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Sample records for alleviating menstrual pain

  1. The Effect of Aromatherapy Abdominal Massage on Alleviating Menstrual Pain in Nursing Students: A Prospective Randomized Cross-Over Study

    PubMed Central

    Marzouk, Tyseer M. F.; El-Nemer, Amina M. R.; Baraka, Hany N.

    2013-01-01

    Dysmenorrhea is a common cause of sickness absenteeism from both classes and work. This study investigated the effect of aromatherapy massage on a group of nursing students who are suffering of primary dysmenorrhea. A randomized blind clinical trial of crossover design was used. In the first treatment phase, group 1 (n = 48) received aromatherapy abdominal massage once daily for seven days prior to menstruation using the essential oils (cinnamon, clove, rose, and lavender in a base of almond oil). Group 2 (n = 47) received the same intervention but with placebo oil (almond oil). In the second treatment phase, the two groups switched to alternate regimen. Level and duration of pain and the amount of menstrual bleeding were evaluated at the baseline and after each treatment phase. During both treatment phases, the level and duration of menstrual pain and the amount of menstrual bleeding were significantly lower in the aromatherapy group than in the placebo group. These results suggests that aromatherapy is effective in alleviating menstrual pain, its duration and excessive menstrual bleeding. Aromatherapy can be provided as a nonpharmacological pain relief measure and as a part of nursing care given to girls suffering of dysmenorrhea, or excessive menstrual bleeding. PMID:23662151

  2. The Effect of the Kinesio Taping and Spiral Taping on Menstrual Pain and Premenstrual Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chaegil; Park, Yongnam; Bae, Youngsook

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of Kinesio taping and spiral taping on menstrual pain and premenstrual syndrome, to investigate the efficacy of the two types of taping as methods for alleviating menstrual pain and premenstrual syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 34 unmarried women. The subjects were randomly divided into a Kinesio taping group, a spiral taping group and a control group. Subjects with a regular menstrual cycle underwent taping a total of six times; twice a week for about three weeks, starting from 14 days before menstruation and continuing until its end. Degrees of menstrual pain and premenstrual syndrome were measured before the application of taping. [Results] The results revealed that Kinesio taping had significant effects on menstrual pain, while spiral taping was effective at alleviating both menstrual pain and premenstrual syndrome. [Conclusion] Both taping methods before menstruation brought significant relief to menstrual pain, which suggests that spiral taping is an effective method of alleviating premenstrual symptoms. PMID:24259847

  3. Pulse Wave Variation during the Menstrual Cycle in Women with Menstrual Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Soo Hyung; Kim, Kyu Kon; Lee, In Seon; Lee, Yong Tae; Kim, Gyeong Cheol; Chi, Gyoo Yong; Cho, Hye Sook; Kang, Hee Jung

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study is performed to obtain objective diagnostic indicators associated with menstrual pain using pulse wave analysis. Methods. Using a pulse diagnostic device, we measured the pulse waves of 541 women aged between 19 and 30 years, placed in either an experimental group with menstrual pain (n = 329) or a control group with little or no menstrual pain (n = 212). Measurements were taken during both the menstrual and nonmenstrual periods, and comparative analysis was performed. Results. During the nonmenstrual period, the experimental group showed a significantly higher value in the left radial artery for the radial augmentation index (RAI) (p = 0.050) but significantly lower values for pulse wave energy (p = 0.021) and time to first peak from baseline (T1) (p = 0.035) in the right radial artery. During the menstrual period, the experimental group showed significantly lower values in the left radial artery for cardiac diastole and pulse wave area during diastole and significantly higher values for pulse wave area during systole, ratio of systolic phase to the full heartbeat, and systolic-diastolic ratio. Conclusion. We obtained indicators of menstrual pain in women during the menstrual period, including prolonged systolic and shortened diastolic phases, increases in pulse wave energy and area of representative pulse wave, and increased blood vessel resistance. PMID:27579304

  4. Thalamic pain alleviated by stellate ganglion block

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenlong; Yang, Min; Liu, Pengfei; Zhong, Wenxiang; Zhang, Wenchuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Thalamic pain is a distressing and treatment-resistant type of central post-stroke pain. Although stellate ganglion block is an established intervention used in pain management, its use in the treatment of thalamic pain has never been reported. Patient concerns: A 66-year-old woman presented with a 3-year history of severe intermittent lancinating pain on the right side of the face and the right hand. The pain started from the ulnar side of the right forearm after a mild ischemic stroke in bilateral basal ganglia and left thalamus. Weeks later, the pain extended to the dorsum of the finger tips and the whole palmar surface, becoming more severe. Meanwhile, there was also pain with similar characteristics emerging on her right face, resembling atypical trigeminal neuralgia. Diagnoses: Thalamic pain was diagnosed. Interventions: After refusing the further invasive treatment, she was suggested to try stellate ganglion block. Outcomes: After a 3-day period of pain free (numerical rating scale: 0) postoperatively, she reported moderate to good pain relief with a numerical rating scale of about 3 to 4 lasting 1 month after the first injection. Pain as well as the quality of life was markedly improved with less dose of analgesic agents. Lessons: Stellate ganglion block may be an optional treatment for thalamic pain. PMID:28151918

  5. Experimenter Effects on Pain Reporting in Women Vary across the Menstrual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Jacob M.; DiDomenico, Jared; Strenth, Chance; Coulombe, Patrick; Kruger, Eric; Mueller, Andrea A.; Guevara Beltran, Diego; Adams, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Background. Separate lines of research have shown that menstrual cycling and contextual factors such as the gender of research personnel influence experimental pain reporting. Objectives. This study examines how brief, procedural interactions with female and male experimenters can affect experimentally reported pain (cold pressor task, CPT) across the menstrual cycle. Methods. Based on the menstrual calendars 94 naturally cycling women and 38 women using hormonal contraceptives (Mage = 19.83,  SD = 3.09) were assigned to low and high fertility groups. This assignment was based on estimates of their probability of conception given their current cycle day. Experimenters (12 males, 7 females) engaged in minimal procedural interactions with participants before the CPT was performed in solitude. Results. Naturally cycling women in the high fertility group showed significantly higher pain tolerance (81 sec, d = .79) following interactions with a male but not a female experimenter. Differences were not found for women in the low fertility or contraceptive groups. Discussion. The findings illustrate that menstrual functioning moderates the effect that experimenter gender has on pain reporting in women. Conclusion. These findings have implications for standardizing pain measurement protocols and understanding how basic biopsychosocial mechanisms (e.g., person-perception systems) can modulate pain experiences. PMID:25892990

  6. The Effect of Premenstrual Syndrome and Menstrual Phase on Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Maliheh; Mirkheshti, Alireza; Noghabaei, Giti; Ashori, Adeleh; Ghasemi, Tahereh; Hosseini-Zijoud, Seyed Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a common finding in luteal phase of menstrual cycle resulting in several changes in woman life including pain sensation. Objectives: This study evaluated the alterations of postoperative pain sensation in those with and without a history of PMS. Patients and Methods: A total of 140 women in in postoperative period were assigned to four groups regarding luteal or follicular phase of menstrual cycle and the history of PMS and were evaluated regarding scale of pain sensation and morphine demand in recovery room. To evaluate the difference among the groups, Mann Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis, and Bonferroni tests were used. Results: Patients with PMS presented higher pain sensation and analgesia request (P = 0.003). Patients in luteal phase showed less pain and analgesia request in two out of five studied outcomes (P = 0.075). Conclusions: The most comfortable postoperative women were those in luteal phase without history of PMS group. PMID:25893183

  7. Reduced quality of life when experiencing menstrual pain in women with primary dysmenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Iacovides, Stella; Avidon, Ingrid; Bentley, Alison; Baker, Fiona C

    2014-02-01

    Primary dysmenorrhea is the most common gynecological condition among women of reproductive age. Although dysmenorrhea has been reported to affect the ability of women to carry out daily activities, the impact of primary dysmenorrheic pain specifically on quality of life (QoL), has yet to be elucidated. We investigated whether QoL varies between women with and without severe primary dysmenorrhea, and whether QoL is impaired only during menstruation or also during pain-free phases of the menstrual cycle. Twelve women with severe primary dysmenorrhea and nine control women completed the quality of life enjoyment and satisfaction questionnaire (Q-LES-Q-SF) during menstruation and during the late follicular phase. Women with dysmenorrhea had a significant reduction in Q-LES-Q-SF scores (mean ± SD: 54 ± 18%, percentage of the total maximum possible score) when they were experiencing severe menstrual pain compared with their own pain-free follicular phase (80 ± 14%, p < 0.0001) and compared with controls during menstruation (81 ± 10%, p < 0.0001). They also rated their overall life satisfaction and contentment as poorer during menstruation. Severe menstrual pain associated with primary dysmenorrhea, therefore, impacts health-related of QoL.

  8. Periodontal Probe Improves Exams, Alleviates Pain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Dentists, comedian Bill Cosby memorably mused, tell you not to pick your teeth with any sharp metal object. Then you sit in their chair, and the first thing they grab is an iron hook!" Conventional periodontal probing is indeed invasive, uncomfortable for the patient, and the results can vary greatly between dentists and even for repeated measurements by the same dentist. It is a necessary procedure, though, as periodontal disease is the most common dental disease, involving the loss of teeth by the gradual destruction of ligaments that hold teeth in their sockets in the jawbone. The disease usually results from an increased concentration of bacteria in the pocket, or sulcus, between the gums and teeth. These bacteria produce acids and other byproducts, which enlarge the sulcus by eroding the gums and the periodontal ligaments. The sulcus normally has a depth of 1 to 2 millimeters, but in patients with early stages of periodontal disease, it has a depth of 3 to 5 millimeters. By measuring the depth of the sulcus, periodontists can have a good assessment of the disease s progress. Presently, there are no reliable clinical indicators of periodontal disease activity, and the best available diagnostic aid, periodontal probing, can only measure what has already been lost. A method for detecting small increments of periodontal ligament breakdown would permit earlier diagnosis and intervention with less costly and time-consuming therapy, while overcoming the problems associated with conventional probing. The painful, conventional method for probing may be destined for the archives of dental history, thanks to the development of ultrasound probing technologies. The roots of ultrasound probes are in an ultrasound-based time-of-flight technique routinely used to measure material thickness and length in the Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Laboratory at Langley Research Center. The primary applications of that technology have been for corrosion detection and bolt tension

  9. Statins alleviate experimental nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiang Qun; Lim, Tony K Y; Lee, Seunghwan; Zhao, Yuan Qing; Zhang, Ji

    2011-05-01

    The statins are a well-established class of drugs that lower plasma cholesterol levels by inhibiting HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase. They are widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and for the prevention of coronary heart disease. Recent studies suggest that statins have anti-inflammatory effects beyond their lipid-lowering properties. We sought to investigate whether statins could affect neuropathic pain by mediating nerve injury-associated inflammatory responses. The effects of hydrophilic rosuvastatin and lipophilic simvastatin were examined in the mouse partial sciatic nerve ligation model. Systemic daily administration of either statin from days 0 to 14 completely prevented the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. When administered from days 8 to 14 after injury, both statins dose-dependently reduced established hypersensitivity. After treatment, the effects of the statins were washed out within 2 to 7 days, depending on dose. Effects of both statins in alleviating mechanical allodynia were further confirmed in a different injury-associated neuropathic pain model, mental nerve chronic constriction, in rats. Both statins were able to abolish interleukin-1β expression in sciatic nerve triggered by nerve ligation. Additionally, quantitative analysis with Iba-1 and glial fibrillary acid protein immunoreactivity demonstrated that rosuvastatin and simvastatin significantly reduced the spinal microglial and astrocyte activation produced by sciatic nerve injury. The increase of interleukin-1β mRNA in the ipsilateral side of spinal cords was also reduced by the treatment of either statin. We identified a potential new application of statins in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The pain-alleviating effects of statins are likely attributable to their immunomodulatory effects.

  10. Effects of acupressure on menstrual distress and low back pain in dysmenorrheic young adult women: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huei-Mein; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Chiu, Min-Huei; Hu, Hsou-Mei

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of acupressure on menstrual distress and low back pain (LBP) in dysmenorrheic young adult women. In all, 129 female students, who had been experiencing dysmenorrhea with LBP during menstruation and who scored more than 4 points on the visual analog scale for pain, were randomly assigned to an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group (n = 65) received acupressure massage three times a week for 30 minutes on the sanyinjiao (SP6), ciliao (BL32), and taichong (Liver 3) acupoints. The control group (n = 64) received only a manual of menstrual health education without acupressure intervention. Data were collected at five time points: at baseline, 30 minutes, and 4, 8, and 12 months after the intervention. During the 12-month follow-up, the experimental group had significantly lower menstrual distress and LBP scores than the control group. Among 65 participants in the experimental group, 53 (82%) reported a moderate to high levels of menstrual distress, 51 (78%) reported moderate to high levels of LBP relief, and 49 (75%) reported moderate to high levels of satisfaction with acupressure. Our findings may serve as a reference for health care professionals and young women to improve self-care during menstruation and help further understand the therapeutic effects of acupressure on menstrual distress and LBP.

  11. Menstrual Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms cause you to miss school or other activities and over-the-counter medicine and other comfort measures don’t help, you should make an appointment with your health care provider. Tags: cramps , period , period tracker Related Content Menstrual Periods Painful Periods (Dysmenorrhea) I’ ...

  12. Prisms for pain. Can visuo-motor rehabilitation strategies alleviate chronic pain?

    PubMed Central

    Torta, DM; Legrain, V; Rossetti, Y; Mouraux, A

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Prism adaptation (PA) is a non-invasive procedure in which participants perform a visuo-motor pointing task while wearing prism goggles inducing a lateral displacement of the visual field and a mismatch between the seen and felt position of the pointing hand. PA is thought to induce a reorganization of sensorimotor coordination, and has been used successfully to rehabilitate neglect following right-hemisphere lesions. Because studies have shown that complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is associated with neglect-like symptoms, it was proposed that PA could be used to alleviate pain in these patients. Database A search for peer-reviewed articles on neglect-like symptoms in CRPS and on the use of prisms in CRPS was conducted using the PubMed database. Results There is still no agreement as to whether CRPS patients really present neglect symptoms and, if they do, what it is that they neglect. Furthermore, there is insufficient data to determine whether PA exerts an effect on CRPS symptoms. Finally, it remains unknown whether neglect can be observed in other types of lateralized pain, or whether PA could be useful for these patients. Conclusion By highlighting open issues, our review provides guidelines for future studies on the use of prisms in pain. The assessment of neglect in patients with CRPS as well as other types of lateralized chronic pain should be characterized using a combination of neuropsychological methods assessing the multiple aspects of neglect in a more refined manner. In addition, further studies should investigate the mechanisms through which PA may modulate pain. PMID:26095341

  13. The art of alleviating pain in greek mythology.

    PubMed

    Türe, Hatice; Türe, Uğur; Göğüş, F Yilmaz; Valavanis, Anton; Yaşargil, M Gazi

    2005-01-01

    We reviewed many of the essential Greek myths to identify the methods used at that time to relieve the pain of both illness and surgery, and we discovered many pioneering methods. Both gods and demigods implemented these methods to ease pain, to conduct surgery, and, on occasion, to kill mythological beings. The myths describe the three most common components of anesthesia: hypnosis, amnesia, and (an)algesia. Drugs and music-aided hypnosis were two of the most common methods use to treat emotional and surgical pain. This article identifies highlights in the development of concepts to treat pain in Greek mythology. The examples found in the Greek myths remind us of the historical significance of pain treatment.

  14. Chronic spinal infusion of loperamide alleviates postsurgical pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Reeta, K H; Ray, Subrata Basu

    2014-04-01

    Plantar incision in rat generates spontaneous pain behaviour. The opioid drug, morphine used to treat postsurgical pain produces tolerance after long-term administration. Loperamide, a potent mu-opioid agonist, has documented analgesic action in various pain conditions. However, loperamide analgesia and associated tolerance following continuous spinal administration in postsurgical pain has not been reported. Chronic spinal infusion of drugs was achieved using intrathecal catheters connected to osmotic minipump. Coinciding with the onset of spinal infusion of loperamide or morphine, rats were subjected to plantar incision. Pain-related behaviour was assessed by Hargreaves apparatus (thermal hyperalgesia) and von Frey filaments (mechanical allodynia). Morphine and loperamide (0.5, 1 and 2 microL/h) induced analgesia was observed until 7th day post-plantar incision in Sprague-Dawley rats. Morphine and loperamide produced dose-dependent analgesia. Loperamide, in the highest dose, produced analgesia till 7th day. However, the highest dose of morphine produced inhibition of thermal hyperalgesia till 5th day and mechanical allodynia only till 3rd day post-plantar incision. Morphine and loperamide produced analgesia in postsurgical pain, which may be mediated through different mechanisms. Longer duration of analgesia with loperamide could probably be due sustained blockade of calcium channels.

  15. Intravenous phentolamine infusion alleviates the pain of abdominal visceral cancer, including pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Masako; Yasukawa, Ken'ichi; Kamiizumi, You; Yokoyama, Ryouji

    2007-01-01

    This case report series describes eight patients (four patients with pancreatic carcinoma, one patient with hepatocellular carcinoma, one patient with gastric and rectal carcinoma, one with sigmoid colon cancer, and one with rectal cancer), whose abdominal cancer pain was treated with intravenous phentolamine infusion at 80 mg x day(-1) for 2 days. All but one of the patients had already been treated with opioids. All eight patients complained of severe abdominal pain; in five patients the pain radiated to the back, and there was associated anal pain in two patients. Analgesia was achieved in three patients; pain alleviation was obtained in four patients, but was not sustained in two of these four patients; and the treatment in one patient could not be judged for efficacy because epidural morphine was used together with the phentolamine. Adverse effects of phentolamine were tachycardia and/or hypotension.

  16. Does going to an amusement park alleviate low back pain? A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Wang, Zhuo; Kasai, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Background Low back pain is often called nonspecific pain. In this type of low back pain, various emotions and stress are known to strongly affect pain perception. The purpose of this study is to investigate how the degree of low back pain changes in people with chronic mild low back pain when they are inside and outside of an amusement park where people are supposed to have physical and psychological enjoyment. Methods The subjects were 23 volunteers (13 males and 10 females) aged 18 to 46 years old with a mean age of 24.0 years who had chronic low back pain. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores of low back pain and salivary amylase levels (kIU/L) of all subjects were measured at five time points: immediately after getting on the bus heading for the amusement park; 10 minutes, 1 hour (immediately after boarding the roller coaster), and 3 hours (immediately after exiting the haunted house) after arriving at the amusement park; and immediately before getting off the bus returning from the park. Results The three VAS values in the amusement park (10 minutes, 1 hour, and 3 hours after arriving at the amusement park) measured were significantly lower (P < 0.05) when compared with the other two values measured immediately after getting on the bus heading for the amusement park and immediately before getting off the return bus. In salivary amylase levels, there were no statistically significant differences among the values measured at the five time points. Conclusion Low back pain was significantly alleviated when the subjects were in the amusement park, which demonstrated that enjoyable activities, though temporarily, alleviated their low back pain. PMID:23118550

  17. Severe pegfilgrastim-induced bone pain completely alleviated with loratadine: A case report.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Cristina; Li, Quan; Copeland, Larry

    2015-08-01

    Febrile neutropenia is an oncologic emergency that can result in serious consequences. Granulocyte colony stimulating factors (G-CSFs) are often used as prophylaxis for febrile neutropenia. Bone pain is the most notorious adverse effect caused by G-CSFs. Specifically, with pegfilgrastim (Neulasta(®)), the incidence of bone pain is higher in practice than was observed during clinical trials. Traditional analgesics, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and opioids, can be ineffective in severe pegfilgrastim-induced bone pain. With the high frequency of this adverse effect, it is clear that health practitioners need additional treatment options for patients who experience severe pegfilgrastim-induced bone pain. The mechanisms of bone pain secondary to G-CSFs are not fully known, but research has shown that histamine release is involved in the inflammatory process. There is scant previous clinical data on antihistamine use in the management of G-CSF-induced pain. We present the first case report in which loratadine prophylaxis completely alleviated NSAID-resistant severe pain secondary to pegfilgrastim. The result showed that loratadine may be a promising option for severe, resistant pegfilgrastim-induced bone pain. Further clinical studies are warranted and ongoing.

  18. Blocking PAR2 Alleviates Bladder Pain and Hyperactivity via TRPA1 Signal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daihui; Liu, Nian; Li, Mao; Liang, Simin

    2016-01-01

    Bladder disorders associated with interstitial cystitis are frequently characterized by increased contractility and pain. The goals of this study were to examine 1) the effects of blocking proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) on the exaggerated bladder activity and pain evoked by cystitis and 2) the underlying mechanisms responsible for the role of PAR2 in regulating cystic sensory activity. The protein expression of PAR2 was amplified in rats with cystitis by inducing it with systemic administration of cyclophosphamide (CYP) as compared with control rats. Blocking PAR2 by intrathecal infusion of PAR2 antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 attenuated bladder hyperactivity and pain. In addition, blocking PAR2 attenuated the transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) signal pathway, whereas inhibition of the TRPA1 decreased bladder hyperactivity and pain. The data revealed specific signaling pathways leading to CYP-induced bladder hyperactivity and pain, including the activation of PAR2 and TRPA1. Inhibition of these pathways alleviates cystic pain. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of overactive bladder and pain often observed in cystitis.

  19. Acupuncture alleviates the affective dimension of pain in a rat model of inflammatory hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Meng, Xianze; Li, Aihui; Xin, Jiajia; Berman, Brian M.; Lao, Lixing; Tan, Ming; Ren, Ke; Zhang, Rui-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Although studies demonstrate that electroacupuncture (EA) alleviates the sensory dimension of pain, they have not addressed EA’s effect on the affective dimension. An inflammatory pain rat model, produced by a complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) injection into the hind paw, was combined with a conditioned place avoidance (CPA) test to determine EA’s effects and its underpinning mechanism on the affective dimension of pain. CFA-injected rats showed place aversion, i.e. the affective dimension of pain, by spending less time in a pain-paired compartment after conditioning than before, while saline-injected rats did not. CFA rats given EA treatment at GB30 before a postconditioning test showed no aversion to the pain-paired compartment, indicating that EA inhibited the affective response. Intra-rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) administration of a κ-, but not μ-opioid receptor antagonist, blocked EA action. These data demonstrate that EA activates opioid receptors in the rACC to inhibit the affective dimension of pain. PMID:21695393

  20. Blocking PAR2 Alleviates Bladder Pain and Hyperactivity via TRPA1 Signal

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Daihui; Liu, Nian; Li, Mao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bladder disorders associated with interstitial cystitis are frequently characterized by increased contractility and pain. The goals of this study were to examine 1) the effects of blocking proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) on the exaggerated bladder activity and pain evoked by cystitis and 2) the underlying mechanisms responsible for the role of PAR2 in regulating cystic sensory activity. The protein expression of PAR2 was amplified in rats with cystitis by inducing it with systemic administration of cyclophosphamide (CYP) as compared with control rats. Blocking PAR2 by intrathecal infusion of PAR2 antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 attenuated bladder hyperactivity and pain. In addition, blocking PAR2 attenuated the transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) signal pathway, whereas inhibition of the TRPA1 decreased bladder hyperactivity and pain. The data revealed specific signaling pathways leading to CYP-induced bladder hyperactivity and pain, including the activation of PAR2 and TRPA1. Inhibition of these pathways alleviates cystic pain. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of overactive bladder and pain often observed in cystitis. PMID:28123833

  1. Recombinant neural progenitor transplants in the spinal dorsal horn alleviate chronic central neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Jergova, Stanislava; Gajavelli, Shyam; Pathak, Nirmal; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2016-04-01

    Neuropathic pain induced by spinal cord injury (SCI) is clinically challenging with inadequate long-term treatment options. Partial pain relief offered by pharmacologic treatment is often counterbalanced by adverse effects after prolonged use in chronic pain patients. Cell-based therapy for neuropathic pain using GABAergic neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) has the potential to overcome untoward effects of systemic pharmacotherapy while enhancing analgesic potency due to local activation of GABAergic signaling in the spinal cord. However, multifactorial anomalies underlying chronic pain will likely require simultaneous targeting of multiple mechanisms. Here, we explore the analgesic potential of genetically modified rat embryonic GABAergic NPCs releasing a peptidergic NMDA receptor antagonist, Serine-histogranin (SHG), thus targeting both spinal hyperexcitability and reduced inhibitory processes. Recombinant NPCs were designed using either lentiviral or adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV2/8) encoding single and multimeric (6 copies of SHG) cDNA. Intraspinal injection of recombinant cells elicited enhanced analgesic effects compared with nonrecombinant NPCs in SCI-induced pain in rats. Moreover, potent and sustained antinociception was achieved, even after a 5-week postinjury delay, using recombinant multimeric NPCs. Intrathecal injection of SHG antibody attenuated analgesic effects of the recombinant grafts suggesting active participation of SHG in these antinociceptive effects. Immunoblots and immunocytochemical assays indicated ongoing recombinant peptide production and secretion in the grafted host spinal cords. These results support the potential for engineered NPCs grafted into the spinal dorsal horn to alleviate chronic neuropathic pain.

  2. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin alleviates bladder hyperactivity and pain in rats with cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Gou, Xin; Chen, Daihui

    2016-01-01

    Background Bladder disorders associated with interstitial cystitis are frequently characterized by increased contractility and pain. The purposes of this study were to examine (1) the effects of blocking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) on the exaggerated bladder activity and pain evoked by cystitis and (2) the underlying mechanisms responsible for the role of mTOR in regulating cystic sensory activity. Results The expression of p-mTOR, mTOR-mediated phosphorylation of p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (p-S6K1), 4 E–binding protein 4 (p-4 E-BP1), as well as phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K) pathway were amplified in cyclophosphamide rats as compared with control rats. Blocking mTOR by intrathecal infusion of rapamycin attenuated bladder hyperactivity and pain. In addition, blocking PI3K signal pathway attenuated activities of mTOR, which was accompanied with decreasing bladder hyperactivity and pain. Inhibition of either mTOR or PI3K blunted the enhanced spinal substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide in cyclophosphamide rats. Conclusions The data for the first time revealed specific signaling pathways leading to cyclophosphamide-induced bladder hyperactivity and pain, including the activation of mTOR and PI3K. Inhibition of these pathways alleviates cystic pain. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of overactive bladder and pain often observed in cystitis. PMID:27780878

  3. Female social and sexual interest across the menstrual cycle: the roles of pain, sleep and hormones

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although research suggests that socio-sexual behavior changes in conjunction with the menstrual cycle, several potential factors are rarely taken into consideration. We investigated the role of changing hormone concentrations on self-reported physical discomfort, sleep, exercise and socio-sexual interest in young, healthy women. Methods Salivary hormones (dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate-DHEAS, progesterone, cortisol, testosterone, estradiol and estriol) and socio-sexual variables were measured in 20 women taking oral contraceptives (OC group) and 20 not using OCs (control group). Outcome measures were adapted from questionnaires of menstrual cycle-related symptoms, physical activity, and interpersonal relations. Testing occurred during menstruation (T1), mid-cycle (T2), and during the luteal phase (T3). Changes in behavior were assessed across time points and between groups. Additionally, correlations between hormones and socio-behavioral characteristics were determined. Results Physical discomfort and sleep disturbances peaked at T1 for both groups. Exercise levels and overall socio-sexual interest did not change across the menstrual cycle for both groups combined. However, slight mid-cycle increases in general and physical attraction were noted among the control group, whereas the OC group experienced significantly greater socio-sexual interest across all phases compared to the control group. Associations with hormones differed by group and cycle phase. The estrogens were correlated with socio-sexual and physical variables at T1 and T3 in the control group; whereas progesterone, cortisol, and DHEAS were more closely associated with these variables in the OC group across test times. The direction of influence further varies by behavior, group, and time point. Among naturally cycling women, higher concentrations of estradiol and estriol are associated with lower attraction scores at T1 but higher scores at T3. Among OC users, DHEAS and progesterone

  4. Effectiveness of elcatonin for alleviating pain and inhibiting bone resorption in patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shinya; Yoshida, Akira; Kono, Shinjiro; Oguma, Tadanori; Hasegawa, Kyoichi; Ito, Manabu

    2016-11-09

    Elderly patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures often experience severe pain that reduces their quality of life (QOL). Calcitonin, a bone resorption inhibitor, has been reported to alleviate pain in such patients; however, few clinical studies have demonstrated this effect. The objective of this study was to compare changes in pain scores, activities of daily living (ADL), QOL, bone resorption, bone mineral density (BMD), and fracture healing among patients with new vertebral fractures who received different treatment modalities. We conducted an open-label, multicenter, randomized, parallel control group study comprising 107 female patients ≥55 years old with acute back pain from vertebral fracture. All subjects received either intramuscular injections of elcatonin, a derivative of calcitonin, or an oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) combined with an active vitamin D3 (VD3) analogue for 6 months. The pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale, and ADL and QOL were assessed using questionnaires. BMD was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. A two-tailed significance level of 5% was used. The elcatonin IM group had significantly higher QOL score at 2 weeks and later, and significantly lower VAS and ADL scores than those in the NSAID + VD3 group at 1 month and later. The elcatonin IM group had significantly reduced TRACP-5b levels compared with those in the NSAID + VD3 group at 3 months and later and significantly higher percent changes in BMD than the NSAID + VD3 group. These results suggest that elcatonin significantly alleviated pain, inhibited bone resorption, and improved ADL, QOL, and BMD compared with NSAID + VD3.

  5. Menstrual Cycle

    MedlinePlus

    ... receive Pregnancy email updates Enter email Submit The menstrual cycle Day 1 starts with the first day of ... drop around Day 25 . This signals the next menstrual cycle to begin. The egg will break apart and ...

  6. Acupuncture Alleviated the Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease including Pain, Depression, and Autonomic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Iseki, Chifumi; Furuta, Taiga; Suzuki, Masao; Koyama, Shingo; Suzuki, Keiji; Suzuki, Tomoko; Kaneko, Akiyo

    2014-01-01

    A woman started to feel intractable pain on her lower legs when she was 76. At the age of 78, she was diagnosed as having Parkinson's disease (PD). The leg pain was suspected to be a symptom of PD after eliminating other causes. The patient also suffered from nonmotor symptoms, depression, anxiety, hot flashes, and paroxysmal sweating. Though the patient had received pharmacotherapy including levodopa for 5 years, she still suffered from the nonmotor symptoms and was referred to our department. We treated her with acupuncture based on the Chinese traditional medicine and electroacupuncture five times per week. After the 2-week treatment, the assessment for the symptoms was as follows; visual analogue scale (VAS) score of the leg pain was 16 mm (70 mm, before), Hamilton's rating scales for depression (HAM-D) score was 9 (18, before), timed 3 m Up and Go took 20 steps in 30 sec (24 steps in 38 sec, before), and the Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) Part 1 score was 13 (21, before). Autonomic symptoms, hot flashes and paroxysmal sweating, were also alleviated. Acupuncture may be a good treatment modality for nonmotor symptoms in PD. PMID:25628905

  7. Acupuncture Alleviated the Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease including Pain, Depression, and Autonomic Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Iseki, Chifumi; Furuta, Taiga; Suzuki, Masao; Koyama, Shingo; Suzuki, Keiji; Suzuki, Tomoko; Kaneko, Akiyo; Mitsuma, Tadamichi

    2014-01-01

    A woman started to feel intractable pain on her lower legs when she was 76. At the age of 78, she was diagnosed as having Parkinson's disease (PD). The leg pain was suspected to be a symptom of PD after eliminating other causes. The patient also suffered from nonmotor symptoms, depression, anxiety, hot flashes, and paroxysmal sweating. Though the patient had received pharmacotherapy including levodopa for 5 years, she still suffered from the nonmotor symptoms and was referred to our department. We treated her with acupuncture based on the Chinese traditional medicine and electroacupuncture five times per week. After the 2-week treatment, the assessment for the symptoms was as follows; visual analogue scale (VAS) score of the leg pain was 16 mm (70 mm, before), Hamilton's rating scales for depression (HAM-D) score was 9 (18, before), timed 3 m Up and Go took 20 steps in 30 sec (24 steps in 38 sec, before), and the Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) Part 1 score was 13 (21, before). Autonomic symptoms, hot flashes and paroxysmal sweating, were also alleviated. Acupuncture may be a good treatment modality for nonmotor symptoms in PD.

  8. Electroacupuncture Treatment Alleviates Central Poststroke Pain by Inhibiting Brain Neuronal Apoptosis and Aberrant Astrocyte Activation

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Gui-Hua; Tao, Shan-Shan; Chen, Man-Tang; Li, Yu-Sang; Shang, Hong-Cai; Tang, Xiao-Yi; Chen, Jian-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) is reported to effectively relieve the central poststroke pain (CPSP). However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The present study investigated the detailed mechanisms of action of EA treatment at different frequencies for CPSP. A CPSP model was established with a single collagenase injection to the left ventral posterolateral nucleus of the thalamus. The EA-treated groups then received EA treatment at frequency of 2, 2/15, or 15 Hz for 30 min daily for five days. The pain-related behavioral responses, neuronal apoptosis, glial activation, and the expression of pain signal transmission-related factors (β-catenin, COX-2, and NK-1R) were assessed using behavioral tests, Nissl staining, TUNEL staining, and immunohistochemical staining, respectively. The low-frequency EA treatment significantly (1) reduced brain tissue damage and hematoma sizes and (2) inhibited neuronal apoptosis, thereby exerting abirritative effects. Meanwhile, the high-frequency EA treatment induced a greater inhibition of the aberrant astrocyte activation, accompanied by the downregulation of the expressions of COX-2, β-catenin, and subsequently NK-1R, thereby alleviating inflammation and producing strong analgesic effects. Together, these findings suggest that CPSP is closely related to pathological changes of the neocortex and hippocampus. EA treatments at different frequencies may exert abirritative effects by inhibiting brain neuronal apoptosis and aberrant astrocyte activation in the brain. PMID:27774321

  9. Breast Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... before your period and sometimes continuing through your menstrual cycle. The pain may be moderate or severe, and ... breasts. Throughout the month, not related to your menstrual cycle. Postmenopausal women sometimes have breast pain, but breast ...

  10. Pain sensations to the cold pressor test in normally menstruating women: comparison with men and relation to menstrual phase and serum sex steroid levels.

    PubMed

    Stening, Kent; Eriksson, Olle; Wahren, Liskarin; Berg, Göran; Hammar, Mats; Blomqvist, Anders

    2007-10-01

    The role of gonadal hormones on pain sensations was investigated in normally menstruating women (n = 16) using the cold pressor test. Tolerance time, pain threshold, and pain intensity were examined once a week during a 4-wk period, and serum concentrations of 17beta-estradiol and progesterone were determined at each test session, which were classified into the early follicular phase, late follicular phase, early luteal phase, and late luteal phase, as determined by the first day of menses and the actual hormone levels recorded. A group of men (n = 10) of the same age interval was examined for comparison. The data show that pain threshold was reduced during the late luteal phase compared with the late follicular phase, and hormone analyses showed significant positive correlation between the progesterone concentration and lowered pain threshold and increasing pain intensity. Hormone analysis also showed an interaction between S-estradiol and S-progesterone on pain intensity, demonstrating that the increased perceived pain intensity that was associated with high progesterone concentrations was significantly reduced with increasing levels of estradiol. While no statistically significant sex differences in pain measurements were found, women displayed much more pronounced, and statistically significant, session-to-session effects than men, with increased pain threshold and decreased pain intensity with each test session. Hence, these data suggest that the changes in the serum concentration of gonadal hormones that occur during the menstrual cycle influence pain sensations elicited by noxious tonic cold stimulation and show that adaptation to the cold pressor test may be sex dependent.

  11. Nutmeg oil alleviates chronic inflammatory pain through inhibition of COX-2 expression and substance P release in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei Kevin; Tao, Shan-Shan; Li, Ting-Ting; Li, Yu-Sang; Li, Xiao-Jun; Tang, He-Bin; Cong, Ren-Huai; Ma, Fang-Li; Wan, Chu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic pain, or sometimes referred to as persistent pain, reduces the life quality of patients who are suffering from chronic diseases such as inflammatory diseases, cancer and diabetes. Hence, herbal medicines draw many attentions and have been shown effective in the treatment or relief of pain. Methods and Results Here in this study, we used the CFA-injected rats as a sustainable pain model to test the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect of nutmeg oil, a spice flavor additive to beverages and baked goods produced from the seed of Myristica fragrans tree. Conclusions We have demonstrated that nutmeg oil could potentially alleviate the CFA-injection induced joint swelling, mechanical allodynia and heat hyperanalgesia of rats through inhibition of COX-2 expression and blood substance P level, which made it possible for nutmeg oil to be a potential chronic pain reliever. PMID:27121041

  12. Infliximab partially alleviates the bite force reduction in a mouse model of temporomandibular joint pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Hyon; Son, Chang-Nam; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Cho, Ho-Chan; Jung, Sung-Won; Hur, Ji An; Baek, Won-Ki; Jung, Hye Ra; Hong, Ji Hee

    2015-05-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder is clinically important because of its prevalence, chronicity, and therapy-refractoriness of the pain. In this study, we investigated the effect of infliximab in a mouse model of TMJ pain using a specially-engineered transducer for evaluating the changes in bite force (BF). The mice were randomly divided into three groups (7 mice per group): the control group, the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) group, and the infliximab group. BF was measured at day 0 (baseline BF). After measuring the baseline BF, CFA or incomplete Freund's adjuvant was injected into both TMJs and then the changes in BF were measured at days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 13 after the TMJ injection. For measuring the BF, we used a custom-built BF transducer. Control, CFA, and infliximab groups showed similar baseline BF at day 0. From day 1, a significant reduction in BF was observed in the CFA group, and this reduction in BF was statistically significant compared to that in the control group (P < 0.05). This reduction in BF was maintained until day 7, and BF started to recover gradually from day 9. In the infliximab group also, the reduction in BF was observed on day 1, and this reduction was maintained until day 7. However, the degree of reduction in BF was less remarkable compared to that in the CFA group. The reduction in BF caused by injection of CFA into the TMJ could be partially alleviated by the injection of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha, infliximab.

  13. Painful menstrual periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... help you to avoid prescription medicines: Apply a heating pad to your lower belly area, below your belly button. Never fall asleep with the heating pad on. Do light circular massage with your fingertips ...

