chronic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain are usually more heavily burdened than patients with nociceptive pain. They suffer more often from insomnia, anxiety, and depression. Moreover, analgesic medication often has an insufficient effect on neuropathic pain. Spinal cord stimulation constitutes a therapy alternative that, to date, remains underused. In the last 10 to 15 years, it has undergone constant technical advancement. This review gives an overview of the present practice of spinal cord stimulation for chronic neuropathic pain and current developments such as high-frequency stimulation and peripheral nerve field stimulation. PMID:25429237

  14. Multidimensional Neuropathic Pain Phenotypes after Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Widerström-Noga, Eva; Felix, Elizabeth R; Adcock, James P; Escalona, Maydelis; Tibbett, Jacqueline

    2016-03-01

    Identifying clinical neuropathic pain phenotypes is a first step to better understand the underlying pain mechanisms after spinal cord injury (SCI). The primary purpose of the present study was to characterize multidimensional neuropathic pain phenotypes based on quantitative sensory testing (QST), pain intensity, and utilization of catastrophizing coping strategies. Thermal perception, thermal pain, and vibratory perception thresholds were assessed above and below the level of injury (LOI) in 101 persons with SCI and neuropathic pain, 18 persons with SCI and no neuropathic pain, and 50 able-bodied, pain-free controls. Cluster analysis of QST z-scores below the LOI, pain intensity ratings, and the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ) catastrophizing subscale scores in subjects with neuropathic pain resulted in two phenotypes: severe neuropathic pain (SNP) with greater pain intensity (7.39 ± 1.57) and thermal and vibratory sensitivity compared with the moderate neuropathic pain (MNP; 5.40 ± 1.43). A factor analysis including all CSQ subscales, the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI) total score, and thermal pain sensitivity above and below the LOI resulted in three factors: (1) adaptive pain coping including increasing activities, diverting attention, and reinterpreting pain sensations; (2) catastrophizing, neuropathic pain, and thermal sensitivity including greater NPSI total score, thermal pain sensitivity below the LOI, and catastrophizing; and (3) general pain sensitivity including greater thermal pain sensitivity above the LOI and lower catastrophizing. Our results suggest that neuropathic pain symptom severity post-SCI is significantly associated with residual spinothalamic tract function below the LOI and catastrophizing pain coping.

  15. Pain Part 5a: Chronic (Neuropathic) Orofacial Pain.

    PubMed

    Renton, Tara; Kahwaja, Nadine

    2015-10-01

    Neuropathic pain is a significant social and economic burden. Back pain, joint pain and headaches affect over 30% of the population. Chronic orofacial pain is a common condition and is difficult to diagnose and manage. This two-part paper aims to provide an overview of novel understanding of neuropathic pain, and furnish clinical teams with an update on the less common and less well-recognized chronic orofacial conditions. Headaches and temporomandibular disorders are the most common conditions and are covered in separate papers (6 and 10). Trigeminal neuralgia, burning mouth, and trigeminal autonomic cephalgias are also covered in separate papers (7, 8 and 9). The remaining conditions: post-traumatic neuropathy (nerve injury); and persistent idiopathic facial pain and atypical odontalgia are discussed in this and the following paper. Clinical Relevance: Neuropathic pain, though rare, is a consequence of dental treatment. Nerve injury in relation to M3M surgery, dental implants, endodontics and local anaesthesia result in 70% of affected patients experiencing chronic neuropathic pain.

  16. An Epidemiological Study of Neuropathic Pain Symptoms in Canadian Adults

    PubMed Central

    VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G.; Mann, Elizabeth G.; Torrance, Nicola; Smith, Blair H.; Johnson, Ana; Gilron, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The reported prevalence of neuropathic pain ranges from 6.9% to 10%; however the only Canadian study reported 17.9%. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology of neuropathic pain in Canada. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a random sample of Canadian adults. The response rate was 21.1% (1504/7134). Likely or possible neuropathic pain was defined using a neuropathic pain-related diagnosis and a positive outcome on the Self-Report Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale (S-LANSS) or the Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4) Questions. The prevalence of likely neuropathic pain was 1.9% (S-LANSS) and 3.4% (DN4) and that of possible neuropathic pain was 5.8% (S-LANSS) and 8.1% (DN4). Neuropathic pain was highest in economically disadvantaged males. There is a significant burden of neuropathic pain in Canada. The low response rate and a slightly older and less educated sample than the Canadian population may have led to an overestimate of neuropathic pain. Population prevalence varies by screening tool used, indicating more work is needed to develop reliable measures. Population level screening targeted towards high risk groups should improve the sensitivity and specificity of screening, while clinical examination of those with positive screening results will further refine the estimate of prevalence. PMID:27445636

  17. Enhancing m currents: a way out for neuropathic pain?

    PubMed

    Rivera-Arconada, Ivan; Roza, Carolina; Lopez-Garcia, Jose A

    2009-01-01

    Almost three decades ago, the M current was identified and characterized in frog sympathetic neurons (Brown and Adams, 1980). The years following this discovery have seen a huge progress in the understanding of the function and the pharmacology of this current as well as on the structure of the underlying ion channels. Therapies for a number of syndromes involving abnormal levels of excitability in neurons are benefiting from research on M currents. At present, the potential of M current openers as analgesics for neuropathic pain is under discussion. Here we offer a critical view of existing data on the involvement of M currents in pain processing. We believe that enhancement of M currents at the site of injury may become a powerful strategy to alleviate pain in some peripheral neuropathies.

  18. Altered Resting State in Diabetic Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cauda, Franco; Sacco, Katiuscia; Duca, Sergio; Cocito, Dario; D'Agata, Federico; Geminiani, Giuliano C.; Canavero, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Background The spontaneous component of neuropathic pain (NP) has not been explored sufficiently with neuroimaging techniques, given the difficulty to coax out the brain components that sustain background ongoing pain. Here, we address for the first time the correlates of this component in an fMRI study of a group of eight patients suffering from diabetic neuropathic pain and eight healthy control subjects. Specifically, we studied the functional connectivity that is associated with spontaneous neuropathic pain with spatial independent component analysis (sICA). Principal Findings Functional connectivity analyses revealed a cortical network consisting of two anti-correlated patterns: one includes the left fusiform gyrus, the left lingual gyrus, the left inferior temporal gyrus, the right inferior occipital gyrus, the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex bilaterally, the pre and postcentral gyrus bilaterally, in which its activity is correlated negatively with pain and positively with the controls; the other includes the left precuneus, dorsolateral prefrontal, frontopolar cortex (both bilaterally), right superior frontal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, thalami, both insulae, inferior parietal lobuli, right mammillary body, and a small area in the left brainstem, in which its activity is correlated positively with pain and negatively with the controls. Furthermore, a power spectra analyses revealed group differences in the frequency bands wherein the sICA signal was decomposed: patients' spectra are shifted towards higher frequencies. Conclusion In conclusion, we have characterized here for the first time a functional network of brain areas that mark the spontaneous component of NP. Pain is the result of aberrant default mode functional connectivity. PMID:19229326

  19. Intrathecal siRNA against GPNMB attenuates nociception in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lili; Zhang, Yanfeng; Yang, Yong; Xiang, Kai; Tan, Qindong; Guo, Qulian

    2015-02-01

    Neuropathic pain is characterized by hyperalgesia, allodynia, and spontaneous pain. Recent studies have shown that glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma B (GPNMB) plays a pivotal role in neuronal survival and neuroprotection. However, the role of GPNMB in neuropathic pain remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to assess the role of GPNMB in neuropathic pain. In cultured spinal cord neurons, we used two small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the complementary DNA (cDNA) sequence of rat GPNMB that had potent inhibitory effects on GPNMB, and siRNA1-GPNMB was selected for further in vivo study as it had the higher inhibitory effect. After sciatic nerve injury in rats, the endogenous level of GPNMB was increased in a time-dependent manner in the spinal cord. Furthermore, the intrathecal injection of siRNA1-GPNMB inhibited the expression of GPNMB and pro-inflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and alleviated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of rats. Taken together, our findings suggest that siRNA against GPNMB can alleviate the chronic neuropathic pain caused by CCI, and this effect may be mediated by attenuated expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in the spinal cord of CCI rats. Therefore, inhibition of GPNMB may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  20. A single trial of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces chronic neuropathic pain following median nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hwi-Young; Suh, Hye Rim; Han, Hee Chul

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a devastating chronic condition and is often induced in the upper limb following nerve injury or damage. Various drugs or surgical methods have been used to manage neuropathic pain; however, these are frequently accompanied by undesirable side effects. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a safe and non-invasive intervention that has been used to alleviate different types of pain in the clinic, but it is unclear whether TENS can improve chronic neuropathic pain in the upper limb. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a single trial of TENS on chronic neuropathic pain following median nerve injury. Male rats weighing 200-250 g received median nerve-ligation of the right forearm, while the control group received only skin-incision without nerve-ligation. Neuropathic pain-behaviors, including mechanical, cold, and thermal allodynia, were measured for 4 weeks. After the development of chronic neuropathic pain, TENS (100 Hz, 200 µs, sub-motor threshold) or placebo-TENS (sham stimulation) was applied for 20 min to the ipsilateral or contralateral side. Neuropathic pain behavior was assessed before and after intervention. Median nerve-ligation significantly induced and maintained neuropathic pain in the ipsilateral side. TENS application to the ipsilateral side effectively attenuated the three forms of chronic neuropathic pain in the ipsilateral side compared to sham-treated rats (peripheral and central effects), while TENS application to contralateral side only reduced mechanical allodynia in the ipsilateral side (central effect). Our findings demonstrate that TENS can alleviate chronic neuropathic pain following median nerve injury.

  1. Neuropathic changes in equine laminitis pain.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emma; Viñuela-Fernandez, Ignacio; Eager, Rachel A; Delaney, Ada; Anderson, Heather; Patel, Anisha; Robertson, Darren C; Allchorne, Andrew; Sirinathsinghji, Eva C; Milne, Elspeth M; MacIntyre, Neil; Shaw, Darren J; Waran, Natalie K; Mayhew, Joe; Fleetwood-Walker, Susan M

    2007-12-05

    Laminitis is a common debilitating disease in horses that involves painful disruption of the lamellar dermo-epidermal junction within the hoof. This condition is often refractory to conventional anti-inflammatory analgesia and results in unremitting pain, which in severe cases requires euthanasia. The mechanisms underlying pain in laminitis were investigated using quantification of behavioural pain indicators in conjunction with histological studies of peripheral nerves innervating the hoof. Laminitic horses displayed consistently altered or abnormal behaviours such as increased forelimb lifting and an increased proportion of time spent at the back of the box compared to normal horses. Electron micrographic analysis of the digital nerve of laminitic horses showed peripheral nerve morphology to be abnormal, as well as having reduced numbers of unmyelinated (43.2%) and myelinated fibers (34.6%) compared to normal horses. Sensory nerve cell bodies innervating the hoof, in cervical, C8 dorsal root ganglia (DRG), showed an upregulated expression of the neuronal injury marker, activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) in both large NF-200-immunopositive neurons and small neurons that were either peripherin- or IB4-positive. A significantly increased expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) was also observed in myelinated afferent neurons. These changes are similar to those reported in other neuropathic pain states and were not observed in the C4 DRG of laminitic horses, which is not associated with innervation of the forelimb. This study provides novel evidence for a neuropathic component to the chronic pain state associated with equine laminitis, indicating that anti-neuropathic analgesic treatment may well have a role in the management of this condition.

  2. miR-155 modulates the progression of neuropathic pain through targeting SGK3

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shaoxing; Zhu, Bo; Sun, Yan; Xie, Xianfeng

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to illustrate the potential effects of miR-155 in neuropathic pain and its potential mechanism. Spragure-Dawley (SD) rats were used for neuropathic pain model of bilateral chronic constriction injury (bCCI) construction. Effects of miR-155 expression on pain threshold of mechanical stimuli (MWT), paw withdrawal threshold latency (PMTL) and cold threshold were analyzed. Target for miR-155 was analyzed using bioinformatics methods. Moreover, effects of miR-155 target gene expression on pain thresholds were also assessed. Compared with the controls and sham group, miR-155 was overexpressed in neuropathic pain rats (P<0.05), but miR-155 slicing could significantly decreased the pain thresholds (P<0.05). Serum and glucocorticoid regulated protein kinase 3 (SGK3) was predicted as the target gene for miR-155, and miR-155 expression was negatively correlated to SGK3 expression. Furthermore, SGK3 overexpression could significantly decreased the pain thresholds which was the same as miR-155 (P<0.05). Moreover, miR-155 slicing and SGK3 overexpression could significantly decrease the painthreshold. The data presented in this study suggested that miR-155 slicing could excellently alleviate neuropathic pain in rats through targeting SGK3 expression. miR-155 may be a potential therapeutic target for neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:26823753

  3. Treatment of Neuropathic Pain with Venlafaxine: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Rohit; Barkin, Robert L; Bhatia, Anurag

    2016-11-11

    OBJECTIVE : To investigate the efficacy of venlafaxine for neuropathic pain and review literature to determine if the medication provides adequate neuropathic pain relief. METHODS : Literature was reviewed on MEDLINE using various key words. These key words include: "venlafaxine and pain," "venlafaxine ER and pain," "venlafaxine XR and pain," "venlafaxine and neuropathic pain," "venlafaxine and neuropathy," "SSRI and neuropathic pain," "SSRI and neuropathy," "SNRI and neuropathic pain," "SNRI and neuropathy," "serotonin reuptake inhibitor and neuropathic pain," "serotonin reuptake inhibitor and neuropathy," "serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor and neuropathic pain" and "serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor and neuropathy." Using this guideline, 13 articles were reviewed. RESULTS : A total of 13 studies reviewed, which are organized by date and diagnosis. It is evident that in the majority of studies, when compared with a placebo, there was a clinical significant reduction in neuropathic pain relief when using venlafaxine. Additionally, one study showed even more significant pain relief when using higher doses of venlafaxine (at least 150 mg). However, when compared with alternative neuropathic medications, venlafaxine for the most part did not perform any better in terms of efficacy. CONCLUSION : In conclusion, venlafaxine is a safe and well-tolerated analgesic drug for the symptomatic treatment of neuropathic pain, and there is limited evidence that high-dose venlafaxine (150 mg/day) can be even more beneficial. While the present evidence is quite encouraging regarding venlafaxine's use for neuropathic pain, further research is needed to continue to expand on these findings, particularly when in consideration with other possible pharmacological agents.

  4. N-acetyl-cysteine attenuates neuropathic pain by suppressing matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiajie; Xu, Lujie; Deng, Xueting; Jiang, Chunyi; Pan, Cailong; Chen, Lu; Han, Yuan; Dai, Wenling; Hu, Liang; Zhang, Guangqin; Cheng, Zhixiang; Liu, Wentao

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of neuropathic pain remains a clinical challenge because of its unclear mechanisms and broad clinical morbidity. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-2 have previously been described as key components in neuropathic pain because of their facilitation of inflammatory cytokine maturation and induction of neural inflammation. Therefore, the inhibition of MMPs may represent a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of neuropathic pain. In this study, we report that N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), which is a broadly used respiratory drug, significantly attenuates neuropathic pain through a unique mechanism of MMP inhibition. Both the in vitro (0.1 mM) and in vivo application of NAC significantly suppressed the activity of MMP-9/2. Orally administered NAC (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) not only postponed the occurrence but also inhibited the maintenance of chronic constrictive injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain in rats. The administration of NAC blocked the maturation of interleukin-1β, which is a critical substrate of MMPs, and markedly suppressed the neuronal activation induced by CCI, including inhibiting the phosphorylation of protein kinase Cγ, NMDAR1, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Finally, NAC significantly inhibited CCI-induced microglia activation but elicited no notable effects on astrocytes. These results demonstrate an effective and safe approach that has been used clinically to alleviate neuropathic pain through the powerful inhibition of the activation of MMPs.

  5. Dose-related neuropathic and anti-neuropathic effects of simvastatin in vincristine-induced neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Shrutya; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2015-06-01

    The present study explores the role of simvastatin in vincristine-induced neuropathic pain, which was induced by administering vincristine (100 µg/kg i.p.) for 10 days (two 5 day cycles with 2 days pause). Pain was assessed by determining mechanical hyperalgesia, mechanical dynamic allodynia, heat hyperalgesia and cold allodynia. Biochemically, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was measured along with serum cholesterol levels. Simvastatin (7.5, 15 and 30 mg/kg) was administered for 14 days after administration of vincristine. Simvastatin (7.5 and 15 mg/kg) reversed vincristine-induced neuropathic pain and attenuated vincristine-induced increase in MPO, without altering cholesterol levels. Simvastatin at higher dose (30 mg/kg) did not alter neuropathic pain despite decreasing MPO levels. Furthermore, administration of simvastatin (30 mg/kg i.p.) in vincristine treated rats as well as it's per se administration in normal rats reduced cholesterol levels. Per se administration of simvastatin in normal rats produced neuropathic pain. It is concluded that simvastatin attenuates neuropathic pain only at lower doses with no reduction in cholesterol levels and anti-inflammatory effects may possibly reverse neuropathic pain. However, despite reducing inflammation, simvastatin did not confer beneficial effects at higher doses at which there is reduction in cholesterol levels, suggesting the critical role of cholesterol in neuropathic pain induction.

  6. Somatosensory Profiles but Not Numbers of Somatosensory Abnormalities of Neuropathic Pain Patients Correspond with Neuropathic Pain Grading

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Karl-Heinz; Harbers, Marten; Houghton, Andrea; Kortekaas, Rudie; van Vliet, Andre; Timmerman, Wia; den Boer, Johan A.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; van Wijhe, Marten

    2012-01-01

    Due to the lack of a specific diagnostic tool for neuropathic pain, a grading system to categorize pain as ‘definite’, ‘probable’, ‘possible’ and ‘unlikely’ neuropathic was proposed. Somatosensory abnormalities are common in neuropathic pain and it has been suggested that a greater number of abnormalities would be present in patients with ‘probable’ and ‘definite’ grades. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the presence of somatosensory abnormalities by means of Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) in patients with a clinical diagnosis of neuropathic pain and correlated the number of sensory abnormalities and sensory profiles to the different grades. Of patients who were clinically diagnosed with neuropathic pain, only 60% were graded as ‘definite’ or ‘probable’, while 40% were graded as ‘possible’ or ‘unlikely’ neuropathic pain. Apparently, there is a mismatch between a clinical neuropathic pain diagnosis and neuropathic pain grading. Contrary to the expectation, patients with ‘probable’ and ‘definite’ grades did not have a greater number of abnormalities. Instead, similar numbers of somatosensory abnormalities were identified for each grade. The profiles of sensory signs in ‘definite’ and ‘probable’ neuropathic pain were not significantly different, but different from the ‘unlikely’ grade. This latter difference could be attributed to differences in the prevalence of patients with a mixture of sensory gain and loss and with sensory loss only. The grading system allows a separation of neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain based on profiles but not on the total number of sensory abnormalities. Our findings indicate that patient selection based on grading of neuropathic pain may provide advantages in selecting homogenous groups for clinical research. PMID:22927981

  7. Tempol Ameliorates and Prevents Mechanical Hyperalgesia in a Rat Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Kee; Hwang, Seon-Hee; Abdi, Salahadin

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain is difficult to treat and prevent. Tempol decreases cellular superoxide radical levels and oxidative stress. The aims of our study were to investigate the analgesic and preventive effects of tempol on paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain in rats and to identify the associated mechanisms of action. Neuropathic pain was induced with intraperitoneally injected paclitaxel on four alternate days in male Sprague–Dawley rats. Tempol was administered systemically as a single injection and a continuous infusion before or after the injection of paclitaxel. The mechanical threshold for allodynia, protein levels, and free radical levels were measured using von Frey filaments, Western blotting, and live cell imaging, respectively. After the rats developed neuropathic pain behavior, a single intraperitoneal injection and continuous infusion of tempol ameliorated paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia. Systemic infusion of tempol in the early phase of the development of pain behavior prevented the development of paclitaxel-induced pain behavior. Paclitaxel increased the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C, phosphorylated nuclear factor κB, phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D), IL-1β, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia; however, tempol decreased these levels. Paclitaxel also increased superoxide levels in a culture of primary dorsal root ganglion cells and tempol decreased these levels. In conclusion, tempol alleviates and prevents chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain in rats by reducing the levels of inflammatory cytokines and free radicals in dorsal root ganglia. PMID:28138318

  8. From antidepressant drugs to beta-mimetics: preclinical insights on potential new treatments for neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Barrot, Michel; Yalcin, Ipek; Choucair-Jaafar, Nada; Benbouzid, Malika; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José

    2009-11-01

    The market for pain treatment is a major segment of nervous system pathologies. Despite this dynamism, the management of some pain conditions remains a clinical challenge. Neuropathic pain arises as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system. It is generally a chronic and disabling condition which is difficult to treat. Antidepressant drugs are recommended as one of the first line treatments, but they display noticeable side effects and are not effective on all patients. Using a murine model of neuropathy, we demonstrated that the stimulation of beta2-adrenergic receptors (beta2-AR) is not only necessary for antidepressant drugs to exert their antiallodynic action but that it is in fact sufficient to alleviate neuropathic allodynia. Chronic, but not acute, treatment with beta-mimetics such as terbutaline, salbutamol, fenoterol, salmeterol, ritodrine, isoprenaline (isoproterenol), metaproterenol (orciprenaline), procaterol, formoterol, clenbuterol or bambuterol, relieves allodynia. Agonists of beta2-ARs, and more generally any molecule stimulating beta2-ARs such as beta-mimetics, are thus proposed as potential new treatments for neuropathic pain. Clinical studies are now in preparation to confirm this potential in patients with neuropathic pain. This article reviews the findings leading to propose beta-mimetics for neuropathic pain treatment and other recent patents on the topic.

  9. Transient Receptor Potential Channels in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Basso, Lilian; Altier, Christophe

    2016-10-27

    Neuropathic pain caused by disease or dysfunction of the nervous system is one of the most difficult pain conditions to treat. Symptoms include a hypersensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimuli, processed by specialized nociceptors that constitute the first line of defence of the somatosensory system. The detection of these stimuli depends on the TRP ion channel family, which activates upon damaging pressure, extreme temperature, or toxic endogenous and exogenous chemicals. This review will summarize the current knowledge of the contribution of TRP channels, particularly the thermosensitive TRP, including TRPV1, TRPA1 and TRPM8 channels that play a central role in the sensitization of nociceptive transduction. We will discuss the pharmacology of these receptors and their relative success in preclinical and clinical studies.

  10. Diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain: recognition and management.

    PubMed

    Cole, B Eliot

    2007-09-01

    The occurrence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is linked to poor glycemic control over time. While most people never develop diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP) as a consequence of DPN, enough of them do that we must have effective options for the management of this disabling condition. Two years ago there were no formally approved medications for the treatment of DPNP, and now there are two medications with Food and Drug Administration approval for DPNP. One of these medications, duloxetine has been established to significantly improve pain and to address depression by its reuptake inhibition of norepinephrine and serotonin. This article examines the epidemiology of DPNP, its underlying pathogenesis, necessary evaluation methods, and treatment options available with a focus on the role of duloxetine.

  11. Neuropathic Pain Treatment: Still a Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.; Pessoa, Bruno L.; Orsini, Marco; Ribeiro, Pedro; Davidovich, Eduardo; Pupe, Camila; Filho, Pedro Moreira; Dornas, Ricardo Menezes; Masiero, Lucas; Bittencourt, Juliana; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is the result of a series of conditions caused by diseases or lesions to the somatosensory system. Due to the better understanding of NP pathophysiology previously unexplored therapies have been used with encouraging results. In this group, acetyl-L-carnitine, alpha-lipoic-acid, cannabinoids, clonidine, EMA401, botulinum toxin type A and new voltage-gated sodium channel blockers, can be included. Besides, changing paradigms may occur with the advent of optogenetics and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation. We reviewed the published literature on the pharmacological treatment of NP. Despite the interesting results, randomized controlled trials are demanded the majority of the therapies previously mentioned. In spite of several studies for the relief of NP, pain control continues being a challenge. PMID:27441065

  12. Effects of gabapentin on brain hyperactivity related to pain and sleep disturbance under a neuropathic pain-like state using fMRI and brain wave analysis.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Yoshinori; Yamashita, Akira; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Furuya, Masaharu; Yanase, Makoto; Niikura, Keiichi; Imai, Satoshi; Hatakeyama, Noboru; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Tsukiyama, Yoshi; Senba, Emiko; Matoba, Motohiro; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Yamazaki, Mitsuaki; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Narita, Minoru

    2011-07-01

    Neuropathic pain is the most difficult pain to manage in the pain clinic, and sleep problems are common among patients with chronic pain including neuropathic pain. In the present study, we tried to visualize the intensity of pain by assessing neuronal activity and investigated sleep disturbance under a neuropathic pain-like state in mice using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalogram (EEG)/electromyogram (EMG), respectively. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of gabapentin (GBP) on these phenomena. In a model of neuropathic pain, sciatic nerve ligation caused a marked decrease in the latency of paw withdrawal in response to a thermal stimulus only on the ipsilateral side. Under this condition, fMRI showed that sciatic nerve ligation produced a significant increase in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity in the pain matrix, which was significantly decreased 2 h after the i.p. injection of GBP. Based on the results of an EEG/EMG analysis, sciatic nerve-ligated animals showed a statistically significant increase in wakefulness and a decrease in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep during the light phase, and the sleep disturbance was almost completely alleviated by a higher dose of GBP in nerve-ligated mice. These findings suggest that neuropathic pain associated with sleep disturbance can be objectively assessed by fMRI and EEG/EMG analysis in animal models. Furthermore, GBP may improve the quality of sleep as well as control pain in patients with neuropathic pain.

  13. Neuropathic pain as part of chronic widespread pain: environmental and genetic influences.

    PubMed

    Momi, Sukhleen K; Fabiane, Stella Maris; Lachance, Genevieve; Livshits, Gregory; Williams, Frances M K

    2015-10-01

    Chronic widespread pain (CWP) has complex aetiology and forms part of the fibromyalgia syndrome. Recent evidence suggests a higher frequency of neuropathic pain features in those with CWP than previously thought. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of neuropathic pain features in individuals with CWP and to estimate the influence of genetic and environmental factors on neuropathic pain in CWP. Validated questionnaires (the London Fibromyalgia Screening Study questionnaire and PainDETECT questionnaire) were used to classify twins as having CWP and neuropathic pain, respectively. The prevalence of CWP was 14.7% (n = 4324), and of the 1357 twins invited to complete neuropathic pain screening, 15.9% of those having CWP demonstrated features of neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain was found to be heritable (A = 37%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 23%-50%) with unique environmental factors accounting for 63% (95% CI: 49%-79%) of the variance. Heritability of neuropathic pain and CWP were found to be correlated, 0.54 (95% CI: 0.42-0.65). Increasing age, raised body mass index, female gender, and smoking were all risk factors for neuropathic pain (P < 0.05), and CWP (P < 0.05). High socioeconomic status showed negative correlation with neuropathic pain (P = 0.003) and CWP (P = 0.001). Bivariate analysis of the 2 pain traits revealed that genetic predisposition to neuropathic pain is shared with that for CWP. This is the first study to provide formal heritability estimates for neuropathic pain in CWP. The findings suggest that at least some of the genetic factors underlying the development of neuropathic pain and CWP are the same.

  14. Neuropathic pain as part of chronic widespread pain: environmental and genetic influences

    PubMed Central

    Momi, Sukhleen K.; Fabiane, Stella Maris; Lachance, Genevieve; Livshits, Gregory; Williams, Frances M. K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chronic widespread pain (CWP) has complex aetiology and forms part of the fibromyalgia syndrome. Recent evidence suggests a higher frequency of neuropathic pain features in those with CWP than previously thought. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of neuropathic pain features in individuals with CWP and to estimate the influence of genetic and environmental factors on neuropathic pain in CWP. Validated questionnaires (the London Fibromyalgia Screening Study questionnaire and PainDETECT questionnaire) were used to classify twins as having CWP and neuropathic pain, respectively. The prevalence of CWP was 14.7% (n = 4324), and of the 1357 twins invited to complete neuropathic pain screening, 15.9% of those having CWP demonstrated features of neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain was found to be heritable (A = 37%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 23%-50%) with unique environmental factors accounting for 63% (95% CI: 49%-79%) of the variance. Heritability of neuropathic pain and CWP were found to be correlated, 0.54 (95% CI: 0.42-0.65). Increasing age, raised body mass index, female gender, and smoking were all risk factors for neuropathic pain (P < 0.05), and CWP (P < 0.05). High socioeconomic status showed negative correlation with neuropathic pain (P = 0.003) and CWP (P = 0.001). Bivariate analysis of the 2 pain traits revealed that genetic predisposition to neuropathic pain is shared with that for CWP. This is the first study to provide formal heritability estimates for neuropathic pain in CWP. The findings suggest that at least some of the genetic factors underlying the development of neuropathic pain and CWP are the same. PMID:26121255

  15. Effects of intraperitoneal thymoquinone on chronic neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Amin, Bahareh; Taheri, Mohammad Mehdi Heravi; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the protective effects of thymoquinone, the major constituent of Nigella sativa seeds on the neuropathic pain of rats with chronic constrictive injury of the sciatic nerve. Rats received repeated administration of thymoquinone (1.25, 2.5, and 5 mg/kg, i. p.) once a day for 14 days, beginning immediately after the nerve injury. Mechanical allodynia, cold allodynia, and thermal hyperalgesia were assessed with the von Frey filament, acetone drop, or radiant heat stimulus, respectively. Recent evidence points towards a role of oxidative stress, spinal glia activation, and cell death in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. Ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (a marker of microglia), glial fibrillary acidic protein (a marker of astroglia), Bcl2-associated X protein (a proapoptotic protein), and B-cell lymphoma protein 2 (an antiapoptotic protein) were measured using Western blot on days 3, 7, and 14 post chronic constrictive injury. The changes in the protein levels of malondialdehyde and glutathione, biomarkers of oxidative stress, were assessed by spectrophotometric assay on day 14 post chronic constrictive injury. Repeated treatment with thymoquinone (2.5 and 5 mg/kg) significantly alleviated behavioral signs of neuropathic pain. In the lumbar spinal cord of neuropathic rats, ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 and Bcl2-associated X protein increased on day 3 post chronic constrictive injury, whereas B-cell lymphoma protein 2 did not significantly change. After repeated thymoquinone administration, the elevated Bcl2-associated X protein and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule reduced on day 3, while the level of B-cell lymphoma protein 2 was even stimulated. Ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule and Bcl2-associated X protein/B-cell lymphoma protein 2 ratio declined by days 7 and 14; consequently, there were no significant differences among groups. No or little change was observed in the glial fibrillary acidic

  16. Classification issues related to neuropathic trigeminal pain.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2004-01-01

    The goal of a classification system of medical conditions is to facilitate accurate communication, to ensure that each condition is described uniformly and universally and that all data banks for the storage and retrieval of research and clinical data related to the conditions are consistent. Classification entails deciding which kinds of diagnostic entities should be recognized and how to order them in a meaningful way. Currently there are 3 major pain classification systems of relevance to orofacial pain: The International Association for the Study of Pain classification system, the International Headache Society classification system, and the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). All use different methodologies, and only the RDC/TMD take into account social and psychologic factors in the classification of conditions. Classification systems need to be reliable, valid, comprehensive, generalizable, and flexible, and they need to be tested using consensus views of experts as well as the available literature. There is an urgent need for a robust classification system for neuropathic trigeminal pain.

  17. Similarity of suffering: equivalence of psychological and psychosocial factors in neuropathic and non-neuropathic orofacial pain patients.

    PubMed

    Gustin, Sylvia Maria; Wilcox, Sophie L; Peck, Chris C; Murray, Greg M; Henderson, Luke A

    2011-04-01

    The degree to which neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain conditions differ in psychological and psychosocial status remains largely unexplored. A better understanding of these aspects would be of considerable benefit in helping to define whether similar psychological treatment strategies (eg, cognitive-behavioural therapy) can be adopted in the management of neuropathic pain as in non-neuropathic pain conditions. Chronic orofacial pain disorders present a unique opportunity to compare nociceptive and neuropathic pain in the same body region. Twenty-four patients with trigeminal neuropathic pain, 21 patients with temporomandibular disorder, and 38 healthy controls were assessed with a psychological/psychosocial battery encompassing the 4 dimensions of the pain experience; sensory-discriminative, affective-motivational, cognitive-evaluative, and psychosocial. Although patients with trigeminal neuropathic pain (neuropathic pain) and temporomandibular disorder (non-neuropathic pain) described the sensory aspects of their pain differently, they exhibited comparable negative affective-motivational, cognitive-evaluative, and psychosocial states, although these were significantly different compared to healthy controls. These findings support growing evidence that the negative affective, cognitive, and psychosocial state of chronic pain is universal, regardless of a neuropathic or nociceptive nature. Further characterisation of these 4 dimensions of the pain experience in different chronic pain subtypes may improve the efficacy of cognitive-behavioural therapy.

  18. Diagnosis and medical treatment of neuropathic pain in leprosy 1

    PubMed Central

    Arco, Rogerio Del; Nardi, Susilene Maria Tonelli; Bassi, Thiago Gasperini; Paschoal, Vania Del Arco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify the difficulties in diagnosing and treating neuropathic pain caused by leprosy and to understand the main characteristics of this situation. Methods: 85 patients were treated in outpatient units with reference to leprosy and the accompanying pain. We used a questionnaire known as the Douleur Neuropathic 4 test and we conducted detailed neurological exams. As a result, 42 patients were excluded from the study for not having proved their pain. Results: Out of the 37 patients that experienced pain, 22 (59.5%) had neuropathic pain (or a mixture of this pain and their existing pain) and of these 90.8% considered this pain to be moderate or severe. 81.8% of the sample suffered with this pain for more than 6 months. Only 12 (54.5%) of the patients had been diagnosed with neuropathic pain and in almost half of these cases, this pain had not been diagnosed. With reference to medical treatment (n=12) for neuropathic pain, 5 (41.6%) responded that they became better. For the other 7 (58.4%) there were no changes in relation to the pain or in some cases the pain worsened in comparison to their previous state. Statistical analysis comparing improvements in relation to the pain amongst the patients that were treated (n=12) and those that were not, showed significant differences (value p=0.020). Conclusion: we noted difficulties in diagnosing neuropathic pain for leprosy in that almost half of the patients that were studied had not had their pain diagnosed. We attributed this to some factors such as the non-adoption of the appropriate protocols which led to inadequate diagnosis and treatment that overlooked the true picture. PMID:27508904

  19. Expression profiling of genes modulated by minocycline in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain are constantly being studied to create new opportunities to prevent or alleviate neuropathic pain. The aim of our study was to determine the gene expression changes induced by sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) that are modulated by minocycline, which can effectively diminish neuropathic pain in animal studies. The genes associated with minocycline efficacy in neuropathic pain should provide insight into the etiology of neuropathic pain and identify novel therapeutic targets. Results We screened the ipsilateral dorsal part of the lumbar spinal cord of the rat CCI model for differentially expressed genes. Out of 22,500 studied transcripts, the abundance levels of 93 transcripts were altered following sciatic nerve ligation. Percentage analysis revealed that 54 transcripts were not affected by the repeated administration of minocycline (30 mg/kg, i.p.), but the levels of 39 transcripts were modulated following minocycline treatment. We then selected two gene expression patterns, B1 and B2. The first transcription pattern, B1, consisted of 10 mRNA transcripts that increased in abundance after injury, and minocycline treatment reversed or inhibited the effect of the injury; the B2 transcription pattern consisted of 7 mRNA transcripts whose abundance decreased following sciatic nerve ligation, and minocycline treatment reversed the effect of the injury. Based on the literature, we selected seven genes for further analysis: Cd40, Clec7a, Apobec3b, Slc7a7, and Fam22f from pattern B1 and Rwdd3 and Gimap5 from pattern B2. Additionally, these genes were analyzed using quantitative PCR to determine the transcriptional changes strongly related to the development of neuropathic pain; the ipsilateral DRGs (L4-L6) were also collected and analyzed in these rats using qPCR. Conclusion In this work, we confirmed gene expression alterations previously identified by microarray analysis in the spinal cord and

  20. Neuropathic Pain in Animal Models of Nervous System Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tian, David H.; Perera, Chamini J.; Moalem-Taylor, Gila

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a frequent chronic presentation in autoimmune diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), causing significant individual disablement and suffering. Animal models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) mimic many aspects of MS and GBS, respectively, and are well suited to study the pathophysiology of these autoimmune diseases. However, while much attention has been devoted to curative options, research into neuropathic pain mechanisms and relief has been somewhat lacking. Recent studies have demonstrated a variety of sensory abnormalities in different EAE and EAN models, which enable investigations of behavioural changes, underlying mechanisms, and potential pharmacotherapies for neuropathic pain associated with these diseases. This review examines the symptoms, mechanisms, and clinical therapeutic options in these conditions and highlights the value of EAE and EAN animal models for the study of neuropathic pain in MS and GBS. PMID:23737643

  1. Peripheral nerve stimulation for the treatment of neuropathic craniofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Slavin, K V

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of neuropathic pain in the region of head and face presents a challenging problem for pain specialists. In particular, those patients who do not respond to conventional treatment modalities usually continue to suffer from pain due to lack of reliable medical and surgical approaches. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) has been used for treatment of neuropathic pain for many decades, but only recently it has been systematically applied to the craniofacial region. Here we summarize published experience with PNS in treatment of craniofacial pain and discuss some technical details of the craniofacial PNS procedure.

  2. New Pharmacological Approaches Using Polyphenols on the Physiopathology of Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Vela, Jose Miguel; Verdu, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Polyphenols constitute a group of a paramount importance within the natural products in the plant kingdom, with an approximate amount of 8000 phenolic structures currently known. Fruits, vegetables, whole grains and several other foods and beverages (as tea, chocolate and wine, for instance) are rich and important sources of polyphenols. The scientific literature provides pre-clinical experimental evidence on the antinociceptive effects of polyphenolic compounds, found in plant extracts, in animal models of neuropathic pain. But not only neuropathic pain is attenuated: in fact, nociceptive pain, caused by stimulation of nerve fibers (either somatic or visceral) responding only to stimuli approaching or exceeding harmful intensity thresholds (nociceptors), and also inflammatory pain, which is associated with tissue damage and infiltration of immune cells, are both reduced and alleviated by polyphenols. In the present work, the antinociceptive effects of polyphenols are reviewed.

  3. Human surrogate models of neuropathic pain: validity and limitations.

    PubMed

    Binder, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Human surrogate models of neuropathic pain in healthy subjects are used to study symptoms, signs, and the hypothesized underlying mechanisms. Although different models are available, different spontaneous and evoked symptoms and signs are inducible; 2 key questions need to be answered: are human surrogate models conceptually valid, ie, do they share the sensory phenotype of neuropathic pain states, and are they sufficiently reliable to allow consistent translational research?

  4. Pulsed radiofrequency attenuates diabetic neuropathic pain and suppresses formalin-evoked spinal glutamate release in rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Hsin; Hou, Shao-Yun; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Chung-Ren

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) has been used to treat chronic pain for years, but its effectiveness and mechanism in treating diabetic neuropathic pain are still unexplored. The aim of this study was to elucidate the modulation of diabetic neuropathic pain induced by streptozotocin and the release of spinal excitatory amino acids by PRF. METHODS: Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin. Pulsed radiofrequency was applied to L5 and L6 dorsal roots at 42 °C for 2 min. The responses of all of the groups to thermal, mechanical and cold stimuli were measured for a period of 6 d after this process. Seven days after PRF treatment, intrathecal microdialysis was used to examine the effect of pulsed radiofrequency on the formalin-evoked spinal release of excitatory amino acids and concurrent behaviour responses from diabetic rats. RESULTS: Three weeks after intraperitoneal streptozotocin treatment and before PRF application, mechanical, thermal and cold hypersensitivity occurred. Application of PRF significantly alleviated hyperglycaemia-induced mechanical, thermal and cold hypersensitivity and also attenuated the increase in formalin-evoked CSF glutamate concentration, compared with sham treated diabetic rats. CONCLUSION: It may be concluded that PRF has an analgesic effect on neuropathic pain by suppressing the nociception-induced release of excitatory neurotransmitters. PRF may provide a novel promising therapeutic approach for managing diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:27994505

  5. Carbamazepine Withdrawal-induced Hyperalgesia in Chronic Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhenyu; Yang, Bing; Yang, Bin; Shi, Le; Sun, Qing-Li; Sun, A-Ping; Lu, Lin; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Rongsheng; Zhai, Suodi

    2015-11-01

    Combined pharmacological treatments are the most used approach for neuropathic pain. Carbamazepine, an antiepileptic agent, is generally used as a third-line treatment for neuropathic pain and can be considered an option only when patients have not responded to the first- and second-line medications. In the case presented herein, a patient with neuropathic pain was treated using a combined pharmacological regimen. The patient's pain deteriorated, despite increasing the doses of opioids, when carbamazepine was discontinued, potentially because carbamazepine withdrawal disrupted the balance that was achieved by the multifaceted pharmacological regimen, thus inducing hyperalgesia. Interestingly, when carbamazepine was prescribed again, the patient's pain was successfully managed. Animal research has reported that carbamazepine can potentiate the analgesic effectiveness of morphine in rodent models of neuropathic pain and postoperative pain. This clinical case demonstrates that carbamazepine may have a synergistic effect on the analgesic effectiveness of morphine and may inhibit or postpone opioid-induced hyperalgesia. We postulate that a probable mechanism of action of carbamazepine may involve -aminobutyric acid-ergic potentiation and the interruption of glutamatergic function via N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Further research is warranted to clarify the analgesic action of carbamazepine and its potential use for the prevention of opioid-induced hyperalgesia in chronic neuropathic pain patients.

  6. Antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Elon; River, Yaron; Shifrin, Ala; Krivoy, Norberto

    2007-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs are an effective treatment for various forms of neuropathic pain of peripheral origin, although they rarely provide complete pain relief. Multiple multicentre randomised controlled trials have shown clear efficacy of gabapentin and pregabalin for postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic neuropathy. Theses drugs can be rapidly titrated and are well tolerated. Topiramate, lamotrigine, carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine are alternatives for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy, but should be titrated slowly. Carbamazepine remains the drug of choice for trigeminal neuralgia; however, oxcarbazepine and lamotrigine are potential alternatives. There is an apparent need for large-scale randomised controlled trials on the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in neuropathic pain in general, and in cancer-related neuropathic pain and neuropathic pain of central origin in particular. Trials with long-term follow-up are required to establish the long-term efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in neuropathic pain. There is only limited scientific evidence to support the idea that drug combinations are likely to be more efficacious and safer than each drug alone; further studies are warranted in this area.

  7. New developments in the pharmacotherapy of neuropathic chronic pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Carey, Erin T; As-Sanie, Sawsan

    2016-12-01

    Advancements in further understanding the pathophysiology of chronic pelvic pain syndromes continue to direct therapy. The mechanisms of chronic pelvic pain are often multifactorial and therefore require a multidisciplinary approach. The final treatment plan is often an accumulation of organ-specific treatment and chronic pain medications directed to the CNS and PNS. This article is a review of commonly used medications for chronic pelvic neuropathic pain disorders as well as an introduction to recent innovative developments in pain medicine.

  8. New developments in the pharmacotherapy of neuropathic chronic pelvic pain

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Erin T; As-Sanie, Sawsan

    2016-01-01

    Advancements in further understanding the pathophysiology of chronic pelvic pain syndromes continue to direct therapy. The mechanisms of chronic pelvic pain are often multifactorial and therefore require a multidisciplinary approach. The final treatment plan is often an accumulation of organ-specific treatment and chronic pain medications directed to the CNS and PNS. This article is a review of commonly used medications for chronic pelvic neuropathic pain disorders as well as an introduction to recent innovative developments in pain medicine. PMID:28116131

  9. Galectin-3 Inhibition Is Associated with Neuropathic Pain Attenuation after Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhicong; Han, Qi; Wang, Xiaolei; Ai, Zisheng; Zheng, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains a prevalent and persistent clinical problem because it is often poorly responsive to the currently used analgesics. It is very urgent to develop novel drugs to alleviate neuropathic pain. Galectin-3 (gal3) is a multifunctional protein belonging to the carbohydrate-ligand lectin family, which is expressed by different cells. Emerging studies showed that gal3 elicits a pro-inflammatory response by recruiting and activating lymphocytes, macrophages and microglia. In the study we investigated whether gal3 inhibition could suppress neuroinflammation and alleviate neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury. We found that L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) increases the expression of gal3 in dorsal root ganglions at the mRNA and protein level. Intrathecal administration of modified citrus pectin (MCP), a gal3 inhibitor, reduces gal3 expression in dorsal root ganglions. MCP treatment also inhibits SNL-induced gal3 expression in primary rat microglia. SNL results in an increased activation of autophagy that contributes to microglial activation and subsequent inflammatory response. Intrathecal administration of MCP significantly suppresses SNL-induced autophagy activation. MCP also inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced autophagy in cultured microglia in vitro. MCP further decreases LPS-induced expression of proinflammatory mediators including IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 by regulating autophagy. Intrathecal administration of MCP results in adecreased mechanical and cold hypersensitivity following SNL. These results demonstrated that gal3 inhibition is associated with the suppression of SNL-induced inflammatory process andneurophathic pain attenuation.

  10. Galectin-3 Inhibition Is Associated with Neuropathic Pain Attenuation after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Zisheng; Zheng, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains a prevalent and persistent clinical problem because it is often poorly responsive to the currently used analgesics. It is very urgent to develop novel drugs to alleviate neuropathic pain. Galectin-3 (gal3) is a multifunctional protein belonging to the carbohydrate-ligand lectin family, which is expressed by different cells. Emerging studies showed that gal3 elicits a pro-inflammatory response by recruiting and activating lymphocytes, macrophages and microglia. In the study we investigated whether gal3 inhibition could suppress neuroinflammation and alleviate neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury. We found that L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) increases the expression of gal3 in dorsal root ganglions at the mRNA and protein level. Intrathecal administration of modified citrus pectin (MCP), a gal3 inhibitor, reduces gal3 expression in dorsal root ganglions. MCP treatment also inhibits SNL-induced gal3 expression in primary rat microglia. SNL results in an increased activation of autophagy that contributes to microglial activation and subsequent inflammatory response. Intrathecal administration of MCP significantly suppresses SNL-induced autophagy activation. MCP also inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced autophagy in cultured microglia in vitro. MCP further decreases LPS-induced expression of proinflammatory mediators including IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 by regulating autophagy. Intrathecal administration of MCP results in adecreased mechanical and cold hypersensitivity following SNL. These results demonstrated that gal3 inhibition is associated with the suppression of SNL-induced inflammatory process andneurophathic pain attenuation. PMID:26872020

  11. Neuropathic Pain Referrals to a Multidisciplinary Pediatric Cancer Pain Service

    PubMed Central

    Anghelescu, Doralina L.; Faughnan, Lane G.; Popenhagen, Mark P.; Oakes, Linda L.; Pei, Deqing; Burgoyne, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Neuropathic pain (NP) in children with cancer is not well characterized. We describe the prevalence of NP and the characteristics, duration of follow-up, and interventions provided for NP among patients referred to a pediatric oncology center’s pain management service. Methods Retrospective review of patient data from a 3.5-year period. Results Fifteen percent (66/439) of all referrals to our pain service were for NP (56/323 patients, 17%; 34 male, 22 female). The NP patient group had 1401 clinical visits (778 inpatient visits [55.5%] and 623 outpatient visits [44.5%]). Patients with NP had a significantly greater mean number of pain visits per consult (p=0.008) and significantly more days (median) of pain service follow-up (p <0.001) than did other patients. The most common cause of NP was cancer treatment rather than the underlying malignancy. Pharmacological management of NP was complex, often comprising 3 medications. Nonpharmacological approaches were used for 57.6% of NP referrals. Discussion NP is less frequently encountered than non-NP in children with cancer; nevertheless, it is more difficult to treat, requiring longer follow up, more clinical visits, complex pharmacological management, and the frequent addition of non-pharmacological interventions. PMID:24602431

  12. Brain morphological alternation in chronic pain patients with neuropathic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sugimine, Satomi; Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Obata, Hideaki; Saito, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuropathic characteristics are highly involved in the development of chronic pain both physically and psychologically. However, little is known about the relationship between neuropathic characteristics and brain morphological alteration. Objectives The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanisms of chronic pain development by examining the above-mentioned relationships by voxel-based morphometry in patients with chronic pain. Methods First, we assessed neuropathic characteristics using the painDETECT Questionnaire in 12 chronic pain patients. Second, to assess the gray matter volume changes by voxel-based morphometry, we conducted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. We applied multiregression analysis of these two assessment methods. Results There were significant positive correlations between painDETECT Questionnaire scores and the gray matter volume in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex and right posterior cingulate cortex. Conclusions Our findings suggest that neuropathic characteristics strongly affect the brain regions related to modulation of pain in patients with chronic pain and, therefore, contribute to the severity of chronic pain. PMID:27284013

  13. Analgesic effect of extracts of Chinese medicinal herbs Moutan cortex and Coicis semen on neuropathic pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Shinichi; Mabuchi, Tamaki; Abe, Tetsuya; Xu, Li; Minami, Toshiaki; Ito, Seiji

    2004-11-11

    Neuropathic pain arising from peripheral nerve injury is a clinical disorder characterized by a combination of spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and tactile pain (allodynia), and remains a significant clinical problem since it is often poorly relieved by conventional analgesics. To seek an analgesic compound(s) in Chinese herbs, we examined the effect of seven Chinese herbs that are routinely prescribed for pain management in two neuropathic pain models: allodynia induced by intrathecal administration of prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) and by selective L5 spinal nerve transection. The extracts of Moutan cortex and Coicis semen dose-dependently alleviated the PGF2alpha-induced allodynia by oral administration 1 h before intrathecal injection of PGF2alpha. When orally administrated every day for 7 days, these extracts attenuated neuropathic pain in the ipsilateral side, but not in the contralateral side, day 7 after L5 spinal nerve transection. The increase in NADPH diaphorase activity in the spinal cord associated with neuropathic pain was also blocked by these extracts. These results suggest that Moutan cortex and Coicis semen contain substances effective in neuropathic pain.

  14. Pregabalin in post traumatic neuropathic pain: Case studies

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Sinha, Vijay Prakash; Pal, U. S.; Yadav, Sharad C.; Singh, Maneesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Pregabalin is effective in the treatment of peripheral and central neuropathic pain. This study evaluated the effectiveness of pregablin in management of post traumatic peripheral nerve injury facial pain not responding to other medication like analgesics. Pregabalin was well tolerated. The most common adverse effects were dizziness and tiredness. PMID:23251069

  15. Recent advances in pharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Sindrup, Søren Hein; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2010-07-14

    Recent studies investigating the pharmacological management of neuropathic pain support the efficacy of certain antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and opioids. Novel directions in drug applications include topical applications of patches with either lidocaine or capsaicin and intradermal injections of botulinum toxin. In cases of partial pain relief, drug combinations may be considered.

  16. Histamine-induced itch converts into pain in neuropathic hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Baron, R; Schwarz, K; Kleinert, A; Schattschneider, J; Wasner, G

    2001-11-16

    Physiologically, itch and pain are transmitted in separate specific peripheral C-units and central afferent pathways. Some neuropathic pain patients with intact but sensitized (irritable) primary C-nociceptors have spontaneous pain, heat hyperalgesia, static and dynamic mechanical hyperalgesia. The question was whether cutaneous histamine application induces pain in these patients. For comparison histamine was applied into normal skin experimentally sensitized by capsaicin. Histamine application in the capsaicin-induced primary or secondary hyperalgesic skin did not change the intensity and quality of capsaicin pain. Itch was profoundly inhibited. Conversely, histamine application in neuropathic skin induced severe increase in spontaneous burning pain but no itch. In neuropathies irritable nociceptors may express histamine receptors or induce central sensitization to histaminergic stimuli so that itch converts into pain.

  17. Case studies illustrating the management of trigeminal neuropathic pain using topical 5% lidocaine plasters

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Zehra; Renton, Tara

    2013-01-01

    Chronic trigeminal pain, with its severe related functional problems, is difficult to treat. Treatment is often empirically based on medications used for other chronic pain conditions. Systemic sodium channel and calcium channel blocking agents may cause a multitude of complications that are often poorly tolerated by the patient. Aim: The aim of this case report was to assess the efficacy of topical 5% lidocaine plasters in reducing pain and reducing adjuvant medication in patients with orofacial neuropathic pain. Method: Fourteen patients with chronic orofacial pain conditions referred to the oral surgery department were instructed to wear 5% lidocaine plasters for 12 hours each day over the painful area. The conditions included post-surgical neuropathy (n = 10), multiple sclerosis-related pain (n = 1), persistent idiopathic facial pain (n = 1), Ramsay Hunt syndrome (post-herpetic neuralgia, n = 1) and trigeminal neuralgia (n = 1). Data were collected on patient demographics, pain levels and medication. Results: Pain levels improved in 12 out of 14 patients. Nine patients had a reduction in adjuvant medication, two of whom completely stopped adjuvant treatment. Conclusion: This case series demonstrates that of the use of 5% lidocaine plasters may play a useful role in the management of chronic trigeminal pain. A suggested novel approach for the management of orofacial pain, for clinicians, is presented. Summary points Management of chronic orofacial pain continues to be a major challenge to the clinician. Patients are often placed on a multitude of medications in an attempt to alleviate pain without success. Topical 5% lidocaine plasters, currently used for the management of post-herpetic neuralgia, offer the option of locally targeting trigeminal pain without the multiple side-effects of systemic medication. This case series demonstrates that lidocaine plasters decrease verbal pain scores in extraoral, trigeminal and neuropathic pain, and reduce the use of other

  18. Surgical animal models of neuropathic pain: Pros and Cons.

    PubMed

    Challa, Siva Reddy

    2015-03-01

    One of the biggest challenges for discovering more efficacious drugs for the control of neuropathic pain has been the diversity of chronic pain states in humans. It is now acceptable that different mechanisms contribute to normal physiologic pain, pain arising from tissue damage and pain arising from injury to the nervous system. To study pain transmission, spot novel pain targets and characterize the potential analgesic profile of new chemical entities, numerous experimental animal pain models have been developed that attempt to simulate the many human pain conditions. Among the neuropathic pain models, surgical models have paramount importance in the induction of pain states. Many surgical animal models exist, like the chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve, partial sciatic nerve ligation (pSNL), spinal nerve ligation (SNL), spared nerve injury (SNI), brachial plexus avulsion (BPA), sciatic nerve transaction (SNT) and sciatic nerve trisection. Most of these models induce responses similar to those found in causalgia, a syndrome of sustained burning pain often seen in the distal extremity after partial peripheral nerve injury in humans. Researchers most commonly use these surgical models in both rats and mice during drug discovery to screen new chemical entities for efficacy in the area of neuropathic pain. However, there is scant literature that provides a comparative discussion of all these surgical models. Each surgical model has its own benefits and limitations. It is very difficult for a researcher to choose a suitable surgical animal model to suit their experimental set-up. Therefore, particular attention has been given in this review to comparatively provide the pros and cons of each model of surgically induced neuropathic pain.

  19. Urotensin II inhibitor eases neuropathic pain by suppressing the JNK/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhao, Pan-Pan; Hao, Ting; Wang, Dan; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Yang-Zi; Wu, Yu-Qing; Zhou, Cheng-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Urotensin II (U-II), a cyclic peptide originally isolated from the caudal neurosecretory system of fishes, can produce proinflammatory effects through its specific G protein-coupled receptor, GPR14. Neuropathic pain, a devastating disease, is related to excessive inflammation in the spinal dorsal horn. However, the relationship between U-II and neuropathic pain has not been reported. This study was designed to investigate the effect of U-II antagonist on neuropathic pain and to understand the associated mechanisms. We reported that U-II and its receptor GPR14 were persistently upregulated and activated in the dorsal horn of L4-6 spinal cord segments after chronic constriction injury (CCI) in rats. Intrathecal injection of SB657510, a specific antagonist against U-II, reversed CCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, we found that SB657510 reduced the expression of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 as well as subsequent secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). It was also showed that both the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and the NF-κB inhibitor PDTC significantly attenuated thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in CCI rats. Our present research showed that U-II receptor antagonist alleviated neuropathic pain possibly through the suppression of the JNK/NF-κB pathway in CCI rats, which will contribute to the better understanding of function of U-II and pathogenesis of neuropathic pain.

  20. The Complement System in Neuropathic and Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Fritzinger, David C.; Benjamin, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    Certain types of pain are major unmet medical needs that affect more than 8 percent of the population. Neuropathic pain can be caused by many pathogenic processes including injury, autoimmune disease, neurological disease, endocrine dysfunction, infection, toxin exposure, and substance abuse and is frequently resistant to available pain therapies. The same can be said of postsurgical pain, which can arise from uncontrolled inflammation around the wound site. The complement system is part of the innate immune system and can both initiate and sustain acute and chronic inflammatory pain. Here we review the complement system and original investigations that identify potential drug targets within this system. Drugs that act to inhibit the complement system could fill major gaps in our current standard of care for neuropathic pain states. PMID:28154610

  1. Neuropathic Pain in Patients with Burning Mouth Syndrome Evaluated Using painDETECT.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Jornet, Pia; Molino-Pagan, Diana; Parra-Perez, Paco; Valenzuela, Sara

    2017-01-04

    OBJECTIVE : This study set out to identify the neuropathic component of pain experienced by burning mouth syndrome (BMS) patients evaluated using painDETECT, a diagnostic tool that could easily be introduced into clinical practice. MATERIALS AND METHODS : This study included 64 patients (33 BMS and 31 suffering nociceptive pain). Each completed the painDETECT neuropathic pain questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and pain intensity was also measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). RESULTS : Pain among BMS patients (evaluated by VAS) was 6.1 ± 1.9, and 4.3 ± 1.7 among nociceptive patients (P < 0.001). PainDETECT obtained total scores ≥ 19 in 21% of BMS patients, indicating the presence of neuropathic pain. When painDETECT pain descriptors were analyzed comparing the BMS group with nociceptive pain subjects, statistically significant differences were found for burning sensation (P < 0.010), prickling (P < 0.001), electric shock-like sensation (P = 0.046), thermal sensation (P < 0.001), and numbness (P = 0.002). Logistic regression analysis found that VAS scoring was the strongest determinant predicting neuropathic pain. CONCLUSION : The present study suggests that almost a third of BMS patients present neuropathic pain, which is strongly associated with the intensity of pain measured using VAS. These data could provide the basis for further research.