  14. Feasibility of Human Amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells in Alleviation of Neuropathic Pain in Chronic Constrictive Injury Nerve Model

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chien-Yi; Liu, Shih-An; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chen, Fu-Chou; Chen, Chun-Jung; Su, Hong-Lin; Pan, Hung-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The neurobehavior of neuropathic pain by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve is very similar to that in humans, and it is accompanied by a profound local inflammation response. In this study, we assess the potentiality of human amniotic fluid derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAFMSCs) for alleviating the neuropathic pain in a chronic constriction nerve injury model. Methods and Methods This neuropathic pain animal model was conducted by four 3–0 chromic gut ligatures loosely ligated around the left sciatic nerve in Sprague—Dawley rats. The intravenous administration of hAFMSCs with 5x105 cells was conducted for three consecutive days. Results The expression IL-1β, TNF-α and synaptophysin in dorsal root ganglion cell culture was remarkably attenuated when co-cultured with hAFMSCs. The significant decrease of PGP 9.5 in the skin after CCI was restored by administration of hAFMSCs. Remarkably increased expression of CD 68 and TNF-α and decreased S-100 and neurofilament expression in injured nerve were rescued by hAFMSCs administration. Increases in synaptophysin and TNF-α over the dorsal root ganglion were attenuated by hAFMSCs. Significant expression of TNF-α and OX-42 over the dorsal spinal cord was substantially attenuated by hAFMSCs. The increased amplitude of sensory evoked potential as well as expression of synaptophysin and TNF-α expression was alleviated by hAFMSCs. Human AFMSCs significantly improved the threshold of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia as well as various parameters of CatWalk XT gait analysis. Conclusion Human AFMSCs administration could alleviate the neuropathic pain demonstrated in histomorphological alteration and neurobehavior possibly through the modulation of the inflammatory response. PMID:27441756

  15. A novel vibratory stimulation-based occlusal splint for alleviation of TMD painful symptoms: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hara, E S; Witzel, A L; de Luca, C E P; Ballester, R Y; Kuboki, T; Bolzan, M C

    2013-03-01

    This pilot study introduces a novel vibratory stimulation-based occlusal splint (VibOS) for management of pain related to temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The study sample consisted of 10 patients (mean age: 40·5 ± 13·7 years, male/female: 3/7) who were using stabilisation splints for more than 2 months prior to the study onset and still complained of pain. Patients utilised the active and inactive VibOS during 15 days in a crossover designed clinical trial. The analysed variables were self-reported VAS pain levels and number of painful sites to palpation (PSP). Statistical analysis was performed with repeated measures anova. At baseline, mean VAS pain levels for group I and II were 45·6 ± 21·0 mm and 37·4 ± 16·3 mm, respectively. Comparison between these baseline values showed no statistical difference (P > 0·05, unpaired t-test). In group I, the inactive VibOS caused a slight increase in VAS pain levels, whereas the active VibOS promoted a significant decrease in VAS pain levels and PSP (P < 0·01). In group II, which received the active VibOS first, a significant decrease in VAS levels (P < 0·05) and in PSP (P < 0·01) was observed. No significant decrease in VAS pain levels or PSP (P > 0·05) was observed with the use of the inactive VibOS. In conclusion, this study demonstrated a good tendency of this novel VibOS in the alleviation of painful symptoms related to TMD after a 15-day management period compared to control VibOS.

  16. Fat Grafting in Burn Scar Alleviates Neuropathic Pain via Anti-Inflammation Effect in Scar and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shu-Hung; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Lee, Su-Shin; Chang, Kao-Ping; Chai, Chee-Yin; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Lin, Sin-Daw; Kwan, Aij-Lie; David Wang, Hui-Min; Lai, Chung-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Burn-induced neuropathic pain is complex, and fat grafting has reportedly improved neuropathic pain. However, the mechanism of fat grafting in improving neuropathic pain is unclear. Previous investigations have found that neuroinflammation causes neuropathic pain, and anti-inflammatory targeting may provide potential therapeutic opportunities in neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that fat grafting in burn scars improves the neuropathic pain through anti-inflammation. Burn-induced scar pain was confirmed using a mechanical response test 4 weeks after burn injuries, and autologous fat grafting in the scar area was performed simultaneously. After 4 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and specimens were collected for the inflammation test, including COX-2, iNOS, and nNOS in the injured skin and spinal cord dorsal horns through immunohistochemistry and Western assays. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 β and TNF-α) in the spinal cord were collected. Double immunofluorescent staining images for measuring p-IκB, p-NFκB, p-JNK, and TUNEL as well as Western blots of AKT, Bax/Bcl-2 for the inflammatory process, and apoptosis were analyzed. Fat grafting significantly reduced COX2, nNOS, and iNOS in the skin and spinal cord dorsal horns, as well as IL-1β and TNF-α, compared with the burn group. Moreover, regarding the anti-inflammatory effect, the apoptosis cells in the spinal cord significantly decreased after the fat grafting in the burn injury group. Fat grafting was effective in treating burn-induced neuropathic pain through the alleviation of neuroinflammation and ameliorated spinal neuronal apoptosis. PMID:26368011

  17. Menstrual arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, J E; Singh, M M; Griffiths, I D

    1993-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is characterised by variations in the absolute and relative concentrations of the hormones of the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis, which in turn affect cell function and cytokine and heat shock protein production. Menstruation involves the shedding of the secretory endometrium, which is part of the mucosal associated lymphoid tissue and hence is rich in immunologically competent cells such as CD8 T cells and macrophages. The case is reported here of a patient presenting with a recurrent but transient symmetrical inflammatory polyarthritis which only occurred at menstruation with no residual damage. The disease was suppressed by danazol. Endometrial degradation products are suggested as the trigger of this 'menstrual arthritis'. PMID:8427519

  18. A commercialized dietary supplement alleviates joint pain in community adults: a double-blind, placebo-controlled community trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    % versus ↓12%, respectively, interaction effect P = 0.081). Patterns of change in SF-36, systemic inflammation biomarkers, and the 6-minute walk test did not differ significantly between groups during the 8-week study Conclusions Results from this randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled community trial support the use of the Instaflex™ dietary supplement in alleviating joint pain severity in middle-aged and older adults, with mitigation of difficulty performing daily activities most apparent in subjects with knee pain. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01956500 PMID:24274358

  19. Exogenous induction of HO-1 alleviates vincristine-induced neuropathic pain by reducing spinal glial activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Zhu, Ming-Di; Jiang, Bao-Chun; Yang, Tian; Gao, Yong-Jing

    2015-07-01

    Chemotherapy drugs such as vincristine can produce painful peripheral neuropathy for which is still lack of effective treatment. Recent studies have demonstrated that neuroinflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) was shown to mediate the resolution of inflammation. In this study, we investigated the contribution of HO-1 in the modulation of vincristine-induced pain and the mechanisms implicated. Injection of vincristine induced persistent mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in mice. The expression of HO-1 mRNA and protein was increased in 2 weeks in the spinal cord. Immunostaining showed that HO-1 was mainly expressed in neurons of spinal cord dorsal horn in naïve animals, but induced in astrocytes and microglia after vincristine injection. Intraperitoneal injection of HO-1 inducer increased HO-1 expression in the spinal cord and attenuated vincristine-induced pain. Persistent induction of HO-1 by intraspinal injection of HO-1-expressing lentivirus alleviated vincristine-induced pain for more than 2 weeks. Furthermore, vincristine induced activation of glial cells (astrocytes and microglia), phosphorylation of MAPKs (JNK, ERK, and p38), and production of TNF-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the spinal cord, which were all reduced by intrathecal injection of HO-1 inducer. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that induction of HO-1 attenuates vincristine-induced neuropathic pain via inhibition of glia-mediated neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. This suggests that exogenously induced HO-1 may have potential as therapy in chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain.

  20. [Fetal pain and intrauterine analgesia/anesthesia--long-term pathologic effects, causes and alleviation of intrauterine pain].

    PubMed

    Deli, Tamás; Szeverényi, Péter

    2010-04-25

    The human fetus can suffer several presumably painful interventions perinatally and even before, during its intrauterine life. In the past years, scientific dispute concerning the existence of fetal pain and the need for its relief has expanded, and a heated social, political, religious, moral and philosophical debate has arisen, focusing mainly on the suffering experienced by the fetus during artificial abortion. In our two connected papers, medical scientific knowledge regarding fetal pain in the literature is reviewed. In the first article published in Orvosi Hetilap volume 150, issue 11, we defined pain and the neuroanatomical structures participating in subjective pain perception, as well as the development of these structures. Then, the objective indicators of intrauterine stress response (such as fetal neuroendocrine, cardiovascular, reflex and behavioral reactions) evoked by noxious stimuli were discussed. The present second article gathers the evidence of long-term pathologic effects caused by early-experienced pain and stress in animal models and humans. Finally, the potentially pain-evoking pre- and perinatal interventions are evaluated, as well as the analgetic/anesthetic methods that can be applied to intrauterine fetuses in everyday obstetrical practice.

  1. Use of “Kangaroo Care” to Alleviate the Intensity of Vaccination Pain in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, Reza; Asnaashari, Zahra; Amirnejad, Mohtaram; Esmaeili, Habibollah; Robatsangi, Mahboobe Gholami

    2011-01-01

    Objective It has been demonstrated that newborns feel pain completely. Thus, they should be treated with this in mind. Recent research showed that non-pharmacological interventions such as “Kangaroo Care” may be useful for decreasing pain in newborns. We tried to determine the effect of kangaroo care on the pain intensity of vaccination in healthy newborns. Methods This study was a randomized case-control clinical trial. Subjects were 60 healthy full-term newborns delivered in a general Hospital, in Iran, from March to July 2006. They were randomly assigned to case and control groups. The case group received 30 minutes skin to skin contact, whereas infants in the control group were put, wrapped in a blanket, aside the mothers. Behavioral changes of newborns were evaluated and observed 2 minutes before, during, and 3 minutes after the intervention. All procedures were filmed. An assistant who was blinded to the study, scored behavior changes using Neonatal/Infant Pain Scale. Heart rate and oxygen saturation levels as displayed on the pulse monitor and duration of crying were recorded using a stopwatch. Findings Mean pain intensity during the intervention v was significantly lower in the case group (P<0.006). Mean pain intensity 3 minutes after intervention was also significantly lower in the case group (P<0.021). Mean duration of crying was significantly lower in case group as well (P<0.001). Conclusion Kangaroo care may be used to decrease pain intensity in newborns undergoing painful procedures. PMID:23056772

  2. Shp-1 dephosphorylates TRPV1 in dorsal root ganglion neurons and alleviates CFA-induced inflammatory pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Tao; Xu, Ling-Chi; Yue, Lu-Peng; Liu, Feng-Yu; Cai, Jie; Liao, Fei-Fei; Kong, Jin-Ge; Xing, Guo-Gang; Yi, Ming; Wan, You

    2015-04-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors are expressed in nociceptive neurons of rat dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) and mediate inflammatory pain. Nonspecific inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) increases the tyrosine phosphorylation of TRPV1 and sensitizes TRPV1. However, less is known about tyrosine phosphorylation's implication in inflammatory pain, compared with that of serine/threonine phosphorylation. Src homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 (Shp-1) is a key phosphatase dephosphorylating TRPV1. In this study, we reported that Shp-1 colocalized with and bound to TRPV1 in nociceptive DRG neurons. Shp-1 inhibitors, including sodium stibogluconate and PTP inhibitor III, sensitized TRPV1 in cultured DRG neurons. In naive rats, intrathecal injection of Shp-1 inhibitors increased both TRPV1 and tyrosine-phosphorylated TRPV1 in DRGs and induced thermal hyperalgesia, which was abolished by pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonists capsazepine, BCTC, or AMG9810. Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain in rats significantly increased the expression of Shp-1, TRPV1, and tyrosine-phosphorylated TRPV1, as well as the colocalization of Shp-1 and TRPV1 in DRGs. Intrathecal injection of sodium stibogluconate aggravated CFA-induced inflammatory pain, whereas Shp-1 overexpression in DRG neurons alleviated it. These results suggested that Shp-1 dephosphorylated and inhibited TRPV1 in DRG neurons, contributing to maintain thermal nociceptive thresholds in normal rats, and as a compensatory mechanism, Shp-1 increased in DRGs of rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain, which was involved in protecting against excessive thermal hyperalgesia.

  3. Nitrous oxide persistently alleviates pain hypersensitivity in neuropathic rats: A dose-dependent effect

    PubMed Central

    Ben Boujema, Meric; Laboureyras, Emilie; Pype, Jan; Bessière, Baptiste; Simonnet, Guy

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite numerous pharmacological approaches, there are no common analgesic drugs that produce meaningful relief for the majority of patients with neuropathic pain. Although nitrous oxide (N2O) is a weak analgesic that acts via opioid-dependent mechanisms, it is also an antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). The NMDAR plays a critical role in the development of pain sensitization induced by nerve injury. OBJECTIVE: Using the chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in male rats as a preclinical model of neuropathic pain, the first aim of the present study was to evaluate the lowest N2O concentration and the shortest time of N2O postinjury exposure that would produce persistent relief of neuropathic pain. The second aim was to compare the effects of N2O with gabapentin, a reference drug used in human neuropathic pain relief. METHODS: Changes in the nociceptive threshold were evaluated using the paw pressure vocalization test in rats. RESULTS: Among the various N2O concentrations tested, which ranged from 25% to 50%, only 50% N2O single exposure for 1 h 15 min induced a persistent (minimum of three weeks) and significant (60%) reduction in pain hypersensitivity. A single gabapentin dose (75 mg/kg to 300 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) induced an acute (1 h to 1 h 30 min) dose-dependent effect, but not a persistent effect such as that observed with N2O. CONCLUSIONS: These preclinical results suggest that N2O is advantageous for long-lasting neuropathic pain relief after sciatic nerve injury compared with other drugs used in humans such as gabapentinoids or NMDAR antagonists. The present preclinical study provides a rationale for developing comparative clinical studies. PMID:26371891

  4. Alleviation of chronic pain following rat spinal cord compression injury with multimodal actions of huperzine A

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dou; Thakor, Devang K.; Han, Inbo; Ropper, Alexander E.; Haragopal, Hariprakash; Sidman, Richard L.; Zafonte, Ross; Schachter, Steven C.; Teng, Yang D.

    2013-01-01

    Diverse mechanisms including activation of NMDA receptors, microglial activation, reactive astrogliosis, loss of descending inhibition, and spasticity are responsible for ∼40% of cases of intractable neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI). Because conventional treatments blocking individual mechanisms elicit only short-term effectiveness, a multimodal approach with simultaneous actions against major pain-related pathways may have value for clinical management of chronic pain. We hypothesize that [-]-huperzine A (HUP-A), an alkaloid isolated from the club moss Huperzia serrata, that is a potent reversible inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase and NMDA receptors, could mitigate pain without invoking drug tolerance or dependence by stimulating cholinergic interneurons to impede pain signaling, inhibiting inflammation via microglial cholinergic activation, and blocking NMDA-mediated central hypersensitization. We tested our hypothesis by administering HUP-A i.p. or intrathecally to female Sprague–Dawley rats (200–235 g body weight) after moderate static compression (35 g for 5 min) of T10 spinal cord. Compared with controls, HUP-A treatment demonstrates significant analgesic effects in both regimens. SCI rats manifested no drug tolerance following repeated bolus i.p. or chronic intrathecal HUP-A dosing. The pain-ameliorating effect of HUP-A is cholinergic dependent. Relative to vehicle treatment, HUP-A administration also reduced neural inflammation, retained higher numbers of calcium-impermeable GluR2-containing AMPA receptors, and prevented Homer1a up-regulation in dorsal horn sensory neurons. Therefore, HUP-A may provide safe and effective management for chronic postneurotrauma pain by reestablishing homeostasis of sensory circuits. PMID:23386718

  5. Inhibiting the breakdown of endogenous opioids and cannabinoids to alleviate pain.

    PubMed

    Roques, Bernard P; Fournié-Zaluski, Marie-Claude; Wurm, Michel

    2012-04-01

    Chronic pain remains unsatisfactorily treated, and few novel painkillers have reached the market in the past century. Increasing the levels of the main endogenous opioid peptides - enkephalins - by inhibiting their two inactivating ectopeptidases, neprilysin and aminopeptidase N, has analgesic effects in various models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Stemming from the same pharmacological concept, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors have also been found to have analgesic effects in pain models by preventing the breakdown of endogenous cannabinoids. Dual enkephalinase inhibitors and FAAH inhibitors are now in early-stage clinical trials. In this Review, we compare the effects of these two potential classes of novel analgesics and describe the progress in their rational design. We also consider the challenges in their clinical development and opportunities for combination therapies.

  6. Reversal of TRESK Downregulation Alleviates Neuropathic Pain by Inhibiting Activation of Gliocytes in the Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Chen, Hongtao; Yang, Chengxiang; Zhong, Jiying; He, Wanyou; Xiong, Qingming

    2017-02-03

    Despite the consensus that activation of TWIK-related spinal cord K(+) (TRESK) might contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic pain, the specific mechanisms underlying the transfer and development of pain signals still remain obscure. In the present study, we validated that TRESK was expressed in neurons instead of glial cells. Furthermore, in the SNI model of neuropathic pain (NP), downregulation of TRESK in spinal cord neurons resulted in upregulation of connexin 36 (Cx36) and connexin 43 (Cx43), both being subtypes of gap junctions in the spinal cord, with gliocytes in the spinal cord activated ultimately. Compared with SNI rats, intrathecal injection of TRESK gene recombinant adenovirus significantly downregulated the expression levels of Cx36 and Cx43 and suppressed the activation of gliocytes in the spinal cord, with hyperalgesia significantly reduced. In conclusion, TRESK contributes to the pathogenesis of NP by upregulation of synaptic transmission and activation of gliocytes.

  7. Blindness, Diabetes, and Amputation: Alleviation of Depression and Pain through Thermal Biofeedback Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Needham, W. E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A 39-year-old man who was blind, diabetic, and had a double amputation with chronic renal failure and peripheral vascular disease was treated with thermal biofeedback to reduce his depression through increased self-control, to minimize pain, and to facilitate healing of a pregangrenous hand. On treatment discharge, his mental and physical states…

  8. A ‘toothache tree’ alkylamide inhibits Aδ mechanonociceptors to alleviate mechanical pain

    PubMed Central

    Tsunozaki, Makoto; Lennertz, Richard C; Vilceanu, Daniel; Katta, Samata; Stucky, Cheryl L; Bautista, D M

    2013-01-01

    In traditional medicine, the ‘toothache tree’ and other plants of the Zanthoxylum genus have been used to treat inflammatory pain conditions, such as toothache and rheumatoid arthritis. Here we examined the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the analgesic properties of hydroxy-α-sanshool, the active alkylamide produced by Zanthoxylum plants. Consistent with its analgesic effects in humans, sanshool treatment in mice caused a selective attenuation of mechanical sensitivity under naïve and inflammatory conditions, with no effect on thermal sensitivity. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which sanshool attenuates mechanical pain, we performed single fibre recordings, calcium imaging and whole-cell electrophysiology of cultured sensory neurons. We found that: (1) sanshool potently inhibits Aδ mechanonociceptors that mediate both sharp acute pain and inflammatory pain; (2) sanshool inhibits action potential firing by blocking voltage-gated sodium currents in a subset of somatosensory neurons, which express a unique combination of voltage-gated sodium channels; and (3) heterologously expressed Nav1.7 is most strongly inhibited by sanshool as compared to other sodium channels expressed in sensory neurons. These results suggest that sanshool targets voltage-gated sodium channels on Aδ mechanosensory nociceptors to dampen excitability and thus induce ‘fast pain’ analgesia. PMID:23652591

  9. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis along the dorsoventral axis contributes differentially to environmental enrichment combined with voluntary exercise in alleviating chronic inflammatory pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; Jiang, Ying-Ying; Xu, Ling-Chi; Ma, Long-Yu; Liu, Feng-Yu; Cui, Shuang; Cai, Jie; Liao, Fei-Fei; Wan, You; Yi, Ming

    2017-03-14

    Cognitive behavioral therapy, such as environmental enrichment combined with voluntary exercise (EE-VEx), is under active investigation as an adjunct to pharmaceutical treatment for chronic pain. However, the effectiveness and underlying mechanisms of EE-VEx remain unclear. In mice with intra-plantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), our results revealed that EE-VEx alleviated perceptual, affective and cognitive dimensions of chronic inflammatory pain. These effects of EE-VEx on chronic pain were contingent on the occurrence of adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus in a functionally dissociated manner along the dorsoventral axis: neurogenesis in the ventral dentate gyrus participated in alleviating perceptual and affective components of chronic pain by EE-VEx, whereas neurogenesis in the dorsal dentate gyrus was involved in EE-VEx's cognitive-enhancing effects. Chronic inflammatory pain was accompanied by decreased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the dentate gyrus, which were reversed by EE-VEx. Over-expression of BDNF in the dentate mimicked the effects of EE-VEx. Our results demonstrate distinct contribution of adult hippocampal neurogenesis along the dorsoventral axis to EE-VEx's beneficial effects on different dimensions of chronic pain.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTEnvironmental enrichment combined with voluntary exercise (EE-VEx) is under active investigation as an adjunct to pharmaceutical treatment for chronic pain, but its effectiveness and underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In a mouse model of inflammatory pain, the present study demonstrates that the beneficial effects of EE-VEx on chronic pain depend on adult neurogenesis with a dorsoventral dissociation along the hippocampal axis. Adult neurogenesis in the ventral dentate gyrus participates in alleviating perceptual and affective components of chronic pain by EE-VEx, whereas that in the dorsal pole is involved in EE-VEx's cognitive-enhancing effects in chronic pain.

  10. Phosphorylation state–dependent modulation of spinal glycine receptors alleviates inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Yévenes, Gonzalo E.; Ralvenius, William T.; Benke, Dietmar; Di Lio, Alessandra; Lara, Cesar O.; Muñoz, Braulio; Burgos, Carlos F.; Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Corringer, Pierre-Jean

    2016-01-01

    Diminished inhibitory neurotransmission in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord is thought to contribute to chronic pain. In inflammatory pain, reductions in synaptic inhibition occur partially through prostaglandin E2- (PGE2-) and PKA-dependent phosphorylation of a specific subtype of glycine receptors (GlyRs) that contain α3 subunits. Here, we demonstrated that 2,6-di-tert-butylphenol (2,6-DTBP), a nonanesthetic propofol derivative, reverses inflammation-mediated disinhibition through a specific interaction with heteromeric αβGlyRs containing phosphorylated α3 subunits. We expressed mutant GlyRs in HEK293T cells, and electrophysiological analyses of these receptors showed that 2,6-DTBP interacted with a conserved phenylalanine residue in the membrane-associated stretch between transmembrane regions 3 and 4 of the GlyR α3 subunit. In native murine spinal cord tissue, 2,6-DTBP modulated synaptic, presumably αβ heteromeric, GlyRs only after priming with PGE2. This observation is consistent with results obtained from molecular modeling of the α-β subunit interface and suggests that in α3βGlyRs, the binding site is accessible to 2,6-DTBP only after PKA-dependent phosphorylation. In murine models of inflammatory pain, 2,6-DTBP reduced inflammatory hyperalgesia in an α3GlyR-dependent manner. Together, our data thus establish that selective potentiation of GlyR function is a promising strategy against chronic inflammatory pain and that, to our knowledge, 2,6-DTBP has a unique pharmacological profile that favors an interaction with GlyRs that have been primed by peripheral inflammation. PMID:27270175

  11. Gelsemine alleviates both neuropathic pain and sleep disturbance in partial sciatic nerve ligation mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-er; Li, Ya-dong; Luo, Yan-jia; Wang, Tian-xiao; Wang, Hui-jing; Chen, Shuo-nan; Qu, Wei-min; Huang, Zhi-li

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Gelsemine, an alkaloid from the Chinese herb Gelsemium elegans (Gardn & Champ) Benth., is effective in mitigating chronic pain in rats. In the present study we investigated whether the alkaloid improved sleep disturbance, the most common comorbid symptoms of chronic pain, in a mouse model of neuropathic pain. Methods: Mice were subjected to partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL). After the mice were injected with gelsemine or pregabalin (the positive control) intraperitoneally, mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were assessed, and electroencephalogram (EEG)/electromyogram (EMG) recording was performed. Motor performance of the mice was assessed using rota-rod test. c-Fos expression in the brain was analyzed with immunohistochemical staining. Results: In PSNL mice, gelsemine (2 and 4 mg/kg) increased the mechanical threshold for 4 h and prolonged the thermal latencies for 3 h. Furthermore, gelsemine (4 mg/kg, administered at 6:30 AM) increased non-rapid eye movement (non-REM, NREM) sleep, decreased wakefulness, but did not affect REM sleep during the first 3 h in PSNL mice. Sleep architecture analysis showed that gelsemine decreased the mean duration of wakefulness and increased the total number of episodes of NREM sleep during the first 3 h after the dosing. Gelsemine (4 mg/kg) did not impair motor coordination in PSNL mice. Immunohistochemical study showed that PSNL increased c-Fos expression in the neurons of the anterior cingulate cortex, and gelsemine (4 mg/kg) decreased c-Fos expression by 58%. Gelsemine (4 mg/kg, administered at either 6:30 AM or 8:30 PM) did not produce hypnotic effect in normal mice. Pregabalin produced similar antinociceptive and hypnotic effects, but impaired motor coordination in PSNL mice. Conclusion: Gelsemine is an effective agent for treatment of both neuropathic pain and sleep disturbance in PSNL mice; anterior cingulate cortex might play a role in the hypnotic effects of gelsemine. PMID:26388157

  12. The measurement of menstrual symptoms: factor structure of the menstrual symptom questionnaire in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Negriff, Sonya; Dorn, Lorah D; Hillman, Jennifer B; Huang, Bin

    2009-10-01

    This study examined the factor structure of the Menstrual Symptom Questionnaire (MSQ) in a sample of 210 adolescent girls (11-17 years). Such an examination has not been carried out with an adolescent sample. In addition, the definitions of menstrual disorders have evolved since the creation of the MSQ. Exploratory factor analysis supported a three factor structure indicating abdominal pain, negative affect/somatic complaints, and back pain. Partial correlations indicated all three MSQ factors were correlated with depressive symptoms, but only the negative affect factor was correlated with trait anxiety. Future research should explore potential associations in multiple areas of functioning as menstrual symptoms may alter healthy developmental processes during adolescence.

  13. Formulation of Novel Layered Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose Film Wound Dressings with Ibuprofen for Alleviating Wound Pain

    PubMed Central

    Vinklárková, Lenka; Vetchý, David; Bernatonienė, Jurga

    2015-01-01

    Effective assessment and management of wound pain can facilitate both improvements in healing rates and overall quality of life. From a pharmacological perspective, topical application of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the form of film wound dressings may be a good choice. Thus, the aim of this work was to develop novel layered film wound dressings containing ibuprofen based on partially substituted fibrous sodium carboxymethylcellulose (nonwoven textile Hcel NaT). To this end, an innovative solvent casting method using a sequential coating technique has been applied. The concentration of ibuprofen which was incorporated as an acetone solution or as a suspension in a sodium carboxymethylcellulose dispersion was 0.5 mg/cm2 and 1.0 mg/cm2 of film. Results showed that developed films had adequate mechanical and swelling properties and an advantageous acidic surface pH for wound application. An in vitro drug release study implied that layered films retained the drug for a longer period of time and thus could minimize the frequency of changing the dressing. Films with suspended ibuprofen demonstrated higher drug content uniformity and superior in vitro drug release characteristics in comparison with ibuprofen incorporation as an acetone solution. Prepared films could be potential wound dressings for the effective treatment of wound pain in low exuding wounds. PMID:26090454

  14. Implication of Hypothalamus in Alleviating Spinal Cord Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Andrew D.; King, Kevin; Deitermann, Annika; Miranpuri, Gurwattan S.; Resnick, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is common among spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, and there remain clinical difficulties in treating NP due to the lack of understanding of underlying mechanisms. Extracellular proteins, such as matrix metalloproteinase and β-catenin, have been shown to be activated in the spinal cord regions following an injury, and may play a key role in contributing to NP states. While these extracellular proteins have been used as therapeutic targets in the spinal cord, there has also been evidence of up-regulation in the hypothalamus following a SCI. We hypothesize that the hypothalamus is involved in regulating NP following a SCI, and hence should be researched further to determine if it is a viable target for future therapeutic treatments. PMID:27721586

  15. Dual Alleviation of Acute and Neuropathic Pain by Fused Opioid Agonist-Neurokinin 1 Antagonist Peptidomimetics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herein, the synthesis and biological evaluation of dual opioid agonists–neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists is described. In these multitarget ligands, the two pharmacophores do not overlap, and this allowed maintaining high NK1R affinity and antagonist potency in compounds 12 and 13. Although the fusion of the two ligands resulted in slightly diminished opioid agonism at the μ- and δ-opioid receptors (MOR and DOR, respectively), as compared to the opioid parent peptide, balanced MOR/DOR activities were obtained. Compared to morphine, compounds 12 and 13 produced more potent antinociceptive effects in both acute (tail-flick) and neuropathic pain models (von Frey and cold plate). Similarly to morphine, analgesic tolerance developed after repetitive administration of these compounds. To our delight, compound 12 did not produce cross-tolerance with morphine and high antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects could be reinstated after chronic administration of each of the two compounds. PMID:26713106

  16. Dual Alleviation of Acute and Neuropathic Pain by Fused Opioid Agonist-Neurokinin 1 Antagonist Peptidomimetics.

    PubMed

    Betti, Cecilia; Starnowska, Joanna; Mika, Joanna; Dyniewicz, Jolanta; Frankiewicz, Lukasz; Novoa, Alexandre; Bochynska, Marta; Keresztes, Attila; Kosson, Piotr; Makuch, Wioletta; Van Duppen, Joost; Chung, Nga N; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Lipkowski, Andrzej W; Schiller, Peter W; Janssens, Frans; Ceusters, Marc; Sommen, François; Meert, Theo; Przewlocka, Barbara; Tourwé, Dirk; Ballet, Steven

    2015-12-10

    Herein, the synthesis and biological evaluation of dual opioid agonists-neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists is described. In these multitarget ligands, the two pharmacophores do not overlap, and this allowed maintaining high NK1R affinity and antagonist potency in compounds 12 and 13. Although the fusion of the two ligands resulted in slightly diminished opioid agonism at the μ- and δ-opioid receptors (MOR and DOR, respectively), as compared to the opioid parent peptide, balanced MOR/DOR activities were obtained. Compared to morphine, compounds 12 and 13 produced more potent antinociceptive effects in both acute (tail-flick) and neuropathic pain models (von Frey and cold plate). Similarly to morphine, analgesic tolerance developed after repetitive administration of these compounds. To our delight, compound 12 did not produce cross-tolerance with morphine and high antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects could be reinstated after chronic administration of each of the two compounds.

  17. Peripheral and spinal activation of cannabinoid receptors by joint mobilization alleviates postoperative pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Martins, D F; Mazzardo-Martins, L; Cidral-Filho, F J; Gadotti, V M; Santos, A R S

    2013-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the relative contribution of cannabinoid receptors (CBRs) subtypes and to analyze cannabimimetic mechanisms involved in the inhibition of anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol degradation on the antihyperalgesic effect of ankle joint mobilization (AJM). Mice (25-35g) were subjected to plantar incision (PI) and 24h after surgery animals received the following treatments, AJM for 9min, AEA (10mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]), WIN 55,212-2 (1.5mg/kg, i.p.), URB937 (0.01-1mg/kg, i.p.; a fatty acid amide hydrolase [FAAH] inhibitor) or JZL184 (0.016-16mg/kg, i.p.; a monoacylglycerol lipase [MAGL] inhibitor). Withdrawal frequency to mechanical stimuli was assessed 24h after PI and at different time intervals after treatments. Receptor specificity was investigated using selective CB1R (AM281) and CB2R (AM630) antagonists. In addition, the effect of the FAAH and MAGL inhibitors on the antihyperalgesic action of AJM was investigated. AJM, AEA, WIN 55,212-2, URB937 and JZL184 decreased mechanical hyperalgesia induced by PI. The antihyperalgesic effect of AJM was reversed by pretreatment with AM281 given by intraperitoneal and intrathecal routes, but not intraplantarly. Additionally, intraperitoneal and intraplantar, but not intrathecal administration of AM630 blocked AJM-induced antihyperalgesia. Interestingly, in mice pretreated with FAAH or the MAGL inhibitor the antihyperalgesic effect of AJM was significantly longer. This article presents data addressing the CBR mechanisms underlying the antihyperalgesic activity of joint mobilization as well as of the endocannabinoid catabolic enzyme inhibitors in the mouse postoperative pain model. Joint mobilization and these enzymes offer potential targets to treat postoperative pain.

  18. Cdk5 inhibitor roscovitine alleviates neuropathic pain in the dorsal root ganglia by downregulating N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Gu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Juan; Ma, Zhengliang

    2014-09-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a member of the small proline-directed serine/threonine kinase family. Cdk5 is not involved in cell cycle regulation, but is implicated in neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role of Cdk5 in neuropathic pain remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the possibility that Cdk5 is involved in neuropathic pain in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We injected intrathecally Cdk5 inhibitor roscovitine in rat model of chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion and examined pain behaviors and the expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 2A (NR2A) but not NR2B or NR1 in DRG. We found that roscovitine alleviated neuropathic pain, causing decline in paw withdrawal mechanical threshold and paw withdrawal thermal latency. Furthermore, roscovitine inhibited NR2A expression in DRG. These data suggest that Cdk5-NR2A pathway regulates neuropathic pain in DRG, and intrathecal injection of roscovitine could alleviate neuropathic pain. Our findings provide new insight into the analgesic effects of Roscovitine and identify Cdk5-NR2A pathway as a potential target for effective treatment of neuropathic pain.

  19. Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Menorrhagia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... will ask you about your medical history and menstrual cycles. He or she may ask you questions like ... got your first period? How long is your menstrual cycle? How many days does your period usually last? ...

  20. Decrease in neuroimmune activation by HSV-mediated gene transfer of TNFα soluble receptor alleviates pain in rats with diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Maier Ortmann, Kathryn L.; Chattopadhyay, Munmun

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of diabetic painful neuropathy are complicated and comprise of peripheral and central pathophysiological phenomena. A number of proinflammatory cytokines are involved in this process. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is considered to be one of the major contributors of neuropathic pain. In order to explore the potential role of inflammation in the peripheral nervous system of Type 1 diabetic animals with painful neuropathy, we investigated whether TNF-α is a key inflammatory mediator to the diabetic neuropathic pain and whether continuous delivery of TNFα soluble receptor from damaged axons achieved by HSV vector mediated transduction of DRG would block or alter the pain perception in animals with diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic animals exhibited changes in threshold of mechanical and thermal pain perception compared to control rats and also demonstrated increases in TNFα in the DRG, spinal cord dorsal horn, sciatic nerve and in the foot skin, 6 weeks after the onset of diabetes. Therapeutic approaches by HSV mediated expression of p55 TNF soluble receptor significantly attenuated the diabetes-induced hyperalgesia and decreased the expression of TNFα with reduction in the phosphorylation of p38MAPK in the spinal cord dorsal horn and DRG. The overall outcome of this study suggests that neuroinflammatory activation in the peripheral nervous system may be involved in the pathogenesis of painful neuropathy in Type 1 diabetes which can be alleviated by local expression of HSV vector expressing p55 TNF soluble receptor. PMID:24880032

  1. Decrease in neuroimmune activation by HSV-mediated gene transfer of TNFα soluble receptor alleviates pain in rats with diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ortmann, Kathryn L Maier; Chattopadhyay, Munmun

    2014-10-01

    The mechanisms of diabetic painful neuropathy are complicated and comprise of peripheral and central pathophysiological phenomena. A number of proinflammatory cytokines are involved in this process. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is considered to be one of the major contributors of neuropathic pain. In order to explore the potential role of inflammation in the peripheral nervous system of Type 1 diabetic animals with painful neuropathy, we investigated whether TNF-α is a key inflammatory mediator to the diabetic neuropathic pain and whether continuous delivery of TNFα soluble receptor from damaged axons achieved by HSV vector mediated transduction of DRG would block or alter the pain perception in animals with diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic animals exhibited changes in threshold of mechanical and thermal pain perception compared to control rats and also demonstrated increases in TNFα in the DRG, spinal cord dorsal horn, sciatic nerve and in the foot skin, 6 weeks after the onset of diabetes. Therapeutic approaches by HSV mediated expression of p55 TNF soluble receptor significantly attenuated the diabetes-induced hyperalgesia and decreased the expression of TNFα with reduction in the phosphorylation of p38MAPK in the spinal cord dorsal horn and DRG. The overall outcome of this study suggests that neuroinflammatory activation in the peripheral nervous system may be involved in the pathogenesis of painful neuropathy in Type 1 diabetes which can be alleviated by local expression of HSV vector expressing p55 TNF soluble receptor.

  2. Menstruation and the Menstrual Cycle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menstruation and the menstrual cycle Menstruation and the menstrual cycle > A-Z Health Topics Want help teaching your ... email updates Enter email Submit Menstruation and the menstrual cycle Menstruation is a woman's monthly bleeding. When you ...

  3. Your Menstrual Cycle

    MedlinePlus

    ... your best Fighting germs Your sexuality What are STDs and STIs? Seeing the doctor Quizzes Links to more information on girls' ... What happens during your menstrual cycle The menstrual cycle includes not just your period, but the rise and fall of hormones and other body changes ...

  4. Interleukin-1β pre-treated bone marrow stromal cells alleviate neuropathic pain through CCL7-mediated inhibition of microglial activation in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Deng, Guoying; Wang, Haowei; Yang, Mei; Yang, Rui; Li, Xiangnan; Zhang, Xiaoping; Yuan, Hongbin

    2017-01-01

    Although neuropathic pain is one of the most intractable diseases, recent studies indicate that systemic or local injection of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) decreases pro-inflammatory cytokines release and alleviates neuropathic pain. However, it is still not clear whether pre-treated BMSCs have a strong anti-inflammatory and/or analgesia effect. Using the spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain, IL-1β pre-treated BMSCs (IL-1β-BMSCs) were injected into rats followed by SNL in order to determine possible effects. Results indicated that IL-1β-BMSCs were more efficacious in both amelioration of neuropathic pain and inhibition of microglia activation. Specifically, microglia inhibition was found to be mediated by chemokine C-C motif ligand 7 (CCL7) but not CCL2. Results also showed that IL-1β-BMSCs had a stronger inhibitory effect on astrocyte activation as well as CCL7 release, which was found to be mediated by IL-10 not transforming growth factor-β1. In addition, we also found directional migration of IL-1β-BMSCs was mediated by inceased C-X-C motif chemokine ligand (CXCL) 13 expression following SNL. In conclusion, our results indicated IL-1β-BMSCs could inhibit microglia activation and neuropathic pain by decreasing CCL7 level in spinal cord. PMID:28195183

  5. Gabapentin alleviates facet-mediated pain in the rat through reduced neuronal hyperexcitability and astrocytic activation in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ling; Crosby, Nathan D.; Winkelstein, Beth A.

    2013-01-01

    Although joint pain is common, its mechanism(s) remain undefined, with little known about the spinal neuronal responses that contribute to this type of pain. Afferent activity and sustained spinal neuronal hyperexcitability correlate to facet joint loading and the extent of behavioral sensitivity induced after painful facet injury, suggesting spinal neuronal plasticity is induced in association with facet-mediated pain. This study used a rat model of painful C6/C7 facet joint stretch, together with intrathecal administration of gabapentin, to investigate the effects of one aspect of spinal neuronal function on joint pain. Gabapentin or saline vehicle was given via lumbar puncture prior to and at 1 day after painful joint distraction. Mechanical hyperalgesia was measured in the forepaw for 7 days. Extracellular recordings of neuronal activity and astrocytic and microglial activation in the cervical spinal cord were evaluated at day 7. Gabapentin significantly (p=0.0001) attenuated mechanical hyperalgesia and the frequency of evoked neuronal firing also significantly decreased (p<0.047) with gabapentin treatment. Gabapentin also decreased (p<0.04) spinal GFAP expression. Although spinal Iba1 expression was doubled over sham, gabapentin did not reduce it. Facet joint-mediated pain appears to be sustained through spinal neuronal modifications that are also associated with astrocytic activation. PMID:24094695

  6. Menstruation and Menstrual Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... woman's body. If fertilization occurs, the newly formed embryo travels back through the fallopian tube into the ... in the form of menstrual bleeding. Implantation The embryo must successfully implant in the thickened wall of ...

  7. Menstrual Cramps (Dysmenorrhea)

    MedlinePlus

    ... than a placebo in easing menstrual cramps. References Smith RP, et al. Primary dysmenorrhea in adult women: ... abnormalities/dysmenorrhea.html#v1062408. Accessed Jan. 17, 2014. Smith RP, et al. Treatment of primary dysmenorrhea in ...

  8. Menorrhagia (Heavy Menstrual Bleeding)

    MedlinePlus

    ... effect of using a nonhormonal intrauterine device for birth control. When an IUD is the cause of excessive menstrual bleeding, you may need to remove it. Pregnancy complications. A single, heavy, late period may be due to a miscarriage. If ...

  9. A Double-Blind Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial of Magnesium Oxide for Alleviation of Chronic Low Back Pain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    place (Smith, 1996). The NMDA receptors are found throughout the brain and especially in the telencephalic structures. The hippocampus is heavily... morphine equivalents) 2. Dependent Variables: (a) Pain (as measured by a 10 point numeric pain intensity scale) (b) Quality of Life (as measured by a...analgesics has also been extensively researched. Miranda and Paeile (1989) reported a minireview of the interactions between calcium channel blockers and

  10. Duloxetine Inhibits Microglial P2X4 Receptor Function and Alleviates Neuropathic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Shota; Zhang, Jiaming; Kometani, Miho; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Kohno, Keita; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Tsuda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    P2X4 receptors (P2X4R) are a family of ATP-gated non-selective cation channels. We previously demonstrated that activation of P2X4R in spinal microglia is crucial for neuropathic pain, a highly debilitating chronic pain condition, suggesting that P2X4R is a potential therapeutic target for treating neuropathic pain. Thus, the identification of a compound that has a potent inhibitory effect on P2X4R is an important clinical challenge. In the present study, we screened a chemical library of clinically approved drugs and show for the first time that duloxetine, a serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, has an inhibitory effect on rodent and human P2X4R. In primary cultured microglial cells, duloxetine also inhibited P2X4R-, but not P2X7R-, mediated responses. Moreover, intrathecal administration of duloxetine in a model of neuropathic pain produced a reversal of nerve injury-induced mechanical allodynia, a cardinal symptom of neuropathic pain. In rats that were pretreated with a serotonin-depleting agent and a noradrenaline neurotoxin, the antiallodynic effect of duloxetine was reduced, but still remained. Based on these results, we suggest that, in addition to duloxetine’s primary inhibitory action on serotonin and noradrenaline transporters, an inhibitory effect on P2X4R may be involved at least in part in an antiallodynic effect of intrathecal duloxetine in a model of neuropathic pain. PMID:27768754

  11. Silencing the NR2B gene in rat ACC neurons by lentivirus-delivered shRNA alleviates pain-related aversion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shou-Gang; Lv, Xiu-Hua; Guan, Shan-Hui; Li, Hui-Lu; Qiao, Yong; Feng, Hao; Cong, Lin; Wang, Gong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor NR2B subunit on neurons in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is implicated in the affective response to noxious stimuli. Selectively silencing this NR2B subunit in ACC neurons could therefore alleviate pain-related aversion. However, to date, there is no optimal approach to selectively silence the NR2B gene in ACC neurons. In the present study, we constructed lentiviral vectors and delivered shRNA (NR2B-RNAi-LV) to effectively silence the NR2B gene in ACC neurons. The use of lentivirus resulted in 95% transfection efficiency and 83% silencing of the NR2B gene in ACC neurons. Electrophysiological experiments showed that the total INMDA was similarly reduced by 48% in lentivirus-transfected ACC neurons. The biochemical and functional data demonstrated that lentiviral shRNA delivery produced a high transfection and silencing efficiency in the ACC neurons. SNI rats weighting 220-250 g were randomly divided into three groups: normal saline group (NS), lenti-siRNA/NC (LV-NC) group, and lenti-siRNA/NR2B (LV-NR2B) group, and conditioned place avoidance was conducted. The results indicated that NR2B-RNAi-LV decreased greatly the conditioning scores of F-CPA while NC-GFP-LV has no effects. NR2B mRNA expression in the NR2B-RNAi-LV group was significantly lower than that in the control group and NC-GFP-LV group. This novel approach of silencing the NR2B gene in ACC neuron could potentially be used to alleviate pain-related aversion.

  12. Behavioral effects of cyclic changes in serotonin during the human menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Warren, D E; Tedford, W H; Flynn, W E

    1979-03-01

    Many cyclic changes during the menstrual cycle (temperature, depression, motor activity, pain sensitivity, etc.) are closely paralleled by changes in brain serotonin level. These changes, in turn, are associated with peripheral hormone levels which are comparatively regular and easily measured. Their measurement may be useful both in predicting behavior and in accounting for atypical menstrual-related behavior.

  13. Safety and efficacy of botox injection in alleviating post-operative pain and improving quality of life in lower extremity limb lengthening and deformity correction

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy, Reggie C; Montpetit, Kathleen; Ruck-Gibis, Joanne; Thorstad, Kelly; Raney, Ellen; Aiona, Michael; Platt, Robert; Finley, Allen; Mackenzie, William; McCarthy, James; Narayanan, Unni

    2007-01-01

    Background Distraction osteogenesis is the standard treatment for the management of lower limb length discrepancy of more than 3 cm and bone loss secondary to congenital anomalies, trauma or infection. This technique consists of an osteotomy of the bone to be lengthened, application of an external fixator, followed by gradual and controlled distraction of the bone ends. Although limb lengthening using the Ilizarov distraction osteogenesis principle yields excellent results in most cases, the technique has numerous problems and is not well tolerated by many children. The objective of the current study is to determine if Botulinum Toxin A (BTX-A), which is known to possess both analgesic and paralytic actions, can be used to alleviate post-operative pain and improve the functional outcome of children undergoing distraction osteogenesis. Methods/Design The study design consists of a multi centre, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Patients between ages 5–21 years requiring limb lengthening or deformity correction using distraction will be recruited from 6 different sites (Shriners Hospital for Children in Montreal, Honolulu, Philadelphia and Portland as well as DuPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Delaware and Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ont). Approximately 150 subjects will be recruited over 2 years and will be randomized to either receive 10 units per Kg of BTX-A or normal saline (control group) intraoperatively following the surgery. Functional outcome effects will be assessed using pain scores, medication dosages, range of motion, flexibility, strength, mobility function and quality of life of the patient. IRB approval was obtained from all sites and adverse reactions will be monitored vigorously and reported to IRB, FDA and Health Canada. Discussion BTX-A injection has been widely used world wide with no major side effects reported. However, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time BTX-A is being used under the

  14. Evaluation of Transient Pin-Stress Requirements for Spacecraft Launching in Lightning Environments. Pain Free Analysis to Alleviate Those Pin Stress Headaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Paul; Terseck, Alex; Trout, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Spacecraft are generally protected from direct lightning attachment by encapsulation within the payload fairing of a launch vehicle and the ground structures that exist at the launch site. Regardless of where lightning strikes, potentially damaging indirect effects prevail from the coupling of electromagnetic fields into a loop created by outer shield of the payload umbilical. The energy coupled into individual spacecraft circuits is dependent on the umbilical current drive, the cable transfer impedance and the source/ load circuitry, and the reference potential used. Lightning induced transient susceptibility of the spacecraft avionics needs to be fully understood in order to define realistic re-test criteria in the event of a lightning occurrence during the launch campaign. Use of standards such as RTCA/DO-160 & SAE 5412 has some applicability but do not represent the indirect environment adequately. This paper evaluates the launch pad environments, the measurement data available, and computer simulations to provide pain-free analysis to alleviate the transient pin-stress headaches for spacecraft launching in Lightning environments.

  15. Moxibustion for pain relief in patients with primary dysmenorrhea: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Linna; Lao, Lixing; Chen, Jiao; Yu, Siyi; Yu, Zheng; Tang, Hongzhi; Yi, Ling; Wu, Xi; Yang, Jie; Liang, Fanrong

    2017-01-01

    Background Though moxibustion is frequently used to treat primary dysmenorrhea in China, relevant evidence supporting its effectiveness is still scanty. Methods This study was a pragmatic randomized, conventional drug controlled, open-labeled clinical trial. After initial screen, 152 eligible participants were averagely randomized to receive two different treatment strategies: Moxibustion and conventional drugs. Participants and practitioners were not blinded in this study. The duration of each treatment was 3 months. The primary outcome was pain relief measured by the Visual Analogue Scale. The menstrual pain severity was recorded in a menstrual pain diary. Results 152 eligible patients were included but only 133 of them eventually completed the whole treatment course. The results showed that the menstrual pain intensity in experimental group and control group was reduced from 6.38±1.28 and 6.41±1.29, respectively, at baseline, to 2.54±1.41 and 2.47±1.29 after treatment. The pain reduction was not significantly different between these two groups (P = 0.76), however; the pain intensity was significantly reduced relative to baseline for each group (P<0.01). Three months after treatment, the effectiveness of moxibustion sustained and started to be superior to the drug’s effect (-0.87, 95%CI -1.32 to -0.42, P<0.01). Secondary outcome analyses showed that moxibustion was as effective as drugs in alleviating menstrual pain-related symptoms. The serum levels of pain mediators, such as PGF2α, OT, vWF, β-EP, PGE2, were significantly improved after treatment in both groups (P<0.05). No adverse events were reported in this trial. Conclusions Both moxibustion and conventional drug showed desirable merits in managing menstrual pain, given their treatment effects and economic costs. This study as a pragmatic trial only demonstrates the effectiveness, not the efficacy, of moxibustion for menstrual pain. It can’t rule out the effect of psychological factors during

  16. Smoking- and menstrual-related symptomatology during short-term smoking abstinence by menstrual phase and depressive symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sharon S.; Allen, Alicia M.; Tosun, Nicole; Lunos, Scott; al’Absi, Mustafa; Hatsukami, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    Menstrual phase and depressive symptoms are known to minimize quit attempts in women. Therefore, the influence of these factors on smoking- and menstrual-related symptomatology during acute smoking cessation was investigated in a controlled cross-over lab-study. Participants (n=147) completed two six-day testing weeks during their menstrual cycle with testing order randomly assigned (follicular vs. luteal). The testing week consisted of two days of ad libitum smoking followed by four days of biochemically verified smoking abstinence. Daily symptomatology measures were collected. Out of the 11 total symptoms investigated, six were significantly associated with menstrual phase and nine were significantly associated with level of depressive symptoms. Two significant interactions were noted indicating that there may be a stronger association between depressive symptoms with negative affect and premenstrual pain during follicular phase compared to luteal phase. Overall, these observations suggest that during acute smoking abstinence in premenopausal smokers, there is an association between depressive symptoms and symptomatology whereas menstrual phase appears to have less of an effect. Further study is needed to determine the effect of these observations on smoking cessation outcomes, as well as to define the mechanism of menstrual phase and depressive symptoms on smoking-related symptomatology. PMID:24594903

  17. Effects of menstrual cycle on sports performance.

    PubMed

    Kishali, Necip Fazil; Imamoglu, Osman; Katkat, Dursun; Atan, Tulin; Akyol, Pelin

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of menstrual cycle on female athletes' performance. Forty-eight teak-wondo athletes, 76 judoka, 81 volleyball, and 36 basketball players (total 241) elite athletes participated in the study. A questionnaire constituted from 21 questions about menstrual cycle applied. A one-way analysis of variance and scheffe tests were performed to assess differences between sport branches about physical and physiological characteristics. Chi square was used to evaluate the regularity of menstrual cycle, performance, and drug taking. The mean age of teak-wondo athletes, judokas, volleyball and basketball players were 20.71 +/- 0.41, 16.91 +/- 0.27, 21.22 +/- 0.26, and 21.03 +/- 0.63 years, respectively. The menarche ages of the athletes were 13.92, 13.22, 13.75, 13.86 years, respectively. 27.8% participated in regional competitions, 46.1% participated in just the national competitions, and 26.1% participated in the international competitions. Whereas the menstrual disorder was seen in 14.5% of the athletes in normal time, during the intensive exercise this ratio was increased to 20.7%. It was determined that during the competition 11.6% of the athletes used drug, 36.9% had a painful menstruation, 17.4% did not have a painful menstruation, 45.6% sometimes had a painful menstruation, and 63.1% of the athletes said that their pain decreased during the competition. First 14 days after the menstruation began, 71% of the athletes said that they felt themselves well. 71% of the athletes felt worst just before the menstruation period, 62.2% of the athletes said that their performance was same during the menstruation, and 21.2% said that their performance got worse. Both in general and during the training the menstruation period of the athletes was found to be regular (p < .01). Most of the athletes said that they have a painful menstruation period, and during the competition their pain decreased. As a result of the questionnaire, during the

  18. "Menstrual induction" with Sulproston.

    PubMed

    Csapo, A I; Peskin, E G; Pulkkinen, M; Laajoki, V; Kivikoski, A; Lampe, L; Godeny, S; Szeverenyi, M; Herczeg, J; Resch, B; Bacos, L

    1982-11-01

    The PGE2-analogue Sulproston (16-phenoxy-omega-17,18,19,20-tetranor-PGE2-mythylsulfonylamide) was administered to 200 medically and gynecologically normal women who were 17 +/- 0.4 days beyond their expected menstrual period and who had a positive pregnancy test. The intramuscular impact dose (500 micrograms repeated after 4 hours) caused an immediate tonic uterine contraction which compromised the estradiol 17 beta, progesterone and chorionic gonadotropin production within the fetoplacental unit, and thereby allowed the evolution of cyclic uterine activity, cervical dilatation and tissue expulsion. Pregnancy termination was complete in 92% of women, 5.5% required surgical curettage and 2.5% were given a second Sulproston treatment 2-3 weeks after the first to remove retained tissue from the uterus. The medical induction of menstruation was preferred by 83% of the women who had previously experienced surgical termination of pregnancy. Normal menstruation resumed in all women after 36 +/- 0.9 days. The majority of 42 women questioned found Sulproston a satisfactory, safe, simple and effective drug regimen for "menstrual induction".

  19. The etiquette of endometriosis: stigmatisation, menstrual concealment and the diagnostic delay.

    PubMed

    Seear, Kate

    2009-10-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic gynaecological condition of uncertain aetiology characterised by menstrual irregularities. Several studies have previously identified a lengthy delay experienced by patients between the first onset of symptoms and eventual diagnosis. Various explanations have been advanced for the diagnostic delay, with both doctors and women being implicated. Such explanations include that doctors normalise women's menstrual pain and that women might delay in seeking medical advice because they have difficulty distinguishing between 'normal' and 'abnormal' menstruation. It has been suggested that the diagnostic delay could be reduced if women were trained in how to distinguish between 'normal' and 'abnormal' menstrual cycles. In this paper I argue that whilst these may be factors in the diagnostic delay, women's reluctance to disclose problems associated with their menstrual cycle may be a more significant and hitherto neglected factor. I argue women are reluctant to disclose menstrual irregularities because menstruation is a 'discrediting attribute' (Goffman, 1963) and disclosure renders women vulnerable to stigmatisation. Women actively conceal their menstrual irregularities through practices of the 'menstrual etiquette' (Laws, 1990) which involves the strategic concealment of menstrual problems. This argument is supported through an analysis of the experiences of 20 Australian women diagnosed with endometriosis. The ramifications of this analysis for chronic pain conditions more generally and for practical strategies designed to address the endometriosis diagnostic delay are considered.

  20. [Menstrual cycle disorders in adolescence].

    PubMed

    Escobar, María E; Pipman, Viviana; Arcari, Andrea; Boulgourdjian, Elisabeth; Keselman, Ana; Pasqualini, Titania; Alonso, Guillermo; Blanco, Miguel

    2010-08-01

    The high prevalence of menstrual disorders during the first years after menarche is well recognized. This is usually a cause of concern for parents and patients, and a common reason for visiting the pediatrician. The immaturity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis is the major cause of these disorders, but there are also some general organic or emotional conditions that may alter the menstrual cycle, which is a sensitive indicator of health. Physiology of the menstrual cycle, its alterations, etiology, assessment, diagnosis and treatment are reviewed in this article.

  1. The menstrual myth revisited.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S J; Garling, J

    1981-01-01

    In an age when research is sweeping away many long-held medical misconceptions, the body of knowledge surrounding women's menstrual cycle remains tainted by age-old myths and taboos. These myths not only reflect inaccuracies, but also perpetuate "theories" about women's behavior that can be detrimental. It is not only in the personal realm, but in the political as well, that this issue gains importance. As long as policy-makers are influenced by suspicions about cyclic symptoms, women's emotional and intellectual stability will be questioned, with consequent repercussions in disability and employment practices. As nurses we have a vested interest in investigations that will establish a new data base from which to draw fresh insights, not only because it is relevant for female clients, but also because nursing as a profession is composed largely of women. As Wilma Scott Heide (1973) observes, "nursing suffers from the same oppression, prejudices, and limitations as women in our society." In other words, the problems of women are the problems of nursing.

  2. Association of physical and emotional symptoms with the menstrual cycle and life-style.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Franco, M R; Malacara, J M

    1993-06-01

    The frequency and severity of physical and emotional menstrual symptoms were investigated with a cross-sectional study of 502 women not seeking treatment for menstrual symptoms. The most frequent symptoms were abdominal bloating, backache, headache, constipation, low abdominal pain, fatigue and symptoms related to depression. Some symptoms increased during the late luteal phase, and others were related to the women's life-style. Lack of schooling and living in rural areas were associated with headache, backache, sadness, insecurity, restlessness and weakness. Women from urban areas with more schooling had more breast tenderness, abdominal pain, irritability, depression, aggressiveness and increased sexual desire. Younger women had increased appetite, lack of concentration, insecurity, desire to be alone, weakness and dissatisfaction with their looks. Heavier women had more leg cramps, swollen feet, lack of coordination and polydipsia. Menstrual symptoms seem to be determined by the interplay of the menstrual cycle with biologic factors and life-style.

  3. Effectiveness and safety of dydrogesterone in regularization of menstrual cycle: a post-marketing study.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Nilesh; Chauhan, Naveen; Vaidya, Vishal

    2016-08-01

    Oral administration of dydrogesterone during second half of menstrual cycle has been shown to reduce menstrual irregularities. This prospective, observational study aimed to determine continued effectiveness of dydrogesterone (prescribed between 1 and 6 cycles or longer) in menstrual cycle regularization in Indian women aged ≥18 years with irregular menstrual cycle for at least 3 months. Those achieving regular cycles (21 to 35 days, inclusive) during treatment were followed up for 6 months after cessation of dydrogesterone treatment. Of the 910 women completing dydrogesterone treatment, 880 (96.7%) achieved cycle regularization (p<0.0001 for 90% success rate) at end of treatment (EOT). Of the 788 subjects available for follow up at 6 months, 747 (94.8%) reported cycle regularity (p<0.0001 for 90% success rate). At EOT, the mean cycle duration reduced by 16.14 (±24.04) days and mean amount of menstrual bleeding decreased by 0.45 (±1.20) pads/day. While five subjects reported worst pain at baseline, none experienced it at EOT. One serious adverse event (appendicitis) and three non-serious adverse events were reported. Dydrogesterone regularizes and improves the duration of the menstrual cycle, reduces the amount of bleeding, relieves menstrual pain and prevents relapse of irregular cycles at six months after discontinuation of treatment.

  4. Lower Back Pain Symptom Checker Flowchart

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the back. Some causes and treatment of back pain are described in this chart.Our trusted Symptom ... Problems Hip Problems Knee Problems Leg Problems Lower Back Pain Menstrual Cycle Problems Mouth Problems Mouth Problems in ...

  5. Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling in the Insular Cortex Alleviates Neuropathic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Minjee; Han, Jeongsoo; Kim, Un Jeng; Cha, Myeounghoon; Um, Sun Woo; Bai, Sun Joon; Hong, Seong-Karp; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Injury of peripheral nerves can trigger neuropathic pain, producing allodynia and hyperalgesia via peripheral and central sensitization. Recent studies have focused on the role of the insular cortex (IC) in neuropathic pain. Because the IC is thought to store pain-related memories, translational regulation in this structure may reveal novel targets for controlling chronic pain. Signaling via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which is known to control mRNA translation and influence synaptic plasticity, has been studied at the spinal level in neuropathic pain, but its role in the IC under these conditions remains elusive. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the role of mTOR signaling in neuropathic pain and to assess the potential therapeutic effects of rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, in the IC of rats with neuropathic pain. Mechanical allodynia was assessed in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats after neuropathic surgery and following microinjections of rapamycin into the IC on postoperative days (PODs) 3 and 7. Optical recording was conducted to observe the neural responses of the IC to peripheral stimulation. Rapamycin reduced mechanical allodynia and downregulated the expression of postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), decreased neural excitability in the IC, thereby inhibiting neuropathic pain-induced synaptic plasticity. These findings suggest that mTOR signaling in the IC may be a critical molecular mechanism modulating neuropathic pain. PMID:28377693

  6. A novel substituted aminoquinoline selectively targets voltage-sensitive sodium channel isoforms and NMDA receptor subtypes and alleviates chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tabakoff, Boris; Ren, Wenhua; Vanderlinden, Lauren; Snell, Lawrence D; Matheson, Christopher J; Wang, Ze-Jun; Levinson, Rock; Smothers, C Thetford; Woodward, John J; Honse, Yumiko; Lovinger, David; Rush, Anthony M; Sather, William A; Gustafson, Daniel L; Hoffman, Paula L

    2016-08-05

    Recent understanding of the systems that mediate complex disease states, has generated a search for molecules that simultaneously modulate more than one component of a pathologic pathway. Chronic pain syndromes are etiologically connected to functional changes (sensitization) in both peripheral sensory neurons and in the central nervous system (CNS). These functional changes involve modifications of a significant number of components of signal generating, signal transducing and signal propagating pathways. Our analysis of disease-related changes which take place in sensory neurons during sensitization led to the design of a molecule that would simultaneously inhibit peripheral NMDA receptors and voltage sensitive sodium channels. In the current report, we detail the selectivity of N,N-(diphenyl)-4-ureido-5,7-dichloro-2-carboxy-quinoline (DCUKA) for action at NMDA receptors composed of different subunit combinations and voltage sensitive sodium channels having different α subunits. We show that DCUKA is restricted to the periphery after oral administration, and that circulating blood levels are compatible with its necessary concentrations for effects at the peripheral cognate receptors/channels that were assayed in vitro. Our results demonstrate that DCUKA, at concentrations circulating in the blood after oral administration, can modulate systems which are upregulated during peripheral sensitization, and are important for generating and conducting pain information to the CNS. Furthermore, we demonstrate that DCUKA ameliorates the hyperalgesia of chronic pain without affecting normal pain responses in neuropathic and inflammation-induced chronic pain models.

  7. Lavandula angustifolia Mill. Oil and Its Active Constituent Linalyl Acetate Alleviate Pain and Urinary Residual Sense after Colorectal Cancer Surgery: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, So Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Pain and urinary symptoms following colorectal cancer (CRC) surgery are frequent and carry a poor recovery. This study tested the effects of inhalation of Lavandula angustifolia Mill. (lavender) oil or linalyl acetate on pain relief and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) following the removal of indwelling urinary catheters from patients after CRC surgery. This randomised control study recruited 66 subjects with indwelling urinary catheters after undergoing CRC surgery who later underwent catheter removal. Patients inhaled 1% lavender, 1% linalyl acetate, or vehicle (control group) for 20 minutes. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), heart rate, LUTS, and visual analog scales of pain magnitude and quality of life (QoL) regarding urinary symptoms were measured before and after inhalation. Systolic BP, diastolic BP, heart rate, LUTS, and QoL satisfaction with urinary symptoms were similar in the three groups. Significant differences in pain magnitude and urinary residual sense of indwelling catheters were observed among the three groups, with inhalation of linalyl acetate being significantly more effective than inhalation of lavender or vehicle. Inhalation of linalyl acetate is an effective nursing intervention to relieve pain and urinary residual sense of indwelling urinary catheters following their removal from patients who underwent CRC surgery. PMID:28154606

  8. The behavioral assessment and alleviation of pain associated with castration in beef calves treated with flunixin meglumine and caudal lidocaine epidural anesthesia with epinephrine.

    PubMed

    Currah, Jan M; Hendrick, Steven H; Stookey, Joseph M

    2009-04-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to determine the effects of flunixin megulmine in combination with caudal epidural anesthesia as a postoperative analgesic in beef calves following surgical castration, and 2) to consider stride length and pedometry as potential behavioral assessment tools for detecting postcastration pain. Surgical castration was performed in 101 beef calves randomly assigned to 3 treatment subgroups: 1) castration without anesthesia (SURG); 2) castration following lidocaine with epinephrine caudal epidural anesthesia (SURG + EPI); 3) castration following lidocaine with epinephrine caudal epidural anesthesia and flunixin meglumine (SURG + EPI + F). Several outcomes, including pedometer counts, changes in stride length, subjective visual assessment of pain, instantaneous scan sampling of the calves' postoperative activities, and the amount of movement and vocalization during the castration procedure, were measured to identify and quantify pain. The results indicated that stride length and the number of steps taken by calves after castration appear to be good measures of pain. Significant differences found between treatment groups for stride length and visual assessments suggest that flunixin meglumine can be considered to provide visible pain relief up to 8 hours postcastration.

  9. Premenarcheal Mexican girls' expectations concerning perimenstrual changes and menstrual attitudes.

    PubMed

    Marván, M L; Espinosa-Hernández, G; Vacio, A

    2002-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine both the perimenstrual changes that Mexican premenarcheal girls expect to experience and their attitudes toward menstruation. A total of 750 premenarcheal girls in fifth and sixth grade were studied. Participants completed a Perimenstrual Change Checklist, which listed 20 negative possible perimenstrual changes and ten positive ones, and a Spanish version of the Adolescent Menstrual Attitude Questionnaire. The results showed a set of mostly negative perimenstrual expectations, the most common being discomfort, cramps or abdominal pain and mood swings. Concerning menstrual attitudes, the girls scored highest on secrecy, followed by negative feelings and by positive feelings. The girls who perceived menstruation as a negative event and with secrecy, expected more negative perimenstrual changes, while those who perceived menstruation as a positive event expected more positive perimenstrual changes. We believe premenarcheal girls, with no personal experience, must be more influenced by cultural stereotypes which are of a negative nature.

  10. Maslinic acid in olive fruit alleviates mild knee joint pain and improves quality of life by promoting weight loss in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Fukumitsu, Satoshi; Villareal, Myra O; Aida, Kazuhiko; Hino, Akihiro; Hori, Noriya; Isoda, Hiroko; Naito, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of olives (Olea europaea L.) is associated with a low incidence of inflammation-related diseases. Olive fruit is rich in bioactive pentacyclic triterpenoids, mainly maslinic acid. This study, a randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial, examined the effects of an orally administered maslinic acid supplement, olive fruit extract, on 20 middle-aged and elderly volunteers with mild knee joint pain. Each subject (58 ± 7 years) received either olive fruit extract, containing 50 mg maslinic acid (n = 12), or placebo (n = 8) daily for 12 weeks and evaluated for pain and physical functions as primary outcome measures. Secondary outcome measures included body composition and inflammatory biomarkers in serum. Although both groups exhibited improved pain visual analogue scale score and quality of life after supplementation, symptoms were better in the maslinic acid group than in the placebo group. After 12 weeks, maslinic acid group exhibited significant decrease in body weight and body mass index suggesting that maslinic acid affected the weight of volunteers with mild knee joint pain. Therefore, olive products containing maslinic acid may be useful as a new preventive and therapeutic food ingredient for arthritic diseases. Since this clinical study is a preliminary study, it was not registered in a publicly accessible database. PMID:27895390

  11. Menstrual Dysfunction in Pathophysiologic States

    PubMed Central

    Neinstein, Lawrence S.

    1985-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is a complex entity involving many interactions of the central nervous system, hypothalamus, pituitary and ovaries. Normal menstrual function depends on a pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion leading to a pulsatile luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone secretion that stimulates the ovaries. A cyclic burst of luteinizing hormone is also required for ovulation. Certain pathophysiologic states, such as those produced by stress, exercise and drugs, have the potential to affect the cycle at many levels. Chronic illness may have effects on β-endorphins and hypothalamic functioning. Alternatively, the weight loss associated with chronic illness may alter estrogen metabolism, thus altering hypothalamic or pituitary function. Anorexia nervosa and simple weight loss may have effects at the hypothalamic level or through altering estrogen metabolism, as well. PMID:3911586

  12. Lunar and menstrual phase locking.

    PubMed

    Cutler, W B

    1980-08-01

    In a selected population of 312 women, prospective menses records were maintained during the autumn of 1977. Women whose menstrual cycle duration approaches the cycle duration of the earth's moon (29.5 days) tend to ovulate in the dark phase of the lunar period. The dark phase encompasses the half-cycle of the month from last quarter, through new moon, to first quarter. Women showing irregular menses also tended to ovulate during the dark phase of the lunar period.

  13. How menstrual shame affects birth.

    PubMed

    Moloney, Sharon

    2010-12-01

    In Western, industrialised culture, menstruation and birth are commonly seen as unstable, pathological processes requiring medical control. Girls learn to see menstruation as shameful and secretive. Menarche is a nodal event around which girls' beliefs and attitudes to being female are organised. The perception of menstruation as a liability has foundational implications for future female experiences, particularly birth. Other cultures have recognised menstruation and birth as spiritual phenomena, with menarche and childbirth experienced as powerful initiatory processes. My PhD research explored the links between cultural attitudes to menstruation and spirituality, and women's experiences of birth. My feminist perspective recognised the power imbalances, patriarchal controls and structural inequities that oppress women in their intimate body experiences. Menstrual shame was identified as a core patriarchal organising principle that inculcates and perpetuates male dominance and female subordination. Engendering the perception of female physiology - and thus womanhood - as inherently flawed, menstrual shame was a key factor that predisposed women to approach birth feeling fearful, disempowered and vulnerable to intervention. However, my research also unearthed a counter-cultural group of women who had transformed their relationship with both menstruation and birth. Redesignating menstruation as a spiritual phenomenon enabled these women to dismantle their menstrual shame, connect with their female spirituality and give birth fearlessly and powerfully. For others, the profound spirituality of birth transformed their understanding of menstruation. Contrary to cultural norms, both menstruation and birth can be sacred female experiences which are sources of authority and empowerment.

  14. Menstrual Management for Adolescents With Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Quint, Elisabeth H; O'Brien, Rebecca F

    2016-07-01

    The onset of menses for adolescents with physical or intellectual disabilities can affect their independence and add additional concerns for families at home, in schools, and in other settings. The pediatrician is the primary health care provider to explore and assist with the pubertal transition and menstrual management. Menstrual management of both normal and abnormal cycles may be requested to minimize hygiene issues, premenstrual symptoms, dysmenorrhea, heavy or irregular bleeding, contraception, and conditions exacerbated by the menstrual cycle. Several options are available for menstrual management, depending on the outcome that is desired, ranging from cycle regulation to complete amenorrhea. The use of medications or the request for surgeries to help with the menstrual cycles in teenagers with disabilities has medical, social, legal, and ethical implications. This clinical report is designed to help guide pediatricians in assisting adolescent females with intellectual and/or physical disabilities and their families in making decisions related to successfully navigating menarche and subsequent menstrual cycles.

  15. Down-Regulation of CXCL12/CXCR4 Expression Alleviates Ischemia-Reperfusion-Induced Inflammatory Pain via Inhibiting Glial TLR4 Activation in the Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Zai-Li; Tan, Wen-Fei; Sun, Xi-Jia; Ma, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is important for the pathogenesis of inflammatory reactions and the promotion of pain processing after ischemia/reperfusion (IR) in spinal cord. Recently, C-X-C chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12) and its receptor, C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), were demonstrated to be simultaneously critical for inflammatory reactions, thereby facilitating glial activation. However, whether CXCL12/CXCR4 expression can contribute to IR-induced inflammatory pain via spinal TLR4 remained unclear. A rat model was established by 8 min of aortic arch occlusion. The effects of CXCL12/CXCR4 expression and TLR4 activation on inflammatory hyperalgesia were investigated by pretreatments with CXCL12-neutralizing antibody, CXCR4 antagonist (AMD3100) and TLR4 antagonist (TAK-242) for 5 consecutive days before surgery. The results indicated that IR induced significant and sustained inflammatory pain, observed as decreases in paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) and paw withdrawal latency (PWL), throughout the post-injury period. The increased levels of TLR4 and proinflammatory chemokine CXCL12, as well as its receptor, CXCR4, were closely correlated with the PWT and PWL trends. Double immunostaining further suggested that TLR4, which is mainly expressed on astrocytes and microglia, was closely co-localized with CXCL12 and CXCR4 in spinal dorsal horn. As expected, intrathecal pretreatment with the TLR4 antagonist, TAK-242 markedly ameliorated pain by inhibiting astrocytic and microglial activation, as shown by decreases in TLR4 immunoreactivity and the percentage of double-labeled cells. These protective effects were likely due in part to the reduced production of the downstream cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α, as well as for the recruitment of CXCL12 and CXCR4. Additionally, intrathecal pretreatment with CXCL12-neutralizing antibody and AMD3100 resulted in similar analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects as those receiving TAK-242 pretreatment. These results suggest that

  16. College Women's Perceptions of Anxiety and Menstrual Distress across the Menstrual Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szollos, Alex; Thyrum, Elizabeth; Martin, Betty

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated fluctuations in anxiety and menstrual distress across the menstrual cycle. Female college students (N = 318) completed self-report measures of symptoms across the menstrual cycle and measures of general psychological adjustment. A subgroup (n = 56) of Anxious participants who reported high levels of anxiety was identified.…

  17. Novel mixed NOP/MOP agonist BU08070 alleviates pain and inhibits gastrointestinal motility in mouse models mimicking diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Sobczak, Marta; Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Sałaga, Maciej; Husbands, Stephen M.; Fichna, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Background The opioid and nociceptin systems play a crucial role in the maintenance of homeostasis in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of BU08070, a novel mixed MOP/NOP agonist, on mouse intestinal contractility in vitro and GI motility in vivo in physiological conditions and in animal models mimicking symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), including diarrhea and abdominal pain. Methods The effect of BU08070 on muscle contractility in vitro was characterized in the ileum and colon. To assess the effect of BU08070 in vivo, the following parameters were assessed: whole GI transit, gastric emptying, geometric center, colonic bead expulsion, fecal pellet output and time to castor oil-induced diarrhea. The antinociceptive activity of BU08070 was characterized in the mustard oil (MO)-induced abdominal pain model and the writhing test, alone and in the presence of MOP and NOP antagonists. Results In vitro, BU08070 (10−10–10−6 M) inhibited colonic and ileal smooth muscle contractions in a concentration-dependent manner. In vivo, BU08070 prolonged the whole GI transit and inhibited colonic bead expulsion. The antitransit and antidiarrheal effect of BU08070 was observed already at the dose of 0.1 mg/kg (i.p.). BU08070 reversed hypermotility and reduced pain in mouse models mimicking IBS-D symptoms. Conclusion Our results suggest that BU08070 has a potential of becoming an efficient drug in IBS-D therapy. Here we also validate mixed NOP/MOP receptor targeting as possible future treatment of functional GI diseases. PMID:24815321

  18. Menstrual and reproductive issues in adolescents with physical and developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Quint, Elisabeth H

    2014-08-01

    Most obstetrician-gynecologists will encounter adolescents with disabilities in their practice, because developmental and physical disabilities are common in young patients (8.4%). Reproductive health issues such as puberty, sexuality, and menstruation can be more complicated for teenagers with disabilities and their families as a result of concerns surrounding menstrual hygiene, abuse risk, vulnerability, changes in seizure pattern, and altered mood. Teenagers with disabilities have gynecologic health care needs similar to those of their peers as well as unique needs related to their physical and cognitive issues. The gynecologic health visit for a teenager with disabilities should include an evaluation of the teenager's reproductive knowledge as well as an assessment of her abuse and coercion risk and her ability to consent to sexual activity. The menstrual history is focused on the effects of menstrual cycles on her daily life. Diagnostic testing is not different from other adolescents. Hormonal treatment is often requested by the patient and her family to alleviate abnormal bleeding, cyclic mood changes, dysmenorrhea, or a combination of these, to assist with menstrual hygiene, and to provide contraception. Menstrual manipulation can be used to induce complete amenorrhea, regulate cycles, or decrease regular menstrual flow. However, treatment risks and side effects may have a different effect on the lives of these adolescents. The comfort level of health care providers to respond to the special concerns of adolescents with disabilities is low, and several barriers exist. This review addresses the complex issues of puberty, menstruation, sexuality, abuse, and safety highlighting the distinctive needs of this population. The options and decisions around menstrual manipulation are highlighted in detail.