  2. Antinociceptive effects of topical mepivacaine in a rat model of HIV-associated peripheral neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Sagen, Jacqueline; Castellanos, Daniel A; Hama, Aldric T

    2016-01-01

    than lidocaine, consistently attenuated two distinct symptoms of neuropathic pain and suggest that topical formulations of this local anesthetic could have utility in the alleviation of clinical HIV neuropathic pain. PMID:27350758

  3. TDM-based imipramine treatment in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Peter V; Jensen, Troels S; Sindrup, Søren H; Bach, Flemming W

    2004-08-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) are the best-documented treatment of neuropathic pain. TCAs have a pronounced interindividual pharmacokinetic variability and a narrow therapeutic index. The aim of this study was to characterize the plasma concentration-effect relationship of imipramine in neuropathic pain and to determine the usefulness of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of TCA treatment in a population with noncancer chronic pain. To do this, 83 patients with chronic noncancer neuropathic pain were included. Information on previous use of TCA was collected, and patients were tested for the presence of hyperalgesia. Pain intensity and pain relief were recorded, and the Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire and Major Depression Inventory were completed before and during a TDM-based imipramine treatment. Imipramine dose was increased in steps of 25 mg/d every second week, and blood samples were taken at every dose. Endpoints were best possible pain relief, unacceptable side effects, or insufficient pain relief despite plasma drug level > 500 nmol/L. Dose range used was 10-300 mg/d. The study showed that imipramine 75 mg/d caused a 36-fold interindividual variation in steady-state plasma drug concentrations. In 46 responders (global pain relief > 25%) the plasma drug concentration at which an individual maximal analgesic effect was obtained ranged from 50 to 1400 nmol/L, but for the majority it was below 400 nmol/L. The concentration-effect relationship was similar for patients with central versus peripheral neuropathic pain and independent of the presence of hyperalgesia. Previous treatment failure with non-TDM TCA treatment was not a predictor of poor response to TDM-based treatment. In conclusion, there is a pronounced interindividual variability in concentration-effect relationship for imipramine treatment in neuropathic pain, but the majority of patients obtain a maximal analgesic effect at drug levels below 400 nmol/L. The concentration-effect relationship is

  4. [Therapeutic advances in pharmaceutical treatment of neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Attal, N

    2011-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is difficult to treat. Recommended first-line treatments include tricyclic antidepressants and alpha2delta agonists pregabalin and gabapentin for multiple neuropathic conditions, the antidepressants duloxetine and venlafaxine in diabetic painful neuropathies and lidocaine patches for postherapetic neuralgia. Therapeutic prospects include focal therapy with sustained analgesic efficacy (capsaicin patches, botulinum toxin), treatments acting on new targets (i.e., cytokine inhibitors, metabotropic glutamate inhibitors, TRPV1 antagonists). The methodology of clinical trials also tends to take better into account the symptomatic profiles of patients, which should contribute to better prediction or responders to treatment.

  5. Diosgenin ameliorates development of neuropathic pain in diabetic rats: Involvement of oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kiasalari, Zahra; Rahmani, Tayebeh; Mahmoudi, Narges; Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Roghani, Mehrdad

    2017-02-01

    Neuropathic pain is one of the prevalent complications of diabetes mellitus (DM). Oxidative stress and inflammation are the principal determinants for its development. Pharmacological interventions targeted at alleviating or suppressing these pathways are clinically promising. Diosgenin is a natural steroidal saponin with anti-diabetic and multiple protective properties. This study was designed to study the efficacy of chronic diosgenin administration on alleviation of hyperalgesia in streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats. Rats were allocated to control, diosgenin-treated control, diabetic, and diosgenin-treated-diabetic groups. Diosgenin was daily administered at a dose of 40mg/kg for 5 weeks. Nociceptive behavior was assessed using paw pressure, hot tail immersion, and formalin tests. In addition, some oxidative stress and inflammation markers were measured. Diosgenin treatment of diabetic group increased mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds and lowered pain score at late phase of the formalin test, but not at its early phase. Biochemical analysis of serum samples and sciatic nerve and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) lysates showed restoration or improvement of nuclear factor-B (NF-κB), malondialdehyde (MDA) level, activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) upon diosgenin treatment of diabetic rats. The obtained results exhibited antinociceptive potential of diosgenin in diabetic rats through lowering oxidative stress and inflammation and improving antioxidant defense system. This suggests possible therapeutic potential of diosgenin for alleviation and management of diabetic neuropathic pain.

  6. Evaluation of anticonvulsants for possible use in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Waszkielewicz, A M; Gunia, A; Słoczyńska, K; Marona, H

    2011-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a kind of pain related with functional abnormality of neurons. Despite large progress in pharmacotherapy, neuropathic pain is still considered an unmet need. Nowadays, there are few drugs registered for this condition, such as pregabalin, gabapentin, duloxetine, carbamazepine, and lidocaine. Among them, pregabalin, gabapentin and carbamazepine are well known antiepileptic drugs. Among the group of new antiepileptic drugs, which are addressed to 1% of human world population suffering from seizures, it turned out that 30% of the seizures resistant to pharmacotherapy has not enough market to justify the costs of drug development. Therefore, it is already a phenomenon that researchers turn their projects toward a larger market, related with possible similar mechanism. Anticonvulsant mechanism of action is in the first place among primary indications for drugs revealing potential analgesic activity. Therefore, many drug candidates for epilepsy, still in preclinical stage, are being evaluated for activity in neuropathic pain. This review is focusing on antiepileptic drugs, which are evaluated for their analgesic activity in major tests related with neuropathic pain. Relation between structure, mechanism of action and result in tests such as the Chung model (spinal nerve ligation SNL), the Bennett model (chronic constriction injury of sciatic nerve CCI) and other tests are considered. The first examples are carbamazepine, gabapentin, and lacosamide as drugs well established in epilepsy market as well as drug candidates such as valnoctamide, and other valproic acid derivatives, novel biphenyl pyrazole derivatives, etc. Moreover, clinical efficacy related with listed animal models has been discussed.

  7. Cerebral stimulation for the affective component of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Andre G.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Plow, Ela; Malone, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review the current state of cerebral stimulation for neuropathic pain and to propose that cerebral stimulation should aim at the affective sphere of chronic pain rather than solely focusing on the primary sensory-discriminative sphere. Methods The past and current goals of cerebral stimulation are reviewed as well as its limitations. A novel deep brain stimulation approach is proposed to evaluate this conceptual shift fromsomatosensory to affective sphere of pain targeting Approach Thalamic and other central pain syndromes aretypically intractable to current treatment methods, including cerebral neuromodulation of somatosensory pathways, leading to long-term distress and disability. Our modern understanding of chronic pain pathophysiology is based largely on the neuromatrix theory, where cognitive, affective and sensory-discriminative spheres contribute equally to the overall pain experience. During the last decade, the safety and feasibility of chronic stimulation of neural pathways related to mood and affect has been explored with promising results. Here, we propose a novel approach to modulate the affective sphere of chronic pain by targeting similar networks in patients with treatment-refractory central pain. Our primary goal is not to produce (or measure) analgesia, but rather to modulate the affective burden of chronic. Discussion Cerebral neuromodulation for neuropathic pain has had limited efficacy thus far. Shifting our aim to neural networks related to the affective sphere of pain may allow us to reduce pain conditioning and pain-related disability. Our ultimate goal is to promote rehabilitation from chronic pain - social and occupational. PMID:23094938

  8. Surgically-Induced Neuropathic Pain (SNPP): Understanding the Perioperative Process

    PubMed Central

    Borsook, David; Kussman, Barry D.; George, Edward; Becerra, Lino R.; Burke, Dennis W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Nerve damage takes place during surgery. As a consequence, significant numbers (10–40%) of patients experience chronic neuropathic pain termed surgically induced neuropathic pain (SNPP). Background The initiating surgery and nerve damage set off a cascade of events that includes both pain and an inflammatory response, resulting in ‘peripheral’ and ‘central sensitization’, with the latter resulting from repeated barrages of neural activity from nociceptors. In affected patients these initial events produce chemical, structural and functional changes in the peripheral (PNS) and central nervous (CNS) systems. The maladaptive changes in damaged nerves lead to peripheral manifestations of the neuropathic state – allodynia, sensory loss, shooting pains etc., that can manifest long after the effects of the surgical injury have resolved. The CNS manifestations that occur are termed ‘centralization of pain’ and affect sensory, emotional and other (e.g., cognitive) systems as well as contributing to some of the manifestations of the chronic pain syndrome (e.g., depression). Conclusions Currently there are no objective measures of pain in the peri-operative period. As such intermittent pain or continuous may take place during and after surgery. New technologies including direct measures of specific brain function of nociception and new insights into preoperative evaluation of patients including genetic predisposition appear to provide initial opportunities for decreasing the burden of SNPP until treatments with high efficacy and low side effects that either prevent or treat pain are discovered. PMID:23059501

  9. Analgesic effects of naringenin in rats with spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    HU, CHUAN YIN; ZHAO, YUN-TAO

    2014-01-01

    Naringenin, a flavonoid abundant in citrus fruits, such as grapefruits, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. The present study aimed to investigate the analgesic potential of naringenin in L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced peripheral neuropathic pain and the underlying mechanisms associated with neuroinflammation. Different doses of naringenin or saline were administered intrathecally once daily for 11 consecutive days, from 3 days prior to surgery to 7 days after surgery. Pain development was assessed 1 day prior to and 7–14 days after surgery in terms of mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency. Astrocytic and microglial activation and production of inflammatory mediators were determined on day 14 after surgery. The results demonstrated that naringenin dose-dependently attenuated the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia induced by SNL. Furthermore, naringenin significantly inhibited SNL-induced activation of glial cells (astrocytes and microglia). Morover, the upregulated expression of inflammatory mediators in neuropathic pain was significantly inhibited by naringenin. Our findings suggested that repeated administration of naringenin may alleviate neuropathic pain, possibly through inhibiting neuroinflammation. PMID:24944810

  10. Elevated Neurosteroids in the Lateral Thalamus Relieve Neuropathic Pain in Rats with Spared Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Meng-Meng; Wu, Honghai; Hou, Yanning; Li, Yun-Feng; Yin, Yuxin; Zheng, Lemin; Liu, Feng-Yu; Yi, Ming; Wan, You

    2016-08-01

    Neurosteroids are synthesized in the nervous system from cholesterol or steroidal precursors imported from peripheral sources. These compounds are important allosteric modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid A receptors (GABAARs), which play a vital role in pain modulation in the lateral thalamus, a main gate where somatosensory information enters the cerebral cortex. Using high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, we found increased levels of neurosteroids (pregnenolone, progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, allopregnanolone, and tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone) in the chronic stage of neuropathic pain (28 days after spared nerve injury) in rats. The expression of the translocator protein TSPO, the upstream steroidogenesis rate-limiting enzyme, increased at the same time. In vivo stereotaxic microinjection of neurosteroids or the TSPO activator AC-5216 into the lateral thalamus (AP -3.0 mm, ML ±3.0 mm, DV 6.0 mm) alleviated the mechanical allodynia in neuropathic pain, while the TSPO inhibitor PK 11195 exacerbated it. The analgesic effects of AC-5216 and neurosteroids were significantly attenuated by the GABAAR antagonist bicuculline. These results suggested that elevated neurosteroids in the lateral thalamus play a protective role in the chronic stage of neuropathic pain.

  11. Neutropenia occurring after starting gabapentin for neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, E; Martin, D

    2004-12-01

    We report a case of neutropenia occurring in a patient receiving gabapentin for neuropathic pain. Five weeks after treatment started, the patient was admitted to hospital with neutropenic sepsis. Gabapentin is widely used, and neutropenia is a rare adverse effect. This case highlights a serious and potential life-threatening complication.

  12. How diagnostic tests help to disentangle the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain symptoms in painful neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Truini, Andrea; Cruccu, Giorgio

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathic pain, ie, pain arising directly from a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory afferent pathway, manifests with various symptoms, the commonest being ongoing burning pain, electrical shock-like sensations, and dynamic mechanical allodynia. Reliable insights into the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain symptoms come from diagnostic tests documenting and quantifying somatosensory afferent pathway damage in patients with painful neuropathies. Neurophysiological investigation and skin biopsy studies suggest that ongoing burning pain primarily reflects spontaneous activity in nociceptive-fiber pathways. Electrical shock-like sensations presumably arise from high-frequency ectopic bursts generated in demyelinated, nonnociceptive, Aβ fibers. Although the mechanisms underlying dynamic mechanical allodynia remain debatable, normally innocuous stimuli might cause pain by activating spared and sensitized nociceptive afferents. Extending the mechanistic approach to neuropathic pain symptoms might advance targeted therapy for the individual patient and improve testing for new drugs.

  13. Resveratrol attenuates neuropathic pain through balancing pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines release in mice.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lei; Ding, Qian; Gao, Changjun; Sun, Xude

    2016-05-01

    Anti-inflammatory activity of resveratrol has been widely studied, while its beneficial effect on the management of neuropathic pain, a refractory chronic syndrome with pro-inflammation implicated in, is very little investigated. In the present study, the effects of different doses and various time window of administration of resveratrol were explored in a neuropathic mouse model of chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. It was demonstrated that pretreatment of resveratrol (5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg) for 7 consecutive days before CCI did not alleviate neuropathic pain, while it clearly relieved the pain when administrated after CCI and such pain relief effect was more pronounced when administrated right after the peak of pain symptom at day 7 after CCI, as evidenced by the alleviation of thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Such a beneficial effect of resveratrol was in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistic study showed that resveratrol repressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, and promoted the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 at the same time, which was further confirmed in a cell model of microglia. It was also shown that neuropathic pain inversely correlated with pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, but not with anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in all experimental mice from Spearman correlation coefficient. Our study reveals that resveratrol displays a significant neuropathic pain relief effect and paved a way for novel treatment of chronic pain.

  14. [Personality and coping in neuropathic chronic pain: a predictable divorce].

    PubMed

    Soriano Pastor, José F; Monsalve Dolz, Vicente; Ibáñez Guerra, Elena; Gómez Carretero, Patricia

    2010-11-01

    We approach the problem about relationships between personality dimensions and the use of coping strategies in chronic pain patients. The most frequently used theoretical model in the area of stress and its relation to pain is the transactional model, taking into account that the incorporation of personality traits improves predictions via coping in the stress process. Following the Big Five model, the relationships between personality and coping strategies in patients with chronical neuropathic pain were established. The results showed slight relationships between the Big-Five dimensions and coping. A vulnerable personality profile in patients with chronic neuropathic pain was obtained, consisting of high neuroticism, low extraversion, openness to experience and responsibility, and moderate agreeableness.

  15. Impairment of adenylyl cyclase-mediated glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the periaqueductal grey in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2015-01-01

    phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor (Ro 20-1724) or an A1-adenosine antagonist (DPCPX). Both forskolin- and isoproterenol-induced EPSC potentiation was impaired in PAG slices of SNL rats. The SNL group had lower AC, but not PDE, activity in PAG synaptosomes than the sham group. Conversely, IPSCs in vlPAG slices were not different between SNL and sham groups. Intra-vlPAG microinjection of forskolin alleviated SNL-induced mechanical allodynia in rats. These results suggest that SNL leads to inadequate descending pain inhibition resulting from impaired glutamatergic synaptic plasticity mediated by the AC–cAMP–PKA signalling cascade, possibly due to AC down-regulation in the PAG, leading to long-term neuropathic pain. PMID:25868084

  16. Pharmacological kynurenine 3-monooxygenase enzyme inhibition significantly reduces neuropathic pain in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Rojewska, Ewelina; Piotrowska, Anna; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the involvement of the kynurenine pathway in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases, but the role of this system in neuropathic pain requires further extensive research. Therefore, the aim of our study was to examine the role of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (Kmo), an enzyme that is important in this pathway, in a rat model of neuropathy after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve. For the first time, we demonstrated that the injury-induced increase in the Kmo mRNA levels in the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was reduced by chronic administration of the microglial inhibitor minocycline and that this effect paralleled a decrease in the intensity of neuropathy. Further, minocycline administration alleviated the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced upregulation of Kmo mRNA expression in microglial cell cultures. Moreover, we demonstrated that not only indirect inhibition of Kmo using minocycline but also direct inhibition using Kmo inhibitors (Ro61-6048 and JM6) decreased neuropathic pain intensity on the third and the seventh days after CCI. Chronic Ro61-6048 administration diminished the protein levels of IBA-1, IL-6, IL-1beta and NOS2 in the spinal cord and/or the DRG. Both Kmo inhibitors potentiated the analgesic properties of morphine. In summary, our data suggest that in neuropathic pain model, inhibiting Kmo function significantly reduces pain symptoms and enhances the effectiveness of morphine. The results of our studies show that the kynurenine pathway is an important mediator of neuropathic pain pathology and indicate that Kmo represents a novel pharmacological target for the treatment of neuropathy.

  17. Neuropathic pain in people with cancer (part 2): pharmacological and non-pharmacological management.

    PubMed

    Taverner, Tarnia

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the management of neuropathic pain associated with cancer and to provide helpful clinical advice for nurses working with patients who may have neuropathic pain. While cancer pain is a mixed-mechanism pain, this article will focus only on neuropathic pain management. The impact of neuropathic pain on patients' quality of life is great and while many patients recover from their cancer, a significant number continue to suffer from a neuropathic pain syndrome. Management of neuropathic pain is significantly different from management of nociceptive pain with respect to pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies. Neuropathic pain is complex, and as such requires complex management using pharmacological as well as non-pharmacological approaches. Specific drugs for neuropathic pain may be effective for some patients, but not all; therefore, ongoing and comprehensive assessment and management are required. Furthermore, these patients may require trials of several drugs before they find one that works for them. It is important for nurses to understand neuropathic pain, its manifestation, impact on quality of life and management when nursing patients with neuropathic pain associated with cancer.

  18. Topical combinations aimed at treating microvascular dysfunction reduce allodynia in rat models of CRPS-I and neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ragavendran, J. Vaigunda; Laferrière, André; Xiao, Wen Hua; Bennett, Gary J.; Padi, Satyanarayana S.V.; Zhang, Ji; Coderre, Terence J.

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that various chronic pain syndromes exhibit tissue abnormalities caused by microvasculature dysfunction in the blood vessels of skin, muscle or nerve. We tested whether topical combinations aimed at improving microvascular function would relieve allodynia in animal models of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) and neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that topical administration of either α2-adrenergic (α2A) receptor agonists or nitric oxide (NO) donors combined with either phosphodiesterase (PDE) or phosphatidic acid (PA) inhibitors would effectively reduce allodynia in these animal models of chronic pain. Single topical agents produced significant dose-dependent anti-allodynic effects in rats with chronic post-ischemia pain, and the anti-allodynic dose-response curves of PDE and PA inhibitors were shifted 2.5–10 fold leftward when combined with non-analgesic doses of α2A receptor agonists or NO donors. Topical combinations also produced significant anti-allodynic effects in rats with sciatic nerve injury, painful diabetic neuropathy and chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy. These effects were shown to be produced by a local action, lasted up to 6 h after acute treatment, and did not produce tolerance over 15 days of chronic daily dosing. The present results support the hypothesis that allodynia in animal models of CRPS-I and neuropathic pain is effectively relieved by topical combinations of α2A or NO donors with PDE or PA inhibitors. This suggests that topical treatments aimed at improving microvascular function may reduce allodynia in patients with CRPS-I and neuropathic pain. Perspective This article presents the synergistic anti-allodynic effects of combinations of α2A or NO donors with PDE or PA inhibitors in animal models of CRPS-I and neuropathic pain. The data suggest effective clinical treatment of chronic neuropathic pain may be achieved by therapies that alleviate microvascular dysfunction in affected areas

  19. Management of Neuropathic Pain Associated with Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Ellen M; Rekand, Tiina

    2015-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is an injury to the spinal cord that leads to varying degrees of motor and/or sensory deficits and paralysis. Chronic pain of both neuropathic and nociceptive type is common and contributes to reduced quality of life. The aim of the review is to provide current clinical understanding as well as discuss and evaluate efficacy of pharmacological interventions demonstrated in the clinical studies. The review was based on literature search in PubMed and Medline with words "neuropathic pain" and "spinal cord injury". The review included clinical studies and not experimental data nor case reports. A limited number of randomized and placebo-controlled studies concerning treatment options of neuropathic pain after SCI were identified. Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant and the antiepileptic drugs, gabapentin and pregabalin, are most studied with demonstrated efficacy, and considered to be the primary choice. Opioids have demonstrated conflicting results in the clinical studies. In addition, administration route used in the studies as well as reported side effects restrict everyday use of opioids as well as ketamine and lidocaine. Topical applications of capsaicin or lidocaine as well as intradermal injections of Botulinum toxin are new treatment modalities that are so far not studied on SCI population and need further studies. Non-pharmacological approaches may have additional effect on neuropathic pain. Management of pain should always be preceded by thorough clinical assessment of the type of pain. Patients need a follow-up to evaluate individual effect of applied measures. However, the applied management does not necessarily achieve satisfactory pain reduction. Further clinical studies are needed to evaluate the effect of both established and novel management options.

  20. Neuropathic pain in the community: more under-treated than refractory?

    PubMed

    Torrance, Nicola; Ferguson, Janice A; Afolabi, Ebenezer; Bennett, Michael I; Serpell, Michael G; Dunn, Kate M; Smith, Blair H

    2013-05-01

    Best current estimates of neuropathic pain prevalence come from studies using screening tools detecting pain with probable neuropathic features; the proportion experiencing significant, long-term neuropathic pain, and the proportion not responding to standard treatment are unknown. These "refractory" cases are the most clinically important to detect, being the most severe, requiring specialist treatment. The aim of this study was to estimate the proportion of neuropathic pain in the population that is "refractory," and to quantify associated clinical and demographic features. We posted self-administered questionnaires to 10,000 adult patients randomly selected from 10 general practitioner practices in 5 UK locations. The questionnaire contained chronic pain identification and severity questions, cause of pain, SF-12, EQ-5D, S-LANSS (Self-administered Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Signs and Symptoms), PSEQ (Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire), use of neuropathic pain medications, and health care utilisation. These data were combined to determine the presence and characteristics of "refractory" neuropathic pain according to the defining features identified by a Delphi survey of international experts. Graded categories of chronic pain with and without neuropathic characteristics were generated, incorporating the refractory criteria. Completed questionnaires were returned by 4451 individuals (response rate 47%); 399 had "chronic pain with neuropathic characteristics" (S-LANSS positive, 8.9% of the study sample); 215 (53.9%) also reported a positive relevant history ("Possible neuropathic pain"); and 98 (4.5% of all Chronic Pain) also reported an "adequate" trial of at least one neuropathic pain drug ("Treated possible neuropathic pain"). The most refractory cases were associated with dramatically poorer physical and mental health, lower pain self-efficacy, higher pain intensity and pain-related disability, and greater health care service use.

  1. Actions of the dual FAAH/MAGL inhibitor JZL195 in a murine neuropathic pain model

    PubMed Central

    Adamson Barnes, Nicholas S.; Mitchell, Vanessa A.; Kazantzis, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose While cannabinoids have been proposed as a potential treatment for neuropathic pain, they have limitations. Cannabinoid receptor agonists have good efficacy in animal models of neuropathic pain; they have a poor therapeutic window. Conversely, selective fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors that enhance the endocannabinoid system have a better therapeutic window, but lesser efficacy. We examined whether JZL195, a dual inhibitor of FAAH and monacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), could overcome these limitations. Experimental Approach C57BL/6 mice underwent the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain. Mechanical and cold allodynia, plus cannabinoid side effects, were assessed in response to systemic drug application. Key Results JZL195 and the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55212 produced dose‐dependent reductions in CCI‐induced mechanical and cold allodynia, plus side effects including motor incoordination, catalepsy and sedation. JZL195 reduced allodynia with an ED50 at least four times less than that at which it produced side effects. By contrast, WIN55212 reduced allodynia and produce side effects with similar ED50s. The maximal anti‐allodynic effect of JZL195 was greater than that produced by selective FAAH, or MAGL inhibitors. The JZL195‐induced anti‐allodynia was maintained during repeated treatment. Conclusions and Implications These findings suggest that JZL195 has greater anti‐allodynic efficacy than selective FAAH, or MAGL inhibitors, plus a greater therapeutic window than a cannabinoid receptor agonist. Thus, dual FAAH/MAGL inhibition may have greater potential in alleviating neuropathic pain, compared with selective FAAH and MAGL inhibitors, or cannabinoid receptor agonists. PMID:26398331

  2. A review of the epidemiology of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, and less commonly studied neuropathic pain conditions.

    PubMed

    Sadosky, Alesia; McDermott, Anne M; Brandenburg, Nancy A; Strauss, Marcie

    2008-01-01

    Although the burden of neuropathic pain is well-recognized, the descriptive epidemiology of specific neuropathic pain conditions has not been well-described. While painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia have been widely evaluated, many other peripheral and central neuropathic pain syndromes have been less frequently studied. This review summarizes incidence and/or prevalence information about two relatively frequent neuropathic pain conditions-painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia-and similarly summarizes the more limited epidemiologic information available for other peripheral and central neuropathic pain conditions. The data suggest that while our knowledge is still incomplete, the high frequency of several of these conditions in specific populations should be considered an important impetus for further studies designed to evaluate their contribution to the overall burden of neuropathic pain.

  3. Gabapentin for chronic neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R Andrew; Wiffen, Philip J; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background This review updates parts of two earlier Cochrane reviews investigating effects of gabapentin in chronic neuropathic pain (pain due to nerve damage). Antiepileptic drugs are used to manage pain, predominantly for chronic neuropathic pain, especially when the pain is lancinating or burning. Objectives To evaluate the analgesic effectiveness and adverse effects of gabapentin for chronic neuropathic pain management. Search methods We identified randomised trials of gabapentin in acute, chronic or cancer pain from MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL. We obtained clinical trial reports and synopses of published and unpublished studies from Internet sources. The date of the most recent search was January 2011. Selection criteria Randomised, double-blind studies reporting the analgesic and adverse effects of gabapentin in neuropathic pain with assessment of pain intensity and/or pain relief, using validated scales. Participants were adults aged 18 and over. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data. We calculated numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNTs), concentrating on IMM-PACT (Initiative on Methods, Measurement and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials) definitions of at least moderate and substantial benefit, and to harm (NNH) for adverse effects and withdrawal. Meta-analysis was undertaken using a fixed-effect model. Main results Twenty-nine studies (3571 participants), studied gabapentin at daily doses of 1200 mg or more in 12 chronic pain conditions; 78% of participants were in studies of postherpetic neuralgia, painful diabetic neuropathy or mixed neuropathic pain. Using the IMMPACT definition of at least moderate benefit, gabapentin was superior to placebo in 14 studies with 2831 participants, 43% improving with gabapentin and 26% with placebo; the NNT was 5.8 (4.8 to 7.2). Using the IMMPACT definition of substantial benefit, gabapentin was superior to placebo in 13 studies with 2627 participants, 31% improving with

  4. Neuropathic pain in the community: More under-treated than refractory?

    PubMed Central

    Torrance, Nicola; Ferguson, Janice A.; Afolabi, Ebenezer; Bennett, Michael I.; Serpell, Michael G.; Dunn, Kate M.; Smith, Blair H.

    2013-01-01

    Best current estimates of neuropathic pain prevalence come from studies using screening tools detecting pain with probable neuropathic features; the proportion experiencing significant, long-term neuropathic pain, and the proportion not responding to standard treatment are unknown. These “refractory” cases are the most clinically important to detect, being the most severe, requiring specialist treatment. The aim of this study was to estimate the proportion of neuropathic pain in the population that is “refractory,” and to quantify associated clinical and demographic features. We posted self-administered questionnaires to 10,000 adult patients randomly selected from 10 general practitioner practices in 5 UK locations. The questionnaire contained chronic pain identification and severity questions, cause of pain, SF-12, EQ-5D, S-LANSS (Self-administered Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Signs and Symptoms), PSEQ (Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire), use of neuropathic pain medications, and health care utilisation. These data were combined to determine the presence and characteristics of “refractory” neuropathic pain according to the defining features identified by a Delphi survey of international experts. Graded categories of chronic pain with and without neuropathic characteristics were generated, incorporating the refractory criteria. Completed questionnaires were returned by 4451 individuals (response rate 47%); 399 had “chronic pain with neuropathic characteristics” (S-LANSS positive, 8.9% of the study sample); 215 (53.9%) also reported a positive relevant history (“Possible neuropathic pain”); and 98 (4.5% of all Chronic Pain) also reported an “adequate” trial of at least one neuropathic pain drug (“Treated possible neuropathic pain”). The most refractory cases were associated with dramatically poorer physical and mental health, lower pain self-efficacy, higher pain intensity and pain-related disability, and greater health care service use

  5. Neuropathic pain management in chronic laminitis.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Bernd; Bauquier, Sébastien H; Zarucco, Laura

    2010-08-01

    Managing pain in horses afflicted by chronic laminitis is one of the greatest challenges in equine clinical practice because it is the dreadful suffering of the animals that most often forces the veterinarian to end the battle with this disease. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of the complex mechanisms involved in generating and amplifying pain in animals with laminitis and, based on this information, to propose a modified approach to pain therapy. Furthermore, a recently developed pain scoring technique is presented that may help better quantify pain and the monitoring of responses to analgesic treatment in horses with laminitis.

  6. Topical phenytoin for the treatment of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Kopsky, David J; Keppel Hesselink, Jan M

    2017-01-01

    We developed and tested a new putative analgesic cream, based on the anticonvulsant phenytoin in patients suffering from treatment refractory neuropathic pain. The use of commercial topical analgesics is not widespread due to the facts that capsaicin creams or patches can give rise to side effects, such as burning, and analgesic patches (e.g., lidocaine 5% patches) have complex handling, especially for geriatric patients. Only in a few countries, compounded creams based on tricyclic antidepressants or other (co-)analgesics are available. Such topical analgesic creams, however, are easy to administer and have a low propensity for inducing side effects. We, therefore, developed a new topical cream based on 5% and 10% phenytoin and described three successfully treated patients suffering from neuropathic pain. All patients were refractory to a number of other analgesics. In all patients, phenytoin cream was effective in reducing pain completely, without any side effects, and the tolerability was excellent. The onset of action of the phenytoin creams was within 30 minutes. Phenytoin cream might become a new treatment modality of the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:28280381

  7. EZH2 regulates spinal neuroinflammation in rats with neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ruchi; Weng, Han-Rong

    2017-05-04

    Alteration in gene expression along the pain signaling pathway is a key mechanism contributing to the genesis of neuropathic pain. Accumulating studies have shown that epigenetic regulation plays a crucial role in nociceptive process in the spinal dorsal horn. In this present study, we investigated the role of enhancer of zeste homolog-2 (EZH2), a subunit of the polycomb repressive complex 2, in the spinal dorsal horn in the genesis of neuropathic pain in rats induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation. EZH2 is a histone methyltransferase, which catalyzes the methylation of histone H3 on K27 (H3K27), resulting in gene silencing. We found that levels of EZH2 and tri-methylated H3K27 (H3K27TM) in the spinal dorsal horn were increased in rats with neuropathic pain on day 3 and day 10 post nerve injuries. EZH2 was predominantly expressed in neurons in the spinal dorsal horn under normal conditions. The number of neurons with EZH2 expression was increased after nerve injury. More strikingly, nerve injury drastically increased the number of microglia with EZH2 expression by more than sevenfold. Intrathecal injection of the EZH2 inhibitor attenuated the development and maintenance of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with nerve injury. Such analgesic effects were concurrently associated with the reduced levels of EZH2, H3K27TM, Iba1, GFAP, TNF-α, IL-1β, and MCP-1 in the spinal dorsal horn in rats with nerve injury. Our results highly suggest that targeting the EZH2 signaling pathway could be an effective approach for the management of neuropathic pain.

  8. A novel rat forelimb model of neuropathic pain produced by partial injury of the median and ulnar nerves.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hanju; Kim, Myung Ah; Back, Seung Keun; Eun, Jong Shin; Na, Heung Sik

    2011-05-01

    The vast majority of human peripheral nerve injuries occur in the upper limb, whereas the most animal studies have been conducted using the hindlimb models of neuropathic pain, involving damages of the sciatic or lumbar spinal nerve(s). We attempted to develop a rat forelimb model of peripheral neuropathy by partial injury of the median and ulnar nerves. The halves of each nerve were transected by microscissors at about 5mm proximal from the elbow joint and behavioral signs of neuropathic pain, such as mechanical and cold allodynia, and heat hyperalgesia, were monitored up to 126 days following nerve injury. Mechanical allodynia was assessed by measuring the forepaw withdrawal threshold to von Frey filaments, and cold allodynia was evaluated by measuring the time spent in lifting or licking the forepaw after applying acetone to it. Heat hyperalgesia was also monitored by investigating the forepaw withdrawal latencies using the Hargreaves' test. After the nerve injury, the experimental animals exhibited long-lasting clear neuropathic pain-like behaviors, such as reduced forepaw withdrawal threshold to von Frey filaments, the increased response duration of the forepaw to acetone application, and the decreased withdrawal latency to radiant heat stimulation. These behaviors were significantly alleviated by administration of gabapentin (5 or 50mg/kg, i.p.) in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, these abnormal sensitivities are interpreted as the signs of neuropathic pain following injury of the median and ulnar nerves. Our rat forelimb model of neuropathic pain may be useful for studying human neuropathic pain and screening for valuable drug candidates.

  9. Interventional management of neuropathic pain: NeuPSIG recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, Robert H.; O’Connor, Alec B.; Kent, Joel; Mackey, Sean C.; Raja, Srinivasa N.; Stacey, Brett R.; Levy, Robert M.; Backonja, Miroslav; Baron, Ralf; Harke, Henning; Loeser, John D.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Turk, Dennis C.; Wells, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is often refractory to pharmacologic and non-interventional treatment. On behalf of the International Association for the Study of Pain Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group (NeuPSIG), the authors evaluated systematic reviews, clinical trials, and existing guidelines for the interventional management of NP. Evidence is summarized and presented for neural blockade, spinal cord stimulation (SCS), intrathecal medication, and neurosurgical interventions in patients with the following peripheral and central NP conditions: herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN); painful diabetic and other peripheral neuropathies; spinal cord injury NP; central post-stroke pain; radiculopathy and failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS); complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS); and trigeminal neuralgia and neuropathy. Due to the paucity of high-quality clinical trials, no strong recommendations can be made. Four weak recommendations based on the amount and consistency of evidence, including degree of efficacy and safety, are: (1) epidural injections for herpes zoster; (2) steroid injections for radiculopathy; (3) SCS for FBSS; and (4) SCS for CRPS type 1. Based on the available data, we recommend not to use sympathetic blocks for PHN nor RF lesions for radiculopathy. No other conclusive recommendations can be made due to the poor quality of available of data. Whenever possible, these interventions should either be part of randomized clinical trials or documented in pain registries. Priorities for future research include randomized clinical trials; long-term studies; and head-to-head comparisons among different interventional and non-interventional treatments. PMID:23748119

  10. Interventional management of neuropathic pain: NeuPSIG recommendations.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Robert H; O'Connor, Alec B; Kent, Joel; Mackey, Sean C; Raja, Srinivasa N; Stacey, Brett R; Levy, Robert M; Backonja, Miroslav; Baron, Ralf; Harke, Henning; Loeser, John D; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Turk, Dennis C; Wells, Christopher D

    2013-11-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is often refractory to pharmacologic and noninterventional treatment. On behalf of the International Association for the Study of Pain Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group, the authors evaluated systematic reviews, clinical trials, and existing guidelines for the interventional management of NP. Evidence is summarized and presented for neural blockade, spinal cord stimulation (SCS), intrathecal medication, and neurosurgical interventions in patients with the following peripheral and central NP conditions: herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN); painful diabetic and other peripheral neuropathies; spinal cord injury NP; central poststroke pain; radiculopathy and failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS); complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS); and trigeminal neuralgia and neuropathy. Due to the paucity of high-quality clinical trials, no strong recommendations can be made. Four weak recommendations based on the amount and consistency of evidence, including degree of efficacy and safety, are: 1) epidural injections for herpes zoster; 2) steroid injections for radiculopathy; 3) SCS for FBSS; and 4) SCS for CRPS type 1. Based on the available data, we recommend not to use sympathetic blocks for PHN nor radiofrequency lesions for radiculopathy. No other conclusive recommendations can be made due to the poor quality of available data. Whenever possible, these interventions should either be part of randomized clinical trials or documented in pain registries. Priorities for future research include randomized clinical trials, long-term studies, and head-to-head comparisons among different interventional and noninterventional treatments.

  11. Impact of Neuropathic Pain at the Population Level

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Ana Shirley Maranhao; Baptista, Abrahao Fontes; Mendes, Livia; Silva, Kamilla Soares; Gois, Sharize Cristine de Araujo; Lima, Flavia Manoela de Almeida; Souza, Israel; Sa, Katia Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the chief complaints of individuals who frequent the Family Health Units is chronic pain which, in Salvador, affects over 40% of the population. However, little is known about the type of pain and its impact on quality of life (QoL) at population level. The aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of neuropathic pain on QoL in a community. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted from March to October 2012, in a Family Health Unit, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. The DN-4 (type of pain), body map (location), VAS (intensity) and SF-36 (QoL) instruments were applied. The Chi-square (univariate analysis) and logistic regression (multivariate) tests were used, with IC 95% and P < 0.05. Results In a sample of 191 individuals with chronic pain, predominantly women (86.4%), single (48.7%), nonwhite (93.2%), low educational (46.6%) and low economic (100%) level. The most affected locations of the body were knees, lumbar region and head. In 60.2% of interviewees, neuropathic pain, of high intensity (VAS = 7.09 ± 3.0) predominated, with duration of 8.53 ± 8.8 years and mean QoL was reduced in 47.13%. Conclusions Intense pain in the dorsal region and type of neuropathy are independent predictors for greater compromise of QoL. PMID:24578752

  12. Neuropathic Pain Components in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    An, Howard S; Moon, Seong Hwan; Lee, Hwan Mo; Suh, Seung Woo; Chen, Ding; Jeon, Jin Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence and characteristics of neuropathic pain (NP) in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) according to subgroup analysis of symptoms. Materials and Methods We prospectively enrolled subjects with LSS (n=86) who were scheduled to undergo spinal surgery. The patients were divided into two groups according to a chief complaint of radicular pain or neurogenic claudication. We measured patient's pain score using the visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Leads Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS). According to LANSS value, the prevalence of NP component pain in patients with LSS was assessed. Statistical analysis was performed to find the relationship between LANSS scores and the other scores. Results From our sample of 86 patients, 31 (36.0%) had a NP component, with 24 (63.4%) in the radicular pain group having NP. However, only seven patients (15.6%) in the neurogenic claudication group had NP. The LANSS pain score was not significantly correlated with VAS scores for back pain, but did correlate with VAS scores for leg pain (R=0.73, p<0.001) and with ODI back pain scores (R=0.54, p<0.01). Conclusion One-third of the patients with LSS had a NP component. The presence of radicular pain correlated strongly with NP. The severity of leg pain and ODI score were also closely related to a NP component. This data may prove useful to understanding the pain characteristics of LSS and in better designing clinical trials for NP treatment in patients with LSS. PMID:26069129

  13. Intrathecal baclofen as adjuvant therapy to enhance the effect of spinal cord stimulation in neuropathic pain: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lind, Göran; Meyerson, Björn A; Winter, Jaleh; Linderoth, Bengt

    2004-08-01

    Only about 60-70% of well selected patients with neuropathic pain syndromes of peripheral origin enjoy sufficient pain relief with spinal cord stimulation (SCS). Since recent animal experiments have demonstrated that the GABA-B receptor is pivotal in the effect of SCS on certain neuropathic symptoms, the use of baclofen as an adjunct to stimulation emerged as an option in patients not responding satisfactorily to SCS. Forty-eight patients with neuropathic pain of peripheral origin responding poorly to SCS were enrolled in a study with intrathecal baclofen; in a few cases adenosine was also tried. Twenty patients reported significant pain reduction at bolus trials and were offered implantation of a drug pump. Seven patients subsequently had pumps implanted together with SCS and four had pumps alone. Three patients had only peroral baclofen therapy as an adjunct to SCS. The 14 patients continuing with baclofen therapy as an adjunct to SCS, or alone, were followed for an average of 35 months after pump implant. The group with SCS+pump n=5; 2 explanted) reported an average decrease of pain ratings from VAS 82 to 33. The group with i.t. baclofen only had a pain decrease from VAS 63 to 33, while the three patients with peroral baclofen+SCS had less benefit from drug therapy. Adjunctive drug therapy for patients with unsatisfactory pain relief by SCS may offer a possibility to enhance pain alleviation.

  14. Effect of Sildenafil on Neuropathic Pain and Hemodynamics in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lan Ji; Choi, Jeong Il; Kim, Woong Mo; Lee, Hyung Gon; Kim, Yeo Ok

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The inhibition of phosphodiesterase 5 produces an antinociception through the increase of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), and increasing cGMP levels enhance the release of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Furthermore, this phosphodiesterase 5 plays a pivotal role in the regulation of the vasodilatation associated to cGMP. In this work, we examined the contribution of GABA receptors to the effect of sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor, in a neuropathic pain rat, and assessed the hemodynamic effect of sildenafil in normal rats. Materials and Methods Neuropathic pain was induced by ligation of L5/6 spinal nerves in Sprague-Dawley male rats. After observing the effect of intravenous sildenafil on neuropathic pain, GABAA receptor antagonist (bicuculline) and GABAB receptor antagonist (saclofen) were administered prior to delivery of sildenafil to determine the role of GABA receptors in the activity of sildenafil. For hemodynamic measurements, catheters were inserted into the tail artery. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were measured over 60 min following administration of sildenafil. Results Intravenous sildenafil dose-dependently increased the withdrawal threshold to the von Frey filament application in the ligated paw. Intravenous bicuculline and saclofen reversed the antinociception of sildenafil. Intravenous sildenafil increased the magnitude of MAP reduction at the maximal dosage, but it did not affect HR response. Conclusion These results suggest that sildenafil is active in causing neuropathic pain. Both GABAA and GABAB receptors are involved in the antinociceptive effect of sildenafil. Additionally, intravenous sildenafil reduces MAP without affecting HR. PMID:20046518

  15. GABA and Central Neuropathic Pain following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gwak, Young S.; Hulsebosch, Claire E.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury induces maladaptive synaptic transmission in the somatosensory system that results in chronic central neuropathic pain. Recent literature suggests that glial-neuronal interactions are important modulators in synaptic transmission following spinal cord injury. Neuronal hyperexcitability is one of the predominant phenomenon caused by maladaptive synaptic transmission via altered glial-neuronal interactions after spinal cord injury. In the somatosensory system, spinal inhibitory neurons counter balance the enhanced synaptic transmission from peripheral input. For a decade, the literature suggests that hypofunction of GABAergic inhibitory tone is an important factor in the enhanced synaptic transmission that often results in neuronal hyperexcitability in dorsal horn neurons following spinal cord injury. Neurons and glial cells synergistically control intracellular chloride ion gradients via modulation of chloride transporters, extracellular glutamate and GABA concentrations via uptake mechanisms. Thus, the intracellular “GABA-glutamate-glutamine cycle” is maintained for normal physiological homeostasis. However, hyperexcitable neurons and glial activation after spinal cord injury disrupts the balance of chloride ions, glutamate and GABA distribution in the spinal dorsal horn and results in chronic neuropathic pain. In this review, we address spinal cord injury induced mechanisms in hypofunction of GABAergic tone that results in chronic central neuropathic pain. PMID:21216257

  16. Nerve injury and neuropathic pain — A question of age

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Maria; McKelvey, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The effects of peripheral nerve injury on somatosensory processing and pain are highly dependent upon the age at which the damage occurs. Adult nerve injury rapidly triggers neuropathic pain, but this is not so if the same nerve injury is performed in animals below postnatal day (P) 28, consistent with observations in paediatric patients. However, longitudinal studies show that pain hypersensitivity emerges later in life, when the animal reaches adolescence, an observation that could be of clinical importance. Here we discuss the evidence that the central consequences of nerve damage are critically determined by the status of neuroimmune regulation at different ages. In the first postnatal weeks, when spinal somatosensory circuits are undergoing synaptic reorganisation, the ‘default’ neuroimmune response is skewed in an anti-inflammatory direction, suppressing the excitation of dorsal horn neurons and preventing the onset of neuropathic pain. As animals grow up and the central nervous system matures, the neuroimmune profile shifts in a pro-inflammatory direction, unmasking a ‘latent’ pain response to an earlier nerve injury. The data predicts that nerve injury in infancy and childhood could go unnoticed at the time, but emerge as clinically ‘unexplained’ or ‘functional’ pain in adolescence. PMID:26220898

  17. Dysfunction of cortical dendritic integration in neuropathic pain reversed by serotoninergic neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Santello, Mirko; Nevian, Thomas

    2015-04-08

    Neuropathic pain is caused by long-term modifications of neuronal function in the peripheral nervous system, the spinal cord, and supraspinal areas. Although functional changes in the forebrain are thought to contribute to the development of persistent pain, their significance and precise subcellular nature remain unexplored. Using somatic and dendritic whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from neurons in the anterior cingulate cortex, we discovered that sciatic nerve injury caused an activity-dependent dysfunction of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated (HCN) channels in the dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons resulting in enhanced integration of excitatory postsynaptic inputs and increased neuronal firing. Specific activation of the serotonin receptor type 7 (5-HT7R) alleviated the lesion-induced pathology by increasing HCN channel function, restoring normal dendritic integration, and reducing mechanical pain hypersensitivity in nerve-injured animals in vivo. Thus, serotoninergic neuromodulation at the forebrain level can reverse the dendritic dysfunction induced by neuropathic pain and may represent a potential therapeutical target.

  18. Gabapentin Treatment for Neuropathic Pain in a Child with Sciatic Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Akkurt, Halil Ekrem; Gümüş, Haluk; Göksu, Hamit; Odabaşı, Ömer Faruk; Yılmaz, Halim

    2015-01-01

    There are a restricted number of studies about usage of gabapentin for neuropathic pain treatment of pediatric patients. We shared a 12-year-old male case with severe neuropathic pain that hindered the rehabilitation programme for the loss of muscle power and movement limitation. Neuropathic pain developed after peripheral sciatic damage due to firearm traumatisation did not respond to other medical treatments but healed nearly completely after gabapentin usage. PMID:26346828

  19. A pharmacological treatment algorithm for localized neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Allegri, Massimo; Baron, Ralf; Hans, Guy; Correa-Illanes, Gerardo; Mayoral Rojals, Victor; Mick, Gerard; Serpell, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system and is difficult to manage, often proving refractory to existing treatments. In more than half of cases, it is localized and affects a specific, clearly circumscribed area of the body (localized neuropathic pain, or LNP). A recently developed screening tool enables patients with probable neuropathic pain/LNP to be identified quickly and easily. In view of the conflicting current treatment recommendations, an advisory board of pain specialists met in June 2015 to develop a complementary treatment guidance algorithm, for use in the primary care setting and by non-pain specialists. The starting point of the algorithm is a diagnosis of LNP and there was consensus that first-line treatment should be a topical analgesic agent, because the benefit/risk ratios are far better than for systemic agents. Topical application offers site-specific delivery, a lower total systemic dose and avoidance of first-pass metabolism, reducing the risk of adverse events and drug/drug interactions. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster has most evidence supporting its use in LNP, producing effective analgesia and reducing the associated area of allodynia, but other topical agents include capsaicin, clonidine and botulinum toxin type A. Treatment should be commenced with the topical agent of choice, and the patient re-assessed after an appropriate period. Where the response is good the topical agent is continued, with a re-evaluation after 3-6 months. A systemic agent (e.g. gabapentin, pregabalin, duloxetine, venlafaxine) is added if there is only a partial response, or substituted if there is no response, and the patient re-assessed after a month. If there is poor or no response to the systemic agent the patient should be switched to an alternative one and, if this also proves ineffective, referred to a pain specialist.

  20. Ziconotide infusion for severe chronic pain: case series of patients with neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Wermeling, Daniel P; Berger, Joseph R

    2006-03-01

    Ziconotide intrathecal infusion was recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of intractable severe chronic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain make up a significant population among those who experience chronic pain for which there are less than optimal pharmacotherapeutic options. Published clinical trials provide a global view of ziconotide efficacy and safety. A subset of patients in clinical trials obtained complete pain relief, a remarkable finding given the history of drug treatment for neuropathic pain. To provide more information regarding those who respond to ziconotide therapy, we discuss three patients with neuropathic pain who received ziconotide infusion. Two patients with longstanding neuropathic pain, one with complex regional pain syndrome (formerly known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy) of the leg and one with lumbar radiculitis, achieved temporary but complete pain relief from single 5- and 10-microg epidural test doses. In the third case, a patient with longstanding bilateral leg and foot neuropathic pain from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and antiretroviral drug therapy achieved considerable pain relief from a long-term continuous intrathecal infusion. The patients who received a single dose had mild central nervous system adverse effects such as sedation, somnolence, nausea, headache, and lightheadedness. The patient who received the intrathecal infusion experienced mild-to-severe adverse effects depending on the rate of infusion; these effects included sedation, confusion, memory impairment, slurred speech, and double vision. This patient could sense impending adverse effects and made rate adjustments or suspended infusion to avert untoward symptoms. In all three cases, patients achieved considerable pain relief that was long-lasting and persisted well after dose administration or suspension of infusion.

  1. Differential pain modulation properties in central neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gruener, Hila; Zeilig, Gabi; Laufer, Yocheved; Blumen, Nava; Defrin, Ruth

    2016-07-01

    It seems that central neuropathic pain (CNP) is associated with altered abilities to modulate pain; whereas dysfunction in descending pain inhibition is associated with the extent of chronic pain distribution, enhanced pain excitation is associated with the intensity of chronic pain. We investigated the hypothesis that CNP is associated with decreased descending pain inhibition along with increased neuronal excitability and that both traits are associated with spinothalamic tract (STT) damage. Chronic spinal cord injury subjects with CNP (n = 27) and without CNP (n = 23) and healthy controls (n = 20) underwent the measurement of pain adaptation, conditioned pain modulation (CPM), tonic suprathreshold pain (TSP), and spatial summation of pain above injury level. Central neuropathic pain subjects also underwent at and below-lesion STT evaluation and completed the questionnaires. Central neuropathic pain subjects showed decreased CPM and increased enhancement of TSP compared with controls. Among CNP subjects, the dysfunction of CPM and pain adaptation correlated positively with the number of painful body regions. The magnitude of TSP and spatial summation of pain correlated positively with CNP intensity. STT scores correlated with CNP intensity and with TSP, so that the more affected the STT below injury level, the greater the CNP and TSP magnitude. It seems that CNP is associated with altered abilities to modulate pain, whereas dysfunction in descending pain inhibition is associated with the extent of chronic pain distribution and enhanced pain excitation is associated with the intensity of chronic pain. Thus, top-down processes may determine the spread of CNP, whereas bottom-up processes may determine CNP intensity. It also seems that the mechanisms of CNP may involve STT-induced hyperexcitability. Future, longitudinal studies may investigate the timeline of this scenario.

  2. Prevalence and associations of neuropathic pain in a cohort of multi-ethnic Asian low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Kew, Yueting; Tan, Cheng-Yin; Ng, Chong-Jing; Thang, Sue-Sien; Tan, Leong-Hooi; Khoo, Yvonne Khaii; Lim, Jun-Ni; Ng, Jia-Hui; Chan, Chris Yin-Wei; Kwan, Mun-Keong; Goh, Khean-Jin

    2017-04-01

    The prevalence of neuropathic low back pain differs in different ethnic populations. The aims of the study are to determine its frequency and associations in a multi-ethnic cohort of Asian low back pain patients. This was a cross-sectional study of low back patients seen at the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Neuropathic low back pain patients were identified using the painDETECT questionnaire and compared with non-neuropathic (unclear or nociceptive) low back pain patients, in terms of socio-demographic and clinical factors, pain severity (numerical pain rating scale, NPRS), disability (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, RMDQ), as well as anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS). Of 210 patients, 26 (12.4%) have neuropathic low back pain. Neuropathic pain is associated with non-Chinese ethnicity, higher body mass index and pain radiation below the knee. Patients with neuropathic pain have significantly higher NPRS and RMDQ scores, and there are more subjects with anxiety on HADS. However, there are no differences between the groups in age, gender, pain duration or underlying diagnosis of low back pain. The prevalence of neuropathic low back pain in a multi-ethnic Malaysian cohort is lower than previously reported in other populations with possible differences between ethnic groups. It is associated with greater pain severity, disability and anxiety.

  3. Rediscovery of Nefopam for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Nefopam (NFP) is a non-opioid, non-steroidal, centrally acting analgesic drug that is derivative of the non-sedative benzoxazocine, developed and known in 1960s as fenazocine. Although the mechanisms of analgesic action of NFP are not well understood, they are similar to those of triple neurotransmitter (serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine) reuptake inhibitors and anticonvulsants. It has been used mainly as an analgesic drug for nociceptive pain, as well as a treatment for the prevention of postoperative shivering and hiccups. Based on NFP's mechanisms of analgesic action, it is more suitable for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Intravenous administration of NFP should be given in single doses of 20 mg slowly over 15-20 min or with continuous infusion of 60-120 mg/d to minimize adverse effects, such as nausea, cold sweating, dizziness, tachycardia, or drowsiness. The usual dose of oral administration is three to six times per day totaling 90-180 mg. The ceiling effect of its analgesia is uncertain depending on the mechanism of pain relief. In conclusion, the recently discovered dual analgesic mechanisms of action, namely, a) descending pain modulation by triple neurotransmitter reuptake inhibition similar to antidepressants, and b) inhibition of long-term potentiation mediated by NMDA from the inhibition of calcium influx like gabapentinoid anticonvulsants or blockade of voltage-sensitive sodium channels like carbamazepine, enable NFP to be used as a therapeutic agent to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:24748937

  4. Hematopoietic pannexin 1 function is critical for neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Janelle L.; Arandjelovic, Sanja; Brown, Gregory; K. Mendu, Suresh; S. Schappe, Michael; Buckley, Monica W.; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Shu, Shaofang; Kim, Jin K.; Chung, Joyce; Krupa, Julia; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna; Desai, Bimal N.; Ravichandran, Kodi S.; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain symptoms respond poorly to available therapeutics, with most treated patients reporting unrelieved pain and significant impairment in daily life. Here, we show that Pannexin 1 (Panx1) in hematopoietic cells is required for pain-like responses following nerve injury in mice, and a potential therapeutic target. Panx1 knockout mice (Panx1−/−) were protected from hypersensitivity in two sciatic nerve injury models. Bone marrow transplantation studies show that expression of functional Panx1 in hematopoietic cells is necessary for mechanical hypersensitivity following nerve injury. Reconstitution of irradiated Panx1 knockout mice with hematopoietic Panx1−/− cells engineered to re-express Panx1 was sufficient to recover hypersensitivity after nerve injury; this rescue required expression of a Panx1 variant that can be activated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Finally, chemically distinct Panx1 inhibitors blocked development of nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity and partially relieved this hypersensitivity after it was established. These studies indicate that Panx1 expressed in immune cells is critical for pain-like effects following nerve injury in mice, perhaps via a GPCR-mediated activation mechanism, and suggest that inhibition of Panx1 may be useful in treating neuropathic pain. PMID:28195232

  5. MicroRNAs as modulators and biomarkers of inflammatory and neuropathic pain conditions.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Hjalte H; Duroux, Meg; Gazerani, Parisa

    2014-11-01

    The post-transcriptional regulator molecules, microRNAs, have emerged as important biomarkers and modulators of numerous pathophysiological processes including oncogenesis and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, a significant number of dysregulations in microRNAs have been reported in patients suffering from painful disorders such as complex regional pain syndrome, cystitis-induced chronic pain and irritable bowel disorder, in both affected tissues and the circulation. Moreover, microRNAs are known to be involved in pain processing based on several recent findings in animal models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The basis of this review was to cover and summarize available articles in English encompassing "microRNA and pain". In animal pain models widespread microRNA modulation is present and manifests on multiple levels i.e.: the dorsal root ganglia, the spinal dorsal horn and the brain. Numerous functional in vivo studies have found that dysregulated microRNAs are involved in the post-transcriptional modulation of genes implicated in pain generation and maintenance. Lastly, a few animal studies have delivered promising results as to the possibility of applying microRNAs as therapeutics to alleviate established pain and several clinical studies have highlighted the potential in applying microRNAs as biomarkers in painful conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome and fibromyalgia. This review briefly introduces the basics of microRNAs, their biogenesis and function, and mainly focuses on the recent advances made in understanding the role of microRNAs in relation to pain processing and painful conditions. It also provides an overview of widely diverse methodological approaches and results with a potential for future implications of microRNAs in the diagnosis and treatment of pain.

  6. Intermittent fasting alleviates the neuropathic phenotype in a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Madorsky, Irina; Opalach, Katherine; Waber, Amanda; Verrier, Jonathan D; Solmo, Chelsea; Foster, Thomas; Dunn, William A; Notterpek, Lucia

    2009-04-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) neuropathies linked to the misexpression of peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) are progressive demyelinating disorders of the peripheral nervous system. In this study we asked whether dietary restriction by intermittent fasting (IF) could alleviate the neuropathic phenotype in the Trembler J (TrJ) mouse model of CMT1A. Our results show that neuropathic mice kept on a five month long IF regimen had improved locomotor performance compared to ad libitum (AL) fed littermates. The functional benefits of this dietary intervention are associated with an increased expression of myelin proteins combined with a thicker myelin sheath, less redundant basal lamina, and a reduction in aberrant Schwann cell proliferation. These morphological improvements are accompanied by a decrease in PMP22 protein aggregates, and enhanced expression of cytosolic chaperones and constituents of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. These results indicate that dietary restriction is beneficial for peripheral nerve function in TrJ neuropathic mice, as it promotes the maintenance of locomotor performance.

  7. Intermittent fasting alleviates the neuropathic phenotype in a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Madorsky, Irina; Opalach, Katherine; Waber, Amanda; Verrier, Jonathan D.; Solmo, Chelsea; Foster, Thomas; Dunn, William A; Notterpek, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) neuropathies linked to the misexpression of peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) are progressive demyelinating disorders of the peripheral nervous system. In this study we asked whether dietary restriction by intermittent fasting (IF) could alleviate the neuropathic phenotype in the Trembler J (TrJ) mouse model of CMT1A. Our results show that neuropathic mice kept on a five month long IF regimen had improved locomotor performance compared to ad libitum (AL) fed littermates. The functional benefits of this dietary intervention are associated with an increased expression of myelin proteins combined with a thicker myelin sheath, less redundant basal lamina, and a reduction in aberrant Schwann cell proliferation. These morphological improvements are accompanied by a decrease in PMP22 protein aggregates, and enhanced expression of cytosolic chaperones and constituents of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. These results indicate that dietary restriction is beneficial for peripheral nerve function in TrJ neuropathic mice, as it promotes the maintenance of locomotor performance. PMID:19320048

  8. Case Report: Neuropathic pain in a patient with congenital insensitivity to pain.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Daniel W; Lee, Michael C H; Harrison, E Katherine; Menon, David K; Woods, C Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    We report a unique case of a woman with Channelopathy-associated Insensitivity to Pain (CIP) Syndrome, who developed features of neuropathic pain after sustaining pelvic fractures and an epidural hematoma that impinged on the right fifth lumbar (L5) nerve root. Her pelvic injuries were sustained during painless labor, which culminated in a Cesarean section. She had been diagnosed with CIP as child, which was later confirmed when she was found to have null mutations of the SCN9A gene that encodes the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. She now complains of troubling continuous buzzing in both legs and a vice-like squeezing in the pelvis on walking. Quantitative sensory testing showed that sensory thresholds to mechanical stimulation of the dorsum of both feet had increased more than 10-fold on both sides compared with tests performed before her pregnancy. These findings fulfill the diagnostic criteria for neuropathic pain. Notably, she mostly only experiences the negative symptoms (such as numbness and tingling, but also electric shocks), and she has not reported sharp or burning sensations, although the value of verbal descriptors is somewhat limited in a person who has never felt pain before. However, her case strongly suggests that at least some of the symptoms of neuropathic pain can persist despite the absence of the Nav1.7 channel. Pain is a subjective experience and this case sheds light on the transmission of neuropathic pain in humans that cannot be learned from knockout mice.

  9. Activation of Corticostriatal Circuitry Relieves Chronic Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michelle; Manders, Toby R.; Eberle, Sarah E.; Su, Chen; D'amour, James; Yang, Runtao; Lin, Hau Yueh; Deisseroth, Karl; Froemke, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Neural circuits that determine the perception and modulation of pain remain poorly understood. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) provides top-down control of sensory and affective processes. While animal and human imaging studies have shown that the PFC is involved in pain regulation, its exact role in pain states remains incompletely understood. A key output target for the PFC is the nucleus accumbens (NAc), an important component of the reward circuitry. Interestingly, recent human imaging studies suggest that the projection from the PFC to the NAc is altered in chronic pain. The function of this corticostriatal projection in pain states, however, is not known. Here we show that optogenetic activation of the PFC produces strong antinociceptive effects in a rat model (spared nerve injury model) of persistent neuropathic pain. PFC activation also reduces the affective symptoms of pain. Furthermore, we show that this pain-relieving function of the PFC is likely mediated by projections to the NAc. Thus, our results support a novel role for corticostriatal circuitry in pain regulation. PMID:25834050

  10. [Chemokines and attraction of myeloid cells in peripheral neuropathic pains].