  19. Cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to alleviate pain in sickle cell anemia via inhibition of mast cell activation and neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Lucile; Vang, Derek; Nguyen, Julia; Benson, Barbara; Lei, Jianxun; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a manifestation of a single point mutation in hemoglobin, but inflammation and pain are the insignia of this disease which can start in infancy and continue throughout life. Earlier studies showed that mast cell activation contributes to neurogenic inflammation and pain in sickle mice. Morphine is the common analgesic treatment but also remains a major challenge due to its side effects and ability to activate mast cells. We, therefore, examined cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to mitigate mast cell activation, neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia, using HbSS-BERK sickle and cannabinoid receptor-2-deleted sickle mice. We show that cannabinoids mitigate mast cell activation, inflammation and neurogenic inflammation in sickle mice via both cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2. Thus, cannabinoids influence systemic and neural mechanisms, ameliorating the disease pathobiology and hyperalgesia in sickle mice. This study provides ‘proof of principle’ for the potential of cannabinoid/cannabinoid receptor-based therapeutics to treat several manifestations of sickle cell anemia. PMID:26703965

  20. Percutaneous radiofrequency lesions adjacent to the dorsal root ganglion alleviate spasticity and pain in children with cerebral palsy: pilot study in 17 patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cerebral palsy (CP) may cause severe spasticity, requiring neurosurgical procedures. The most common neurosurgical procedures are continuous infusion of intrathecal baclofen and selective dorsal rhizotomy. Both are invasive and complex procedures. We hypothesized that a percutaneous radiofrequency lesion of the dorsal root ganglion (RF-DRG) could be a simple and safe alternative treatment. We undertook a pilot study to test this hypothesis. Methods We performed an RF-DRG procedure in 17 consecutive CP patients with severe hip flexor/adductor spasms accompanied by pain or care-giving difficulties. Six children were systematically evaluated at baseline, and 1 month and 6 months after treatment by means of the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and a self-made caregiver's questionnaire. Eleven subsequent children were evaluated using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for spasticity, pain and ease of care. Results A total of 19 RF-DRG treatments were performed in 17 patients. We found a small improvement in muscle tone measured by MAS, but no effect on the GMFM scale. Despite this, the caregivers of these six treated children unanimously stated that the quality of life of their children had indeed improved after the RF-DRG. In the subsequent 11 children we found improvements in all VAS scores, in a range comparable to the conventional treatment options. Conclusion RF-DRG is a promising new treatment option for severe spasticity in CP patients, and its definitive effectiveness remains to be defined in a randomised controlled trial. PMID:20569438

  1. Symptomatology of irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease during the menstrual cycle

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Shishira; Barber, Matthew D.; Graff, Lesley A.; Shen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Gender-related physiological variations in gastrointestinal (GI) symptomatology have been observed in women of reproductive age. Many women experience cyclical changes in GI symptomatology during their menstrual cycle, particularly alteration in their bowel habits. Physiological studies of healthy women during the menstrual cycle showed a prolonged GI transit time during the luteal phase, either in the oro-cecum route or in the colon. Worsened GI symptoms, such as abdominal pain, bloating or diarrhea are observed in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) during menses. This may be due to elevated prostaglandin levels during menses, with an enhanced perception of viscera-somatic stimuli resulting in nausea, abdominal distension and pain. Also patients with IBS or IBD demonstrate a cyclical pattern more closely related to their bowel habits than healthy controls. Women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) also have exacerbated symptoms during menses; however, it is unclear whether this relates to physiological variation or disease exacerbation in IBS or IBD. Studies examining the association of the menstrual cycle and GI symptomatology in patients with IBS or IBD, have not yet clarified the underlying mechanisms. Moreover medications—such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and oral contraceptive pills used for dysmenorrhea and menstrual migraine in those patients have not well been controlled for in the previous studies, which can contribute to further bias. Understanding changes in GI symptomatology during the menstrual cycle may help to determine the true extent of disease exacerbation and proper management strategy. PMID:25788484

  2. Environmental exposure and altered menstrual function

    SciTech Connect

    Keye, W.R. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The impact of environmental agents and occupational factors on hypothalamic and pituitary function and menstruation are poorly understood. To date, most research related to environment, occupation, and reproduction has focused on pregnancy outcome, not menstrual function. It is imperative, however, that menstrual function be considered as an outcome variable in the study of reproduction and occupation.

  3. The Menstrual Cycle and the Female Athlete.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolka, Margaret A.; Stephenson, Lou A.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of the menstrual cycle on the performance, heart rate, and body temperature of female athletes are discussed. Biological causes of menstrual problems such as dysmenorrhea and amenorrhea are explained. Research indicates that the higher the level of training achieved, the less effect each cycle phase has on physical performance. (PP)

  4. Women's Comedy Preferences during the Menstrual Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadowcroft, Jeanne M.; Zillman, Dolf

    1987-01-01

    Indicates that premenstrual and menstrual women preferred comedy over alternative choices more strongly than did women midway through the cycle. Suggests that this preference reflects a desire to overcome the hormonally mediated noxious mood states that are characteristically associated with the premenstrual and menstrual phases of the cycle. (JD)

  5. Menstrual Health products, practices, and problems.

    PubMed

    Reame, N

    1983-01-01

    This review article examines factors affecting normal variations in menstrual flow, methods used to estimate vaginal blood loss, menstrual health problems related to hygiene practices, and methods of assessing tampon absorbancy. Preliminary studies from this laboratory suggest that normal, cycling women exhibit menstrual flow rates that are significantly higher during the day than at night; also that menstrual blood has a more acid pH than previously reported, and that it demonstrates unique biological properties unlike peripheral venous blood. Women in wheelchairs may be at special risk for the development of menstrual health problems because of difficulties with hygiene management as evidenced by results of a study of 22 women with traumatic spinal cord injuries.

  6. Length of Menstrual Cycle and Risk of Endometriosis: A Meta-Analysis of 11 Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ming; Cheng, Yanfei; Bu, Huaien; Zhao, Ye; Zhao, Wenli

    2016-03-01

    Endometriosis is a complex disease that affects a large number of women worldwide and may cause pain and infertility. To systematically review published studies evaluating the relationship between menstrual cycle length and risk of endometriosis. We searched the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Web of Science, and EMBASE in databases in July 2014 using the keywords "case-control studies," "epidemiologic determinants," "risk factors," "menstrual cycle," "menstrual length," "menstrual character," and "endometriosis." We included case-control studies published in English that investigated cases of surgically confirmed endometriosis and examined the relationship between endometriosis risk and menstrual cycle. Eleven articles that met the inclusion criteria included data of 3392 women with endometriosis and 5006 controls. Fixed-effects and random-effects models were used for the evaluation. For the association of risk of endometriosis and menstrual cycle length shorter than or equal to 27 days (SEQ27) or length longer than or equal to 29 days (LEQ29), the odds ratio was 1.22 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.43) and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.48-0.96), respectively. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests that menstrual cycle length SEQ27 increase the risk of endometriosis and cycle length LEQ29 decrease the risk.

  7. Menstrual issues for women with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Jane; Grover, Sonia; Macgibbon, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    The approach to menstrual management in girls with intellectual disabilities should be the same as it is for other girls. Advice may need to be tailored according to the severity of the disability. Girls who can manage their own toilet hygiene can usually learn to manage their menses independently. They need preparation for the menarche with information appropriate to their level of understanding. When assessing menstrual problems, it may help to chart any symptoms against the menstrual cycle to confirm that they are related. The management options for problems such as dysmenorrhoea or heavy bleeding are the same as they are for other women.

  8. Menstrual bleeding from an endometriotic lesion.

    PubMed

    Burney, Richard O; Lathi, Ruth B

    2009-05-01

    We present a case in which endometriotic lesions were observed to be focally hemorrhagic at laparoscopy performed during menstruation. Red vesicular lesions likely represent early disease with intact capacity for hormonally induced menstrual bleeding.

  9. Menstrual cycle-related exacerbation of disease

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V.; Guico-Pabia, Christine J.; Taylor, Hugh S.

    2011-01-01

    Exacerbation of common medical and mental health disorders at specific phases of the menstrual cycle is a prevalent phenomenon. Although the precise cause is unclear, studies implicate complex interactions between the immune and neuroendocrine systems. The menstrual cycle also is a trigger for the onset of depressive disorders, including premenstrual dysphoric disorder, a disorder specific to the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, and depression associated with the transition to menopause. This article discusses common mental health problems exacerbated by the menstrual cycle, with a particular focus on premenstrual dysphoric disorder and perimenopausal depression. Throughout the reproductive lifespan, routine screening and assessment for the presence of common psychiatric disorders are critical for accurate diagnosis and provision of effective treatment. Management options include referral or consultation with a primary care provider or psychiatrist; treatment options for premenstrual dysphoric disorder and perimenopausal depression include pharmacotherapy with antidepressant agents and/or psychotherapy. Hormones may be helpful. PMID:20207238

  10. Menstrual cycle disorders in female volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Wodarska, M; Witkoś, J; Drosdzol-Cop, A; Dąbrowska, J; Dąbrowska-Galas, M; Hartman, M; Plinta, R; Skrzypulec-Plinta, V

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relation between increased physical activity and menstrual disorders in adolescent female volleyball players. The study was conducted on 210 Polish female volleyball players, aged 13-17 years, the authorship questionnaire was used. The results of the study showed that irregular menstruation occurred in 19% of girls, spotting between menstrual periods in 27% and heavy menstruation was reported in 33% of girls. Out of all volleyball female players participating in the study, 94 girls (45%) declared absence of menstrual periods after regular cycles. Statistical analysis showed that the more training hours per week, the bigger probability of the occurrence of irregular menstruation. It was concluded that the number of hours of volleyball training per week affects regularity of menstrual cycles in female volleyball players. The absence of menstruation might be caused by the duration of training per week or years of training.

  11. Fear recognition across the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Rebecca; Lewis, Michael B

    2005-03-01

    This study assesses the mediating role of stage of menstrual cycle in the recognition of emotional expressions. It was hypothesised that fear recognition ability would be stronger at high-oestrogen stages of the menstrual cycle. The accuracy of recognising emotional expressions was compared across 50 women who were at different stages of their menstrual cycle. It was found that accuracy to recognise emotions was significantly affected by the interaction between stages of the menstrual cycle and the emotion being displayed. Further analysis revealed that for the emotion expression of fear alone, participants were significantly more accurate at the preovulatory surge (highest oestrogen levels) than at menstruation (oestrogen levels at lowest point). The results have implications for the processes that underlie fear processing and a possible insight into the sexual dimorphism of this ability and conditions that show variations in fear recognition (e.g., autism, Turner syndrome).

  12. Serum levels of relaxin during the menstrual cycle and oral contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Wreje, U; Kristiansson, P; Aberg, H; Byström, B; von Schoultz, B

    1995-01-01

    Serum relaxin levels were analysed in 12 healthy women every other day during the menstrual cycle and during a second cycle on oral contraceptives. Relaxin levels in 7 women with posterior pelvic and lumbar pain were also measured. Relaxin was detected during both the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle in some of the healthy women. Serum levels were further increased during the use of oral contraceptives. Oestradiol levels in the untreated women correlated to the relaxin levels. Women with posterior pelvic and lumbar pain had higher relaxin levels than did healthy women, a finding that needs to be further explored. Our data indicate the existence of sources for relaxin production other than the corpus luteum in the non-pregnant woman. Endogenous and exogenous oestrogens may stimulate the production of relaxin.

  13. [Changes in menstrual pattern following tubal ligation].

    PubMed

    Rosales Estrada, G

    1985-06-01

    50 women undergoing tubal sterilization by the modified Pomeroy technique at a hospital in Toluca, Mexico, were selected at random and followed for 6 months postoperative to detect changes in menstrual patterns. The women had normal menstrual histories and had not used contraceptive medications for at least 3 months prior to operation. Analgesia was provided by peridural block with 2% lidocaine. There were 45 cases of interval and 5 of immediate postpartum sterilization. The women ranged in age from 25 to 44 years and averaged 34.5.16 women, or 32%, had altered menstrual patterns. There were 12 cases of hypermenorrhea and 1 each of oligomenorrhea, polymenorrhea, amenorrhea, and proiomenorrhea. Age at menarche, parity, and obstetric history were unrelated to menstrual changes. Changes in menstrual patterns after surgical tubal occlusion have been attributed to damage in the uterine and ovarian blood vessels leading to reduced blood supply and ultimately to abnormal maturation of ovarian follicles and hormonal changes. Psychogenic factors may play a role. The extent of surgical damage after various techniques of tubal occlusion and the materials used for suturing should be assessed as possible sources of local or regional inflammation that could have repercussions in blood perfusion and nervous function.

  14. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Menstrual Irregularities?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose menstrual irregularities? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider diagnoses menstrual irregularities using a combination of ...

  15. 21 CFR 884.5470 - Unscented menstrual tampon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5470 Unscented menstrual tampon. (a) Identification. An unscented menstrual tampon is a device... absorb menstrual or other vaginal discharge. This generic type of device does not include...

  16. 21 CFR 884.5470 - Unscented menstrual tampon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5470 Unscented menstrual tampon. (a) Identification. An unscented menstrual tampon is a device... absorb menstrual or other vaginal discharge. This generic type of device does not include...

  17. 21 CFR 884.5435 - Unscented menstrual pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5435 Unscented menstrual pad. (a) Identification. An unscented menstrual pad is a device that is a... discharge. This generic type of device includes sterile unscented menstrual pads used for...

  18. 21 CFR 884.5435 - Unscented menstrual pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5435 Unscented menstrual pad. (a) Identification. An unscented menstrual pad is a device that is a... discharge. This generic type of device includes sterile unscented menstrual pads used for...

  19. 21 CFR 884.5470 - Unscented menstrual tampon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5470 Unscented menstrual tampon. (a) Identification. An unscented menstrual tampon is a device... absorb menstrual or other vaginal discharge. This generic type of device does not include...

  20. 21 CFR 884.5435 - Unscented menstrual pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5435 Unscented menstrual pad. (a) Identification. An unscented menstrual pad is a device that is a... discharge. This generic type of device includes sterile unscented menstrual pads used for...

  1. 21 CFR 884.5470 - Unscented menstrual tampon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5470 Unscented menstrual tampon. (a) Identification. An unscented menstrual tampon is a device... absorb menstrual or other vaginal discharge. This generic type of device does not include...

  2. 21 CFR 884.5470 - Unscented menstrual tampon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5470 Unscented menstrual tampon. (a) Identification. An unscented menstrual tampon is a device... absorb menstrual or other vaginal discharge. This generic type of device does not include...

  3. 21 CFR 884.5435 - Unscented menstrual pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5435 Unscented menstrual pad. (a) Identification. An unscented menstrual pad is a device that is a... discharge. This generic type of device includes sterile unscented menstrual pads used for...

  4. 21 CFR 884.5435 - Unscented menstrual pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5435 Unscented menstrual pad. (a) Identification. An unscented menstrual pad is a device that is a... discharge. This generic type of device includes sterile unscented menstrual pads used for...

  5. Evaluating and Treating Exercise-Related Menstrual Irregularities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Kimberly G.

    2002-01-01

    Menstrual abnormalities are extremely common in both athletic and non-athletic adolescents and young women. Exercise- related menstrual abnormality is linked with hypothalamic pituitary axis-dysfunction and is a diagnosis of exclusion. In athletes, treatment of secondary menstrual abnormalities and associated health concerns such as bone density…

  6. Menstrual suppression in special circumstances.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Yolanda A; Ornstein, Melanie P; Aggarwal, Anjali; McQuillan, Sarah; Allen, Lisa; Millar, Debra; Dalziel, Nancy; Gascon, Suzy; Hakim, Julie; Ryckman, Julie; Spitzer, Rachel; Van Eyk, Nancy

    2014-10-01

    Objectif : Offrir, aux fournisseurs de soins de santé, un document de consensus canadien comptant des recommandations pour ce qui est de la suppression menstruelle chez les patientes qui font face à des obstacles physiques et/ou cognitifs ou chez les patientes qui font l’objet d’un traitement contre le cancer et pour lesquelles les règles pourraient exercer un effet délétère sur la santé. Options : Le présent document analyse les options disponibles aux fins de la suppression menstruelle, les indications, les contre-indications et les effets indésirables (tant immédiats qu’à long terme) propres à cette dernière, et les explorations et le monitorage nécessaires tout au long de la suppression. Issues : Les cliniciens seront mieux renseignés au sujet des options et des indications propres à la suppression menstruelle chez les patientes qui présentent des déficiences cognitives et/ou physiques et chez les patientes qui font l’objet d’une chimiothérapie, d’une radiothérapie ou d’autres traitements contre le cancer. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans Medline, EMBASE, OVID et The Cochrane Library au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé et de mots clés appropriés (p. ex. « heavy menstrual bleeding », « menstrual suppression », « chemotherapy/radiation », « cognitive disability », « physical disability », « learning disability »). Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux essais comparatifs randomisés, aux études observationnelles et aux études pilotes. Aucune restriction n’a été imposée en matière de langue ou de date. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et du nouveau matériel a été intégré à la directive clinique jusqu’en septembre 2013. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d

  7. The menstrual cycle:feminist research from the society for menstrual cycle research.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Phyllis Kernoff; Stubbs, Margaret L

    2007-01-01

    In this special issue, we present seven articles reporting on cutting-edge research on the menstrual cycle. The authors are all members of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research (SMCR) and the papers were presented at the sixteenth biennial conference of SMCR in Boulder, Colorado in June, 2005. The collection of papers taken as a whole demonstrates unequivocally that context affects not only the discourse surrounding menstruation but also how women actually experience it. We hope readers will enjoy these papers.

  8. Menstrual cycle hormones, food intake, and cravings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Food craving and intake are affected by steroid hormones during the menstrual cycle, especially in the luteal phase, when craving for certain foods has been reported to increase. However, satiety hormones such as leptin have also been shown to affect taste sensitivity, and therefore food ...

  9. Citation analysis of puerperal and menstrual psychosis.

    PubMed

    Brockington, Ian

    2017-02-01

    A citation analysis of more than 2500 works on the childbearing and menstrual psychoses has shown that the average number of citations is 1 % of the literature or less; Anglo-Saxon authors have the lowest standards of scholarship. Many excellent works have received few of no citations. Attention is drawn to citation fraud and the pernicious effect of superficial "reviews."

  10. Menstrual Characteristics of Pubertal Girls: A Questionnaire-Based Study in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Esen, İhsan; Oğuz, Baran; Serin, Hepsen Mine

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Clinicians should show an awareness on the menstrual characteristics of adolescent girls which may differ from adults in some aspects. To define menstrual cycle features among high school girls residing in a city center in southeastern Turkey. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 1256 girls attending a high school located in the city center of Elazığ, Turkey. Data from 879 girls (median age, 16.2 years; range, 13.6-19.2 years) who agreed to participate in the study and had started to menstruate were evaluated. Results: Mean age at menarche was 12.7±1.3 years (range, 8.2-17.3 years). The mean cycle duration was 28.7±4.4 days, and the mean menstrual flow lasted 5.9±1.3 days. Severe, moderate, and mild dysmenorrhea was reported in 29%, 43%, and 28% of the girls, respectively, and 52% used analgesics for dysmenorrhea. A total of 34% of the girls defined their menstrual cycle as irregular, and 32% reported school absenteeism due to menstruation-associated complaints (pain and/or heavy bleeding). Menstrual bleeding affected attendance to classes and other school activities, daily work, social, family, and friend relationships, as well as sports/exercise activities in 43%, 49%, 58%, 48%, 44%, and 60% of the participants, respectively. In total, 30% of the responders had a problem with menstruation, and 12% and 17% of these stated that they consulted a primary care physician or specialist, respectively. Conclusion: Dysmenorrhea was found to be common in adolescent Turkish girls and to affect daily life in approximately half of the girls. PMID:26758209

  11. Counseling for Pain Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espin, Olivia M.; Ganikos, Mary L.

    1975-01-01

    New techniques are being developed that enhance the effectiveness of psychological forces in controlling bodily reactions. All of them are powerful tools for the psychological control of pain. This article reviews such techniques and addresses itself to the contributions that counselors can make to alleviate physical pain. (Author)

  12. Automatic female dehumanization across the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Valentina; Fantoni, Carlo; Foroni, Francesco; Bianchi, Mauro; Carnaghi, Andrea

    2016-11-30

    In this study, we investigate whether hormonal shifts during the menstrual cycle contribute to the dehumanization of other women and men. Female participants with different levels of likelihood of conception (LoC) completed a semantic priming paradigm in a lexical decision task. When the word 'woman' was the prime, animal words were more accessible in high versus low LoC whereas human words were more inhibited in the high versus low LoC. When the word 'man' was used as the prime, no difference was found in terms of accessibility between high and low LoC for either animal or human words. These results show that the female dehumanization is automatically elicited by menstrual cycle-related processes and likely associated with an enhanced activation of mate-attraction goals.

  13. Menstrual Cycle and Visual Information Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Participants Eighteen female and 18 male participants were recruited from Brigham Young University undergraduate psychology and neuroscience classes...Finally, it has recently been proposed that hemispheric asymmetry might give rise to greater P300 amplitudes in females than males (Roalf, 59 Lowery...Heister, P. (1989). Shift of functional cerebral asymmetry during the menstrual cycle. Neuropsychologia, 27(6), 871- 880. Hicks, C. R. (1973

  14. Pre-menstrual tension and mood change.

    PubMed

    Blank, A M; Goldstein, S E; Chatterjee, N

    1980-11-01

    Pre-menstrual tension has been studied intensively for many years. A review of relevant literature was undertaken to try to clarify the admixture of fact and fiction which has accumulated. The bulk of research noted has been done using self-reporting scales of physiological and psychological discomfort. This research has been criticized on methodological grounds. There seems little question that mood changes do occur during the menstrual cycle. It would appear that, irrespective of personality factors and psychopatholoy, such changes can be correlated with levels of progesterone and estrogen. Gonadal hormones affect cerebral MAO levels and catecholamine metabolism. High levels of estrogen have been related to increased feelings of well-being and low levels of depression. Studies have attempted to explain differences in menstrual mood changes to the psychological impact this process may have. While this cannot be discounted, it is likely that there is an interaction between psychological and physiological factors. Clarification of this is an important challenge for future research.

  15. Effects of menstrual cycle and neuroticism on females' emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mengying; Zhou, Renlai; Huang, Yamei

    2014-12-01

    Fifteen highly neurotic women and 21 women who were low in neuroticism participated in this study. The women were surveyed three times over a single menstrual cycle during the mid-late luteal, menstrual, and late follicular phases. Each time, the participants were asked to use reappraisal to regulate their emotions, which were evoked by a sad film clip, and their subjective emotional experiences and physiological responses were recorded. The results showed that neuroticism had no impact on emotion regulation, and the females experienced fluctuations in their emotion regulation success over their menstrual cycle. During the menstrual phase, women reported significantly higher levels of reappraisal, but subjective sadness did not differ throughout the three phases. Additionally, the regulation effects on galvanic skin response (GSR) were smaller during the menstrual phase than in the mid-late luteal phase. These results suggested that women in the menstrual phase expended more effort but gained less success at regulating their emotions.

  16. [Sports performance of women during the menstrual cycle].

    PubMed

    Fraccaroli, G

    1980-11-30

    Sports woman performance during menstrual cycle has been examined by many Authors, but the comparison of performance during all menstrual cycle has been less examined. The results of a research carried out on a group of 40 women attending the Parallel Courses' of Verona, of ISEF of Bologna, are illustrated. The conclusion of this research are: a less sporting efficiency in the premenstrual period, a normal or almost normal efficiency in the other period, including the menstrual one as well.

  17. Men in menstrual product advertising--1920-1949.

    PubMed

    Linton, David

    2007-01-01

    Menstruation and menstrual products are commonly thought to be solely the concerns of women, yet the values that shape attitudes and representations of the period are strongly influenced by men. Magazine advertising for menstrual products reveals both subtle and overt examples of male presence in the formation of perspectives on the period. This article examines a variety of menstrual product ads from two decades in order to assess how the presence of men shapes these perspectives.

  18. The Effect of Cinnamon on Menstrual Bleeding and Systemic Symptoms With Primary Dysmenorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Jaafarpour, Molouk; Hatefi, Masoud; Najafi, Fatemeh; Khajavikhan, Javaher; Khani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Primary dysmenorrhea with interferes in daily activities can have adverse effects on quality of life of women. Objectives: Regarding the use of herbal medicine, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of cinnamon on primary dysmenorrhea in a sample of Iranian female college students from Ilam University of Medical Sciences (west of Iran) during 2013-2014. Patients and Methods: In a randomized double-blind trial, 76 female student received placebo (n = 38, capsules containing starch, three times a day (TDS)) or cinnamon (n = 38, capsules containing 420 mg cinnamon, TDS) in 24 hours. Visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to determine the severity of pain and nausea. Vomiting and menstrual bleeding were assessed by counting the number of saturated pads. The parameters were recorded in the group during the first 72 hours of the cycle. Results: The mean amount of menstrual bleeding in the cinnamon group was significantly lower than the placebo group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively). The mean pain severity score in the cinnamon group was less than the placebo group at various intervals (4.1 ± 0.5 vs. 6.1 ± 0.4 at 24 hours, 3.2 ± 0.6 vs. 6.1 ± 0.4 at 48 hours, and 1.8 ± 0.4 vs. 4.0 ± 0.3 at 72 hours, respectively) (P < 0.001). The mean severity of nausea and the frequencies of vomiting significantly decreased in the cinnamon group compared with the placebo group at various intervals (P < 0.001, P < 0.05). Conclusions: Regarding the significant effect of cinnamon on reduction of pain, menstrual bleeding, nausea and vomiting with primary dysmenorrhea without side effects, it can be regarded as a safe and effective treatment for dysmenorrhea in young women. PMID:26023350

  19. Six-month trial of Yoga Nidra in menstrual disorder patients: Effects on somatoform symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Khushbu; Tiwari, S. C.; Singh, Uma; Agrawal, G. G.; Srivastava, Neena

    2011-01-01

    Background: Yoga Nidra is a successful therapy for both recent and long-standing psychological disturbances of all kinds especially depression and high anxiety level and neurotic patterns. Objective: The purpose of the present work, therefore, was to conduct a preliminary randomized study of Yoga Nidra as a treatment in the patients of menstrual disorders with somatoform symptoms. Materials and Methods: Patients were recruited from Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, CSM Medical University (erstwhile KGMU) Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India. One hundred and fifty female patients with menstrual disorders were randomly divided in to two groups 1- Intervention group: 75 subjects (Yoga Nidra intervention and medication) 2- control group: 75 subjects (without Yoga Nidra intervention only medication). Schedule for clinical assessment in neuropsychiatry tool was used. Results: There was significant improvement in pain symptoms (P<0.006), gastrointestinal symptoms (P<0.04), cardiovascular symptoms (P<0.02) and urogenital symptoms (P<0.005) after 6 months of Yoga Nidra therapy in Intervention group in comparison to control group. Conclusion: Yoga Nidra appears to be a promising intervention for psychosomatic problems. It is cost-effective and easy to implement. The results indicate that somatoform symptoms in patients with menstrual disorder can be decreased by learning and applying a program based on Yogic intervention (Yoga Nidra). PMID:23271863

  20. Pain management in neonates.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, Ricardo; Gall, Olivier; Annequin, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest an increased sensitivity to pain in neonates. Repeated and prolonged pain exposure may affect the subsequent development of pain systems, as well as potentially contribute to alterations in long-term development and behavior. Despite impressive gains in the knowledge of neonatal pain mechanisms and strategies to treat neonatal pain acquired during the last 15 years, a large gap still exists between routine clinical practice and research results. Accurate assessment of pain is crucial for effective pain management in neonates. Neonatal pain management should rely on current scientific evidence more than the attitudes and beliefs of care-givers. Parents should be informed of pain relief strategies and their participation in the health care plan to alleviate pain should be encouraged. The need for systemic analgesia for both moderate and severe pain, in conjunction with behavioral/environmental approaches to pain management, is emphasized. A main sources of pain in the neonate is procedural pain which should always be prevented and treated. Nonpharmacological approaches constitute important treatment options for managing procedural pain. Nonpharmacological interventions (environmental and preventive measures, non-nutritive sucking, sweet solutions, skin-skin contact, and breastfeeding analgesia) can reduce neonatal pain indirectly by reducing the total amount of noxious stimuli to which infants are exposed, and directly, by blocking nociceptive transduction or transmission or by activation of descending inhibitory pathways or by activating attention and arousal systems that modulate pain. Opioids are the mainstay of pharmacological pain treatment but there are other useful medications and techniques that may be used for pain relief. National guidelines are necessary to improve neonatal pain management at the institutional level, individual neonatal intensive care units need to develop specific practice guidelines regarding pain

  1. Day-to-day co-variations of psychological and physical symptoms of the menstrual cycle: insights to individual differences in steroid reactivity.

    PubMed

    Kiesner, Jeff; Pastore, Massimiliano

    2010-04-01

    The associations between physical and psychological symptoms of the menstrual cycle have not been carefully studied in past research, but may lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of these symptoms. The present study examines the day-to-day co-variations among physical and psychological symptoms of the menstrual cycle. These symptoms were evaluated on a daily basis across one entire menstrual cycle, with a non-clinical sample of 92 university students. Results showed that headaches, gastrointestinal problems, lower abdominal bloating, skin changes, and breast changes, were all significantly associated with higher levels of psychological symptoms; whereas back and joint pain, lower abdominal cramps, cervical mucous, and menstrual flow, were not associated with psychological symptoms. However, significant differences in these associations were observed across individuals for back and joint pain, headaches, lower abdominal cramps, skin changes, and menstrual flow: Whereas some women demonstrated higher levels of psychological symptoms associated with these physical symptoms, other women demonstrated lower levels of psychological symptoms. Finally, correlations among the associations between physical and psychological symptoms (slopes) demonstrated clear differences across the different physical symptoms. These results indicate that, although higher levels of some physical symptoms are associated with higher levels of psychological symptoms, there are significant differences in the magnitude and direction of these relations across individuals. Further consideration of physical symptoms may provide useful information for understanding individual differences in symptom profiles and response to steroid fluctuations, and for improving differential diagnosis and treatment planning and evaluation.

  2. Pain and pain management in haemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Auerswald, Günter; Dolan, Gerry; Duffy, Anne; Hermans, Cedric; Jiménez-Yuste, Victor; Ljung, Rolf; Morfini, Massimo; Lambert, Thierry; Šalek, Silva Zupančić

    2016-01-01

    Joint pain is common in haemophilia and may be acute or chronic. Effective pain management in haemophilia is essential to reduce the burden that pain imposes on patients. However, the choice of appropriate pain-relieving measures is challenging, as there is a complex interplay of factors affecting pain perception. This can manifest as differences in patients’ experiences and response to pain, which require an individualized approach to pain management. Prophylaxis with factor replacement reduces the likelihood of bleeds and bleed-related pain, whereas on-demand therapy ensures rapid bleed resolution and pain relief. Although use of replacement or bypassing therapy is often the first intervention for pain, additional pain relief strategies may be required. There is an array of analgesic options, but consideration should be paid to the adverse effects of each class. Nevertheless, a combination of medications that act at different points in the pain pathway may be beneficial. Nonpharmacological measures may also help patients and include active coping strategies; rest, ice, compression, and elevation; complementary therapies; and physiotherapy. Joint aspiration may also reduce acute joint pain, and joint steroid injections may alleviate chronic pain. In the longer term, increasing use of prophylaxis or performing surgery may be necessary to reduce the burden of pain caused by the degenerative effects of repeated bleeds. Whichever treatment option is chosen, it is important to monitor pain and adjust patient management accordingly. Beyond specific pain management approaches, ongoing collaboration between multidisciplinary teams, which should include physiotherapists and pain specialists, may improve outcomes for patients. PMID:27439216

  3. Variations in menstrual cycle symptom reporting.

    PubMed

    Sheldrake, P; Cormack, M

    1976-01-01

    The student population at Edinburgh University was surveyed in 1974 to collect data on women's menstrual cycles and to examine sources of individual differences in reporting symptoms associated with the cycle. 2542 non-oral contraceptive (OC) users and 756 OC users provided data. Both sets of respondents were questioned about the occurrence, both premenstrually and during menstruation, of 9 symptoms. The "physical" symptoms (stomachache, backache, nausea, fainting) were more often reported during menstruation, whereas the so-called "emotional" symptoms (lethargy, irritability, depression, tension, headache) had a greater prevalence premenstrually. When the 9 menstrual symptoms were broken down by students' fields of concentration, arts students were found to report more "emotional" symptoms than those in the sciences and professions (medicine and law). Further analysis showed that only and 1st born children were slightly less likely to report symptoms than those whose nearest sibling is 7 or more years older or younger or later born children. A similar trend was found for the reporting of illness in an earlier analysis of data from this sample. When cycle length and reqularity were analyzed together, women with long and regular cycles were found to have the lowest proportion reporting symptoms during menstruating with the exception of tension, nausea, and fainting, and women with short and irregular cycles had a correspondingly high incidence of all symptoms. In addition, women with more regular cycles were more likely to report infrequent recall of dreams than those with irregular cycles. Overall, the women who are most likely to report menstrual symptoms, especially those of an "emotional" character, are more likely to report other illnesses with emotional connotations, recall their dreams more frequently, show a preference for the arts, and tend to have been brought up with older siblings. This cluster of personality attributes defines an "expressive

  4. Intellectual Performance as a Function of Repression and Menstrual Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englander-Golden, Paula; And Others

    Performance on complex (Space Relations and Verbal Reasoning) and simple (Digit Symbol) tests was investigated as a function of Byrne's Repression-Sensitization (RS) dimension, phase of menstrual cycle and premenstrual-menstrual (PM) symptomatology in a group of females not taking oral contraceptives. Two control groups, consisting of males and…

  5. The Magnitude of Premenstrual and Menstrual Mood Changes in Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golub, Sharon; Murphy, Denise

    Frequent mood changes in adolescents are often attributed to the influence of shifting hormone levels. The presence and magnitude of menstrual-related mood changes in adolescent women were examined in 10th and 11th grade females (N=158) who completed the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ). Self-reports of the onset date for the next two…

  6. The Menstrual Cycle and Response to Erotic Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Paul R.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This study focuses upon the relationship between phase of the menstrual cycle and sexual arousability. Women (N=133) participated in an experiment that induced sexual arousal by means of an erotic story. Independent factors were use of contraceptive pills versus no contraceptive pills and phase of the menstrual cycle. (Author)

  7. Menstrual Cycle in Schizophrenic Patients: Review with a Case.

    PubMed

    Sönmez, İpek; Köşger, Ferdi

    2015-12-01

    There are not enough studies about the relationship between menstrual psychosis and schizophrenia exacerbation during the menstrual cycle. In patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, it is important to examine the psychotic symptoms and depression and anxiety symptoms during the menstrual cycle and to adjust the treatment according to these symptoms. If depression and anxiety symptoms are present, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors can be used. In patients with exacerbated psychotic symptoms, it may be effective to increase the dose of an antipsychotic drug, which has no effect on prolactin release, 3-5 days prior to menstruation. In addition, hormonal therapy or menstrual cycle suppression is an alternative option. In this article, a case of a schizophrenic patient whose psychotic symptoms exacerbated with the menstrual cycle is presented.

  8. Menstrual Cycle in Schizophrenic Patients: Review with a Case

    PubMed Central

    SÖNMEZ, İpek; KÖŞGER, Ferdi

    2015-01-01

    There are not enough studies about the relationship between menstrual psychosis and schizophrenia exacerbation during the menstrual cycle. In patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, it is important to examine the psychotic symptoms and depression and anxiety symptoms during the menstrual cycle and to adjust the treatment according to these symptoms. If depression and anxiety symptoms are present, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors can be used. In patients with exacerbated psychotic symptoms, it may be effective to increase the dose of an antipsychotic drug, which has no effect on prolactin release, 3–5 days prior to menstruation. In addition, hormonal therapy or menstrual cycle suppression is an alternative option. In this article, a case of a schizophrenic patient whose psychotic symptoms exacerbated with the menstrual cycle is presented.

  9. Association of menstrual phase with smoking behavior, mood and menstrual phase-associated symptoms among young Japanese women smokers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies of the relationship between the menstrual phases and smoking behavior have been problematic, so the association of menstrual phases with smoking behavior and correlations among smoking, psychological and physical conditions in each phase of the menstrual cycle are unclear. Methods To accurately examine the association between menstrual phases and the amount of smoking (number of cigarettes smoked and breath CO concentration), craving of smoking on visual analogue scale (VAS), depression in the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale, and menstrual phase-associated symptoms in the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ), we improved various methodological issues, specifically, 1) Ovulation was confirmed by measuring the basal body temperature and identifying a urinary luteinizing hormone (LH) surge in two cycles; 2) The menstrual, follicular, and luteal phases were clearly defined for subjects with different menstrual cycles; 3) The breath CO concentration was measured every day. A notice was posted on public bulletin boards to recruit research subjects and twenty-nine young Japanese women smokers aged 19 to 25 years old were analyzed. Results The number of cigarettes smoked was greater and the CO concentration was higher in the luteal phase than in the follicular phase. The levels of craving for smoking (VAS), depressiveness (CES-D), and menstrual phase-associated symptoms (MDQ) in the menstrual and luteal phases were higher than those in the follicular phase. The mean score for CES-D was 16 points (the cut-off value in screening for depression) or higher in the menstrual (16.9 ± 8.2) and luteal phases (17.2 ± 8.4). The number of cigarettes smoked and CO concentration were significantly correlated with the levels of craving for smoking, depressiveness, and menstrual phase-associated symptoms in all phases except for MDQ scores in follicular phase. The amount of smoking in the luteal phase was most strongly

  10. Common medical pains

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Pain in infancy and childhood is extremely common. Sources of pain include illness, injury, and medical and dental procedures. Over the past two decades, tremendous progress has been made in the assessment, prevention and treatment of pain. It is important for the paediatric health care provider to be aware of the implications and consequences of pain in childhood. A multitude of interventions are available to reduce or alleviate pain in children of all ages, including neonates. These include behavioural and psychological methods, as well as a host of pharmacological preparations, which are safe and effective when used as indicated. Many complementary and alternative treatments appear to be promising in treating and relieving pain, although further research is required. The present article reviews the most common sources of pain in childhood and infancy, as well as current treatment strategies and options. PMID:19030348

  11. Buffet Load Alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryall, T. G.; Moses, R. W.; Hopkins, M. A.; Henderson, D.; Zimcik, D. G.; Nitzsche, F.

    2004-01-01

    High performance aircraft are, by their very nature, often required to undergo maneuvers involving high angles of attack. Under these conditions unsteady vortices emanating from the wing and the fuselage will impinge on the twin fins (required for directional stability) causing excessive buffet loads, in some circumstances, to be applied to the aircraft. These loads result in oscillatory stresses, which may cause significant amounts of fatigue damage. Active control is a possible solution to this important problem. A full-scale test was carried out on an F/A-18 fuselage and fins using piezoceramic actuators to control the vibrations. Buffet loads were simulated using very powerful electromagnetic shakers. The first phase of this test was concerned with the open loop system identification whereas the second stage involved implementing linear time invariant control laws. This paper looks at some of the problems encountered as well as the corresponding solutions and some results. It is expected that flight trials of a similar control system to alleviate buffet will occur as early as 2001.

  12. Female athletes and menstrual disorders: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Laura; Galanti, Giorgio; Lorini, Silvia; Beni, Giada; Dei, Metella; Maffulli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background There is a greater incidence of menstrual disorders in female athletes than in their sedentary counterparts. The menstrual disorder is reported in female athletes suffering from athletic triad syndrome, while few data in those free of this syndrome are available. The study aims to ascertain the presence of menstrual disorders and the eventual relationship with myocardial performance in female athletes practicing different sports. Methods A sample of 64 subjects aged 18.5±2 was selected and divided into 3 groups (37 subjects practicing rhythmic gymnastics, 11 swimmers, and 16 volleyball players). All underwent echocardiography, biompendance analysis, and answered a questionnaire. Results All anthropometrics parameters were normal. Few athletes reported menstrual disorders. No association between the presence of menstrual disorders and BMI. All echo results were within the normal range. Cardiac Mass Index (CMI) was normal for all athletes despite in swimmers significantly higher values (90.64±14.9 g/m2) compared to the volleyball players (78.25±14.0 g/m2; p<.04) and rhythmic gymnasts (77.89±13.4 g/m2; p<.009) were found. Conclusions Despite menstrual disorders are represented among female athletes, the eventual relationship with the sport practiced is not so evident. Questionnaire should be used to identify menstrual disorders in non-elite athletically active females. PMID:27900290

  13. Pure menstrual migraine with sensory aura: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiann-Jy; Hsu, Yung-Chu; Chen, Dem-Lion

    2012-07-01

    Hormonal changes related to the menstrual cycle have a great impact on migraines in women. Menstrual migraine attacks are almost invariably without aura. Categorizing migraines into menstrual or non-menstrual types is one way to stratify migraines without aura according to the appendix criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. We report a peri-menopausal woman whose sensory aura exclusively heralded menstrual migraine. A 51-year-old woman had suffered from monthly episodic headaches since the age of 46. Before a headache, and within 1 h on the first day of her menstruation, she always experienced numbness in her entire left upper limb. After the sensory aura, migrainous headaches occurred with nausea and photophobia. In the postmenopausal period, she no longer had sensory aura, and her headache pattern changed and became less severe. Her physical and neurologic exams as well as electroencephalography, brain magnetic resonance imaging, and conventional angiography were all normal. She fulfilled the diagnosis of pure menstrual migraine with typical sensory aura. To our knowledge, this is the first formal case report of pure menstrual migraine with aura.

  14. Menstrual cycle effects on psychological symptoms in women with PTSD.

    PubMed

    Nillni, Yael I; Pineles, Suzanne L; Patton, Samantha C; Rouse, Matthew H; Sawyer, Alice T; Rasmusson, Ann M

    2015-02-01

    The menstrual cycle has been implicated as a sex-specific biological process influencing psychological symptoms across a variety of disorders. Limited research exists regarding the role of the menstrual cycle in psychological symptoms among women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The current study examined the severity of a broad range of psychological symptoms in both the early follicular (Days 2-6) and midluteal (6-10 days postlutenizing hormone surge) phases of the menstrual cycle in a sample of trauma-exposed women with and without PTSD (N = 49). In the sample overall, total psychological symptoms (d = 0.63), as well as depression (d = 0.81) and phobic anxiety (d = 0.81) symptoms, specifically, were increased in the early follicular compared to midluteal phase. The impact of menstrual cycle phase on phobic anxiety was modified by a significant PTSD × Menstrual Phase interaction (d = 0.63). Women with PTSD reported more severe phobic anxiety during the early follicular versus midluteal phase, whereas phobic anxiety did not differ across the menstrual cycle in women without PTSD. Thus, the menstrual cycle appears to impact fear-related symptoms in women with PTSD. The clinical implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed.

  15. Circadian patterns of ad libitum smoking by menstrual phase

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Alicia M.; Mooney, Marc; Chakraborty, Rima; Allen, Sharon S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recent research suggests nicotine metabolism may be influenced by sex hormones. Thus, we hypothesized that circadian smoking patterns would vary by menstrual phase. Methods Healthy female smokers (n = 31) between the ages of 18 and 40 with regular menstrual cycles, and not using hormones or psychotropic medications, were recruited for a randomized clinical study. Subjects recorded the time of each cigarette smoked and their menstrual phase with daily diaries prospectively for one complete menstrual cycle of ad libitum smoking. Analyses included Poisson regression to assess variations in the rate of smoking during waking hours (i.e., 6:00 a.m. and 12:00 midnight) and circadian smoking patterns by menstrual phase. Results Participants were 29.61 ± 5.44 years of age and smoked 16.93 ± 5.37 cigarettes per day. Participants had a lower rate of smoking during waking hours in the follicular phase as compared to the menses phase. There were no significant menstrual phase differences in the circadian smoking patterns. Conclusions These results offer further support for the influence of sex hormones on smoking behavior, but not on circadian patterns of smoking. Additional research is needed to study the direct relationship between nicotine metabolism, sex hormones, menstrual phase, and smoking behavior. PMID:19517420

  16. Women's experiences with medication for menstrual regulation in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Marlow, Heather M; Biswas, Kamal; Griffin, Risa; Menzel, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Menstrual regulation has been legal in Bangladesh since 1974, but the use of medication for menstrual regulation is new. In this study, we sought to understand women's experiences using medication for menstrual regulation in Bangladesh. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews with rural and urban women between December 2013 and February 2014. All interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, translated, computer recorded and coded for analysis. The majority of women in our study had had positive experiences with medication for menstrual regulation and successful outcomes, regardless of whether they obtained their medication from medicine sellers/pharmacies, doctors or clinics. Women were strongly influenced by health providers when deciding which method to use. There is a need to educate not only women of reproductive age, but also communities as a whole, about medication for menstrual regulation, with a particular emphasis on cost and branding the medication. Continued efforts to improve counselling by providers about the dose, medication and side-effects of medication for menstrual regulation, along with education of the community about medication as an option for menstrual regulation, will help to de-stigmatise the procedure and the women who seek it.

  17. Medical management of heavy menstrual bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Maybin, Jacqueline A; Critchley, Hilary OD

    2016-01-01

    Women with benign heavy menstrual bleeding have the choice of a number of medical treatment options to reduce their blood loss and improve quality of life. The role of the clinician is to provide information to facilitate women in making an appropriate choice. Unfortunately, many options can be associated with hormonal side effects, prevention of fertility and lack of efficacy, leading to discontinuation and progression to surgical interventions. Herein, we discuss the various options currently available to women, including antifibrinolytics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory preparations, oral contraceptive pills and oral, injectable and intrauterine progestogens. In addition, we describe the more novel option of selective progesterone receptor modulators and their current benefits and limitations. PMID:26695687

  18. Menstrual phase effects on smoking relapse

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sharon S.; Bade, Tracy; Center, Bruce; Finstad, Deborah; Hatsukami, Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    Aims To examine if menstrual phase affects relapse in women attempting to quit smoking. Design An intent-to-treat randomized smoking cessation trial where women were assigned to quit smoking in either the follicular (F) or luteal (L) menstrual phase and were followed for up to 26 weeks. They were assessed for relapse by days to relapse and relapse phase to determine if those who begin a quit attempt during the F phase were more successful than those who begin during the L phase. Setting Tobacco Use Research Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Participants A total of 202 women. Measurements Latency to relapse from continuous and prolonged abstinence, point prevalence, phase of relapse, first slip within the first 3 and 5 days post-quit date, subject completion rates and symptomatology (i.e. withdrawal and craving). Findings The mean days to relapse from continuous abstinence and relapse from prolonged abstinence for the F group were 13.9 and 20.6 days, respectively, and 21.5 and 39.2 days, respectively, for the L group. Using point prevalence analysis at 14 days, 84% of the F group had relapsed compared with 65% of the L group [χ2 = 10.024, P = 0.002; odds ratio (OR) = 2.871, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.474– 5.590]. At 30 days, 86% of the F group relapsed, compared with 66% of the L group (χ2 = 11.076, P = 0.001; OR = 3.178, 95% CI, 1.594–6.334). Conclusion Women attempting to quit smoking in the F phase had less favorable outcomes than those attempting to quit in the L phase. This could relate to ovarian hormones, which may play a role in smoking cessation for women. PMID:18412759

  19. Psychophysiological aspects of the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, W G

    1976-01-01

    After a survey of literature on electrolyte changes associated with the varying excretion of hormones during the menstrual cycle, a study of 30 women aged 18-33 is reported. Measurements of sodium and potassium ions in the saliva were made at 4 points in the menstrual cycle and, since previous work had shown bilateral asymmetry in sodium reabsorption in the eccrine sweat glands, samples were collected from both the right and left sides of the mouth. The smallest sodium/potassium (Na+/K+) ratios were found at ovulation and the premenstruum. This fits 2 sets of facts: 1) during stress Na+/K+ ratios decrease and 2) this decrease comes exactly when most women report feelings of irritability, anxiety, and such. Differences in Na+/K+ ratios over points in the cycle were significant at p less than .001. Differences between right and left side were significant during the premenstruum (p less than .05). K+ was highest at ovulation (p less than .001) and the left side produced higher values (p less than .05). Na+ was lowest at ovulation, highest at menstruation (p less than .001) with concentration on right side higher at menstruation (p less than .05). This seems to indicate that the right side not only reabsorbs Na+ more efficiently but it can also excrete more efficiently and maintains homeostasis more effectively. Estrogen seems to play a major role in initiating these variations in body electrolytes, which are similar to stress reactions. It is also suggested that salivary electrolytes, recorded for parotid saliva, reflect readings similar to that of plasma with Na+ and K+ tending to move in opposite directions.

  20. How I Manage Exercise-Related Menstrual Disturbances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shangold, Mona M.

    1986-01-01

    Amenorrhea and oligomenorrhea are often related to heavy exercise, but these conditions can signal a serious pathologic condition. Tests to pinpoint causes of menstrual dysfunctions are listed, and treatments to establish a proper hormone balance are described. (MT)

  1. Lack of Influence of the Menstrual Cycle on Blood Lactate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamont, Linda S.

    1986-01-01

    Nine healthy women were tested before, during, and after exercise during the follicular and luteal phases of their menstrual cycles to determine the effect of menstruation on blood lactate levels. Findings are discussed. (Author/MT)

  2. The perpetuation of menstrual shame: implications and directions.

    PubMed

    McKeever, P

    1984-01-01

    In North America, many taboos and myths related to menstruating women have been officially discredited. Unfortunately however, menstruation continues to be imbued with complex, largely negative meanings. This paper examines how menstrual shame and embarrassment are perpetuated through common folk wisdom, educational methods, and commercial advertising. A discussion of female socialization illustrates how girls arrive at puberty with attitudes that reflect largely negative cultural stereotypes. Implications and directions for education and research which are intended to counterbalance the prevalent menstrual ideology are presented.

  3. Variation of fluorescence spectroscopy during the menstrual cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macaulay, Calum; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Utzinger, Urs; Fedyk, Amanda; Neely Atkinson, E.; Cox, Dennis; Follen, Michele

    2002-06-01

    Cervical autofluorescence has been demonstrated to have potential for real-time diagnosis. Inter-patient and intra-patient variations in fluorescence intensity have been measured. Inter-patient measurements may vary by a factor of ten, while intra-patient measurements may vary by a factor of two. Age and menopausal status have been demonstrated to account for some of the variations, while race and smoking have not. In order to explore in detail the role of the menstrual cycle in intra-patient variation, a study was designed to measure fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMs) in patients daily throughout one cycle. Ten patients with a history of normal menstrual cycles and normal Papanicolaou smears underwent daily measurements of fluorescence EEMs from three colposcopically normal sites throughout one menstrual cycle. Changes in signals from porphyrin, NADH, and FAD fluorescence and blood absorption were noted when the data was viewed in a graphical format. Visually interpreted features of the EEMs in this graphical format did not appear to correlate with the day of the menstrual cycle with the exception that blood absorption features were more prominent during the menstrual phase (during which bleeding occurs), suggesting that measurements during the menstrual phase should be avoided. Variations in cycle date likely do not account for inter- or intra-patient variations.

  4. Dichotic listening asymmetry: sex differences and menstrual cycle effects.

    PubMed

    Wadnerkar, Meghana B; Whiteside, Sandra P; Cowell, Patricia E

    2008-07-01

    The impact of menstrual cyclicity and sex differences on dichotic listening was studied in 25 women and 20 men (aged 20-25 years). Dichotic listening was administered using consonant-vowel (CV) stimuli and tested across three attention conditions. Women were tested at two points in the menstrual cycle (Day 2-5: low oestrogen and progesterone/Low-EP; Day 18-25: high oestrogen and progesterone/High-EP). Men were tested once. Performance averaged across attention conditions was analysed for menstrual cycle and sex effects. Significant menstrual cycle phase effects were observed in women. At the High-EP phase women showed a greater right ear advantage (REA) compared to the Low-EP phase. Sex differences were found when dichotic listening asymmetry in men was compared to women at the Low-EP, but not the High-EP phase. In contrast to laterality effects, baseline perceptual performance (total right plus left ear response) was similar in men and women at both phases of the menstrual cycle. Results support a role for ovarian hormones in shaping laterality of speech perception in women. This study also emphasises the importance of considering menstrual cycle effects when evaluating sex differences in dichotic listening.

  5. [Pain perception of the fetus].

    PubMed

    Jakobovits, Akos

    2010-11-07

    Author presents a comprehensive overview of the currently available information about fetal pain perception. In this context the article discusses the concept of pain sensation, its evolution during intrauterine life and its physical and biochemical signs. Only the last mentioned phenomena allow deduction with regard to the severity of pain related stress reaction, in the absence of objective yardstick for measuring the intensity of pain felt by the fetus. The discussion also involves pain associated with birthing process and extends to its possible alleviation.

  6. A micro-computer software for the analysis of menstrual diaries: the menstrual diary system.

    PubMed

    Pinol, A; Machin, D

    1988-08-01

    A microcomputer software was developed to analyse menstrual diaries following the reference period method as described in the article "The analysis of vaginal bleeding patterns induced by fertility regulating methods" published in this journal (Contraception, 34:253-260, 1986). The programme allows the analysis of groups of diaries selected according to subjects' characteristics recorded at commencement of the diary. It also offers flexibility in selecting options of analysis within the reference period method. The output can be presented graphically as Box-whisker plots. A tutorial is included in the package.

  7. Mood, mileage and the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Cockerill, I M; Nevill, A M; Byrne, N C

    1992-01-01

    Forty women took part in a study to determine the effects of high-intensity training and the menstrual cycle on mood states. Half of the sample were competitive distance runners following a training load of between 50 km and 130 km running per week. Seven athletes were amenorrhoeic and 13 either eumenorrhoeic or oligomenorrhoeic. The remaining 20 subjects were inactive women who menstruated regularly. The mean age of all 40 subjects was 29 years. Each subject completed two identical Profile of Mood States (POMS) questionnaires. The 33 menstruating subjects completed both a premenstrual and a midcycle form and the amenorrhoeic athletes completed the questionnaires at a 3-week interval, which acted as a control for the potential effects of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) among the menstruating females. Results showed highly significant differences in mood profiles among amenorrhoeic athletes, non-amenorrhoeic athletes and inactive women. The greatest difference was between premenstrual and midcycle measures for the inactive group. PMS appears to cause marked negative mood swings among menstruating women which the POMS inventory is sensitive in detecting. While the lower-intensity-training runners appeared to benefit psychologically from a training distance of approximately 50 km week-1, high-intensity training had an adverse effect on mood. PMID:1422649

  8. Comparative legal aspects of pain management.

    PubMed

    Vansweevelt, T

    2008-12-01

    Administering pain medication to terminal patients can cause legal problems when it has a life-shortening effect, because according to some authors it equates with manslaughter. The legal basis of the acceptance of pain alleviation with life-shortening effect can be found on the grounds of necessity. In different countries physicians have been prosecuted because of their pain management, which to the public prosecutor was in fact a sort of euthanasia. On the other hand, it is not unknown that physicians administer opioids to mask euthanasia. Pain management needs some rules, which can reassure the physician who alleviates pain. The physician who alleviates pain with life-shortening effect will have to act with due care to avoid a liability risk. This implies at least an informed consent, to observe the proportionality rule, and to keep a medical record.

  9. Pain in Children: Assessment and Nonpharmacological Management

    PubMed Central

    Srouji, Rasha; Ratnapalan, Savithiri; Schneeweiss, Suzan

    2010-01-01

    Pain perception in children is complex, and is often difficult to assess. In addition, pain management in children is not always optimized in various healthcare settings, including emergency departments. A review of pain assessment scales that can be used in children across all ages, and a discussion of the importance of pain in control and distraction techniques during painful procedures are presented. Age specific nonpharmacological interventions used to manage pain in children are most effective when adapted to the developmental level of the child. Distraction techniques are often provided by nurses, parents or child life specialists and help in pain alleviation during procedures. PMID:20706640

  10. Pharmacological modulation of cold-induced pain in cutaneous leiomyomata.

    PubMed

    Archer, C B; Whittaker, S; Greaves, M W

    1988-02-01

    In two patients with painful cutaneous leiomyomata, induction of pain by the application of an ice cube allowed assessment of a number of topical and systemic treatments aimed at reducing or preventing the pain. In one patient the alpha-adrenoceptor blocker, phenoxybenzamine alleviated cold-induced pain. In the second patient, topical 9% hyoscine hydrobromide (an anticholinergic agent) decreased pain induced by the ice cube, but was not helpful in reducing lesional pain due to cold weather.

  11. Recent advances in managing and understanding menstrual disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Moazzam

    2015-01-01

    Menstrual disorders are a major reason for gynaecological consultations worldwide and, unfortunately there are many different definitions and classifications of this condition. Clear definitions and terminology are necessary for scientific literature, particularly for clinicians, and for clinical trials comparing two treatments. The International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Menstrual Disorders Working Group has proposed abandoning the use of one common term, dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB), while continuing to use the terms abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) and heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB). Furthermore, the group issued the PALM-COEIN classification system for menstrual disorders, which has quickly been adopted around the world. The PALM-COEIN system allows clinicians and researchers to identify and classify women with both AUB and HMB in a systematic manner, provides reliable information for research purposes and for epidemiological and prevalence studies in different settings, and supports accurate diagnoses and treatment. Additionally, this classification system is useful for selecting treatments appropriate for different stages of women's reproductive years and for different patterns of menstrual bleeding. Among the proposed treatments are the use of combined oral contraceptives, the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, tranexamic acid, mefenamic acid, and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). PMID:25926984

  12. Alleviating Stress for Women Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ten Elshof, Annette; Tomlinson, Elaine

    1981-01-01

    Describes a workshop designed to help women administrators assess individual stress levels. Stress can be alleviated through exercise, support groups or networking, sleep and diet, relaxation, guided fantasy, and planned activity. The long-term implications include preventing illness and making women more effective within the administrative…

  13. Altered Cytokine Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood Monocytes across the Menstrual Cycle in Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongyue; Hong, Min; Duan, Jinao; Liu, Pei; Fan, Xinsheng; Shang, Erxin; Su, Shulan; Guo, Jianming; Qian, Dawei; Tang, Yuping

    2013-01-01

    Primary dysmenorrhea is one of the most common gynecological complaints in young women, but potential peripheral immunologic features underlying this condition remain undefined. In this paper, we compared 84 common cytokine gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from six primary dysmenorrheic young women and three unaffected controls on the seventh day before (secretory phase), and the first (menstrual phase) and the fifth (regenerative phase) days of menstruation, using a real-time PCR array assay combined with pattern recognition and gene function annotation methods. Comparisons between dysmenorrhea and normal control groups identified 11 (nine increased and two decreased), 14 (five increased and nine decreased), and 15 (seven increased and eight decreased) genes with ≥2-fold difference in expression (P<0.05) in the three phases of menstruation, respectively. In the menstrual phase, genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL1B, TNF, IL6, and IL8) were up-regulated, and genes encoding TGF-β superfamily members (BMP4, BMP6, GDF5, GDF11, LEFTY2, NODAL, and MSTN) were down-regulated. Functional annotation revealed an excessive inflammatory response and insufficient TGF-β superfamily member signals with anti-inflammatory consequences, which may directly contribute to menstrual pain. In the secretory and regenerative phases, increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and decreased expression of growth factors were also observed. These factors may be involved in the regulation of decidualization, endometrium breakdown and repair, and indirectly exacerbate primary dysmenorrhea. This first study of cytokine gene expression profiles in PBMCs from young primary dysmenorrheic women demonstrates a shift in the balance between expression patterns of pro-inflammatory cytokines and TGF-β superfamily members across the whole menstrual cycle, underlying the peripheral immunologic features of primary dysmenorrhea. PMID:23390521

  14. Disorders of the menstrual cycle in airline stewardesses.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, R; Terrés, A; Chavarria, A

    1980-05-01

    Of 200 airline stewardesses, 39% underwent unfavourable changes in the menstrual cycle after commencing aeronautical activities while 11% who had previous disorders healed soon after joining the company. Although 48% of the stewardesses underwent changes in menstruation during flight, in about half of these the menstrual flow increased and in the other half it decreased or disappeared, only to reappear with greater intensity after the flight; 38% of the stewardesses manifected suffering from pelvic discomfort after long flights. Sufficient research in this field has not been done. Therefore, it is difficult to trace the exact origin and mechanism of these changes in the menstrual cycle. Stress and internal desynchronitation due to disruption of circadian rhythm may intervene in generating these disorders.

  15. Current advances in orthodontic pain

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hu; Wang, Yan; Jian, Fan; Liao, Li-Na; Yang, Xin; Lai, Wen-Li

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic pain is an inflammatory pain that is initiated by orthodontic force-induced vascular occlusion followed by a cascade of inflammatory responses, including vascular changes, the recruitment of inflammatory and immune cells, and the release of neurogenic and pro-inflammatory mediators. Ultimately, endogenous analgesic mechanisms check the inflammatory response and the sensation of pain subsides. The orthodontic pain signal, once received by periodontal sensory endings, reaches the sensory cortex for pain perception through three-order neurons: the trigeminal neuron at the trigeminal ganglia, the trigeminal nucleus caudalis at the medulla oblongata and the ventroposterior nucleus at the thalamus. Many brain areas participate in the emotion, cognition and memory of orthodontic pain, including the insular cortex, amygdala, hippocampus, locus coeruleus and hypothalamus. A built-in analgesic neural pathway—periaqueductal grey and dorsal raphe—has an important role in alleviating orthodontic pain. Currently, several treatment modalities have been applied for the relief of orthodontic pain, including pharmacological, mechanical and behavioural approaches and low-level laser therapy. The effectiveness of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain relief has been validated, but its effects on tooth movement are controversial. However, more studies are needed to verify the effectiveness of other modalities. Furthermore, gene therapy is a novel, viable and promising modality for alleviating orthodontic pain in the future. PMID:27341389

  16. Menstrual Pattern following Tubal Ligation: A Historical Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sadatmahalleh, Shahideh Jahanian; Ziaei, Saeideh; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Mohamadi, Eesa

    2016-01-01

    Background Tubal ligation (TL) is recommended for women who have completed their family planning. The existence of the menstrual disorders following this procedure has been the subject of debate for decades. This study was conducted to identify the relationship between tubal ligation and menstrual disorders. Materials and Methods A historical cohort study was carried out on 140 women undergoing tubal ligation (TL group) and on 140 women using condom as the main contraceptive method (Non-TL group). They aged between 20 and 40 years and were selected from a health care center in Rudsar, Guilan Province, Iran, during 2013-2014. The two groups were comparable in demographic characteristics, obstetrical features and menstrual bleeding pattern using a routine questionnaire. A validated pictorial blood loss assessment chart (PBLAC) was also used to measure the menstrual blood loss. Results Women with TL had more menstrual irregularity than those without TL (24.3 vs. 10%, P=0.002). Women with TL had more polymenorrhea (9.3 vs. 1.4%, P=0.006), hypermenorrhea (12.1 vs. 2.1%, P=0.002), menorrhagia (62.9 vs. 22.1%, P<0.0001) and menometrorrhagia (15.7 vs. 3.6%, P=0.001) than those without TL. There is a significant difference in the PBLAC score between women with and without TL (P<0.0001). According to logistic regression, age odds ratio [(OR=1.08, con- fidence interval (CI):1.07-1.17, P=0.03)], TL (OR=5.95, CI:3.45-10.26, P<0.0001) and cesarean section (OR=2.72, CI:1.49-4.97, P=0.001) were significantly associated with menorrhagia. Conclusion We found significant differences in menstrual disorders between women with and without TL. Therefore, women should be informed by the health providers regarding the advantages and disadvantages of TL before the procedures. PMID:26985334

  17. The Muscle Stretch Reflex throughout the Menstrual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Ellen; Hameed, Farah; Dhaher, Yasin Y.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The significant sex-disparity in sports-related knee injuries may be due to underlying differences in motor control. While the development of sex-specific movement patterns is likely multi-factorial, this study specifically focuses on the potential modulatory role of sex hormones. Purpose To investigate the muscle stretch reflex (MSR) across the menstrual cycle. We hypothesized that the MSR would fluctuate throughout the menstrual cycle, and that the lowest response would correspond with peak concentrations of estrogen. Methods Nineteen healthy women ages 18–35 participated in this study: 8 eumenorrheic women and 11 women taking oral contraceptives. Serum estradiol and progesterone concentrations, anterior knee laxity (AKL) and the MSR response of the quadriceps muscles were measured three times during the menstrual cycle. Results The MSR response of the RF varied significantly across the menstrual cycle in both groups. Specifically, the RF MSR response was 2.4 times lower during the peri-ovulatory phase when compared to the luteal phase (P = 0.007). The same trend was seen in the VM, but this did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.070). The MSR response of the VL did not change significantly across the menstrual cycle (P = 0.494). A mixed model comparison did not show an association between endogenous concentrations of estradiol and progesterone, exposure to hormonal contraceptives or AKL and the MSR response for any muscle. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the RF MSR response varies throughout the menstrual cycle with the lowest response around the time of ovulation. Additional research is needed to clarify the exact relationship between sex hormones, AKL and the MSR response and to determine the specific origin of the change along the monosynaptic reflex arc. PMID:24091990

  18. Menstrual cycle effects on sympathetic neural responses to upright tilt.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qi; Okazaki, Kazunobu; Shibata, Shigeki; Shook, Robin P; VanGunday, Tiffany B; Galbreath, M Melyn; Reelick, Miriam F; Levine, Benjamin D

    2009-05-01

    Young women are more susceptible to orthostatic intolerance than men, though the sex-specific pathophysiology remains unknown. As blood pressure (BP) is regulated through the baroreflex mechanism, we tested the hypothesis that baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during orthostasis is impaired in women and can be affected by the menstrual cycle. MSNA and haemodynamics were measured supine and during a graded upright tilt (30 deg for 6 min, 60 deg for 45 min or till presyncope) in 11 young men and 11 women during the early follicular (EFP) and mid-luteal phase (MLP) of the menstrual cycle. Sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity was quantified using the slope of the linear correlation between total activity and diastolic BP during spontaneous breathing. Baroreflex function was further assessed during a Valsalva manoeuvre (VM). Although MSNA burst frequency responses during tilting were similar between sexes and menstrual phases, increases in total activity were lower in women during EFP than MLP (P = 0.030), while total peripheral resistance and plasma noradrenaline were not similarly lower; upright total activity tended to be lower in women during EFP than men (P = 0.102). Sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity did not differ between sexes (P = 0.676) supine (-281 +/- 46 (S.E.M.) units beat(-1) mmHg(-1) in men vs -252 +/- 52 in EFP and -272 +/- 40 in MLP in women), at 30 deg tilt (-648 +/- 129 vs -611 +/- 79 and -487 +/- 94), and at 60 deg tilt (-792 +/- 135 vs -831 +/- 92 and -814 +/- 142); this sensitivity was not affected by the menstrual cycle (P = 0.747). Similar sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity between sexes and phases was also observed during the VM. Cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity assessed during decreasing BP (i.e. early phase II of the VM) was comparable between sexes, but it was greater in men than women during increasing BP (i.e. phase IV); the menstrual cycle had no influences on cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity. We conclude

  19. The Relationship of Stress Arousal and Stress Prone Personality Traits to Menstrual Distress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, David C.

    The various relationships of stress arousal and stress-prone personality traits to menstrual distress were investigated in order to quantify psychophysiological arousal differences between high and low menstrual distress symptom reporters and examine differences in stress-prone personality traits between high and low menstrual distress symptom…

  20. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  1. The OPRM1 A118G polymorphism modulates the descending pain modulatory system for individual pain experience in young women with primary dysmenorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shyh-Yuh; Chen, Li-Fen; Lin, Ming-Wei; Li, Wei-Chi; Low, Intan; Yang, Ching-Ju; Chao, Hsiang-Tai; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen

    2017-01-01

    The mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1) A118G polymorphism underpins different pain sensitivity and opioid-analgesic outcome with unclear effect on the descending pain modulatory system (DPMS). Primary dysmenorrhea (PDM), the most prevalent gynecological problem with clear painful and pain free conditions, serves as a good clinical model of spontaneous pain. The objective of this imaging genetics study was therefore to explore if differences in functional connectivity (FC) of the DPMS between the OPRM1 A118G polymorphisms could provide a possible explanation for the differences in pain experience. Sixty-one subjects with PDM and 65 controls participated in the current study of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the menstruation and peri-ovulatory phases; blood samples were taken for genotyping. We studied 3 aspects of pain experience, namely, mnemonic pain (recalled overall menstrual pain), present pain (spontaneous menstrual pain), and experimental pain (thermal pain) intensities. We report that G allele carriers, in comparison to AA homozygotes, exhibited functional hypo-connectivity between the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and periaqueductal gray (PAG). Furthermore, G allele carriers lost the correlation with spontaneous pain experience and exhibited dysfunctional DPMS by means of PAG-seeded FC dynamics. This OPRM1 A118G-DPMS interaction is one plausible neurological mechanism underlying the individual differences in pain experience. PMID:28057931

  2. Menstrual Cycle Phase Does Not Predict Political Conservatism

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Isabel M.; Pound, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Recent authors have reported a relationship between women's fertility status, as indexed by menstrual cycle phase, and conservatism in moral, social and political values. We conducted a survey to test for the existence of a relationship between menstrual cycle day and conservatism. 2213 women reporting regular menstrual cycles provided data about their political views. Of these women, 2208 provided information about their cycle date, 1260 provided additional evidence of reliability in self-reported cycle date, and of these, 750 also indicated an absence of hormonal disruptors such as recent hormonal contraception use, breastfeeding or pregnancy. Cycle day was used to estimate day-specific fertility rate (probability of conception); political conservatism was measured via direct self-report and via responses to the "Moral Foundations” questionnaire. We also recorded relationship status, which has been reported to interact with menstrual cycle phase in determining political preferences. We found no evidence of a relationship between estimated cyclical fertility changes and conservatism, and no evidence of an interaction between relationship status and cyclical fertility in determining political attitudes. Our findings were robust to multiple inclusion/exclusion criteria and to different methods of estimating fertility and measuring conservatism. In summary, the relationship between cycle-linked reproductive parameters and conservatism may be weaker or less reliable than previously thought. PMID:25923332

  3. Relationships Among Premenstrual Symptom Reports, Menstrual Attitudes, and Mindfulness

    PubMed Central

    Lustyk, M. Kathleen B.; Gerrish, Winslow G.; Douglas, Haley; Bowen, Sarah; Marlatt, G. Alan

    2016-01-01

    The physical and affective symptoms of a broad range of conditions are improved following mindfulness-based practices. One set of symptoms that has yet to be explored through the lens of mindfulness, however, is that associated with the premenstruum. Also, given the relationships among negative attitudes towards menstruation and amplified symptom reporting, it is reasonable to expect that mindfulness qualities cultivated through practices aimed at dispelling negative anticipatory and judgmental thinking will moderate these relationships. Thus, in this study we examined interrelationships among premenstrual symptom severity reports (PMSR), menstrual attitudes, and mindfulness qualities in a sample of 127 women (age range 18–26 years). Results revealed several statistically significant positive relationships between menstrual attitudes and PMSR. Also, higher scores on measures of mindfulness were significantly associated with lower PMSR. Moderating effects revealed that mindfulness significantly buffered the relationships between menstrual attitudes and PMSR, specifically between: anticipation of menses onset and PMSR as well as anticipation of menses onset and premenstrual water retention. These results may offer the first empirical evidence of relationships among menstrual attitudes, PMSR, and mindfulness qualities. Results from this study align with the body of research showing that mindfulness is predictive of improved symptomatology and well-being across varied conditions. We conclude with discussion supporting the development of a mindfulness-based intervention aimed at reducing symptom severity in premenstrual symptom sufferers. PMID:27162560

  4. Menstrual hygiene among adolescent schoolgirls in Mansoura, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady; Badawi, Karima; El-Fedawy, Sanaa

    2005-11-01

    Learning about menstrual hygiene is a vital aspect of health education for adolescent girls. This study among 664 schoolgirls aged 14-18 in Mansoura, Egypt, asked about type of sanitary protection used, frequency of changing pads or cloths, means of disposal and bathing during menstruation. Girls were selected by cluster sampling technique in public secondary schools in urban and rural areas. Data were collected through an anonymous, self-administered, open-ended questionnaire during class time. The significant predictors of use of sanitary pads were availability of mass media at home, high and middle social class and urban residence. Use of sanitary pads may be increasing, but not among girls from rural and poor families, and other aspects of personal hygiene were generally found to be poor, such as not changing pads regularly or at night, and not bathing during menstruation. Lack of privacy was an important problem. Mass media were the main source of information about menstrual hygiene, followed by mothers, but a large majority of girls said they needed more information. Instruction in menstrual hygiene should be linked to an expanded programme of health education in schools. A supportive environment for menstrual hygiene has to be provided both at home and in school and sanitary pads made more affordable.

  5. Pre-Menstrual Syndrome in Women with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Linda; Cunningham, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) may be higher in women with Down syndrome due to syndrome specific characteristics in biochemistry, psychopathology and lifestyle. Recognition of PMS may be difficult for women with intellectual disabilities and their carers. Method: A daily diary, used to diagnose PMS with typical women, was…

  6. Sex hormone-binding globulin changes during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Plymate, S R; Moore, D E; Cheng, C Y; Bardin, C W; Southworth, M B; Levinski, M J

    1985-11-01

    Although sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) production is stimulated by estrogen, no change in SHBG has been demonstrated during the menstrual cycle. To further study possible cyclic changes in serum SHBG, 12 women with a normal menstrual and fertility history had daily SHBG measurements during a menstrual cycle. SHBG was measured by dextran-coated charcoal saturation analysis and RIA. Serum LH was measured by mouse Leydig cell bioassay and RIA, and FSH, estradiol (E2), and progesterone were determined by RIA. In 10 women, a significant increase in mean SHBG by both methods occurred during the luteal phase of the cycle, immediately after the preovulatory increase in serum E2 (P less than 0.001). Two women had no SHBG increase; although each had a significant rise in serum E2 before the LH surge, luteal phase E2 levels were similar to those in the early follicular phase. In one of these women, a rise in SHBG was demonstrated by RIA. This study demonstrates that SHBG changes during the menstrual cycle in association with E2 changes, and it appears to be a marker for the endogenous estrogen changes that occur in normal ovulating women.

  7. Menstrual differences due to vegetarian and nonvegetarian diets.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, A B; Bartholomew, M J; Dolence, L A; Aljadir, L P; Netteburg, K L; Lloyd, T

    1991-04-01

    We studied 41 nonvegetarian and 34 vegetarian premenopausal women whom we closely screened. The two groups were indistinguishable with respect to height, weight, body mass index, and menarche. The incidence of menstrual irregularity was 4.9% among nonvegetarians and 26.5% among vegetarians (P = 0.009). The vegetarian group consumed significantly greater amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids, carbohydrates, vitamin B-6, and dietary fiber whereas the nonvegetarians reported greater intakes of saturated fatty acids, protein, cholesterol, caffeine and alcohol. Logistic-regression analyses showed that the probability of menstrual regularity among all study subjects (n = 75) was positively associated with increasing protein/kJ and increasing cholesterol/kJ intakes. The probability of being menstrually regular was negatively associated with increasing dietary fiber/kJ and increasing magnesium/kJ intakes. These results are consistent with the notion that menstrual regularity can be influenced by specific dietary nutrients that may have direct effects or exert their effects by modulating circulating sex steroid status.

  8. Mood Fluctuations: Women Versus Men And Menstrual Versus Other Cycles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarlane, Jessica; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Studied mood fluctuations and cyclic changes in 15 women using oral contraceptives, 12 normally cycling women, and 15 men. Found no evidence of mood fluctuations over lunar cycle and groups did not differ in mood stability. Women's moods fluctuated less over menstrual cycle than over days of week. Differences between concurrent and retrospective…

  9. Fluctuation in Spatial Ability Scores during the Menstrual Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, M. Suzanne

    Whether or not fluctuations in spatial ability as measured by S. G. Vandenberg's Mental Rotations Test occur during the menstrual cycle was studied with 133 female students from 9 undergraduate educational psychology and nursing classes. For comparison, 28 male students also took the test. Scores from 55 females fell into the relevant menstrual…

  10. Characterization of chaotic dynamics in the human menstrual cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derry, Gregory; Derry, Paula

    2010-03-01

    The human menstrual cycle exhibits much unexplained variability, which is typically dismissed as random variation. Given the many delayed nonlinear feedbacks in the reproductive endocrine system, however, the menstrual cycle might well be a nonlinear dynamical system in a chaotic trajectory, and that this instead accounts for the observed variability. Here, we test this hypothesis by performing a time series analysis on data for 7438 menstrual cycles from 38 women in the 20-40 year age range, using the database maintained by the Tremin Research Program on Women's Health. Using phase space reconstruction techniques with a maximum embedding dimension of 6, we find appropriate scaling behavior in the correlation sums for this data, indicating low dimensional deterministic dynamics. A correlation dimension of 2.6 is measured in this scaling regime, and this result is confirmed by recalculation using the Takens estimator. These results may be interpreted as offering an approximation to the fractal dimension of a strange attractor governing the chaotic dynamics of the menstrual cycle.

  11. Mood Effects of Alcohol and Expectancies during the Menstrual Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adesso, Vincent J.; Freitag, Wendy J.

    This research attempted to develop a profile of women's moods across the menstrual cycle and to determine alcohol's effects upon those moods. The Profile of Mood States was used to measure mood in 96 female college students who were heavy drinkers. Subjects were randomly assigned to the cells of the balanced placebo design with equal numbers in…

  12. Narratives of Menstrual Product Consumption: Convenience, Culture, or Commoditization?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The environmental and social costs of consumer societies have increasingly been recognized. Achieving sustainable household consumption requires an understanding of the underlying roots of current consumption levels. Using the case study of menstrual care practices, different theoretical frameworks--or narratives--for understanding household…

  13. A confirmed case of toxic shock syndrome associated with the use of a menstrual cup.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Michael A; Bisch, Steve; Arntfield, Shannon; Hosseini-Moghaddam, Seyed M

    2015-01-01

    Menstrual cups have been reported to be an acceptable substitute for tampons. These flexible cups have also been reported to provide a sustainable solution to menstrual management, with modest cost savings and no significant health risk. The present article documents the first case of toxic shock syndrome associated with the use of a menstrual cup in a woman 37 years of age, using a menstrual cup for the first time. Toxic shock syndrome and the literature on menstrual cups is reviewed and a possible mechanism for the development of toxic shock syndrome in the patient is described.

  14. Menstrual cycle influences on voice and speech in adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Meurer, Elisea M; Garcez, Vera; von Eye Corleta, Helena; Capp, Edison

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize voice intensity and stability of fundamental frequency, formants and diadochokinesis, vocal modulations, rhythms, and speed of speech in adolescents during follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Twenty-three adolescent females who were nonusers of oral contraceptives participated in a cross-sectional study of menstrual cycle influences on voicing and speaking tasks. Acoustic analyses were performed during both phases of the menstrual cycle using the Kay Elemetrics Computer Speech Lab Software Package. Data were analyzed using Student's paired sample t test. Phono-articulatory parameters were similar in both phases of the menstrual cycle (fundamental frequency: 192.6+/-23.9 Hz; minimum formant 891.7+/-110.3 Hz; and maximum formant: 2471.5+/-203.6 Hz). In diadochokinesis, they had a speed of 5.6+/-0.6 seg/s and vocal intensity was 61.5+/-2.6 dB. The mean values for the variations in voice modulations were as follows: anger (21.7+/-8.7 Hz)menstrual cycle, the speed of speech was 5.2+/-0.6 seg/s in meaningful sentences and 1.9+/-0.2 seg/s in meaningless sentences. In conclusion, the adolescents showed similar voice fundamental frequency and intensity, formants, speed of speech, and suprasegmental speech parameters. The results shown in this study may be used as standard of acoustic phono-articulatory for adolescents.