    PubMed

    Sapienza, Anaïs; Réaux-Le Goazigo, Annabelle; Rostène, William; Mélik-Parsadaniantz, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain has become a real social issue, due to the difficulty of its treatment and by the major impairment to quality of life that it causes in every day behavior. Understanding neurobiological basis and pathophysiological causes of diverse painful syndromes constantly evolves and reports the complexity of its mechanisms. Unfortunately this complexity makes it difficult to discover effective treatments against chronic pain syndromes, in particular as regards peripheral neuropathic pains. Recent studies reveal that, during chronic peripheral neuropathy, inflammatory mediators (in particular chemokines), besides their implications in the modulation of nociceptive messages and central neuroinflammatory mechanisms, play a critical role in the orchestration of the immune response induced by a peripheral nerve lesion. In this review, after a brief introduction about chemokines and their role in neuromodulation of the nociceptive message, we will attempt to define their functions and implications in the immune response associated to peripheral neuropathies. Thus, perfectly understanding the molecular and cellular communications between the nervous system and the immune system will be useful for the future development of novel and innovative therapeutic strategies against these highly disabling pathologies.

  11. Capsaicinoids in the treatment of neuropathic pain: a review

    PubMed Central

    Pappagallo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of neuropathic pain is difficult. Oral pharmaceuticals have significant side effects, and treatment efficacy tends to be modest. The use of topical analgesics reduces the potential for systemic side effects and allows direct application of medications to the area of pain. The natural spicy substance, capsaicin, has historically been known for its topical use. Capsaicin, once applied to the skin, causes a brief initial sensitization followed by a prolonged desensitization of the local pain nerves. This occurs through stimulation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) expressing pain nerve fibers. While low-dose capsaicin has not resulted in good efficacy, the larger dose 8% topical capsaicin has had some of the best data currently available in the treatment of post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) and other neuropathic conditions. This paper discusses the data currently existing for capsaicin 8% in the treatment of PHN. It further reviews data for the low-dose capsaicin products and the current status in the development of other capsaicinoids, e.g. resiniferotoxin, and high-concentration liquid capsaicin. PMID:24409200

  12. Botulinum Toxin for Neuropathic Pain: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyun-Mi; Chung, Myung Eun

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), derived from Clostridium botulinum, has been used therapeutically for focal dystonia, spasticity, and chronic migraine. Its spectrum as a potential treatment for neuropathic pain has grown. Recent opinions on the mechanism behind the antinociceptive effects of BoNT suggest that it inhibits the release of peripheral neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators from sensory nerves. There is some evidence showing the axonal transport of BoNT, but it remains controversial. The aim of this review is to summarize the experimental and clinical evidence of the antinociceptive effects, mechanisms, and therapeutic applications of BoNT for neuropathic pain conditions, including postherpetic neuralgia, complex regional pain syndrome, and trigeminal neuralgia. The PubMed and OvidSP databases were searched from 1966 to May 2015. We assessed levels of evidence according to the American Academy of Neurology guidelines. Recent studies have suggested that BoNT injection is an effective treatment for postherpetic neuralgia and is likely efficient for trigeminal neuralgia and post-traumatic neuralgia. BoNT could also be effective as a treatment for diabetic neuropathy. It has not been proven to be an effective treatment for occipital neuralgia or complex regional pain syndrome. PMID:26287242

  13. Neuropathic Pain in Elderly Patients with Chronic Low Back Painand Effects of Pregabalin: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kenyu; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Sadayuki; Harada, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Preliminary study. Purpose To assess the association of neuropathic pain with chronic low back pain (LBP) and the effect of pregabalin on neuropathic pain in the elderly. Overview of Literature Of those with chronic LBP, 37% were predominantly presenting with neuropathic pain in young adults. Pregabalin is effective for pain in patients with diabetic neuropathy and peripheral neuralgia. No study has reported on the effects of pregabalin for chronic LBP in elderly patients yet. Methods Pregabalin was administered to 32 patients (age, ≥65 years) with chronic LBP for 4 weeks. Pain and activities of daily living were assessed using the Neuropathic Pain Screening Questionnaire (NePSQ), the pain DETECT questionnaire, visual analog scale, the Japanese Orthopedic Association score, the short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire and the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Modic change and spinal canal stenosis were investigated using magnetic resonance imaging. Results Altogether, 43.3% of patients had neuropathic pain according to the NePSQ and 15.6% patients had pain according to the pain DETECT. The efficacy rate of pregabalin was 73.3%. A significant effect was observed in patients with neuropathic pain after 4 weeks of administration. Conclusions Neuropathic pain was slightly less frequently associated with chronic LBP in the elderly. Pregabalin was effective in reducing pain in patients with chronic LBP accompanied with neuropathic pain. Lumbar spinal stenosis and lower limb symptoms were observed in patients with neuropathic pain. We recommend the use of pregabalin for patients after evaluating a screening score, clinical symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging studies. PMID:25901238

  14. Thalamic activity and biochemical changes in individuals with neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gustin, S M; Wrigley, P J; Youssef, A M; McIndoe, L; Wilcox, S L; Rae, C D; Edden, R A E; Siddall, P J; Henderson, L A

    2014-05-01

    There is increasing evidence relating thalamic changes to the generation and/or maintenance of neuropathic pain. We have recently reported that neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with altered thalamic anatomy, biochemistry, and activity, which may result in disturbed thalamocortical oscillatory circuits. Despite this evidence, it is possible that these thalamic changes are not responsible for the presence of pain per se, but result as a consequence of the injury. To clarify this subject, we compared brain activity and biochemistry in 12 people with below-level neuropathic pain after complete thoracic spinal cord injury with 11 people with similar injuries and no neuropathic pain and 21 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Quantitative arterial spinal labelling was used to measure thalamic activity, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in neuronal variability quantifying N-acetylaspartate and alterations in inhibitory function quantifying gamma amino butyric acid. This study revealed that the presence of neuropathic pain is associated with significant changes in thalamic biochemistry and neuronal activity. More specifically, the presence of neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury is associated with significant reductions in thalamic N-acetylaspartate, gamma amino butyric acid content, and blood flow in the region of the thalamic reticular nucleus. Spinal cord injury on its own did not account for these changes. These findings support the hypothesis that neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic structure and function, which may disturb central processing and play a key role in the experience of neuropathic pain.

  15. Thalamic activity and biochemical changes in individuals with neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Gustin, S.M.; Wrigley, P.J.; Youssef, A.M.; McIndoe, L.; Wilcox, S.L.; Rae, C.D.; Edden, R; Siddall, P.J.; Henderson, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence relating thalamic changes to the generation and/or maintenance of neuropathic pain. We have recently reported that neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with altered thalamic anatomy, biochemistry and activity, which may result in disturbed thalamocortical oscillatory circuits. Despite this evidence, it is possible that these thalamic changes are not responsible for the presence of pain per se, but result as a consequence of the injury. To clarify this subject, we compared brain activity and biochemistry in 12 people with below-level neuropathic pain after complete thoracic spinal cord injury to 11 people with similar injuries and no neuropathic pain and 21 age and gender matched healthy controls. Quantitative arterial spinal labelling was used to measure thalamic activity and magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in neuronal variability quantifying N-acetylaspartate and alterations in inhibitory function quantifying gamma amino butyric acid. This study revealed that the presence of neuropathic pain is associated with significant changes in thalamic biochemistry and neuronal activity. More specifically, the presence of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury is associated with significant reductions in thalamic N-acetylaspartate, gamma amino butyric acid content and blood flow in the region of the thalamic reticular nucleus. Spinal cord injury on its own did not account for these changes. These findings support the hypothesis that neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic structure and function, which may disturb central processing and play a key role in the experience of neuropathic pain. PMID:24530612

  16. Brain-evoked potentials as a tool for diagnosing neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Pazzaglia, Costanza; Valeriani, Massimiliano

    2009-05-01

    Neuropathic pain is a complex subject, not completely understood yet, and it is quite common in clinical practice, even outside of a neurological context. Neuropathic pain, often being a chronic process, alters and profoundly affects the quality of life. Therefore, the management of neuropathic pain involves a multidimensional approach, as physicians have to take care not only of the objective aspects of the problem, but also of the subjective experiences of pain. This explains why the attainment of a diagnosis becomes so important, as it allows clinicians to treat the patients with the best therapeutic approach. Several studies report the use of brain-evoked potentials for studying patients suffering from neuropathic pain. In particular, laser- and contact heat-evoked potentials have proved useful for the diagnosis of clinical conditions characterized by neuropathic pain. However, although these tools are reliable and safe instruments to assess function of the nociceptive system, their use is still largely confined to research purposes.

  17. [Controlled release hydromorphone for visceral, somatic and neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Alon, E; Cachin, C

    2010-03-03

    The aim of this multicentre, longitudinal investigation was to document the efficacy and tolerability profiles of controlled release hydromorphone in patients with heavy visceral, somatic or neuropathic pain under practical conditions. To this end, a prospective observational study was conducted in 57 centres in Switzerland, on a total of 196 patients. After an average of 43 days of treatment with controlled release hydromorphone, the intensity of momentary pain dropped by 46.5% and that of maximum pain dropped by 41.3%, with the efficacy of the treatment being most pronounced with visceral and somatic pain. At the same time, the prevalence of sleep disorders as a result of pain decreased from initially 86.7% to 21.0%. Controlled release hydromorphone was excellently tolerated in this group of elderly (average age 70.6 years), multimorbid pain patients receiving various medical treatments (average of 2.4 drugs in addition to pain medication), even in the voluntary long-term extension study of up to 96 days. No medical interactions were reported. Six and thirteen weeks after introducing the treatment, 89.8% and 85.2%, respectively, were still taking controlled release hydromorphone. Controlled release hydromorphone is a recommendable option for practical treatment of heavy and extremely heavy pain of various genesis.

  18. Fear of pain in children and adolescents with neuropathic pain and CRPS

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    A significant proportion of children and adolescents with chronic pain endorse elevated pain-related fear. Pain-related fear is associated with high levels of disability, depressive symptoms, and school impairment. Due to faulty nerve signaling, individuals with neuropathic pain and CRPS may be more prone to develop pain-related fear as they avoid use of and neglect the affected body area(s), resulting in exacerbated symptoms, muscle atrophy, maintenance of pain signaling, and ongoing pain-related disability. Not surprisingly, effective treatments for elevated pain-related fears involve exposure to previously avoided activities to down-regulate incorrect pain signaling. In the context of intensive interdisciplinary pain treatment of youth with neuropathic pain, decreasing pain-related fear is associated with improved physical and psychological functioning, while high initial pain-related fear is a risk factor for less treatment responsiveness. An innovative approach to targeting pain-related fear as well as evidence of a neural response to treatment involving decoupling of the amygdala with key fear circuits in youth with CRPS suggest breakthroughs in our ability to ameliorate these issues. PMID:26785161

  19. Combined approaches for the relief of spinal cord injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Young S; Kim, Hee Young; Lee, Bong Hyo; Yang, Chae Ha

    2016-04-01

    The adequate treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced neuropathic pain still remains an unresolved problem. The current medications predominantly used in the SCI-induced neuropathic pain therapy are morphine, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, and antiepileptics, which suggests that psychiatric aspects might be important factors in the treatment of neuropathic pain. It is well documented that the modulation of the sensory events is not a unique way for achieving pain relief. In addition, pain patients still express dissatisfaction and complain of unwanted effects of the medications, suggesting that alternative approaches for the treatment of neuropathic pain are essential. In psychiatry, pain relief represents relaxation and a feeling of comfort and satisfaction, which suggests that cognitive and emotional motivations are important factors in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The comorbidity of chronic pain and psychiatric disorders, which is well recognized, suggests that the effective therapeutic relief for neuropathic pain induced by SCI can be achieved in conjunction with the management of the sensory and psychiatric aspects of patient. In this review, we address the feasibility of a combined acupuncture and pharmacotherapy treatment for the relief of neuropathic pain behavior following SCI.

  20. Cannabinoids as pharmacotherapies for neuropathic pain: from the bench to the bedside.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Elizabeth J; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2009-10-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating form of chronic pain resulting from nerve injury, disease states, or toxic insults. Neuropathic pain is often refractory to conventional pharmacotherapies, necessitating validation of novel analgesics. Cannabinoids, drugs that share the same target as Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, have the potential to address this unmet need. Here, we review studies evaluating cannabinoids for neuropathic pain management in the clinical and preclinical literature. Neuropathic pain associated with nerve injury, diabetes, chemotherapeutic treatment, human immunodeficiency virus, multiple sclerosis, and herpes zoster infection is considered. In animals, cannabinoids attenuate neuropathic nociception produced by traumatic nerve injury, disease, and toxic insults. Effects of mixed cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) agonists, CB(2) selective agonists, and modulators of the endocannabinoid system (i.e., inhibitors of transport or degradation) are compared. Effects of genetic disruption of cannabinoid receptors or enzymes controlling endocannabinoid degradation on neuropathic nociception are described. Specific forms of allodynia and hyperalgesia modulated by cannabinoids are also considered. In humans, effects of smoked marijuana, synthetic Delta(9)-THC analogs (e.g., Marinol, Cesamet) and medicinal cannabis preparations containing both Delta(9)-THC and cannabidiol (e.g., Sativex, Cannador) in neuropathic pain states are reviewed. Clinical studies largely affirm that neuropathic pain patients derive benefits from cannabinoid treatment. Subjective (i.e., rating scales) and objective (i.e., stimulus-evoked) measures of pain and quality of life are considered. Finally, limitations of cannabinoid pharmacotherapies are discussed together with directions for future research.

  1. Differential drug effects on spontaneous and evoked pain behavior in a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Deseure, K; Hans, GH

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Baclofen and morphine have shown efficacy against mechanical allodynia after infraorbital nerve chronic constriction injury (IoN-CCI). No drug effects have yet been reported on spontaneous trigeminal neuropathic pain. It has been proposed that the directed face grooming behavior that also develops following IoN-CCI offers a measure of spontaneous trigeminal neuropathic pain. Subjects and methods We examined the effects of a continuous 1-week infusion of 30 mg/day carbamazepine (the first-line drug treatment for trigeminal neuralgia), 1.06 mg/day baclofen, 4.18 mg/day clomipramine, and 5 mg/day morphine on spontaneous and mechanically evoked pain behavior (ie, directed face grooming and von Frey testing) in IoN-CCI rats. Results Isolated face grooming was significantly reduced in rats receiving carbamazepine and baclofen but not in clomipramine- or morphine-treated rats. All drugs showed significant antiallodynic effects; carbamazepine showed the strongest effects, whereas clomipramine had only minor efficacy. Conclusion The tested drugs have differential effects in the IoN-CCI model, and different neuropathological mechanisms may underlie the different somatosensory symptoms in this model. A mechanism-based approach may be needed to treat (trigeminal) neuropathic pain. The present data support IoN-CCI as a model of trigeminal neuralgia in which isolated face grooming is used as a measure of spontaneous neuropathic pain. PMID:28184169

  2. Cellular prion protein protects from inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Gadotti, Vinicius M; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2011-08-16

    Cellular prion protein (PrPC) inhibits N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Since NMDA receptors play an important role in the transmission of pain signals in the dorsal horn of spinal cord, we thus wanted to determine if PrPC null mice show a reduced threshold for various pain behaviours.We compared nociceptive thresholds between wild type and PrPC null mice in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, in the presence and the absence of a NMDA receptor antagonist. 2-3 months old male PrPC null mice exhibited an MK-801 sensitive decrease in the paw withdrawal threshold in response both mechanical and thermal stimuli. PrPC null mice also exhibited significantly longer licking/biting time during both the first and second phases of formalin-induced inflammation of the paw, which was again prevented by treatment of the mice with MK-801, and responded more strongly to glutamate injection into the paw. Compared to wild type animals, PrPC null mice also exhibited a significantly greater nociceptive response (licking/biting) after intrathecal injection of NMDA. Sciatic nerve ligation resulted in MK-801 sensitive neuropathic pain in wild-type mice, but did not further augment the basal increase in pain behaviour observed in the null mice, suggesting that mice lacking PrPC may already be in a state of tonic central sensitization. Altogether, our data indicate that PrPC exerts a critical role in modulating nociceptive transmission at the spinal cord level, and fit with the concept of NMDA receptor hyperfunction in the absence of PrPC.

  3. Metabolite Concentrations in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex Predict High Neuropathic Pain Impact After Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    in diabetes neuropathy [45] in which ACC NAA concentrations were no different in subjects with neuropathic pain compared with pain-free control...brain regions in patients with diabetes and painful neuropathy . Diabetes Care. 2008; 31:980–1. [PubMed: 18299445] 46. Spielberger, CD.; Garsuch, RC... diabetes [45] and after SCI [34]. Basic research suggests that glial activation is an important mechanism underlying neuropathic pain after SCI [22,23

  4. Ulinastatin attenuates neuropathic pain induced by L5-VRT via the calcineurin/IL-10 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Handong; Nie, Bilin; Wang, Peizong; Li, Qiang; Huang, Wan; Xin, Wenjun; Zeng, Weian; Liu, Xianguo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ulinastatin, an effective inhibitor of the inflammatory response in clinical applications, can attenuate hyperalgesia in rodents. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we first examined the change in the calcineurin level, which plays an important role in regulating cytokine release in the nervous system, following lumbar 5 ventral root transection in the rat. Furthermore, we determined whether intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of ulinastatin attenuated pain behavior via inhibition of the calcineurin-mediated inflammatory response induced by lumbar 5 ventral root transection. The results showed that the paw withdrawal threshold and paw withdrawal latency were significantly decreased following lumbar 5 ventral root transection compared to the sham group. Neuropathic pain induced by lumbar 5 ventral root transection significantly decreased the expression of calcineurin in the DRG, and calcineurin was mostly located with NF-200-positive cells, IB4-positive cells, and CGRP-positive cells and less with GFAP-positive satellite cells. Furthermore, intrathecal (i.t.) injection of exogenous calcineurin attenuated the pain behavior induced by lumbar 5 ventral root transection. Importantly, intraperitoneal injection of ulinastatin alleviated the pain behavior and calcineurin downregulation induced by lumbar 5 ventral root transection. Lastly, the cytokine IL-10 was significantly decreased following lumbar 5 ventral root transection, and application of calcineurin (intrathecal) or ulinastatin (intraperitoneal) inhibited the IL-10 downregulation induced by lumbar 5 ventral root transection. These results suggested that ulinastatin, by acting on the CN/IL-10 pathway, might be a novel and effective drug for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  5. Selective small molecule angiotensin II type 2 receptor antagonists for neuropathic pain: preclinical and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Maree T; Anand, Praveen; Rice, Andrew S C

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathic pain affects up to 10% of the general population, but drug treatments recommended for the treatment of neuropathic pain are associated with modest efficacy and/or produce dose-limiting side effects. Hence, neuropathic pain is an unmet medical need. In the past 2 decades, research on the pathobiology of neuropathic pain has revealed many novel pain targets for use in analgesic drug discovery programs. However, these efforts have been largely unsuccessful as molecules that showed promising pain relief in rodent models of neuropathic pain generally failed to produce analgesia in early phase clinical trials in patients with neuropathic pain. One notable exception is the angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor that has clinical validity on the basis of a successful double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of EMA401, a highly selective, orally active, peripherally restricted AT2 receptor antagonist in patients with postherpetic neuralgia. In this study, we review research to date on target validation, efficacy, and mode of action of small molecule AT2 receptor antagonists in rodent models of peripheral neuropathic pain and in cultured human sensory neurons, the preclinical pharmacokinetics of these compounds, and the outcome of the above clinical trial.

  6. Methylcobalamin ameliorates neuropathic pain induced by vincristine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Wang, Wei; Zhong, Xiong-Xiong; Feng, Yi-Wei; Liu, Xian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Background Vincristine, a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, often induces painful peripheral neuropathy and there are currently no effective drugs to prevent or treat this side effect. Previous studies have shown that methylcobalamin has potential analgesic effect in diabetic and chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion model; however, whether methylcobalamin has effect on vincristine-induced painful peripheral neuropathy is still unknown. Results We found that vincristine-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, accompanied by a significant loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers in the plantar hind paw skin and an increase in the incidence of atypical mitochondria in the sciatic nerve. Moreover, in the spinal dorsal horn, the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase and the protein expression of p-p65 as well as tumor necrosis factor α was increased, whereas the protein expression of IL-10 was decreased following vincristine treatment. Furthermore, intraperitoneal injection of methylcobalamin could dose dependently attenuate vincristine-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, which was associated with intraepidermal nerve fibers rescue, and atypical mitochondria prevalence decrease in the sciatic nerve. Moreover, methylcobalamin inhibited the activation of NADPH oxidase and the downstream NF-κB pathway. Production of tumor necrosis factor α was also decreased and production of IL-10 was increased in the spinal dorsal horn following methylcobalamin treatment. Intrathecal injection of Phorbol-12-Myristate-13-Acetate, a NADPH oxidase activator, could completely block the analgesic effect of methylcobalamin. Conclusions Methylcobalamin attenuated vincrinstine-induced neuropathic pain, which was accompanied by inhibition of intraepidermal nerve fibers loss and mitochondria impairment. Inhibiting the activation of NADPH oxidase and the downstream NF-κB pathway, resulting in the rebalancing of

  7. Pro-inflammatory cytokines involvement in the hesperidin antihyperalgesic effects at peripheral and central levels in a neuropathic pain model.

    PubMed

    Carballo-Villalobos, A I; González-Trujano, M E; Alvarado-Vázquez, N; López-Muñoz, F J

    2017-03-06

    Emerging evidence proposes a link between immune changes and pain, which is consistent with the inflammation theory and the increased incidence of neurodegenerative diseases. Flavonoids have long been used because of their anti-inflammatory potential activity and they are considered a promising alternative to alleviate neuropathic pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the antihyperalgesic effect of hesperidin and the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines evaluated at peripheral and central levels in the chronic constriction injury as model of neuropathic pain in rats. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were assessed in the aesthesiometer and plantar tests, respectively, as related to the presence of cytokines concentrations (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) in sciatic nerve and segments of the spinal cord after 15 days chronic constriction injury model in rats receiving vehicle or hesperidin. Antihyperalgesic response of hesperidin (100 mg/kg) was associated to the presence of cytokines mainly at several sections of the spinal cord suggesting not only peripheral but also its involvement in central sensitization in the experimental neuropathic pain.

  8. Evaluation of milnacipran, in comparison with amitriptyline, on cold and mechanical allodynia in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Berrocoso, Esther; Mico, Juan-Antonio; Vitton, Olivier; Ladure, Philippe; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Depoortère, Ronan; Bardin, Laurent

    2011-03-25

    Milnacipran, a serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), has shown efficacy against several chronic pain conditions, including fibromyalgia. Here, we evaluated, in rats, its anti-allodynic effects following acute or sub-chronic treatment in a model of neuropathic pain (chronic constriction injury, CCI, of the sciatic nerve). Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant active pre-clinically and clinically against neuropathic pains, was added as a comparison compound. Upon acute i.p. administration, milnacipran was potently efficacious in the CCI model. It significantly reduced thermal allodynia in the cold (4°C) plate test (MED=2.5mg/kg), and attenuated mechanical allodynia in the von Frey filaments test (MED=10mg/kg). Given sub-chronically (7day, b.i.d.), milnacipran was effective at 10mg/kgi.p. in both tests. Acute amitriptyline (10mg/kgi.p.) was efficacious against mechanical, but less so against cold allodynia; under sub-chronic conditions, it was only active against mechanical allodynia. These data show that milnacipran is as efficacious as the reference compound amitriptyline in a pre-clinical model of injury-induced neuropathy, and demonstrate for the first time that it is active acutely and sub-chronically against cold allodynia. They also suggest that milnacipran has the potential to alleviate allodynia associated with nerve compression-induced neuropathic pain in the clinic (for example following discal hernia, avulsion or cancer-induced tissue damage).

  9. Neuropathic pain in the general population: a systematic review of epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    van Hecke, O; Austin, Sophie K; Khan, Rafi A; Smith, B H; Torrance, N

    2014-04-01

    Most patients with neuropathic pain symptoms present and are managed in primary care, with only a minority being referred for specialist clinical assessment and diagnoses. Previous reviews have focused mainly on specific neuropathic pain conditions based in specialist settings. This is the first systematic review of epidemiological studies of neuropathic pain in the general population. Electronic databases were searched from January 1966 to December 2012, and studies were included where the main focus was on neuropathic pain prevalence and/or incidence, either as part of a specific neuropathic pain-related condition or as a global entity in the general population. We excluded studies in which data were extracted from pain or other specialist clinics or focusing on specific population subgroups. Twenty-one articles were identified and underwent quality assessment and data extraction. Included studies differed in 3 main ways: method of data retrieval, case ascertainment tool used, and presentation of prevalence/incidence rates. This heterogeneity precluded any meta-analysis. We categorised comparable incidence and prevalence rates into 2 main subgroups: (1) chronic pain with neuropathic characteristics (range 3-17%), and (2) neuropathic pain associated with a specific condition, including postherpetic neuralgia (3.9-42.0/100,000 person-years [PY]), trigeminal neuralgia (12.6-28.9/100,000 PY), painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (15.3-72.3/100,000 PY), glossopharyngeal neuralgia (0.2-0.4/100,000 PY). These differences highlight the importance of a standardised approach for identifying neuropathic pain in future epidemiological studies. A best estimate of population prevalence of pain with neuropathic characteristics is likely to lie between 6.9% and 10%.

  10. Neuropathic pain in dogs and cats: if only they could tell us if they hurt.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Karol A

    2008-11-01

    Neuropathic pain is difficult to diagnose in veterinary patients because they are unable to verbalize their pain. By assuming that neuropathic pain may exist based on the history of events that each patient has experienced, a focused client history and neurologic examination may identify a lesion resulting in persistent or spontaneous pain. Once neuropathic pain is diagnosed, a trial analgesic or acupuncture session(s) should be prescribed with instructions for owners to observe behavior. Dosing of the analgesic can be titrated to the patient's needs while avoiding adverse effects. When a particular analgesic may be ineffectual, an alternate class should be tried. As research into the neurobiologic mechanisms of neuropathic pain continues, specific therapies for its management should eventually appear in the human clinical setting and subsequently be investigated for veterinary clinical use.

  11. Sigma-1 receptors regulate activity-induced spinal sensitization and neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Beatriz; Nadal, Xavier; Portillo-Salido, Enrique; Sánchez-Arroyos, Ricard; Ovalle, Sergio; Palacios, Gabriel; Muro, Asunción; Romero, Luz; Entrena, José Manuel; Baeyens, José Manuel; López-García, José Antonio; Maldonado, Rafael; Zamanillo, Daniel; Vela, José Miguel

    2009-10-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (sigma(1)R) is expressed in key CNS areas involved in nociceptive processing but only limited information is available about its functional role. In the present study we investigated the relevance of sigma(1)R in modulating nerve injury-evoked pain. For this purpose, wild-type mice and mice lacking the sigma(1)R gene were exposed to partial sciatic nerve ligation and neuropathic pain-related behaviors were investigated. To explore underlying mechanisms, spinal processing of repetitive nociceptive stimulation and expression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were also investigated. Sensitivity to noxious heat of homozygous sigma(1)R knockout mice did not differ from wild-type mice. Baseline values obtained in sigma(1)R knockout mice before nerve injury in the plantar, cold-plate and von Frey tests were also indistinguishable from those obtained in wild-type mice. However, cold and mechanical allodynia did not develop in sigma(1)R null mice exposed to partial sciatic nerve injury. Using isolated spinal cords we found that mice lacking sigma(1)R showed reduced wind-up responses respect to wild-type mice, as evidenced by a reduced number of action potentials induced by trains of C-fiber intensity stimuli. In addition, in contrast to wild-type mice, sigma(1)R knockout mice did not show increased phosphorylation of ERK in the spinal cord after sciatic nerve injury. Both wind-up and ERK activation have been related to mechanisms of spinal cord sensitization. Our findings identify sigma(1)R as a constituent of the mechanisms modulating activity-induced sensitization in pain pathways and point to sigma(1)R as a new potential target for drugs designed to alleviate neuropathic pain.

  12. Palmitoylethanolamide, a naturally occurring disease-modifying agent in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Skaper, Stephen D; Facci, Laura; Fusco, Mariella; Della Valle, Maria Federica; Zusso, Morena; Costa, Barbara; Giusti, Pietro

    2014-04-01

    Persistent pain affects nearly half of all people seeking medical care in the US alone, and accounts for at least $80 billion worth of lost productivity each year. Among all types of chronic pain, neuropathic pain stands out: this is pain resulting from damage or disease of the somatosensory nervous system, and remains largely untreatable. With few available treatment options, neuropathic pain represents an area of significant and growing unmet medical need. Current treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain involves several drug classes, including opioids, gabapentinoids, antidepressants, antiepileptic drugs, local anesthetics and capsaicin. Even so, less than half of patients achieve partial relief. This review discusses a novel approach to neuropathic pain management, based on knowledge of: the role of glia and mast cells in pain and neuroinflammation; the body's innate mechanisms to maintain cellular homeostasis when faced with external stressors provoking, for example, inflammation. The discovery that palmitoylethanolamide, a member of the N-acylethanolamine family which is produced from the lipid bilayer on-demand, is capable of exerting anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects by down-modulating both microglial and mast cell activity has led to the application of this fatty acid amide in several clinical studies of neuropathic pain, with beneficial outcome and no indication of adverse effects at pharmacological doses. Collectively, the findings presented here propose that palmitoylethanolamide merits further consideration as a disease-modifying agent for controlling inflammatory responses and related chronic and neuropathic pain.

  13. Neuropathic pain: an updated grading system for research and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Finnerup, Nanna B; Haroutounian, Simon; Kamerman, Peter; Baron, Ralf; Bennett, David L H; Bouhassira, Didier; Cruccu, Giorgio; Freeman, Roy; Hansson, Per; Nurmikko, Turo; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rice, Andrew S C; Serra, Jordi; Smith, Blair H; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Jensen, Troels S

    2016-08-01

    The redefinition of neuropathic pain as "pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system," which was suggested by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) Special Interest Group on Neuropathic Pain (NeuPSIG) in 2008, has been widely accepted. In contrast, the proposed grading system of possible, probable, and definite neuropathic pain from 2008 has been used to a lesser extent. Here, we report a citation analysis of the original NeuPSIG grading paper of 2008, followed by an analysis of its use by an expert panel and recommendations for an improved grading system. As of February, 2015, 608 eligible articles in Scopus cited the paper, 414 of which cited the neuropathic pain definition. Of 220 clinical studies citing the paper, 56 had used the grading system. The percentage using the grading system increased from 5% in 2009 to 30% in 2014. Obstacles to a wider use of the grading system were identified, including (1) questions about the relative significance of confirmatory tests, (2) the role of screening tools, and (3) uncertainties about what is considered a neuroanatomically plausible pain distribution. Here, we present a revised grading system with an adjusted order, better reflecting clinical practice, improvements in the specifications, and a word of caution that even the "definite" level of neuropathic pain does not always indicate causality. In addition, we add a table illustrating the area of pain and sensory abnormalities in common neuropathic pain conditions and propose areas for further research.

  14. Economic burden of back and neck pain: effect of a neuropathic component.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Nathan; Patel, Aarti A; Benson, Carmela; Macario, Alex; Kim, Myoung; Biondi, David M

    2014-08-01

    This was a retrospective database analysis (2001-2009) of employees' medical, prescription drug, and absence costs and days from sick leave, short- and long-term disability, and workers' compensation. Employees with an ICD-9 diagnostic code for back or neck pain and an ICD-9 for a back- or neck-related neuropathic condition (eg, myelopathy, compression of the spinal cord, neuritis, radiculitis) or radiculopathy were considered to have nociceptive back or neck pain with a neuropathic component. Employees with an ICD-9 for back pain or neck pain and no ICD-9 for a back- or neck-related neuropathic condition or radiculopathy were defined to have nociceptive back or neck pain. Patients with nociceptive back or neck pain with a neuropathic component were classified as having or not having prior nociceptive pain. Annual costs (medical and prescription drug costs and absence costs) and days from sick leave, short- and long-term disability, and workers' compensation were evaluated. Mean annual total costs were highest ($8512) for nociceptive pain with a neuropathic component with prior nociceptive pain (n=9162 employees), $7126 for nociceptive pain with a neuropathic component with no prior nociceptive pain (n=5172), $5574 for nociceptive pain only (n=35,347), and $3017 for control employees with no back or neck pain diagnosis (n=226,683). Medical, short-term disability, and prescription drugs yielded the highest incremental costs compared to controls. Mean total absence days/year were 8.26, 7.86, 5.70, and 3.44, respectively. The economic burden of back pain or neck pain is increased when associated with a neuropathic component.

  15. Thalamic pain alleviated by stellate ganglion block

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenlong; Yang, Min; Liu, Pengfei; Zhong, Wenxiang; Zhang, Wenchuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Thalamic pain is a distressing and treatment-resistant type of central post-stroke pain. Although stellate ganglion block is an established intervention used in pain management, its use in the treatment of thalamic pain has never been reported. Patient concerns: A 66-year-old woman presented with a 3-year history of severe intermittent lancinating pain on the right side of the face and the right hand. The pain started from the ulnar side of the right forearm after a mild ischemic stroke in bilateral basal ganglia and left thalamus. Weeks later, the pain extended to the dorsum of the finger tips and the whole palmar surface, becoming more severe. Meanwhile, there was also pain with similar characteristics emerging on her right face, resembling atypical trigeminal neuralgia. Diagnoses: Thalamic pain was diagnosed. Interventions: After refusing the further invasive treatment, she was suggested to try stellate ganglion block. Outcomes: After a 3-day period of pain free (numerical rating scale: 0) postoperatively, she reported moderate to good pain relief with a numerical rating scale of about 3 to 4 lasting 1 month after the first injection. Pain as well as the quality of life was markedly improved with less dose of analgesic agents. Lessons: Stellate ganglion block may be an optional treatment for thalamic pain. PMID:28151918

  16. Histone deacetylase inhibitors relieve morphine resistance in neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Hitoshi; Matsushita, Yosuke; Araki, Kohei; Mukae, Takehiro; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is often insensitive to morphine. Our previous study has demonstrated that neuron-restrictive silencer factor represses mu opioid receptor (MOP) gene expression in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) via histone hypoacetylation-mediated mechanisms after peripheral nerve injury, thereby causing loss of peripheral morphine analgesia. Here, we showed that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, such as trichostatin A and valproic acid, restored peripheral and systemic morphine analgesia in neuropathic pain. Also, these agents blocked nerve injury-induced MOP down-regulation in the DRG. These results suggest that HDAC inhibitors could serve as adjuvant analgesics to morphine for the management of neuropathic pain.

  17. Metabolic brain activity suggestive of persistent pain in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Scott J; Millecamps, Magali; Aliaga, Antonio; Seminowicz, David A; Low, Lucie A; Bedell, Barry J; Stone, Laura S; Schweinhardt, Petra; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pain is a central characteristic of neuropathic pain conditions in humans. Knowing whether rodent models of neuropathic pain produce persistent pain is therefore crucial to their translational applicability. We investigated the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain and the formalin pain model in rats using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with the metabolic tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to determine if there is ongoing brain activity suggestive of persistent pain. For the formalin model, under brief anesthesia we injected one hindpaw with 5% formalin and the FDG tracer into a tail vein. We then allowed the animals to awaken and observed pain behavior for 30 min during the FDG uptake period. The rat was then anesthetized and placed in the scanner for static image acquisition, which took place between minutes 45 and 75 post-tracer injection. A single reference rat brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) was used to align the PET images with the Paxinos and Watson rat brain atlas. Increased glucose metabolism was observed in the somatosensory region associated with the injection site (S1 hindlimb contralateral), S1 jaw/upper lip and cingulate cortex. Decreases were observed in the prelimbic cortex and hippocampus. Second, SNI rats were scanned 3 weeks post-surgery using the same scanning paradigm, and region-of-interest analyses revealed increased metabolic activity in the contralateral S1 hindlimb. Finally, a second cohort of SNI rats were scanned while anesthetized during the tracer uptake period, and the S1 hindlimb increase was not observed. Increased brain activity in the somatosensory cortex of SNI rats resembled the activity produced with the injection of formalin, suggesting that the SNI model may produce persistent pain. The lack of increased activity in S1 hindlimb with general anesthetic demonstrates that this effect can be blocked, as well as highlights the importance of investigating brain activity in awake and behaving

  18. Metabolic brain activity suggestive of persistent pain in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Scott J; Millecamps, Magali; Aliaga, Antonio; Seminowicz, David A; Low, Lucie A; Bedell, Barry J; Stone, Laura S; Schweinhardt, Petra; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2014-05-01

    Persistent pain is a central characteristic of neuropathic pain conditions in humans. Knowing whether rodent models of neuropathic pain produce persistent pain is therefore crucial to their translational applicability. We investigated the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain and the formalin pain model in rats using positron emission tomography (PET) with the metabolic tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to determine if there is ongoing brain activity suggestive of persistent pain. For the formalin model, under brief anesthesia we injected one hindpaw with 5% formalin and the FDG tracer into a tail vein. We then allowed the animals to awaken and observed pain behavior for 30min during the FDG uptake period. The rat was then anesthetized and placed in the scanner for static image acquisition, which took place between minutes 45 and 75 post-tracer injection. A single reference rat brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) was used to align the PET images with the Paxinos and Watson rat brain atlas. Increased glucose metabolism was observed in the somatosensory region associated with the injection site (S1 hindlimb contralateral), S1 jaw/upper lip and cingulate cortex. Decreases were observed in the prelimbic cortex and hippocampus. Second, SNI rats were scanned 3weeks post-surgery using the same scanning paradigm, and region-of-interest analyses revealed increased metabolic activity in the contralateral S1 hindlimb. Finally, a second cohort of SNI rats was scanned while anesthetized during the tracer uptake period, and the S1 hindlimb increase was not observed. Increased brain activity in the somatosensory cortex of SNI rats resembled the activity produced with the injection of formalin, suggesting that the SNI model may produce persistent pain. The lack of increased activity in S1 hindlimb with general anesthetic demonstrates that this effect can be blocked, as well as highlights the importance of investigating brain activity in awake and behaving rodents.

  19. Presynaptic GABAergic inhibition regulated by BDNF contributes to neuropathic pain induction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeremy Tsung-chieh; Guo, Da; Campanelli, Dario; Frattini, Flavia; Mayer, Florian; Zhou, Luming; Kuner, Rohini; Heppenstall, Paul A.; Knipper, Marlies; Hu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The gate control theory proposes the importance of both pre- and post-synaptic inhibition in processing pain signal in the spinal cord. However, although postsynaptic disinhibition caused by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proved as a crucial mechanism underlying neuropathic pain, the function of presynaptic inhibition in acute and neuropathic pain remains elusive. Here we show that a transient shift in the reversal potential (EGABA) together with a decline in the conductance of presynaptic GABAA receptor result in a reduction of presynaptic inhibition after nerve injury. BDNF mimics, whereas blockade of BDNF signalling reverses, the alteration in GABAA receptor function and the neuropathic pain syndrome. Finally, genetic disruption of presynaptic inhibition leads to spontaneous development of behavioural hypersensitivity, which cannot be further sensitized by nerve lesions or BDNF. Our results reveal a novel effect of BDNF on presynaptic GABAergic inhibition after nerve injury and may represent new strategy for treating neuropathic pain. PMID:25354791

  20. Neuropathic Pain and Psychological Morbidity in Patients with Treated Leprosy: A Cross-Sectional Prevalence Study in Mumbai

    PubMed Central

    Lasry-Levy, Estrella; Hietaharju, Aki; Pai, Vivek; Ganapati, Ramaswamy; Rice, Andrew S. C.; Haanpää, Maija; Lockwood, Diana N. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain has been little studied in leprosy. We assessed the prevalence and clinical characteristics of neuropathic pain and the validity of the Douleur Neuropathique 4 questionnaire as a screening tool for neuropathic pain in patients with treated leprosy. The association of neuropathic pain with psychological morbidity was also evaluated. Methodology/Principal Findings Adult patients who had completed multi-drug therapy for leprosy were recruited from several Bombay Leprosy Project clinics. Clinical neurological examination, assessment of leprosy affected skin and nerves and pain evaluation were performed for all patients. Patients completed the Douleur Neuropathique 4 and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire to identify neuropathic pain and psychological morbidity. Conclusions/Significance One hundred and one patients were recruited, and 22 (21.8%) had neuropathic pain. The main sensory symptoms were numbness (86.4%), tingling (68.2%), hypoesthesia to touch (81.2%) and pinprick (72.7%). Neuropathic pain was associated with nerve enlargement and tenderness, painful skin lesions and with psychological morbidity. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 92% in diagnosing neuropathic pain. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 is a simple tool for the screening of neuropathic pain in leprosy patients. Psychological morbidity was detected in 15% of the patients and 41% of the patients with neuropathic pain had psychological morbidity. PMID:21408111

  1. Neuropathic ocular pain due to dry eye is associated with multiple comorbid chronic pain syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Galor, Anat; Covington, Derek; Levitt, Alexandra E.; McManus, Katherine T.; Seiden, Benjamin; Felix, Elizabeth R.; Kalangara, Jerry; Feuer, William; Patin, Dennis J.; Martin, Eden R.; Sarantopoulos, Konstantinos D.; Levitt, Roy C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent data demonstrate that dry eye (DE) susceptibility and other chronic pain syndromes (CPS) such as chronic widespread pain, irritable bowel syndrome and pelvic pain, may share common heritable factors. Previously, we showed that DE patients describing more severe symptoms tended to report features of neuropathic ocular pain (NOP). We hypothesize that patients with a greater number of CPS would have a different DE phenotype compared to those with fewer CPS. We recruited a cohort of 154 DE patients from the Miami Veterans Affairs Hospital and defined high and low CPS groups by cluster analysis. In addition to worse non-ocular pain complaints and higher PTSD and depression scores (P<0.01), we found that the high CPS group reported more severe neuropathic-type DE symptoms compared to the low CPS group, including worse ocular pain assessed via 3 different pain scales (P<0.05), with similar objective corneal DE signs. This is the first study to demonstrate DE patients who manifest a greater number of comorbid CPS report more severe DE symptoms and features of NOP. These findings provide further evidence that NOP may represent a central pain disorder, and that shared mechanistic factors may underlie vulnerability to some forms of DE and other comorbid CPS. PMID:26606863

  2. Neuropathic pain modifies antioxidant activity in rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Renata P; Bosco, Lidiane Dal; Teixeira, Camila M; Araújo, Alex S R; Llesuy, Susana; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia M; Partata, Wania A

    2006-05-01

    Oxidative stress is an important pathophysiological mechanism of many neurological diseases. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species have been cited as molecules involved in the nociceptive process. In this study, rats were submitted to sciatic nerve transection (SNT) for induction of neuropathic pain, and enzyme activities of SOD and catalase as well as lipid peroxidation (LPO) were measured in the lumbosacral spinal cord. The results show that LPO was not changed after SNT. SOD activity was reduced 7 days after SNT, while the change in catalase activity occurred on the third and seventh days in both sham and SNT animals. Hyperalgesia in SNT group was detected at the same points in time. These results suggest that SNT was not a strong enough stimulus to deplete all antioxidant content in the spinal cord, since increase in LPO was not detected. However, the role of oxidative stress in nociception can not be excluded.

  3. Topical analgesics for neuropathic pain: preclinical exploration, clinical validation, future development.

    PubMed

    Sawynok, J

    2014-04-01

    Topical analgesics applied locally to skin or to specialized compartments modify pain by actions on sensory nerve endings and/or adjacent cellular elements. With this approach, there are low systemic drug levels, good tolerability and few drug interactions, and combination with oral formulations is feasible. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the potential for topical analgesics to contribute to improved management of neuropathic pain. Mechanistic and preclinical studies indicate much potential for development of novel topical analgesics for neuropathic pain. In humans, two topical analgesics are approved for use in post-herpetic neuralgia (lidocaine 5% medicated plaster, capsaicin 8% patch), and there is evidence for efficacy in other neuropathic pain conditions. Comparative trials indicate similar efficacy between topical and oral analgesics. Not all individuals respond to topical analgesics, and there is interest in determining factors (patient factors, sensory characteristics) which might predict responsiveness to topical analgesics. There is a growing number of controlled trials and case reports of investigational agents (vasodilators, glutamate receptor antagonists, α2-adrenoreceptor agonists, antidepressants, centrally acting drugs), including combinations of several agents, indicating these produce pain relief in neuropathic pain. There is interest in compounding topical analgesics for neuropathic pain, but several challenges remain for this approach. Topical analgesics have the potential to be a valuable additional approach for the management of neuropathic pain.

  4. The importance of TRPV1-sensitisation factors for the development of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Malek, Natalia; Pajak, Agnieszka; Kolosowska, Natalia; Kucharczyk, Mateusz; Starowicz, Katarzyna

    2015-03-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), classically associated with transduction of high-temperature and low-pH pain, underlies pain hypersensitivity in neuropathic pain. The molecular regulation of TRPV1 channel activity is not yet fully understood. Therefore, we investigated factors regulating sensitisation of this receptor during development of neuropathic pain in a rat model of chronic construction injury (CCI) in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). In the rat CCI model, elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6) in DRG corresponded to development of neuropathic pain. We assessed the expression of known kinases influencing TRPV1 sensitisation at the mRNA and/or protein level. Protein kinase C ε (PKCε) showed the strongest upregulation at the mRNA and protein levels among all tested kinases. Co-expression of PKCε and TRPV1 in L5 DRG of CCI animals was high during the development of neuropathic pain. The number of neurons expressing PKCε increased throughout the experiment. We provide complex data on the expression of a variety of factors involved in TRPV1 sensitisation in a CCI model of neuropathic pain. Our study supports evidence for involvement of TRPV1 in the development of neuropathic pain, by showing increased expression of interleukins and kinases responsible for the channel sensitisation. TNFα and NGF seem to play a role in the transition from acute to neuropathic pain, while PKCε in its maintenance. Further studies might confirm their significance as novel targets for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  5. Functional brain imaging: what has it brought to our understanding of neuropathic pain? A special focus on allodynic pain mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Peyron, Roland

    2016-02-01

    Brain responses to nociception are well identified. The same is not true for allodynic pain, a strong painful sensation in response to touch or innocuous cold stimuli that may be experienced by patients with neuropathic pain. Brain (or spinal cord) reorganization that may explain this paradoxical perception still remains largely unknown. Allodynic pain is associated with abnormally increased activity in SII and in the anterior insular cortex, contralateral and/or ipsilateral to allodynia. Because a bilateral increase in activity has been repeatedly reported in these areas in nociceptive conditions, the observed activation during allodynia can explain that a physiologically nonpainful stimulus could be perceived by the damaged nervous system as a painful one. Both secondary somatosensory and insular cortices receive input from the thalamus, which is a major relay of sensory and spinothalamic pathways, the involvement of which is known to be crucial for the development of neuropathic pain. Both thalamic function and structure have been reported to be abnormal or impaired in neuropathic pain conditions including in the basal state, possibly explaining the spontaneous component of neuropathic pain. A further indication as to how the brain can create neuropathic pain response in SII and insular cortices stems from examples of diseases, including single-case reports in whom a focal brain lesion leads to central pain disappearance. Additional studies are required to certify the contribution of these areas to the disease processes, to disentangle abnormalities respectively related to pain and to deafferentation, and, in the future, to guide targeting of stimulation studies.

  6. Intrathecal Administration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces the Reactive Oxygen Species and Pain Behavior in Neuropathic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, En Ji; Ko, Young Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain induced by spinal or peripheral nerve injury is very resistant to common pain killers, nerve block, and other pain management approaches. Recently, several studies using stem cells suggested a new way to control the neuropatic pain. In this study, we used the spinal nerve L5 ligation (SNL) model to investigate whether intrathecal rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) were able to decrease pain behavior, as well as the relationship between rMSCs and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Methods Neuropathic pain of the left hind paw was induced by unilateral SNL in Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 10 in each group). Mechanical sensitivity was assessed using Von Frey filaments at 3, 7, 10, 12, 14, 17, and 24 days post-ligation. rMSCs (10 µl, 1 × 105) or phosphate buffer saline (PBS, 10 µl) was injected intrathecally at 7 days post-ligation. Dihydroethidium (DHE), an oxidative fluorescent dye, was used to detect ROS at 24 days post-ligation. Results Tight ligation of the L5 spinal nerve induced allodynia in the left hind paw after 3 days post-ligation. ROS expression was increased significantly (P < 0.05) in spinal dorsal horn of L5. Intrathecal rMSCs significantly (P < 0.01) alleviated the allodynia at 10 days after intrathecal injection (17 days post-ligation). Intrathecal rMSCs administration significantly (P < 0.05) reduced ROS expression in the spinal dorsal horn. Conclusions These results suggest that rMSCs may modulate neuropathic pain generation through ROS expression after spinal nerve ligation. PMID:25031809

  7. AMPAkines have novel analgesic properties in rat models of persistent neuropathic and inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Le, Alexander M.; Lee, Michelle; Su, Chen; Zou, Anthony; Wang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Background Novel analgesics that do not suppress the respiratory drive are urgently needed. Glutamate signaling through α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors plays important roles in central pain circuits. AMPAkines augment AMPA receptor function and have been shown to stimulate the respiratory drive to oppose opioid-induced hypoventilation. However, their role in chronic pain states remains unknown. Methods We studied AMPAkines (CX546 and CX516) in rat spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain and Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA) model of inflammatory pain. We measured the effect of AMPAkines on mechanical and cold allodynia. We also evaluated their effect on depressive symptoms of pain using the forced swim test, as time of immobility on this test has been used as a measure for behavioral despair, a feature of depression. Results We found that CX546, compared with DMSO control, reduced both mechanical and sensory allodynia in SNI(DMSO group, n = 9; CX546 group, n = 11) and CFA models (Both DMSO and CX546 groups, n=9). We found that CX546, compared with control, also reduced depressive symptoms of pain by decreasing immobility on the forced swim test in both SNI (both DMSO and CX546 groups, n = 8) and CFA models (both DMSO and CX546 groups, n = 10). Finally, we found that CX516, compared with control, also reduced mechanical and cold allodynia in the SNI model (both DMSO and CX516 groups, n = 10). Conclusions AMPAkines alleviate pain hypersensitivity as well as depression-like behaviors associated with long-lasting nerve injury and inflammatory insult. PMID:25338127

  8. Metabolite concentrations in the anterior cingulate cortex predict high neuropathic pain impact after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Widerström-Noga, Eva; Pattany, Pradip M; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Felix, Elizabeth R; Perez, Salome; Cardenas, Diana D; Martinez-Arizala, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    Persistent pain is a common reason for reduced quality of life after a spinal cord injury (SCI). Biomarkers of neuropathic pain may facilitate translational research and the understanding of underlying mechanisms. Research suggests that pain and affective distress are anatomically and functionally integrated in the anterior cingulate cortex and can modulate sensory and affective aspects of pain. We hypothesized that severe neuropathic pain with a significant psychosocial impact would be associated with metabolite concentrations (obtained by magnetic resonance spectroscopy) in the anterior cingulate cortex, indicating neuronal and/or glial dysfunction. Participants with SCI and severe, high-impact neuropathic pain (SCI-HPI; n=16), SCI and moderate, low-impact neuropathic pain (SCI-LPI; n=24), SCI without neuropathic pain (SCI-noNP; n=14), and able-bodied, pain-free control subjects (A-B; n=22) underwent a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging brain scan. Analyses revealed that the SCI-HPI group had significantly higher levels of myoinositol (Ins) (P<.000), creatine (P=.007), and choline (P=.014), and significantly lower levels of N-acetyl aspartate/Ins (P=.024) and glutamate-glutamine (Glx)/Ins (P=.003) ratios than the SCI-LPI group. The lower Glx/Ins ratio significantly discriminated between SCI-HPI and the A-B (P=.006) and SCI-noNP (P=.026) groups, displayed excellent test-retest reliability, and was significantly related to greater pain severity, interference, and affective distress. This suggests that the combination of lower glutamatergic metabolism and proliferation of glia and glial activation are underlying mechanisms contributing to the maintenance of severe neuropathic pain with significant psychosocial impact in chronic SCI. These findings indicate that the Glx/Ins ratio may be a useful biomarker for severe SCI-related neuropathic pain with significant psychosocial impact.

  9. Neuropathic pain may be common in chronic lower limb tendinopathy: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Patrick C

    2016-01-01

    Background: To identify the prevalence of neuropathic pain, through the use of the painDETECT questionnaire, in a cohort of patients with chronic lower limb tendinopathy conditions. Methods: Patients with chronic lower limb tendinopathy conditions treated within a Sport and Exercise Medicine hospital clinic were identified from clinical records. At the time of the clinical consultation, pain and painDETECT scores were recorded. Results: In total, 282 suitable patients with chronic lower limb tendinopathy conditions were identified who had completed a painDETECT questionnaire. There was a median age of 51.9 years, 35% of patients were male and a median duration of symptoms of 24.0 months. There was a median score of 7.0/10 for self-reported ‘average’ pain and 8.0/10 for self-reported ‘worst’ pain. There was a median painDETECT score of 14.0, 28% of respondents scored 19 or higher with painDETECT (neuropathic component to pain may be likely), 29% scored 13–18 (equivocal result) and 43% of respondents scored 12 or less (neuropathic pain component was unlikely). Conclusions: This study suggests that neuropathic pain as identified by the painDETECT questionnaire may be common in patients with chronic lower limb tendinopathy conditions. It is unclear if patients with tendinopathy who have neuropathic pain may have poorer outcomes from initial treatments, contributing to the high proportion seen in secondary care. These are results from a single hospital clinic, and comparison with a control group is currently lacking. However, on the results to date, neuropathic pain should be considered in management strategies in patients with chronic tendinopathy. PMID:28386400

  10. Recommendations for the pharmacological management of neuropathic pain: an overview and literature update.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Robert H; O'Connor, Alec B; Audette, Joseph; Baron, Ralf; Gourlay, Geoffrey K; Haanpää, Maija L; Kent, Joel L; Krane, Elliot J; Lebel, Alyssa A; Levy, Robert M; Mackey, Sean C; Mayer, John; Miaskowski, Christine; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rice, Andrew S C; Schmader, Kenneth E; Stacey, Brett; Stanos, Steven; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Turk, Dennis C; Walco, Gary A; Wells, Christopher D

    2010-03-01

    The Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group of the International Association for the Study of Pain recently sponsored the development of evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain. Tricyclic antidepressants, dual reuptake inhibitors of serotonin and norepinephrine, calcium channel alpha(2)-delta ligands (ie, gabapentin and pregabalin), and topical lidocaine were recommended as first-line treatment options on the basis of the results of randomized clinical trials. Opioid analgesics and tramadol were recommended as second-line treatments that can be considered for first-line use in certain clinical circumstances. Results of several recent clinical trials have become available since the development of these guidelines. These studies have examined botulinum toxin, high-concentration capsaicin patch, lacosamide, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and combination therapies in various neuropathic pain conditions. The increasing number of negative clinical trials of pharmacological treatments for neuropathic pain and ambiguities in the interpretation of these negative trials must also be considered in developing treatment guidelines. The objectives of the current article are to review the Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group guidelines for the pharmacological management of neuropathic pain and to provide a brief overview of these recent studies.

  11. Pmp22 mutant allele-specific siRNA alleviates demyelinating neuropathic phenotype in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Su; Chang, Eun Hyuk; Koo, Ok Jae; Jwa, Dong Hwan; Mo, Won Min; Kwak, Geon; Moon, Hyo Won; Park, Hwan Tae; Hong, Young Bin; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2017-04-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a genetic disorder that can be caused by aberrations in >80 genes. CMT has heterogeneous modes of inheritance, including autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked dominant, and X-linked recessive. Over 95% of cases are dominantly inherited. In this study, we investigated whether regulation of a mutant allele by an allele-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) can alleviate the demyelinating neuropathic phenotype of CMT. We designed 19 different allele-specific siRNAs for Trembler J (Tr-J) mice harboring a naturally occurring mutation (Leu16Pro) in Pmp22. Using a luciferase assay, we identified an siRNA that specifically and selectively reduced the expression level of the mutant allele and reversed the low viability of Schwann cells caused by mutant Pmp22 over-expression in vitro. The in vivo efficacy of the allele-specific siRNA was assessed by its intraperitoneal injection to postnatal day 6 of Tr-J mice. Administration of the allele-specific siRNA to Tr-J mice significantly enhanced motor function and muscle volume, as assessed by the rotarod test and magnetic resonance imaging analysis, respectively. Increases in motor nerve conduction velocity and compound muscle action potentials were also observed in the treated mice. In addition, myelination, as evidenced by toluidine blue staining and electron microscopy, was augmented in the sciatic nerves of the mice after allele-specific siRNA treatment. After validating suppression of the Pmp22 mutant allele at the mRNA level in the Schwann cells of Tr-J mice, we observed increased expression levels of myelinating proteins such as myelin basic protein and myelin protein zero. These data indicate that selective suppression of the Pmp22 mutant allele by non-viral delivery of siRNA alleviates the demyelinating neuropathic phenotypes of CMT in vivo, implicating allele-specific siRNA treatment as a potent therapeutic strategy for dominantly inherited peripheral neuropathies.

  12. Quality of life and functional capacity are adversely affected in osteoarthritis patients with neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Aşkın, Ayhan; Özkan, Ayten; Tosun, Aliye; Demirdal, Ümit Seçil; İsnaç, Fethi

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the neuropathic pain component of knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients and to investigate the relationship between neuropathic pain, disease stage, functional state, depression, anxiety, and quality of life. This study included 60 patients with knee OA. All demographic data and radiological results were recorded. Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Timed Up and Go Test, Chair Stand Test, Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), PainDETECT questionnaire, DN4 questionnaire, Short form-36 questionnaire, and Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale were performed for each patient. Neuropathic pain was detected in 66.7% of patients based on the PainDETECT scale and in 46.7% of patients based on DN4 scale. VAS-resting, OA grade, WOMAC scores, and SF-scores showed a significant difference in patients that detected neuropathic pain with PainDETECT (p<0.05). Based on the DN4 scale, patients with neuropathic pain had significantly higher WOMAC scores and significantly lower SF-36 scores (p<0.05). The PainDETECT questionnaire scores showed positive correlations with Timed Up-and-go Test, VAS-resting, WOMAC scores, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale scores, and a negative correlation with all SF-36 scores (p<0.05). DN4 questionnaire scores showed a negative correlation with SF-36 scores and positive correlation with WOMAC scores (p<0.05). To conclude, it should be kept in mind that patients with knee OA who describe intense pain may have a neuropathic component involved in the clinical condition. Quality of life and functional capacity are adversely affected in patients with knee OA who have neuropathic pain. This should be taken into account while planning the treatment of these patients.