  15. Helping to alleviate pain for children having venepuncture.

    PubMed

    Gilboy, Siobhan; Hollywood, Eleanor

    2009-10-01

    This article reviews the literature on venepuncture and children. The evidence on the use of topical agents namely tetracaine (amethocaine) gel and lidocaine/prilocaine cream is discussed, along with the use and benefits of distraction techniques and parental presence to make this an easier procedure for the child, their families and the nurse.

  16. Alleviating Pain and Distress in Childhood Chronic Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuttner, Leora

    1987-01-01

    Describes psychological techniques, such as distraction and hypnotic imaginative involvement techniques, which have been found effective among chronically ill children and their parents in reducing anxiety and distress, and increasing the ability to cope with taxing medical procedures. Cases from research conducted in Vancouver, British Columbia…

  17. Endogenous inhibition of pain and spinal nociception in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder

    PubMed Central

    Palit, Shreela; Bartley, Emily J; Kuhn, Bethany L; Kerr, Kara L; DelVentura, Jennifer L; Terry, Ellen L; Rhudy, Jamie L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is characterized by severe affective and physical symptoms, such as increased pain, during the late-luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. The mechanisms underlying hyperalgesia in women with PMDD have yet to be identified, and supraspinal pain modulation has yet to be examined in this population. The present study assessed endogenous pain inhibitory processing by examining conditioned pain modulation (CPM, a painful conditioning stimulus inhibiting pain evoked by a test stimulus at a distal body site) of pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR, a spinally-mediated withdrawal reflex) during the mid-follicular, ovulatory, and late-luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Methods Participants were regularly-cycling women (14 without PMDD; 14 with PMDD). CPM was assessed by delivering electrocutaneous test stimuli to the sural nerve before, during, and after a painful conditioning ischemia task. Participants rated their pain to electrocutaneous stimuli, and NFR magnitudes were measured. A linear mixed model analysis was used to assess the influence of group and menstrual phase on CPM. Results Compared with controls, women with PMDD experienced greater pain during the late-luteal phase and enhanced spinal nociception during the ovulation phase, both of which were independent of CPM. Both groups showed CPM inhibition of pain that did not differ by menstrual phase. Only women with PMDD evidenced CPM inhibition of NFR. Conclusion Endogenous modulation of pain and spinal nociception is not disrupted in women with PMDD. Additionally, greater NFR magnitudes during ovulation in PMDD may be due to tonically-engaged descending mechanisms that facilitate spinal nociception, leading to enhanced pain during the premenstrual phase. PMID:26929663

  18. Relief of Lower Back and Leg Pain after Myelography

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Mizuno, Tetsutaro; Akeda, Koji; Kondo, Tetsushi; Kasai, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It is well-known that many patients will have adverse reactions such as headache and nausea after undergoing myelography, but we have often seen cases where symptoms such as lower back pain and leg pain were alleviated following myelography. To the best of our knowledge, such clinical cases of post-myelographic alleviation have not been reported. Materials and Methods: A total of 325 patients with a degenerative lumbar spinal disorder who underwent myelography were prospectively investigated at four hospitals from April 2012 to March 2014 to survey the post-myelographic alleviation of lower back and leg pain prospectively. The severities of lower back pain, leg pain and numbness of the lower extremities were evaluated and intermittent claudication distance was measured before myelography. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and myelographic findings were also evaluated for the patients that their symptoms were improved. Results: Thirty-five of 325 cases (10.8%) of these patients had their symptoms alleviated after undergoing myelography; 26 cases of lower back pain, two cases of leg pain, two cases of numbness of the lower extremity, and five cases of intermittent claudication. Conclusion: In the patients of a degenerative lumbar spinal disorder, about 10% cases with lower back pain or intermittent claudication had post-myelographic alleviation. Intradural injection therapy might be a therapeutic method to alleviate these symptoms. PMID:27990191

  19. Labour is still painful after prepared childbirth training.

    PubMed Central

    Melzack, R.; Taenzer, P.; Feldman, P.; Kinch, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Labour pain was measured with the McGill Pain Questionnaire in 87 primiparas and 54 multiparas. The average intensity of labour pain ranked among the most intense pains recorded with the questionnaire. However, the pain scores had a wide range and were influenced by several medical and social variables. They were significantly higher for the primiparas than for the multiparas. Moreover, high pain levels were associated with a history of menstrual difficulties and lower socioeconomic status. The primiparas who had received prepared childbirth training had lower pain scores than those who had received no such training. Nevertheless, the effects of prepared childbirth training were relatively small, and most patients (81%) who received it requested epidural anesthesia. Because many women who received training suffered severe pain during labour, prepared childbirth training and epidural anesthesia should be regarded as compatible, complementary procedures. PMID:7272887

  20. Low back pain.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, George E.

    2003-01-01

    Low back pain is a leading cause of disability. It occurs in similar proportions in all cultures, interferes with quality of life and work performance, and is the most common reason for medical consultations. Few cases of back pain are due to specific causes; most cases are non-specific. Acute back pain is the most common presentation and is usually self-limiting, lasting less than three months regardless of treatment. Chronic back pain is a more difficult problem, which often has strong psychological overlay: work dissatisfaction, boredom, and a generous compensation system contribute to it. Among the diagnoses offered for chronic pain is fibromyalgia, an urban condition (the diagnosis is not made in rural settings) that does not differ materially from other instances of widespread chronic pain. Although disc protrusions detected on X-ray are often blamed, they rarely are responsible for the pain, and surgery is seldom successful at alleviating it. No single treatment is superior to others; patients prefer manipulative therapy, but studies have not demonstrated that it has any superiority over others. A WHO Advisory Panel has defined common outcome measures to be used to judge the efficacy of treatments for studies. PMID:14710509

  1. Menstrual Hygiene Practices and Sources of Menstrual Hygiene Information among Adolescent Secondary School Girls in Abakaliki Education Zone of Ebonyi State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilo, Cajetan I.; Nwimo, Ignatius O.; Onwunaka, Chinagorom

    2016-01-01

    Menstruation is clouded by socio-cultural restrictions resulting in adolescent girls remaining ignorant of hygienic practices. The study was designed to ascertain the menstrual hygiene practices and sources of menstrual hygiene information among 1200 adolescent secondary school girls, who completed the questionnaire designed for the study. Out of…

  2. Acupuncture as prophylaxis for menstrual-related migraine: study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Menstrual-related migraine is a common form of migraine affecting >50% of female migraineurs. Acupuncture may be a choice for menstrual-related migraine, when pharmacological prophylaxis is not suitable. However, the efficacy of acupuncture has not been confirmed. We design and perform a randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture compared with naproxen in menstrual-related migraine patients. Methods/Design This is a multicenter, single blind, randomized controlled clinical trial. A total of 184 participants will be randomly assigned to two different groups. Participants will receive verum acupuncture and placebo medicine in the treatment group, while participants in the control group will be treated with sham acupuncture and medicine (Naproxen Sustained Release Tablets). All treatments will be given for 3 months (menstrual cycles). The primary outcome measures are the change of migraine days inside the menstrual cycle and the proportion of responders (defined as the proportion of patients with at least a 50% reduction in the number of menstrual migraine days). The secondary outcome measures are the change of migraine days outside the menstrual cycle, duration of migraine attack, the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and intake of acute medication. The assessment will be made at baseline (before treatment), 3 months (menstrual cycles), and 4 months (menstrual cycles) after the first acupuncture session. Discussion The results of this trial will be helpful to supply the efficacy of acupuncture for menstrual-related migraine prophylaxis. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN57133712 PMID:24195839

  3. A common neurobiology for pain and pleasure.

    PubMed

    Leknes, Siri; Tracey, Irene

    2008-04-01

    Pain and pleasure are powerful motivators of behaviour and have historically been considered opposites. Emerging evidence from the pain and reward research fields points to extensive similarities in the anatomical substrates of painful and pleasant sensations. Recent molecular-imaging and animal studies have demonstrated the important role of the opioid and dopamine systems in modulating both pain and pleasure. Understanding the mutually inhibitory effects that pain and reward processing have on each other, and the neural mechanisms that underpin such modulation, is important for alleviating unnecessary suffering and improving well-being.

  4. Menstrual Cycle Effects on Attitudes toward Romantic Kissing

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarski, Rafael; Dunbar, Robin I. M.

    2015-01-01

    Hormonal changes associated with the human menstrual cycle have been previously found to affect female mate preference, whereby women in the late follicular phase of their cycle (i.e., at higher risk of conception) prefer males displaying putative signals of underlying genetic fitness. Past research also suggests that romantic kissing is utilized in human mating contexts to assess potential mating partners. The current study examined whether women in their late follicular cycle phase place greater value on kissing at times when it might help serve mate assessment functions. Using an international online questionnaire, results showed that women in the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle felt that kissing was more important at initial stages of a relationship than women in the luteal phase of their cycle. Furthermore, it was found that estimated progesterone levels were a significant negative predictor for these ratings. PMID:24078298

  5. Menstrual and premenstrual experiences of women in a developing country.

    PubMed

    McMaster, J; Cormie, K; Pitts, M

    1997-01-01

    The menstrual and premenstrual experiences of black Zimbabwean women were examined. Twenty-five professional women and twenty-five domestic workers were interviewed using semistructured, open-ended interviews designed to explore their experiences. An analysis of consensual data indicated a number of predominant themes, including secrecy associated with menstruation, the negativity surrounding menarche, the breakdown of the traditional family network that passes on information about menstruation, and the acceptance of menstrual cycle experiences by the women. The main differences between the two groups concerned explanations of the functions and purpose of menstruation and the reporting of physical and affective symptoms. These differences are suggestive of the impact of educational level on experiences of menstruation.

  6. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem you need to take care of. Chronic pain is different. The pain signals go on for ... there is no clear cause. Problems that cause chronic pain include Headache Low back strain Cancer Arthritis Pain ...

  7. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is ...

  8. Flank pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  9. Heel pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. However, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: Swelling and pain in the Achilles tendon ...

  10. The Influence of the Menstrual Phases on Polysomnography

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Andrew R; Alexandru, Diana; Auerbach, Sanford H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study is to determine how the phases of the menstrual cycle influence the results of polysomnography (PSG). Methods: Twenty-eight adult subjects who reported regular menstrual periods, last menstrual period (LMP) within 26 days of their PSG, no exogenous hormone use, no history of polycystic ovarian syndrome, and who were scheduled for diagnostic PSG at Boston Medical satisfied inclusion criteria for the study. These subjects were divided into a Follicular Cohort (days 0-13 of the cycle) or Luteal Cohort (days 14-26 of the cycle), and a one-way analysis using a t-test was performed to test the hypothesis that the follicular phase confers protection against obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). A likelihood-ratio chi-square test was also applied to assess for a statistically significant association between menstrual stage and the presence of moderate-to-severe sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) > 15/h). Thus, the statistical analysis was performed using AHI as both a continuous and a categorical outcome. Results: The mean AHI for patients in the Follicular Cohort (6.1/h) was significantly lower than the Luteal Cohort (14.3/h, p = 0.033). In the Follicular Cohort, 12% of patients had moderate to severe OSA. In the Luteal Cohort, 46% of patients had moderate to severe OSA (p = 0.045). Conclusions: Subjects undergoing PSG during the follicular phase have significantly lower AHIs than those in the luteal phase. Thus, the timing of PSG acquisition for regularly menstruating women should be considered when interpreting results. PMID:27994989

  11. Gynecologic disorders and menstrual cycle lightheadedness in postural tachycardia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Peggs, Kiffany J.; Nguyen, HoVan; Enayat, Diba; Keller, Nancy R.; Al-Hendy, Ayman; Raj, Satish R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess differences in gynecologic history and lightheadedness during menstrual cycle phases among patients with POTS and healthy control women. Methods In a prospective, questionnaire-based study carried out at Paden Autonomic Dysfunction Center, Vanderbilt University, between April 2005 and January 2009, a custom-designed questionnaire was administered to patients with POTS (n=65) and healthy individuals (n=95). The results were analyzed via Fisher exact test and Mann–Whitney U test. Results Patients with POTS reported increased lightheadedness through all phases of the menstrual cycle phases as compared with healthy controls. Both groups experienced the greatest lightheadedness during menses, and a decrease in lightheadedness during the follicular phase. Patients with POTS reported a higher incidence of gynecologic diseases as compared with healthy controls. Conclusion The severity of lightheadedness was found to vary during the menstrual cycle, which may relate to changes in estrogen levels. Patients with POTS also reported an increase in estrogen-related gynecologic disease. PMID:22721633

  12. [Menstrual pattern characteristics in female adolescents with epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Serret-Montoya, Juana; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Angel; Ríos-Zúñiga, Sandra; Sánchez-Vaca, Gerardo; Zurita-Cruz, Jessie Nalley; Hernández-Cabezza, Abigail

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: existen múltiples efectos adversos de los fármacos antiepilépticos, uno de ellos son las irregularidades menstruales como amenorrea, oligomenorrea, ginecomastia, galactorrea y síndrome de ovarios poliquísticos. Ante la poca información, el objetivo de este estudio fue determinar la frecuencia de alteraciones menstruales en adolescentes con epilepsia en un hospital pediátrico de tercer nivel de atención. MÉTODOS: se incluyó a adolescentes con epilepsia, mayores de nueve años de edad y con más de un año con epilepsia. Inicialmente se definió el estadio puberal. Durante seis meses se evaluó el patrón menstrual. Entre quienes se detectó alguna alteración se evaluó perfil hormonal y se realizó ultrasonido ginecológico. El análisis fue descriptivo.

  13. Management of menstrual migraine: a review of current abortive and prophylactic therapies.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Elizabeth; Bushnell, Cheryl

    2010-10-01

    After menarche, women have an increased prevalence of migraine compared to men. There is significant variability in the frequency and severity of migraine throughout the menstrual cycle. Women report migraines occur more frequently during menses, and that those are more severe than other migraines. This creates a unique challenge of effectively treating menstrually related and pure menstrual migraines. As with treatment of other migraines, both abortive and prophylactic treatment regimens are used. Triptans demonstrate efficacy in the abortive management of menstrually related and pure menstrual migraines. For migraines that occur primarily during menses or that are particularly resistant to other therapies, intermittent prophylactic therapies can be used. Naproxen and estrogens have been studied for this use. More recently, triptans have been examined and have shown efficacy for intermittent prophylaxis of menstrual migraine.

  14. Management of Menstrual Migraine: A Review of Current Abortive and Prophylactic Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    After menarche, women have an increased prevalence of migraine compared to men. There is significant variability in the frequency and severity of migraine throughout the menstrual cycle. Women report migraines occur more frequently during menses, and that those are more severe than other migraines. This creates a unique challenge of effectively treating menstrually related and pure menstrual migraines. As with treatment of other migraines, both abortive and prophylactic treatment regimens are used. Triptans demonstrate efficacy in the abortive management of menstrually related and pure menstrual migraines. For migraines that occur primarily during menses or that are particularly resistant to other therapies, intermittent prophylactic therapies can be used. Naproxen and estrogens have been studied for this use. More recently, triptans have been examined and have shown efficacy for intermittent prophylaxis of menstrual migraine. PMID:20697846

  15. Alleviating cancer patients' suffering: whose responsibility is it?

    PubMed

    Grau, Jorge

    2009-07-01

    In medicine, we have historically been better at learning about the body and disease than we have at understanding the human beings who come to us with the ailments. We have acted to relieve pain, consoling patients and families as a complement, but done little to understand and alleviate suffering as a fundamental part of our practice. In fact, only in more recent decades has "suffering" been conceptualized as something apart from pain, associated with distress and its causes. It was Eric T. Cassell, in his ground-breaking work in the 1980s, who posed the need to consider alleviation of suffering and treatment of illness as twin-and equally important-obligations of the medical profession. Suffering is defined as a negative, complex emotional and cognitive state, characterized by feeling under constant threat and powerless to confront it, having drained the physical and psycho-social resources that might have made resistance possible. This unique depletion of personal resources is key to understanding suffering.

  16. Relationship between the phases of the menstrual cycle and the transversus abdominis muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ubukata, Hitomi; Matsumura, Ayana

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated changes in the thickness of the transversus abdominis muscle at various stages of the menstrual cycle. [Subjects] The subjects were 15 young healthy females with regular menstrual cycles. [Methods] A regular menstrual cycle was defined as a 28-day cycle comprising 3 phases: the menstrual phase, the follicular phase, and the luteal phase. For the purpose of the study, measurements were taken at day 3 (menstrual phase), day 12 (follicular phase), and day 21 (luteal phase) of the cycle. An ultrasonic imaging diagnostic device (MyLab 25) and a linear expression probe were used for measurement of the transversus abdominis muscle. [Results] There were no significant differences in the variation rate of the thickness of the muscle at any phase of the menstrual cycle. [Conclusion] The results suggested that the sex hormones associated with the menstrual cycle do not affect the contractility or changes in the thickness of the transversus abdominis muscle. For the reasons stated above, there is little need to consider the menstrual cycle when measuring muscle thickness in physical therapy scenarios because the transversus abdominis muscle does not depend on the menstrual cycle. PMID:25931681

  17. Effect of different phases of menstrual cycle on brainstem auditory evoked response

    PubMed Central

    Batta, Meenal; Dhir, Shashi Kant; Kumar, Avnish; Singh, KD

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The change in the hormonal levels during the three phases of menstrual cycle, namely, menstrual phase (hormonal withdrawal), proliferative phase (estrogen peak), and secretory phase (progesterone peak), influences the conduction velocities in the central auditory pathways. Variable findings of brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) have been reported during different phases of menstrual cycle by different researchers. Aim: To study the effect of different phases of menstrual cycle on BAER. Methodology: A prospective observational study on 80 audiometrically normal, healthy, eumenorrheic female students in age group of 18–24 years was done at a medical college of northern India. BAER was recorded across the three phases of the menstrual cycle, i.e., menstrual phase (day 1–3), proliferative phase (day 10–12), and secretory phase (day 20–22). Recordings of peak latencies, interpeak latencies, and amplitude of waves of BAER were taken and statistically analyzed. Results: In this study, significant decrease in the latencies of wave III, wave V, and interpeak latency I-III and a trend of decrease in latencies of wave I and interpeak latency I-V (which was statistically insignificant) were observed in proliferative (estrogen peak) phase as compared to menstrual and secretory phase. However, there was no statistically significant difference found in the amplitude of waves of BAER during all the three phases of menstrual cycle. Conclusion: The hormonal changes during different phases of menstrual cycle do seem to influence BAER. PMID:28251107

  18. The role of perceived control over anxiety in prospective symptom reports across the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Jennifer N; Rohan, Kelly J; Nillni, Yael I; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    The present investigation tested the role of psychological vulnerabilities to anxiety in reported menstrual symptom severity. Specifically, the current study tested the incremental validity of perceived control over anxiety-related events in predicting menstrual symptom severity, controlling for the effect of anxiety sensitivity, a documented contributor to menstrual distress. It was expected that women with lower perceived control over anxiety-related events would report greater menstrual symptom severity, particularly in the premenstrual phase. A sample of 49 normally menstruating women, aged 18-47 years, each prospectively tracked their menstrual symptoms for one cycle and completed the Anxiety Control Questionnaire (Rapee, Craske, Brown, & Barlow Behav Ther 27:279-293. doi: 10.1016/S0005-7894(96)80018-9 , 1996) in their follicular and premenstrual phases. A mixed model analysis revealed perceived control over anxiety-related events was a more prominent predictor of menstrual symptom severity than anxiety sensitivity, regardless of the current cycle phase. This finding provides preliminary evidence that perceived control over anxiety-related events is associated with the perceived intensity of menstrual symptoms. This finding highlights the role of psychological vulnerabilities in menstrual distress. Future research should examine whether psychological interventions that target cognitive vulnerabilities to anxiety may help reduce severe menstrual distress.

  19. [Principles on therapy of myoarthropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Palla, S

    2002-09-01

    The myoarthropathic pain is the major source of orofacial pain. The diagnosis is not always easy because the diagnostic signs are not pathognomonic and they may occur also with other pain disorders. The pain intensity fluctuates, and mild to medium intensity pain has the tendency to subside spontaneously or can be alleviated with simple, non-invasive therapies as counseling, self-control, analgesics, physiotherapy, and occlusal appliances. For most patients a combination of counseling, self-control and physiotherapy (home program) is sufficient to relieve the pain. Occlusal appliances should therefore be used only if these modalities fail or in presence of pain on awakening, ostheoarthritis, a painful discopathy, and/or a malocclusion caused by condylar remodeling secondary to ostheoarthrosis. Only in a small percentage of patients the myoarthropathic pain persists and becomes chronic. These patients need a multimodal therapy, according to the biopsychosocial pain model. In addition to the modalities just described, the treatment must address also the affective, emotional, cognitive, and behavioral pain component and be tailored to the single patient based on his/her psychosocial and constitutional characteristics. The goal is not pain relieve but improvement of the quality of life by teaching the patient more efficient pain coping strategies by means of behavioral and relaxation therapy. In addition, tricyclic antidepressants may be used in order to treat the somatic pain component caused by the neuroplastic changes that take place in the central nervous system in chronic pain conditions.

  20. New Labor Pain Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Koyyalamudi, Veerandra; Sidhu, Gurleen; Cornett, Elyse M; Nguyen, Viet; Labrie-Brown, Carmen; Fox, Charles J; Kaye, Alan D

    2016-02-01

    Presently, the gold standard for pain control in laboring patients is neuraxial blockade, which includes a spinal, epidural, or a combined spinal-epidural technique. In conjunction with neuraxial blockade or by itself, some of the other agents employed related to labor pain include opioids, non-opioids, nitrous oxide, patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), and distraction therapy. Alternative treatments include acupuncture, hypnotism, yoga, exercise during pregnancy, hydrotherapy, transcutaneous electronic nerve stimulation, massage, and relaxation techniques. This review will focus on current updates and recent trends in labor pain management. Neuraxial management, pharmacotherapy, and newer alternative methods to mitigate labor pain are reviewed. Newer techniques in epidural analgesia include the dural puncture epidural technique, which needs further evaluation. There are limited published data on the use of acupuncture, hypnotism, yoga, exercise during pregnancy, hydrotherapy, transcutaneous electronic nerve stimulation, massage, and relaxation techniques in the alleviation of labor pain. These alternative therapies maybe considered as an adjuvant as the analgesic efficiency is inferior to that provided by typical standard pharmacotherapy. Future studies are warranted to evaluate the role of immersion virtual reality in alleviating labor pain.

  1. Harnessing Motivation to Alleviate Neglect

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Charlotte; Li, Korina; Malhotra, Paresh A.

    2013-01-01

    The syndrome of spatial neglect results from the combination of a number of deficits in attention, with patients demonstrating both spatially lateralized and non-lateralized impairments. Previous reports have hinted that there may be a motivational component to neglect and that modulating this might alleviate some of the debilitating symptoms. Additionally, recent work on the effects of reward on attention in healthy participants has revealed improvements across a number of paradigms. As the primary deficit in neglect has been associated with attention, this evidence for reward’s effects is potentially important. However, until very recently there have been few empirical studies addressing this potential therapeutic avenue. Here we review the growing body of evidence that attentional impairments in neglect can be reduced by motivation, for example in the form of preferred music or anticipated monetary reward, and discuss the implications of this for treatments for these patients. Crucially these effects of positive motivation are not observed in all patients with neglect, suggesting that the consequences of motivation may relate to individual lesion anatomy. Given the key role of dopaminergic systems in motivational processes, we suggest that motivational stimulation might act as a surrogate for dopaminergic stimulation. In addition, we consider the relationship between clinical post stroke apathy and lack of response to motivation. PMID:23761744

  2. Harnessing motivation to alleviate neglect.

    PubMed

    Russell, Charlotte; Li, Korina; Malhotra, Paresh A

    2013-01-01

    The syndrome of spatial neglect results from the combination of a number of deficits in attention, with patients demonstrating both spatially lateralized and non-lateralized impairments. Previous reports have hinted that there may be a motivational component to neglect and that modulating this might alleviate some of the debilitating symptoms. Additionally, recent work on the effects of reward on attention in healthy participants has revealed improvements across a number of paradigms. As the primary deficit in neglect has been associated with attention, this evidence for reward's effects is potentially important. However, until very recently there have been few empirical studies addressing this potential therapeutic avenue. Here we review the growing body of evidence that attentional impairments in neglect can be reduced by motivation, for example in the form of preferred music or anticipated monetary reward, and discuss the implications of this for treatments for these patients. Crucially these effects of positive motivation are not observed in all patients with neglect, suggesting that the consequences of motivation may relate to individual lesion anatomy. Given the key role of dopaminergic systems in motivational processes, we suggest that motivational stimulation might act as a surrogate for dopaminergic stimulation. In addition, we consider the relationship between clinical post stroke apathy and lack of response to motivation.

  3. Cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Swerdlow, M.; Ventafridda, V.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Importance of the Problem; Neurophysiology and Biochemistry of Pain; Assessment of Pain in Patients with Cancer; Drug Therapy; Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Cancer Pain; Sympton Control as it Relates to Pain Control; and Palliative Surgery in Cancer Pain Treatment.

  4. Vegan diet alleviates fibromyalgia symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, K; Lammi, K; Hypen, M; Nenonen, M; Hanninen, O; Rauma, A L

    2000-01-01

    The effect of a strict, low-salt, uncooked vegan diet rich in lactobacteria on symptoms in 18 fibromyalgia patients during and after a 3-month intervention period in an open, non-randomized controlled study was evaluated. As control 15 patients continued their omnivorous diet. The groups did not differ significantly from each other in the beginning of the study in any other parameters except in pain and urine sodium. The results revealed significant improvements in Visual analogue scale of pain (VAS) (p=0.005), joint stiffness (p=0.001), quality of sleep (p=0.0001), Health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) (p=0.031), General health questionnaire (GHQ) (p=0.021), and a rheumatologist's own questionnaire (p=0.038). The majority of patients were overweight to some extent at the beginning of the study and shifting to a vegan food caused a significant reduction in body mass index (BMI) (p=0.0001). Total serum cholesterol showed a statistically significant lowering (p=0.003). Urine sodium dropped to 1/3 of the beginning values (p=0.0001) indicating good diet compliance. It can be concluded that vegan diet had beneficial effects on fibromyalgia symptoms at least in the short run.

  5. Menstrual physiology: implications for endometrial pathology and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Maybin, Jacqueline A.; Critchley, Hilary O.D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Each month the endometrium becomes inflamed, and the luminal portion is shed during menstruation. The subsequent repair is remarkable, allowing implantation to occur if fertilization takes place. Aberrations in menstrual physiology can lead to common gynaecological conditions, such as heavy or prolonged bleeding. Increased knowledge of the processes involved in menstrual physiology may also have translational benefits at other tissue sites. METHODS Pubmed and Cochrane databases were searched for all original and review articles published in English until April 2015. Search terms included ‘endometrium’, ‘menstruation’, ‘endometrial repair’, ‘endometrial regeneration’ ‘angiogenesis’, ‘inflammation’ and ‘heavy menstrual bleeding’ or ‘menorrhagia’. RESULTS Menstruation occurs naturally in very few species. Human menstruation is thought to occur as a consequence of preimplantation decidualization, conferring embryo selectivity and the ability to adapt to optimize function. We highlight how current and future study of endometrial inflammation, vascular changes and repair/regeneration will allow us to identify new therapeutic targets for common gynaecological disorders. In addition, we describe how increased knowledge of this endometrial physiology will have many translational applications at other tissue sites. We highlight the clinical applications of what we know, the key questions that remain and the scientific and medical possibilities for the future. CONCLUSIONS The study of menstruation, in both normal and abnormal scenarios, is essential for the production of novel, acceptable medical treatments for common gynaecological complaints. Furthermore, collaboration and communication with specialists in other fields could significantly advance the therapeutic potential of this dynamic tissue. PMID:26253932

  6. SHIV Susceptibility Changes during the Menstrual Cycle of Pigtail Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kersh, Ellen N.; Henning, Tara; Vishwanathan, Sundaram A.; Morris, Monica; Butler, Katherine; Adams, Debra R.; Guenthner, Patricia; Srinivasan, Priya; Smith, James; Radzio, Jessica; Garcia-Lerma, J. Gerardo; Dobard, Charles; Heneine, Walid; McNicholl, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Background Hormonal changes during menstrual cycling may affect susceptibility to HIV. Methods We determined the SHIV acquisition time point in 43 cycling pigtail macaques infected by repeated vaginal virus exposures initiated randomly in the cycle. Results SHIV infection was first detected in the follicular phase in 38 macaques (88%), and in the luteal phase in 5 macaques (12%), indicating a statistically significant timing difference. Assuming a 7-day eclipse phase, most infections occurred during or following a high-progesterone period associated with menstruation, vaginal epithelium thinning and suppressed mucosal immunity. Conclusions This raises questions whether other high progesterone conditions (pregnancy, hormonal contraception) similarly affect HIV risk. PMID:24779484

  7. Intermittent nasal carriage with Staphylococcus aureus within a menstrual cycle

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Su-Hsun; Chen, Kuan-Fu; Chen, Chih-Jung; Lin, Yi-Hsiung; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Female sex hormones have been related to nasal Staphylococcus aureus carriage in healthy individuals; however, whether nasal staphylococcal carriage varies by menstrual cycle phase remains unknown. We sampled anterior nares of female healthcare workers twice per week for 6 consecutive menstrual cycles. We used mixed-effects Poisson regression models to determine whether intermittent carriage was associated with cycle phases in a given individual. We also performed recurrent event survival analysis to identify host factors linked to incident carriage status. Overall, we collected 754 nasal swabs over 89 consecutive person-cycles from 14 intermittent carriers. In 84 ovulation-defined menstrual cycles (715 swabs), the period prevalence of staphylococcal carriage was 58.7%, 63.1%, and 64.9% in the follicular, periovulatory, and luteal phases, respectively; these differences were not statistically significant after multivariable adjustment and correction for within-person correlation (adjusted relative risk [RR]—periovulatory 0.92, P: 0.30; luteal 1.00, P: 0.98). Using survival analysis, we identified several host factors that were associated with incident loss, gain of colonization, or both. For example, as compared to women aged 20 to 30 years, those aged 30 to 40 years were less likely to losing carriage (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.26, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.09, 0.80) but were as likely to regaining carriage (HR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.21, 1.34). In comparison, being underweight (body mass index [BMI] <18.5) was significantly associated with a higher risk for regaining (HR: 1.95, 95% CI: 1.34, 1.51) and losing (HR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.16, 2.12) colonization, indicating the alternating tendency for status changes. Personal hygiene behaviors, such as nostril cleansing habit and methods, differentially affected carriers’ risk for losing or regaining staphylococcal colonization. Using an intensive sampling scheme, we found that nasal staphylococcal carriage could

  8. Foetal pain?

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, Stuart W G

    2010-10-01

    The majority of commentary on foetal pain has looked at the maturation of neural pathways to decide a lower age limit for foetal pain. This approach is sensible because there must be a minimal necessary neural development that makes pain possible. Very broadly, it is generally agreed that the minimal necessary neural pathways for pain are in place by 24 weeks gestation. Arguments remain, however, as to the possibility of foetal pain before or after 24 weeks. Some argue that the foetus can feel pain earlier than 24 weeks because pain can be supported by subcortical structures. Others argue that the foetus cannot feel pain at any stage because it is maintained in a state of sedation in the womb and lacks further neural and conceptual development necessary for pain. Much of this argument rests on the definition of terms such as 'wakefulness' and 'pain'. If a behavioural and neural reaction to a noxious stimulus is considered sufficient for pain, then pain is possible from 24 weeks and probably much earlier. If a conceptual subjectivity is considered necessary for pain, however, then pain is not possible at any gestational age. Regardless of how pain is defined, it is clear that pain for conceptual beings is qualitatively different than pain for non-conceptual beings. It is therefore a mistake to draw an equivalence between foetal pain and pain in the older infant or adult.

  9. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries and conditions that cause pain and restrict motion. Neck pain causes include: Muscle strains. Overuse, such ... body then forms bone spurs that affect joint motion and cause pain. Nerve compression. Herniated disks or ...

  10. Ankle pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - ankle ... Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. An ankle sprain is an injury to the ligaments, which ... the joint. In addition to ankle sprains, ankle pain can be caused by: Damage or swelling of ...

  11. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  12. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  13. Eye pain

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  14. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  15. Foot pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - foot ... Foot pain may be due to: Aging Being on your feet for long periods of time Being overweight A ... sports activity Trauma The following can cause foot pain: Arthritis and gout . Common in the big toe, ...

  16. Phantom Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... be an effective treatment for some types of chronic pain. In acupuncture, the practitioner inserts extremely fine, sterilized ... and Stroke. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/chronic_pain/detail_chronic_pain.htm. Accessed Sept. 16, 2014. ...

  17. Hip pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain involves any pain in or around the hip joint. You may not feel pain from your hip ... 2012:chap 48. Read More Hip fracture surgery Hip joint replacement Patient Instructions Hip fracture - discharge Hip or ...

  18. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  19. 21 CFR 884.5425 - Scented or scented deodorized menstrual pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5425 Scented or scented deodorized menstrual pad. (a) Identification. A scented or scented deodorized menstrual pad is a device that is a pad made of cellulosic or synthetic material...

  20. 21 CFR 884.5460 - Scented or scented deodorized menstrual tampon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5460 Scented or scented deodorized menstrual tampon. (a) Identification. A scented or scented deodorized menstrual tampon is a device that is a plug made of cellulosic or...

  1. 21 CFR 884.5425 - Scented or scented deodorized menstrual pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5425 Scented or scented deodorized menstrual pad. (a) Identification. A scented or scented deodorized menstrual pad is a device that is a pad made of cellulosic or synthetic material...

  2. 21 CFR 884.5460 - Scented or scented deodorized menstrual tampon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5460 Scented or scented deodorized menstrual tampon. (a) Identification. A scented or scented deodorized menstrual tampon is a device that is a plug made of cellulosic or...

  3. 21 CFR 884.5460 - Scented or scented deodorized menstrual tampon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5460 Scented or scented deodorized menstrual tampon. (a) Identification. A scented or scented deodorized menstrual tampon is a device that is a plug made of cellulosic or...

  4. 21 CFR 884.5460 - Scented or scented deodorized menstrual tampon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5460 Scented or scented deodorized menstrual tampon. (a) Identification. A scented or scented deodorized menstrual tampon is a device that is a plug made of cellulosic or...

  5. 21 CFR 884.5425 - Scented or scented deodorized menstrual pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5425 Scented or scented deodorized menstrual pad. (a) Identification. A scented or scented deodorized menstrual pad is a device that is a pad made of cellulosic or synthetic material...

  6. 21 CFR 884.5425 - Scented or scented deodorized menstrual pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5425 Scented or scented deodorized menstrual pad. (a) Identification. A scented or scented deodorized menstrual pad is a device that is a pad made of cellulosic or synthetic material...

  7. 21 CFR 884.5425 - Scented or scented deodorized menstrual pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5425 Scented or scented deodorized menstrual pad. (a) Identification. A scented or scented deodorized menstrual pad is a device that is a pad made of cellulosic or synthetic material...

  8. 21 CFR 884.5460 - Scented or scented deodorized menstrual tampon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5460 Scented or scented deodorized menstrual tampon. (a) Identification. A scented or scented deodorized menstrual tampon is a device that is a plug made of cellulosic or...

  9. Effects of the Menstrual Cycle and Oral Contraception on Singers' Pitch Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La, Filipa M. B.; Sundberg, Johan; Howard, David M.; Sa-Couto, Pedro; Freitas, Adelaide

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Difficulties with intonation and vibrato control during the menstrual cycle have been reported by singers; however, this phenomenon has not yet been systematically investigated. Method: A double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial assessing effects of the menstrual cycle and use of a combined oral contraceptive pill (OCP) on pitch…

  10. The Effect of Menstrual Cycle on Nasal Resonance Characteristics in Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Suman; Basu, Shriya; Sinha, Anisha; Chatterjee, Indranil

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze resonance characteristics (nasality and nasalance values) during the menstrual cycle. Previous studies indicate changes in voice quality and nasal mucosa due to temporary falling estrogen levels in human females during their menstrual cycle. The present study compared the nasality and "nasalance scores"…

  11. Hormones and Dichotic Listening: Evidence from the Study of Menstrual Cycle Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowell, Patricia E.; Ledger, William L.; Wadnerkar, Meghana B.; Skilling, Fiona M.; Whiteside, Sandra P.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents evidence for changes in dichotic listening asymmetries across the menstrual cycle, which replicate studies from our laboratory and others. Increases in the right ear advantage (REA) were present in women at phases of the menstrual cycle associated with higher levels of ovarian hormones. The data also revealed correlations…

  12. Efficacy of Common Analgesics for Postsurgical Pain in Rats.

    PubMed

    Waite, Megan E; Tomkovich, Ashleigh; Quinn, Tammie L; Schumann, Alan P; Dewberry, L Savannah; Totsch, Stacie K; Sorge, Robert E

    2015-07-01

    Each year, millions of rats undergo surgery for research purposes and receive analgesics to alleviate pain. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of common analgesics in tests of hot-plate nociception and postsurgical pain by using the Rat Grimace Scale. Rats received a single dose of one of several drug-dose combinations and were tested by using the hot-plate test (acute pain) or after laparotomy (with either prophylactic or intraoperative analgesic). The efficacy of analgesics for hot-plate pain was generally not predictive of efficacy for surgical pain. Carprofen and ketoprofen were rarely effective in any of the conditions tested. With the exception of the opioid buprenorphine, several of the drugs we tested required higher-than-recommended doses to alleviate pain. Taken together, our data suggest that current analgesic use frequently is insufficient, and many rats may experience significant postsurgical pain even when analgesics are used in commonly recommended doses.

  13. Stress and Eating Disorder Behavior in Anorexia Nervosa as a Function of Menstrual Cycle Status

    PubMed Central

    Jappe, Leah M.; Cao, Li; Crosby, Ross D.; Crow, Scott J.; Peterson, Carol B.; Le Grange, Daniel; Engel, Scott G.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Fluctuations in ovarian hormones during the menstrual cycle and psychosocial stress contribute to eating disorder (ED) behavior. Methods Using ecological momentary assessment techniques, this study examined relationships between stress and binge eating, self-induced vomiting, and dietary restriction based on menstrual cycle status in anorexia nervosa (AN). 109 females with full and subthreshold AN (17–45 years old) recorded ED behavior and stress ratings over two weeks. Using hierarchical linear modeling, individuals with eumenorrhea and those with amenorrhea or oligomenorrhea were compared. Results Following episodes of meal skipping, momentary stress decreased in individuals with normal menstrual cycles and increased in those with irregular menstrual cycles. Discussion Results suggest that changes in stress severity in response to food restriction may differ based on ovarian hormonal status and may be a mechanism by which AN is maintained in individuals without menstrual disturbance. PMID:24222529

  14. Food-Derived Natural Compounds for Pain Relief in Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Lim, Eun Yeong; Kim, Yun Tai

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, defined as pain caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system, is characterized by dysesthesia, hyperalgesia, and allodynia. The number of patients with this type of pain has increased rapidly in recent years. Yet, available neuropathic pain medicines have undesired side effects, such as tolerance and physical dependence, and do not fully alleviate the pain. The mechanisms of neuropathic pain are still not fully understood. Injury causes inflammation and immune responses and changed expression and activity of receptors and ion channels in peripheral nerve terminals. Additionally, neuroinflammation is a known factor in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. During neuropathic pain development, the C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) acts as an important signaling mediator. Traditional plant treatments have been used throughout the world for treating diseases. We and others have identified food-derived compounds that alleviate neuropathic pain. Here, we review the natural compounds for neuropathic pain relief, their mechanisms of action, and the potential benefits of natural compounds with antagonistic effects on GPCRs, especially those containing CCR2, for neuropathic pain treatment.