  13. Analgesic Effect of Indian Gooseberry (Emblica officinalis Fruit) Extracts on Postoperative and Neuropathic Pain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Dong Wook; Kim, Jae Goo; Kim, Yun Tai

    2016-01-01

    Indian gooseberry (Emblica officinalis fruit), also known as “Amla” is one of the oldest edible fruits known in India. It has also traditionally been used to treat inflammation, and as an analgesic to treat wounds. However, experimental evidence for the analgesic effects of E. officinalis has been lacking. The present study investigated whether E. officinalis extracts exhibit analgesic effects in the plantar incision (PI) and spared nerve injury (SNI) pain-model rats. We evaluated the mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) using von Frey filaments, and pain-related behavior was determined after surgery based on ultrasonic vocalization (USV). The group treated with E. officinalis extracts at 300 mg/kg had significantly increased MWT values at 6 h and 24 h after the PI, and had a significantly reduced number of 22–27-kHz USVs at 6 h and 24 h after PI. Moreover, after 15 days of continuous treatment with E. officinalis extracts, the treated group showed significantly alleviated SNI-induced hypersensitivity and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Thus, E. officinalis extracts have potential analgesic effects in both postoperative and neuropathic pain models in vivo. PMID:27898027

  14. Effect of Botulinum Toxin on Disabling Neuropathic Pain: A Case Presentation Suggesting a New Therapeutic Strategy.

    PubMed

    Buonocore, Michelangelo; Demartini, Laura; Mandrini, Silvia; Dall'Angelo, Anna; Dalla Toffola, Elena

    2017-02-01

    This case presentation describes a 47-year-old woman who developed complex regional pain syndrome type II with severe neuropathic pain following iatrogenic transection of the tibial nerve at the ankle. The pain and disability progressively worsened over time, markedly impaired ambulation, and were not relieved despite various analgesic treatments. After injection of botulinum toxin (abobotulinumtoxinA, BoNT-A) in the leg muscles the tendons of which pass through the tarsal tunnel (together with the tibial nerve), her pain decreased and her walking capacity improved. This case suggests a new therapeutic role for botulin toxin in treating peripheral neuropathic pain caused by movement-evoked ectopic potentials.

  15. Neuropathic pain in breast cancer survivors: using the ID pain as a screening tool.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Gibby, Cielito; Morrow, Phuong Khanh; Bennett, Michael I; Jensen, Mark P; Shete, Sanjay

    2010-05-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is a debilitating symptom experienced by a number of patients with cancer. We evaluated the validity of ID Pain as a screening tool for NP in breast cancer survivors using the Self-Report Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (S-LANSS) and a reported diagnosis of NP as criterion measures. Two hundred forty breast cancer survivors with a mean age of 58 years (standard deviation=16) participated in this survey. Forty-five percent of the sample reported having pain in the past week. Of those reporting pain, 33% reported that they had been diagnosed by their health care provider with NP, 39% had a positive ID Pain (> or = 2) score, and 19% had a positive S-LANSS score. The most commonly endorsed ID Pain item was "hot/burning" (n=48) followed by feeling "numb" (n=47) and "pins and needles" (n=45). Total ID Pain score was significantly associated with a clinical diagnosis of NP (r=0.41; P<0.001) and the S-LANSS total score (r=0.54; P<0.001). Receiver operating curve analysis demonstrated that ID Pain has a predictive validity of 0.72 and 0.70 for diagnosis of NP as made by clinicians and the S-LANSS, respectively. We also found that an ID Pain score greater than or equal to 2 corresponded with the likelihood of NP in this sample, consistent with the original ID Pain development study. This study provides evidence for ID Pain as a valid screening measure for NP in breast cancer survivors.

  16. Altered rate-dependent depression of the spinal H-reflex as an indicator of spinal disinhibition in models of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Lee-Kubli, Corinne A G; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2014-02-01

    The unpredictable efficacy of current therapies for neuropathic pain may reflect diverse etiological mechanisms operating between, and within, diseases. As descriptions of pain rarely establish specific mechanisms, a tool that can identify underlying causes of neuropathic pain would be useful in developing patient-specific treatments. Rate-dependent depression (RDD), a measure of the change in amplitude of the Hoffman reflex over consecutive stimulations, is attenuated in diabetic rats that also exhibit impaired spinal γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor function, reduced spinal potassium chloride co-transporter (KCC2) expression, and indices of painful neuropathy. To investigate whether loss of RDD is a reliable indicator of the contribution of spinal GABAergic dysfunction to neuropathic pain, we assessed RDD, tactile allodynia, and formalin-evoked hyperalgesia in 3 models: rats treated acutely with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), diabetic rats treated with the BDNF-sequestering molecule tyrosine receptor kinase B/Fc (TrkB/Fc), and rats with paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Delivery of BDNF to the spinal cord of normal rats produced RDD deficits and features of painful neuropathy associated with disrupted GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory function and reduced dorsal spinal KCC2 expression. Treating diabetic rats with TrkB/Fc restored RDD and alleviated indices of painful neuropathy. In paclitaxel-treated rats, RDD was not impaired and behavioral indices of neuropathic pain were not associated with spinal GABAergic dysfunction or reduced dorsal spinal KCC2 expression. Our data reveal BDNF as part of the mechanism underlying spinal cord disinhibition caused by altered GABAA receptor function in diabetic rats and suggest that RDD deficits may be a useful indicator of neuropathic pain states associated with spinal disinhibition, thereby revealing specific therapeutic targets.

  17. [Case of acute exacerbation of neuropathic cancer pain rapidly relieved by simultaneous oral intake of immediate release oxycodone and pregabalin].

    PubMed

    Baba, Mika; Gomwo, Ikuo

    2012-10-01

    Cancer pain consists of continuous pain lasting almost all day and transient exacerbation of pain called breakthrough pain. Breakthrough pain is classified as somatic pain and visceral pain, neuropathic pain according to the character of pain. Although the immediate release opioid is used as the first treatment of choice to breakthrough pain, the effect is not enough when it shows the character of neuropathic pain. Pregabalin has become the first medicine for the treatment of neuropathic pain, and it sometimes reveals prompt analgesic effect based on its pharmacological profile. It has also been reported that pregabalin used with oxycodine reveals analgesic effect with smaller dosage than pregabalin alone. We experienced a young patient with lung cancer suffering from sudden exacerbation of symptomatic sciatica, whose pain was markedly reduced within 30 minutes by taking immediate release oxycodone 5 mg and pregabalin 75 mg simultaneously. Conclusions : Pregabalin with immediate release oxycodone simultaneously may be able to improve acute exacerbation of neuropathic cancer pain rapidly.

  18. Peripheral sensory neuron injury contributes to neuropathic pain in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, I-Ching; Chung, Chen-Yen; Liao, Fang; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Cheng-Han

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS)-induced neuropathic pain deteriorates quality of life in patients but is often refractory to treatment. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a rodent model of MS, animals develop neuropathy and inflammation-induced tissue acidosis, which suggests the involvement of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). Also, peripheral neuropathy is reported in MS patients. However, the involvement of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) in MS neuropathic pain remains elusive. This study investigated the contribution of ASICs and peripheral neuropathy in MS-induced neuropathic pain. Elicited pain levels were as high in Asic1a−/−, Asic2−/− and Asic3−/− mice as wild-type mice even though only Asic1a−/− mice showed reduced EAE disease severity, which indicates that pain in EAE was independent of disease severity. We thus adopted an EAE model without pertussis toxin (EAEnp) to restrain activated immunity in the periphery and evaluate the PNS contribution to pain. Both EAE and EAEnp mice showed similar pain behaviors and peripheral neuropathy in nerve fibers and DRG neurons. Moreover, pregabalin significantly reduced neuropathic pain in both EAE and EAEnp mice. Our findings highlight the essential role of the PNS in neuropathic pain in EAE and pave the way for future development of analgesics without side effects in the CNS. PMID:28181561

  19. Modulation of neuropathic-pain-related behaviour by the spinal endocannabinoid/endovanilloid system

    PubMed Central

    Starowicz, Katarzyna; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain refers to chronic pain that results from injury to the nervous system. The mechanisms involved in neuropathic pain are complex and involve both peripheral and central phenomena. Although numerous pharmacological agents are available for the treatment of neuropathic pain, definitive drug therapy has remained elusive. Recent drug discovery efforts have identified an original neurobiological approach to the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain. The development of innovative pharmacological strategies has led to the identification of new promising pharmacological targets, including glutamate antagonists, microglia inhibitors and, interestingly, endogenous ligands of cannabinoids and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1). Endocannabinoids (ECs), endovanilloids and the enzymes that regulate their metabolism represent promising pharmacological targets for the development of a successful pain treatment. This review is an update of the relationship between cannabinoid receptors (CB1) and TRPV1 channels and their possible implications for neuropathic pain. The data are focused on endogenous spinal mechanisms of pain control by anandamide, and the current and emerging pharmacotherapeutic approaches that benefit from the pharmacological modulation of spinal EC and/or endovanilloid systems under chronic pain conditions will be discussed. PMID:23108547

  20. Fxyd2 regulates Aδ- and C-fiber mechanosensitivity and is required for the maintenance of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ventéo, Stéphanie; Laffray, Sophie; Wetzel, Christiane; Rivat, Cyril; Scamps, Frédérique; Méchaly, Ilana; Bauchet, Luc; Raoul, Cédric; Bourinet, Emmanuel; Lewin, Gary R.; Carroll, Patrick; Pattyn, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Identification of the molecular mechanisms governing sensory neuron subtype excitability is a key requisite for the development of treatments for somatic sensory disorders. Here, we show that the Na,K-ATPase modulator Fxyd2 is specifically required for setting the mechanosensitivity of Aδ-fiber low-threshold mechanoreceptors and sub-populations of C-fiber nociceptors, a role consistent with its restricted expression profile in the spinal somatosensory system. We also establish using the spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain, that loss of Fxyd2 function, either constitutively in Fxyd2−/− mice or acutely in neuropathic rats, efficiently alleviates mechanical hypersensitivity induced by peripheral nerve lesions. The role of Fxyd2 in modulating Aδ- and C-fibers mechanosensitivity likely accounts for the anti-allodynic effect of Fxyd2 knockdown. Finally, we uncover the evolutionarily conserved restricted expression pattern of FXYD2 in human dorsal root ganglia, thus identifying this molecule as a potentially promising therapeutic target for peripheral neuropathic pain management. PMID:27805035

  1. Duloxetine in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ormseth, Michelle J; Scholz, Beth A; Boomershine, Chad S

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy affects up to 70% of diabetics, and diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP) is the most common and debilitating of the diabetic neuropathies. DPNP significantly reduces quality of life and increases management costs in affected patients. Despite the impact of DPNP, management is poor with one-quarter of patients receiving no treatment and many treated with medications having little or no efficacy in managing DPNP. Duloxetine is one of two drugs approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for DPNP management. Duloxetine is a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) proven safe, effective, and cost-saving in reducing DPNP symptoms at a dose of 60 mg/day. Duloxetine doses greater than 60 mg/day for DPNP management are not recommended since they are no more efficacious and associated with more side effects; addition of pregabalin or gabapentin for these patients may be beneficial. Side effects of duloxetine are generally mild and typical for the SNRI class including nausea, dizziness, somnolence, fatigue, sweating, dry mouth, constipation, and diarrhea. Given its other indications, duloxetine is a particularly good choice for DPNP treatment in patients with coexisting depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, or chronic musculoskeletal pain. Duloxetine treatment had no clinically significant effect on glycemic control and did not increase the risk of cardiovascular events in diabetes patients. However, duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with hepatic disease or severe renal impairment. Given its safety, efficacy, and tolerability, duloxetine is an excellent choice for DPNP treatment in many patients. PMID:21845034

  2. Can chronic neuropathic pain following thoracic surgery be predicted during the postoperative period?

    PubMed

    Searle, Robert D; Simpson, Matthew P; Simpson, Karen H; Milton, Richard; Bennett, Michael I

    2009-12-01

    Chronic pain following thoracic surgery is common and associated with neuropathic symptoms, however, the proportion of patients with neuropathic pain in the immediate postoperative period is unknown. We aimed to determine the proportion of patients who have neuropathic symptoms and signs immediately after, and at three months following thoracic surgery. The study was designed as a prospective observational cohort study. We identified patients with pain of predominantly neuropathic origin using the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) score in the immediate postoperative period and the self-report LANSS (S-LANSS) version three months after surgery. One hundred patients undergoing video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) or thoracotomy completed LANSS scores preoperatively and in the immediate postoperative period. Eighty-seven percent completed three months S-LANSS follow-up scores. Eight percent of patients had positive LANSS scores in the immediate postoperative period; 22% of patients had positive S-LANSS scores three months following surgery. There was a significant association between positive scores in the acute and chronic periods (relative risk (RR) 3.5, [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-7.2]). Identifying pain of predominantly neuropathic origin in the postoperative period with a simple pain score can help identify those at risk of developing chronic pain with these features following thoracic surgery.

  3. Gender differences in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Naji-Esfahani, H; Vaseghi, G; Safaeian, L; Pilehvarian, A-A; Abed, A; Rafieian-Kopaei, M

    2016-02-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain is one of the major problems for cancer patients. Although paclitaxel and cisplatin are widely used in women, most laboratory studies of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain have been conducted on male animals. The current study examined the gender differences in chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain in mice. Neuropathic pain was induced by intraperitoneal injection of paclitaxel (2 mg/kg) for five consecutive days and cisplatin (1 mg/kg) for seven consecutive days. Cold allodynia was evaluated by measuring the paw withdrawal frequency and duration of paw licking in mice; however, mechanical allodynia was assessed by von Frey filaments. Neuropathic pain began to manifest after a few days (P < 0.001). Cold allodynia was more robust in female mice (P < 0.001) treated with paclitaxel, while no differences were observed between the two genders in the manifestation of paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia. Interestingly, no gender differences were observed in cisplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia tests. In conclusion, gender differences play a major role in neuropathic pain induced by paclitaxel. The differences between male and female animals should be considered in future studies and the findings should be generalized to humans with caution.

  4. Deep brain stimulation of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex for the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Russo, Jennifer F; Sheth, Sameer A

    2015-06-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain is estimated to affect 3%-4.5% of the worldwide population. It is associated with significant loss of productive time, withdrawal from the workforce, development of mood disorders such as depression and anxiety, and disruption of family and social life. Current medical therapeutics often fail to adequately treat chronic neuropathic pain. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeting subcortical structures such as the periaqueductal gray, the ventral posterior lateral and medial thalamic nuclei, and the internal capsule has been investigated for the relief of refractory neuropathic pain over the past 3 decades. Recent work has identified the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) as a new potential neuromodulation target given its central role in cognitive and affective processing. In this review, the authors briefly discuss the history of DBS for chronic neuropathic pain in the United States and present evidence supporting dACC DBS for this indication. They review existent literature on dACC DBS and summarize important findings from imaging and neurophysiological studies supporting a central role for the dACC in the processing of chronic neuropathic pain. The available neurophysiological and empirical clinical evidence suggests that dACC DBS is a viable therapeutic option for the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain and warrants further investigation.

  5. Nerve Regenerative Effects of GABA-B Ligands in a Model of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cavalli, Erica; Pajardi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain arises as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the peripheral somatosensory system. It may be associated with allodynia and increased pain sensitivity. Few studies correlated neuropathic pain with nerve morphology and myelin proteins expression. Our aim was to test if neuropathic pain is related to nerve degeneration, speculating whether the modulation of peripheral GABA-B receptors may promote nerve regeneration and decrease neuropathic pain. We used the partial sciatic ligation- (PSL-) induced neuropathic model. The biochemical, morphological, and behavioural outcomes of sciatic nerve were analysed following GABA-B ligands treatments. Simultaneous 7-days coadministration of baclofen (10 mg/kg) and CGP56433 (3 mg/kg) alters tactile hypersensitivity. Concomitantly, specific changes of peripheral nerve morphology, nerve structure, and myelin proteins (P0 and PMP22) expression were observed. Nerve macrophage recruitment decreased and step coordination was improved. The PSL-induced changes in nociception correlate with altered nerve morphology and myelin protein expression. Peripheral synergic effects, via GABA-B receptor activation, promote nerve regeneration and likely ameliorate neuropathic pain. PMID:25165701

  6. Blocking the GABA transporter GAT-1 ameliorates spinal GABAergic disinhibition and neuropathic pain induced by paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ruchi; Yan, Xisheng; Maixner, Dylan W.; Gao, Mei; Weng, Han-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a chemotherapeutic agent widely used for treating carcinomas. Patients receiving paclitaxel often develop neuropathic pain and have a reduced quality of life which hinders the use of this life-saving drug. In this study, we determined the role of GABA transporters in the genesis of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain using behavioral tests, electrophysiology, and biochemical techniques. We found that tonic GABA receptor activities in the spinal dorsal horn were reduced in rats with neuropathic pain induced by paclitaxel. In normal controls, tonic GABA receptor activities were mainly controlled by the GABA transporter GAT-1 but not GAT-3. In the spinal dorsal horn, GAT-1 was expressed at presynaptic terminals and astrocytes while GAT-3 was only expressed in astrocytes. In rats with paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain, the protein expression of GAT-1 was increased while GAT-3 was decreased. This was concurrently associated with an increase of global GABA uptake. The paclitaxel-induced attenuation of GABAergic tonic inhibition was ameliorated by blocking GAT-1 but not GAT-3 transporters. Paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain was significantly attenuated by the intrathecal injection of a GAT-1 inhibitor. These findings suggest that targeting GAT-1 transporters for reversing disinhibition in the spinal dorsal horn may be a useful approach for treating paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:25827582

  7. Neuropathic pain is constitutively suppressed in early life by anti-inflammatory neuroimmune regulation.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Rebecca; Berta, Temugin; Old, Elizabeth; Ji, Ru-Rong; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2015-01-14

    Peripheral nerve injury can trigger neuropathic pain in adults but not in infants; indeed, for unknown reasons, neuropathic pain is rare before adolescence. We show here that the absence of neuropathic pain response in infant male rats and mice following nerve injury is due to an active, constitutive immune suppression of dorsal horn pain activity. In contrast to adult nerve injury, which triggers a proinflammatory immune response in the spinal dorsal horn, infant nerve injury triggers an anti-inflammatory immune response, characterized by significant increases in IL-4 and IL-10. This immediate anti-inflammatory response can also be evoked by direct C-fiber nerve stimulation in infant, but not adult, mice. Blockade of the anti-inflammatory activity with intrathecal anti-IL10 unmasks neuropathic pain behavior in infant nerve injured mice, showing that pain hypersensitivity in young mice is actively suppressed by a dominant anti-inflammatory neuroimmune response. As infant nerve injured mice reach adolescence (postnatal day 25-30), the dorsal horn immune profile switches from an anti-inflammatory to a proinflammatory response characterized by significant increases in TNF and BDNF, and this is accompanied by a late onset neuropathic pain behavior and increased dorsal horn cell sensitivity to cutaneous mechanical and cold stimuli. These findings show that neuropathic pain following early life nerve injury is not absent but suppressed by neuroimmune activity and that "latent" pain can still emerge at adolescence, when the neuroimmune profile changes. The data may explain why neuropathic pain is rare in young children and also why it can emerge, for no observable reason, in adolescent patients.

  8. Neuropathic Pain Is Constitutively Suppressed in Early Life by Anti-Inflammatory Neuroimmune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    McKelvey, Rebecca; Berta, Temugin; Old, Elizabeth; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury can trigger neuropathic pain in adults but not in infants; indeed, for unknown reasons, neuropathic pain is rare before adolescence. We show here that the absence of neuropathic pain response in infant male rats and mice following nerve injury is due to an active, constitutive immune suppression of dorsal horn pain activity. In contrast to adult nerve injury, which triggers a proinflammatory immune response in the spinal dorsal horn, infant nerve injury triggers an anti-inflammatory immune response, characterized by significant increases in IL-4 and IL-10. This immediate anti-inflammatory response can also be evoked by direct C-fiber nerve stimulation in infant, but not adult, mice. Blockade of the anti-inflammatory activity with intrathecal anti-IL10 unmasks neuropathic pain behavior in infant nerve injured mice, showing that pain hypersensitivity in young mice is actively suppressed by a dominant anti-inflammatory neuroimmune response. As infant nerve injured mice reach adolescence (postnatal day 25–30), the dorsal horn immune profile switches from an anti-inflammatory to a proinflammatory response characterized by significant increases in TNF and BDNF, and this is accompanied by a late onset neuropathic pain behavior and increased dorsal horn cell sensitivity to cutaneous mechanical and cold stimuli. These findings show that neuropathic pain following early life nerve injury is not absent but suppressed by neuroimmune activity and that “latent” pain can still emerge at adolescence, when the neuroimmune profile changes. The data may explain why neuropathic pain is rare in young children and also why it can emerge, for no observable reason, in adolescent patients. PMID:25589741

  9. Prevalence of Neuropathic Pain in Radiotherapy Oncology Units

    SciTech Connect

    Manas, Ana; Monroy, Jose Luis; Ramos, Avelino Alia; Cano, Carmen; Lopez-Gomez, Vanessa; Masramon, Xavier; Perez, Maria

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Neuropathic pain (NP) in cancer patients severely impacts quality of life. Radiotherapy (RT) may cause NP, and at the same time, cancer patients visit RT units for pain relief. NP prevalence at these sites and current analgesic treatment should be assessed to improve management. Methods and Materials: This epidemiological, prospective, multicenter study was undertaken to assess NP prevalence, according to Douleur Neuropathique 4 questions questtionaire (DN4) test results, and analgesic management in cancer pain patients visiting RT oncologic units. Secondary analyses assessed NP etiology and pain intensity (using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form) and impact (using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Medical Outcomes Study [MOS] for Sleep, and the Health Survey Short Form-12). Results: A total of 1,098 patients with any kind of pain were registered. NP prevalence was 31.1% (95% confidence interval, 28.4%--33.9%); 291 NP patients (mean age, 62.2 {+-}12.5 years and 57.7% men) were eligible for study; 49% of patients were overweight. The most frequent tumors were those of breast and lung, and stage IIIB was the most common cancer stage. The tumors caused 75% of NP cases. Anxiety, sleepiness, and depression were common. At 8 weeks, pain intensity and interference with daily activities decreased significantly for 50.8% of responders. Depression and anxiety (p < 0.0001) scores on the Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary measures (p < 0.0001) and all MOS-Sleep subscales, except for snoring, improved significantly. The percentage of satisfied patients increased from 13.8% to 87.4% (p < 0.0001) with the current analgesic treatment, which meant a 1.2- and 6-fold increase (p < 0.0001) in narcotic analgesics and anticonvulsants, respectively, compared to previous treatment. Conclusions: NP is highly prevalent at RT oncology units, with sleepiness, anxiety, and depression as frequent comorbidities. There is a need to improve

  10. A prospective study of neuropathic pain induced by thoracotomy: incidence, clinical description, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Guastella, Virginie; Mick, Gérard; Soriano, Christophe; Vallet, Laurent; Escande, Georges; Dubray, Claude; Eschalier, Alain

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated prospectively the incidence of neuropathic pain after thoracotomy, described its clinical characteristics, and delineated landmarks for its diagnosis in daily practice. We evaluated clinically painful symptoms and sensory deficits in 54 patients after lateral/posterolateral thoracotomy for broncho-pulmonary carcinoma with standardized surgical and analgesic procedures. At 2months, 49 patients suffered from non malignant thoracic pain, and at 6months 38 patients (loss to follow-up for 7) reported persisting pain. In 35 patients, painful symptoms and sensory deficits could be evaluated using a standardized clinical bedside procedure. According to the grading system proposed by Treede et al. [41], neuropathic pain was considered probable in 21 patients, while use of the DN4 questionnaire concluded that neuropathic pain was probable in 17 patients. The two diagnostic procedures provided similar conclusions in 16 patients. Morphine consumption during the early post-operative period (mean 111.3±30.8mg/day) and pain intensity (VAS: mean 5.71±2.1) were significantly higher in patients suffering from neuropathic pain than in other patients with pain (mean 80±21.4mg/day; VAS: mean 3.9±2.4). The clinical picture in most patients with neuropathic pain included electric shocks and severe multimodal hypoesthesia in the sensory area of 5th/6th intercostal nerves. Thus, our results indicate a minimal incidence of chronic post-thoracotomy pain at 70% and that of neuropathic pain at 29%, this latter being clinically suggested by a combination of certain symptoms and reinforced by the DN4 questionnaire when sensory deficit at scar is present.

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists modulate neuropathic pain: a link to chemokines?

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Caroline M.; Miller, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain presents a widespread and intractable medical problem. While numerous pharmaceuticals are used to treat chronic pain, drugs that are safe for extended use and highly effective at treating the most severe pain do not yet exist. Chronic pain resulting from nervous system injury (neuropathic pain) is common in conditions ranging from multiple sclerosis to HIV-1 infection to type II diabetes. Inflammation caused by neuropathy is believed to contribute to the generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Chemokines are key inflammatory mediators, several of which (MCP-1, RANTES, MIP-1α, fractalkine, SDF-1 among others) have been linked to chronic, neuropathic pain in both human conditions and animal models. The important roles chemokines play in inflammation and pain make them an attractive therapeutic target. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are a family of nuclear receptors known for their roles in metabolism. Recent research has revealed that PPARs also play a role in inflammatory gene repression. PPAR agonists have wide-ranging effects including inhibition of chemokine expression and pain behavior reduction in animal models. Experimental evidence suggests a connection between the pain ameliorating effects of PPAR agonists and suppression of inflammatory gene expression, including chemokines. In early clinical research, one PPARα agonist, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), shows promise in relieving chronic pain. If this link can be better established, PPAR agonists may represent a new drug therapy for neuropathic pain. PMID:25191225

  12. Modulating the Delicate Glial-Neuronal Interactions in Neuropathic Pain: Promises and Potential Caveats

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vinod; Guan, Yun; Raja, Srinivasa N.

    2014-01-01

    During neuropathic pain, glial cells (mainly astrocytes and microglia) become activated and initiate a series of signaling cascades that modulate pain processing at both spinal and supraspinal levels. It has been generally accepted that glial cell activation contributes to neuropathic pain because glia release proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and factors such as calcitonin gene-related peptide, substance P, and glutamate, which are known to facilitate pain signaling. However, recent research has shown that activation of glia also leads to some beneficial outcomes. Glia release anti-inflammatory factors that protect against neurotoxicity and restore normal pain. Accordingly, use of glial inhibitors might compromise the protective functions of glia in addition to suppressing their detrimental effects. With a better understanding of how different conditions affect glial cell activation, we may be able to promote the protective function of glia and pave the way for future development of novel, safe, and effective treatments of neuropathic pain. PMID:24820245

  13. Forebrain GABAergic neuron precursors integrate into adult spinal cord and reduce injury-induced neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Bráz, JM; Sharif-Naeini, R; Vogt, D; Kriegstein, A; Alvarez-Buylla, A; Rubenstein, JL; Basbaum, AI

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic debilitating disease characterized by mechanical allodynia and spontaneous pain. Because symptoms are often unresponsive to conventional methods of pain treatment, new therapeutic approaches are essential. Here, we describe a strategy that not only ameliorates symptoms of neuropathic pain, but is also potentially disease modifying. We show that transplantation of immature telencephalic GABAergic interneurons from the mouse medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) into the adult mouse spinal cord completely reverses the mechanical hypersensitivity produced by peripheral nerve injury. Underlying this improvement is a remarkable integration of the MGE transplants into the host spinal cord circuitry, in which the transplanted cells make functional connections with both primary afferent and spinal cord neurons. By contrast, MGE transplants were not effective against inflammatory pain. Our findings suggest that MGE-derived GABAergic interneurons overcome the spinal cord hyperexcitability that is a hallmark of nerve-injury induced neuropathic pain. PMID:22632725

  14. The selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist E-52862 attenuates neuropathic pain of different aetiology in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gris, Georgia; Portillo-Salido, Enrique; Aubel, Bertrand; Darbaky, Yassine; Deseure, Kristof; Vela, José Miguel; Merlos, Manuel; Zamanillo, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    E-52862 is a selective σ1R antagonist currently undergoing phase II clinical trials for neuropathic pain and represents a potential first-in-class analgesic. Here, we investigated the effect of single and repeated administration of E-52862 on different pain-related behaviours in several neuropathic pain models in rats: mechanical allodynia in cephalic (trigeminal) neuropathic pain following chronic constriction injury of the infraorbital nerve (IoN), mechanical hyperalgesia in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic polyneuropathy, and cold allodynia in oxaliplatin (OX)-induced polyneuropathy. Mechanical hypersensitivity induced after IoN surgery or STZ administration was reduced by acute treatment with E-52862 and morphine, but not by pregabalin. In the OX model, single administration of E-52862 reversed the hypersensitivity to cold stimuli similarly to 100 mg/kg of gabapentin. Interestingly, repeated E-52862 administration twice daily over 7 days did not induce pharmacodynamic tolerance but an increased antinociceptive effect in all three models. Additionally, as shown in the STZ and OX models, repeated daily treatment with E-52862 attenuated baseline pain behaviours, which supports a sustained modifying effect on underlying pain-generating mechanisms. These preclinical findings support a role for σ1R in neuropathic pain and extend the potential for the use of selective σ1R antagonists (e.g., E-52862) to the chronic treatment of cephalic and extra-cephalic neuropathic pain. PMID:27087602

  15. An Intensive Locomotor Training Paradigm Improves Neuropathic Pain following Spinal Cord Compression Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Elizabeth A; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2015-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is often associated with both locomotor deficits and sensory dysfunction, including debilitating neuropathic pain. Unfortunately, current conventional pharmacological, physiological, or psychological treatments provide only marginal relief for more than two-thirds of patients, highlighting the need for improved treatment options. Locomotor training is often prescribed as an adjunct therapy for peripheral neuropathic pain but is rarely used to treat central neuropathic pain. The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential anti-nociceptive benefits of intensive locomotor training (ILT) on neuropathic pain consequent to traumatic SCI. Using a rodent SCI model for central neuropathic pain, ILT was initiated either 5 d after injury prior to development of neuropathic pain symptoms (the "prevention" group) or delayed until pain symptoms fully developed (∼3 weeks post-injury, the "reversal" group). The training protocol consisted of 5 d/week of a ramping protocol that started with 11 m/min for 5 min and increased in speed (+1 m/min/week) and time (1-4 minutes/week) to a maximum of two 20-min sessions/d at 15 m/min by the fourth week of training. ILT prevented and reversed the development of heat hyperalgesia and cold allodynia, as well as reversed developed tactile allodynia, suggesting analgesic benefits not seen with moderate levels of locomotor training. Further, the analgesic benefits of ILT persisted for several weeks once training had been stopped. The unique ability of an ILT protocol to produce robust and sustained anti-nociceptive effects, as assessed by three distinct outcome measures for below-level SCI neuropathic pain, suggests that this adjunct therapeutic approach has great promise in a comprehensive treatment strategy for SCI pain.

  16. Sciatic nerve cuffing in mice: a model of sustained neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Benbouzid, Malika; Pallage, Viviane; Rajalu, Mathieu; Waltisperger, Elisabeth; Doridot, Stéphane; Poisbeau, Pierrick; Freund-Mercier, Marie José; Barrot, Michel

    2008-07-01

    Because of its severity, chronicity, resistance to usual therapy and its consequences on quality of life, neuropathic pain represents a real clinical challenge. Fundamental research on this pathology uses metabolic, pharmacological or traumatic models in rodents that reproduce the characteristic human pain symptoms. In 1996, Mosconi and Kruger morphologically described a model of peripheral neuropathy in which a cuff of polyethylene tubing was placed around the sciatic nerve in rats. In the present study, we evaluated the behavioral consequences of this neuropathic pain model in C57Bl/6J mice which is the main genetic background used for studies in transgenic mice. A short cuff of polyethylene tubing was unilaterally placed around the main branch of the sciatic nerve. It induced an ipsilateral heat thermal hyperalgesia lasting around 3 weeks, and a sustained ipsilateral mechanical allodynia lasting at least 2 months. We showed that this neuropathic pain model is insensitive to ketoprofen, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Morphine treatment acutely suppressed the mechanical allodynia, but tolerance to this effect rapidly developed. The analysis of video recordings revealed that most aspects of spontaneous behavior remained unaffected on the long term, excepted for a decrease in the time spent at social interaction for the neuropathic mice. Using the elevated plus-maze and the marble-burying test, we also showed that neuropathic mice develop an anxiety phenotype. Our data indicate that sciatic nerve cuffing in mice is a pertinent model for the study of nociceptive and emotional consequences of sustained neuropathic pain.

  17. Does the epidermal nerve fibre density measured by skin biopsy in patients with peripheral neuropathies correlate with neuropathic pain?

    PubMed

    Truini, A; Biasiotta, A; Di Stefano, G; Leone, C; La Cesa, S; Galosi, E; Piroso, S; Pepe, A; Giordano, C; Cruccu, G

    2014-04-01

    The different neuropathic pain types (e.g., ongoing burning pain and allodynia) are frequent and disabling complaints in patients with peripheral neuropathies. Although the reference standard technique for diagnosing painful small-fibre neuropathies is nerve fibre density assessment by skin biopsy, the relationship between the epidermal nerve fibre (ENF) density and neuropathic pain is still unclear. In a clinical and skin biopsy study designed to investigate whether changes in ENF density are directly related to pain, we enrolled 139 consecutive patients with distal symmetric peripheral neuropathy. All patients underwent clinical examination. The Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory was used to distinguish the different neuropathic pain types. A skin biopsy was conducted, and ENFs were immunostained with the antiprotein gene product 9.5, and their linear density was quantified with bright-field microscopy. No difference was found in ENF density between patients with and without neuropathic pain, nor between patients with and without ongoing burning pain. Conversely, ENF density was higher in patients with provoked pains (including mechanical dynamic allodynia) than in those without. The variable association between ENF density and symptoms of neuropathic pain supports the idea that neuropathic pain symptoms arise through distinct underlying mechanisms. The lack of relationship between ongoing burning pain and ENF density suggests that this type of pain reflects factors other than loss of nociceptive afferents. The association between ENF density and provoked pain (including mechanical dynamic allodynia) suggests that this type of pain might be mediated by spared and sensitised nociceptive afferents.

  18. Involvement of mesolimbic dopaminergic network in neuropathic pain relief by treadmill exercise

    PubMed Central

    Wakaizumi, Kenta; Kondo, Takashige; Hamada, Yusuke; Narita, Michiko; Kawabe, Rui; Narita, Hiroki; Watanabe, Moe; Kato, Shigeki; Senba, Emiko; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yamanaka, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Exercise alleviates pain and it is a central component of treatment strategy for chronic pain in clinical setting. However, little is known about mechanism of this exercise-induced hypoalgesia. The mesolimbic dopaminergic network plays a role in positive emotions to rewards including motivation and pleasure. Pain negatively modulates these emotions, but appropriate exercise is considered to activate the dopaminergic network. We investigated possible involvement of this network as a mechanism of exercise-induced hypoalgesia. Methods In the present study, we developed a protocol of treadmill exercise, which was able to recover pain threshold under partial sciatic nerve ligation in mice, and investigated involvement of the dopaminergic reward network in exercise-induced hypoalgesia. To temporally suppress a neural activation during exercise, a genetically modified inhibitory G-protein-coupled receptor, hM4Di, was specifically expressed on dopaminergic pathway from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens. Results The chemogenetic-specific neural suppression by Gi-DREADD system dramatically offset the effect of exercise-induced hypoalgesia in transgenic mice with hM4Di expressed on the ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons. Additionally, anti-exercise-induced hypoalgesia effect was significantly observed under the suppression of neurons projecting out of the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens as well. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the dopaminergic pathway from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens is involved in the anti-nociception under low-intensity exercise under a neuropathic pain-like state. PMID:27909152

  19. Pattern of neuropathic pain induced by topical capsaicin application in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, Jörn; Dimova, Violeta; Hermens, Hanneke; Zimmermann, Michael; Geisslinger, Gerd; Oertel, Bruno G; Ultsch, Alfred

    2015-03-01

    Human experimental pain models are widely used to study drug effects under controlled conditions, but they require further optimization to better reflect clinical pain conditions. To this end, we measured experimentally induced pain in 110 (46 men) healthy volunteers. The quantitative sensory testing (QST) battery (German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain) was applied on untreated ("control") and topical capsaicin-hypersensitized ("test") skin. Z-transformed QST-parameter values obtained at the test site were compared with corresponding values published from 1236 patients with neuropathic pain using Bayesian statistics. Subjects were clustered for the resemblance of their QST pattern to neuropathic pain. Although QST parameter values from the untreated site agreed with reference values, several QST parameters acquired at the test site treated with topical capsaicin deviated from normal. These deviations resembled in 0 to 7 parameters of the QST pattern observed in patients with neuropathic pain. Higher degrees (50%-60%) of resemblance to neuropathic QST pattern were obtained in 18% of the subjects. Inclusion in the respective clusters was predictable at a cross-validated accuracy of 86.9% by a classification and regression tree comprising 3 QST parameters (mechanical pain sensitivity, wind-up ratio, and z-transformed thermal sensory limen) from the control sites. Thus, we found that topical capsaicin partly induced the desired clinical pattern of neuropathic pain in a preselectable subgroup of healthy subjects to a degree that fuels expectations that experimental pain models can be optimized toward mimicking clinical pain. The subjects, therefore, qualify for enrollment in analgesic drug studies that use highly selected cohorts to enhance predictivity for clinical analgesia.

  20. Pain-related evoked potentials after intraepidermal electrical stimulation to Aδ and C fibers in patients with neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Omori, Shigeki; Isose, Sagiri; Misawa, Sonoko; Watanabe, Keisuke; Sekiguchi, Yukari; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Beppu, Minako; Amino, Hiroshi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2017-03-18

    Neuropathic pain can result from neuronal hyperexcitability and complex interactions of the nociceptive pathways. Intraepidermal electrical stimulation (IES) is a novel technique that can selectively activate Aδ and C fibers. To investigate patterns of changes in Aδ- and C-mediated brain responses in patients with neuropathic pain using IES, we recorded pain-related evoked potential (PREP) after IES of Aδ and C fibers in 20 patients with neuropathic pain and 15 age-matched healthy volunteers. We evaluated PREP latencies, amplitudes, and amplitude ratios of PREPs after C/Aδ-fiber stimulation. PREP amplitudes after Aδ-fiber stimulation tended to be smaller in the patient group, whereas there were no significant differences in amplitudes after C-fiber stimulation between the patient and normal control groups. PREP amplitude ratios after C/Aδ-fiber stimulation were significantly greater in the patient group than in the control group, and the higher ratio tended to be associated with a greater visual analog scale score. Patients with neuropathic pain had a tendency towards decreased Aδ amplitudes and significantly increased C/Aδ PREP amplitude ratios and this ratio appeared to be associated with the intensity of pain. Our findings suggest that decreased inhibition of the Aδ to C nociceptive systems is associated with generation of neuropathic pain.

  1. Neuropathic cancer pain: What we are dealing with? How to manage it?

    PubMed Central

    Esin, Ece; Yalcin, Suayib

    2014-01-01

    Cancer pain is a serious health problem, and imposes a great burden on the lives of patients and their families. Pain can be associated with delay in treatment, denial of treatment, or failure of treatment. If the pain is not treated properly it may impair the quality of life. Neuropathic cancer pain (NCP) is one of the most complex phenomena among cancer pain syndromes. NCP may result from direct damage to nerves due to acute diagnostic/therapeutic interventions. Chronic NCP is the result of treatment complications or malignancy itself. Although the reason for pain is different in NCP and noncancer neuropathic pain, the pathophysiologic mechanisms are similar. Data regarding neuropathic pain are primarily obtained from neuropathic pain studies. Evidence pertaining to NCP is limited. NCP due to chemotherapeutic toxicity is a major problem for physicians. In the past two decades, there have been efforts to standardize NCP treatment in order to provide better medical service. Opioids are the mainstay of cancer pain treatment; however, a new group of therapeutics called coanalgesic drugs has been introduced to pain treatment. These coanalgesics include gabapentinoids (gabapentin, pregabalin), antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants, duloxetine, and venlafaxine), corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists, and cannabinoids. Pain can be encountered throughout every step of cancer treatment, and thus all practicing oncologists must be capable of assessing pain, know the possible underlying pathophysiology, and manage it appropriately. The purpose of this review is to discuss neuropathic pain and NCP in detail, the relevance of this topic, clinical features, possible pathology, and treatments of NCP. PMID:24790459

  2. The Molecular and Pharmacological Mechanisms of HIV-Related Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shuanglin

    2013-01-01

    Infection of the nervous system with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) can lead to cognitive, motor and sensory disorders. HIV-related sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN) mainly contains the HIV infection-related distal sensory polyneuropathy (DSP) and antiretroviral toxic neuropathies (ATN). The main pathological features that characterize DSP and ATN include retrograde (“dying back”) axonal degeneration of long axons in distal regions of legs or arms, loss of unmyelinated fibers, and variable degree of macrophage infiltration in peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). One of the most common complaints of HIV-DSP is pain. Unfortunately, many conventional agents utilized as pharmacologic therapy for neuropathic pain are not effective for providing satisfactory analgesia in painful HIV-related distal sensory polyneuropathy, because the molecular mechanisms of the painful HIV-SDP are not clear in detail. The HIV envelope glycoprotein, gp120, appears to contribute to this painful neuropathy. Recently, preclinical studies have shown that glia activation in the spinal cord and DRG has become an attractive target for attenuating chronic pain. Cytokines/chemokines have been implicated in a variety of painful neurological diseases and in animal models of HIV-related neuropathic pain. Mitochondria injured by ATN and/or gp120 may be also involved in the development of HIV-neuropathic pain. This review discusses the neurochemical and pharmacological mechanisms of HIV-related neuropathic pain based on the recent advance in the preclinical studies, providing insights into novel pharmacological targets for future therapy. PMID:24403874

  3. Inhibitory Effects of Scolopendra Pharmacopuncture on the Development and Maintenance of Neuropathic Pain in Rats: Possible Involvement of Spinal Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengjin; Ji, Byeong Uk; Lee, Ji Eun; Park, Min Young; Kim, Sungchul; Kim, Seung Tae; Koo, Sungtae

    2015-10-01

    Scolopendra extracts were used for pharmacopuncture at the Kidney 1 acupoint to investigate the role of Scolopendra pharmacopuncture (SPP) in both the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation in rats and the contribution of spinal glial cells. A single treatment and five once-daily treatments with SPP were given to evaluate its effects on the development and maintenance stages of neuropathic pain, respectively, which was followed by behavioral tests. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting tests were also carried out. A single treatment of SPP delayed spinal nerve ligation-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and induced a profound decrease in the expression of ionized calcium binding adaptor protein in the lumbar spinal cord. Repeated SPP treatments reliably suppressed mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at later time points, and these results correlated mainly with decreases in glial fibrillary acidic protein. Intriguingly, ionized calcium binding adaptor protein expression was also reduced after repeated SPP. These results illustrate that neuropathic pain in the development and maintenance stages is alleviated by SPP treatment, which may be ascribed principally to deactivations of microglia and astroglia, respectively. Additionally, microglial inactivation seems to be partially involved in preventing neuropathic pain in the maintenance stage.

  4. Neuropathic pain: an updated grading system for research and clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Finnerup, Nanna B.; Haroutounian, Simon; Kamerman, Peter; Baron, Ralf; Bennett, David L.H.; Bouhassira, Didier; Cruccu, Giorgio; Freeman, Roy; Hansson, Per; Nurmikko, Turo; Raja, Srinivasa N.; Rice, Andrew S.C.; Serra, Jordi; Smith, Blair H.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Jensen, Troels S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The redefinition of neuropathic pain as “pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system,” which was suggested by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) Special Interest Group on Neuropathic Pain (NeuPSIG) in 2008, has been widely accepted. In contrast, the proposed grading system of possible, probable, and definite neuropathic pain from 2008 has been used to a lesser extent. Here, we report a citation analysis of the original NeuPSIG grading paper of 2008, followed by an analysis of its use by an expert panel and recommendations for an improved grading system. As of February, 2015, 608 eligible articles in Scopus cited the paper, 414 of which cited the neuropathic pain definition. Of 220 clinical studies citing the paper, 56 had used the grading system. The percentage using the grading system increased from 5% in 2009 to 30% in 2014. Obstacles to a wider use of the grading system were identified, including (1) questions about the relative significance of confirmatory tests, (2) the role of screening tools, and (3) uncertainties about what is considered a neuroanatomically plausible pain distribution. Here, we present a revised grading system with an adjusted order, better reflecting clinical practice, improvements in the specifications, and a word of caution that even the “definite” level of neuropathic pain does not always indicate causality. In addition, we add a table illustrating the area of pain and sensory abnormalities in common neuropathic pain conditions and propose areas for further research. PMID:27115670

  5. GABA-A RECEPTOR ACTIVITY IN THE NORADRENERGIC LOCUS COERULEUS DRIVES TRIGEMINAL NEUROPATHIC PAIN IN THE RAT; CONTRIBUTION OF NAα1 RECEPTORS IN THE MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    KAUSHAL, R.; TAYLOR, B. K.; JAMAL, A. B.; ZHANG, L.; MA, F.; DONAHUE, R.; WESTLUND, K. N.

    2017-01-01

    Trigeminal neuropathic pain is described as constant excruciating facial pain. The study goal was to investigate the role of nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) in a model of chronic orofacial neuropathic pain (CCI-ION). The study examines LC’s relationship to both the medullary dorsal horn receiving trigeminal nerve sensory innervation and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). LC is a major source of CNS noradrenaline (NA) and a primary nucleus involved in pain modulation. Although descending inhibition of acute pain by LC is well established, contribution of the LC to facilitation of chronic neuropathic pain is also reported. In the present study, a rat orofacial pain model of trigeminal neuropathy was induced by chronic constrictive injury of the infraorbital nerve (CCI-ION). Orofacial neuropathic pain was indicated by development of whisker pad mechanical hypersensitivity. Hypersensitivity was alleviated by selective elimination of NA neurons, including LC (A6 cell group), with the neurotoxin anti-dopamine-β-hydroxylase saporin (anti-DβH-saporin) microinjected either intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or into trigeminal spinal nucleus caudalis (spVc). The GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, administered directly into LC (week 8) inhibited hypersensitivity. This indicates a valence shift in which increased GABAA signaling ongoing in LC after trigeminal nerve injury paradoxically produces excitatory facilitation of the chronic pain state. Microinjection of NAα1 receptor antagonist, benoxathian, into mPFC attenuated whisker pad hypersensitivity, while NAα2 receptor antagonist, idazoxan, was ineffective. Thus, GABAA-mediated activation of NA neurons during CCI-ION can facilitate hypersensitivity through NAα1 receptors in the mPFC. These data indicate LC is a chronic pain generator. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of IBRO. PMID:27520081

  6. A burden of illness study for neuropathic pain in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Liedgens, Hiltrud; Obradovic, Marko; De Courcy, Jonathan; Holbrook, Timothy; Jakubanis, Rafal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Neuropathic pain (NP) is often severe and represents a major humanistic and economic burden. This study aimed at providing insight on this burden across France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK, considering direct and indirect costs, productivity loss, and humanistic impact on patients and their families. Methods Physician questionnaires provided data on patients presenting with NP covering demographics, sick leave and retirement, number of consultations, drug treatments, and surgical procedures. Patients provided further demographic and disease-related data and completed the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI), the EuroQol 5-Dimension (EQ-5D), and the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) questionnaires. All health-related direct unitary costs were collected from relevant country-specific sources and adjusted to 2012 prices (€) where necessary. A subgroup analysis of costs based on diabetic peripheral neuropathy (n=894), fibromyalgia (n=300), and low back pain (n=963) was performed. Findings About 413 physicians completed a total of 3,956 patient records forms. Total annual direct health-care costs per patient ranged from €1,939 (Italy) to €3,131 (Spain). Annual professional caregiver costs ranged from €393 (France) to €1,242 (UK), but this only represented a small proportion of total care because much care is provided by family or friends. Sick leave costs ranged from €5,492 (UK) to €7,098 (France), with 10%–32% patients prevented from working at some point by NP. Total cost (including direct and indirect costs) of NP per patient was €10,313 in France (69% of the total cost), €14,446 in Germany (78%), €9,305 in Italy (69%), €10,597 in Spain (67%), and €9,685 in the UK (57%). Indirect costs (ie, sick leave) constituted the majority of costs in all five countries: €7,098 in France, €11,232 in Germany, €6,382 in Italy, €7,066 in Spain, and €5,492 in the UK. In the subgroup analysis, total annual direct costs per patient

  7. Lysophosphatidic acid receptors (LPARs): Potential targets for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Velasco, María; O'Sullivan, Catherine; Sheridan, Graham K

    2017-02-01

    Neuropathic pain can arise from lesions to peripheral or central nerve fibres leading to spontaneous action potential generation and a lowering of the nociceptive threshold. Clinically, neuropathic pain can manifest in many chronic disease states such as cancer, diabetes or multiple sclerosis (MS). The bioactive lipid, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), via activation of its receptors (LPARs), is thought to play a central role in both triggering and maintaining neuropathic pain. In particular, following an acute nerve injury, the excitatory neurotransmitters glutamate and substance P are released from primary afferent neurons leading to upregulated synthesis of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), the precursor for LPA production. LPC is converted to LPA by autotaxin (ATX), which can then activate macrophages/microglia and modulate neuronal functioning. A ubiquitous feature of animal models of neuropathic pain is demyelination of damaged nerves. It is thought that LPA contributes to demyelination through several different mechanisms. Firstly, high levels of LPA are produced following macrophage/microglial activation that triggers a self-sustaining feed-forward loop of de novo LPA synthesis. Secondly, macrophage/microglial activation contributes to inflammation-mediated demyelination of axons, thus initiating neuropathic pain. Therefore, targeting LPA production and/or the family of LPA-activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) may prove to be fruitful clinical approaches to treating demyelination and the accompanying neuropathic pain. This review discusses our current understanding of the role of LPA/LPAR signalling in the initiation of neuropathic pain and suggests potential targeted strategies for its treatment. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Lipid Sensing G Protein-Coupled Receptors in the CNS'.

  8. [Altered expression of transporter and analgesic of morphine in neuropathic pain mice].

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Wataru; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    It is known that morphine is less effective for patients with neuropathic pain, accounting for approximately 70% of cancer patients with severe pain. One of the causes of the decline is reported as a decreased function of the μ-opioid receptor, which binds to the active metabolites of morphine in the mesencephalic ventral tegmental area. However, the details of this mechanism are not understood. We hypothesized that a decrease in the concentration of morphine in the brain reduces its analgesic effect on neuropathic pain, and found that the analgesic effect of morphine was correlated with its concentration in the brain. We examined the reason for the decreased concentration of morphine in the brain in case of neuropathic pain. We discovered increased P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression in the small intestine, increased expression and activity of UGT2B in the liver, and increased P-gp expression in the brain under conditions of neuropathic pain. In this symposium, we argue that low brain morphine concentration is considered one of the causes of lower sensitivity to morphine in neuropathic pain patients.

  9. Antinociceptive effects of amiloride and benzamil in neuropathic pain model rats.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seongtae; Lee, Seong Heon; Kim, Yeo Ok; Yoon, Myung Ha

    2013-08-01

    Amiloride and benzamil showed antinocicepitve effects in several pain models through the inhibition of acid sensing ion channels (ASICs). However, their role in neuropathic pain has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the effect of the intrathecal amiloride and benzamil in neuropathic pain model, and also examined the role of ASICs on modulation of neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain was induced by L4-5 spinal nerve ligation in male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 100-120 g, and intrathecal catheterization was performed for drug administration. The effects of amiloride and benzamil were measured by the paw-withdrawal threshold to a mechanical stimulus using the up and down method. The expression of ASICs in the spinal cord dorsal horn was also analyzed by RT-PCR. Intrathecal amiloride and benzamil significantly increased the paw withdrawal threshold in spinal nerve-ligated rats (87%±12% and 76%±14%, P=0.007 and 0.012 vs vehicle, respectively). Spinal nerve ligation increased the expression of ASIC3 in the spinal cord dorsal horn (P=0.01), and this increase was inhibited by both amiloride and benzamil (P<0.001 in both). In conclusion, intrathecal amiloride and benzamil display antinociceptive effects in the rat spinal nerve ligation model suggesting they may present an alternative pharmacological tool in the management of neuropathic pain at the spinal level.

  10. Maintaining efficacy in the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain: role of duloxetine

    PubMed Central

    Zilliox, Lindsay; Russell, James W

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Neuropathy is one of the most frequent complications of diabetes. Of all the symptoms associated with diabetic neuropathy, pain has the largest impact on sleep and quality of life. In the past few years further medications have been added to the available therapies for neuropathic pain. One of these medications, duloxetine hydrochloride (duloxetine), is a balanced and potent selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. Methods Medline was searched from January 2005 to September 2009 using the key words duloxetine and peripheral neuropathy for clinical trials limited to human research published in English and duloxetine and pharmacology in the nervous system. Results Duloxetine has been shown to effectively reduce diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain compared to placebo at doses of 60 mg/day and 120 mg/day with minimal to moderate side effects. This effect is seen with minimal effects on glycemic control and without any clinically relevant effects on lipid control, or cardiovascular parameters. In addition, its efficacy and tolerability is comparable to other medications commonly used in the management of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, duloxetine performs favorably both in terms of quality of life and in cost utility analyses. Discussion and conclusion This article reviewed the issues related to management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, the pharmacology and rationale for use of duloxetine, efficacy studies, and the safety and tolerability of treatment with duloxetine. Duloxetine is an acceptable initial or alternative treatment for patients with diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:21437071

  11. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor Receptor-β Antagonism Restores Morphine Analgesic Potency against Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Donica, Courtney L.; Cui, Yan; Shi, Shanping; Gutstein, Howard B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic, intractable pain is a problem of pandemic proportions. Pain caused by nerve injuries (neuropathic pain) is extremely difficult to treat. For centuries, opiates such as morphine have been the first-line treatment for severe chronic pain. However, opiates are often ineffective against neuropathic pain, leaving few options for suffering patients. We previously demonstrated that platelet-derived growth factor- β (PDGFR-β) inhibition completely eliminated morphine tolerance. In these studies, we determined whether PDGFR-β inhibition could improve the effectiveness of morphine for neuropathic pain treatment. Results and Findings Spinal nerve ligation was performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The clinically used PDGFR antagonist imatinib did not relieve mechanical pain in a nerve injury model as determined by Von Frey assay. Surprisingly, combining imatinib with a previously ineffective dose of morphine led to complete pain relief. Scavenging released PDGF-B also markedly augmented the analgesic effect of morphine. Conclusions These findings suggest the novel hypothesis that PDGF-B released by injured nerves renders animals resistant to morphine, implying that PDGFR-β inhibition could potentially eliminate the tremendous suffering caused by neuropathic pain. PMID:24820332

  12. Decrease in serotonin concentration in raphe magnus nucleus and attenuation of morphine analgesia in two mice models of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Sounvoravong, Sourisak; Nakashima, Mihoko N; Wada, Mitsuhiro; Nakashima, Kenichiro

    2004-01-26

    The alleviation of neuropathic pain cannot be satisfactorily achieved by treatment with opioids. There is much evidence to indicate that the active site of morphine for inducing effective analgesia is in the raphe magnus nucleus, where serotonin (5-HT, 5-hydroxytryptamine) acts as a primary transmitter. Therefore, we developed the hypothesis that 5-HT released in the raphe magnus nucleus could be related to the effectiveness of morphine in two mice models of neuropathic pain, diabetic (DM)-induced neuropathy and sciatic nerve ligation (SL). Two weeks after a single administration of streptozotocin, or 10 days after sciatic nerve ligation, mice were subcutaneously (s.c.) injected with morphine at 3, 5 and 10 mg/kg. The antinociceptive effect of morphine was estimated in the tail-pinch test; 5-HT content was measured after induction of neuropathic pain by microdialysis followed by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). Morphine produced as insufficient antinociceptive effect in SL mice at all doses compared with that in sham-operated mice, while in DM mice, morphine given s.c. at 5 and 10 mg/kg produced antinociceptive effects compared with those in non-diabetic mice, but not at 3 mg/kg. The 5-HT content of dialysates, expressed as AUC for 75 min, in SL and DM mice was less than that in control mice. However, morphine given s.c. at 5 mg/kg did not significantly affect 5-HT levels in both mice models compared to their controls. These results suggest that the decrease in 5-HT levels in the raphe magnus nucleus may be related to attenuation of the analgesic effect of morphine caused by the abnormal pain state found in diabetes and partial peripheral nerve injury.

  13. Relationship between electrodiagnostic severity and neuropathic pain assessed by the LANSS pain scale in carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gürsoy, Azize Esra; Kolukısa, Mehmet; Yıldız, Gülsen Babacan; Kocaman, Gülşen; Çelebi, Arif; Koçer, Abdülkadir

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of neuropathic pain assessed by the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) scale and electrophysiological findings in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods We studied 124 hands with idiopathic CTS with pain complaints involving hand and wrist. All hands were assessed by the LANSS with which a score of 12 or more is defined as pain dominated by neuropathic mechanisms. These hands were assigned to minimal, mild, moderate, severe, or extreme severe groups according to the results of the median nerve conduction studies. Results A LANSS score ≥ 12, suggestive of pain dominated by neuropathic mechanisms, was defined in 59 (47.6%) CTS hands. Pain intensity was significantly higher in CTS hands with a LANSS score ≥ 12 (P < 0.001). Among electrophysiological findings, compound muscle action potential amplitude was significantly lower in hands with a LANSS score ≥ 12 compared with hands with a LANSS score < 12 (P = 0.020). Severity of CTS was not significantly different between LANSS ≥ 12 and LANSS < 12 groups. Electrophysiological severity was significantly higher in CTS hands with evoked pain (P = 0.005) and allodynia (P < 0.001) in LANSS subscore analysis. Conclusion We suggest that the presence of pain dominated by neuropathic mechanisms in CTS is not related to electrophysiological CTS severity. Neuropathic pain should be assessed carefully in patients with CTS, and an appropriate treatment plan should be chosen, taking into account the clinical and electrophysiological findings together with the true pain classification. PMID:23326196

  14. Non-invasive Brain Stimulation, a Tool to Revert Maladaptive Plasticity in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Naro, Antonino; Milardi, Demetrio; Russo, Margherita; Terranova, Carmen; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Cacciola, Alberto; Marino, Silvia; Calabro, Rocco S.; Quartarone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Neuromodulatory effects of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) have been extensively studied in chronic pain. A hypothetic mechanism of action would be to prevent or revert the ongoing maladaptive plasticity within the pain matrix. In this review, the authors discuss the mechanisms underlying the development of maladaptive plasticity in patients with chronic pain and the putative mechanisms of NIBS in modulating synaptic plasticity in neuropathic pain conditions. PMID:27512368

  15. A Mangifera indica L. extract could be used to treat neuropathic pain and implication of mangiferin.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Suárez, Bárbara B; Garrido, Gabino; Delgado, Rene; Bosch, Fe; del C Rabí, María

    2010-12-09

    It has been accepted that neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and glial activation are involved in the central sensitization underlying neuropathic pain. Vimang is an aqueous extract of Mangifera indica L. traditionally used in Cuba for its analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and immunomodulatory properties. Several formulations are available, and also for mangiferin, its major component. Preclinical studies demonstrated that these products prevented tumor necrosis factor α -induced IκB degradation and the binding of nuclear factor κB to DNA, which induces the transcription of genes implicated in the expression of some mediators and enzymes involved in inflammation, pain, oxidative stress and synaptic plasticity. In this paper we propose its potential utility in the neuropathic pain treatment. This hypothesis is supported in the cumulus of preclinical and clinical evidence around the extract and mangiferin, its major component, and speculates about the possible mechanism of action according to recent advances in the physiopathology of neuropathic pain.

  16. Role of PAR2 in regulating oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain via TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Tian, Liujun; Fan, Tianren; Zhou, Nan; Guo, Hui; Zhang, Weijie

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin (OXL) is a third-generation chemotherapeutic agent commonly used to treat metastatic digestive tumors; however, one of the main limiting complications of OXL is neuropathic pain. In this study, the underlying mechanisms responsible for OXL evoked-neuropathic pain were examined. Using a rat model, the results demonstrated that intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of OXL significantly increased mechanical pain and cold sensitivity as compared with control animals (P < 0.05 vs. control rats). Blocking proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) significantly attenuated mechanical pain and cold sensitivity observed in control rats and OXL rats (P < 0.05 vs. vehicle control). The attenuating effect of PAR2 on mechanical pain and cold sensitivity were significantly smaller in OXL-rats than in control rats. The role played by PAR2 downstream signaling pathways [namely, transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1)] in regulating OXL evoked-neuropathic pain was also examined. The data shows that TRPA1 expression was upregulated in the lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of OXL rats and blocking TRPA1 inhibited mechanical pain and heightened cold sensitivity (P < 0.05 vs. control rats). Blocking PAR2 also significantly decreased TRPA1 expression in the DRG. Findings in this study show that OXL intervention amplifies mechanical hyperalgesia and cold hypersensitivity and PAR2 plays an important role in regulating OXL-induced neuropathic pain via TRPA1 pathways.

  17. Traumatic peripheral nerve injuries: epidemiological findings, neuropathic pain and quality of life in 158 patients.

    PubMed

    Ciaramitaro, Palma; Mondelli, Mauro; Logullo, Francesco; Grimaldi, Serena; Battiston, Bruno; Sard, Arman; Scarinzi, Cecilia; Migliaretti, Giuseppe; Faccani, Giuliano; Cocito, Dario

    2010-06-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) epidemiological analysis of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries; (2) assessment of neuropathic pain and quality of life in patients affected by traumatic neuropathies. All consecutive patients with a diagnosis of traumatic neuropathies from four Italian centres were enrolled. Electromyography confirmed clinical level and site diagnosis of peripheral nerve injury. All patients were evaluated by disability scales, pain screening tools, and quality of life tests. 158 consecutive patients for a total of 211 traumatic neuropathies were analysed. The brachial plexus was a frequent site of traumatic injury (36%) and the radial, ulnar, and peroneal were the most commonly involved nerves with 15% of iatrogenic injuries. Seventy-two percent of the traumatic neuropathies were painful. Pain was present in 66% and neuropathic pain in 50% of all patients. Patients had worse quality of life scores than did the healthy Italian population. Moreover, there was a strong correlation between the quality of life and the severity of the pain, particularly neuropathic pain (Short Form-36 [SF-36] p < 0.005; Beck Depression Inventory [BDI] p < 0.0001). Traumatic neuropathies were more frequent in young males after road accidents, mainly in the upper limbs. Severe neuropathic pain and not only disability contributed to worsening the quality of life in patients with traumatic neuropathies.

  18. Micronized palmitoylethanolamide reduces the symptoms of neuropathic pain in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Schifilliti, Chiara; Cucinotta, Lelio; Fedele, Viviana; Ingegnosi, Carmela; Luca, Salvatore; Leotta, Carmelo

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of micronized palmitoylethanolamide (PEA-m) treatment in reducing the painful symptoms experienced by diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. PEA-m, a fatty acid amide of the N-acylethanolamine family, was administered (300 mg twice daily) to 30 diabetic patients suffering from painful diabetic neuropathy. Before treatment start, after 30 and 60 days the following parameters were assessed: painful symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening instrument; intensity of symptoms characteristic of diabetic neuropathic pain by the Total Symptom Score; and intensity of different subcategories of neuropathic pain by the Neuropathic Pain Symptoms Inventory. Hematological and blood chemistry tests to evaluate metabolic control and safety were also performed. Statistical analysis (ANOVA) indicated a highly significant reduction in pain severity (P < 0.0001) and related symptoms (P < 0.0001) evaluated by Michigan Neuropathy Screening instrument, Total Symptom Score, and Neuropathic Pain Symptoms Inventory. Hematological and urine analyses did not reveal any alterations associated with PEA-m treatment, and no serious adverse events were reported. These results suggest that PEA-m could be considered as a promising and well-tolerated new treatment for symptomatology experienced by diabetic patients suffering from peripheral neuropathy.

  19. Micronized Palmitoylethanolamide Reduces the Symptoms of Neuropathic Pain in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schifilliti, Chiara; Cucinotta, Lelio; Fedele, Viviana; Ingegnosi, Carmela; Luca, Salvatore; Leotta, Carmelo

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of micronized palmitoylethanolamide (PEA-m) treatment in reducing the painful symptoms experienced by diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. PEA-m, a fatty acid amide of the N-acylethanolamine family, was administered (300 mg twice daily) to 30 diabetic patients suffering from painful diabetic neuropathy. Before treatment start, after 30 and 60 days the following parameters were assessed: painful symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening instrument; intensity of symptoms characteristic of diabetic neuropathic pain by the Total Symptom Score; and intensity of different subcategories of neuropathic pain by the Neuropathic Pain Symptoms Inventory. Hematological and blood chemistry tests to evaluate metabolic control and safety were also performed. Statistical analysis (ANOVA) indicated a highly significant reduction in pain severity (P < 0.0001) and related symptoms (P < 0.0001) evaluated by Michigan Neuropathy Screening instrument, Total Symptom Score, and Neuropathic Pain Symptoms Inventory. Hematological and urine analyses did not reveal any alterations associated with PEA-m treatment, and no serious adverse events were reported. These results suggest that PEA-m could be considered as a promising and well-tolerated new treatment for symptomatology experienced by diabetic patients suffering from peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24804094

  20. The antiallodynic action of pregabalin in neuropathic pain is independent from the opioid system

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Ipek; Nexon, Laurent; Wurtz, Xavier; Ceredig, Rhian Alice; Daniel, Dorothée; Hawkes, Rachael Aredhel; Salvat, Eric; Barrot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical management of neuropathic pain, which is pain arising as a consequence of a lesion or a disease affecting the somatosensory system, partly relies on the use of anticonvulsant drugs such as gabapentinoids. Therapeutic action of gabapentinoids such as gabapentin and pregabalin, which act by the inhibition of calcium currents through interaction with the α2δ-1 subunit of voltage-dependent calcium channels, is well documented. However, some aspects of the downstream mechanisms are still to be uncovered. Using behavioral, genetic, and pharmacological approaches, we tested whether opioid receptors are necessary for the antiallodynic action of acute and/or long-term pregabalin treatment in the specific context of neuropathic pain. Results Using the cuff model of neuropathic pain in mice, we show that acute pregabalin administration at high dose has a transitory antiallodynic action, while prolonged oral pregabalin treatment leads to sustained antiallodynic action, consistent with clinical observations. We show that pregabalin remains fully effective in μ-opioid receptor, in δ-opioid receptor and in κ-opioid receptor deficient mice, either female or male, and its antiallodynic action is not affected by acute naloxone. Our work also shows that long-term pregabalin treatment suppresses tumor necrosis factor-α overproduction induced by sciatic nerve constriction in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia. Conclusions We demonstrate that neither acute nor long-term antiallodynic effect of pregabalin in a context of neuropathic pain is mediated by the endogenous opioid system, which differs from opioid treatment of pain and antidepressant treatment of neuropathic pain. Our data are also supportive of an impact of gabapentinoid treatment on the neuroimmune aspect of neuropathic pain. PMID:27030724

  1. A long noncoding RNA contributes to neuropathic pain by silencing Kcna2 in primary afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiuli; Tang, Zongxiang; Zhang, Hongkang; Atianjoh, Fidelis E.; Zhao, Jian-Yuan; Liang, Lingli; Wang, Wei; Guan, Xiaowei; Kao, Sheng-Chin; Tiwari, Vinod; Gao, Yong-Jing; Hoffman, Paul N.; Cui, Hengmi; Li, Min; Dong, Xinzhong; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a refractory disease characterized by maladaptive changes in gene transcription and translation within the sensory pathway. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as new players in gene regulation, but how lncRNAs operate in the development of neuropathic pain is unclear. Here we identify a conserved lncRNA for Kcna2 (named Kcna2 antisense RNA) in first-order sensory neurons of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Peripheral nerve injury increases Kcna2 antisense RNA expression in injured DRG through activation of myeloid zinc finger protein 1, a transcription factor that binds to Kcna2 antisense RNA gene promoter. Mimicking this increase downregulates Kcna2, reduces total Kv current, increases excitability in DRG neurons, and produces neuropathic pain symptoms. Blocking this increase reverses nerve injury-induced downregulation of DRG Kcna2 and attenuates development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. These findings suggest native Kcna2 antisense RNA as a new therapeutic target for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:23792947

  2. Antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of neuropathic pain: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Espinosa, Maríam L.; Sanmartí-García, Gemma; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Many therapies have been proposed for the management of neuropathic pain, and they include the use of different antiepileptic drugs. However, the lack of high quality studies indicates that results on the different neuropathic disorders under study do not recommend a particular drug treatment. This study makes a systematic review of the published literature on the use of several antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain, and has the objective of considering both its clinical characteristics and pharmacological use, which will depend on their level of scientific evidence and will follow the principles of evidence-based dentistry. The articles were stratified according to their scientific evidence using the SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy), and it included those articles that only have level 1 or 2. Randomized clinical trials were stratified according to their level of quality using the JADAD scale, an instrument described by Jadad et al. (7). to assess the quality of clinical trials, while studies with a level below 3 were discarded. Recently, type A or B recommendations are given in favor or against the use of antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain on the basis of their scientific quality. Key words:Neuropathic pain, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, post- herpetic neuralgia, burning mouth syndrome, persistent idiopathic facial pain. PMID:22549682

  3. Persistent post-surgical pain and neuropathic pain after total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Drosos, Georgios I; Triantafilidou, Triantafilia; Ververidis, Athanasios; Agelopoulou, Cristina; Vogiatzaki, Theodosia; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the prevalence of persistent post-surgical pain (PPSP) and neuropathic pain (NP) after total knee replacement (TKR). METHODS: MEDLINE and Embase databases were searched for articles published until December 2014 in English language. Published articles were included if they referred to pain that lasts at least 3 mo after primary TKR for knee osteoarthritis, and measured pain with pain specific instruments. Studies that referred to pain caused by septic reasons and implant malalignment were excluded. Both prospective and retrospective studies were included and only 14 studies that match the inclusion criteria were selected for this review. RESULTS: The included studies were characterized by the heterogeneity on the scales used to measure pain and pre-operative factors related to PPSP and NP. The reported prevalence of PPSP and NP seems to be relatively high, but it varies among different studies. There is also evidence that the prevalence of post-surgical pain is related to the scale used for pain measurement. The prevalence of PPSP is ranging at 6 mo from 16% to 39% and at 12 mo from 13.1% to 23% and even 38% of the patients. The prevalence of NP at 6 mo post-operatively is ranging from 5.2% to 13%. Pre-operative factors related to the development of PPSP also differ, including emotional functioning, such as depression and pain catastrophizing, number of comorbidities, pain problems elsewhere and operations in knees with early grade of osteoarthritis. CONCLUSION: No firm conclusions can be reached regarding the prevalence of PPSP and NP and the related factors due to the heterogeneity of the studies. PMID:26301182

  4. Neuropathic ocular pain: an important yet underevaluated feature of dry eye

    PubMed Central

    Galor, A; Levitt, R C; Felix, E R; Martin, E R; Sarantopoulos, C D

    2015-01-01

    Dry eye has gained recognition as a public health problem given its prevalence, morbidity, and cost implications. Dry eye can have a variety of symptoms including blurred vision, irritation, and ocular pain. Within dry eye-associated ocular pain, some patients report transient pain whereas others complain of chronic pain. In this review, we will summarize the evidence that chronicity is more likely to occur in patients with dysfunction in their ocular sensory apparatus (ie, neuropathic ocular pain). Clinical evidence of dysfunction includes the presence of spontaneous dysesthesias, allodynia, hyperalgesia, and corneal nerve morphologic and functional abnormalities. Both peripheral and central sensitizations likely play a role in generating the noted clinical characteristics. We will further discuss how evaluating for neuropathic ocular pain may affect the treatment of dry eye-associated chronic pain. PMID:25376119

  5. Revised definition of neuropathic pain and its grading system: an open case series illustrating its use in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Geber, Christian; Baumgärtner, Ulf; Schwab, Rainer; Müller, Harald; Stoeter, Peter; Dieterich, Marianne; Sommer, Clemens; Birklein, Frank; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2009-10-01

    The definition of neuropathic pain has recently been revised by an expert committee of the Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group of the International Association for the Study of Pain (NeuPSIG) as "pain arising as direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system," and a grading system of "definite," "probable," and "possible" neuropathic pain has been introduced. This open case series of 5 outpatients (3 men, 2 women; mean age 48 +/- 12 years) demonstrates how the grading system can be applied, in combination with appropriate confirmatory testing, to diagnosis neuropathic conditions in clinical practice. The proposed grading system includes a dynamic algorithm that enhances the physician's ability to determine with a greater level of certainty whether a pain condition is neuropathic. Its clinical use should be further validated in prospective studies.

  6. Prevalence of neuropathic features of back pain in clinical populations: implications for the diagnostic triage paradigm.

    PubMed

    Hush, Julia M; Marcuzzi, Anna

    2012-07-01

    SUMMARY Contemporary clinical assessment of back pain is based on the diagnostic triage paradigm. The most common diagnostic classification is nonspecific back pain, considered to be of nociceptive etiology. A small proportion are diagnosed with radicular pain, of neuropathic origin. In this study we review the body of literature on the prevalence of neuropathic features of back pain, revealing that the point prevalence is 17% in primary care, 34% in mixed clinical settings and 53% in tertiary care. There is evidence that neuropathic features of back pain are not restricted to typical clinical radicular pain phenotypes and may be under-recognized, particularly in primary care. The consequence of this is that in the clinic, diagnostic triage may erroneously classify patients with nonspecific back pain or radicular pain. A promising alternative is the development of mechanism-based pain phenotyping in patients with back pain. Timely identification of contributory pain mechanisms may enable greater opportunity to select appropriate therapeutic targets and improve patient outcomes.

  7. Periodontal Probe Improves Exams, Alleviates Pain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Dentists, comedian Bill Cosby memorably mused, tell you not to pick your teeth with any sharp metal object. Then you sit in their chair, and the first thing they grab is an iron hook!" Conventional periodontal probing is indeed invasive, uncomfortable for the patient, and the results can vary greatly between dentists and even for repeated measurements by the same dentist. It is a necessary procedure, though, as periodontal disease is the most common dental disease, involving the loss of teeth by the gradual destruction of ligaments that hold teeth in their sockets in the jawbone. The disease usually results from an increased concentration of bacteria in the pocket, or sulcus, between the gums and teeth. These bacteria produce acids and other byproducts, which enlarge the sulcus by eroding the gums and the periodontal ligaments. The sulcus normally has a depth of 1 to 2 millimeters, but in patients with early stages of periodontal disease, it has a depth of 3 to 5 millimeters. By measuring the depth of the sulcus, periodontists can have a good assessment of the disease s progress. Presently, there are no reliable clinical indicators of periodontal disease activity, and the best available diagnostic aid, periodontal probing, can only measure what has already been lost. A method for detecting small increments of periodontal ligament breakdown would permit earlier diagnosis and intervention with less costly and time-consuming therapy, while overcoming the problems associated with conventional probing. The painful, conventional method for probing may be destined for the archives of dental history, thanks to the development of ultrasound probing technologies. The roots of ultrasound probes are in an ultrasound-based time-of-flight technique routinely used to measure material thickness and length in the Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Laboratory at Langley Research Center. The primary applications of that technology have been for corrosion detection and bolt tension

  8. SIP30 Is Regulated by ERK in Peripheral Nerve Injury-induced Neuropathic Pain*

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guangdun; Han, Mei; Du, Yimin; Lin, Anning; Yu, Lei; Zhang, Yuqiu; Jing, Naihe

    2009-01-01

    ERK plays an important role in chronic neuropathic pain. However, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. Here we show that in chronic constriction injury-treated rat spinal cords, up-regulation of SIP30 (SNAP25-interacting protein 30), which is involved in the development and maintenance of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain, correlates with ERK activation and that the up-regulation of SIP30 is suppressed by intrathecal delivery of the MEK inhibitor U0126. In PC12 cells, up-regulation of SIP30 by nerve growth factor is also dependent on ERK activation. We found that there is an ERK-responsive region in the rat sip30 promoter. Activation of ERK promotes the recruitment of the transcription factor cyclic AMP-response element-binding protein to the sip30 gene promoter. Taken together, our results provide a potential downstream target of ERK activation-mediated neuropathic pain. PMID:19723624

  9. Orofacial pain--Part I: Assessment and management of musculoskeletal and neuropathic causes.

    PubMed

    Sarlani, Eleni; Balciunas, Birute A; Grace, Edward G

    2005-01-01

    Orofacial pain is a common complaint, affecting the lives of millions of people around the world. Chronic orofacial pain often constitutes a challenging diagnostic problem that can be complicated by psychosocial factors and typically requires multidisciplinary treatment approaches. The fundamental prerequisite for successful management of orofacial pain is an accurate diagnosis. Generating a differential diagnosis, which will ultimately lead to a definite diagnosis, requires thorough knowledge of the diagnostic range of orofacial pain. There is a vast array of orofacial pain categories including: (1) musculoskeletal, (2) neuropathic, (3) vascular, (4) neurovascular, (5) idiopathic, (6) pain caused by local, distant, or systemic pathology, and (7) psychogenic. This article presents the salient clinical features and the therapeutic approaches for the various subtypes of musculoskeletal and neuropathic pain. Musculoskeletal pain is the most prevalent orofacial pain, with temporomandibular disorders and tension-type headache being the main examples. Neuropathic pain develops secondary to neural injury and/or irritation and can be distinguished into episodic, including trigeminal neuralgia and glossopharyngeal neuralgia, as well as continuous, such as herpetic and postherpetic neuralgia, traumatic neuralgia, and Eagle's syndrome.

  10. Effects of intermedin on dorsal root ganglia in the transmission of neuropathic pain in chronic constriction injury rats.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Qiu, Shu-yi; Xu, Ling-yun; Zhang, Chun-ping; Yi, Yun; Wu, Qin; Huang, Li-ping; Liu, Shuang-mei; Wu, Bing; Peng, Li-chao; Song, Miao-miao; Gao, Yun; Liang, Shang-dong

    2015-07-01

    lower than that in the CCI+NS group or the CCI+IMD1-53 group. Our findings indicate that IMD might increase the sensitization effects of IMD on P2X3 receptors to alleviate chronic neuropathic pain injury. The IMD agonist IMD1-53 might enhance nociceptive responses mediated by P2X3 receptors in neuropathic pain, and the IMD inhibitor IMD14-47 could inhibit the sensitization of the P2X3 receptor in chronic neuropathic pain injury.

  11. [Experience in treatment of patients with neuropathic facial pain using ziconotide].

    PubMed

    Lux, E A; Rasche, D

    2011-08-01

    We report on the intrathecal use of ziconotide in three patients with idiopathic facial pain after surgery of the mouth, jaw or face and one patient with neuropathic pain after damage of the lingual nerve. The therapy was successful in three patients but one patient with idiopathic facial pain had pain relief only during the test phase of ziconotide with an external pump and not after implanting the Synchromed® pump. With intrathecal morphine therapy this patient achieved good pain relief. We recommend that patients with neuropathic facial pain should be treated with ziconotide after implementation of guideline-based therapy. In the test phase the ziconotide dose should be increased by 0.6 µg/day per week after an initial dose of 0.6-1.2 µg/day to avoid side-effects.

  12. Cell transplants to treat the "disease" of neuropathic pain and itch.

    PubMed

    Basbaum, Allan I; Bráz, João M

    2016-02-01

    Among many mechanisms implicated in the development of neuropathic pain after nerve damage is a profound dysfunction of GABAergic inhibitory controls, manifested by ongoing pain, mechanical hypersensitivity, and thermal hyperalgesia. In some respects, neuropathic pain can be considered a "disease" of the nervous system, with features in common with trauma-induced seizures. Indeed, first-line management involves anticonvulsant therapy. An alternative to pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain is an approach that reestablishes the inhibitory tone that is lost after nerve damage. To this end, we have transplanted embryonic cortical GABAergic precursor neurons into the spinal cord of nerve-injured mice. Using a combination of light and electron microscopic analyses, and also in vitro electrophysiological recordings from spinal cord slice preparations, we demonstrated remarkable integration of the transplants into the host, adult spinal cord. Most importantly, transplants produced a complete reversal of the hypersensitivity in a sciatic nerve injury model and in a paclitaxel-generated chemotherapy model of neuropathic pain. In related studies, we demonstrated that medial ganglionic eminence cell transplants are also effective in a chronic neuropathic itch model in which there is a significant loss of dorsal horn inhibitory interneurons. Most importantly, in contrast to systemic or intrathecal pharmacological therapies, adverse side effects are minimized when the inhibitory control, namely, γ-aminobutyric acid release, occurs in a spinal cord circuit. These studies suggest that therapy targeted at repairing the GABAergic dysfunction is a viable and novel alternative to the management of neuropathic pain and itch, particularly those that are or become refractory to traditional pharmacotherapy.

  13. Enduring Reversal Of Neuropathic Pain By A Single Intrathecal Injection Of Adenosine 2A Receptor Agonists: A Novel Therapy For Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Loram, Lisa C; Harrison, Jacqueline A; Sloane, Evan M; Hutchinson, Mark R; Sholar, Paige; Taylor, Frederick R; Berkelhammer, Debra; Coats, Benjamen D; Poole, Stephen; Milligan, Erin D; Maier, Steven F; Rieger, Jayson; Watkins, Linda R

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies of peripheral immune cells have documented that activation of adenosine 2A receptors (A2AR) decrease pro-inflammatory cytokine release and increase release of the potent anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10). Given the growing literature supporting that glial proinflammatory cytokines importantly contribute to neuropathic pain, and that IL-10 can suppress such pain, we evaluated the effects of intrathecally (i.t.) administered A2AR agonists on neuropathic pain using the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. A single i.t. injection of the A2AR agonists ATL313 or CGS21680, 10-14 d after CCI versus sham surgery, produced a long-duration reversal of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia for at least 4 wk. Neither drug altered the nociceptive responses of sham-operated controls. An A2AR antagonist (ZM241385) co-administered i.t. with ATL313 abolished the action of ATL313 in rats with neuropathy-induced allodynia, but had no effect on allodynia in the absence of the A2AR agonist. ATL313 attenuated CCI-induced upregulation of spinal cord activation markers for microglia and astrocytes in the L4-L6 spinal cord segments both 1 wk and 4 wk after a single i.t. ATL313 administration. Neutralizing IL-10 antibodies administered i.t. transiently abolished the effect of ATL313 on neuropathic pain. In addition, IL-10 mRNA was significantly elevated in the CSF cells collected from the lumbar region. Activation of A2ARs following i.t. administration may be a novel, therapeutic approach for the treatment of neuropathic pain by increasing IL-10 in the immunocompetent cells of the CNS. PMID:19890011

  14. Physical therapy modalities and rehabilitation techniques in the management of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Akyuz, Gulseren; Kenis, Ozge

    2014-03-01

    Neuropathic pain is an important problem because of its complex natural history, unclear etiology, and poor response to standard physical therapy agents. It causes severe disability unrelated to its etiology. The primary goals of the management of neuropathic pain are to detect the underlying cause, to define the differential diagnosis and eliminate risk factors, and to reduce the pain. The physician should also know the functional and psychologic conditions of the patient. Therefore, a multimodal management plan in neuropathic pain is essential. This review aimed to reflect a diverse point of view about various physical therapy modalities and rehabilitation techniques. Physical therapy modalities and rehabilitation techniques are important options and must be considered when pharmacotherapy alone is not sufficient. In addition, psychosocial support and cognitive behavioral therapy could also be taken into consideration. It has been suggested that the importance of pain rehabilitation techniques will increase in time and these will take a larger part in the management of neuropathic pain. However, it is now early to comment on these methods because of the lack of adequate publications.

  15. Therapeutic Strategies for Neuropathic Pain: Potential Application of Pharmacosynthetics and Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gum Hwa; Kim, Sang Seong

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain originating from neuronal damage remains an incurable symptom debilitating patients. Proposed molecular modalities in neuropathic pain include ion channel expressions, immune reactions, and inflammatory substrate diffusions. Recent advances in RNA sequence analysis have discovered specific ion channel expressions in nociceptors such as transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, voltage-gated potassium, and sodium channels. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) also play an important role in triggering surrounding immune cells. The multiple protein expressions complicate therapeutic development for neuropathic pain. Recent progress in optogenetics and pharmacogenetics may herald the development of novel therapeutics for the incurable pain. Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs) facilitate the artificial manipulation of intracellular signaling through excitatory or inhibitory G protein subunits activated by biologically inert synthetic ligands. Expression of excitatory channelrhodopsins and inhibitory halorhodopsins on injured neurons or surrounding cells can attenuate neuropathic pain precisely controlled by light stimulation. To achieve the discrete treatment of injured neurons, we can exploit the transcriptome database obtained by RNA sequence analysis in specific neuropathies. This can recommend the suitable promoter information to target the injury sites circumventing intact neurons. Therefore, novel strategies benefiting from pharmacogenetics, optogenetics, and RNA sequencing might be promising for neuropathic pain treatment in future. PMID:26884648

  16. A central neuropathic pain model by DSP-4 induced lesion of noradrenergic neurons: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Takashi; Kushikata, Tetsuya; Kudo, Mihoko; Kudo, Tsuyoshi; Hirota, Kazuyoshi

    2010-09-06

    Neuropathic pain models are classified as central and peripheral pain models. Although various peripheral neuropathic pain models are established, central pain models are based only on spinal cord injury. DSP-4 is a competitive inhibitor of norepinephrine uptake that selectively degenerates the locus coeruleus (LC)-noradrenergic neurons projection to the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In the present study, we have tested whether lesion of LC-noradrenergic neurons by ip DSP-4 (0, 10, 30, 50 mg/kg, n=7 each) could provide a new central neuropathic pain model in rats using a hot-plate and tail-flick tests. DSP-4 significantly reduced the hot-plate latency and norepinephrine contents especially in the coerulean regions. However, DSP-4 did not change tail-flick latency. There are significant correlations of the latency in the hot-plate test with norepinephrine contents in the cerebral cortex (r=0.432, p=0.022), the hippocampus (r=0.465, p=0.013) and the pons (r=0.400, p=0.035) but not with those in the hypothalamus and the spinal cord. As response to hot-plate and tail-flick implies supra-spinal process and spinal reflex, respectively, central neuropathic pain may be facilitated by DSP-4 depleting LC-noradrenergic neurons although the present data are preliminary.

  17. Overexpression of miR-206 ameliorates chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats via the MEK/ERK pathway by targeting brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenbo; Zhang, Limin; Li, Rui

    2017-01-24

    Neuropathic pain is chronic pain caused by lesions or diseases of the somatosensory system and existing tolerance to currently available analgesics. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been widely studied in the development of neuropathic pain and neuro-inflammation resulting from nerve injury. However, the precise mechanism of miRNAs involved in neuropathic pain remains largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the vital roles of miR-206 and its putative target gene, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), in neuropathic pain in the rat model of chronic constriction injury (CCI). The levels of miR-206 were down-regulated in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of rats following CCI, while the expressions of BDNF mRNA and protein were up-regulated in vivo. MiR-206 mimics attenuated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in a time-dependent manner in CCI rats. The changes were most significant at 7 days. And, the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were decreased by miR-206 mimics. A direct interaction between miR-206 and the 3'-UTR of BDNF was verified by a dual-luciferase reporter assay. MiR-206 mimics inhibited the expression levels of BDNF mRNA and protein. Moreover, miR-206 mimics suppressed the activation of the MEK/ERK pathway in the DRG of CCI rats. Overexpression of BDNF abrogated the effects of miR-206 inhibition on neuropathic pain, neuro-inflammation and the MEK/ERK pathway. Treatment with U0126, an ERK inhibitor, exerted the same effect as treatment with miR-206 mimics. These results demonstrate that miR-206 alleviates neuropathic pain development via targeting of BDNF, and negatively mediates the MEK/ERK pathway, suggesting that miR-206 may act as a potential target for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  18. Procaine Attenuates Pain Behaviors of Neuropathic Pain Model Rats Possibly via Inhibiting JAK2/STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghua; Yan, Yurong; Yu, Lingzhi; Duan, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NPP) is the main culprit among chronic pains affecting the normal life of patients. Procaine is a frequently-used local anesthesia with multiple efficacies in various diseases. However, its role in modulating NPP has not been reported yet. This study aims at uncovering the role of procaine in NPP. Rats were pretreated with procaine by intrathecal injection. Then NPP rat model was induced by sciatic nerve chronic compression injury (CCI) and behavior tests were performed to analyze the pain behaviors upon mechanical, thermal and cold stimulations. Spinal expression of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was detected by qRT-PCR and western blot. JAK2 was also overexpressed in procaine treated model rats for behavior tests. Results showed that procaine pretreatment improved the pain behaviors of model rats upon mechanical, thermal and cold stimulations, with the best effect occurring on the 15th day post model construction (p<0.05). Procaine also inhibited JAK2 and STAT3 expression in both mRNA (p<0.05) and protein levels. Overexpression of JAK2 increased STAT3 level and reversed the improvement effects of procaine in pain behaviors (p<0.01). These findings indicate that procaine is capable of attenuating NPP, suggesting procaine is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating NPP. Its role may be associated with the inhibition on JAK2/STAT3 signaling. PMID:27530113

  19. Heritability of Nociception IV: Neuropathic pain assays are genetically distinct across methods of peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Young, Erin E.; Costigan, Michael; Herbert, Teri A.; Lariviere, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Prior genetic correlation analysis of 22 heritable behavioral measures of nociception and hypersensitivity in the mouse identified five genetically distinct pain types. In the present study, we reanalyzed that dataset and included the results of an additional nine assays of nociception and hypersensitivity to: 1) replicate the previously identified five pain types; 2) test whether any of the newly added pain assays represent novel genetically distinct pain types; 3) test the level of genetic relatedness among nine commonly employed neuropathic pain assays. Multivariate analysis of pairwise correlations between assays shows that the newly added zymosan-induced heat hypersensitivity assay does not conform to the two previously identified groups of heat hypersensitivity assays and cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis, the first organ-specific visceral pain model examined, is genetically distinct from other inflammatory assays. The four included mechanical hypersensitivity assays are genetically distinct, and do not comprise a single pain type as previously reported. Among the nine neuropathic pain assays including autotomy, chemotherapy, nerve ligation and spared nerve injury assays, at least four genetically distinct types of neuropathic sensory abnormalities were identified, corresponding to differences in nerve injury method. In addition, two itch assays and Comt genotype were compared to the expanded set of nociception and hypersensitivity assays. Comt genotype was strongly related only to spontaneous inflammatory nociception assays. These results indicate the priority for continued investigation of genetic mechanisms in several assays newly identified to represent genetically distinct pain types. PMID:24071598

  20. Heritability of nociception IV: neuropathic pain assays are genetically distinct across methods of peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Young, Erin E; Costigan, Michael; Herbert, Teri A; Lariviere, William R

    2014-05-01

    Prior genetic correlation analysis of 22 heritable behavioral measures of nociception and hypersensitivity in the mouse identified 5 genetically distinct pain types. In the present study, we reanalyzed that dataset and included the results of an additional 9 assays of nociception and hypersensitivity, with the following goals: to replicate the previously identified 5 pain types; to test whether any of the newly added pain assays represent novel genetically distinct pain types; and to test the level of genetic relatedness among 9 commonly used neuropathic pain assays. Multivariate analysis of pairwise correlations between assays shows that the newly added zymosan-induced heat hypersensitivity assay does not conform to the 2 previously identified groups of heat hypersensitivity assays and cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis, the first organ-specific visceral pain model examined, is genetically distinct from other inflammatory assays. The 4 included mechanical hypersensitivity assays are genetically distinct and do not comprise a single pain type as previously reported. Among the 9 neuropathic pain assays including autotomy, chemotherapy, nerve ligation and spared nerve injury assays, at least 4 genetically distinct types of neuropathic sensory abnormalities were identified, corresponding to differences in nerve injury method. In addition, 2 itch assays and Comt genotype were compared to the expanded set of nociception and hypersensitivity assays. Comt genotype was strongly related only to spontaneous inflammatory nociception assays. These results indicate the priority for continued investigation of genetic mechanisms in several assays newly identified to represent genetically distinct pain types.

  1. Expectations and positive emotional feelings accompany reductions in ongoing and evoked neuropathic pain following placebo interventions.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Gitte L; Finnerup, Nanna B; Grosen, Kasper; Pilegaard, Hans K; Tracey, Irene; Benedetti, Fabrizio; Price, Donald D; Jensen, Troels S; Vase, Lene

    2014-12-01

    Research on placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia has primarily included healthy subjects or acute pain patients, and it is unknown whether these effects can be obtained in ongoing pain in patients with chronic pain caused by an identifiable nerve injury. Eighteen patients with postthoracotomy neuropathic pain were exposed to placebo and nocebo manipulations, in which they received open and hidden administrations of pain-relieving (lidocaine) or pain-inducing (capsaicin) treatment controlled for the natural history of pain. Immediately after the open administration, patients rated their expected pain levels on a mechanical visual analogue scale (M-VAS). They also reported their emotional feelings via a quantitative/qualitative experiential method. Subsequently, patients rated their ongoing pain levels on the M-VAS and underwent quantitative sensory testing of evoked pain (brush, pinprick, area of hyperalgesia, wind-up-like pain). There was a significant placebo effect on both ongoing (P=.009 to .019) and evoked neuropathic pain (P=.0005 to .053). Expected pain levels accounted for significant amounts of the variance in ongoing (53.4%) and evoked pain (up to 34.5%) after the open lidocaine administration. Furthermore, patients reported high levels of positive and low levels of negative emotional feelings in the placebo condition compared with the nocebo condition (P⩽.001). Pain increases during nocebo were nonsignificant (P=.394 to 1.000). To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate placebo effects in ongoing neuropathic pain. It provides further evidence for placebo-induced reduction in hyperalgesia and suggests that patients' expectations coexist with emotional feelings about treatments.

  2. Endogenous CBS-H2S Pathway Contributes to the Development of CCI-Induced Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Gui, Yulong; Li, Aiyuan; Qiu, Bihui; Chen, Feng; Chen, Liang; Liu, Daming; Chen, Shuxian; Zhou, Wei; Zhou, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Studies showed a complex relationship between hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and neuropathic pain. In this study, the relationship between endogenous CBS-H2S pathway in L4-6 spinal cord and neuropathic pain was explored. A total of 163 adult Kunming mice were used in this study. CBS expression and H2S formation in L4-6 spinal cord were detected in the development of neuropathic pain firstly. Then, effect of AOAA, an CBS inhibitor, on treatment of neuropathic pain by chronic construction injury surgery (CCI) was detected. Pain thresholds and activation of NF-κB(p65), ERK1/2 and CREB were measured as biomarks of neuropathic pain. Results showed that CCI surgery significantly upregulated protein expression of CBS and H2S formation. Correlation analysis showed pain thresholds had negative relationships with protein expression of CBS and H2S formation. Treatment with AOAA, a CBS inhibitor, inhibited CCI-induced upregulation of CBS expression and H2S formation (P < 0.05). Further, AOAA significantly decreased activation of NF-κB(p65), ERK1/2 and CREB pathway, and reversed CCI-induced allodynia (P < 0.05). This indicated that CBS-H2S pathway promoted the development of neuropathic pain. CBS-H2S pathway could be a promising target for treatment of neuropathic pain.

  3. Long-term response of neuropathic pain to intravenous immunoglobulin in relapsing diabetic lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy. A case report.

    PubMed

    Tamburin, Stefano; Magrinelli, Francesca; Favaro, Flaviano; Briani, Chiara; Zanette, Giampietro

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy (DLRPN) is a rare painful peripheral neuropathic complication of diabetes mellitus. The clinical features of DLRPN include severe neuropathic pain, weakness, atrophy, and sensory loss in the lower limbs with asymmetrical distribution. Nerve ischemia due to inflammation and microvasculitis has been suggested as the pathophysiological mechanism for DLRPN. Analgesics and drugs for neuropathic pain often cannot achieve adequate pain control in DLRPN. Some reports suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) may reduce pain in DLRPN, but the mechanisms of this effect are unclear. We report a patient with relapsing DLRPN who was followed up for 8 years and whose pain improved after IVIg on nine occasions. We measured serum cytokines before and after IVIg; serum tumor necrosis factor α was increased when the patient reported pain and normalized after IVIg in parallel with pain improvement. Our data extend the notion that some types of pain, including peripheral neuropathic pain, may respond to IVIg and give some clue on the mechanism of this therapeutic effect. They are also consistent with the suggested role of the immune system in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain and offer support to the hypothesis that cytokines may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain.

  4. [Neuropathic pain associated with Nav1.7 mutations: clinical picture and treatment].

    PubMed

    Doppler, K; Sommer, C

    2013-12-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for electrogenesis in excitable cells. The isoform Nav1.7 is primarily expressed in nociceptors. Mutations of the SCN9A gene, which codes for the α-subunit of Nav1.7, are the cause of primary erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, two rare neuropathic pain conditions. Recent studies have shown that mutations in the SCN9A gene are the cause of a subgroup of idiopathic small fiber neuropathies and that polymorphisms of SCN9A are associated with an increase in susceptibility to pain. These findings not only contribute to the understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain but also offer targets for a more specific pain therapy.

  5. Glycinergic dysfunction in a subpopulation of dorsal horn interneurons in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Imlach, Wendy L.; Bhola, Rebecca F.; Mohammadi, Sarasa A.; Christie, Macdonald J.

    2016-01-01

    The development of neuropathic pain involves persistent changes in signalling within pain pathways. Reduced inhibitory signalling in the spinal cord following nerve-injury has been used to explain sensory signs of neuropathic pain but specific circuits that lose inhibitory input have not been identified. This study shows a specific population of spinal cord interneurons, radial neurons, lose glycinergic inhibitory input in a rat partial sciatic nerve ligation (PNL) model of neuropathic pain. Radial neurons are excitatory neurons located in lamina II of the dorsal horn, and are readily identified by their morphology. The amplitude of electrically-evoked glycinergic inhibitory post-synaptic currents (eIPSCs) was greatly reduced in radial neurons following nerve-injury associated with increased paired-pulse ratio. There was also a reduction in frequency of spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs) and miniature IPSCs (mIPSC) in radial neurons without significantly affecting mIPSC amplitude. A subtype selective receptor antagonist and western blots established reversion to expression of the immature glycine receptor subunit GlyRα2 in radial neurons after PNL, consistent with slowed decay times of IPSCs. This study has important implications as it identifies a glycinergic synaptic connection in a specific population of dorsal horn neurons where loss of inhibitory signalling may contribute to signs of neuropathic pain. PMID:27841371

  6. Nox2-dependent signaling between macrophages and sensory neurons contributes to neuropathic pain hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kallenborn-Gerhardt, Wiebke; Hohmann, Stephan W; Syhr, Katharina M J; Schröder, Katrin; Sisignano, Marco; Weigert, Andreas; Lorenz, Jana E; Lu, Ruirui; Brüne, Bernhard; Brandes, Ralf P; Geisslinger, Gerd; Schmidtko, Achim

    2014-10-01

    Emerging lines of evidence indicate that production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at distinct sites of the nociceptive system contributes to the processing of neuropathic pain. However, the mechanisms underlying ROS production during neuropathic pain processing are not fully understood. We here detected the ROS-generating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase isoform Nox2 in macrophages of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in mice. In response to peripheral nerve injury, Nox2-positive macrophages were recruited to DRG, and ROS production was increased in a Nox2-dependent manner. Nox2-deficient mice displayed reduced neuropathic pain behavior after peripheral nerve injury, whereas their immediate responses to noxious stimuli were normal. Moreover, injury-induced upregulation of tumor necrosis factor α was absent, and activating transcription factor 3 induction was reduced in DRG of Nox2-deficient mice, suggesting an attenuated macrophage-neuron signaling. These data suggest that Nox2-dependent ROS production in macrophages recruited to DRG contributes to neuropathic pain hypersensitivity, underlining the observation that Nox-derived ROS exert specific functions during the processing of pain.

  7. Microglial P2Y12 Receptors Regulate Microglial Activation and Surveillance during Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Nan; Eyo, Ukpong B.; Murugan, Madhuvika; Peng, Jiyun; Matta, Sanjana; Dong, Hailong; Wu, Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microglial cells are critical in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain and several microglial receptors have been proposed to mediate this process. Of these receptors, the P2Y12 receptor is a unique purinergic receptor that is exclusively expressed by microglia in the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we set forth to investigate the role of P2Y12 receptors in microglial electrophysiological and morphological (static and dynamic) activation during spinal nerve transection (SNT)-induced neuropathic pain in mice. First, we found that a genetic deficiency of the P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12−/− mice) ameliorated pain hypersensitivities during the initiation phase of neuropathic pain. Next, we characterized both the electrophysiological and morphological properties of microglia in the superficial spinal cord dorsal horn following SNT injury. We show dramatic alterations including a peak at 3 days post injury in microglial electrophysiology while high resolution two-photon imaging revealed significant changes of both static and dynamic microglial morphological properties by 7 days post injury. Finally, in P2Y12−/− mice, these electrophysiological and morphological changes were ameliorated suggesting roles for P2Y12 receptors in SNT-induced microglial activation. Our results therefore indicate that P2Y12 receptors regulate microglial electrophysiological as well as static and dynamic microglial properties after peripheral nerve injury, suggesting that the microglial P2Y12 receptor could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:26576724

  8. Antinociceptive effect of matrine on vincristine-induced neuropathic pain model in mice.

    PubMed

    Linglu, Dun; Yuxiang, Li; Yaqiong, Xu; Ru, Zhou; Lin, Ma; Shaoju, Jin; Juan, Du; Tao, Sun; Jianqiang, Yu

    2014-06-01

    Chemotherapy drugs treatment causes neuropathic pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia are common components of neuropathic pain, so effectively therapeutic strategy is required. In this study, we evaluated the antinociceptive effects of matrine on vincristine-induced neuropathic pain in mice. Vincristine (100 μg/kg i.p.) was administered once per day for 7 days (day 0-6) in mice. Matrine (15, 30, 60 mg/kg, i.p.) was repeated administration in early phase (day 0-6) or late phase (day 7-13). Hyperalgesia and allodynia were evaluated by withdrawal response using von Frey filaments, plantar and cold-plate on 7, 14 and 21 day. Injection of vincristine produced mechanical hyperalgesia and cold allodynia. Matrine was found to produce a protective role in both von Frey filaments and cold-plate test. The analysis of the effect supports the hypothesis that matrine is useful in therapy of vincristine-induced neuropathic pain. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that administration of matrine is associated with antinociceptive effect on mechanical and cold stimuli in a mice model of vincristine-induced neuropathy pain.

  9. Dynamics of Circadian Thalamocortical Flow of Information during a Peripheral Neuropathic Pain Condition.

    PubMed

    Cardoso-Cruz, Helder; Sameshima, Koichi; Lima, Deolinda; Galhardo, Vasco

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the thalamocortical loop plays a crucial role in the encoding of sensory-discriminative features of painful stimuli. However, only a few studies have addressed the changes in thalamocortical dynamics that may occur after the onset of chronic pain. Our goal was to evaluate how the induction of chronic neuropathic pain affected the flow of information within the thalamocortical loop throughout the brain states of the sleep-wake cycle. To address this issue we recorded local field potentials (LFPs) - both before and after the establishment of neuropathic pain in awake freely moving adult rats chronically implanted with arrays of multielectrodes in the lateral thalamus and primary somatosensory cortex. Our results show that the neuropathic injury induced changes in the number of wake and slow-wave-sleep (SWS) state episodes, and especially in the total number of transitions between brain states. Moreover, partial directed coherence - analysis revealed that the amount of information flow between cortex and thalamus in neuropathic animals decreased significantly, indicating that the overall thalamic activity had less weight over the cortical activity. However, thalamocortical LFPs displayed higher phase-locking during awake and SWS episodes after the nerve lesion, suggesting faster transmission of relevant information along the thalamocortical loop. The observed changes are in agreement with the hypothesis of thalamic dysfunction after the onset of chronic pain, and may result from diminished inhibitory effect of the primary somatosensory cortex over the lateral thalamus.

  10. Dynamics of Circadian Thalamocortical Flow of Information during a Peripheral Neuropathic Pain Condition

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso-Cruz, Helder; Sameshima, Koichi; Lima, Deolinda; Galhardo, Vasco

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the thalamocortical loop plays a crucial role in the encoding of sensory–discriminative features of painful stimuli. However, only a few studies have addressed the changes in thalamocortical dynamics that may occur after the onset of chronic pain. Our goal was to evaluate how the induction of chronic neuropathic pain affected the flow of information within the thalamocortical loop throughout the brain states of the sleep–wake cycle. To address this issue we recorded local field potentials (LFPs) – both before and after the establishment of neuropathic pain in awake freely moving adult rats chronically implanted with arrays of multielectrodes in the lateral thalamus and primary somatosensory cortex. Our results show that the neuropathic injury induced changes in the number of wake and slow-wave-sleep (SWS) state episodes, and especially in the total number of transitions between brain states. Moreover, partial directed coherence – analysis revealed that the amount of information flow between cortex and thalamus in neuropathic animals decreased significantly, indicating that the overall thalamic activity had less weight over the cortical activity. However, thalamocortical LFPs displayed higher phase-locking during awake and SWS episodes after the nerve lesion, suggesting faster transmission of relevant information along the thalamocortical loop. The observed changes are in agreement with the hypothesis of thalamic dysfunction after the onset of chronic pain, and may result from diminished inhibitory effect of the primary somatosensory cortex over the lateral thalamus. PMID:22007162

  11. NerveCheck for the Detection of Sensory Loss and Neuropathic Pain in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ponirakis, Georgios; Odriozola, Maria N.; Odriozola, Samantha; Petropoulos, Ioannis N.; Azmi, Shazli; Ferdousi, Maryam; Fadavi, Hassan; Alam, Uazman; Marshall, Andrew; Jeziorska, Maria; Miro, Anthony; Kheyami, Ahmad; Tavakoli, Mitra; Al-Ahmar, Ahmed; Odriozola, Maria B.; Odriozola, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Accurate and economic detection of nerve damage in diabetes is key to more widespread diagnosis of patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and painful diabetic neuropathy. This study examined the diagnostic performance of NerveCheck, an inexpensive ($500) quantitative sensory testing (QST) device. Methods: One hundred forty-four subjects (74 with and 70 without diabetes) underwent assessment with NerveCheck, neuropathy disability score (NDS), nerve conduction studies (NCS), intraepidermal and corneal nerve fiber density (IENFD and CNFD), and McGill questionnaire for neuropathic pain. Results: Of the 74 subjects with diabetes, 41 were diagnosed with DPN based on the NDS. The NerveCheck scores for vibration perception threshold (VPT), cold perception threshold (CPT), and warm perception threshold (WPT) were significantly lower (P ≤ 0.0001) in diabetic patients with DPN compared to patients without DPN. The diagnostic accuracy of VPT was high with reference to NCS (area under the curve [AUC]: 82%–84%) and moderate for IENFD, CNFD, and neuropathic pain (AUC: 60%–76%). The diagnostic accuracy of CPT and WPT was moderate with reference to NCS, IENFD, and CNFD (AUC: 69%–78%) and low for neuropathic pain (AUC: 63%–65%). Conclusions: NerveCheck is a low-cost QST device with good diagnostic utility for identifying sensory deficits, comparable to established tests of large and small fiber neuropathy and for the severity of neuropathic pain. PMID:27922760

  12. Effects of silymarin on neuropathic pain and formalin-induced nociception in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Faezeh Vahdati; Rezaee, Ramin; Sazegara, Hasan; Hashemzaei, Mahmoud; Shirani, Kobra; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Based on the previous reports, silymarin can suppress nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leukotrienes, cytokines production, and neutrophils infiltration. Regarding the fact that inflammation plays an important role in neuropathic and formalin-induced pain, it was assumed that silymarin could reduce pain. The present study investigates the analgesic effects of silymarin in chemical nociception and a model of neuropathic pain. Materials and Methods: Chemical nociception was produced by injection of 20 µl of formalin (0.5% formaldehyde in saline) into the plantar region of the right hind paw. A sciatic-nerve ligated mouse was applied as the model of neuropathic pain and the antinociceptive response of silymarin was examined 14 days after unilateral nerve-ligation using the hot plate test. Results: The intraperitoneal administration of silymarin (25, 50, and, 100 mg/kg) 2 hr prior to the intraplantar formalin injection suppressed the nociceptive response during the late phase of the formalin test significantly, but it was not in a dose-dependent manner. Different doses of silymarin 14 days after unilateral sciatic nerve ligation in hot plate test did not induce obvious antinociception. Conclusion: Results of the present study indicated that repeated administration of silymarin prevents the formalin-induced nociceptive behavior. However, it is not effective in the treatment of sciatic neuropathic pain. PMID:26351564

  13. Detecting the neuropathic pain component in the clinical setting: a study protocol for validation of screening instruments for the presence of a neuropathic pain component

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The presence of nerve damage plays a key role in the development and prognosis of chronic pain states. Assessment of the presence and severity of a neuropathic pain component (NePC) is key in diagnosing chronic pain patients. Low back pain (LBP) and neck and shoulder pain (NSP) are highly prevalent and clinically important medical and societal problems in which a NePC is frequently present. The more severe the NePC, the worse the course of the pain, its prognosis and the results of treatment. Reliable and standardised diagnosis of the NePC remains difficult to achieve. Standardized and validated screening tools may help to reliably identify the NePC in individual chronic pain patients. The aim of this study is to validate the Dutch language versions of the PainDETECT Questionnaire (PDQ-Dlv) and the ‘Douleur Neuropathique 4 Questions’ (DN4-Dlv) for use in primary and specialist medical care settings to screen for a NePC in patients with chronic pain due to (1) LBP, (2) NSP or (3) known peripheral nerve damage (PND). Methods/design The study design is cross-sectional to assess the validity of the PDQ-Dlv and the DN4-Dlv with 2 weeks follow-up for test-retest reliability and 3 months follow-up for monitoring and prognosis. 438 patients with chronic pain due to (1) LBP, (2) NSP or (3) PND. will be included in this study. Based on the IASP definition of neuropathic pain, two physicians will independently assess whether the patient has a NEPC or not. This result will be compared with the outcome of the PDQ-Dlv & DN4-Dlv, the grading system for neuropathic pain, bed side examination and quantitative sensory testing. This study will further collect data regarding prevalence of NePC, general health status, mental health status, functioning, pain attribution and quality of life. Discussion The rationale for this study is to provide detailed information on the clinimetric quality of the PDQ-Dlv and DN4-Dlv in Dutch speaking countries. Our innovative multi

  14. An approach to identify microRNAs involved in neuropathic pain following a peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Norcini, Monica; Sideris, Alexandra; Martin Hernandez, Lourdes A.; Zhang, Jin; Blanck, Thomas J. J.; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury alters the expression of hundreds of proteins in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Targeting some of these proteins has led to successful treatments for acute pain, but not for sustained post-operative neuropathic pain. The latter may require targeting multiple proteins. Since a single microRNA (miR) can affect the expression of multiple proteins, here, we describe an approach to identify chronic neuropathic pain-relevant miRs. We used two variants of the spared nerve injury (SNI): Sural-SNI and Tibial-SNI and found distinct pain phenotypes between the two. Both models induced strong mechanical allodynia, but only Sural-SNI rats maintained strong mechanical and cold allodynia, as previously reported. In contrast, we found that Tibial-SNI rats recovered from mechanical allodynia and never developed cold allodynia. Since both models involve nerve injury, we increased the probability of identifying differentially regulated miRs that correlated with the quality and magnitude of neuropathic pain and decreased the probability of detecting miRs that are solely involved in neuronal regeneration. We found seven such miRs in L3-L5 DRG. The expression of these miRs increased in Tibial-SNI. These miRs displayed a lower level of expression in Sural-SNI, with four having levels lower than those in sham animals. Bioinformatic analysis of how these miRs could affect the expression of some ion channels supports the view that, following a peripheral nerve injury, the increase of the seven miRs may contribute to the recovery from neuropathic pain while the decrease of four of them may contribute to the development of chronic neuropathic pain. The approach used resulted in the identification of a small number of potentially neuropathic pain relevant miRs. Additional studies are required to investigate whether manipulating the expression of the identified miRs in primary sensory neurons can prevent or ameliorate chronic neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve

  15. Effectiveness of transcranial direct current stimulation and visual illusion on neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Soler, Maria Dolors; Kumru, Hatice; Pelayo, Raul; Vidal, Joan; Tormos, Josep Maria; Fregni, Felipe; Navarro, Xavier; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effect of transcranial direct current stimulation of the motor cortex and techniques of visual illusion, applied isolated or combined, in patients with neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury. In a sham controlled, double-blind, parallel group design, 39 patients were randomized into four groups receiving transcranial direct current stimulation with walking visual illusion or with control illusion and sham stimulation with visual illusion or with control illusion. For transcranial direct current stimulation, the anode was placed over the primary motor cortex. Each patient received ten treatment sessions during two consecutive weeks. Clinical assessment was performed before, after the last day of treatment, after 2 and 4 weeks follow-up and after 12 weeks. Clinical assessment included overall pain intensity perception, Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory and Brief Pain Inventory. The combination of transcranial direct current stimulation and visual illusion reduced the intensity of neuropathic pain significantly more than any of the single interventions. Patients receiving transcranial direct current stimulation and visual illusion experienced a significant improvement in all pain subtypes, while patients in the transcranial direct current stimulation group showed improvement in continuous and paroxysmal pain, and those in the visual illusion group improved only in continuous pain and dysaesthesias. At 12 weeks after treatment, the combined treatment group still presented significant improvement on the overall pain intensity perception, whereas no improvements were reported in the other three groups. Our results demonstrate that transcranial direct current stimulation and visual illusion can be effective in the management of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury, with minimal side effects and with good tolerability.

  16. Use of the Rat Grimace Scale to Evaluate Neuropathic Pain in a Model of Cervical Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Philips, Blythe H; Weisshaar, Christine L; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2017-02-01

    Although neck and low-back pain are common sources of neuropathic pain with high societal costs, the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain is not well-defined. Traditionally, most rodent pain studies rely on evoked reflex-based testing to measure pain. However, these testing methods do not reveal spontaneous pain, particularly early after injury. The rat grimace scale (RGS) for quantifying spontaneous pain has been validated after visceral, incisional, orthopedic, and inflammatory insults but not neuropathic pain. The current study used a rat model of radiculopathy to investigate the time course of RGS, the effect of the NSAID meloxicam on RGS, and the reliability and consistency of RGS across testers. RGS values at baseline and at 3, 6, 24, and 48 h after cervical nerve root compression (NRC) that induced robust evoked pain responses were compared with those obtained after sham surgery. The RGS was also evaluated at 6 h after NRC in another set of rats that had received meloxicam treatment prior to surgery. At 6 h, NRC induced higher RGS scores (1.27 ± 0.18) than did sham surgery (0.93 ± 0.20), and scores remained above baseline for as long as 48 h. Treatment with meloxicam before NRC reduced RGS at 6 h to sham levels, which were lower than those of injury without treatment. The RGS was associated with very good interobserver reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.91) and excellent internal consistency (Cronbach α, 0.87). These findings suggest that RGS is a useful approach to identifying and monitoring acute neuropathic pain in rats.

  17. Wnt/Ryk signaling contributes to neuropathic pain by regulating sensory neuron excitability and spinal synaptic plasticity in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Liu, Yue-Peng; Huang, Zhi-Jiang; Zhang, Yan-Kai; Song, Angela A; Ma, Ping-Chuan; Song, Xue-Jun

    2015-12-01

    Treating neuropathic pain continues to be a major clinical challenge and underlying mechanisms of neuropathic pain remain elusive. We have recently demonstrated that Wnt signaling, which is important in developmental processes of the nervous systems, plays critical roles in the development of neuropathic pain through the β-catenin-dependent pathway in the spinal cord and the β-catenin-independent pathway in primary sensory neurons after nerve injury. Here, we report that Wnt signaling may contribute to neuropathic pain through the atypical Wnt/Ryk signaling pathway in rats. Sciatic nerve injury causes a rapid-onset and long-lasting expression of Wnt3a, Wnt5b, and Ryk receptors in primary sensory neurons, and dorsal horn neurons and astrocytes. Spinal blocking of the Wnt/Ryk receptor signaling inhibits the induction and persistence of neuropathic pain without affecting normal pain sensitivity and locomotor activity. Blocking activation of the Ryk receptor with anti-Ryk antibody, in vivo or in vitro, greatly suppresses nerve injury-induced increased intracellular Ca and hyperexcitability of the sensory neurons, and also the enhanced plasticity of synapses between afferent C-fibers and the dorsal horn neurons, and activation of the NR2B receptor and the subsequent Ca-dependent signals CaMKII, Src, ERK, PKCγ, and CREB in sensory neurons and the spinal cord. These findings indicate a critical mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain and suggest that targeting the Wnt/Ryk signaling may be an effective approach for treating neuropathic pain.

  18. Neuropathic Pain Post Spinal Cord Injury Part 2: Systematic Review of Dorsal Root Entry Zone Procedure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pharmacotherapy may not sufficiently reduce neuropathic pain in many individuals post spinal cord injury (SCI). The use of alternative therapies such as surgery may be effective in reducing neuropathic pain in these individuals. However, because of the invasive nature of surgery, it is important to examine the evidence for use of this treatment. Objective: The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of published literature on the surgical treatment of neuropathic pain after SCI. Methods: MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases were searched for articles in which surgical treatment of pain after SCI was examined. Articles were restricted to the English language. Article selection was conducted by 2 independent reviewers with the following inclusion criteria: the subjects participated in a surgical intervention for neuropathic pain; at least 50% of the subjects had an SCI; at least 3 subjects had an SCI; and a definable intervention involving the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ) procedure was used to reduce pain. Data extracted included study design, study type, subject demographics, inclusion and exclusion criteria, sample size, outcome measures, and study results. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were assessed for quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) assessment scale. Levels of evidence were assigned to each intervention using a modified Sackett scale. Results: Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. One study provided level 2 evidence, and the rest provided level 4 evidence. The DREZ procedure was shown to be more effective for segmental pain than for diffuse pain after SCI. Further, individuals with conus medullaris level injury were found to have a higher level of neuropathic pain relief than those with cervical, thoracic, or cauda equina injury. Conclusions: The studies demonstrated that the DREZ procedure may be effective in reducing segmental pain. Hence, DREZ may be important in treatment of

  19. Peripheral neuropathic pain: a mechanism-related organizing principle based on sensory profiles.

    PubMed

    Baron, Ralf; Maier, Christoph; Attal, Nadine; Binder, Andreas; Bouhassira, Didier; Cruccu, Giorgio; Finnerup, Nanna B; Haanpää, Maija; Hansson, Per; Hüllemann, Philipp; Jensen, Troels S; Freynhagen, Rainer; Kennedy, Jeffrey D; Magerl, Walter; Mainka, Tina; Reimer, Maren; Rice, Andrew S C; Segerdahl, Märta; Serra, Jordi; Sindrup, Sören; Sommer, Claudia; Tölle, Thomas; Vollert, Jan; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2017-02-01

    Patients with neuropathic pain are heterogeneous in etiology, pathophysiology, and clinical appearance. They exhibit a variety of pain-related sensory symptoms and signs (sensory profile). Different sensory profiles might indicate different classes of neurobiological mechanisms, and hence subgroups with different sensory profiles might respond differently to treatment. The aim of the investigation was to identify subgroups in a large sample of patients with neuropathic pain using hypothesis-free statistical methods on the database of 3 large multinational research networks (German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS), IMI-Europain, and Neuropain). Standardized quantitative sensory testing was used in 902 (test cohort) and 233 (validation cohort) patients with peripheral neuropathic pain of different etiologies. For subgrouping, we performed a cluster analysis using 13 quantitative sensory testing parameters. Three distinct subgroups with characteristic sensory profiles were identified and replicated. Cluster 1 (sensory loss, 42%) showed a loss of small and large fiber function in combination with paradoxical heat sensations. Cluster 2 (thermal hyperalgesia, 33%) was characterized by preserved sensory functions in combination with heat and cold hyperalgesia and mild dynamic mechanical allodynia. Cluster 3 (mechanical hyperalgesia, 24%) was characterized by a loss of small fiber function in combination with pinprick hyperalgesia and dynamic mechanical allodynia. All clusters occurred across etiologies but frequencies differed. We present a new approach of subgrouping patients with peripheral neuropathic pain of different etiologies according to intrinsic sensory profiles. These 3 profiles may be related to pathophysiological mechanisms and may be useful in clinical trial design to enrich the study population for treatment responders.