  15. Food-Derived Natural Compounds for Pain Relief in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Eun Yeong

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, defined as pain caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system, is characterized by dysesthesia, hyperalgesia, and allodynia. The number of patients with this type of pain has increased rapidly in recent years. Yet, available neuropathic pain medicines have undesired side effects, such as tolerance and physical dependence, and do not fully alleviate the pain. The mechanisms of neuropathic pain are still not fully understood. Injury causes inflammation and immune responses and changed expression and activity of receptors and ion channels in peripheral nerve terminals. Additionally, neuroinflammation is a known factor in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. During neuropathic pain development, the C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) acts as an important signaling mediator. Traditional plant treatments have been used throughout the world for treating diseases. We and others have identified food-derived compounds that alleviate neuropathic pain. Here, we review the natural compounds for neuropathic pain relief, their mechanisms of action, and the potential benefits of natural compounds with antagonistic effects on GPCRs, especially those containing CCR2, for neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:27891521

  16. Menstrual Health and the Metabolic Syndrome in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Tfayli, Hala; Arslanian, Silva

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome, a constellation of interrelated risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus, has become a major public health concern against the backdrop of increasing rates of obesity. Insulin resistance plays a pivotal role as the underlying pathophysiological linchpin of the various components of the syndrome. The metabolic syndrome is well recognized in adults, and there is convincing evidence that it starts in childhood, with progressive clustering of the various components over time and tracking through adulthood. Adult women and adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have higher prevalence rates of the metabolic syndrome compared with the general population. Several anthropometric (obesity, particularly abdominal obesity), metabolic (insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia) and hormonal (low IGFBP1, IGFBP2 and low sex hormone binding globulin) features of adolescents with PCOS are also features of the metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance, believed to be a key pathogenic factor in both PCOS and the metabolic syndrome, may be the thread that links the two conditions. Menstrual health in adolescents could be viewed as yet another component in the evaluation of the metabolic syndrome. Careful assessment of menstrual history and appropriate laboratory work-up could reveal the presence of PCOS in obese at-risk adolescent girls with a family history of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:18574212

  17. A situation analysis of the menstrual regulation programme in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Syeda Nahid Mukith; Moni, Dipu

    2004-11-01

    Menstrual regulation (MR) using vacuum aspiration is widely available in Bangladesh through public, NGO and private sector facilities, even though abortion is illegal except to save a woman's life. For more than two decades the MR programme was run as a vertical programme. In 1998 the Government of Bangladesh introduced the Health and Population Sector Programme (HPSP) incorporating menstrual regulation into the essential services package. This paper reports a situation analysis of the MR Programme under the HPSP, using the World Health Organization rapid evaluation methodology. In spite of wide availability, barriers such as distance to health facilities and transportation costs, unofficial fees, lack of privacy, confidentiality and cleanliness in public health facilities, and in some cases attitudes of service providers, are limiting access to MR services. Quality of care is compromised by inadequacies in infection control and in provider training and counselling. Health system weaknesses include gross under-reporting of cases by providers who do not wish to share unofficial fees, which affects monitoring and adequate provision of supplies. The HPSP has caused uncertainty regarding supervision in public sector facilities, and adversely affected training by NGOs and government-NGO coordination. Services in part of the NGO sector have also been affected by funding changes. To make the programme as a whole more effective, all these issues have to be addressed.

  18. The menstrual cycle and susceptibility to coriolis-induced sickness.

    PubMed

    Cheung, B; Heskin, R; Hofer, K; Gagnon, M

    2001-01-01

    Survey studies on motion sickness susceptibility suggest that females tend to report greater severity in illness and higher incidence of vomiting than males. Menstruation is said to be a contributing factor. A recent study suggested that females were least susceptible to seasickness during ovulation in a "round the world" yacht race. Sixteen subjects (18-36 years old) were exposed to Coriolis cross-coupling stimulation in the laboratory. They were tested once during permenstruation (Day 1-5), ovulation (Day 12-15) and premenstruation (Day 24-28), based on a normalized 28-day cycle, in a randomised design. Physiological measurements of motion sickness included forearm and calf cutaneous blood flow. Subjective evaluation of sickness symptoms was based on Graybiel's diagnostic criteria and Golding's rating method. Our results indicated that under controlled laboratory conditions, different phases of the menstrual cycle appear to have no influence on subjective symptoms of motion sickness or on cutaneous blood flow increase in the forearm and calf. The lack of commonality between the types and levels of hormones that are released during motion sickness and those that are involved in different menstrual phases appears to support our findings.

  19. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - shoulder ... changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain when lifting the arm above your head or ... The most common cause of shoulder pain occurs when rotator cuff tendons ... The tendons become inflamed or damaged. This condition ...

  20. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  1. Dynamic Changes of Functional Pain Connectome in Women with Primary Dysmenorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ting-Hsuan; Tu, Cheng-Hao; Chao, Hsiang-Tai; Li, Wei-Chi; Low, Intan; Chuang, Chih-Ying; Yeh, Tzu-Chen; Cheng, Chou-Ming; Chou, Chih-Che; Chen, Li-Fen; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen

    2016-01-01

    Primary dysmenorrhea (PDM) is the most prevalent gynecological problem. Many key brain systems are engaged in pain processing. In light of dynamic communication within and between systems (or networks) in shaping pain experience and behavior, the intra-regional functional connectivity (FC) in the hub regions of the systems may be altered and the functional interactions in terms of inter-regional FCs among the networks may be reorganized to cope with the repeated stress of menstrual pain in PDM. Forty-six otherwise healthy PDM subjects and 49 age-matched, healthy female control subjects were enrolled. Intra- and inter-regional FC were assessed using regional homogeneity (ReHo) and ReHo-seeded FC analyses, respectively. PDM women exhibited a trait-related ReHo reduction in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, part of the default mode network (DMN), during the periovulatory phase. The trait-related hypoconnectivity of DMN-salience network and hyperconnectivity of DMN-executive control network across the menstrual cycle featured a dynamic transition from affective processing of pain salience to cognitive modulation. The altered DMN-sensorimotor network may be an ongoing representation of cumulative menstrual pain. The findings indicate that women with long-term PDM may develop adaptive neuroplasticity and functional reorganization with a network shift from affective processing of salience to the cognitive modulation of pain. PMID:27089970

  2. Changes in basal body temperature and simple reaction times during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Simić, Nataša; Ravlić, Arijana

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown cyclic changes in the activation levels and performance of different tasks throughout the menstrual cycle. The aim of this study was to examine if changes in the reaction time to both light and sound stimuli may be associated with basal body temperature changes and subjective assessments of General and High Activation during the different phases of a menstrual cycle characterized by high (preovulatory and midluteal phase) and low (menstrual and early follicular phase) levels of oestrogen and progesterone. The study included measurements of basal body temperature, simple reaction times to light and sound and self-assessment of General and High Activation during the menstrual, early follicular, late follicular and luteal phase. The sample consisted of 19 female subjects with regular menstrual cycles. The results obtained in this study indicate lower basal body temperature values during phases with low sex hormone levels, while the activation assessments suggest stable levels of both General and High Activation throughout the menstrual cycle. Similar patterns of change have been shown for reaction times in visual and auditory sensory modalities. Reaction times were shorter during phases characterized by high sex hormone levels, while phases with low hormone levels were associated with longer reaction times. From the modified text on correlations in the data analysis section, it is evident that they were calculated from averaged data from all phases of the menstrual cycle. Therefore, they do not reflect intraindividual but rather interindividual variations between the observed variables, and are not related to the hypotheses of this paper.

  3. Optimal timing for performing hysterectomy according to different phase of menstrual cycle: Which is best?

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Jin; Kang, Jun Hyeok; Lee, Kyo Won; Kim, Kye Hyun; Song, Taejong

    2017-03-13

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the different phases of the menstrual cycle could affect operative bleeding in women undergoing laparoscopic hysterectomy. This was a retrospective comparative study. Based on the adjusted day of menstrual cycle, 212 women who underwent laparoscopic hysterectomy were classified into three groups: the follicular phase (n = 51), luteal phase group (n = 125), and menstruation group (n = 36). The primary outcome measure was the operative bleeding. There was no difference in the baseline characteristics of the patients belonging to the three groups. For the groups, there were no significant differences in operative bleeding (p = .469) and change in haemoglobin (p = .330), including operative time, length of hospital stay and complications. The menstrual cycle did not affect the operative bleeding and other parameters. Therefore, no phase of the menstrual cycle could be considered as an optimal timing for performing laparoscopic hysterectomy with minimal operative bleeding. Impact statement What is already known on this subject: the menstrual cycle results in periodic changes in haemostasis and blood flow in the reproductive organs. What the results of this study add: the menstrual cycle did not affect the operative bleeding and other operative parameters during laparoscopic hysterectomy. What the implications are of these findings for clinical practice and/or further research: no phase of the menstrual cycle could be considered as an optimal timing for performing laparoscopic hysterectomy with minimal operative bleeding.

  4. Determining menstrual phase in human biobehavioral research: A review with recommendations.

    PubMed

    Allen, Alicia M; McRae-Clark, Aimee L; Carlson, Samantha; Saladin, Michael E; Gray, Kevin M; Wetherington, Cora Lee; McKee, Sherry A; Allen, Sharon S

    2016-02-01

    Given the volume and importance of research focusing on menstrual phase, a review of the strategies being used to identify menstrual phase and recommendations that will promote methodological uniformity in the field is needed. We conducted a literature review via Ovid Medline and PsycINFO. Our goal was to review methods used to identify menstrual phase and subphases in biobehavioral research studies with women who had physiologically natural menstrual cycles. Therefore, we excluded articles that focused on any of the following: use of exogenous hormones, the postpartum period, menstrual-related problems (e.g., polycystic ovarian syndrome, endometriosis), and infertility/anovulation. We also excluded articles on either younger (<18 years old) or older (>45 years old) study samples. We initially identified a total of 1,809 articles. After our exclusionary criteria were applied, 146 articles remained, within which our review identified 6 different methods used to identify menstrual phase and subphases. The most common method used was self-report of onset of menses (145/146 articles) followed by urine luteinizing hormone testing (50/146 articles) and measurement of hormones (estradiol and/or progesterone) in blood samples (49/146 articles). Overall, we found a lack of consistency in the methodology used to determine menstrual phase and subphases. We provide several options to improve accuracy of phase identification, as well as to minimize costs and burden. Adoption of these recommendations will decrease misclassification within individual studies, facilitate cross-study comparisons, and enhance the reproducibility of results.

  5. Determining Menstrual Phase in Human Biobehavioral Research: A Review with Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Alicia M.; McRae-Clark, Aimee L.; Carlson, Samantha; Saladin, Michael E.; Gray, Kevin M.; Wetherington, Cora Lee; McKee, Sherry A.; Allen, Sharon S.

    2015-01-01

    Given the volume and importance of research focusing on menstrual phase, a review of the strategies being used to identify menstrual phase and recommendations that will promote methodological uniformity in the field is needed. We conducted a literature review via Ovid Medline and PsycINFO. Our goal was to review methods used to identify menstrual phase and subphases in biobehavioral research studies with women who had physiologically natural menstrual cycles. Therefore, we excluded articles that focused on any of the following: use of exogenous hormones, the postpartum period, menstrual-related problems (e.g. polycystic ovarian syndrome, endometriosis), and infertility/anovulation. We also excluded articles on either younger (<18 years old) or older (>45 years old) study samples. We initially identified a total of 1,809 articles. After our exclusionary criteria were applied, 146 articles remained, within which our review identified six different methods used to identify menstrual phase and subphases. The most common method used was self-report of onset of menses (145/146 articles) followed by urine luteinizing hormone testing (50/146 articles) and measurement of hormones (estradiol and/or progesterone) in blood samples (49/146 articles). Overall, we found a lack of consistency in the methodology used to determine menstrual phase and subphases. We provide several options to improve accuracy of phase identification, as well as to minimize costs and burden. Adoption of these recommendations will decrease misclassification within individual studies, facilitate cross-study comparisons and enhance the reproducibility of results. PMID:26570992

  6. Pain Control Research in the Terminally Ill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Michael H.

    1988-01-01

    Two main goals in the care of the terminally ill are to optimize the quality of their remaining life and to alleviate the distress of their survivors. Pain control research has contributed significantly to meeting those goals, but continued progress is needed in both basic studies and expanded applications of new techniques. (Author/NB)

  7. Imperforate hymen: a cause of abdominal pain in female adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lardenoije, Céline; Aardenburg, Robert; Mertens, Helen

    2009-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented with primary amenorrhea and had had cyclical abdominal pain for almost a year. At examination we observed a painful mass in the lower abdomen and normal secondary sex characteristics. Perineal examination showed a bluish bulging hymen. Transabdominal ultrasonography revealed a dense mass in the pelvis measuring about 12×11 cm. We diagnosed an imperforate hymen with haematocolpos and haematometra. The hymen was opened surgically and a large quantity of menstrual blood was drained from the vagina and uterus. Postoperative recovery was normal without any pain. The patient now menstruates regularly. An imperforate hymen occurs in 0.05% of women. It is important to be aware of this while examining a female adolescent presenting with cyclical abdominal pain and primary amenorrhea. Late discovery of an imperforate hymen may lead to pain, infections, hydronephrosis and endometriosis with subfertility as a possible consequence. PMID:21686660

  8. Affective disturbance associated with premenstrual dysphoric disorder does not disrupt emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception.

    PubMed

    Rhudy, Jamie L; Bartley, Emily J; Palit, Shreela; Kuhn, Bethany L; Kerr, Kara L; Martin, Satin L; DelVentura, Jennifer L; Terry, Ellen L

    2014-10-01

    In healthy individuals, emotions modulate pain and spinal nociception according to a valence linear trend (ie, pain/nociception is highest during negative emotions and lowest during positive emotions). However, emerging evidence suggests that emotional modulation of pain (but not spinal nociception) is disrupted in fibromyalgia and disorders associated with chronic pain risk (eg, major depression, insomnia). The present study attempted to extend this work and to examine whether women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), a cyclical syndrome associated with debilitating affective symptoms during the late-luteal (premenstrual) phase of the menstrual cycle, is also associated with disrupted emotional modulation of pain. To do so, an affective picture-viewing procedure was used to study emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception in 14 women with PMDD and 14 control women during mid-follicular, ovulatory, and late-luteal phases of the menstrual cycle (verified by salivary hormone levels and luteinizing hormone tests). At each phase, mutilation, neutral, and erotic pictures were presented to manipulate emotion. During picture viewing, suprathreshold electrocutaneous stimuli were presented to evoke pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR; a physiological measure of spinal nociception). Statistically powerful linear mixed model analyses confirmed that pictures evoked the intended emotional states in both groups across all menstrual phases. Furthermore, emotion modulated pain and NFR according to a valence linear trend in both groups and across all menstrual phases. Thus, PMDD-related affective disturbance is not associated with a failure to emotionally modulate pain, suggesting that PMDD does not share this pain phenotype with major depression, insomnia, and fibromyalgia.

  9. Menstrual cycle variation of women's interest in erotica.

    PubMed

    Zillmann, D; Schweitzer, K J; Mundorf, N

    1994-10-01

    Female respondents were given the opportunity to choose feature films for viewing. Choices were made on the basis of synopses and promotional videos. These materials projected (i) a focus on erotic, sexual events, (ii) romantic themes, (iii) action-packed violent drama, and (iv) hilarious comedy. Additionally, respondents evaluated the appeal of the projected films. Respondents' position in the menstrual cycle was then determined, with placement into one of seven 4-day phases. Measured in both choices and evaluations, a postmenstrual surge in erotic interest was evident. Erotic interest was also pronounced prior to and during menses. In contrast, it was at a minimum during the first half of the luteal phase. The choice of romantic films was not appreciably influenced by cycle position. However, in evaluating films with romantic themes, premenstrual women expressed particularly little interest in this genre.

  10. Prefrontal Brain Asymmetry and Pre-Menstrual Dysphoric Disorder Symptomatology

    PubMed Central

    Accortt, Eynav E.; Stewart, Jennifer L.; Coan, James A.; Manber, Rachel; Allen, John J.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), a dysphoric form of premenstrual syndrome, is included as a diagnosis for further study in the DSM-IV-TR (APA, 2000). The present study investigated whether a marker of risk for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), prefrontal brain asymmetry, also characterizes women with PMDD. Methods In a sample of 25 college women with PMDD symptomatology and 25 matched controls, resting frontal electroencephalographic (EEG) activity was assessed on four occasions within a two-week span. Results Across several frontal sites women with PMDD had relatively less left than right prefrontal brain activity, consistent with a diathesis-stress model for menstrual-related dysphoria. Conclusions The findings suggest an overlap in the risk profile for MDD and PMDD. PMID:20833433

  11. Modeling Women's Menstrual Cycles using PICI Gates in Bayesian Network.

    PubMed

    Zagorecki, Adam; Łupińska-Dubicka, Anna; Voortman, Mark; Druzdzel, Marek J

    2016-03-01

    A major difficulty in building Bayesian network (BN) models is the size of conditional probability tables, which grow exponentially in the number of parents. One way of dealing with this problem is through parametric conditional probability distributions that usually require only a number of parameters that is linear in the number of parents. In this paper, we introduce a new class of parametric models, the Probabilistic Independence of Causal Influences (PICI) models, that aim at lowering the number of parameters required to specify local probability distributions, but are still capable of efficiently modeling a variety of interactions. A subset of PICI models is decomposable and this leads to significantly faster inference as compared to models that cannot be decomposed. We present an application of the proposed method to learning dynamic BNs for modeling a woman's menstrual cycle. We show that PICI models are especially useful for parameter learning from small data sets and lead to higher parameter accuracy than when learning CPTs.

  12. Glucose and insulin tolerance throughout the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Fioretti, P; Genazzani, A R; Felber, J P; Facchini, V; Onano, A M; Romagnino, S; Facchinetti, F; Piras, G L

    1975-03-01

    On the basis of the behaviour during menstrual cycle of the pituitary hormones plasma levels, the Authors have studied during the different periods of the cycle (follicular, ovulatory and luteal) the effects of OGTT and ITT's on the plasma levels of Glucose, insulin, HGH and Cortisol. Significantly lower levels of IRI, HGH and Cortisol were found in follicular phase compared to ovulatory period and luteal phase except for Cortisol in luteal phase. A slightly higher glucose tolerance was found in follicular phase as well as a reduced hypoglicemia under insulin load. Reduced HGH response to ITT was found in follicular phase as well as a reduced Cortisol response compared to the results observed in ovulatory and luteal phase. These data sustain the concept that hormonal variations occurring in an ovulatory cycle are also capable of modifying the woman's body response to various stimuli such as OGTT and ITT.

  13. No effect of menstrual cycle phase on fuel oxidation during exercise in rowers.

    PubMed

    Vaiksaar, Sille; Jürimäe, Jaak; Mäestu, Jarek; Purge, Priit; Kalytka, Svetlana; Shakhlina, Larissa; Jürimäe, Toivo

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to examine the effects of menstrual cycle phase on substrate oxidation and lactate concentration during exercise. Eleven eumenorrheic female rowers (18.4 ± 1.9 years; 172.0 ± 4.0 cm; 67.2 ± 8.4 kg; 27.7 ± 4.8% body fat) completed 1 h rowing ergometer exercise at 70% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)) during two different phases of the menstrual cycle: the follicular phase (FP) and the luteal phase (LP). Resting and exercise measurements of the whole body energy expenditure, oxygen consumption (VO(2)), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), substrate oxidation and lactate blood levels were made. Energy expenditure, VO(2) and heart rate during the 1-h exercise were not significantly different (P > 0.05) among menstrual cycle phases. Resting RER and RER during the entire 1 h exercise period were not significantly different among menstrual cycle phases. There was an increase (P < 0.05) in RER in the transition between rest and exercise and a further increase in RER occurred after the first 30 min of exercise at both menstrual cycle phases. Blood lactate concentrations significantly increased in the transition between rest and exercise and remained relatively constant during the whole 1 h of exercise in both menstrual cycle phases. No menstrual cycle phase effect (P > 0.05) was observed for blood lactate concentrations. In conclusion, our results demonstrated no effect of menstrual cycle phase on substrate oxidation and blood lactate concentration during rowing exercise at 70% of VO(2max) in athletes. Normally menstruating female rowers should not be concerned about their menstrual cycle phase with regard to substrate oxidation in everyday training.

  14. Tongue color changes within a menstrual cycle in eumenorrheic women.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shu-Feng; Shen, Li-Ling; Su, Shan-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Tongue color ( shé sè) has been used to diagnose abnormal body conditions for thousands of years in traditional Chinese Medicine ( zhōng yī). However, it is not clear whether tongue color alters with physiological changes within a normal menstrual cycle ( yuè jīng zhōu qī). This study investigated difference in tongue color between the follicular phase and luteal phase in eumenorrheic women. Tongue surface photographs were taken in the follicular phase and the luteal phase of thirty-two volunteers with biphasic basal body temperature. Color values on five areas of the tongue surface were examined and comparisons of color values were made between the two phases according to the red-green-blue (RGB), hue-saturation-brightness (HSB), luminance-a-b (Lab), and cyan-magenta-yellow-black (CMYK) models. Based on the RGB model, the values of green and blue in the tip area were larger in the follicular phase than both in the luteal phase. The values of magenta and yellow based in the CMYK model were smaller in the tip area in the follicular phase than that in the luteal phase. The saturation in the tip area was smaller in the follicular phase than that in the luteal phase. Based on the Lab model, b value in the middle area was smaller in the follicular phase than that in the luteal phase. The data revealed that tongue color varied within a eumenorrheic menstrual cycle, suggesting that tongue color differences between the follicular and luteal phases need to be considered while practicing tongue diagnosis ( shé zhěn) or performing clinical studies among childbearing women.

  15. Women's reasons for participation in a clinical trial for menstrual pain: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Blödt, Susanne; Witt, Claudia M; Holmberg, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to explore women's motivations for participating in a clinical trial and to evaluate how financial compensation impacts women's explanations for participation. Design, setting and participants Semistructured interviews were conducted face to face or by telephone with 25 of 220 women who participated in a pragmatic randomised trial for app-administered self-care acupressure for dysmenorrhoea (AKUD). Of these 25 women, 10 had entered AKUD knowing they would receive a financial compensation of €30. A purposive sampling strategy was used. Results Women had a long history of seeking help and were unsatisfied with the options available, namely painkillers and oral contraceptives. While interviewees were open to painkillers, they were uneasy about taking them on a monthly basis. The AKUD trial offered the possibility to find an alternative solution. A second reason for participation was the desire to add a new treatment to routine medical care, for which the interviewees considered randomised trials a prerequisite. The financial incentive was a subsidiary motivation in the interviewees' narratives. Conclusions Our results contribute to the ongoing discussion of the impact of financial compensation on research participants' assessment of risk. The interviewed women considered all research participants able to make their own choices regarding trial participation, even in the face of financial compensation or payment of study participants. Furthermore, the importance of clinical trials providing new treatments that could change medical practice might be an overlooked reason for trial participation and could be used in future recruitment strategies. PMID:27965251

  16. Disposable menstrual regulation kits in a non-throw-away economy.

    PubMed

    Fortney, J A; Vengadasalam, D

    1980-03-01

    The directions for use that are packaged with plastic menstrual regulation kits state that the kits are designed to be durable for approximately 50 procedures when used as directed. However, in much of the developing world, directions for use are ignored, equipment is not maintained properly and nothing (including disposable medical equipment) is discarded until it is unless. Therefore, it is of interest to know for how many procedures the disposable menstrual regulation kit can safely be used. This paper describes a study conducted in Singapore to determine the durability of three menstrual regulation kits manufactured by different companies and comments on how cleaning and sterilizing affects the durability of these kits.

  17. Menstrual Cycle Irregularity and Metabolic Disorders: A Population-Based Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Rostami Dovom, Marzieh; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Djalalinia, Shirin; Cheraghi, Leila; Behboudi Gandavani, Samira; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2016-01-01

    The regularity of menstrual cycles is considered an indicator of women’s reproductive health. Previous studies with a cross-sectional design have documented the relationship between menstrual cycle irregularities, insulin-resistance and the future risks for metabolic disorders. Limited data documented by prospective studies can lead to premature conclusions regarding the relationship between menstrual cycle irregularities and other conditions influencing women’s health. The present study therefore, using a prospective design aimed to assess the risk of metabolic disorders in women with a history of irregular menstrual cycles, was based on the data gathered from the Tehran Lipid and Glucose study (TLGS) an ongoing prospective cohort study initiated in 1999. Participants of the current study were 2128 women, aged between 18–49 years, followed for 15 years. Based on their menstrual cycles, the women were divided into two groups: (i) women with regular menstrual cycles (n = 1749), and (ii) those with irregular menstrual cycles (n = 379). The proportional COX regression model was used to compare hazard ratios (HRs) between the groups for the proposed events, including diabetes mellitus (DM), pre-diabetes (pre-DM), hypertension (HTN), pre-hypertension (pre-HTN) and dyslipidemia. It was found that during a 15-year follow up, there were 123 cases of DM, 456 cases of pre-DM, 290 cases of HTN, 481 cases of pre-HTN, and 402 cases of dyslipidemia. Compared to those with regular cycles, women with irregular menstrual cycles were found to have an increased risk for DM2 (age adjusted Hazard Ratios (HRs), 2.01; 95% confidence intervals (CI:1.59–3.50), the increased risk for DM, associated with irregular cycles remained significant after the adjustment for Body Mass Index (BMI), fasting blood sugar (FBS), family history of diabetes, and parity (HRS, 1.73; 95% CI: 1.14–2.64). There was no significant difference in the increased risk for pre-DM between the groups (age

  18. Metabolic implications of menstrual cycle length in non-hyperandrogenic women with polycystic ovarian morphology.

    PubMed

    Alebić, Miro Šimun; Stojanović, Nataša; Baldani, Dinka Pavičić; Duvnjak, Lea Smirčić

    2016-12-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the association between menstrual cycle lenght and metabolic parameters in non-hyperandrogenic women with polycystic ovarian morphology, n = 250. Metabolic profiles of all participants were evaluated using anthropometric parameters (body mass index, waist circumference), parameters of dyslipidemia (total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides) and markers of insulin resistance (fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance index). The associations between menstrual cycle lenght and cardiometabolic risk factors such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and obesity were investigated. In non-hyperandrogenic women with polycystic ovarian morphology, menstrual cycle lenght was associated with hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance independently of body mass index. Moreover, menstrual cycle lenght added value to body mass index in predicting hypertriglyceridemia. The optimal menstrual cycle lenght cut-off value for identifying of non-hyperandrogenic women with polycystic ovarian morphology at metabolic risk was found to be 45 days. Metabolic profile of non-hyperandrogenic women with polycystic ovarian morphology (n = 75) with menstrual cycle lenght >45 days was similar to that of hyperandrogenic women with polycystic ovarian morphology (n = 138) while metabolic profile of non-hyperandrogenic women with polycystic ovarian morphology with menstrual cycle lenght ≤45 days (n = 112) was similar to that of controls (n = 167). Non-hyperandrogenic women with polycystic ovarian morphology with menstrual cycle lenght >45 days had higher prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors compared to those with menstrual cycle lenght ≤45 days. Non-hyperandrogenic women with polycystic ovarian morphology are not metabolically homogeneous. Menstrual cycle lenght is an easy-to-obtain clinical parameter positively associated with the probability of unfavorable metabolic status in non

  19. ENDOGENOUS ANALGESIA, DEPENDENCE, AND LATENT PAIN SENSITIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bradley K; Corder, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous activation of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides relief from acute pain. Recent studies have established that tissue inflammation produces latent pain sensitization (LS) that is masked by spinal MOR signaling for months, even after complete recovery from injury and re-establishment of normal pain thresholds. Disruption with MOR inverse agonists reinstates pain and precipitates cellular, somatic and aversive signs of physical withdrawal; this phenomenon requires N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated activation of calcium-sensitive adenylyl cyclase type 1 (AC1). In this review, we present a new conceptual model of the transition from acute to chronic pain, based on the delicate balance between LS and endogenous analgesia that develops after painful tissue injury. First, injury activates pain pathways. Second, the spinal cord establishes MOR constitutive activity (MORCA) as it attempts to control pain. Third, over time, the body becomes dependent on MORCA, which paradoxically sensitizes pain pathways. Stress or injury escalates opposing inhibitory and excitatory influences on nociceptive processing as a pathological consequence of increased endogenous opioid tone. Pain begets MORCA begets pain vulnerability in a vicious cycle. The final result is a silent insidious state characterized by the escalation of two opposing excitatory and inhibitory influences on pain transmission: LS mediated by AC1 (which maintains accelerator), and pain inhibition mediated by MORCA (which maintains the brake). This raises the prospect that opposing homeostatic interactions between MORCA analgesia and latent NMDAR–AC1-mediated pain sensitization create a lasting vulnerability to develop chronic pain. Thus, chronic pain syndromes may result from a failure in constitutive signaling of spinal MORs and a loss of endogenous analgesic control. An overarching long-term therapeutic goal of future research is to alleviate chronic pain by either: a) facilitating endogenous opioid

  20. Sexual pain.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Lori A; Stockdale, Colleen K

    2009-12-01

    Sexual pain is an underrecognized and poorly treated constellation of disorders that significantly impact affected women and their partners. Recognized as a form of chronic pain, sexual pain disorders are heterogeneous and include dyspareunia (superficial and deep), vaginismus, vulvodynia, vestibulitis, and noncoital sexual pain disorder. Women too often tolerate pain in the belief that this will meet their partners' needs. This article provides a review of the terminology and definition of the condition, theories on the pathophysiology, diagnostic considerations, and recommendations on the management of female sexual pain.

  1. Renal Artery Embolization Controls Intractable Pain in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Seong Tai; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Kim, Choon-Yul; Chang, Yoon Sik

    1999-09-15

    A 65-year-old man with adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) and chronic renal failure suffered from intractable abdominal pain and distension for 2 weeks. Meperidine infusion did not alleviate his pain. However, pain and abdominal distension were successfully controlled by embolization of both renal arteries.

  2. Pain Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... acupuncture, chiropractic care, massage or other manual therapies, yoga, herbal and nutritional therapies, or others. This information helps the health care provider understand the nature of the pain or the potential benefits of treatment. The goals of the comprehensive pain ...

  3. Anal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... change in bowel habit or rectal bleeding. A hemorrhoid that develops quickly or is particularly painful may ... your doctor. The blood clot of a thrombosed hemorrhoid, although painful, can't break loose and travel, ...

  4. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific points on the body. Some people with low back pain report that acupuncture helps relieve their symptoms. Massage. ... Accessed May 29, 2015. Adult acute and subacute low back pain. Bloomington, Minn.: Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement. http:// ...

  5. Period Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may also have other symptoms, such as lower back pain, nausea, diarrhea, and headaches. Period pain is not ... Taking a hot bath Doing relaxation techniques, including yoga and meditation You might also try taking over- ...

  6. Finger pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  7. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oh, my aching back!", you are not alone. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems, ... 10 people at some point during their lives. Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to ...

  8. Hip Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... clues about the underlying cause. Problems within the hip joint itself tend to result in pain on the ... tendons and other soft tissues that surround your hip joint. Hip pain can sometimes be caused by diseases ...

  9. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain.

  10. Standardizing the descriptive terminology of abnormal menstrual bleeding: it is time we talk the same talk.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Steven R

    2007-03-01

    The movement towards international standardization of the terminology used to describe abnormal uterine bleeding and of the definition that sets the boundaries of normal menstrual bleeding will greatly benefit clinicians and researchers.

  11. The risk of menstrual abnormalities after tubal sterilization: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Shobeiri, Mehri Jafari; Atashkhoii, Simin

    2005-05-02

    BACKGROUND: Tubal sterilization is the method of family planning most commonly used. The existence of the post-tubal-ligation syndrome of menstrual abnormalities has been the subject of debate for decades. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, 112 women with the history of Pomeroy type of tubal ligation achieved by minilaparatomy as the case group and 288 women with no previous tubal ligation as the control group were assessed for menstrual abnormalities. RESULTS: Menstrual abnormalities were not significantly different between the case and control groups (p = 0.824). The abnormal uterine bleeding frequency differences in two different age groups (30-39 and 40-45 years old) were statistically significant (p = 0.0176). CONCLUSION: Tubal sterilization does not cause menstrual irregularities.

  12. Raman spectroscopy coupled with advanced statistics for differentiating menstrual and peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Sikirzhytskaya, Aliaksandra; Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Lednev, Igor K

    2014-01-01

    Body fluids are a common and important type of forensic evidence. In particular, the identification of menstrual blood stains is often a key step during the investigation of rape cases. Here, we report on the application of near-infrared Raman microspectroscopy for differentiating menstrual blood from peripheral blood. We observed that the menstrual and peripheral blood samples have similar but distinct Raman spectra. Advanced statistical analysis of the multiple Raman spectra that were automatically (Raman mapping) acquired from the 40 dried blood stains (20 donors for each group) allowed us to build classification model with maximum (100%) sensitivity and specificity. We also demonstrated that despite certain common constituents, menstrual blood can be readily distinguished from vaginal fluid. All of the classification models were verified using cross-validation methods. The proposed method overcomes the problems associated with currently used biochemical methods, which are destructive, time consuming and expensive.

  13. Pharmacokinetic changes of theophylline and amikacin through the menstrual cycle in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, S; Kotegawa, T; Tsutsumi, K; Nakamura, K; Nakano, S

    1999-12-01

    The objective of this open-label, single-dose study was to clarify the influence of the menstrual cycle on the pharmacokinetics of theophylline (n = 10) and amikacin (n = 8) in young healthy Japanese women with regular menstrual cycles. Each subject received an intravenous infusion of theophylline or amikacin sulfate at four different phases--mid-follicular (phase I), peri-ovulatory (phase II), mid-luteal (phase III), and premenstrual days (phase IV). In the theophylline study, there were no significant differences in the pharmacokinetic parameters among the four phases studied. In the amikacin study, CLtot was 15% higher in phase III than in phase I (p < 0.01). Vd beta was 35% higher in phase III than in phase I (p < 0.05). The other pharmacokinetic parameters of amikacin were not significantly altered during the menstrual cycle. Evidence suggests that the phase of the menstrual cycle may be a factor in determining the pharmacokinetics of amikacin.

  14. The relationship between alcohol consumption and menstrual cycle: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Lustyk, Kathleen B.; Larimer, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol use affects men and women differently, with women being more affected by the health effects of alcohol use (NIAAA, 2011). Yet, a dearth of information investigating the alcohol use in women exists (SAMSHA, 2011). In particular, one dispositional factor hypothesized to contribute to alcohol consumption in women is the menstrual cycle. However, only 13 empirical papers have considered the menstrual cycle as related to alcohol consumption in women. These studies fall out with somewhat mixed findings suggesting that the premenstrual week is associated with increased, decreased, or no change in alcohol consumption, likely due to methodological differences in menstrual cycle determination and measures of alcohol consumption. These methodological differences and possible other contributing factors are discussed here with recommendations for future research in this area. Understanding the contribution of the menstrual cycle to alcohol consumption is one step in addressing an important women’s health concern. PMID:26293593

  15. The relationship between alcohol consumption and menstrual cycle: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Haley A; Lustyk, M Kathleen B; Larimer, Mary E

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol use affects men and women differently, with women being more affected by the health effects of alcohol use (NIAAA, 2011). Yet, a dearth of information investigating the alcohol use in women exists (SAMSHA, 2011). In particular, one dispositional factor hypothesized to contribute to alcohol consumption in women is the menstrual cycle. However, only 13 empirical papers have considered the menstrual cycle as related to alcohol consumption in women. These studies fall out with somewhat mixed findings suggesting that the premenstrual week is associated with increased, decreased, or no change in alcohol consumption, likely due to methodological differences in menstrual cycle determination and measures of alcohol consumption. These methodological differences and possible other contributing factors are discussed here with recommendations for future research in this area. Understanding the contribution of the menstrual cycle to alcohol consumption is one step in addressing an important women's health concern.

  16. Ovarian hormones and chronic pain: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Samah; Muere, Abi; Einstein, Gillian

    2014-12-01

    Most chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) conditions are more common in women and have been reported to worsen, particularly during the peak reproductive years. This phenomenon suggests that ovarian hormones might play a role in modulating CNCP pain. To this end, we reviewed human literature aiming to assess the potential role of ovarian hormones in modulating the following CNCP conditions: musculoskeletal pain, migraine headache, temporal mandibular disorder, and pelvic pain. We found 50 relevant clinical studies, the majority of which demonstrated a correlation between hormone changes or treatments and pain intensity, threshold, or symptoms. Taken together, the findings suggest that changes in hormonal levels may well play a role in modulating the severity of CNCP conditions. However, the lack of consistency in study design, methodology, and interpretation of menstrual cycle phases impedes comparison between the studies. Thus, while the literature is highly suggestive of the role of ovarian hormones in modulating CNCP conditions, serious confounds impede a definitive understanding for most conditions except menstrual migraine and endometriosis. It may be that these inconsistencies and the resulting lack of clarity have contributed to the failure of hormonal effects being translated into medical practice for treatment of CNCP conditions.