  20. Effect of antioxidant treatment on spinal GABA neurons in a neuropathic pain model in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Yowtak, June; Wang, Jigong; Kim, Hee Young; Lu, Ying; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2013-11-01

    One feature of neuropathic pain is a reduced spinal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory function. However, the mechanisms behind this attenuation remain to be elucidated. This study investigated the involvement of reactive oxygen species in the spinal GABA neuron loss and reduced GABA neuron excitability in spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model of neuropathic pain in mice. The importance of spinal GABAergic inhibition in neuropathic pain was tested by examining the effects of intrathecally administered GABA receptor agonists and antagonists in SNL and naïve mice, respectively. The effects of SNL and antioxidant treatment on GABA neuron loss and functional changes were examined in transgenic GAD67-enhanced green fluorescent protein positive (EGFP+) mice. GABA receptor agonists transiently reversed mechanical hypersensitivity of the hind paw in SNL mice. On the other hand, GABA receptor antagonists made naïve mice mechanically hypersensitive. Stereological analysis showed that the numbers of enhanced green fluorescent protein positive (EGFP+) GABA neurons were significantly decreased in the lateral superficial laminae (I-II) on the ipsilateral L5 spinal cord after SNL. Repeated antioxidant treatments significantly reduced the pain behaviors and prevented the reduction in EGFP+ GABA neurons. The response rate of the tonic firing GABA neurons recorded from SNL mice increased with antioxidant treatment, whereas no change was seen in those recorded from naïve mice, which suggested that oxidative stress impaired some spinal GABA neuron activity in the neuropathic pain condition. Together the data suggest that neuropathic pain, at least partially, is attributed to oxidative stress, which induces both a GABA neuron loss and dysfunction of surviving GABA neurons.

  1. Peripheral neuropathic pain: a mechanism-related organizing principle based on sensory profiles

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Ralf; Maier, Christoph; Attal, Nadine; Binder, Andreas; Bouhassira, Didier; Cruccu, Giorgio; Finnerup, Nanna B.; Haanpää, Maija; Hansson, Per; Hüllemann, Philipp; Jensen, Troels S.; Freynhagen, Rainer; Kennedy, Jeffrey D.; Magerl, Walter; Mainka, Tina; Reimer, Maren; Rice, Andrew S.C.; Segerdahl, Märta; Serra, Jordi; Sindrup, Sören; Sommer, Claudia; Tölle, Thomas; Vollert, Jan; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with neuropathic pain are heterogeneous in etiology, pathophysiology, and clinical appearance. They exhibit a variety of pain-related sensory symptoms and signs (sensory profile). Different sensory profiles might indicate different classes of neurobiological mechanisms, and hence subgroups with different sensory profiles might respond differently to treatment. The aim of the investigation was to identify subgroups in a large sample of patients with neuropathic pain using hypothesis-free statistical methods on the database of 3 large multinational research networks (German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS), IMI-Europain, and Neuropain). Standardized quantitative sensory testing was used in 902 (test cohort) and 233 (validation cohort) patients with peripheral neuropathic pain of different etiologies. For subgrouping, we performed a cluster analysis using 13 quantitative sensory testing parameters. Three distinct subgroups with characteristic sensory profiles were identified and replicated. Cluster 1 (sensory loss, 42%) showed a loss of small and large fiber function in combination with paradoxical heat sensations. Cluster 2 (thermal hyperalgesia, 33%) was characterized by preserved sensory functions in combination with heat and cold hyperalgesia and mild dynamic mechanical allodynia. Cluster 3 (mechanical hyperalgesia, 24%) was characterized by a loss of small fiber function in combination with pinprick hyperalgesia and dynamic mechanical allodynia. All clusters occurred across etiologies but frequencies differed. We present a new approach of subgrouping patients with peripheral neuropathic pain of different etiologies according to intrinsic sensory profiles. These 3 profiles may be related to pathophysiological mechanisms and may be useful in clinical trial design to enrich the study population for treatment responders. PMID:27893485

  2. Neurolysis using a carbohydrate polymer gel for the treatment of postoperative neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Daniel P; Kalbermatten, Daniel F; Egloff, Daniel V; Raffoul, Wassim

    2010-02-01

    Perineural and intraneural fibrosis is thought to be the main cause of failure of the many surgical treatments of neuropathic pain. We have used Adcon-T/N carbohydrate polymer gel for prevention of perineural fibrosis in several parts of the body. In this retrospective study, 54 patients who presented with postoperative neuropathic pain had microsurgical epineural neurolysis and relocation of a terminal neuroma. In 19 of them, the carbohydrate gel was applied at the same time. The mean follow-up was four years and the nerve distribution varied. Postoperative improvement in pain scores (visual analogue scale (VAS) and neuropathic pain scale inventory (NPSI)), sensitivity, overall improvement and satisfaction were equivalent in the two groups, with pain relief in about 80% of the patients. There was no significant beneficial effect in the carbohydrate gel group. Patients treated with this device had a higher infection rate (21 compared with 0, p = 0.01) and delayed wound healing (31.6 compared with 11.8, p = 0.2). We conclude that good long-term pain relief is obtained postoperatively independently of the addition of carbohydrate gel. There was a slight but not significant trend towards profound pain relief with the gel.

  3. The involvement of the TRPA1 receptor in a mouse model of sympathetically maintained neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Francielle de Vargas; Villarinho, Jardel Gomes; Silva, Cássia Regina; Oliveira, Sara Marchesan; Pinheiro, Kelly de Vargas; Petri, Delia; Rossato, Mateus Fortes; Guerra, Gustavo Petri; Trevisan, Gabriela; Antonello Rubin, Maribel; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Ferreira, Juliano; André, Eunice

    2015-01-15

    Sympathetic fibres maintain some forms of neuropathic pain, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Therefore, this study investigated the possible involvement of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and the role of the sympathetic nervous system (involved in sympathetically maintained neuropathic pain) in a model of neuropathic pain induced by sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) in mice. Systemic injection of the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 reversed the mechanical and cold allodynia that was induced by sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI). Nerve injury also sensitised mice to nociception, which was induced by the intraplantar injection of a low dose of the TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate without changing TRPA1 immunoreactivity in the injected paw. Furthermore, chemical sympathectomy produced by guanethidine largely prevented CCI-induced mechanical and cold allodynia. CCI also induced a norepinephrine-triggered nociception that was inhibited by an α-adrenoceptor antagonist, norepinephrine transporter block and monoamine oxidase inhibition. Finally, the peripheral injection of HC-030031 also largely reduced CCI-induced norepinephrine nociception and mechanical or cold allodynia. Taken together, the present findings reveal a critical role of TRPA1 in mechanical and cold hypersensitivity and norepinephrine hypersensitivity following nerve injury. Finally, our results suggest that TRPA1 antagonism may be useful to treat patients who present sympathetically maintained neuropathic pain.

  4. Paeoniflorin and Albiflorin Attenuate Neuropathic Pain via MAPK Pathway in Chronic Constriction Injury Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianyu; Wang, Linyuan; Wang, Jingxia; Wang, Chun; Yang, Zhihui; Wang, Chenglong; Zhu, Yingli; Zhang, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains as the most frequent cause of suffering and disability around the world. The isomers paeoniflorin (PF) and albiflorin (AF) are major constituents extracted from the roots of Paeonia (P.) lactiflora Pall. Neuroprotective effect of PF has been demonstrated in animal models of neuropathologies. However, only a few studies are related to the biological activities of AF and no report has been published on analgesic properties of AF about neuropathic pain to date. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of AF and PF against CCI-induced neuropathic pain in rat and explore the underlying mechanism. We had found that both PF and AF could inhibit the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) pathway in spinal microglia and subsequent upregulated proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)). AF further displayed remarkable effects on inhibiting the activation of astrocytes, suppressing the overelevated expression of phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (p-JNK) in astrocytes, and decreasing the content of chemokine CXCL1 in the spinal cord. These results suggest that both PF and AF are potential therapeutic agents for neuropathic pain, which merit further investigation. PMID:27429639

  5. Neuropathic Pain and Lung Delivery of Nanoparticulate Drugs: An Emerging Novel Therapeutic Strategy.

    PubMed

    Islam, Nazrul; Abbas, Muzaffar; Rahman, Shafiqur

    2016-12-12

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic neurological disorder affecting millions of people around the world. The currently available pharmacologic agents for the treatment of neuropathic pain have limited efficacy and are associated with dose related unwanted adverse effects. Due to the limited access of drug molecules across blood-brain barrier, a small percentage of drug that is administered systematically, reaches the central nervous system in active form. These therapeutic agents also require daily treatment regimen that is inconvenient and potentially impact patient compliance. Application of nanoparticulate drugs for enhanced delivery system has been explored extensively in the last decades. Pulmonary delivery of nanomedicines for the management of various diseases has become an emerging treatment strategy that ensures the targeted delivery of drugs both for systemic and local effects with low dose and limited adverse effects. To the best of our knowledge, there are no inhaled drug products available on market for the treatment of neuropathic pain. The advantages of delivering therapeutics into deep lungs include non-invasive drug delivery, higher bioavailability with low dose, lower systemic toxicity, and potentially greater blood-brain barrier penetration. This review discusses and highlights the important issues on the application of emerging nanoparticulate lung delivery of drugs for the effective treatment of neuropathic pain.

  6. Sativex: clinical efficacy and tolerability in the treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Michael Philip

    2006-04-01

    Sativex is one of the first cannabis-based medicines to undergo conventional clinical development and to be approved as a prescription medicine. It is an oromucosal spray that allows flexible, individualised dosing. Patients self titrate their overall dose and pattern of dosing according to their response to and tolerance of the medicine. This usually results in the administration of approximately 8-12 sprays/day. Each spray delivers tetrahydrocannabinol 2.7 mg and cannabidiol 2.5 mg, giving an approximate average dose of tetrahydrocannabinol 22-32 mg/day and cannabidiol 20-30 mg/day. Development has concentrated on the treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis, notably spasticity and neuropathic pain, as well as the treatment of neuropathic pain of other aetiologies. Positive results in placebo-controlled trials of the use of Sativex as an add-on therapy in these indications demonstrate that Sativex is efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of these symptoms. Sativex has been approved for use in neuropathic pain due to multiple sclerosis in Canada. If ongoing studies replicate the results already observed, further approvals for the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis and for neuropathic pain are likely.

  7. Blockade of IL-18 signaling diminished neuropathic pain and enhanced the efficacy of morphine and buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Pilat, Dominika; Piotrowska, Anna; Rojewska, Ewelina; Jurga, Agnieszka; Ślusarczyk, Joanna; Makuch, Wioletta; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the low efficacy of antinociceptive drugs for the treatment of neuropathic pain is a major therapeutic problem. Here, we show the potential role of interleukin (IL)-18 signaling in this phenomenon. IL-18 is an important molecule that performs various crucial functions, including the alteration of nociceptive transmission in response to neuropathic pain. We have studied the changes in the mRNA and protein levels (qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively) of IL-18, IL-18-binding protein (IL-18BP) and the IL-18 receptor (IL-18R) over time in rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Our study demonstrated that the spinal levels of IL-18BP were slightly downregulated at days 7 and 14 in the rats subjected to CCI. In contrast, the IL-18 and IL-18R mRNA expression and protein levels were elevated in the ipsilateral spinal cord on days 2, 7 and 14. Moreover, in rats exposed to a single intrathecal administration of IL-18BP (50 and 100 ng) 7 or 14 days following CCI, symptoms of neuropathic pain were attenuated, and the analgesia pursuant to morphine and buprenorphine (0.5 and 2.5 μg) was enhanced. In summary, the restoration of the analgesic activity of morphine and buprenorphine via the blockade of IL-18 signaling suggests that increased IL-18 pathway may account for the decreased analgesic efficacy of opioids for neuropathic pain.

  8. Antinociceptive effect of intracerebroventricular administration of glycine transporter-2 inhibitor ALX1393 in rat models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Hara, Koji; Haranishi, Yasunori; Terada, Tadanori; Obara, Goh; Sata, Takeyoshi

    2015-03-01

    Glycinergic transmission has an important role in regulating nociception in the spinal cord. The glycine transporter-2 (GlyT2) is localized at presynaptic terminals of glycinergic neurons and eliminates glycine from the synaptic cleft to terminate glycinergic transmission. Systemic and intrathecal administration of GlyT2 inhibitors alleviate various types of pain. Although the GlyT2s and glycine receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system, little is known about the role of glycinergic transmission in pain perception at supraspinal regions. The present study examined the antinociceptive effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of the selective GlyT2 inhibitor ALX1393 on inflammatory and neuropathic pain in experimental models. For i.c.v. administration, a guide cannula was implanted into the right lateral ventricle of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Normal rats were used to assess inflammatory nociception using the formalin test and motor function using the rotarod test. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve was induced in the rats. The CCI rats were then used to assess mechanical, cold, and thermal hyperalgesia using the electronic von Frey test, cold plate test, and the plantar test, respectively. ALX1393 (25, 50, and 100 μg) was administered i.c.v. to examine its effects on supraspinal antinociception. Supraspinal ALX1393 in normal rats suppressed the late-phase response in the formalin test but did not affect motor performance. In the CCI rats, ALX1393 inhibited mechanical and cold hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent manner. The antihyperalgesic effects of ALX1393 (100 μg) were reversed completely by i.c.v. pretreatment with a glycine receptor antagonist strychnine (10 μg). These results suggest that GlyT2 contributes to nociceptive transmission at supraspinal level and that the selective GlyT2 inhibitor is a promising candidate for the treatment of inflammatory and neuropathic pain without causing motor dysfunction.

  9. Medial plantar nerve ligation as a novel model of neuropathic pain in mice: pharmacological and molecular characterization

    PubMed Central

    Sant’Anna, Morena B.; Kusuda, Ricardo; Bozzo, Tiago A.; Bassi, Gabriel S.; Alves-Filho, José C.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Ferreira, Sergio H.; Souza, Guilherme R.; Cunha, Thiago M.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathic pain is a consequence of an injury/disease of the peripheral nerves. The mechanisms involved in its pathophysiology are not entirely understood. To better understand the mechanisms involved in the development of peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain, more experimental models are required. Here, we developed a novel peripheral neuropathic pain model in mice by using a minimally invasive surgery and medial plantar nerve ligation (MPNL). After MPNL, mechanical allodynia was established, and mice quickly recovered from the surgery without any significant motor impairment. MPNL causes an increased expression of ATF-3 in the sensory neurons. At 14 days after surgery, gabapentin was capable of reversing the mechanical allodynia, whereas anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids were ineffective. MPNL-induced neuropathic pain was mediated by glial cells activation and the production of TNF-α and IL-6 in the spinal cord. These results indicate MPNL as a reasonable animal model for the study of peripheral neuropathic pain, presenting analgesic pharmacological predictivity to clinically used drugs. The results also showed molecular phenotypic changes similar to other peripheral neuropathic pain models, with the advantage of a lack of motor impairment. These features indicate that MPNL might be more appropriate for the study of neuropathic pain than classical models. PMID:27230787

  10. Long-Term Outcome of the Management of Chronic Neuropathic Pain: A Prospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Dwight E; Clark, A John; Gordon, Allan; Lynch, Mary; Morley-Forster, Patricia K; Nathan, Howard; Smyth, Cathy; Toth, Cory; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth; Gilani, Ammar; Ware, Mark A

    2015-09-01

    This prospective observational cohort study addressed the long-term clinical effectiveness of the management of chronic neuropathic noncancer pain at 7 Canadian tertiary pain centers. Patients were treated according to standard guidelines and were followed at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Standard outcome measures for pain, mood, quality of life, and overall treatment satisfaction were administered, with the primary outcome measure designated as the composite of 30% reduction in average pain intensity and 1-point decrease in the mean Interference Scale Score (0-10) of the Brief Pain Inventory at 12 months relative to baseline. Of 789 patients recruited, mean age was 53.5 ± 14.2 years (55% female) and mean duration of pain was 4.88 ± 5.82 years. Mean average pain intensity (0-10) at baseline was 6.1 ± 1.9. All standard outcome measures showed statistically significant improvement at 12 months relative to baseline (P < .001). However, only 23.7% attained clinically significant improvement in pain and function at 12 months as the primary outcome measure. Univariable analyses showed poorer outcomes at 12-month follow-up with longer duration of pain (P = .002), greater cigarette use (P = .01), more disability compensation (P = .001), and higher opioid doses at baseline and at 12 months (P < .02). Our present treatment modalities provide significant long-term benefit in only about a quarter of patients with neuropathic pain managed at tertiary care pain clinics. Opioid therapy may not be beneficial for the long term. Perspective: Evidence-based treatment of chronic neuropathic pain provides long-term benefit in only about one-quarter of patients seen in tertiary care centers. Opioid therapy may not be beneficial.

  11. Niflumic acid, a TRPV1 channel modulator, ameliorates stavudine-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Marwaha, Lovish; Bansal, Yashika; Singh, Raghunath; Saroj, Priyanka; Sodhi, Rupinder Kaur; Kuhad, Anurag

    2016-12-01

    TRP channels have been discovered as a specialized group of somatosensory neurons involved in the detection of noxious stimuli. Desensitization of TRPV1 located on dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia exhibits analgesic effect and makes it potential therapeutic target for treatment of neuropathic pain. With this background, the present study was aimed to investigate the protective effect of niflumic acid, a TRPV1 modulator, on stavudine (STV)-induced neuropathic pain in rats. Stavudine (50 mg/kg) was administered intravenously via tail vein in rats to induce neuropathic pain. Various behavioral tests were performed to access neuropathic pain (hyperalgesia and allodynia) on 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th days. Electrophysiology (motor nerve conduction velocity; MNCV) and biochemical estimations were conducted after 28th day. Niflumic acid (10, 15, and 20 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally and evaluated against behavioral, electrophysiological (MNCV), and biochemical alterations in stavudine-treated rats. Pregabalin (30 mg/kg) was taken as reference standard and administered intraperitoneally. Four weeks after stavudine injection, rats developed behavioral, electrophysiological (MNCV), and biochemical (oxidative, nitrosative stress, and inflammatory cytokines, TRPV1) alterations. Niflumic acid restored core and associated symptoms of peripheral neuropathy by suppressing oxidative-nitrosative stress, inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) and TRPV1 level in stavudine-induced neuropathic pain in rats. Pharmacological efficacy of niflumic acid (20 mg/kg) was equivalent to pregabalin (30 mg/kg). In conclusion, niflumic acid attenuates STV-induced behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical alterations by manipulating TRP channel activity in two manners: (1) direct antagonistic action against TRPV1 channels and (2) indirect inhibition of TRP channels by blocking oxidative and inflammatory surge. Therefore, NA can be developed as a potential pharmacotherapeutic

  12. Increased efficacy of early spinal cord stimulation in an animal model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Truin, Michiel; van Kleef, Maarten; Linderoth, Bengt; Smits, Helwin; Janssen, Sofie P M; Joosten, Elbert A J

    2011-02-01

    Although spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is an established treatment for chronic neuropathic pain, pain relief is still not successful in a large group of patients. We suggest that the success of SCS may be related to the timing of SCS during the development of chronic neuropathic pain. We therefore compared the effect of SCS applied after 24h of neuropathic pain (early SCS) and after 16days of neuropathic pain (late SCS). For early SCS, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=13) were implanted with an SCS device, followed by a partial ligation of the sciatic nerve. Using von Frey monofilaments, tactile allodynia was assessed 24h after ligation. Animals with tactile allodynia received 30min of SCS. Withdrawal thresholds were assessed just before SCS, during SCS and until the return to pre-stimulation withdrawal threshold. Results were compared with the data from late SCS (n=29). Out of the 13 allodynic animals that received early SCS, 10 (77%) responded to SCS with significantly increased withdrawal thresholds, compared to 38% in the late SCS group. The increase of the withdrawal threshold in the early SCS group could still be noticed 90min after termination of SCS. In more than half of these animals, pre-stimulation withdrawal thresholds were reached only the next day. Early SCS resulted in an increased number of responders to SCS and furthermore an increased duration of the effect of SCS as compared to late SCS. Early SCS treatment of neuropathic rats is more effective as compared to the late SCS treatment.

  13. Adult stem cell as new advanced therapy for experimental neuropathic pain treatment.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Silvia; Castelli, Mara; Amodeo, Giada; Niada, Stefania; Ferrari, Daniela; Vescovi, Angelo; Brini, Anna Teresa; Panerai, Alberto Emilio; Sacerdote, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is a highly invalidating disease resulting as consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system. All the pharmacological treatments today in use give a long lasting pain relief only in a limited percentage of patients before pain reappears making NP an incurable disease. New approaches are therefore needed and research is testing stem cell usage. Several papers have been written on experimental neuropathic pain treatment using stem cells of different origin and species to treat experimental NP. The original idea was based on the capacity of stem cell to offer a totipotent cellular source for replacing injured neural cells and for delivering trophic factors to lesion site; soon the researchers agreed that the capacity of stem cells to contrast NP was not dependent upon their regenerative effect but was mostly linked to a bidirectional interaction between the stem cell and damaged microenvironment resident cells. In this paper we review the preclinical studies produced in the last years assessing the effects induced by several stem cells in different models of neuropathic pain. The overall positive results obtained on pain remission by using stem cells that are safe, of easy isolation, and which may allow an autologous transplant in patients may be encouraging for moving from bench to bedside, although there are several issues that still need to be solved.

  14. [Topical pharmacologic approach with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in the treatment of localized neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Provinciali, L; Lattanzi, S; Chiarlone, R; Fogliardi, A; Intelligente, F; Irace, C; Lanzilotta, M; Palomba, R; Storelli, E; Zampi, M

    2014-12-01

    The treatment of neuropathic pain is a medical challenge. The responsiveness to the different classes of drugs is often unsatisfactory and frequently associated to a wide range of side effects. International guidelines suggest for the "localized" neuropathic pain the topical treatment with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, alone or associated to systemic drugs, as the first choice since its favorable efficacy and tolerability profile. Many clinical experiences support the rationale for using 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in different kinds of localized neuropathic pain, such as postherpetic and trigeminal neuralgia, compressive syndromes, painful diabetic polyneuropathy and pain secondary to trauma or surgical interventions. This paper reports a series of clinical cases whose heterogeneity suggests the wide burden of applicability of the topical 5% lidocaine, either alone and associated to systemic drugs. All the described conditions were characterized by a highly intense pain, not adequately controlled by actual medications, which improved after the use of topical lidocaine. The good response to lidocaine allowed the reduction, of even the withdrawal, of concurrent drugs and improved the patients' quality of life.

  15. Orofacial Neuropathic Pain Leads to a Hyporesponsive Barrel Cortex with Enhanced Structural Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Karine; Rivière, Sébastien; Lenkei, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a long-lasting debilitating condition that is particularly difficult to treat due to the lack of identified underlying mechanisms. Although several key contributing processes have been described at the level of the spinal cord, very few studies have investigated the supraspinal mechanisms underlying chronic pain. Using a combination of approaches (cortical intrinsic imaging, immunohistochemical and behavioural analysis), our study aimed to decipher the nature of functional and structural changes in a mouse model of orofacial neuropathic pain, focusing on cortical areas involved in various pain components. Our results show that chronic neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with decreased haemodynamic responsiveness to whisker stimulation in the barrel field cortex. This reduced functional activation is likely due to the increased basal neuronal activity (measured indirectly using cFos and phospho-ERK immunoreactivity) observed in several cortical areas, including the contralateral barrel field, motor and cingulate cortices. In the same animals, immunohistochemical analysis of markers for active pre- or postsynaptic elements (Piccolo and phospho-Cofilin, respectively) revealed an increased immunofluorescence in deep cortical layers of the contralateral barrel field, motor and cingulate cortices. These results suggest that long-lasting orofacial neuropathic pain is associated with exacerbated neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity at the cortical level. PMID:27548330

  16. Neuropathic pain following multilevel surgery in children with cerebral palsy: a case series and review.

    PubMed

    Lauder, G R; White, M C

    2005-05-01

    Six children with cerebral palsy are presented who developed neuropathic pain following multilevel orthopedic surgery. This significant complication is previously unreported. The diagnosis and treatment options are reviewed. Treatment should be kept as simple and noninvasive as possible, and aim to enable physiotherapy to continue. Early recognition and interdisciplinary treatment is important to prevent a downward spiral of increasing pain and decreased function. A good outcome in respect of improved pain and functioning was achieved in five of these six children. It is our opinion that this complication should form part of informed consent for multilevel surgery and that anesthetists should be aware of this complication when managing postoperative pain control.

  17. [Pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain caused by injury to the afferent nerve fibers].

    PubMed

    Weber, W E

    2001-04-28

    Phantom pain, a form of neuropathic pain, is caused by damage to somatosensible afferent nerve fibres in the peripheral or central nervous system. Often, the pain cannot be satisfactorily treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Dependent on the underlying mechanism the pain is treated with either antidepressants (for more or less continuous pain) or anti-epileptics (for paroxysmal pain). Of the antidepressants, the tricyclic antidepressants are the best studied and most prescribed. The activity of new drugs, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxetine as well as venlafaxine, has yet to be clearly shown. Of the anti-epileptics, carbamazepine and phenytoin are the most prescribed. New drugs which provide greater pain relief than the placebo are oxcarbazepine, gabapentine and lamotrigine. Other effective drugs for phantom pain are: gamma-butyric acid agonists (baclofen), opiates (morphine preparations with a regulated release; phentanyl patch), the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist amantadine, transdermally administered clonidine and locally applied lidocaine.

  18. Bilateral Sensory Abnormalities in Patients with Unilateral Neuropathic Pain; A Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) Study

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Karl-Heinz; Harbers, Marten; Houghton, Andrea; Kortekaas, Rudie; van Vliet, Andre; Timmerman, Wia; den Boer, Johan A.; Struys, Michel M.R.F.; van Wijhe, Marten

    2012-01-01

    In patients who experience unilateral chronic pain, abnormal sensory perception at the non-painful side has been reported. Contralateral sensory changes in these patients have been given little attention, possibly because they are regarded as clinically irrelevant. Still, bilateral sensory changes in these patients could become clinically relevant if they challenge the correct identification of their sensory dysfunction in terms of hyperalgesia and allodynia. Therefore, we have used the standardized quantitative sensory testing (QST) protocol of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS) to investigate somatosensory function at the painful side and the corresponding non-painful side in unilateral neuropathic pain patients using gender- and age-matched healthy volunteers as a reference cohort. Sensory abnormalities were observed across all QST parameters at the painful side, but also, to a lesser extent, at the contralateral, non-painful side. Similar relative distributions regarding sensory loss/gain for non-nociceptive and nociceptive stimuli were found for both sides. Once a sensory abnormality for a QST parameter at the affected side was observed, the prevalence of an abnormality for the same parameter at the non-affected side was as high as 57% (for Pressure Pain Threshold). Our results show that bilateral sensory dysfunction in patients with unilateral neuropathic pain is more rule than exception. Therefore, this phenomenon should be taken into account for appropriate diagnostic evaluation in clinical practice. This is particularly true for mechanical stimuli where the 95% Confidence Interval for the prevalence of sensory abnormalities at the non-painful side ranges between 33% and 50%. PMID:22629414

  19. Nociceptor-expressed ephrin-B2 regulates inflammatory and neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background EphB receptors and their ephrin-B ligands play an important role in nervous system development, as well as synapse formation and plasticity in the adult brain. Recent studies show that intrathecal treatment with EphB-receptor activator ephrinB2-Fc induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in rat, indicating that ephrin-B2 in small dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and EphB receptors in the spinal cord modulate pain processing. To examine the role of ephrin-B2 in peripheral pain pathways, we deleted ephrin-B2 in Nav1.8+ nociceptive sensory neurons with the Cre-loxP system. Sensory neuron numbers and terminals were examined using neuronal makers. Pain behavior in acute, inflammatory and neuropathic pain models was assessed in the ephrin-B2 conditional knockout (CKO) mice. We also investigated the c-Fos expression and NMDA receptor NR2B phosphorylation in ephrin-B2 CKO mice and littermate controls. Results The ephrin-B2 CKO mice were healthy with no sensory neuron loss. However, pain-related behavior was substantially altered. Although acute pain behavior and motor co-ordination were normal, inflammatory pain was attenuated in ephrin-B2 mutant mice. Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced mechanical hyperalgesia was halved. Formalin-induced pain behavior was attenuated in the second phase, and this correlated with diminished tyrosine phosphorylation of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subunit NR2B in the dorsal horn. Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were significantly reduced in the Seltzer model of neuropathic pain. Conclusions Presynaptic ephrin-B2 expression thus plays an important role in regulating inflammatory pain through the regulation of synaptic plasticity in the dorsal horn and is also involved in the pathogenesis of some types of neuropathic pain. PMID:21059214

  20. Active Nerve Regeneration with Failed Target Reinnervation Drives Persistent Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral nerves can regenerate and, when injured, may cause neuropathic pain. We propose that the active regeneration process plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of neuropathic pain. In one commonly used rodent neuropathic pain model, pronounced pain behaviors follow ligation and cutting of the L5 spinal nerve. We found that the injured nerve regenerates into the sciatic nerve and functionally reinnervates target tissues: the regenerated nerve conducts electrical signals, mechanical responses, and tracers between the leg/hindpaw and axotomized sensory ganglion. The regenerating nerve is the primary source of abnormal spontaneous activity detected in vivo. Disrupting the regeneration inhibited pain. First, semaphorin 3A, an inhibitory axonal guidance molecule, reduced functional regeneration, spontaneous activity, and pain behaviors when applied to the injury site in vivo. Second, knockdown of the upregulated growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) with siRNA injected into the axotomized sensory ganglion reduced pain behaviors. We next examined the spared nerve injury model, in which pain behaviors are essentially permanent. The regeneration resulted in tangled GAP43-positive neuromas at the nerve injury site without target reinnervation. Perfusing the nerve stump with semaphorin 3A, but not removing the tangled fibers, prevented or reversed pain behaviors. This effect far outlasted the semaphorin 3A perfusion. Hence, in this model the long-lasting chronic pain may reflect the anatomical inability of regenerating nerves to successfully reinnervate target tissues, resulting in an ongoing futile regeneration process. We propose that specifically targeting the regeneration process may provide effective long-lasting pain relief in patients when functional reinnervation becomes impossible. PMID:28197545

  1. Effective management of intractable neuropathic pain using an intrathecal morphine pump in a patient with acute transverse myelitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Ting; Huang, Yu-Hui; Chen, Der-Cherng; Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Chou, Li-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Transverse myelitis is a rare inflammatory myelopathy characterized by loss of motor and sensory function below the affected level of the spinal cord, and causes neurogenic bowel and bladder. Occasionally, it also causes neuropathic pain with spasticity. Traditional therapies for neuropathic pain are multiple, including multimodal analgesic regimens, antiepileptic or antidepressant medications, opioids, sympathetic blocks, and spinal cord stimulation. Persistent neuropathic pain can cause emotional distress by affecting sleep, work, recreation, and emotional well-being. Here we report the case of a patient suffering from intractable neuropathic pain following acute transverse myelitis that was not relieved by combinations of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory, anti-epileptic, antidepressant, and opioid medications, or by acupuncture. Implantation of an intrathecal morphine pump controlled the pain successfully without side effects, and enabled the patient to embark on intensive rehabilitation. The patient's muscle strength has improved significantly and the patient may soon be able to use a walker with minimal assistance.

  2. Effective management of intractable neuropathic pain using an intrathecal morphine pump in a patient with acute transverse myelitis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Ting; Huang, Yu-Hui; Chen, Der-Cherng; Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Chou, Li-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Transverse myelitis is a rare inflammatory myelopathy characterized by loss of motor and sensory function below the affected level of the spinal cord, and causes neurogenic bowel and bladder. Occasionally, it also causes neuropathic pain with spasticity. Traditional therapies for neuropathic pain are multiple, including multimodal analgesic regimens, antiepileptic or antidepressant medications, opioids, sympathetic blocks, and spinal cord stimulation. Persistent neuropathic pain can cause emotional distress by affecting sleep, work, recreation, and emotional well-being. Here we report the case of a patient suffering from intractable neuropathic pain following acute transverse myelitis that was not relieved by combinations of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory, anti-epileptic, antidepressant, and opioid medications, or by acupuncture. Implantation of an intrathecal morphine pump controlled the pain successfully without side effects, and enabled the patient to embark on intensive rehabilitation. The patient’s muscle strength has improved significantly and the patient may soon be able to use a walker with minimal assistance. PMID:23935366

  3. Fisetin exerts antihyperalgesic effect in a mouse model of neuropathic pain: engagement of spinal serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Wang, Chuang; Cui, Wu-Geng; Ma, Qing; Zhou, Wen-Hua

    2015-03-12

    Fisetin, a natural flavonoid, has been shown in our previous studies to exert antidepressant-like effect. As antidepressant drugs are clinically used to treat chronic neuropathic pain, this work aimed to investigate the potential antinociceptive efficacies of fisetin against neuropathic pain and explore mechanism(s). We subjected mice to chronic constriction injury (CCI) by loosely ligating the sciatic nerves, and Hargreaves test or von Frey test was used to assess thermal hyperalgesia or mechanical allodynia, respectively. Chronic fisetin treatment (5, 15 or 45 mg/kg, p.o.) ameliorated thermal hyperalgesia (but not mechanical allodynia) in CCI mice, concomitant with escalated levels of spinal monoamines and suppressed monoamine oxidase (MAO)-A activity. The antihyperalgesic action of fisetin was abolished by chemical depletion of spinal serotonin (5-HT) but potentiated by co-treatment with 5-HTP, a precursor of 5-HT. Moreover, intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intrathecal (i.t.) co-treatment with 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB-258719 completely abrogated fisetin's antihyperalgesia. These findings confirm that chronic fisetin treatment exerts antinociceptive effect on thermal hyperalgesia in neuropathic mice, with spinal serotonergic system (coupled with 5-HT7) being critically involved. Of special benefit, fisetin attenuated co-morbidly behavioral symptoms of depression and anxiety (evaluated in forced swim test, novelty suppressed feeding test and light-dark test) evoked by neuropathic pain.

  4. Antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of neuropathic pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Espinosa, María-Lucila; Sanmartí-García, Gemma; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2012-09-01

    Many therapies have been proposed for the management of neuropathic pain, and they include the use of different antiepileptic drugs. However, the lack of high quality studies indicates that results on the different neuropathic disorders under study do not recommend a particular drug treatment. This study makes a systematic review of the published literature on the use of several antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain, and has the objective of considering both its clinical characteristics and pharmacological use, which will depend on their level of scientific evidence and will follow the principles of evidence-based dentistry. The articles were stratified according to their scientific evidence using the SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy), and it included those articles that only have level 1 or 2. Randomized clinical trials were stratified according to their level of quality using the JADAD scale, an instrument described by Jadad et al. (7). to assess the quality of clinical trials, while studies with a level below 3 were discarded. Recently, type A or B recommendations are given in favor or against the use of antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain on the basis of their scientific quality.

  5. Increase in reactive oxygen species and activation of Akt signaling pathway in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Renata P; Araújo, Alex S R; Janner, Daiane; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia M; Partata, Wania A

    2008-12-01

    Neuropathic pain occurs as a result of peripheral or central nervous system injury. Its pathophysiology involves mainly a central sensitization mechanism that may be correlated to many molecules acting in regions involved in pain processing, such as the spinal cord. It has been demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and signaling molecules, such as the serine/threonine protein kinase Akt, are involved in neuropathic pain mechanisms. Thus, the aim of this study was to provide evidence of this relationship. Sciatic nerve transection (SNT) was used to induce neuropathic pain in rats. Western blot analysis of Akt and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE)-Michael adducts, and measurement of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in the lumbosacral spinal cord were performed. The main findings were found seven days after SNT, when there was an increase in HNE-Michael adducts formation, total and p-Akt expression, and H(2)O(2) concentration. However, one and 15 days after SNT, H(2)O(2) concentration was raised in both sham (animals that were submitted to surgery without nerve injury) and SNT groups, showing the high sensibility of this ROS to nociceptive afferent stimuli, not only to neuropathic pain. p-Akt also increased in sham and SNT groups one day post injury, but at 3 and 7 days the increase occurred exclusively in SNT animals. Thus, there is crosstalk between intracellular signaling pathways and ROS, and these molecules can act as protective agents in acute pain situations or play a role in the development of chronic pain states.

  6. Spinal analgesic action of endomorphins in acute, inflammatory and neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Przewłocka, B; Mika, J; Labuz, D; Toth, G; Przewłocki, R

    1999-02-19

    We studied spinal analgesic and antiallodynic effects of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 administered i.t. in comparison with Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) or morphine, during acute, inflammatory and neuropathic pain in rats chronically implanted with intrathecal cannulas. Endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 (2.5, 5, 10 microg i.t.) increased the tail-flick latency and, to the lesser extent, the paw pressure latency. The range of potencies in both those models of acute pain was as follows: DAMGO > morphine = endomorphin-1 > endomorphin-2. In a model of inflammatory pain, the number of formalin-induced flinching episodes was decreased by endomorphin-1. The effect of endomorphin-2 was much less pronounced. Both DAMGO and morphine significantly inhibited the pain-related behavior evoked by formalin. In a neuropathic pain model (sciatic nerve crushing in rats), endomorphin-1 and -2 (5 microg i.t.) had a statistically significant effect on the tail-flick latency and on the cold-water tail flick latency. Morphine, 5 microg, was found to be ineffective. Endomorphin-1 and -2 (2.5 and 5 microg i.t.) dose-dependently antagonized allodynia. Those effects of endomorphins were antagonized in acute (30 microg), inflammatory (30 microg) and neuropathic pain models (60 microg) by cyprodime, a selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist. In conclusion, our results show a strong analgesic action of endomorphins at the spinal cord level. The most interesting finding is a strong, stronger than in the case of morphine, antiallodynic effect of endomorphins in rats subjected to sciatic nerve crushing, which suggests a possible use of these compounds in a very difficult therapy of neuropathic pain.

  7. RNA editing enzyme ADAR2 is a mediator of neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Hitoshi; Matsumura, Shinji; Okada, Shunpei; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Minami, Toshiaki; Ito, Seiji

    2017-01-26

    Transcriptional and post-translational regulations are important in peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain, but little is known about the role of post-transcriptional modification. Our objective was to determine the possible effect of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes, which catalyze post-transcriptional RNA editing, in tactile allodynia, a hallmark of neuropathic pain. Seven days after L5 spinal nerve transection (SNT) in adult mice, we found an increase in ADAR2 expression and a decrease in ADAR3 expression in the injured, but not in the uninjured, dorsal root ganglions (DRGs). These changes were accompanied by elevated levels of editing at the D site of the serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2CR), at the I/V site of coatomer protein complex subunit α (COPA), and at the R/G site of AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 in the injured DRG. Compared to Adar2(+/+)/Gria2(R/R) littermate controls, Adar2(-/-)/Gria2(R/R) mice completely lacked the increased editing of 5-HT2CR, COPA, and GluA2 transcripts in the injured DRG and showed attenuated tactile allodynia after SNT. Furthermore, the antidepressant fluoxetine inhibited neuropathic allodynia after injury and reduced the COPA I/V site editing in the injured DRG. These findings suggest that ADAR2 is a mediator of injury-induced tactile allodynia and thus a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of neuropathic pain.-Uchida, H., Matsumura, S., Okada, S., Suzuki, T., Minami, T., Ito, S. RNA editing enzyme ADAR2 is a mediator of neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury.

  8. Upregulated TLR3 Promotes Neuropathic Pain by Regulating Autophagy in Rat With L5 Spinal Nerve Ligation Model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weijia; Lu, Zhijun

    2016-12-21

    Microglia, rapidly activated following peripheral nerve injury (PNI), accumulate within the spinal cord and adopt inflammation that contributes to development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Microglia express functional Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which play pivotal roles in regulating inflammatory processes. However, little is known about the role of TLR3 in regulating neuropathic pain after PNI. Here TLR3 expression and autophagy activation was assayed in dorsal root ganglions and in microglia following PNI by using realtime PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. The role of TLR3/autophagy signaling in regulating tactile allodynia was evaluated by assaying paw mechanical withdrawal threshold and cold allodynia after intrathecal administration of Poly (I:C) and 3-methyladenine (3-MA). We found that L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) induces the expression of TLR3 in dorsal root ganglions and in primary rat microglia at the mRNA and protein level. Meanwhile, L5 SNL results in an increased activation of autophagy, which contributes to microglial activation and subsequent inflammatory response. Intrathecal administration of Poly (I:C), a TLR3 agonist, significantly increases the activation of microglial autophagy, whereas TLR3 knockdown markedly inhibits L5 SNL-induced microglial autophagy. Poly (I:C) treatment promotes the expression of proinflammatory mediators, whereas 3-MA (a specific inhibitor of autophagy) suppresses Poly (I:C)-induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Autophagy inhibition further inhibits TLR3-mediated mechanical and cold hypersensitivity following SNL. These results suggest that inhibition of TLR3/autophagy signaling contributes to alleviate neurophathic pain triggered by SNL.

  9. Recent advances in understanding neuropathic pain: glia, sex differences, and epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Machelska, Halina; Celik, Melih Ö.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain results from diseases or trauma affecting the nervous system. This pain can be devastating and is poorly controlled. The pathophysiology is complex, and it is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms in order to identify the relevant targets for therapeutic intervention. In this article, we focus on the recent research investigating neuro-immune communication and epigenetic processes, which gain particular attention in the context of neuropathic pain. Specifically, we analyze the role of glial cells, including microglia, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, in the modulation of the central nervous system inflammation triggered by neuropathy. Considering epigenetics, we address DNA methylation, histone modifications, and the non-coding RNAs in the regulation of ion channels, G-protein-coupled receptors, and transmitters following neuronal damage. The goal was not only to highlight the emerging concepts but also to discuss controversies, methodological complications, and intriguing opinions. PMID:28105313

  10. Chronic neuropathic facial pain after intense pulsed light hair removal. Clinical features and pharmacological management

    PubMed Central

    Párraga-Manzol, Gabriela; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Moreno-Arias, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) photodepilation is usually performed as a hair removal method. The treatment is recommended to be indicated by a physician, depending on each patient and on its characteristics. However, the use of laser devices by medical laypersons is frequent and it can suppose a risk of damage for the patients. Most side effects associated to IPL photodepilation are transient, minimal and disappear without sequelae. However, permanent side effects can occur. Some of the complications are laser related but many of them are caused by an operator error or mismanagement. In this work, we report a clinical case of a patient that developed a chronic neuropathic facial pain following IPL hair removal for unwanted hair in the upper lip. The specific diagnosis was painful post-traumatic trigeminal neuropathy, reference 13.1.2.3 according to the International Headache Society (IHS). Key words:Neuropathic facial pain, photodepilation, intense pulse light. PMID:26535105

  11. Lateral Hypothalamic Stimulation Reduces Hyperalgesia Through Spinally Descending Orexin-A Neurons in Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Wardach, Jacob; Wagner, Monica; Jeong, Younhee; Holden, Janean E

    2016-03-01

    No evidence to date shows that lateral hypothalamic (LH) stimulation produces orexin-A-mediated antinociception in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) in a model of neuropathic pain. We conducted experiments to examine the effect of orexin-A-mediated LH stimulation in female rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI) on thermal hyperalgesia. Rats receiving carbachol into the LH demonstrated antinociception on both the left CCI and right nonligated paws (p < .05). Rats were given carbachol in the LH followed by intrathecal injection of the orexin-1 (OX1) receptor antagonist SB-334867, which blocked LH-induced antinociception compared with control groups (p < .05) in the left paw, but not in the right paw. These findings support the hypothesis that LH stimulation produces antinociception in rats with thermal hyperalgesia from neuropathic pain via an orexin-A connection between the LH and the SCDH. Identification of this pathway may lead to studies using orexins to manage clinical pain.

  12. The effect of Neuragen PN® on Neuropathic pain: A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A double blind, randomized, placebo controlled study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the naturally derived topical oil, "Neuragen PN®" for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Methods Sixty participants with plantar cutaneous (foot sole) pain due to all cause peripheral neuropathy were recruited from the community. Each subject was randomly assigned to receive one of two treatments (Neuragen PN® or placebo) per week in a crossover design. The primary outcome measure was acute spontaneous pain level as reported on a visual analog scale. Results There was an overall pain reduction for both treatments from pre to post application. As compared to the placebo, Neuragen PN® led to significantly (p < .05) greater pain reduction. Fifty six of sixty subjects (93.3%) receiving Neuragen PN® reported pain reduction within 30 minutes. This reduction within 30 minutes occurred in only twenty one of sixty (35.0%) subjects receiving the placebo. In a break out analysis of the diabetic only subgroup, 94% of subjects in the Neuragen PN® group achieved pain reduction within 30 minutes vs 11.0% of the placebo group. No adverse events were observed. Conclusions This randomized, placebo controlled, clinical trial with crossover design revealed that the naturally derived oil, Neuragen PN®, provided significant relief from neuropathic pain in an all cause neuropathy group. Participants with diabetes within this group experienced similar pain relief. Trial registration ISRCTN registered: ISRCTN13226601 PMID:20487567

  13. A brief comparison of the pathophysiology of inflammatory versus neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qinghao; Yaksh, Tony L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review The aetiologies of inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain are fundamentally different. There are, however, common mechanisms underlying the generation of each pain state. We will discuss some specific elements observed in both tissue and nerve injury pain states and consider the hypothesis that these two states actually demonstrate a convergence over time. Recent findings The increased pain sensation following tissue and nerve injury results from several mechanisms, including altered ion channel expression in DRG neurons, enhanced dorsal horn glutamate release from primary afferents, enhanced glutamate receptor function in second order neurons, disinhibition in the dorsal horn and glia cell activation. The role of specific subtypes of receptors, ion channels and glutamate transporters is revealed at peripheral and central sites. Importantly over time, a number of changes, in the dorsal root ganglion and in dorsal horn observed after tissue injury resemble changes observed after nerve injury. Summary Recognition of mechanisms common to both inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain might shed light on the understanding of the transition from acute pain to persistent pain. PMID:21659872

  14. Antinociceptive effects of sinomenine in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing; Sun, Yuehua; Zhu, Jie; Fang, Tian; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jun-Xu

    2014-01-01

    Sinomenine is a principal ingredient of traditional Chinese medicine, Sinomenium Acutum, which has been reported to have various pharmacological effects including anti-rheumatism and immunomodulation. This study examined the effects of sinomenine in rats that received chronic constriction injury (CCI), a model of peripheral neuropathic pain. CCI injury on the right sciatic nerve led to long-lasting mechanical hyperalgesia. Acute sinomenine treatment (10–40 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly and dose-dependently reversed mechanical hyperalgesia. In addition, the antinociceptive effects of sinomenine remained stable during repeated daily treatment for up to 2 weeks. Although sinomenine did not alter the duration of immobility in the forced swimming test in healthy animals, it dose-dependently reversed the increased immobility time in rats receiving CCI, suggesting that sinomenine attenuated chronic pain-induced depressive-like behavior. The antinociceptive effects of sinomenine were blocked by the GABAa receptor antagonist bicuculine. The doses of sinomenine studied here did not significantly alter the spontaneous locomotor activity. Together, these results suggested that sinomenine exerts significant antinociceptive effects for neuropathic pain via GABAa-mediated mechanism, which suggests that sinomenine may be useful for the management of chronic painful conditions such as neuropathic pain. PMID:25434829

  15. Antinociceptive effects of sinomenine in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing; Sun, Yuehua; Zhu, Jie; Fang, Tian; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jun-Xu

    2014-12-01

    Sinomenine is a principal ingredient of traditional Chinese medicine, Sinomenium Acutum, which has been reported to have various pharmacological effects including anti-rheumatism and immunomodulation. This study examined the effects of sinomenine in rats that received chronic constriction injury (CCI), a model of peripheral neuropathic pain. CCI injury on the right sciatic nerve led to long-lasting mechanical hyperalgesia. Acute sinomenine treatment (10-40 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly and dose-dependently reversed mechanical hyperalgesia. In addition, the antinociceptive effects of sinomenine remained stable during repeated daily treatment for up to 2 weeks. Although sinomenine did not alter the duration of immobility in the forced swimming test in healthy animals, it dose-dependently reversed the increased immobility time in rats receiving CCI, suggesting that sinomenine attenuated chronic pain-induced depressive-like behavior. The antinociceptive effects of sinomenine were blocked by the GABAa receptor antagonist bicuculine. The doses of sinomenine studied here did not significantly alter the spontaneous locomotor activity. Together, these results suggested that sinomenine exerts significant antinociceptive effects for neuropathic pain via GABAa-mediated mechanism, which suggests that sinomenine may be useful for the management of chronic painful conditions such as neuropathic pain.

  16. Do botulinum toxins have a role in the management of neuropathic pain?: a focused review.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Gerard E; Tan, Huaiyu; Green, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is usually used in physiatric practice in the treatment of spasticity and dystonia. Research involving both animal and human subjects has emerged suggesting potential benefits in painful neuropathic conditions. The animal data strongly support the use of BoNT in the treatment of sensitized pain states. BoNT is probably effective at treating postherpetic neuralgia, probably or possibly effective at treating postoperative/posttraumatic neuropathic pain, and probably effective at treating painful diabetic neuropathy. BoNT's proposed mechanism of action is described as decreasing sensitized nociception in four ways by (1) inhibiting glutamate release in peripheral tissues, (2) decreasing calcitonin gene-related peptide release in peripheral tissue, (3) decreasing transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 trafficking to peripheral neuron cell membrane, and (4) decreasing substance P release in peripheral tissue. This review discusses pertinent cellular/animal basic science research in conjunction with clinical research with regard to the role of BoNT in treating neuropathic pain.

  17. Clinical characteristics, patient-reported outcomes, and previous therapeutic management of patients with uncontrolled neuropathic pain referred to pain clinics.

    PubMed

    de Andrés, José; de la Calle, José-Luis; Pérez, María; López, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this report was to evaluate the clinical profile and previous management of patients with uncontrolled neuropathic pain who were referred to pain clinics. Methods. We included adult patients with uncontrolled pain who had a score of ≥4 in the DN4 questionnaire. In addition to sociodemographic and clinical data, we evaluated pain levels using a visual analog scale as well as anxiety, depression, sleep, disability, and treatment satisfaction employing validated tools. Results. A total of 755 patients were included in the study. The patients were predominantly referred to pain clinics by traumatologists (34.3%) and primary care physicians (16.7%). The most common diagnoses were radiculopathy (43%) and pain of oncological origin (14.3%). The major cause for uncontrolled pain was suboptimal treatment (88%). Fifty-three percent of the patients were depressed, 43% had clinical anxiety, 50% rated their overall health as bad or very bad, and 45% noted that their disease was severely or extremely interfering with their daily activities. Conclusions. Our results showed that uncontrolled neuropathic pain is a common phenomenon among the specialties that address these clinical entities and, regardless of its etiology, uncontrolled pain is associated with a dramatic impact on patient well-being.

  18. Clinical Characteristics, Patient-Reported Outcomes, and Previous Therapeutic Management of Patients with Uncontrolled Neuropathic Pain Referred to Pain Clinics

    PubMed Central

    de Andrés, José; de la Calle, José-Luis; Pérez, María; López, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this report was to evaluate the clinical profile and previous management of patients with uncontrolled neuropathic pain who were referred to pain clinics. Methods. We included adult patients with uncontrolled pain who had a score of ≥4 in the DN4 questionnaire. In addition to sociodemographic and clinical data, we evaluated pain levels using a visual analog scale as well as anxiety, depression, sleep, disability, and treatment satisfaction employing validated tools. Results. A total of 755 patients were included in the study. The patients were predominantly referred to pain clinics by traumatologists (34.3%) and primary care physicians (16.7%). The most common diagnoses were radiculopathy (43%) and pain of oncological origin (14.3%). The major cause for uncontrolled pain was suboptimal treatment (88%). Fifty-three percent of the patients were depressed, 43% had clinical anxiety, 50% rated their overall health as bad or very bad, and 45% noted that their disease was severely or extremely interfering with their daily activities. Conclusions. Our results showed that uncontrolled neuropathic pain is a common phenomenon among the specialties that address these clinical entities and, regardless of its etiology, uncontrolled pain is associated with a dramatic impact on patient well-being. PMID:24891950

  19. Non-neuronal cell modulation relieves neuropathic pain: efficacy of the endogenous lipid palmitoylethanolamide.

    PubMed

    Bettoni, Isabella; Comelli, Francesca; Colombo, Anita; Bonfanti, Patrizia; Costa, Barbara

    2013-02-01

    We have previously shown that the endogenous lipid palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) induced relief of neuropathic pain through an action upon receptors located on the nociceptive pathway. Recently, it has been proposed that immune cells, in particular mast cells, and microglia, by releasing algogen mediators interact with neurons to alter pain sensitivity thereby contributing to the development and maintenance of chronic pain states. The aim of this work was to explore whether the anti-nociceptive properties of PEA might be accompanied by modulation of these non-neuronal cells. Mice were subjected to a chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain and treated with PEA. The data show that at the earlier (3 days) time-point after nerve injury there was a substantial recruitment of mast cells whose activation was not yet pronounced. In contrast, at the later time point (8 days) there was no further increase in mast cell number, but rather a marked activation of these cells. An up-regulation of activated microglia was found in the spinal cord of neuropathic pain mice. PEA delayed mast cell recruitment, protected mast cells against degranulation and abolished the nerve growth factor increase in sciatic nerve concomitantly preserving the nerve from degeneration, while reducing microglia activation in the spinal cord. These findings support the idea that non-neuronal cells may be a valuable pharmacological target to treat neuropathic pain since the current neuronal-direct drugs are still unsatisfactory. In this context PEA could represent an innovative molecule, combining a dual analgesic activity, both on neurons and on nonneuronal cells.

  20. Effect of NMDA NR2B antagonist on neuropathic pain in two spinal cord injury models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngkyung; Cho, Hwi-young; Ahn, Young Ju; Kim, Junesun; Yoon, Young Wook

    2012-05-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are thought to play an important role in the processes of central sensitization and pathogenesis of neuropathic pain, particularly after spinal cord injury (SCI). NMDA antagonists effectively reduce neuropathic pain, but serious side effects prevent their use as therapeutic drugs. NMDA NR2B antagonists have been reported to effectively reduce inflammatory and neuropathic pain. In this study, we investigated the effects of NR2B antagonists on neuropathic pain and the expression of NR2B in the spinal cord in 2 SCI models. SCI was induced at T12 by a New York University impactor (contusion) or by sectioning of the lateral half of the spinal cord (hemisection). Ifenprodil (100, 200, 500, 1000nmol) and Ro25-6981 (20, 50, 100, 200nmol) were intrathecally injected and behavioral tests were conducted. Ifenprodil increased the paw withdrawal threshold in both models but also produced mild motor depression at higher doses. Ro25-6981 increased the mechanical nociceptive threshold in a dose-dependent manner without motor depression. NR2B expression was significantly increased on both sides at the spinal segments of L1-2 and L4-5 in the hemisection model but did not change in the contusion model. Increased expression of NR2B in the hemisection model was reduced by intrathecal ifenprodil. These results suggest that intrathecal NMDA NR2B antagonist increased the mechanical nociceptive threshold after SCI without motor depression. A selective subtype of NMDA receptor, such as NR2B, may be a more selective target for pain control because NMDA receptors play a crucial role in the development and maintenance of chronic pain.

  1. Analgesic effect of piracetam on peripheral neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury of sciatic nerve in rats.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ashish K; Bhati, Yogendra; Tripathi, Chakra D; Sharma, Krishna K

    2014-08-01

    Despite immense advances in the treatment strategies, management of neuropathic pain remains unsatisfactory. Piracetam is a prototype of nootropic drugs, used to improve cognitive impairment. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of piracetam on peripheral neuropathic pain in rats. Neuropathic pain was induced by the chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. Following this, piracetam was intraperitoneally administered for 2 weeks in doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, and pain was assessed by employing the behavioural tests for thermal hyperalgesia (hot plate and tail flick tests) and cold allodynia (acetone test). After the induction of neuropathic pain, significant development of thermal hyperalgesia and cold allodynia was observed. The administration of piracetam (50 mg/kg) did not have any significant effect on all the behavioural tests. Further, piracetam (100 mg/kg) also had no effect on the hot plate and tail flick tests; however it significantly decreased the paw withdrawal duration in the acetone test. Piracetam in a dose of 200 mg/kg significantly modulated neuropathic pain as observed from the increased hot plate and tail flick latencies, and decreased paw withdrawal duration (in acetone test). Therefore, the present study suggests the potential use of piracetam in the treatment of neuropathic pain, which merits further clinical investigation.

  2. The Central Analgesic Mechanism of YM-58483 in Attenuating Neuropathic Pain in Rats.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zeyou; Wang, Yaping; Zhou, Haocheng; Liang, Na; Yang, Lin; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Calcium channel antagonists are commonly used to treat neuropathic pain. Their analgesic effects rely on inhibiting long-term potentiation, and neurotransmitters release in the spinal cord. Store-operated Ca(2+)channels (SOCCs) are highly Ca(2+)-selective cation channels broadly expressed in non-excitable cells and some excitable cells. Recent studies have shown that the potent inhibitor of SOCCs, YM-58483, has analgesic effects on neuropathic pain, but its mechanism is unclear. This experiment performed on spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced neuropathic pain model in rats tries to explore the mechanism, whereby YM-58483 attenuates neuropathic pain. The left L5 was ligated to produce the SNL neuropathic pain model in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The withdrawal threshold of rats was measured by the up-down method and Hargreaves' method before and after intrathecal administration of YM-58483 and vehicle. The SOCCs in the spinal dorsal horn were located by immunofluorescence. The expression of phosphorylated ERK and phosphorylated CREB, CD11b, and GFAP proteins in spinal level was tested by Western blot, while the release of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, PGE2) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Intrathecal YM-58483 at the concentration of 300 μM (1.5 nmol) and 1000 μM (10 nmol) produced a significant central analgesic effect on the SNL rats, compared with control + vehicle (n = 7, P < 0.001). However, both could not prevent the development of neuropathic pain, compared with normal + saline (P < 0.001). Immunofluorescent staining revealed that Orai1 and STIM1 (the two key components of SOCCs) were located in the spinal dorsal horn neurons. Western blot showed that YM-58483 could decrease the levels of P-ERK and P-CREB (n = 10, #P < 0.05), without affecting the expression of CD11b and GFAP (n = 10, #P > 0.05). YM-58483 also inhibited the release of spinal cord IL-1β, TNF-α, and PGE2, compared with control

  3. Deep brain stimulation versus motor cortex stimulation for neuropathic pain: A minireview of the literature and proposal for future research.

    PubMed

    Honey, C Michael; Tronnier, Volker M; Honey, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of neuropathic pain remains a public health concern. A growing cohort of patients is plagued by medically refractory, unrelenting severe neuropathic pain that ruins their quality of life and productivity. For this group, neurosurgery can offer two different kinds of neuromodulation that may help: deep brain simulation (DBS) and motor cortex stimulation (MCS). Unfortunately, there is no consensus on how to perform these procedures, which stimulation parameters to select, how to measure success, and which patients may benefit. This brief review highlights the literature supporting each technique and attempts to provide some comparisons and contrasts between DBS and MCS for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Finally, we highlight the current unanswered questions in the field and suggest future research strategies that may advance the care of our patients with neuropathic pain.

  4. DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a contributes to neuropathic pain by repressing Kcna2 in primary afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian-Yuan; Liang, Lingli; Gu, Xiyao; Li, Zhisong; Wu, Shaogen; Sun, Linlin; Atianjoh, Fidelis E.; Feng, Jian; Mo, Kai; Jia, Shushan; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Bekker, Alex; Nestler, Eric J.; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Nerve injury induces changes in gene transcription in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, which may contribute to nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. DNA methylation represses gene expression. Here, we report that peripheral nerve injury increases expression of the DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a in the injured DRG neurons via the activation of the transcription factor octamer transcription factor 1. Blocking this increase prevents nerve injury-induced methylation of the voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channel subunit Kcna2 promoter region and rescues Kcna2 expression in the injured DRG and attenuates neuropathic pain. Conversely, in the absence of nerve injury, mimicking this increase reduces the Kcna2 promoter activity, diminishes Kcna2 expression, decreases Kv current, increases excitability in DRG neurons and leads to spinal cord central sensitization and neuropathic pain symptoms. These findings suggest that DNMT3a may contribute to neuropathic pain by repressing Kcna2 expression in the DRG. PMID:28270689

  5. Feasibility of Topical Applications of Natural High-Concentration Capsaicinoid Solutions in Patients with Peripheral Neuropathic Pain: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mouraux, Andre; Deumens, Ronald; Leerink, Marjolein; le Polain de Waroux, Bernard; Joëlle, Quetin-Leclercq

    2016-01-01

    Background. Capsaicin, one of several capsaicinoid compounds, is a potent TRPV1 agonist. Topical application at high concentration (high concentration, >1%) induces a reversible disappearance of epidermal free nerve endings and is used to treat peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP). While the benefit of low-concentration capsaicin remains controversial, the 8%-capsaicin patch (Qutenza®, 2010, Astellas, Netherlands) has shown its effectiveness. This patch is, however, costly and natural high-concentration capsaicinoid solutions may represent a cheaper alternative to pure capsaicin. Methods. In this retrospective study, 149 patients were screened, 132 were included with a diagnosis of neuropathic pain, and eighty-four were retained in the final analyses (median age: 57.5 years [IQR25–75: 44.7–67.1], male/female: 30/54) with PNP who were treated with topical applications of natural high-concentration capsaicinoid solutions (total number of applications: 137). Indications were postsurgical PNP (85.7%) and nonsurgical PNP (14.3%) (posttraumatic, HIV-related, postherpetic, and radicular PNP). Objectives. To assess the feasibility of topical applications of natural high-concentration capsaicinoid solutions for the treatment of PNP. Results. The median treated area was 250 cm2 [IQR25–75: 144–531]. The median amount of capsaicinoids was 55.1 mg [IQR25–75: 28.7–76.5] per plaster and the median concentration was 172.3 μg/cm2 [IQR25–75: 127.6–255.2]. Most patients had local adverse effects on the day of treatment, such as mild to moderate burning pain and erythema. 13.6–19.4% of the patients experienced severe pain or erythema. Following treatment, 62.5% of patients reported a lower pain intensity or a smaller pain surface, and 35% reported a sustained pain relief lasting for at least 4 weeks. Conclusion. Analgesic topical treatment with natural high-concentration capsaicinoid is feasible and may represent a low cost alternative to alleviate PNP in

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in the peripheral nervous system is a significant driver of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Inceoglu, Bora; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Trindade da Silva, Carlos A; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Haj, Fawaz G; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-07-21

    Despite intensive effort and resulting gains in understanding the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain, limited success in therapeutic approaches have been attained. A recently identified, nonchannel, nonneurotransmitter therapeutic target for pain is the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). The sEH degrades natural analgesic lipid mediators, epoxy fatty acids (EpFAs), therefore its inhibition stabilizes these bioactive mediators. Here we demonstrate the effects of EpFAs on diabetes induced neuropathic pain and define a previously unknown mechanism of pain, regulated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The activation of ER stress is first quantified in the peripheral nervous system of type I diabetic rats. We demonstrate that both pain and markers of ER stress are reversed by a chemical chaperone. Next, we identify the EpFAs as upstream modulators of ER stress pathways. Chemical inducers of ER stress invariably lead to pain behavior that is reversed by a chemical chaperone and an inhibitor of sEH. The rapid occurrence of pain behavior with inducers, equally rapid reversal by blockers and natural incidence of ER stress in diabetic peripheral nervous system (PNS) argue for a major role of the ER stress pathways in regulating the excitability of the nociceptive system. Understanding the role of ER stress in generation and maintenance of pain opens routes to exploit this system for therapeutic purposes.

  7. Pannexin 1: a novel participant in neuropathic pain signaling in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Bravo, David; Ibarra, Paula; Retamal, Jeffri; Pelissier, Teresa; Laurido, Claudio; Hernandez, Alejandro; Constandil, Luis

    2014-10-01

    Pannexin 1 (panx1) is a large-pore membrane channel expressed in many tissues of mammals, including neurons and glial cells. Panx1 channels are highly permeable to calcium and adenosine triphosphatase (ATP); on the other hand, they can be opened by ATP and glutamate, two crucial molecules for acute and chronic pain signaling in the spinal cord dorsal horn, thus suggesting that panx1 could be a key component for the generation of central sensitization during persistent pain. In this study, we examined the effect of three panx1 blockers, namely, 10panx peptide, carbenoxolone, and probenecid, on C-reflex wind-up activity and mechanical nociceptive behavior in a spared nerve injury neuropathic rat model involving sural nerve transection. In addition, the expression of panx1 protein in the dorsal horn of the ipsilateral lumbar spinal cord was measured in sural nerve-transected and sham-operated control rats. Sural nerve transection resulted in a lower threshold for C-reflex activation by electric stimulation of the injured hindpaw, together with persistent mechanical hypersensitivity to pressure stimuli applied to the paw. Intrathecal administration of the panx1 blockers significantly depressed the spinal C-reflex wind-up activity in both neuropathic and sham control rats, and decreased mechanical hyperalgesia in neuropathic rats without affecting the nociceptive threshold in sham animals. Western blotting showed that panx1 was similarly expressed in the dorsal horn of lumbar spinal cord from neuropathic and sham rats. The present results constitute the first evidence that panx1 channels play a significant role in the mechanisms underlying central sensitization in neuropathic pain.

  8. Amitriptyline/Ketamine as therapy for neuropathic pruritus and pain secondary to herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John R; Davis, Mark D P

    2015-02-01

    Frequent causes of morbidity secondary to herpes zoster include acute pain, secondary infection, and postherpetic neuralgia. A less documented complication is pruritus, which can be either acute or postinfectious when it persists more than 3 months after the rash has healed. We discuss a case of severe, acute neuropathic pruritus and pain secondary to active herpes zoster that was unresponsive to standard medical therapy, including oral antihistamines, topical lidocaine, oral gabapentin, and local wound care. Modest control of the pruritus and pain was achieved with continued multimodal therapy and the addition of topical 2% amitriptyline/0.5% ketamine gel.

  9. Molecular mechanisms underlying the enhanced analgesic effect of oxycodone compared to morphine in chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Karine; Calvino, Bernard; Rivals, Isabelle; Marchand, Fabien; Dubacq, Sophie; McMahon, Stephen B; Pezet, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Oxycodone is a μ-opioid receptor agonist, used for the treatment of a large variety of painful disorders. Several studies have reported that oxycodone is a more potent pain reliever than morphine, and that it improves the quality of life of patients. However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the therapeutic action of these two opioids are only partially understood. The aim of this study was to define the molecular changes underlying the long-lasting analgesic effects of oxycodone and morphine in an animal model of peripheral neuropathy induced by a chemotherapic agent, vincristine. Using a behavioural approach, we show that oxycodone maintains an optimal analgesic effect after chronic treatment, whereas the effect of morphine dies down. In addition, using DNA microarray technology on dorsal root ganglia, we provide evidence that the long-term analgesic effect of oxycodone is due to an up-regulation in GABAB receptor expression in sensory neurons. These receptors are transported to their central terminals within the dorsal horn, and subsequently reinforce a presynaptic inhibition, since only the long-lasting (and not acute) anti-hyperalgesic effect of oxycodone was abolished by intrathecal administration of a GABAB receptor antagonist; in contrast, the morphine effect was unaffected. Our study demonstrates that the GABAB receptor is functionally required for the alleviating effect of oxycodone in neuropathic pain condition, thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the sustained analgesic action of oxycodone.

  10. Influence of amygdaloid glutamatergic receptors on sensory and emotional pain-related behavior in the neuropathic rat.

    PubMed

    Ansah, Osei B; Bourbia, Nora; Gonçalves, Leonor; Almeida, Armando; Pertovaara, Antti

    2010-05-01

    The role of amygdaloid glutamatergic receptors (GluRs) in maintenance of the sensory versus emotional component of neuropathic pain was studied by assessing monofilament-induced limb withdrawal response (sensory pain) and aversive place-conditioning behavior (emotional pain) following amygdaloid administration of various glutamatergic compounds in nerve-injured animals. The results indicate that endogenous activation of amygdaloid group I metabotropic GluRs, mGluR(1) and mGluR(5), and the NMDA-R contributes to maintenance of sensory and emotional components of neuropathic pain. The predominant effect by amygdaloid group I mGluRs was facilitation of emotional-like pain behavior.

  11. Pharmacological management of chronic neuropathic pain: Revised consensus statement from the Canadian Pain Society

    PubMed Central

    Moulin, DE; Boulanger, A; Clark, AJ; Clarke, H; Dao, T; Finley, GA; Furlan, A; Gilron, I; Gordon, A; Morley-Forster, PK; Sessle, BJ; Squire, P; Stinson, J; Taenzer, P; Velly, A; Ware, MA; Weinberg, EL; Williamson, OD

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuropathic pain (NeP), redefined as pain caused by a lesion or a disease of the somatosensory system, is a disabling condition that affects approximately two million Canadians. OBJECTIVE: To review the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews related to the pharmacological management of NeP to develop a revised evidence-based consensus statement on its management. METHODS: RCTs, systematic reviews and existing guidelines on the pharmacological management of NeP were evaluated at a consensus meeting in May 2012 and updated until September 2013. Medications were recommended in the consensus statement if their analgesic efficacy was supported by at least one methodologically sound RCT (class I or class II) showing significant benefit relative to placebo or another relevant control group. Recommendations for treatment were based on the degree of evidence of analgesic efficacy, safety and ease of use. RESULTS: Analgesic agents recommended for first-line treatments are gabapentinoids (gabapentin and pregabalin), tricyclic antidepressants and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors. Tramadol and controlled-release opioid analgesics are recommended as second-line treatments for moderate to severe pain. Cannabinoids are now recommended as third-line treatments. Recommended fourth-line treatments include methadone, anticonvulsants with lesser evidence of efficacy (eg, lamotrigine, lacos-amide), tapentadol and botulinum toxin. There is support for some analgesic combinations in selected NeP conditions. CONCLUSIONS: These guidelines provide an updated, stepwise approach to the pharmacological management of NeP. Treatment should be individualized for each patient based on efficacy, side-effect profile and drug accessibility, including cost. Additional studies are required to examine head-to-head comparisons among analgesics, combinations of analgesics, long-term outcomes and treatment of pediatric, geriatric and central NeP. PMID:25479151

  12. Orofacial neuropathic pain mouse model induced by Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC) of the infraorbital nerve

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Trigeminal neuropathic pain attacks can be excruciating for patients, even after being lightly touched. Although there are rodent trigeminal nerve research models to study orofacial pain, few models have been applied to studies in mice. A mouse trigeminal inflammatory compression (TIC) model is introduced here which successfully and reliably promotes vibrissal whisker pad hypersensitivity. Results The chronic orofacial neuropathic pain model is induced after surgical placement of chromic gut suture in the infraorbital nerve fissure in the maxillary bone. Slight compression and chemical effects of the chromic gut suture on the portion of the infraorbital nerve contacted cause mild nerve trauma. Nerve edema is observed in the contacting infraorbital nerve bundle as well as macrophage infiltration in the trigeminal ganglia. Centrally in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, increased immunoreactivity for an activated microglial marker is evident (OX42, postoperative day 70). Mechanical thresholds of the affected whisker pad are significantly decreased on day 3 after chromic gut suture placement, persisting at least 10 weeks. The mechanical allodynia is reversed by suppression of microglial activation. Cold allodynia was detected at 4 weeks. Conclusions A simple, effective, and reproducible chronic mouse model mimicking clinical orofacial neuropathic pain (Type 2) is induced by placing chromic gut suture between the infraorbital nerve and the maxillary bone. The method produces mild inflammatory compression with significant continuous mechanical allodynia persisting at least 10 weeks and cold allodynia measureable at 4 weeks. PMID:23270529

  13. Indantadol, a novel NMDA antagonist and nonselective MAO inhibitor for the potential treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Mattia, Consalvo; Coluzzi, Flaminia

    2007-09-01

    Indantadol is an oral and nonselective monoamine oxidase inhibitor and NMDA antagonist that is being developed by Vernalis plc, under license from Chiesi Farmaceutici SpA, for the potential treatment of neuropathic pain. In preclinical studies, indantadol exhibited neuroprotective effects after kainite-induced seizures, and displayed anticonvulsant and antihyperalgesic activity. Indantadol also caused a dose-dependent decrease in exploratory motility. In a human heat-capsaicin-induced pain model, indantadol at a dose of 500 mg effectively reduced the area of secondary hyperalgesia to 67%. Indantadol undergoes extensive liver metabolism, withthe formation of two major metabolites - CHF-3567 and 2-aminoindane. The drug is excreted in urine partially as the parent compound, but mostly as CHF-3567. The tolerability profile of indantadol at single doses up to 600 mg and twice-daily doses up to 400 mg in clinical trials was significantly more favorable than for other NMDA antagonists. Most side effects have been observed to be mild, and include dizziness and asthenia. Indantadol is currently in phase II clinical trials in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain. Given the results available to date, indantadol may have a role in the treatment of neuropathic pain if the favorable pharmacokinetic profile and efficacy of the drug are maintained in more extensive clinical trials.

  14. Discovery of Potent Antiallodynic Agents for Neuropathic Pain Targeting P2X3 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young-Hwan; Kim, Yeo Ok; Lin, Hai; Cho, Joong-Heui; Park, Jin-Hee; Lee, So-Deok; Bae, Jinsu; Kang, Koon Mook; Kim, Yoon-Gyoon; Pae, Ae Nim; Ko, Hyojin; Park, Chul-Seung; Yoon, Myung Ha; Kim, Yong-Chul

    2017-04-06

    Antagonism of the P2X3 receptor is one of the potential therapeutic strategies for the management of neuropathic pain because P2X3 receptors are predominantly localized on small to medium diameter C- and Aδ-fiber primary afferent neurons, which are related to the pain-sensing system. In this study, 5-hydroxy pyridine derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their in vitro biological activities by two-electrode voltage clamp assay at hP2X3 receptors. Among the novel hP2X3 receptor antagonists, intrathecal treatment of compound 29 showed parallel efficacy with pregabalin (calcium channel modulator) and higher efficacy than AF353 (P2X3 receptor antagonist) in the evaluation of its antiallodynic effects in spinal nerve ligation rats. However, because compound 29 was inactive by intraperitoneal administration in neuropathic pain animal models due to low cell permeability, the corresponding methyl ester analogue, 28, which could be converted to compound 29 in vivo, was investigated as a prodrug concept. Intravenous injection of compound 28 resulted in potent antiallodynic effects, with ED50 values of 2.62 and 2.93 mg/kg in spinal nerve ligation and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy rats, respectively, indicating that new drug development targeting the P2X3 receptor could be promising for neuropathic pain, a disease with high unmet medical needs.

  15. The antihyperalgesic effect of cytidine-5'-diphosphate-choline in neuropathic and inflammatory pain models.

    PubMed

    Bagdas, Deniz; Sonat, Fusun Ak; Hamurtekin, Emre; Sonal, Songul; Gurun, Mine Sibel

    2011-09-01

    This study was designed to test the effects of intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered CDP-choline (cytidine-5'-diphosphate-choline; citicoline) and its metabolites in rat models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The i.c.v. administration of CDP-choline (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 µmol) produced a dose and time-dependent reversal of mechanical hyperalgesia in both carrageenan-induced inflammatory and chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain models in rats. The antihyperalgesic effect of CDP-choline was similar to that observed with an equimolar dose of choline (1 µmol). The CDP-choline-induced antihyperalgesic effect was prevented by central administration of the neuronal high-affinity choline uptake inhibitor hemicholinium-3 (1 µg), the nonselective nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (50 µg), the α7-selective nicotinic ACh receptor antagonist, α-bungarotoxin (2 µg) and the γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor antagonist CGP-35348 (20 µg). In contrast, i.c.v. pretreatment with the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (10 µg) only prevented the CDP-choline-induced antihyperalgesic effect in the neuropathic pain model while the nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (10 µg) did not alter the antihyperalgesic effect in the two models. These results indicate that CDP-choline-elicited antihyperalgesic effect in different models of pain occurs through mechanisms that seem to involve an interaction with supraspinal α7-selective nicotinic ACh receptors, and γ-aminobutyric acid B receptors, whereas central opioid receptors have a role only in the neuropathic pain model.

  16. Sustained-release pregabalin with methylcobalamin in neuropathic pain: an Indian real-life experience

    PubMed Central

    Dongre, Yasmin U; Swami, Onkar C

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Neuropathic pain is intense in nature and difficult to manage. Thus, the primary goal is maximum relief from pain. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of a fixed-dose combination of sustained-release pregabalin and methylcobalamin in reducing neuropathic pain in Indian patients, in the real-life situation. Methods This was a multicenter, prospective, open-labeled, single-arm, observational, 14-day study. Patients received fixed dose combination of 75 or 150 mg sustained-release pregabalin combined with 1500 mcg immediate release methylcobalamin, depending on the clinical requirement. Data was collected for pain reduction and other positive and negative symptoms associated with neuropathy, including hyperesthesia, paresthesia, numbness/tingling, burning sensation, muscle weakness, sleep disturbances, and impairment of movement. Pain intensity was measured on a ten-point visual analog scale (VAS) (0 represented “no pain,” and 10 represented “worst pain ever”). The safety of the drug was also evaluated throughout the study duration. Data was analyzed using appropriate statistical methods. Results The overall reduction in mean VAS score over 14 days was 72.3%. The reduction in mean VAS score was significant as early as the first week. Both positive and negative symptoms of peripheral neuropathy were significantly improved in >50% patients within the 2 weeks. Giddiness (4.7%), followed by sedation (3.6%), dizziness (2.9%), drowsiness (2.3%), and nausea (2.3%) were the most commonly observed adverse effects. The overall efficacy and tolerability was rated as good to excellent by >95% of the investigators and patients. Conclusion Fixed dose combination of sustained-release pregabalin and methylcobalamin significantly reduced neuropathic pain, with significant improvement in both the positive and negative symptoms associated with neuropathy, in Indian patients and was well tolerated. PMID:23761981

  17. Longstanding neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury is refractory to transcranial direct current stimulation: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wrigley, Paul J; Gustin, Sylvia M; McIndoe, Leigh N; Chakiath, Rosemary J; Henderson, Luke A; Siddall, Philip J

    2013-10-01

    Neuropathic pain remains one of the most difficult consequences of spinal cord injury (SCI) to manage. It is a major cause of suffering and adds to the physical, emotional, and societal impact of the injury. Despite the use of the best available treatments, two thirds of people experiencing neuropathic pain after SCI do not achieve satisfactory pain relief. This study was undertaken in response to a recent clinical trial reporting short-term, clinically significant reductions in neuropathic SCI pain with primary motor cortex transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). In this investigation, we aimed to build on this previous clinical trial by extending the assessment period to determine the short-, medium-, and long-term efficacy of tDCS for the treatment of neuropathic pain after SCI. We found that, contrary to previous reports, after 5 tDCS treatment periods, mean pain intensity and unpleasantness rating were not significantly different from initial assessment. That is, in this trial tDCS did not provide any pain relief in subjects with neuropathic SCI pain (n=10). A similar lack of effect was also seen after sham treatment. Because the injury duration in this study was significantly greater than that of previous investigations, it is possible that tDCS is an effective analgesic only in individuals with relatively recent injuries and pain. Future investigations comparing a range of injury durations are required if we are to determine whether this is indeed the case.

  18. Prognostic Value of Preoperative Coping Strategies for Pain in Patients with Residual Neuropathic Pain after Laminoplasty for Compressive Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Single-center retrospective cohort study. Purpose To clarify the prognostic value of preoperative coping strategies for pain due to compressive cervical myelopathy. Overview of Literature Preoperative physical function, imaging and electrophysiological findings are known predictors of surgical outcomes. However, coping strategies for pain have not been considered. Methods Postoperative questionnaires, concerning health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and daily living activities, were sent to 78 patients with compressive cervical myelopathy who had suffered from neuropathic pain before laminoplasty, and been preoperatively assessed with respect to their physical and mental status and coping strategies for pain. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was performed to clarify the extent to which the patient's preoperative coping strategies could explain the variance in postoperative HRQOL and activity levels. Results Forty-two patients with residual neuropathic pain after laminoplasty were analyzed by questionnaires (28 men, 14 women; mean age, 62.7±10.2 years; symptom duration, 48.0±66.0 months). The valid response rate was 53.8%. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that preoperative coping strategies, which involved coping self-statements, diverting attention, and catastrophizing, were independently associated with postoperative HRQOL and activity level, and could explain 7% to 11% of their variance. Combinations of the coping strategies for pain and upper/lower motor functions could explain 26% to 36% of the variance in postoperative HRQOL and activity level. Conclusions Preoperative coping strategies for pain are good predictors of postoperative HRQOL and activities of daily living in patients with postoperative residual neuropathic pain due to compressive cervical myelopathy. PMID:26435783

  19. Botulinum Toxin Type A for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Neuro-Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Intiso, Domenico; Basciani, Mario; Santamato, Andrea; Intiso, Marta; Di Rienzo, Filomena

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a natural protective mechanism and has a warning function signaling imminent or actual tissue damage. Neuropathic pain (NP) results from a dysfunction and derangement in the transmission and signal processing along the nervous system and it is a recognized disease in itself. The prevalence of NP is estimated to be between 6.9% and 10% in the general population. This condition can complicate the recovery from stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord lesions, and several neuropathies promoting persistent disability and poor quality of life. Subjects suffering from NP describe it as burning, itching, lancing, and numbness, but hyperalgesia and allodynia represent the most bothersome symptoms. The management of NP is a clinical challenge and several non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions have been proposed with variable benefits. Botulinum toxin (BTX) as an adjunct to other interventions can be a useful therapeutic tool for the treatment of disabled people. Although BTX-A is predominantly used to reduce spasticity in a neuro-rehabilitation setting, it has been used in several painful conditions including disorders characterized by NP. The underlying pharmacological mechanisms that operate in reducing pain are still unclear and include blocking nociceptor transduction, the reduction of neurogenic inflammation by inhibiting neural substances and neurotransmitters, and the prevention of peripheral and central sensitization. Some neurological disorders requiring rehabilitative intervention can show neuropathic pain resistant to common analgesic treatment. This paper addresses the effect of BTX-A in treating NP that complicates frequent disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system such as spinal cord injury, post-stroke shoulder pain, and painful diabetic neuropathy, which are commonly managed in a rehabilitation setting. Furthermore, BTX-A has an effect in relief pain that may characterize less common neurological disorders including post

  20. Attenuation of neuropathic pain and neuroinflammatory responses by a pyranocoumarin derivative, anomalin in animal and cellular models.

    PubMed

    Khan, Salman; Choi, Ran Joo; Lee, Joohee; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2016-03-05

    The present study investigated the neuropathic pain, anti-neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective properties of a pyranocoumarin derivative (anomalin) in in vivo and in vitro models. An in vivo streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic neuropathic pain model demonstrated that anomalin significantly suppressed neuropathic pain in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism of the anti-neuropathic pain activity of anomalin, sodium-nitroprusside (SNP)-induced neuroinflammation in neuro-2a (N2a) cells was further investigated in signaling pathways. The effects of anomalin against SNP-induced toxicity, nitrite production and related mRNA gene expression (iNOS and COX-2) were considerably reduced by anomalin in the SNP-induced N2a cells. In the molecular signaling pathway, anomalin effectively blocked the SNP-induced activation of the IKKα/β, IκBα, ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK pathways. Furthermore, anomalin remarkably reduced the increase in the SNP-induced nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) pathway. Additionally, the pro-inflammatory cytokines level was remarkably inhibited by anomalin in high glucose-induced DRG primary neurons and SNP-induced N2a cells. These findings indicate that anomalin has anti-neuropathic pain, anti-neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective effects against STZ-induced diabetic type I neuropathic pain and SNP-induced in neuronal cell models via the inactivation of the NF-κB, Nrf2 and MAPK signaling pathways.

  1. Chronic Oral Pelargonidin Alleviates Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Neuropathic Hyperalgesia in Rat: Involvement of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Mirshekar, Mohammadali; Roghani, Mehrdad; Khalili, Mohsen; Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Arab Moazzen, Saiedeh

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus in some clinical cases is accompanied with hyperalgesia. In this study, we evaluated the possible beneficial effect of chronic pelargonidin (PG) treatment on hyperalgesia in streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic neuropathic rat. Methods: Male Wistar rats (n = 56) were divided into seven groups, i.e. control, diabetic, PG-treated control, PG (single- and multiple-dose)-treated diabetic, and sodium salicylate-treated control and diabetics. For induction of diabetes, STZ was injected i.p. at a single dose of 60 mg/kg. PG was orally administered at a dose of 10 mg/kg once and/or on alternate days for 8 weeks; 1 week after diabetes induction. After two months, hyperalgesia was assessed using standard formalin and hot tail immersion tests. Meanwhile, markers of oxidative stress in brain were measured. One-way analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis of the data. Results: Diabetic rats showed a marked chemical and thermal hyperalgesia, indicating that development of diabetic neuropathy and PG treatment (especially multiple-doses) significantly ameliorated the alteration in hyperalgesia (P<0.05-0.01) in diabetic rats as compared to untreated diabetics. PG (multiple doses) also significantly decreased diabetes-induced thiobarbituric acid reactive substances formation and non-significantly reversed elevation of nitrite level and reduction of antioxidant defensive enzyme superoxide dismutase. Conclusion: These results clearly suggest that PG prevents diabetic neuropathic hyperalgesia through attenuation of oxidative stress. PMID:20683496

  2. Antinociceptive effect of ambroxol in rats with neuropathic spinal cord injury pain

    PubMed Central

    Hama, Aldric T.; Plum, Ann Woodhouse; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    Symptoms of neuropathic spinal cord injury (SCI) pain include evoked cutaneous hypersensitivity and spontaneous pain, which can be present below the level of the injury. Adverse side-effects obtained with currently available analgesics complicate effective pain management in SCI patients. Voltage-gated Na+ channels expressed in primary afferent nociceptors have been identified to mediate persistent hyperexcitability in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, which in part underlies the symptoms of nerve injury-induced pain. Ambroxol has previously demonstrated antinociceptive effects in rat chronic pain models and has also shown to potently block Na+ channel current in DRG neurons. Ambroxol was tested in rats that underwent a mid-thoracic spinal cord compression injury. Injured rats demonstrated robust hind paw (below-level) heat and mechanical hypersensitivity. Orally administered ambroxol significantly attenuated below-level hypersensitivity at doses that did not affect performance on the rotarod test. Intrathecal injection of ambroxol did not ameliorate below-level hypersensitivity. The current data suggest that ambroxol could be effective for clinical neuropathic SCI pain. Furthermore, the data suggests that peripherally expressed Na+ channels could lend themselves as targets for the development of pharmacotherapies for SCI pain. PMID:20732348

  3. MrgC agonism at central terminals of primary sensory neurons inhibits neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    He, Shao-Qiu; Li, Zhe; Chu, Yu-Xia; Han, Liang; Xu, Qian; Li, Man; Yang, Fei; Liu, Qin; Tang, Zongxiang; Wang, Yun; Hin, Niyada; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara; Tiwari, Vinod; Shechter, Ronen; Wei, Feng; Raja, Srinivasa N; Dong, Xinzhong; Guan, Yun

    2014-03-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain is often refractory to current pharmacotherapies. The rodent Mas-related G-protein-coupled receptor subtype C (MrgC) shares substantial homogeneity with its human homologue, MrgX1, and is located specifically in small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons. However, evidence regarding the role of MrgC in chronic pain conditions has been disparate and inconsistent. Accordingly, the therapeutic value of MrgX1 as a target for pain treatment in humans remains uncertain. Here, we found that intrathecal injection of BAM8-22 (a 15-amino acid peptide MrgC agonist) and JHU58 (a novel dipeptide MrgC agonist) inhibited both mechanical and heat hypersensitivity in rats after an L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Intrathecal JHU58-induced pain inhibition was dose dependent in SNL rats. Importantly, drug efficacy was lost in Mrg-cluster gene knockout (Mrg KO) mice and was blocked by gene silencing with intrathecal MrgC siRNA and by a selective MrgC receptor antagonist in SNL rats, suggesting that the drug action is MrgC dependent. Further, in a mouse model of trigeminal neuropathic pain, microinjection of JHU58 into ipsilateral subnucleus caudalis inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity in wild-type but not Mrg KO mice. Finally, JHU58 attenuated the miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents frequency both in medullary dorsal horn neurons of mice after trigeminal nerve injury and in lumbar spinal dorsal horn neurons of mice after SNL. We provide multiple lines of evidence that MrgC agonism at spinal but not peripheral sites may constitute a novel pain inhibitory mechanism that involves inhibition of peripheral excitatory inputs onto postsynaptic dorsal horn neurons in different rodent models of neuropathic pain.

  4. Enhanced serotonin and mesolimbic dopamine transmissions in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Sagheddu, Claudia; Aroni, Sonia; De Felice, Marta; Lecca, Salvatore; Luchicchi, Antonio; Melis, Miriam; Muntoni, Anna Lisa; Romano, Rosaria; Palazzo, Enza; Guida, Francesca; Maione, Sabatino; Pistis, Marco

    2015-10-01

    In humans, affective consequences of neuropathic pain, ranging from depression to anxiety and anhedonia, severely impair quality of life and are a major disease burden, often requiring specific medications. Depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors have also been observed in animal models of peripheral nerve injury. Dysfunctions in central nervous system monoamine transmission have been hypothesized to underlie depressive and anxiety disorders in neuropathic pain. To assess whether these neurons display early changes in their activity that in the long-term might lead to chronicization, maladaptive plasticity and affective consequences, we carried out in vivo extracellular single unit recordings from serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and from dopamine neurons in ventral tegmental area (VTA) in the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain in rats. Extracellular dopamine levels and the expression of dopamine D1, D2 receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) were measured in the nucleus accumbens. We report that, two weeks following peripheral nerve injury, discharge rate of serotonin DRN neurons and burst firing of VTA dopamine cells are enhanced, when compared with sham-operated animals. We also observed higher extracellular dopamine levels and reduced expression of D2, but not D1, receptors and TH in the nucleus accumbens. Our study confirms that peripheral neuropathy induces changes in the serotonin and dopamine systems that might be the early result of chronic maladaptation to persistent pain. The allostatic activation of these neural systems, which mirrors that already described as a consequence of stress, might lead to depression and anxiety previously observed in neuropathic animals but also an attempt to cope positively with the negative experience.

  5. Activation of neurotrophins in lumbar dorsal root probably contributes to neuropathic pain after spinal nerve ligation

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Abdolreza; Rahmati, Masoud; Eslami, Rasoul; Sheibani, Vahid

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Neurotrophins (NTs) exert various effects on neuronal system. Growing evidence indicates that NTs are involved in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain. However, the exact role of these proteins in modulating nociceptive signaling requires being defined. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of spinal nerve ligation (SNL) on NTs activation in the lumbar dorsal root. Materials and Methods: Ten male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to two groups: tight ligation of the L5 spinal nerve (SNL: n=5) and Sham (n=5). In order to produce neuropathic pain, the L5 spinal nerve was tightly ligated (SNL). Then, allodynia and hyperalgesia tests were conducted weekly. After 4 weeks, tissue samples were taken from the two groups for laboratory evaluations. Here, Real-Time PCR quantity method was used for measuring NTs gene expression levels. Results: SNL resulted in a significant weight loss in the soleus muscle (P<0.05), mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia thresholds (respectively, P<0.05; P<0.05). Also, NGF, NT-4, NT-3, TrkA, TrkB and TrkC expression were up-regulated following spinal nerve ligation group (respectively, P=0.025, P=0.013, P=0.001, P=0.002, P<0.001, P=001) (respectively, 4.7, 5.2, 7.5, 5.1, 7.2, 6.2 folds). Conclusion: The present study provides new evidence that neuropathic pain induced by spinal nerve ligation probably activates NTs and Trk receptors expression in DRG. However, further studies are needed to better elucidate the role of NTs in a neuropathic pain. PMID:28133521

  6. Dynorphin A analogs for the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sara M; Lee, Yeon Sun; Hruby, Victor J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is one of the most ubiquitous diseases in the world, but treatment is difficult with conventional methods, due to undesirable side effects of treatments and unknown mechanisms of pathological pain states. The endogenous peptide, dynorphin A has long been established as a target for the treatment of pain. Interestingly, this unique peptide has both inhibitory (opioid in nature) and excitatory activities (nonopioid) in the CNS. Both of these effects have been found to play a role in pain and much work has been done to develop therapeutics to enhance the inhibitory effects. Here we will review the dynorphin A compounds that have been designed for the modulation of pain and will discuss where the field stands today. PMID:26824470

  7. The contribution of TRPM8 and TRPA1 channels to cold allodynia and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Caspani, Ombretta; Zurborg, Sandra; Labuz, Dominika; Heppenstall, Paul A

    2009-10-08

    Cold allodynia is a common feature of neuropathic pain however the underlying mechanisms of this enhanced sensitivity to cold are not known. Recently the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels TRPM8 and TRPA1 have been identified and proposed to be molecular sensors for cold. Here we have investigated the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 mRNA in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and examined the cold sensitivity of peripheral sensory neurons in the chronic construction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain in mice.In behavioral experiments, chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve induced a hypersensitivity to both cold and the TRPM8 agonist menthol that developed 2 days post injury and remained stable for at least 2 weeks. Using quantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization we examined the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 in DRG. Both channels displayed significantly reduced expression levels after injury with no change in their distribution pattern in identified neuronal subpopulations. Furthermore, in calcium imaging experiments, we detected no alterations in the number of cold or menthol responsive neurons in the DRG, or in the functional properties of cold transduction following injury. Intriguingly however, responses to the TRPA1 agonist mustard oil were strongly reduced.Our results indicate that injured sensory neurons do not develop abnormal cold sensitivity after chronic constriction injury and that alterations in the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 are unlikely to contribute directly to the pathogenesis of cold allodynia in this neuropathic pain model.

  8. Effect of pioglitazone on neuropathic pain and spinal expression of TLR-4 and cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hongbin; Xu, Shuangshuang; Liu, Qingzhen; Liu, Jian; Xu, Jianguo; Li, Weiyan; Jin, Yi; Ji, Qing

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain have yet to be elucidated. The present study aimed to examine the modulation of neuroimmune activation in the spinal cord by the synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) agonist, pioglitazone (Pio), in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI). Rats were randomly assigned into four groups: Sham surgery with vehicle, chronic constriction injury with vehicle or Pio (10 mg/kg), and chronic constriction injury with Pio and a PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (2 mg/kg). Pio or vehicle was administered 1 h prior to the surgery and continued daily until day 7 post-surgery. Paw pressure threshold was measured prior to surgery and on days 0, 1, 3 and 7 post-surgery. Microglia activation markers macrophage antigen complex-1, the mRNA expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-1β, and the mRNA expression levels of toll like receptor (TLR-4) in the lumbar spinal cord were determined. Administration of Pio resulted in the prominent attenuation of mechanical hyperalgesia. In addition, Pio was able to significantly inhibit neuroimmune activation characterized by glial activation, the production of cytokines and expression levels of TLR-4. Concurrent administration of a PPAR-γ antagonist, GW9662, reversed the effects of Pio. The antihyperalgesic effect of administration of Pio in rats receiving CCI may, in part, be attributed to the inhibition of neuroimmune activation associated with the sustaining of neuropathic pain. PMID:27698768

  9. Antinociceptive effects of fucoidan in rat models of vincristine-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chuanyin; Zhao, Yun-Tao; Zhang, Guoping; Xu, Ming-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs commonly induce peripheral neuropathic pain, which limit their clinic use. In the present study, the effect of fucoidan on the development of vincristine‑induced neuropathic pain was evaluated and the underlying mechanism was examined. A neuropathy model was established in Sprague‑Dawley rats by intraperitoneal injection of vincristine sulfate 50 µg/kg once a day for 10 consecutive days. Fucoidan (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg.) and pregabalin (10 mg/kg) were injected for 14 consecutive days. Behavioral assessments were then performed and the expression of GABAB receptor was determined. The results showed that a single treatment with fucoidan did not prevent the induction of vincristine‑induced mechanical or cold allodynia. However, repeated fucoidan administration attenuated vincristine‑induced mechanical and cold allodynia in a dose‑dependent manner. Additionally, the analgesic effects of fucoidan contributed to an upregulation in the expression of GABAB receptor in the spinal cord. Furthermore, all the effects of fucoidan against vincristine‑induced neuropathy were reversed by saclofen, a selective GABAB receptor antagonist. These results suggested that the antinociceptive effects of fucoidan may be through activation of GABAB receptor, and fucoidan may be a promising drug for the treatment of chemotherapeutic drug-induced neuropathic pain.

  10. Sensory Symptom Profiles of Patients with Neuropathic Pain after Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Soler, M Dolors; Moriña, David; Rodríguez, Neus; Saurí, Joan; Vidal, Joan; Navarro, Albert; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-12-13

    Patients suffering from neuropathic pain (NP) after spinal cord injury (SCI) present with a variety of pain descriptors in different combinations and at different intensities. These sensory features form distinct patterns, known as sensory symptom profiles. In the present cross-sectional study, we have used a multivariate statistical method (multiple correspondence analysis) to categorize the sensory symptom profiles of a cohort of 338 patients with at-level or below-level NP after SCI. We also investigated possible associations between positive neuropathic symptoms and features of the neurological lesion. The majority of patients had a combination of pain descriptors, with 59% of patients presenting with 3 or 4 pain subtypes. No significant associations were found between specific pain profiles and etiology or clinical degree of the neurological lesion. Furthermore, similar symptom profiles were seen in patients with at-level and below-level NP. The most frequent pattern observed in patients with cervical SCI consisted predominantly of electric shocks and tingling, without burning, pressure pain or allodynia. Classification of SCI-NP patients into the five groups identified in the present study based on their distinct sensory symptom profiles may allow identification of those most likely to respond to a specific analgesic approach.

  11. Brain Stimulation in the Treatment of Chronic Neuropathic and Non-Cancerous Pain

    PubMed Central

    Plow, EB; Pascual-Leone, A; Machado, A

    2012-01-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain is one of the most prevalent and debilitating disorders. Conventional medical management, however, remains frustrating for both patients and clinicians owing to poor specificity of pharmacotherapy, delayed-onset of analgesia and extensive side-effects. Neuromodulation presents as a promising alternative, or at least an adjunct, as it is more specific in inducing analgesia without associated risks of pharmacotherapy. Here, we discuss common clinical and investigational methods of neuromodulation. Compared to clinical spinal cord stimulation (SCS), investigational techniques of cerebral neuromodulation, both invasive [deep brain stimulation (DBS) and motor cortical stimulation (MCS)] and noninvasive [repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS)], may be more advantageous. By adaptively targeting the multi-dimensional experience of pain, subtended by integrative pain circuitry in the brain, including somatosensory and thalamocortical, limbic and cognitive, cerebral methods may modulate the sensory-discriminative, affective-emotional and evaluative-cognitive spheres of the pain neuromatrix. Despite promise, the current state of results alludes to the possibility that cerebral neuromodulation has thus far not been effective in producing analgesia as intended in patients with chronic pain disorders. These techniques, thus, remain investigational and off-label. We discuss issues implicated in inadequate efficacy, variability of responsiveness and poor retention of benefit, while recommending design and conceptual refinements for future trials of cerebral neuromodulation in management of chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:22484179

  12. Frutalin reduces acute and neuropathic nociceptive behaviours in rodent models of orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, Marina B M V; de Melo Júnior, José de Maria A; Santos, Sacha Aubrey A R; Melo, Luana T M; Leite, Laura Hévila I; Vieira-Neto, Antonio E; Moreira, Renato de A; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina de O; Campos, Adriana R

    2016-08-25

    Orofacial pain is a highly prevalent clinical condition, yet difficult to control effectively with available drugs. Much attention is currently focused on the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties of lectins. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of frutalin (FTL) using rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic orofacial pain. Acute pain was induced by formalin, glutamate or capsaicin (orofacial model) and hypertonic saline (corneal model). In one experiment, animals were pretreated with l-NAME and naloxone to investigate the mechanism of antinociception. The involvement of the lectin domain in the antinociceptive effect of FTL was verified by allowing the lectin to bind to its specific ligand. In another experiment, animals pretreated with FTL or saline were submitted to the temporomandibular joint formalin test. In yet another, animals were submitted to infraorbital nerve transection to induce chronic pain, followed by induction of thermal hypersensitivity using acetone. Motor activity was evaluated with the rotarod test. A molecular docking was performed using the TRPV1 channel. Pretreatment with FTL significantly reduced nociceptive behaviour associated with acute and neuropathic pain, especially at 0.5 mg/kg. Antinociception was effectively inhibited by l-NAME and d-galactose. In line with in vivo experiments, docking studies indicated that FTL may interact with TRPV1. Our results confirm the potential pharmacological relevance of FTL as an inhibitor of orofacial nociception in acute and chronic pain mediated by TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPM8 receptor.

  13. Intrathecal ziconotide and baclofen provide pain relief in seven patients with neuropathic pain and spasticity: case reports.

    PubMed

    Saulino, M; Burton, A W; Danyo, D A; Frost, S; Glanzer, J; Solanki, D R

    2009-03-01

    Seven cases of combination of intrathecal (IT) ziconotide and baclofen therapy in patients with refractory neuropathic pain and spasticity were reviewed. Five of the seven adult patients were receiving IT baclofen treatment when ziconotide was initiated. All five patients had experienced at least one previous failed IT treatment regimen. Pain intensity scores improved by a mean of 50.3% with the use of ziconotide-baclofen therapy. Mean time to onset of pain relief was 15 weeks, at a mean ziconotide dose of 3.7 microg/day. Within this group of patients, adverse events were observed in one patient, but they were not considered to be ziconotide related and subsequently resolved. The remaining two patients were receiving ziconotide treatment when baclofen was initiated. Pain intensity scores improved by 75% and 30%, respectively. Pain relief was evident at two weeks and one week, with corresponding ziconotide doses of 2.4 microg/day and 14.4 microg/day, respectively. One patient in this group reported adverse events, but all resolved during continued treatment with the study drugs. Treatment regimens varied between patients in these case series; each regimen used a different titration strategy and different concentrations of ziconotide and baclofen. Combination IT ziconotide and baclofen therapy may be a treatment option for patients with neuropathic pain and spasticity. Future studies are warranted to determine the optimal dosing and titration schedules for ziconotide-baclofen usage.

  14. Decrease in neuroimmune activation by HSV-mediated gene transfer of TNFα soluble receptor alleviates pain in rats with diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Maier Ortmann, Kathryn L.; Chattopadhyay, Munmun

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of diabetic painful neuropathy are complicated and comprise of peripheral and central pathophysiological phenomena. A number of proinflammatory cytokines are involved in this process. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is considered to be one of the major contributors of neuropathic pain. In order to explore the potential role of inflammation in the peripheral nervous system of Type 1 diabetic animals with painful neuropathy, we investigated whether TNF-α is a key inflammatory mediator to the diabetic neuropathic pain and whether continuous delivery of TNFα soluble receptor from damaged axons achieved by HSV vector mediated transduction of DRG would block or alter the pain perception in animals with diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic animals exhibited changes in threshold of mechanical and thermal pain perception compared to control rats and also demonstrated increases in TNFα in the DRG, spinal cord dorsal horn, sciatic nerve and in the foot skin, 6 weeks after the onset of diabetes. Therapeutic approaches by HSV mediated expression of p55 TNF soluble receptor significantly attenuated the diabetes-induced hyperalgesia and decreased the expression of TNFα with reduction in the phosphorylation of p38MAPK in the spinal cord dorsal horn and DRG. The overall outcome of this study suggests that neuroinflammatory activation in the peripheral nervous system may be involved in the pathogenesis of painful neuropathy in Type 1 diabetes which can be alleviated by local expression of HSV vector expressing p55 TNF soluble receptor. PMID:24880032

  15. Decrease in neuroimmune activation by HSV-mediated gene transfer of TNFα soluble receptor alleviates pain in rats with diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ortmann, Kathryn L Maier; Chattopadhyay, Munmun

    2014-10-01

    The mechanisms of diabetic painful neuropathy are complicated and comprise of peripheral and central pathophysiological phenomena. A number of proinflammatory cytokines are involved in this process. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is considered to be one of the major contributors of neuropathic pain. In order to explore the potential role of inflammation in the peripheral nervous system of Type 1 diabetic animals with painful neuropathy, we investigated whether TNF-α is a key inflammatory mediator to the diabetic neuropathic pain and whether continuous delivery of TNFα soluble receptor from damaged axons achieved by HSV vector mediated transduction of DRG would block or alter the pain perception in animals with diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic animals exhibited changes in threshold of mechanical and thermal pain perception compared to control rats and also demonstrated increases in TNFα in the DRG, spinal cord dorsal horn, sciatic nerve and in the foot skin, 6 weeks after the onset of diabetes. Therapeutic approaches by HSV mediated expression of p55 TNF soluble receptor significantly attenuated the diabetes-induced hyperalgesia and decreased the expression of TNFα with reduction in the phosphorylation of p38MAPK in the spinal cord dorsal horn and DRG. The overall outcome of this study suggests that neuroinflammatory activation in the peripheral nervous system may be involved in the pathogenesis of painful neuropathy in Type 1 diabetes which can be alleviated by local expression of HSV vector expressing p55 TNF soluble receptor.

  16. Nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain causes disinhibition of the anterior cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Blom, Sigrid Marie; Pfister, Jean-Pascal; Santello, Mirko; Senn, Walter; Nevian, Thomas

    2014-04-23

    Neuropathic pain caused by peripheral nerve injury is a debilitating neurological condition of high clinical relevance. On the cellular level, the elevated pain sensitivity is induced by plasticity of neuronal function along the pain pathway. Changes in cortical areas involved in pain processing contribute to the development of neuropathic pain. Yet, it remains elusive which plasticity mechanisms occur in cortical circuits. We investigated the properties of neural networks in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), a brain region mediating affective responses to noxious stimuli. We performed multiple whole-cell recordings from neurons in layer 5 (L5) of the ACC of adult mice after chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve of the left hindpaw and observed a striking loss of connections between excitatory and inhibitory neurons in both directions. In contrast, no significant changes in synaptic efficacy in the remaining connected pairs were found. These changes were reflected on the network level by a decrease in the mEPSC and mIPSC frequency. Additionally, nerve injury resulted in a potentiation of the intrinsic excitability of pyramidal neurons, whereas the cellular properties of interneurons were unchanged. Our set of experimental parameters allowed constructing a neuronal network model of L5 in the ACC, revealing that the modification of inhibitory connectivity had the most profound effect on increased network activity. Thus, our combined experimental and modeling approach suggests that cortical disinhibition is a fundamental pathological modification associated with peripheral nerve damage. These changes at the cortical network level might therefore contribute to the neuropathic pain condition.

  17. Effect of subcutaneous treatment with human umbilical cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells on peripheral neuropathic pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Ju; Yoon, Tae Gyoon; Kang, Moonkyu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aim to determine the in vivo effect of human umbilical cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) on neuropathic pain, using three, principal peripheral neuropathic pain models. Four weeks after hUCB-MSC transplantation, we observed significant antinociceptive effect in hUCB-MSC–transplanted rats compared to that in the vehicle-treated control. Spinal cord cells positive for c-fos, CGRP, p-ERK, p-p 38, MMP-9 and MMP 2 were significantly decreased in only CCI model of hUCB-MSCs-grafted rats, while spinal cord cells positive for CGRP, p-ERK and MMP-2 significantly decreased in SNL model of hUCB-MSCs-grafted rats and spinal cord cells positive for CGRP and MMP-2 significantly decreased in SNI model of hUCB-MSCs-grafted rats, compared to the control 4 weeks or 8weeks after transplantation (p<0.05). However, cells positive for TIMP-2, an endogenous tissue inhibitor of MMP-2, were significantly increased in SNL and SNI models of hUCB-MSCs-grafted rats. Taken together, subcutaneous injection of hUCB-MSCs may have an antinociceptive effect via modulation of pain signaling during pain signal processing within the nervous system, especially for CCI model. Thus, subcutaneous administration of hUCB-MSCs might be beneficial for improving those patients suffering from neuropathic pain by decreasing neuropathic pain activation factors, while increasing neuropathic pain inhibition factor. PMID:28280408

  18. Central sensitization and neuropathic features of ongoing pain in a rat model of advanced osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Havelin, Joshua; Imbert, Ian; Cormier, Jennifer; Allen, Joshua; Porreca, Frank; King, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) pain is most commonly characterized by movement-triggered joint pain. However, in advanced disease, OA pain becomes persistent, ongoing and resistant to treatment with NSAIDs. The mechanisms underlying ongoing pain in advanced OA are poorly understood. We recently showed that intra-articular (i.a.) injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) into the rat knee joint produces concentration-dependent outcomes. Thus, a low dose of i.a. MIA produces NSAID-sensitive weight asymmetry without evidence of ongoing pain while a high i.a. MIA dose produces weight asymmetry and NSAID-resistant ongoing pain. In the present studies, palpation of the ipsilateral hindlimb of rats treated 14 days previously with high, but not low, doses of i.a. MIA produced FOS expression in the spinal dorsal horn. Inactivation of descending pain facilitatory pathways by microinjection of lidocaine within the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) induced conditioned place preference (CPP) selectively in rats treated with the high dose of MIA. CPP to intra-articular lidocaine was blocked by pretreatment with duloxetine (30 mg/kg, i.p. at −30 min). These observations are consistent with the likelihood of a neuropathic component of OA that elicits ongoing, NSAID resistant pain and central sensitization that is mediated, in part, by descending modulatory mechanisms. This model provides a basis for exploration of underlying mechanisms promoting neuropathic components of OA pain and for the identification of mechanisms that may guide drug discovery for treatment of advanced OA pain without the need for joint replacement. PMID:26694132

  19. Neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel subtypes: key roles in inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, J; Adams, D J

    2006-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play an important role in neuronal excitability. Regulation of VGSC activity is a complex phenomenon that occurs at multiple levels in the cell, including transcriptional regulation, post-translational modification and membrane insertion and retrieval. Multiple VGSC subtypes exist that vary in their biophysical and pharmacological properties and tissue distribution. Any alteration of the VGSC subtype profile of a neuron or the mechanisms that regulate VGSC activity can cause significant changes in neuronal excitability. Inflammatory and neuropathic pain states are characterised by alterations in VGSC subtype composition and activity in sensory neurons. This review focuses on the VGSC subtypes involved in such pain states.

  20. Evaluation of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of saffron, Crocus sativus L., and its constituents, safranal and crocin in allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Amin, Bahareh; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2012-07-01

    The current study was designed to evaluate therapeutic potential of systemically administered ethanolic and aqueous extracts of saffron as well as its bioactive ingredients, safranal and crocin, in chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain in rats. The von Frey filaments, acetone drop, and radiant heat test were performed to assess the degree of mechanical allodynia, thermal allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia respectively, at different time intervals, i.e., one day before surgery and 3, 5, 7 and 10 days post surgery. The ambulatory behavior was evaluated using the open field test. A 7-day treatment with the ethanolic and aqueous extracts (50,100 and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) and safranal (0.025, 0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg, i.p.), attenuated the behavioral symptoms of neuropathic pain in a dose dependent manner. Crocin even at the high dose (50 mg/kg) failed to produce any protective role. However, gabapentine (100 mg/kg) as a reference drug significantly alleviated all behavioral manifestations of neuropathic pain compared to control group. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that ethanolic and aqueous extracts of saffron as well as safranal could be useful in treatment of different kinds of neuropathic pains and as an adjuvant to conventional medicines.

  1. [Neuropathic pain due to herpes zoster infection with atypical localization].

    PubMed

    Sağır, Özlem; Özaslan, Sabri; Meriç, Yücel; Arslan, İsmail; Köroğlu, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Acute herpes zoster infection appears in the situation of depression of immune system and reactivation of varicella zoster virus which causes small pox. Pain and maculopapular lesion accompany clinical symptoms. Various pharmacological and invasive methods can be used for treatment. Efficient therapy is important for prevention of postherpetic neuralgia and cure of acute pain and dermatological lesions. A 55 years old, 160 cm height and 65 kg weight female patient with complaints of severe pain, sensation of burning, tingling at the right hand and forearm was admitted to our pain department. The patient who was diagnosed as cervical hernia at an other medical center had a normal physical servical spine examination. Patient history and physical examination findings with acute herpes zoster infection was considered. Right stellate ganglion blockade for diagnosis and treatment was performed because of regressed and atypically located lesions and a visual analog scale score of 10. VAS score decreased 50% at 9th min after block, VAS score at 2nd hour was 2. Antiviral, gabapentin, and tricyclic antidepressant treatment was started after stellat ganglion blockade and patient was discharged. After 3 months complaints dissapeared and drug doses were discreased and stopped. In conclusion we think that stellate ganglion blockade can be useful in diagnosis, acute pain control, improving patient comfort and compatibility to drug therapy in atypically located herpes zoster.

  2. Alterations in the Anandamide Metabolism in the Development of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Natalia; Kucharczyk, Mateusz; Starowicz, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Endocannabinoids (EC), particularly anandamide (AEA), released constitutively in pain pathways might be accountable for the inhibitory effect on nociceptors. Pathogenesis of neuropathic pain may reflect complex remodeling of the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and spinal cord EC system. Multiple pathways involved both in the biosynthesis and degradation of AEA have been suggested. We investigated the local synthesis and degradation features of AEA in DRGs and spinal cord during the development and maintenance of pain in a model of chronic constriction injury (CCI). All AEA synthesis and degradation enzymes are present on the mRNA level in DRGs and lumbar spinal cord of intact as well as CCI-treated animals. Deregulation of EC system components was consistent with development of pain phenotype at days 3, 7, and 14 after CCI. The expression levels of enzymes involved in AEA degradation was significantly upregulated ipsilateral in DRGs and spinal cord at different time points. Expression of enzymes of the alternative, sPLA2-dependent and PLC-dependent, AEA synthesis pathways was elevated in both of the analyzed structures at all time points. Our data have shown an alteration of alternative AEA synthesis and degradation pathways, which might contribute to the variation of AEA levels and neuropathic pain development. PMID:25276812

  3. Minocycline enhances the effectiveness of nociceptin/orphanin FQ during neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Rojewska, Ewelina; Jurga, Agnieszka M; Makuch, Wioletta; Zador, Ferenz; Borsodi, Anna; Piotrowska, Anna; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) antinociception, which is mediated selectively by the N/OFQ peptide receptor (NOP), was demonstrated in pain models. In this study, we determine the role of activated microglia on the analgesic effects of N/OFQ in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve. Repeated 7-day administration of minocycline (30 mg/kg i.p.), a drug that affects microglial activation, significantly reduced pain in CCI-exposed rats and it potentiates the analgesic effects of administered N/OFQ (2.5-5 μg i.t.). Minocycline also downregulates the nerve injury-induced upregulation of NOP protein in the dorsal lumbar spinal cord. Our in vitro study showed that minocycline reduced NOP mRNA, but not protein, level in rat primary microglial cell cultures. In [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays we have shown that minocycline increases the spinal N/OFQ-stimulated NOP signaling. We suggest that the modulation of the N/OFQ system by minocycline is due to the potentiation of its neuronal antinociceptive activity and weakening of the microglial cell activation. This effect is beneficial for pain relief, and these results suggest new targets for the development of drugs that are effective against neuropathic pain.

  4. Minocycline Enhances the Effectiveness of Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ during Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Rojewska, Ewelina; Jurga, Agnieszka M.; Makuch, Wioletta; Zador, Ferenz; Piotrowska, Anna; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) antinociception, which is mediated selectively by the N/OFQ peptide receptor (NOP), was demonstrated in pain models. In this study, we determine the role of activated microglia on the analgesic effects of N/OFQ in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve. Repeated 7-day administration of minocycline (30 mg/kg i.p.), a drug that affects microglial activation, significantly reduced pain in CCI-exposed rats and it potentiates the analgesic effects of administered N/OFQ (2.5–5 μg i.t.). Minocycline also downregulates the nerve injury-induced upregulation of NOP protein in the dorsal lumbar spinal cord. Our in vitro study showed that minocycline reduced NOP mRNA, but not protein, level in rat primary microglial cell cultures. In [35S]GTPγS binding assays we have shown that minocycline increases the spinal N/OFQ-stimulated NOP signaling. We suggest that the modulation of the N/OFQ system by minocycline is due to the potentiation of its neuronal antinociceptive activity and weakening of the microglial cell activation. This effect is beneficial for pain relief, and these results suggest new targets for the development of drugs that are effective against neuropathic pain. PMID:25276817

  5. Morphine paradoxically prolongs neuropathic pain in rats by amplifying spinal NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Grace, Peter M; Strand, Keith A; Galer, Erika L; Urban, Daniel J; Wang, Xiaohui; Baratta, Michael V; Fabisiak, Timothy J; Anderson, Nathan D; Cheng, Kejun; Greene, Lisa I; Berkelhammer, Debra; Zhang, Yingning; Ellis, Amanda L; Yin, Hang Hubert; Campeau, Serge; Rice, Kenner C; Roth, Bryan L; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2016-06-14

    Opioid use for pain management has dramatically increased, with little assessment of potential pathophysiological consequences for the primary pain condition. Here, a short course of morphine, starting 10 d after injury in male rats, paradoxically and remarkably doubled the duration of chronic constriction injury (CCI)-allodynia, months after morphine ceased. No such effect of opioids on neuropathic pain has previously been reported. Using pharmacologic and genetic approaches, we discovered that the initiation and maintenance of this multimonth prolongation of neuropathic pain was mediated by a previously unidentified mechanism for spinal cord and pain-namely, morphine-induced spinal NOD-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasomes and associated release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). As spinal dorsal horn microglia expressed this signaling platform, these cells were selectively inhibited in vivo after transfection with a novel Designer Receptor Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADD). Multiday treatment with the DREADD-specific ligand clozapine-N-oxide prevented and enduringly reversed morphine-induced persistent sensitization for weeks to months after cessation of clozapine-N-oxide. These data demonstrate both the critical importance of microglia and that maintenance of chronic pain created by early exposure to opioids can be disrupted, resetting pain to normal. These data also provide strong support for the recent "two-hit hypothesis" of microglial priming, leading to exaggerated reactivity after the second challenge, documented here in the context of nerve injury followed by morphine. This study predicts that prolonged pain is an unrealized and clinically concerning consequence of the abundant use of opioids in chronic pain.

  6. Posttraumatic and postsurgical neuropathic pain responsive to treatment with capsaicin 8% topical patch.

    PubMed

    Zis, Panagiotis; Apsokardos, Alexandros; Isaia, Christina; Sykioti, Panagiota; Vadalouca, Athina

    2014-01-01

    Capsaicin 8% patch (Qutenza) is mainly used to treat postherpetic neuralgia and human immunodeficiency virus-associated neuropathy. However, evidence of the efficacy of Qutenza in other forms of neuropathic pain is lacking. A 24-year old Libyan man, with no previous medical history, sustained multiple wounds in the right side of the chest and back after a bomb explosion. The patient experienced pain, which persisted in a wide location around the surgical intervention for a long time, beyond the usual course of natural healing of an acute pain and was different from that suffered preoperatively. The characteristics of the pain included burning, electric shock-like sensation, tingling, and numbness, and it was paroxysmal. The pain was associated with hyperalgesia and intense allodynia in a wide area, approximately of 1,100 cm2. Our initial treatment strategy included pregabalin, tramadol, and duloxetine. However, our patient's pain responded to treatment with capsaicin 8% patch when the initial treatments showed only minimal effectiveness regarding the intensity of pain. Interestingly, the most important finding was that capsaicin 8% patch showed a more than 80% reduction of the area of allodynia associated with the pain, when other treatments failed. Moreover, although recent data showed that in patients who respond to Qutenza, analgesia starts within a few days of treatment and lasts on average 5 months, our patient showed an initial response within 7 days of treatment but a longer duration of more than 18 months. Although further controlled studies are needed to explore the efficacy of the capsaicin 8% patch in patients who experience posttraumatic neuropathic pain, we encourage clinicians to try the capsaicin 8% patch when alternative treatments fail.

  7. Dorsal root ganglion myeloid zinc finger protein 1 contributes to neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve trauma.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhisong; Gu, Xiyao; Sun, Linlin; Wu, Shaogen; Liang, Lingli; Cao, Jing; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Bekker, Alex; Zhang, Wei; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-04-01

    Peripheral nerve injury-induced changes in gene transcription and translation in primary sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) are considered to contribute to neuropathic pain genesis. Transcription factors control gene expression. Peripheral nerve injury increases the expression of myeloid zinc finger protein 1 (MZF1), a transcription factor, and promotes its binding to the voltage-gated potassium 1.2 (Kv1.2) antisense (AS) RNA gene in the injured DRG. However, whether DRG MZF1 participates in neuropathic pain is still unknown. Here, we report that blocking the nerve injury-induced increase of DRG MZF1 through microinjection of MZF1 siRNA into the injured DRG attenuated the initiation and maintenance of mechanical, cold, and thermal pain hypersensitivities in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve, without affecting locomotor functions and basal responses to acute mechanical, heat, and cold stimuli. Mimicking the nerve injury-induced increase of DRG MZF1 through microinjection of recombinant adeno-associated virus 5 expressing full-length MZF1 into the DRG produced significant mechanical, cold, and thermal pain hypersensitivities in naive rats. Mechanistically, MZF1 participated in CCI-induced reductions in Kv1.2 mRNA and protein and total Kv current and the CCI-induced increase in neuronal excitability through MZF1-triggered Kv1.2 AS RNA expression in the injured DRG neurons. MZF1 is likely an endogenous trigger of neuropathic pain and might serve as a potential target for preventing and treating this disorder.

  8. H2S and Pain: A Novel Aspect for Processing of Somatic, Visceral and Neuropathic Pain Signals.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yuka; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) formed by multiple enzymes including cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) targets Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels (T-channels) and transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1). Intraplantar and intracolonic administration of H2S donors promotes somatic and visceral pain, respectively, via activation of Cav3.2 and TRPA1 in rats and/or mice. Injection of H2S donors into the plantar tissues, pancreatic duct, colonic lumen, or bladder causes T-channel-dependent excitation of nociceptors, determined as phosphorylation of ERK or expression of Fos in the spinal dorsal horn. Electrophysiological studies demonstrate that exogenous and/or endogenous H2S facilitates membrane currents through T-channels in NG108-15 cells and isolated mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons that abundantly express Cav3.2 and also in Cav3.2-transfected HEK293 cells. In mice with cerulein-induced pancreatitis and cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis, visceral pain and/or referred hyperalgesia are inhibited by CSE inhibitors and by pharmacological blockade or genetic silencing of Cav3.2, and CSE protein is upregulated in the pancreas and bladder. In rats with neuropathy induced by L5 spinal nerve cutting or by repeated administration of paclitaxel, an anticancer drug, the neuropathic hyperalgesia is reversed by inhibitors of CSE or T-channels and by silencing of Cav3.2. Upregulation of Cav3.2 protein in DRG is detectable in the former, but not in the latter, neuropathic pain models. Thus, H2S appears to function as a nociceptive messenger by facilitating functions of Cav3.2 and TRPA1, and the enhanced function of the CSE/H2S/Cav3.2 pathway is considered to be involved in the pancreatitis- and cystitis-related pain and in neuropathic pain.

  9. Ganglioside GM3 synthase depletion reverses neuropathic pain and small fiber neuropathy in diet-induced diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraj, Nirupa D; Wilson, Heather M; Ren, Dongjun; Flood, Kelsey; Wang, Xiao-Qi; Shum, Andrew; Miller, Richard J; Paller, Amy S

    2016-01-01

    Background Small fiber neuropathy is a well-recognized complication of type 2 diabetes and has been shown to be responsible for both neuropathic pain and impaired wound healing. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that ganglioside GM3 depletion by knockdown of GM3 synthase fully reverses impaired wound healing in diabetic mice. However, the role of GM3 in neuropathic pain and small fiber neuropathy in diabetes is unknown. Purpose Determine whether GM3 depletion is able to reverse neuropathic pain and small fibers neuropathy and the mechanism of the reversal. Results We demonstrate that GM3 synthase knockout and the resultant GM3 depletion rescues the denervation in mouse footpad skin and fully reverses the neuropathic pain in diet-induced obese diabetic mice. In cultured dorsal root ganglia from diet-induced diabetic mice, GM3 depletion protects against increased intracellular calcium influx in vitro. Conclusions These studies establish ganglioside GM3 as a new candidate responsible for neuropathic pain and small fiber neuropathy in diabetes. Moreover, these observations indicate that systemic or topically applied interventions aimed at depleting GM3 may improve both the painful neuropathy and the wound healing impairment in diabetes by protecting against nerve end terminal degeneration, providing a disease-modifying approach to this common, currently intractable medical issue. PMID:27590073

  10. The Effect of Intrathecal Administration of Muscimol on Modulation of Neuropathic Pain Symptoms Resulting from Spinal Cord Injury; an Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Marjan; Karami, Zohreh; Janzadenh, Atousa; Jameie, Seyed Behnamedin; Haji Mashhadi, Zahra; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Nasirinezhad, Farinaz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Neuropathic pain can be very difficult to treat and it is one of the important medical challenging about pain treatments. Muscimol as a new agonist of gamma-Aminobutyric acid receptor type A (GABAA) have been introduced for pain management. Thus, the present study was performed to evaluate the pain alleviating effect of intrathecal injection of different doses of muscimol as GABAA receptor agonist in spinal cord injury (SCI) model of neuropathic pain. Methods: In the present experimental study, male Wistar rats were treated by muscimol 0.01, 0.1 or 1 µg/10ul, intrathecally (i.t.) three weeks after induction of spinal cord injury using compression injury model. Neuropathic pain symptoms were assessed at before treatment, 15 minutes, one hour and three hours after muscimol administration. The time of peak effect and optimum dosage was assessed by repeated measures analysis of variance and analysis of covariance, respectively. Results: Muscimol with the dose of 0.01 µg in 15 minutes caused to improve the thermal hyperalgesia (df: 24, 5; F= 6.6; p<0.001), mechanical hyperalgesia (df: 24, 5; F= 7.8; p<0.001), cold allodynia (df: 24, 5; F= 6.96; p<0.001), and mechanical allodynia (df: 24, 5; F= 15.7; p<0.001). The effect of doses of 0.1 µg and 1 µg were also significant. In addition, the efficacy of different doses of muscimol did not have difference on thermal hyperalgesia (df: 24, 5; F= 1.52; p= 0.24), mechanical hyperalgesia (df: 24, 5; F= 0.3; p= -0.75), cold allodynia (df: 24, 5; F= 0.8; p= -0.56), and mechanical allodynia (df: 24, 5; F= 1.75; p= 0.86). Conclusion: The finding of the present study revealed that using muscimol with doses of 0.01µg, 0.1µg, and 1 µg reduces the symptoms of neuropathic pain. In addition, the effect of GABAA agonist is short term and its effectiveness gradually decreases by time. PMID:26495371

  11. Characterization of cannabinoid-induced relief of neuropathic pain in a rat model of cisplatin-induced neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vera, Gema; Cabezos, Pablo Antonio; Martín, María Isabel; Abalo, Raquel

    2013-04-01

    Clinical use of antineoplastic drugs is associated with the development of numerous adverse effects that many patients find intolerable, including peripheral neuropathy. Cannabinoids have relieved neuropathic pain in different animal models. But their therapeutic activities could be affected by their psychoactive properties. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of cannabinoids in cisplatin-evoked neuropathy. For this purpose, the non-selective agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN), the CB1-selective agonist ACEA or the CB2-selective agonist JWH133 (or their vehicle) was either systemically administered at a non-psychoactive dose or locally injected in cisplatin-treated rats. Selective CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid antagonists (AM251 and SR144528, respectively) were used to characterize cannabinoid effects. Cisplatin-treated rats showed mechanical allodynia but not thermal hyperalgesia. Cannabinoid agonists alleviated mechanical allodynia. This effect was mediated by both CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors when the cannabinoid was systemically applied. At the dose used, cannabinoid agonists had no psychoactive effect. The local effect of the drug involved the activation of peripheral CB1 receptors whereas involvement of CB2 receptors was less clear. In a rat model of cisplatin-induced neuropathy, cannabinoids have an antinociceptive effect, but the cannabinoid receptors involved could be different depending on the route of administration. Non-psychoactive doses of cannabinoid agonists are capable of alleviating the signs of peripheral neuropathy when systemically applied. Interestingly, local administration of selective CB1 agonists or systemic administration of CB2 agonists, which are non-psychoactive, may serve as new therapeutic alternatives for symptom management in painful neuropathy associated with cisplatin treatment.

  12. Sacral neuromodulation as a treatment for neuropathic clitoral pain after abdominal hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Marcelissen, Tom; Van Kerrebroeck, Philip; de Wachter, Stefan

    2010-10-01

    Sacral neuromodulation (SNM) may be beneficial in the treatment of patients with chronic pelvic pain, although it is not an FDA-approved indication. We present a case of a 51-year-old patient that presented with symptoms of lower urinary tract dysfunction and clitoral pain after an abdominal hysterectomy. Electrophysiological evaluation suggested a pudendal nerve lesion. After failure of conservative treatment, she was offered SNM as a treatment for her voiding symptoms. During test stimulation, she experienced only moderate improvement in voiding symptoms, but a striking improvement in pain symptoms. She underwent a two-stage implantation of a neurostimulator with a successful outcome after 6 months' follow-up. The results of this report suggest that SNM may be effective in patients with neuropathic pelvic pain.

  13. A class of sulfonamide carbonic anhydrase inhibitors with neuropathic pain modulating effects.

    PubMed

    Carta, Fabrizio; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Pinard, Melissa; Ghelardini, Carla; Scozzafava, Andrea; McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-04-15

    A series of benzene sulfonamide carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors which incorporate lipophilic 4-alkoxy- and 4-aryloxy moieties, together with several derivatives of ethoxzolamide and sulfanilamide are reported. These derivatives were investigated as inhibitors of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) of which multiple isoforms are known, and some appear to be involved in pain. These sulfonamides showed modest inhibition against the cytosolic isoform CA I, but were generally effective, low nanomolar CA II, VII, IX and XII inhibitors. X-ray crystallographic data for the adduct of several such sulfonamides with CA II allowed us to rationalize the good inhibition data. In a mice model of neuropathic pain induced by oxaliplatin, one of the strong CA II/VII inhibitors reported here induced a long lasting pain relieving effect, a fact never observed earlier. This is the first report of rationally designed sulfonamide CA inhibitors with pain effective modulating effects.

  14. Stronger antinociceptive efficacy of opioids at the injured nerve trunk than at its peripheral terminals in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Labuz, Dominika; Machelska, Halina

    2013-09-01

    Activation of opioid receptors on peripheral sensory neurons has the potential for safe pain control, as it lacks centrally mediated side effects. While this approach often only partially suppressed neuropathic pain in animal models, opioids were mostly applied to animal paws although neuropathy was induced at the nerve trunk. Here we aimed to identify the most relevant peripheral site of opioid action for efficient antinociception in neuropathy. On days 2 and 14 following a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in mice, we evaluated dose and time relationships of the effects of μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptor agonists injected either at the CCI site or intraplantarly (i.pl.) into the lesioned nerve-innervated paw, on spontaneous paw lifting and heat and mechanical hypersensitivity (using Hargreaves and von Frey tests, respectively). We found that neither agonist diminished spontaneous paw lifting, despite the application site. Heat hypersensitivity was partially attenuated by i.pl. μ-receptor agonist only, while it was improved by all three agonists applied at the CCI site. Mechanical hypersensitivity was slightly diminished by all agonists administered i.pl., whereas it was completely blocked by all opioids injected at the CCI site. These antinociceptive effects were opioid receptor type-selective and site-specific. Thus, opioids might not be effective against spontaneous pain, but they improve heat and mechanical hypersensitivity in neuropathy. Importantly, efficient alleviation of hypersensitivity is governed by peripheral opioid receptors at the injured nerve trunk rather than at its peripheral terminals. Identifying the primary action site of analgesics is important for the development of adequate pain therapies.

  15. Complications related to the use of spinal cord stimulation for managing persistent postoperative neuropathic pain after lumbar spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Shamji, Mohammed F; Westwick, Harrison J; Heary, Robert F

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Structural spinal surgery yields improvement in pain and disability for selected patients with spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, or a herniated intervertebral disc. A significant fraction of patients exhibit persistent postoperative neuropathic pain (PPNP) despite technically appropriate intervention, and such patients can benefit from spinal cord stimulation (SCS) to alleviate suffering. The complication profile of this therapy has not been systematically assessed and, thus, was the goal of this review. METHODS A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify prospective cohorts of patients who had PPNP following structurally corrective lumbar spinal surgery and who underwent SCS device implantation. Data about study design, technique of SCS lead introduction, and complications encountered were collected and analyzed. Comparisons of complication incidence were performed between percutaneously and surgically implanted systems, with the level of significance set at 0.05. RESULTS Review of 11 studies involving 542 patients formed the basis of this work: 2 randomized controlled trials and 9 prospective cohorts. Percutaneous implants were used in 4 studies and surgical implants were used in 4 studies; in the remainder, the types were undefined. Lead migration occurred in 12% of cases, pain at the site of the implantable pulse generator occurred in 9% of cases, and wound-related complications occurred in 5% of cases; the latter 2 occurred more frequently among surgically implanted devices. CONCLUSIONS Spinal cord stimulation can provide for improved pain and suffering and for decreased narcotic medication use among patients with PPNP after lumbar spinal surgery. This study reviewed the prospective studies forming the evidence base for this therapy, to summarize the complications encountered and, thus, best inform patients and clinicians considering its use. There is a significant rate of minor complications, many of which require further surgical

  16. Opioids and TRPV1 in the peripheral control of neuropathic pain--Defining a target site in the injured nerve.

    PubMed

    Labuz, Dominika; Spahn, Viola; Celik, Melih Özgür; Machelska, Halina

    2016-02-01

    Targeting peripheral neuropathic pain at its origin may prevent the development of hypersensitivity. Recently we showed this can be mediated by opioid receptors at the injured nerve trunk. Here, we searched for the most relevant peripheral site to block transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), and investigated analgesic interactions between TRPV1 and opioids in neuropathy. In a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in mice, we assessed the effects of μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptor agonists and TRPV1 antagonist (SB366791) injected at the CCI site or into the injured nerve-innervated paw on spontaneous paw lifting, heat and mechanical sensitivity. We also examined TRPV1 expression in total membrane and plasma membrane fractions from nerves and paws. We found that opioids and SB366791 co-injected in per se nonanalgesic doses at the CCI site or into the paw diminished heat and mechanical sensitivity. SB366791 alone dose-dependently alleviated heat and mechanical sensitivity. TRPV1 blockade in the paw was more effective than at the CCI site. None of the treatments diminished spontaneous paw lifting. TRPV1 expression analysis suggests that the levels of functional TRPV1 do not critically determine the TRPV1 antagonist-mediated analgesia. Together, the identification of the primary action site in damaged nerves is crucial for effective pain control. Contrary to opioids, the TRPV1 blockade in the injured nerve peripheral terminals, rather than at the nerve trunk, appears promising against heat pain. Opioid/TRPV1 antagonist combinations at both locations partially reduced neuropathy-triggered heat and mechanical pain.

  17. Inhibition of AAK1 Kinase as a Novel Therapeutic Approach to Treat Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kostich, Walter; Hamman, Brian D.; Li, Yu-Wen; Naidu, Sreenivasulu; Dandapani, Kumaran; Feng, Jianlin; Easton, Amy; Bourin, Clotilde; Baker, Kevin; Allen, Jason; Savelieva, Katerina; Louis, Justin V.; Dokania, Manoj; Elavazhagan, Saravanan; Vattikundala, Pradeep; Sharma, Vivek; Das, Manish Lal; Shankar, Ganesh; Kumar, Anoop; Holenarsipur, Vinay K.; Gulianello, Michael; Molski, Ted; Brown, Jeffrey M.; Lewis, Martin; Huang, Yanling; Lu, Yifeng; Pieschl, Rick; O’Malley, Kevin; Lippy, Jonathan; Nouraldeen, Amr; Lanthorn, Thomas H.; Ye, Guilan; Wilson, Alan; Balakrishnan, Anand; Denton, Rex; Grace, James E.; Lentz, Kimberley A.; Santone, Kenneth S.; Bi, Yingzhi; Main, Alan; Swaffield, Jon; Carson, Ken; Mandlekar, Sandhya; Vikramadithyan, Reeba K.; Nara, Susheel J.; Dzierba, Carolyn; Bronson, Joanne; Macor, John E.; Zaczek, Robert; Westphal, Ryan; Kiss, Laszlo; Bristow, Linda; Conway, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    To identify novel targets for neuropathic pain, 3097 mouse knockout lines were tested in acute and persistent pain behavior assays. One of the lines from this screen, which contained a null allele of the adapter protein-2 associated kinase 1 (AAK1) gene, had a normal response in acute pain assays (hot plate, phase I formalin), but a markedly reduced response to persistent pain in phase II formalin. AAK1 knockout mice also failed to develop tactile allodynia following the Chung procedure of spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Based on these findings, potent, small-molecule inhibitors of AAK1 were identified. Studies in mice showed that one such inhibitor, LP-935509, caused a reduced pain response in phase II formalin and reversed fully established pain behavior following the SNL procedure. Further studies showed that the inhibitor also reduced evoked pain responses in the rat chronic constriction injury (CCI) model and the rat streptozotocin model of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Using a nonbrain-penetrant AAK1 inhibitor and local administration of an AAK1 inhibitor, the relevant pool of AAK1 for antineuropathic action was found to be in the spinal cord. Consistent with these results, AAK1 inhibitors dose-dependently reduced the increased spontaneous neural activity in the spinal cord caused by CCI and blocked the development of windup induced by repeated electrical stimulation of the paw. The mechanism of AAK1 antinociception was further investigated with inhibitors of α2 adrenergic and opioid receptors. These studies showed that α2 adrenergic receptor inhibitors, but not opioid receptor inhibitors, not only prevented AAK1 inhibitor antineuropathic action in behavioral assays, but also blocked the AAK1 inhibitor–induced reduction in spinal neural activity in the rat CCI model. Hence, AAK1 inhibitors are a novel therapeutic approach to neuropathic pain with activity in animal models that is mechanistically linked (behaviorally and electrophysiologically) to α2

  18. Evaluation of neuropathic pain occurring after high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy of oral tongue

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Kapoor, Rakesh; Ahuja, Chirag K.; Oinam, Arun S.; Ghoshal, Sushmita

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To recognize neuropathic pain as a complication of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy of oral tongue and to evaluate the possible causes of neuropathy. Material and methods Twenty one patients who underwent interstitial brachytherapy for early cancer of oral tongue were evaluated. The patients either underwent primary brachytherapy (42-48 Gy at 3-4 Gy/fraction) or a boost (18-24 Gy at 3 Gy/fraction) after external radiation to 40 Gy. Lingual nerve was the nerve concerned and the sublingual space (SLS) was contoured as its surrogate. Dosimetric parameters were correlated with onset of pain. Results Ten patients out of 21 (47.61%) developed painful neuropathy. Five patients of six (5/6) who underwent primary brachytherapy developed neuropathy. Five out of 15 (5/15) patients who underwent brachytherapy as a boost developed neuropathy. The patients who underwent primary brachytherapy were ten times more likely to develop neuropathy. Among the patients receiving boost treatment, the equivalent dose at 2 Gy/fraction (EQD2) to 2 cc of SLS was higher (39.25 Gy) in the patients who developed pain compared to those without pain (10.29 Gy). Conclusions This is the first report to recognize neuropathic pain as a complication of HDR brachytherapy of oral tongue. Patients undergoing primary brachytherapy were more likely to develop pain. Among other factors like dose to SLS, number of catheters, size of the primary tumor, and the dose rate, only dose to 2 cc of the SLS correlated with onset of pain. The SLS (containing the lingual nerve) may be considered an organ at risk to prevent the occurrence of this complication. PMID:26034495

  19. Inhibition of AAK1 Kinase as a Novel Therapeutic Approach to Treat Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Kostich, Walter; Hamman, Brian D; Li, Yu-Wen; Naidu, Sreenivasulu; Dandapani, Kumaran; Feng, Jianlin; Easton, Amy; Bourin, Clotilde; Baker, Kevin; Allen, Jason; Savelieva, Katerina; Louis, Justin V; Dokania, Manoj; Elavazhagan, Saravanan; Vattikundala, Pradeep; Sharma, Vivek; Das, Manish Lal; Shankar, Ganesh; Kumar, Anoop; Holenarsipur, Vinay K; Gulianello, Michael; Molski, Ted; Brown, Jeffrey M; Lewis, Martin; Huang, Yanling; Lu, Yifeng; Pieschl, Rick; O'Malley, Kevin; Lippy, Jonathan; Nouraldeen, Amr; Lanthorn, Thomas H; Ye, Guilan; Wilson, Alan; Balakrishnan, Anand; Denton, Rex; Grace, James E; Lentz, Kimberley A; Santone, Kenneth S; Bi, Yingzhi; Main, Alan; Swaffield, Jon; Carson, Ken; Mandlekar, Sandhya; Vikramadithyan, Reeba K; Nara, Susheel J; Dzierba, Carolyn; Bronson, Joanne; Macor, John E; Zaczek, Robert; Westphal, Ryan; Kiss, Laszlo; Bristow, Linda; Conway, Charles M; Zambrowicz, Brian; Albright, Charles F

    2016-09-01

    To identify novel targets for neuropathic pain, 3097 mouse knockout lines were tested in acute and persistent pain behavior assays. One of the lines from this screen, which contained a null allele of the adapter protein-2 associated kinase 1 (AAK1) gene, had a normal response in acute pain assays (hot plate, phase I formalin), but a markedly reduced response to persistent pain in phase II formalin. AAK1 knockout mice also failed to develop tactile allodynia following the Chung procedure of spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Based on these findings, potent, small-molecule inhibitors of AAK1 were identified. Studies in mice showed that one such inhibitor, LP-935509, caused a reduced pain response in phase II formalin and reversed fully established pain behavior following the SNL procedure. Further studies showed that the inhibitor also reduced evoked pain responses in the rat chronic constriction injury (CCI) model and the rat streptozotocin model of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Using a nonbrain-penetrant AAK1 inhibitor and local administration of an AAK1 inhibitor, the relevant pool of AAK1 for antineuropathic action was found to be in the spinal cord. Consistent with these results, AAK1 inhibitors dose-dependently reduced the increased spontaneous neural activity in the spinal cord caused by CCI and blocked the development of windup induced by repeated electrical stimulation of the paw. The mechanism of AAK1 antinociception was further investigated with inhibitors of α2 adrenergic and opioid receptors. These studies showed that α2 adrenergic receptor inhibitors, but not opioid receptor inhibitors, not only prevented AAK1 inhibitor antineuropathic action in behavioral assays, but also blocked the AAK1 inhibitor-induced reduction in spinal neural activity in the rat CCI model. Hence, AAK1 inhibitors are a novel therapeutic approach to neuropathic pain with activity in animal models that is mechanistically linked (behaviorally and electrophysiologically) to α2

  20. Morphine paradoxically prolongs neuropathic pain in rats by amplifying spinal NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Keith A.; Galer, Erika L.; Urban, Daniel J.; Wang, Xiaohui; Baratta, Michael V.; Fabisiak, Timothy J.; Anderson, Nathan D.; Cheng, Kejun; Greene, Lisa I.; Berkelhammer, Debra; Zhang, Yingning; Ellis, Amanda L.; Yin, Hang Hubert; Campeau, Serge; Rice, Kenner C.; Roth, Bryan L.; Maier, Steven F.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2016-01-01

    Opioid use for pain management has dramatically increased, with little assessment of potential pathophysiological consequences for the primary pain condition. Here, a short course of morphine, starting 10 d after injury in male rats, paradoxically and remarkably doubled the duration of chronic constriction injury (CCI)-allodynia, months after morphine ceased. No such effect of opioids on neuropathic pain has previously been reported. Using pharmacologic and genetic approaches, we discovered that the initiation and maintenance of this multimonth prolongation of neuropathic pain was mediated by a previously unidentified mechanism for spinal cord and pain—namely, morphine-induced spinal NOD-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasomes and associated release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). As spinal dorsal horn microglia expressed this signaling platform, these cells were selectively inhibited in vivo after transfection with a novel Designer Receptor Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADD). Multiday treatment with the DREADD-specific ligand clozapine-N-oxide prevented and enduringly reversed morphine-induced persistent sensitization for weeks to months after cessation of clozapine-N-oxide. These data demonstrate both the critical importance of microglia and that maintenance of chronic pain created by early exposure to opioids can be disrupted, resetting pain to normal. These data also provide strong support for the recent “two-hit hypothesis” of microglial priming, leading to exaggerated reactivity after the second challenge, documented here in the context of nerve injury followed by morphine. This study predicts that prolonged pain is an unrealized and clinically concerning consequence of the abundant use of opioids in chronic pain. PMID:27247388

  1. Efficient assessment of neuropathic pain drugs in patients with small fiber sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Ho, T W; Backonja, M; Ma, J; Leibensperger, H; Froman, S; Polydefkis, M

    2009-01-01

    We sought to develop an enrichment crossover study design that would allow us to efficiently evaluate and compare promising candidate neuropathic pain drugs. We evaluated the efficacy of gabapentin or tramadol vs. active placebo (diphenhydramine) in subjects with biopsy-proven painful idiopathic small fiber neuropathy (SFN) who were self-reported gabapentin responders. Eligible subjects entered two single blind run-in phases. In the first phase (Period A), subjects were treated with single blinded gabapentin at their prestudy dose followed by a second run-in phase (Period B) in which they were treated with diphenhydramine active placebo. Subjects with >or=3 pain and a >or=30% increase in pain intensity in Period B compared to Period A were then randomized to a double-blind three period cross over trial of gabapentin at pre study dosage, tramadol 50mg QID and diphenhydramine 50mgqhs. Of the 59 subjects enrolled, 41 subjects were excluded: Twenty-three had an insufficient rise in pain intensity in Period B; eight had skin biopsies that did not confirm SFN. Eighteen subjects were randomized into the double-blind, crossover phase. There was a significant treatment effect of gabapentin vs. diphenhydramine (p=0.001) and tramadol vs. diphenhydramine (p=0.018) by the before-bed daily pain score averaged over the final 7 days of each treatment period. We conclude that gabapentin and tramadol were effective in the treatment of painful SFN and that this experimental enrichment paradigm is attractive to screen potential neuropathic pain compounds for efficacy in proof-of-concept studies.

  2. Effects of tianeptine on the development and maintenance of mechanical allodynia in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Heo, Bong Ha; Shin, Jae Yun; Park, Keun Suk; Lee, Hyung Gon; Choi, Jeong Il; Yoon, Myung Ha; Kim, Woong Mo

    2016-10-28

    We validate the analgesic efficacy of tianeptine by different administration routes and timing in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain was induced by ligating the L5 and L6 spinal nerves in male Sprague-Dawley rats, and mechanical allodynia was assessed using von Frey filaments. The effects of orally administered tianeptine and pretreatment with tianeptine (intrathecally or intraperitoneally) on mechanical allodynia were assessed. Oral and preemptive intrathecal administration of tianeptine significantly increased the paw withdrawal threshold but preemptive intraperitoneal administration did not. Nevertheless, intraperitoneal pretreatment of tianeptine potentiated the antiallodynic effects of subsequently administered tianeptine. These findings suggest that tianeptine may be effective for preventing and treating neuropathic pain and that it can be used more widely in clinical pain practice.

  3. A critical review of controlled clinical trials for peripheral neuropathic pain and complex regional pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kingery, W S

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this review was to identify and analyze the controlled clinical trial data for peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP) and complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS). A total of 72 articles were found, which included 92 controlled drug trials using 48 different treatments. The methods of these studies were critically reviewed and the results summarized and compared. The PNP trial literature gave consistent support (two or more trials) for the analgesic effectiveness of tricyclic antidepressants, intravenous and topical lidocaine, intravenous ketamine, carbamazepine and topical aspirin. There was limited support (one trial) for the analgesic effectiveness of oral, topical and epidural clonidine and for subcutaneous ketamine. The trial data were contradictory for mexiletine, phenytoin, topical capsaicin, oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication, and intravenous morphine. Analysis of the trial methods indicated that mexiletine and intravenous morphine were probably effective analgesics for PNP, while non-steroidals were probably ineffective. Codeine, magnesium chloride, propranolol, lorazepam, and intravenous phentolamine all failed to provide analgesia in single trials. There were no long-term data supporting the analgesic effectiveness of any drug and the etiology of the neuropathy did not predict treatment outcome. Review of the controlled trial literature for CRPS identified several potential problems with current clinical practices. The trial data only gave consistent support for analgesia with corticosteroids, which had long-term effectiveness. There was limited support for the analgesic effectiveness of topical dimethylsulfoxyde (DMSO), epidural clonidine and intravenous regional blocks (IVRBs) with bretylium and ketanserin. The trial data were contradictory for intranasal calcitonin and intravenous phentolamine and analysis of the trial methods indicated that both treatments were probably ineffective for most patients. There were consistent trial

  4. Lycopene attenuates thermal hyperalgesia in a diabetic mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Kuhad, Anurag; Sharma, Sameer; Chopra, Kanwaljit

    2008-07-01

    Diabetic neuropathic pain, an important microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus is recognized as one of the most difficult types of pain to treat. The development of tolerance, inadequate relief and potential toxicity of classical antinociceptives warrant the investigation of the newer agents to relieve this pain. The aim of the present study was to explore the antinociceptive effect of lycopene and its effect on tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and nitric oxide (NO) release in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice. Four weeks after a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (200 mg/kg), mice were tested in the tail immersion and hot-plate assays. Diabetic mice exhibited significant hyperalgesia alongwith increased plasma glucose and decreased body weights as compared with control mice. Lycopene (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg body weight; per oral) treatment, from the 4th to 8th week after streptozotocin injection, significantly attenuated thermal hyperalgesia and the hot-plate latencies. Lycopene also inhibited the TNF-alpha and NO release in a dose dependent manner. These results indicate an antinociceptive activity of lycopene possibly through its inhibitory action on NO and TNF-alpha release and point towards its potential to attenuate diabetic neuropathic pain.

  5. The Effect of Repeated Electroacupuncture Analgesia on Neurotrophic and Cytokine Factors in Neuropathic Pain Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junying; Duanmu, Chenlin; Feng, Xiumei; Yan, Yaxia

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a common disability influencing quality of life. Results of previous studies showed that acupuncture has a cumulative analgesic effect, but the relationship with spinal cytokines neurotrophic factors released by astrocytes remains unknown. The present study was designed to observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) treatment on spinal cytokines neurotrophic factors in chronic neuropathic pain rats. The chronic neuropathic pain was established by chronic constrictive injury (CCI). EA treatment was applied at Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34) (both bilateral) once a day, for 30 min. IL-1β mRNA, TNF-α mRNA, and IL-1 mRNA were detected by quantitative real-time PCR, and the proteins of BDNF, NGF, and NT3/4 were detected by Western blot. The expression levels of cytokines such as IL-1β mRNA, TNF-α mRNA, IL-6 mRNA, and neurotrophic factors such as BDNF, NGF, and NT3/4 in the spinal cord were increased significantly after CCI. The astrocytes released more IL-1β and BDNF after CCI. Repeated EA treatment could suppress the elevated expression of IL-1β mRNA, TNFα mRNA, and BDNF, NGF, and NT3/4 but had no effect on IL-6 mRNA. It is suggested that cytokines and neurotrophic factors which may be closely associated with astrocytes participated in the process of EA relieving chronic pain. PMID:27800006

  6. Combined Effects of Bee Venom Acupuncture and Morphine on Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woojin; Kim, Min Joon; Go, Donghyun; Min, Byung-Il; Na, Heung Sik; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a chemotherapeutic drug for colorectal cancer, induces severe peripheral neuropathy. Bee venom acupuncture (BVA) has been used to attenuate pain, and its effect is known to be mediated by spinal noradrenergic and serotonergic receptors. Morphine is a well-known opioid used to treat different types of pain. Here, we investigated whether treatment with a combination of these two agents has an additive effect on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain in mice. To assess cold and mechanical allodynia, acetone and von Frey filament tests were used, respectively. Significant allodynia signs were observed three days after an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.). BVA (0.25, 1, and 2.5 mg/kg, s.c., ST36) or morphine (0.5, 2, and 5 mg/kg, i.p.) alone showed dose-dependent anti-allodynic effects. The combination of BVA and morphine at intermediate doses showed a greater and longer effect than either BVA or morphine alone at the highest dose. Intrathecal pretreatment with the opioidergic (naloxone, 20 μg) or 5-HT3 (MDL-72222, 15 μg) receptor antagonist, but not with α2-adrenergic (idazoxan, 10 μg) receptor antagonist, blocked this additive effect. Therefore, we suggest that the combination effect of BVA and morphine is mediated by spinal opioidergic and 5-HT3 receptors and this combination has a robust and enduring analgesic action against oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:26805884

  7. Combined Effects of Bee Venom Acupuncture and Morphine on Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woojin; Kim, Min Joon; Go, Donghyun; Min, Byung-Il; Na, Heung Sik; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2016-01-22

    Oxaliplatin, a chemotherapeutic drug for colorectal cancer, induces severe peripheral neuropathy. Bee venom acupuncture (BVA) has been used to attenuate pain, and its effect is known to be mediated by spinal noradrenergic and serotonergic receptors. Morphine is a well-known opioid used to treat different types of pain. Here, we investigated whether treatment with a combination of these two agents has an additive effect on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain in mice. To assess cold and mechanical allodynia, acetone and von Frey filament tests were used, respectively. Significant allodynia signs were observed three days after an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.). BVA (0.25, 1, and 2.5 mg/kg, s.c., ST36) or morphine (0.5, 2, and 5 mg/kg, i.p.) alone showed dose-dependent anti-allodynic effects. The combination of BVA and morphine at intermediate doses showed a greater and longer effect than either BVA or morphine alone at the highest dose. Intrathecal pretreatment with the opioidergic (naloxone, 20 μg) or 5-HT3 (MDL-72222, 15 μg) receptor antagonist, but not with α2 adrenergic (idazoxan, 10 μg) receptor antagonist, blocked this additive effect. Therefore, we suggest that the combination effect of BVA and morphine is mediated by spinal opioidergic and 5-HT3 receptors and this combination has a robust and enduring analgesic action against oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain.

  8. Intraspinal transplantation of GABAergic neural progenitors attenuates neuropathic pain in rats: a pharmacologic and neurophysiological evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Jergova, Stanislava; Hentall, Ian D.; Gajavelli, Shyam; Varghese, Mathew S.; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunctional γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory neurotransmission is hypothesized to underlie chronic neuropathic pain. Intraspinal transplantation of GABAergic neural progenitor cells (NPCs) may reduce neuropathic pain by restoring dorsal horn inhibition. Rat NPCs pre-differentiated to a GABAergic phenotype were transplanted into the dorsal horn of rats with unilateral chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. GABA signaling in antinociceptive effects of NPC grafts was tested with the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (BIC), GABAB receptor antagonist CGP35348 (CGP) and GABA reuptake inhibitor SKF 89976A (SKF). NPC-treated animals showed decreased hyperalgesia and allodynia 1-3 week post-transplantation; vehicle-injected CCI rats continued displaying pain behaviors. Intrathecal application of BIC or CGP attenuated the antinociceptive effects of the NPC transplants while SKF injection induced analgesia in control rats. Electrophysiological recordings in NPC treated rats showed reduced responses of wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons to peripheral stimulation compared to controls. A spinal application of BIC or CGP increased wind-up response and post-discharges of WDR neurons in NPC treated animals. Results suggest that transplantation of GABAergic NPCs attenuate pain behaviors and reduce exaggerated dorsal horn neuronal firing induced by CCI. The effects of GABA receptor inhibitors suggest participation of continuously released GABA in the grafted animals. PMID:22193109

  9. Pioglitazone rapidly reduces neuropathic pain through astrocyte and non-genomic PPARγ mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Ryan B.; Donahue, Renee R.; Morgenweck, Jenny; Grace, Peter M.; Sutton, Amanda; Watkins, Linda R.; Taylor, Bradley K.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated administration of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists reduces neuropathic pain-like behavior and associated changes in glial activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn. As PPARγ is a nuclear receptor, sustained changes in gene expression are widely believed to be the mechanism of pain reduction. However, we recently reported that a single intrathecal injection of pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, reduced hyperalgesia within 30 minutes, a time frame that is typically less than that required for genomic mechanisms. To determine the very rapid anti-hyperalgesic actions of PPARγ activation we administered pioglitazone to rats with spared nerve injury (SNI) and evaluated hyperalgesia. Pioglitazone inhibited hyperalgesia within 5 min of injection, consistent with a non-genomic mechanism. Systemic or intrathecal administration of GW9662, a PPARγ antagonist, inhibited the anti-hyperalgesic actions of intraperitoneal or intrathecal pioglitazone, suggesting a spinal PPARγ-dependent mechanism. To further address the contribution of non-genomic mechanisms, we blocked new protein synthesis in the spinal cord with anisomycin. When co-administered intrathecally, anisomycin did not change pioglitazone anti-hyperalgesia at an early 7.5 min timepoint, further supporting a rapid non-genomic mechanism. At later timepoints anisomycin reduced pioglitazone anti-hyperalgesia, suggesting a delayed recruitment of genomic mechanisms. Pioglitazone reduction of SNI-induced increases in GFAP expression occurred more rapidly than expected, within 60 min. We are the first to show that activation of spinal PPARγ rapidly reduces neuropathic pain independent from canonical genomic activity. We conclude that acute pioglitazone inhibits neuropathic pain in part by reducing astrocyte activation, and via both genomic and non-genomic PPARγ mechanisms. PMID:25599238

  10. The Anticonvulsant Enaminone E139 Attenuates Paclitaxel-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Dhandapani; Edafiogho, Ivan Ogheneochuko

    2013-01-01

    The enaminone methyl 4-(4′-bromophenyl)aminocyclohex-3-en-6-methyl-2-oxo-1-oate (E139) has anticonvulsant activities. It has been reported to have a better safety profile than some anticonvulsant drugs. Since some anticonvulsant drugs are used in the management of neuropathic pain, we evaluated the effects of E139 in rodent models of acute pain and paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain. The reaction latency to thermal stimuli (hot-plate test) of BALB/c mice was recorded before and after intraperitoneal treatment with paclitaxel (2 mg/kg, i.p. for 5 consecutive days), and after treatment with E139 (0.1–40 mg/kg), amitriptyline (10 mg/kg), and gabapentin (10 and 30 mg/kg). Mechanical allodynia in paclitaxel-treated Sprague Dawley (SD) rats was measured using a dynamic plantar aesthesiometer before and after treatment with E139 (10 and 20 mg/kg) or its vehicle for four consecutive days from day 7 after first administration of paclitaxel (16 mg/kg on two alternate days). Administration of E139 (10–40 mg/kg) produced antinociceptive activity against thermal nociception in naïve mice. Treatment with E139, amitriptyline, or gabapentin reduced paclitaxel-induced thermal hyperalgesia. E139 reduced paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia, with the effects lasting longer (24 h) after repetitive dosing. Our results indicate that E139 has antinociceptive activity and attenuates paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain in rodents. PMID:24385872

  11. Effect of photobiomodulation therapy (808 nm) in the control of neuropathic pain in mice.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Ana Laura Martins; Bossini, Paulo Sérgio; do Canto De Souza, Azair Liane Matos; Sanchez, Ariane Dutra; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio

    2017-03-10

    Neuropathic pain can be defined as the pain initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction of the central or peripheral nervous system. Photobiomodulation therapy (PBM) stands out among the physical therapy resources used for analgesia. However, application parameters, especially the energy density, remain controversial in the literature. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the PBM effect, in different energy densities to control neuropathic pain in mice. Fifty (50) mice were induced to neuropathy by chronic constriction surgery of the sciatic nerve (CCI), treated with PBM (808 nm), and divided into five groups: GP (PBM simulation), GS (sham), GL10, GL20, GL40 (energy density of 10, 20, and 40 J/cm(2), respectively). The evaluations were carried out using the hot plate test and Randall and Selitto test, before and after the CCI surgery, every 15 days during the 90 days experiment. β-Endorphin blood dosage was also tested. For both the hot plate and Randall and Selitto tests, the GL20 and GL40 groups presented reduction of the nociceptive threshold from the 30th day of treatment, the GL10 group only after day 75, and the GP group did not show any improvement throughout the experiment. The β-endorphin dosage was higher for all groups when compared to the GP group. However, only the GL20 group and GL40 presented a significant increase. This study demonstrates that PBM in higher energy density (20, 40 J/cm(2)) is more effective in the control of neuropathic pain.

  12. Effect of artemisinin on neuropathic pain mediated by P2X4 receptor in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Ying, Mofeng; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Tengling; Jiang, Chenxu; Gong, Yingxin; Wu, Bing; Zou, Lifang; Yi, Zhihua; Rao, Shenqiang; Li, Guilin; Zhang, Chunping; Jia, Tianyu; Zhao, Shanhong; Yuan, Huilong; Shi, Liran; Li, Lin; Liang, Shangdong; Liu, Shuangmei

    2017-02-09

    Neuropathic pain is a type of chronic pain caused by nervous system damage and dysfunction. The pathogenesis of chronic pain is complicated, and there are no effective therapies for neuropathic pain. Studies show that the P2X4 receptor expressed in the satellite glial cells (SGCs) of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) is related to neuropathic pain. Artemisinin is a monomeric component extracted from traditional Chinese medicine and has a variety of important pharmacological effects and potential applications. This study observed the effect of artemisinin on neuropathic pain and delineated its possible mechanism. The chronic constriction injury (CCI) rat model was used in this study. The results demonstrated that artemisinin relieved pain behaviors in the CCI rats, inhibited the expression of P2X4 receptor in the DRG, and decreased the ATP-activated currents in HEK293 cells transfected with P2X4 plasmid. Dual-labeling immunofluorescence showed that the coexpression of P2X4 receptor and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the DRG of CCI rats was increased compared to control rats. After CCI rats were treated with artemisinin, the coexpression of P2X4 receptor and GFAP in the DRG was significantly decreased compared to the CCI group. This finding suggested that artemisinin could inhibit the nociceptive transmission mediated by P2X4 receptor in the DRG SGCs and thus relieve pain behaviors in the CCI rats.

  13. Neuropathic pain develops normally in mice lacking both Nav1.7 and Nav1.8

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Mohammed A; Levato, Alessandra; Stirling, L Caroline; Wood, John N

    2005-01-01

    Two voltage gated sodium channel α-subunits, Nav1.7 and Nav1.8, are expressed at high levels in nociceptor terminals and have been implicated in the development of inflammatory pain. Mis-expression of voltage-gated sodium channels by damaged sensory neurons has also been implicated in the development of neuropathic pain, but the role of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 is uncertain. Here we show that deleting Nav1.7 has no effect on the development of neuropathic pain. Double knockouts of both Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 also develop normal levels of neuropathic pain, despite a lack of inflammatory pain symptoms and altered mechanical and thermal acute pain thresholds. These studies demonstrate that, in contrast to the highly significant role for Nav1.7 in determining inflammatory pain thresholds, the development of neuropathic pain does not require the presence of either Nav1.7 or Nav1.8 alone or in combination. PMID:16111501

  14. Safety and Utility of Quantitative Sensory Testing among Adults with Sickle Cell Disease: Indicators of Neuropathic Pain?

    PubMed Central

    Ezenwa, Miriam O.; Molokie, Robert E.; Wang, Zaijie Jim; Yao, Yingwei; Suarez, Marie L.; Pullum, Cherese; Schlaeger, Judith M.; Fillingim, Roger B.; Wilkie, Diana J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Pain is the hallmark symptom of sickle cell disease (SCD), yet the types of pain that these patients experience, and the underlying mechanisms, have not been well characterized. The study purpose was to determine the safety and utility of a mechanical and thermal quantitative sensory testing (QST) protocol and the feasibility of utilizing neuropathic pain questionnaires among adults with SCD. Methods A convenience sample (N=25, 18 women, mean age 38.5 ± 12.5 [20–58 years]) completed self-report pain and quality-of-life tools. Subjects also underwent testing with the TSA-II NeuroSensory Analyzer and calibrated von Frey microfilaments. Results We found that the QST protocol was safe and did not stimulate a SCD pain crisis. There was evidence of central sensitization (n=15), peripheral sensitization (n=1), a mix of central and peripheral sensitization (n=8), or no sensitization (n=1). The neuropathic pain self-report tools were feasible with evidence of construct validity; 40% of the subjects reported S-LANSS scores that were indicative of neuropathic pain and had evidence of central, peripheral or mixed sensitization. Discussion The QST protocol can be safely conducted in adults with SCD and provides evidence of central or peripheral sensitization, which is consistent with a neuropathic component to SCD pain. These findings are novel, warrant a larger confirmatory study, and indicate the need for normative QST data from African American adults and older adults. PMID:25581383

  15. Prophylactic treatment with the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine prevents development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain through activation of endogenous analgesic systems.

    PubMed

    Deng, Liting; Lee, Wan-Hung; Xu, Zhili; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2016-12-01

    Neuropathic pain impacts approximately 3-4.5% of the global population and remains an unresolved health problem. The management of neuropathic pain has two distinct goals-prevention of development and control of established neuropathic pain. We examined the impact of both prophylactic and therapeutic treatments with the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine on the development and maintenance of toxic neuropathic pain induced by the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel. We also investigated the involvement of endogenous analgesic (i.e., endogenous opioid and endocannabinoid) systems in the antinociceptive actions of desipramine in these two distinct phases of neuropathic pain. Chronic subcutaneous infusion of desipramine via osmotic pumps suppressed both the development and maintenance of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain. However, only prophylactic desipramine treatment blocked the development of neuropathic pain throughout the three month observation interval; neuropathic pain did not return. The opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocked the antinociceptive effects of both prophylactic and therapeutic desipramine treatments throughout the entire timecourse of desipramine-induced antinociception. By contrast, cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists partially attenuated the antinociceptive actions of desipramine in a manner that was restricted to the development phase of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain only. Paclitaxel decreased cell viability in TMD231 tumor cells in an MTT assay in vitro. Notably, desipramine (1nM-1μM) alone did not alter tumor cell viability and did not prevent the cytotoxic effects of paclitaxel under identical conditions. The highest concentration of desipramine (10μM) reduced tumor cell viability alone and enhanced the cytotoxic effects of paclitaxel. Our study identifies a previously unrecognized preemptive analgesic strategy that prevents development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain, and also dissects receptor mechanisms

  16. High-resolution transcriptome analysis reveals neuropathic pain gene-expression signatures in spinal microglia after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Heejin; Na, Young-Ji; Lee, Kihwan; Kim, Yong Ho; Lee, Yunsin; Kang, Minho; Jiang, Bao-Chun; Yeom, Young Il; Wu, Long-Jun; Gao, Yong-Jing; Kim, Junhyong; Oh, Seog Bae

    2016-04-01

    Microglial cells, the resident immune cells of the spinal cord, become activated in response to peripheral nerve injury. Microglia activation contributes to the development of neuropathic pain. Here we employed microarray analysis of individually collected pools of 10 spinal microglia cells to identify changes of levels and cell-to-cell expression variance of microglial genes during their activation after peripheral nerve injury. The analysis of microglia on postoperative day 1 (POD1) identified miR-29c as a critical factor for microglial activation and the development of neuropathic pain. Early POD1 microglia exhibited a very distinct expression profile compared to late POD7 microglia, possibly leading to the transition from initiation to maintenance of neuropathic pain. We found sample variance patterns that were consistent with the hypothesis that microglia were highly heterogeneous at the level of individual cells, and variation analysis identified 56 microglial genes potentially linked to the maintenance of neuropathic pain which included Gria1. This study provides insights into spinal microglial biology and reveals novel microglial targets for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  17. Somatosensory Rehabilitation for Neuropathic Pain in Burn Survivors: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Calva, Valerie; Chouinard, Annick; Couture, Marie-Andrée; Godbout, Elisabeth; de Oliveira, Ana; LaSalle, Léo

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is an enormous rehabilitation challenge that has a substantial negative effect on patient function and quality of life. Somatosensory rehabilitation is a novel, nonpharmacological intervention described by Spicher based on the neuroplasticity of the somatosensory system. The rationale for somatosensory rehabilitation is that treating hypoesthesia will decrease neuropathic pain. Particularly for those with established neuropathic pain, the hypoesthesia may be masked by mechanical allodynia, which must be treated before treating the underlying hyposensitive zone. This case series describes the outcome of 17 burn survivors treated with somatosensory rehabilitation for their neuropathic pain. Before initiating treatment a modified version of the McGill Pain Questionnaire-short form (Questionnaire de la douleur St. Antoine, QDSA) was completed with the patients. The total score (×/64) was converted to percentage. The mechanical allodynia was assessed with the Rainbow Pain Scale that uses touch with the 15-g Semmes Weinstein Monofilaments (SWMs) and that was rated as painful on the visual analog scale (3/10 or resting pain + 1/10), as the criteria for mechanical allodynia. The severity level was assessed using seven predetermined SWMs to identify the smallest that elicited pain. The treatment consisted of avoiding all touch in the allodynic zone while concurrently providing proximal sensory and vibratory counter stimulation. Once the mechanical allodynia was eliminated, the underlying hypoesthesia was treated. Hypoesthesia was evaluated with the SWMs, and the percent improvement from baseline was calculated. The sensory reeducation treatment for hypoesthesia consisted of touch discrimination, texture perception, and vibratory stimulation. Seventeen patients (71/29% male/female, 21 ± 25% TBSA burned, 486 ± 596 days postburn) were evaluated and treated. Of these 15 initially presented with mechanical allodynia. The SWM scores had improved by 27 ± 21

  18. Meta-analysis of placebo responses in central neuropathic pain: impact of subject, study, and pain characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cragg, Jacquelyn J; Warner, Freda M; Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Jensen, Mark P; Mercier, Catherine; Richards, John Scott; Wrigley, Paul; Soler, Dolors; Kramer, John L K

    2016-03-01

    The placebo response is a complex construct related to psychobiological effects, as well as natural history and regression to the mean. Moreover, patient and study design characteristics have also been proposed as significantly affecting placebo responses. The aim of the current investigation was to identify factors that contribute to variable placebo responses in clinical trials involving individuals with central neuropathic pain. To this end, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials examining pharmacological and noninvasive brain stimulation interventions for central neuropathic pain. Study design, subject characteristics, and pain ratings for the placebo group were extracted from each trial. Pooling of results and identification of moderating factors were carried out using random effects meta-analysis and meta-regression techniques. A total of 39 published trials met the inclusion criteria (spinal cord injury, n = 26; stroke, n = 6; multiple sclerosis, n = 7). No significant publication bias was detected. Overall, there was a significant effect for placebo to reduce central pain (-0.64, CI: -0.83 to -0.45). Smaller placebo responses were associated with crossover-design studies, longer pain duration, and greater between-subject baseline pain variability. There were no significant effects for neurological condition (stroke vs multiple sclerosis vs spinal cord injury) or the type of intervention (eg, pharmacological vs noninvasive brain stimulation). In a planned subanalysis, the severity of damage in the spinal cord also had no significant effect on the placebo response. Further study is warranted to identify factors that may explain the impact of pain duration on the placebo response at the individual subject level.

  19. [Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Schuler, U; Heller, S

    2017-03-14

    The perception of the media is that chemotherapy is mainly associated with nausea, vomiting and hair loss. In the longer term the development of peripheral neuropathy, i.e. chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is often more important for patients. The CIPN represents a side effect of many antineoplastic substances with severe functional impairment and its prevention and treatment is an important task. In addition to many interventions, which have been shown to be ineffective, physiotherapeutic measures and possibly the prophylactic application of cold are helpful for prevention. Randomized studies on the treatment of painful CIPN provided positive data for duloxetine and to a lesser extent for venlafaxine.

  20. TRPA1 mediates trigeminal neuropathic pain in mice downstream of monocytes/macrophages and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Gabriela; Benemei, Silvia; Materazzi, Serena; De Logu, Francesco; De Siena, Gaetano; Fusi, Camilla; Fortes Rossato, Mateus; Coppi, Elisabetta; Marone, Ilaria Maddalena; Ferreira, Juliano; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Nassini, Romina

    2016-05-01

    Despite intense investigation, the mechanisms of the different forms of trigeminal neuropathic pain remain substantially unidentified. The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel (encoded by TRPA1) has been reported to contribute to allodynia or hyperalgesia in some neuropathic pain models, including those produced by sciatic nerve constriction. However, the role of TRPA1 and the processes that cause trigeminal pain-like behaviours from nerve insult are poorly understood. The role of TRPA1, monocytes and macrophages, and oxidative stress in pain-like behaviour evoked by the constriction of the infraorbital nerve in mice were explored. C57BL/6 and wild-type (Trpa1(+/+)) mice that underwent constriction of the infraorbital nerve exhibited prolonged (20 days) non-evoked nociceptive behaviour and mechanical, cold and chemical hypersensitivity in comparison to sham-operated mice (P < 0.05-P < 0.001). Both genetic deletion of Trpa1 (Trpa1(-/-)) and pharmacological blockade (HC-030031 and A-967079) abrogated pain-like behaviours (both P < 0.001), which were abated by the antioxidant, α-lipoic acid, and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor, apocynin (both P < 0.001). Nociception and hypersensitivity evoked by constriction of the infraorbital nerve was associated with intra- and perineural monocytic and macrophagic invasion and increased levels of oxidative stress by-products (hydrogen peroxide and 4-hydroxynonenal). Attenuation of monocyte/macrophage increase by systemic treatment with an antibody against the monocyte chemoattractant chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) or the macrophage-depleting agent, clodronate (both P < 0.05), was associated with reduced hydrogen peroxide and 4-hydroxynonenal perineural levels and pain-like behaviours (all P < 0.01), which were abated by perineural administration of HC-030031, α-lipoic acid or the anti-CCL2 antibody (all P < 0.001). The present findings propose that, in the constriction of the

  1. Pregabalin, the lidocaine plaster and duloxetine in patients with refractory neuropathic pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients frequently fail to receive adequate pain relief from, or are intolerant of, first-line therapies prescribed for neuropathic pain (NeP). This refractory chronic pain causes psychological distress and impacts patient quality of life. Published literature for treatment in refractory patients is sparse and often published as conference abstracts only. The aim of this study was to identify published data for three pharmacological treatments: pregabalin, lidocaine plaster, and duloxetine, which are typically used at 2nd line or later in UK patients with neuropathic pain. Methods A systematic review of the literature databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and CCTR was carried out and supplemented with extensive conference and grey literature searching. Studies of any design (except single patient case studies) that enrolled adult patients with refractory NeP were included in the review and qualitatively assessed. Results Seventeen studies were included in the review: nine of pregabalin, seven of the lidocaine plaster, and one of duloxetine. No head-to-head studies of these treatments were identified. Only six studies included treatments within UK licensed indications and dose ranges. Reported efficacy outcomes were not consistent between studies. Pain scores were most commonly assessed in studies including pregabalin; trials of pregabalin and the lidocaine plaster reported the proportion of responders. Significant improvements in the total, sensory and affective scores of the Short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire, and in function interference, sleep interference and pain associated distress, were associated with pregabalin treatment; limited or no quality of life data were available for the other two interventions. Limitations to the review are the small number of included studies, which are generally small, of poor quality and heterogeneous in patient population and study design. Conclusions Little evidence is available relevant to the treatment of refractory

  2. Chemokine contribution to neuropathic pain: respective induction of CXCL1 and CXCR2 in spinal cord astrocytes and neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Cao, De-Li; Zhang, Xin; Ji, Ru-Rong; Gao, Yong-Jing

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have indicated an important role of chemokines such as CCL2 in the development of chronic pain. However, the distinct roles of different chemokines in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain and in their interactions with neurons have not been clearly elucidated. We found that spinal nerve ligation (SNL) not only induced persistent neuropathic pain symptoms, including mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia, but also produced sustained CXCL1 upregulation in the spinal cord. Double staining of immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization revealed that CXCL1 was primarily induced in spinal astrocytes. In cultured astrocytes, tumor necrosis factor-α induced robust CXCL1 expression via the activation of the c-jun N-terminal kinase. Intrathecal administration of CXCL1 neutralizing antibody transiently reduced SNL-induced pain hypersensitivity, suggesting an essential role of CXCL1 in neuropathic pain sensitization. In particular, intraspinal delivery of CXCL1 shRNA lentiviral vectors, either before or after SNL, persistently attenuated SNL-induced pain hypersensitivity. Spinal application of CXCL1 not only elicited pain hypersensitivity but also induced rapid neuronal activation, as indicated by the expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and cAMP response element binding protein, and c-Fos in spinal cord neurons. Interestingly, CXCR2, the primary receptor of CXCL1, was upregulated in dorsal horn neurons after SNL, and the CXCR2 antagonist SB225002 completely blocked the CXCL1-induced heat hyperalgesia. SB225002 also attenuated SNL-induced pain hypersensitivity. Collectively, our results have demonstrated a novel form of chemokine-mediated glial-neuronal interaction in the spinal cord that can drive neuropathic pain. Inhibition of the CXCL1-CXCR2 signaling may offer a new therapy for neuropathic pain management.

  3. Neuropathic pain-induced depressive-like behavior and hippocampal neurogenesis and plasticity are dependent on TNFR1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Dellarole, Anna; Morton, Paul; Brambilla, Roberta; Walters, Winston; Summers, Spencer; Bernardes, Danielle; Grilli, Mariagrazia; Bethea, John R

    2014-10-01

    Patients suffering from neuropathic pain have a higher incidence of mood disorders such as depression. Increased expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been reported in neuropathic pain and depressive-like conditions and most of the pro-inflammatory effects of TNF are mediated by the TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1). Here we sought to investigate: (1) the occurrence of depressive-like behavior in chronic neuropathic pain and the associated forms of hippocampal plasticity, and (2) the involvement of TNFR1-mediated TNF signaling as a possible regulator of such events. Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and TNFR1(-/-) mice. Anhedonia, weight loss and physical state were measured as symptoms of depression. Hippocampal neurogenesis, neuroplasticity, myelin remodeling and TNF/TNFRs expression were analyzed by immunohistochemical analysis and western blot assay. We found that neuropathic pain resulted in the development of depressive symptoms in a time dependent manner and was associated with profound hippocampal alterations such as impaired neurogenesis, reduced expression of neuroplasticity markers and myelin proteins. The onset of depressive-like behavior also coincided with increased hippocampal levels of TNF, and decreased expression of TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2), which were all fully restored after mice spontaneously recovered from pain. Notably, TNFR1(-/-) mice did not develop depressive-like symptoms after injury, nor were there changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and plasticity. Our data show that neuropathic pain induces a cluster of depressive-like symptoms and profound hippocampal plasticity that are dependent on TNF signaling through TNFR1.

  4. Effects of Intravenous Ketamine Infusions in a Neuropathic Pain Patient with Lichen Sclerosus et Atrophicus

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Ashraf F.; Armstrong, Josh S.; Smith, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    A patient reported to the Florida Spine Institute (Clearwater, Fla., USA) with severe lichen sclerosus of the anogenital region and legs. The patient's pain presentation was neuropathic with hypersensitivity, allodynia, swelling, and weakness. The patient had failed multiple