  17. Percutaneous trigeminal ganglion radiofrequency thermocoagulation alleviates anxiety and depression disorders in patients with classic trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Tang, YuanZhang; Ma, Ling; Li, Na; Guo, Yuna; Yang, Liqiang; Wu, Baishan; Yue, Jianning; Wang, Qi; Liu, Jingjie; Ni, Jia-xiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a neurological condition that presents as excruciating facial pain. Depression and anxiety are commonly associated with TN; however, anxiety and depression disorders in patients with TN and the effects of the various therapeutic strategies for TN on these disorders are not well studied. To evaluate depression and anxiety in patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN), identify factors that predict their occurrence and study the effect of the percutaneous trigeminal ganglion radiofrequency thermocoagulation (PRT) procedure for alleviating pain on depression and anxiety. Patients with classic TN, who received PRT treatment, were consecutively recruited between October 2014 and October 2015. Severity of pain was determined using the visual analogue scale (VAS) score. Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI) and Beck anxiety Inventory (BAI) were used to evaluate depression and anxiety disorders pre- and post-PRT. Medical, demographic, and psychosocial backgrounds were also assessed as predictive factors. A BDI score of ≥14 represented depression and BAI score of ≥45 represented anxiety. VAS, BDI, and BAI scores were collected at the time of admission and on the day of discharge. Of the 167 patients who participated in the study, 121 (72.5%) had depression and 34 (20.4%) suffered anxiety. Pre-PRT procedure, female sex, age >50 years, ineffective treatment, and high pain intensity (VAS ≥7) predicted the development of depression and anxiety. Post-PRT procedure, all patients who experienced pain relief also reported amelioration of depression and anxiety. A considerable percentage of patients with TN developed depression and anxiety. Patients who were female, older than 50 years, or suffered from failure treatment and severe pain (VAS>7), were at higher risk of depression and anxiety development. Complete alleviation of pain by using surgical PRT could immediately attenuate depressive and anxiety disorders associated with TN. PMID

  18. Do sex hormones influence emotional modulation of pain and nociception in healthy women?

    PubMed

    Rhudy, Jamie L; Bartley, Emily J; Palit, Shreela; Kerr, Kara L; Kuhn, Bethany L; Martin, Satin L; Delventura, Jennifer L; Terry, Ellen L

    2013-12-01

    Sex hormones may contribute to inter- and intra-individual differences in pain by influencing emotional modulation of pain and nociception. To study this, a well-validated picture-viewing paradigm was used to assess emotional modulation of pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR; physiologic measure of nociception) during mid-follicular, ovulatory, and late-luteal phases of the menstrual cycle in healthy normally cycling women (n=40). Salivary estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone were assessed at each testing session. Emotional modulation of pain/NFR did not differ across menstrual phases, but low estradiol was associated with weaker emotional modulation of NFR (during all phases) and emotional modulation of pain (ovulatory and late-luteal phases). Given evidence that a failure to emotionally modulate pain might be a risk factor for chronic pain, low estradiol may promote chronic pain via this mechanism. However, future research is needed to extend these findings to women with disturbances of pain, emotion, and/or sex hormones.

  19. Breast size, bra fit and thoracic pain in young women: a correlational study

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Katherine; Cameron, Melainie; Fitzgerald, Kylie

    2008-01-01

    Introduction A single sample study was undertaken to determine the strength and direction of correlations between: a) breast size and thoracic spine or posterior chest wall pain; b) bra fit and thoracic spine or posterior chest wall pain and; c) breast size and bra fit, in thirty nulliparous women (18–26 years), with thoracic spine or posterior chest wall pain, who wore bras during daytime. Measures Pain (Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire), bra size (Triumph International), bra fit (Triumph International). Results Most (80%) women wore incorrectly sized bras: 70% wore bras that were too small, 10% wore bras that were too large. Breast size was negatively correlated with both bra size (r = -0.78) and bra fit (r = -0.50). These results together indicate that large breasted women were particularly likely to be wearing incorrectly sized and fitted bras. Negligible relationships were found between pain and bra fit, and breast size and pain. Menstrual cycle stage was moderately positively correlated with bra fit (r = 0.32). Conclusion In young, nulliparous women, thoracic pain appears unrelated to breast size. Bra fit is moderately related to stage of menstrual cycle suggesting that this research may be somewhat confounded by hormonal changes or reproductive stage. Further research is needed to clarify whether there is a relationship between breast size or bra fit and thoracic pain in women during times of hormonal change. PMID:18339205

  20. Human Performance: Sex Differences and the Influence of the Menstrual Cycle (A Selected Bibliography)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-01

    U. 6. Stephens, W. A cross- cultural study of menstrual taboos . Genetic Psychology Mono-graphs, 1961 ,_0, 385-416. 7. Young, F., & Bacdayan, A... Menstrual taboos and social rigidity. Ethnoqraph, 1965, 4, 225- 240. 0. MENOPAUSE 1. Flint, M. The menopause: Reward or punishment? Psyhosmatics, 1975, j,161...55 L. Effects on Behavior .. ...... ........ ......... 56 M. Correlates of Oral Contraceptive Use .. ........ ........ 58 N. Social Taboos

  1. Menstrual disorders in a Paediatric and Adolescent Gynaecology Clinic: patient presentations and longitudinal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chung, P W; Chan, Symphorosa S C; Yiu, K W; Lao, Terence T H; Chung, Tony K H

    2011-10-01

    OBJECTIVE. To study the presentations, diagnoses, and outcomes in adolescents with menstrual disorders. DESIGN. Prospective cohort study. SETTING. Paediatric and Adolescent Gynaecology Clinic, Hong Kong. PARTICIPANTS. A total of 577 adolescents aged 14 to 19 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. The presentations and diagnoses of adolescents with menstrual disorders were reviewed and their menstrual outcomes determined by a telephone survey. RESULTS. In all, 47% presented with menorrhagia, prolonged menstruation, and short menstrual cycles; 27% had secondary amenorrhoea, 12% had dysmenorrhoea, 11% had oligomenorrhoea, and 3% had primary amenorrhoea. Significant diagnoses included congenital genital tract anomalies, premature ovarian failure, anorexia nervosa, and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Polycystic ovarian syndrome was diagnosed in 16% of the cohort. In all, 24% of these 577 patients had abnormal menstrual cycles 4 years later. Direct logistic regression analysis indicated a cycle length of more than 35 days at presentation (adjusted odds ratio=2.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-4.5), previous diagnosis of polycystic ovarian syndrome (adjusted odds ratio=2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.4), and current body mass index of 23 kg/m(2) or higher (adjusted odds ratio=1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-3.0) were risk factors for persistently long menstrual cycle exceeding 35 days. Adolescents who were screened out with a definitive diagnosis after initial assessment were at low risk of persistently long menstrual cycles at follow-up (adjusted odds ratio=0.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-0.8). CONCLUSIONS. Adolescent menstrual disorders should not be ignored. Long cycle, diagnosis of polycystic ovarian syndrome at first consultation, and a current body mass index of 23 kg/m(2) or higher were statistically associated with persistent problems.

  2. Menstrual Symptoms in Adolescent Girls: Association with Smoking, Depressive Symptoms and Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Lorah D.; Negriff, Sonya; Huang, Bin; Pabst, Stephanie; Hillman, Jennifer; Braverman, Paula; Susman, Elizabeth J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Dysmenorrhea affects quality of life and contributes to absenteeism from school and work diminishing opportunities for successful psychosocial and cognitive development during adolescence. In adults, depression, anxiety, and smoking have an impact on menstrual cycles and dysmenorrhea. Associations between these potential problems have not been examined in adolescents. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between depressive symptoms and anxiety with menstrual symptoms. Smoking was examined as a moderator of this relationship. Methods This study enrolled 154 post-menarcheal girls from a sample of 207 girls age 11, 13, 15, and 17 years [M = 15.4 years (± 1.9)]. Self-reported measures included the Menstrual Symptom Questionnaire (MSQ), Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and smoking behavior. Generalized linear regression modeled MSQ outcomes separately for depressive symptoms and anxiety. Results More depressive symptoms/anxiety were related to higher numbers of menstrual symptoms (r = 0.23–0.44, p < .05). Smoking status (ever) was related to higher MSQ scores. Moderating effects of smoking and depressive symptoms or anxiety on menstrual symptoms were consistent across most MSQ factors where effects were stronger in never smokers. Conclusion This is the first study in adolescents showing smoking status and depressive symptoms/anxiety are related to menstrual symptoms and that the impact of depressive symptoms/anxiety on menstrual symptoms is stronger in never smokers. The dynamic and complex nature of smoking, moods, and dysmenorrhea cannot be disentangled without longitudinal analyses. Efforts to reduce menstrual symptoms should begin at a young gynecological age and include consideration of mood and smoking status. PMID:19237109

  3. Investigation of polymorphisms in genes involved in estrogen metabolism in menstrual migraine.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Heidi G; Champion, Morgane; Plays, Amelie; Stuart, Shani; Haupt, Larisa M; Frith, Alison; MacGregor, E Anne; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2017-04-05

    Migraine is a common, disabling headache disorder, which is influenced by multiple genes and environmental triggers. After puberty, the prevalence of migraine in women is three times higher than in men and >50% of females suffering from migraine report a menstrual association, suggesting hormonal fluctuations can influence the risk of migraine attacks. It has been hypothesized that the drop in estrogen during menses is an important trigger for menstrual migraine. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are involved in estrogen synthesis and metabolism. Functional polymorphisms in these genes can influence estrogen levels and therefore may be associated with risk of menstrual migraine. In this study we investigated four single nucleotide polymorphisms in three genes involved in estrogen metabolism that have been reported to impact enzyme levels or function, in a specific menstrual migraine cohort. 268 menstrual migraine cases and 142 controls were genotyped for rs4680 in COMT (Val158Met), rs4646903 and rs1048943 in CYP1A1 (T3801C and Ile462Val) and rs700519 in CYP19A1 (Cys264Arg). Neither genotype nor allele frequencies for the COMT and CYP SNPs genotyped were found to be significantly different between menstrual migraineurs and controls by chi-square analysis (P>0.05). Therefore we did not find association of functional polymorphisms in the estrogen metabolism genes COMT, CYP1A1 or CYP19A1 with menstrual migraine. Further studies are required to assess whether menstrual migraine is genetically distinct from the common migraine subtypes and identify genes that influence risk.

  4. Anxiety and rumination moderate menstrual cycle effects on mood in daily life.

    PubMed

    Welz, Annett; Huffziger, Silke; Reinhard, Iris; Alpers, Georg W; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich; Kuehner, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Evidence for menstrual cycle-related mood fluctuations in the general population of women has been mixed. While most previous research has relied on retrospective self-report and did not consider possible moderators, the present study aimed to examine cycle-related mood variations in daily life and possible moderating effects of anxiety and trait rumination. Fifty-nine women with natural menstrual cycles, aged 18-44 years, were examined between January and October, 2012. Mood components of calmness, positive valence, energetic-arousal, and irritability were assessed, using smartphones, by ambulatory assessment ten times per day on eight days across the cycle. The menstrual, follicular, ovulatory, and late luteal phases were each covered by two consecutive assessment days. Moderators were assessed with questionnaires. Hierarchical linear models (HLMs) revealed higher calmness in the luteal and menstrual than in the follicular and ovulatory phase, while the menstrual cycle did not exhibit significant main effects on other mood components. Anxiety and ruminative self-reflection moderated the association between menstrual cycle and all mood variables. Specifically, highly anxious and ruminative women showed an increase in irritability, while women with lower anxiety and lower rumination were protected against mood deterioration toward the end of the cycle. Further research could examine whether reducing anxiety and rumination helps to prevent premenstrual syndrome-related syndromes.

  5. Body weight changes during the menstrual cycle among university students in Ahvaz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Haghighizadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Karandish, Majid; Ghoreishi, Mahdiye; Soroor, Farshad; Shirani, Fatemeh

    2014-07-01

    Weight changes during menstrual cycle may be a cause of concern about body weight among most women. Limited data are available linking menstrual cycle and body weight changes. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between menstrual cycles and body weight changes among university students in Ahvaz, Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 50 Iranian female students aged 18-24 years. Anthropometric indices were measured according to standard protocols. During a complete menstrual cycle, weights of participants were measured each morning. Seventy eight percent of participants had normal weight (Body Mass Index: 18.5-24.9 kg m(-2)). Body weight increased only slightly during the three days before beginning of the menstruation. By using repeated-measures ANOVA, no statistically significant differences were found in weigh during menstrual cycle (p-value = 0.301). No statistically significant changes were found in body weight during women's menstrual cycle in a group of healthy non-obese Iranian young women. Further studies on overweight and obese women are suggested.

  6. Menstrual Cycle Phase Modulates Auditory-Motor Integration for Vocal Pitch Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoxia; Niu, Yang; Li, Weifeng; Zhang, Zhou; Liu, Peng; Chen, Xi; Liu, Hanjun

    2016-01-01

    In adult females, previous work has demonstrated that changes in auditory function and vocal motor behaviors may accompany changes in gonadal steroids. Less is known, however, about the influence of gonadal steroids on auditory-motor integration for voice control in humans. The present event-related potential (ERP) study sought to examine the interaction between gonadal steroids and auditory feedback-based vocal pitch regulation across the menstrual cycle. Participants produced sustained vowels while hearing their voice unexpectedly pitch-shifted during the menstrual, follicular, and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Measurement of vocal and cortical responses to pitch feedback perturbations and assessment of estradiol and progesterone levels were performed in all three phases. The behavioral results showed that the menstrual phase (when estradiol levels are low) as associated with larger magnitudes of vocal responses than the follicular and luteal phases (when estradiol levels are high). Furthermore, there was a significant negative correlation between the magnitudes of vocal responses and estradiol levels. At the cortical level, ERP P2 responses were smaller during the luteal phase (when progesterone levels were high) than the menstrual and follicular phases (when progesterone levels were low). These findings show neurobehavioral evidence for the modulation of auditory-motor integration for vocal pitch regulation across the menstrual cycle, and provide important insights into the neural mechanisms and functional outcomes of gonadal steroids' influence on speech motor control in adult women. PMID:28082863

  7. Role of sex hormones produced during menstrual cycle on brainstem encoding of speech stimulus.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Prashanth; Banerjee, Neha; Anil, Arya; Abdulla, Asma

    2016-11-01

    There are no studies attempted to determine the effects of different phases of menstrual cycle on frequency following response (FFR) for speech stimuli. The aim of the study was to determine the differences in latencies and amplitude of FFR waves recorded at four phases of menstrual cycle. In addition, it was also attempted to determine if there is any ear effect on latency and amplitude measures across the phases of menstrual cycle. FFR was recorded in 20 females in the age range of 18-25 years in the four menstrual cycles [Phase I-menses (day 1-3), Phase II-proliferative phase (day 11-14), Phase III-mid-luteal phase (day 17-22) and Phase IV-pre-menstrual phase (day 25-27)]. The results of the study showed that there was significant reduction in latencies and slight increase in amplitude during menses and mid-luteal phase compared to mid-cycle and pre-menstruation cycles. The present study supports the hypothesis that difference in the levels of sex hormones in women during menstrual cycle can affect brainstem encoding of speech stimuli.

  8. Lightweight, Economical Device Alleviates Drop Foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deis, B. C.

    1983-01-01

    Corrective apparatus alleviates difficulties in walking for victims of drop foot. Elastic line attached to legband provides flexible support to toe of shoe. Device used with flat (heelless) shoes, sneakers, crepe-soled shoes, canvas shoes, and many other types of shoes not usable with short leg brace.

  9. Alleviation of Communication Apprehension: An Individualized Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Arden K.

    Communication apprehension (CA) affects from 15% to 20% of the college population, indicating inherent problems of negative cognitive appraisal, conditioned anxiety, or skills deficits. Use of an individualized approach to the alleviation of CA has been shown to increase students' class interaction and to improve their verbal skills. During an…

  10. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  11. Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-Term

    MedlinePlus

    ... myhealthfinder Immunization Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-termJust about everyone has had a " ... time or another. But sudden severe abdominal pain (stomach pain), also called acute pain, shouldn't be ...

  12. Ketamine Metabolites for the Treatment of Depression and Pain | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute on Aging, Laboratory of Clinical Investigation, is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop ketamine metabolites for the treatment of different forms of depression and for alleviating pain.

  13. Menstrual cycle phase affects discrimination of infant cuteness.

    PubMed

    Lobmaier, Janek S; Probst, Fabian; Perrett, David I; Heinrichs, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that women are more sensitive than men to subtle cuteness differences in infant faces. It has been suggested that raised levels in estradiol and progesterone may be responsible for this advantage. We compared young women's sensitivity to computer-manipulated baby faces varying in cuteness. Thirty-six women were tested once during ovulation and once during the luteal phase of their menstrual cycle. In a two alternative forced-choice experiment, participants chose the baby which they thought was cuter (Task 1), younger (Task 2), or the baby that they would prefer to babysit (Task 3). Saliva samples to assess levels of estradiol, progesterone and testosterone were collected at each test session. During ovulation, women were more likely to choose the cuter baby than during the luteal phase, in all three tasks. These results suggest that cuteness discrimination may be driven by cyclic hormonal shifts. However none of the measured hormones were related to increased cuteness sensitivity. We speculate that other hormones than the ones measured here might be responsible for the increased sensitivity to subtle cuteness differences during ovulation.

  14. Hormonal contraceptives, menstrual cycle and brain response to faces

    PubMed Central

    Marečková, Klara; Perrin, Jennifer S.; Nawaz Khan, Irum; Lawrence, Claire; Dickie, Erin; McQuiggan, Doug A.

    2014-01-01

    Both behavioral and neuroimaging evidence support a female advantage in the perception of human faces. Here we explored the possibility that this relationship may be partially mediated by female sex hormones by investigating the relationship between the brain’s response to faces and the use of oral contraceptives, as well as the phase of the menstrual cycle. First, functional magnetic resonance images were acquired in 20 young women [10 freely cycling and 10 taking oral contraception (OC)] during two phases of their cycle: mid-cycle and menstruation. We found stronger neural responses to faces in the right fusiform face area (FFA) in women taking oral contraceptives (vs freely cycling women) and during mid-cycle (vs menstruation) in both groups. Mean blood oxygenation level-dependent response in both left and right FFA increased as function of the duration of OC use. Next, this relationship between the use of OC and FFA response was replicated in an independent sample of 110 adolescent girls. Finally in a parallel behavioral study carried out in another sample of women, we found no evidence of differences in the pattern of eye movements while viewing faces between freely cycling women vs those taking oral contraceptives. The imaging findings might indicate enhanced processing of social cues in women taking OC and women during mid-cycle. PMID:23175677

  15. Hormonal contraceptives, menstrual cycle and brain response to faces.

    PubMed

    Marecková, Klara; Perrin, Jennifer S; Nawaz Khan, Irum; Lawrence, Claire; Dickie, Erin; McQuiggan, Doug A; Paus, Tomás

    2014-02-01

    Both behavioral and neuroimaging evidence support a female advantage in the perception of human faces. Here we explored the possibility that this relationship may be partially mediated by female sex hormones by investigating the relationship between the brain's response to faces and the use of oral contraceptives, as well as the phase of the menstrual cycle. First, functional magnetic resonance images were acquired in 20 young women [10 freely cycling and 10 taking oral contraception (OC)] during two phases of their cycle: mid-cycle and menstruation. We found stronger neural responses to faces in the right fusiform face area (FFA) in women taking oral contraceptives (vs freely cycling women) and during mid-cycle (vs menstruation) in both groups. Mean blood oxygenation level-dependent response in both left and right FFA increased as function of the duration of OC use. Next, this relationship between the use of OC and FFA response was replicated in an independent sample of 110 adolescent girls. Finally in a parallel behavioral study carried out in another sample of women, we found no evidence of differences in the pattern of eye movements while viewing faces between freely cycling women vs those taking oral contraceptives. The imaging findings might indicate enhanced processing of social cues in women taking OC and women during mid-cycle.

  16. Menstrual cycle influence on cognitive function and emotion processing—from a reproductive perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sundström Poromaa, Inger; Gingnell, Malin

    2014-01-01

    The menstrual cycle has attracted research interest ever since the 1930s. For many researchers the menstrual cycle is an excellent model of ovarian steroid influence on emotion, behavior, and cognition. Over the past years methodological improvements in menstrual cycle studies have been noted, and this review summarizes the findings of methodologically sound menstrual cycle studies in healthy women. Whereas the predominant hypotheses of the cognitive field state that sexually dimorphic cognitive skills that favor men are improved during menstrual cycle phases with low estrogen and that cognitive skills that favor women are improved during cycle phases with increased estrogen and/or progesterone, this review has not found sufficient evidence to support any of these hypotheses. Mental rotation has gained specific interest in this aspect, but a meta-analysis yielded a standardized mean difference in error rate of 1.61 (95% CI −0.35 to 3.57), suggesting, at present, no favor of an early follicular phase improvement in mental rotation performance. Besides the sexually dimorphic cognitive skills, studies exploring menstrual cycle effects on tasks that probe prefrontal cortex function, for instance verbal or spatial working memory, have also been reviewed. While studies thus far are few, results at hand suggest improved performance at times of high estradiol levels. Menstrual cycle studies on emotional processing, on the other hand, tap into the emotional disorders of the luteal phase, and may be of relevance for women with premenstrual disorders. Although evidence at present is limited, it is suggested that emotion recognition, consolidation of emotional memories, and fear extinction is modulated by the menstrual cycle in women. With the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging, several studies report changes in brain reactivity across the menstrual cycle, most notably increased amygdala reactivity in the luteal phase. Thus, to the extent that behavioral changes

  17. The relationship between food frequency and menstrual distress in high school females

    PubMed Central

    Mohamadirizi, Soheila; Kordi, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nutrition pattern is one of the important factors predicting menstrual distress, which varies among different cultures and countries. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between food frequency and menstrual distress in high school girls from Mashhad. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 using a two-stage sampling method on 407 high school female students from Mashhad who met the inclusion criteria. Subjects completed questionnaires of demographic characteristics, food frequency, and Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ) during three phases of the menstrual cycle (a week before bleeding, during menstrual bleeding period, and a week after menstruation). The collected data were analyzed by statistical tests such as Pearson correlation coefficient test, independent Student's t-test, and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: Results showed that 87.7% of the students were at moderate economic status, 82.2% were exposed to cigarette smoke, 94.8% had mothers without university education, and 9.4% had working mothers. About 71% of the students reported minor pre-menstruation distress, 81% reported minor distress during bleeding, and 39% reported minor post-menstruation distress. In addition, the mean (SD) values for sweet–fatty foods, salty–fatty foods, fast foods, and caffeine were 3.6, 3.3, 1.3, and 10.2 per week, respectively. In addition, Pearson correlation coefficient test showed no significant correlation between total menstruation distress and food frequency (P > 0.05). Conclusions: With regard to the inappropriate food frequency and high intensity of menstrual distress among high school students and as health care and educational efforts for prevention and health promotion in society are among the duties of health workers, the results of this study can help the officials involved in education to emphasize on nutrition and the menstrual health of students. PMID:26793254

  18. Uterine leiomyoma and its association with menstrual pattern and history of depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate injections

    PubMed Central

    Amanti, L; Sadeghi-Bazargani, H; Abdollahi, H; Ehdaeivand, F

    2011-01-01

    Background and aim: Despite the high prevalence of uterine leiomyoma, according to recent review studies there is uncertainty and a paucity of information regarding its predisposing or protective factors. The aim of this study was to assess the possible association between menstrual cycle pattern and occurrence of surgically treated myomas and also to check if depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) injection earlier in reproductive life can affect the later occurrence of myomas needing surgical treatment. Methods: In a case–control study in Ardabil, 85 women with definite diagnosis of surgically treated uterine leiomyoma and 154 community controls were enrolled. Possible predictors of myoma including menstrual cycle and menstrual bleeding patterns were assessed. Data were analyzed using SPSS software (SPSS, IBM, Somers, NY). Odds ratios were used as the main statistic in assessing the strength of observed associations. Results: Mean age of the participants was 41.8 ± 8.5 years. Length of menstrual cycle was associated with myoma and a higher likelihood of myoma was observed among those having shorter menstrual cycles (P < 0.05). Number of menstrual bleeding days was also associated with surgically treated myoma and longer bleeding periods increased the likelihood of myoma (P < 0.05). Only one of the eight women who had a history of depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate injections had developed surgically treated uterine leiomyoma and the others belonged to the control group without a history of surgical treatment for uterine leiomyoma. Conclusion: Menstrual cycle pattern is associated with developing leiomyomas requiring surgical treatment. DMPA, other than its role in myoma treatment, is also assumed to have a role in preventing myomas, but due to the small sample size in this study, larger scale prospective trials are needed in the future. PMID:21845062

  19. Physical activity of adult female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) across the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Hunnell, Nathan A; Rockcastle, Nathan J; McCormick, Kristen N; Sinko, Laurel K; Sullivan, Elinor L; Cameron, Judy L

    2007-06-01

    Physical activity is an important physiological variable impacting on a number of systems in the body. In rodents and several species of domestic animals, levels of physical activity have been reported to vary across the estrous cycle; however, it is unclear whether such changes in activity occur in women and other primates across the menstrual cycle. To determine whether significant changes in activity occur over the menstrual cycle, we continuously measured physical activity in seven adult female rhesus monkeys by accelerometry over the course of one menstrual cycle. Monkeys were checked daily for menses, and daily blood samples were collected for measurement of reproductive hormones. All monkeys displayed ovulatory menstrual cycles, ranging from 23 to 31 days in length. There was a significant increase in estradiol from the early follicular phase to the day of ovulation (F(1.005,5.023) = 40.060, P = 0.001). However, there was no significant change in physical activity across the menstrual cycle (F(2,12) = 0.225, P = 0.802), with activity levels being similar in the early follicular phase, on the day of the preovulatory rise in estradiol and during the midluteal phase. Moreover, the physical activity of these monkeys was not outside the range of physical activity that we measured in 15 ovariectomized monkeys. We conclude that, in primates, physical activity does not change across the menstrual cycle and is not influenced by physiological changes in circulating estradiol. This finding will allow investigators to record physical activity in female primates without the concern of controlling for the phase of the menstrual cycle.

  20. Low back pain - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    Nonspecific back pain; Backache - chronic; Lumbar pain - chronic; Pain - back - chronic; Chronic back pain - low ... Low back pain is common. Almost everyone has back pain at some time in their life. Often, the exact cause of ...

  1. Effectiveness of pain management following electrical injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Adrienne L K; Gomez, Manuel; Fish, Joel S

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of pain management after electrical injury. A retrospective hospital chart review was conducted among electrically injured patients discharged from the outpatient burn clinic of a rehabilitation hospital (July 1, 1999, to July 31, 2008). Demographic data, numeric pain ratings (NPRs) at initial assessment and discharge, medications, nonpharmacologic modalities, and their effects before admission and after rehabilitation were collected. Pain management effects were compared between high (> or =1000 v) and low (<1000 v) voltage, and between electrical contact and electrical flash patients, using Student's t-test and chi, with a P < .05 considered significant. Of 82 electrical patients discharged during the study period, 27 were excluded because of incomplete data, leaving 55 patients who had a mean age +/-SD of 40.7 +/- 11.3 years, TBSA of 19.2 +/- 22.7%, and treatment duration of 16.5 +/- 15.7 months. The majority were men (90.9%), most injuries occurred at work (98.2%), mainly caused by low voltage (n = 32, 58.2%), and the rest caused by high voltage (n = 18, 32.7%). Electrical contact was more common (54.5%) than electrical flash (45.5%). Pain was a chief complaint (92.7%), and hands were the most affected (61.8%), followed by head and neck (38.2%), shoulders (38.2%), and back torso (38.2%). Before rehabilitation, the most common medication were opioids (61.8%), relieving pain in 82.4%, followed by acetaminophen (47.3%) alleviating pain in 84.6%. Heat treatment was the most common nonpharmacologic modality (20.0%) relieving pain in 81.8%, followed by massage therapy (14.5%) alleviating pain in 75.0%. During the rehabilitation program, antidepressants were the most common medication (74.5%), relieving pain in 22.0%, followed by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (61.8%), alleviating pain in 70.6%. Massage therapy was the most common nonpharmacologic modality (60.0%), alleviating pain in 75.8%, and then

  2. Neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Colloca, Luana; Ludman, Taylor; Bouhassira, Didier; Baron, Ralf; Dickenson, Anthony H.; Yarnitsky, David; Freeman, Roy; Truini, Andrea; Attal, Nadine; Finnerup, Nanna B.; Eccleston, Christopher; Kalso, Eija; Bennett, David L.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Raja, Srinivasa N.

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory system, including peripheral fibres (Aβ, Aδ and C fibres) and central neurons, and affects 7–10% of the general population. Multiple causes of neuropathic pain have been described and its incidence is likely to increase owing to the ageing global population, increased incidence of diabetes mellitus and improved survival from cancer after chemotherapy. Indeed, imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory somatosensory signalling, alterations in ion channels and variability in the way that pain messages are modulated in the central nervous system all have been implicated in neuropathic pain. The burden of chronic neuropathic pain seems to be related to the complexity of neuropathic symptoms, poor outcomes and difficult treatment decisions. Importantly, quality of life is impaired in patients with neuropathic pain owing to increased drug prescriptions and visits to health care providers, as well as the morbidity from the pain itself and the inciting disease. Despite challenges, progress in the understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain is spurring the development of new diagnostic procedures and personalized interventions, which emphasize the need for a multidisciplinary approach to the management of neuropathic pain. PMID:28205574

  3. Central pain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Supreet

    2014-12-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The topic addressed in this issue is central pain, a neuropathic pain syndrome caused by a lesion in the brain or spinal cord that sensitizes one's perception of pain. It is a debilitating condition caused by various diseases such as multiple sclerosis, strokes, spinal cord injuries, or brain tumors. Varied symptoms and the use of pharmacological medicines and nonpharmacological therapies will be addressed.

  4. Gust Alleviation Using Direct Gust Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Sven Marco

    2000-01-01

    The increasing competition in the market of civil aircraft leads to operating efficiency and passenger comfort being very important sales arguments. Continuous developments in jet propulsion technology helped to reduce energy consumption, as well as noise and vibrations due to the engines. The main problem with respect to ride comfort is, however, the transmittance of accelerations and jerkiness imposed by atmospheric turbulence from the wings to the fuselage. This 'gust' is also a design constraint: Light airplane structures help to save, energy, but are more critical to resist the loads imposed by turbulence. For both reasons, efficient gust alleviation is necessary to improve the performance of modern aircraft. Gust can be seen as a change in the angle of attack or as an additional varying vertical component of the headwind. The effect of gust can be very strong, since the same aerodynamic forces that keep the airplane flying are involved. Event though the frequency range of those changes is quite low, it is impossible for the pilot to alleviate gust manually. Besides, most of the time during the flight, the, autopilot maintains course and the attitude of flight. Certainly, most autopilots should be capable of damping the roughest parts of turbulence, but they are unable to provide satisfactory results in that field. A promising extension should be the application of subsidiary, control, where the inner (faster) control loop alleviates turbulence and the outer (slower) loop controls the attitude of flight. Besides the mentioned ride comfort, another reason for gust alleviation with respect to the fuselage is the sensibility of electrical devices to vibration and high values of acceleration. Many modern airplane designs--especially inherently instable military aircraft--are highly dependent on avionics. The lifetime and the reliability of these systems is thus essential.

  5. Endocannabinoid Regulation in Human Endometrium Across the Menstrual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Scotchie, Jessica G.; Savaris, Ricardo F.; Martin, Caitlin E.

    2015-01-01

    Humans produce endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), a group of molecules that activate the same receptors as tetrahydrocannabinol. Endocannabinoids play important roles in reproduction in multiple species, but data in human endometrium are limited. Because endocannabinoids such as anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) often act within tissues as paracrine factors, their effects can be modulated by changes in expression of locally produced synthetic and degradative/oxidative enzymes. The objective of this study was to localize and quantify expression of these key synthetic and degradative/oxidative enzymes for AEA and 2-AG in human endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle. Key synthetic enzymes include N-arachidonyl-phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase-D (NAPE-PLD), diacylglycerol-lipase a (DAGL-α, and DAGL-β. Key degradative enzymes include fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL); cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) is an oxidative enzyme. Endometrial samples were collected in 49 regularly cycling, normal women. Protein localization and expression were achieved by immunohistochemistry and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. No significant cycle-dependent mRNA expression was observed except that of COX2 (P = .002), which demonstrated maximum expression in the proliferative phase. During the secretory phase, NAPE-PLD protein had increased expression in luminal (P = .001), stromal (P = .007), and glandular (P = .04) epithelia, while FAAH had increased glandular (P = .009) and luminal (P = .01) expression. Increased expression in glandular epithelia was identified for MAGL (P = .03). The COX2 had increased luminal expression during the early secretory phase (P < .0001). In conclusion, maximal expression of degradatory/oxidative enzymes in the secretory phase may foster decreased endocannabinoid tone during implantation. PMID:24819878

  6. Endometrial ablation as a treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding.

    PubMed

    Glazerman, Larry R

    2013-09-01

    Until the 1980s, the only available definitive treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) was hysterectomy, usually performed abdominally, and sometimes vaginally. Historically, multiple attempts to effect ablation of the endometrium were developed, including using steam and toxic chemicals, such as chloriquine. The advent of Nd-YAG laser endometrial ablation in the mid-1980s offered the first minimally invasive alternative to hysterectomy for the treatment of HMB. Nd-YAG ablation, however, was expensive, cumbersome, and difficult to learn; rollerball resectoscopic ablation was initially described by DeCherney in 1987, and soon overtook laser as the main method of ablation, although adoption continued to be limited because of the hysteroscopic skills necessary to perform the technique were not widely available. In 1994, the first "global" endometrial ablation, the Thermachoice™ (Ethicon Women's Health and Urology, Somerville, NJ) balloon was introduced in the U.S. Soon thereafter, four other techniques were introduced, namely microwave (MEA™, Microsulis, Hampshire, UK), circulating hot water (HTA™, Boston Scientific, Boston, MA), cryo-ablation (HerOption™, CooperSurgical, Trumbull, CT), and bipolar radiofrequency (Novasure™, Hologic, Bedford, MA). All of these techniques are done in an outpatient setting, often office-based, with little or no anesthesia, and success rates ranging from 50% to 70% amenorrhea, and 80% to 95% patient satisfaction. Although there have been few head-to-head comparisons of various techniques, current data suggests that they are all relatively effective, quite safe, and well-tolerated. This article describes the history and development of various ablation technologies, and explores each technique in depth, including published data, indications, risks, and benefits.

  7. The cortisol awakening response (CAR) across the female menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Maren; Bellingrath, Silja; Kudielka, Brigitte M

    2011-07-01

    The cortisol awakening response (CAR) has been established as a useful marker of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and has become a standard tool for stress research in ambulatory settings. Although much knowledge has been accumulated on a variety of factors modulating the CAR, the impact of the female menstrual cycle, especially during ovulation, still remains unclear. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that measured the CAR during menses, the follicular phase, ovulation and the luteal phase in a repeated measurement design. For this purpose, a final sample of 29 naturally cycling, healthy, non-smoking, and medication-free women collected saliva samples directly after awakening as well as 30, 45, and 60 min later during each of the four different phases. To determine the timing of ovulation, an ambulatory chromatographic ovulation test kit was applied. A repeated measurements ANOVA resulted in a significant interaction effect sample × cycle phase (p=0.04), with the highest awakening response during ovulation. While awakening cortisol levels were comparable across the four cycle phases (p=n.s.), the net increase was significantly elevated during ovulation (p=0.05). Our data also confirmed earlier cross-sectional results reporting no differences in the CAR between the follicular and luteal phase. Finally, a concurrent assessment of mood applying the POMS (Profile of Mood States) yielded no differences across the four cycle phases (all p=n.s.). In sum, the present data points to the idea that the CAR is elevated during ovulation, an effect which is presumably mediated by elevated sex steroid levels during the ovulation period.

  8. In-vivo Dynamics of the Human Hippocampus across the Menstrual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Claudia; Steele, Christopher J; Mueller, Karsten; Rekkas, Vivien P.; Arélin, Katrin; Pampel, Andre; Burmann, Inga; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Villringer, Arno; Sacher, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormones fluctuate during the menstrual cycle. Evidence from animal studies suggests similar subtle fluctuations in hippocampal structure, predominantly linked to estrogen. Hippocampal abnormalities have been observed in several neuropsychiatric pathologies with prominent sexual dimorphism. Yet, the potential impact of subtle sex-hormonal fluctuations on human hippocampal structure in health is unclear. We tested the feasibility of longitudinal neuroimaging in conjunction with rigorous menstrual cycle monitoring to evaluate potential changes in hippocampal microstructure associated with physiological sex-hormonal changes. Thirty longitudinal diffusion weighted imaging scans of a single healthy female subject were acquired across two full menstrual cycles. We calculated hippocampal fractional anisotropy (FA), a measure sensitive to changes in microstructural integrity, and investigated potential correlations with estrogen. We observed a significant positive correlation between FA values and estrogen in the hippocampus bilaterally, revealing a peak in FA closely paralleling ovulation. This exploratory, single-subject study demonstrates the feasibility of a longitudinal DWI scanning protocol across the menstrual cycle and is the first to link subtle endogenous hormonal fluctuations to changes in FA in vivo. In light of recent attempts to neurally phenotype single humans, our findings highlight menstrual cycle monitoring in parallel with highly sampled individual neuroimaging data to address fundamental questions about the dynamics of plasticity in the adult brain. PMID:27713470

  9. Differential expression of extracellular matrix components in the Fallopian tubes throughout the menstrual cycle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the unique characteristics of the female genital tract is the extensive tissue remodeling observed throughout the menstrual cycle. Multiple components of the extracellular matrix take part in this tissue rebuilding; however, the individual components involved have not been identified. Methods In the present study, the expression of extracellular matrix proteins and selected matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activities in Fallopian tubes (FT) throughout the menstrual cycle were examined by PCR array, immunocytochemistry, zymography and bioinformatics. Results Of the eighty-four genes analyzed, eighty-three were expressed in the FT during at least one stage of the menstrual cycle. We observed a significant increase (>/=2-fold) in ADAMTS1, ADAMTS13, COL7A1, MMP3, MMP9, PECAM1, and THBS3 in the periovulatory phase compared to the follicular phase. Meanwhile, we observed a significant decrease (>/= 2-fold) in COL7A1, ICAM1, ITGA8, MMP16, MMP9, CLEC3B, SELE and TIMP2 in the lutheal phase compared to the periovulatory phase. Immunocytochemistry showed that MMP-3 and MMP-9 were localized in the endosalpinx during all phases of the menstrual cycle. Gelatin zymograms detected non-cycle-dependent protease activity. Conclusions Several extracellular matrix components were regulated throughout the menstrual cycle in a cyclic pattern, suggesting a possible steroid regulation and a role in tissue remodeling and FT functions. PMID:22897899

  10. Blood pressure and renal haemodynamic response to salt during the normal menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Pechère-Bertschi, A; Maillard, M; Stalder, H; Brunner, H R; Burnier, M

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate prospectively blood pressure and the renal haemodynamic response to salt during the normal menstrual cycle. A total of 35 healthy normotensive young women not on oral contraceptives were enrolled; 17 were studied in the follicular phase and 18 in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. The women in each group were then randomly allocated to receive a low-sodium (40 mmol/day) or a high-sodium (250 mmol/day) diet for a 7-day period in two consecutive menstrual cycles. At the end of each dietary period, 24 h ambulatory blood pressure, urinary sodium excretion, plasma renin activity, plasma catecholamine levels and renal haemodynamics were measured. Our results show that the blood pressure response to salt is comparable during the luteal and the follicular phases of the normal menstrual cycle and is characterized by a salt-resistant pattern. In the kidney, effective renal plasma flow was significantly greater and the filtration fraction lower (P<0.05) after salt loading in women studied in the luteal phase compared with women investigated in the follicular phase. This study thus demonstrates that the female hormone status does not affect the blood pressure response to sodium in young normotensive women. However, in contrast with systemic haemodynamics, the renal response to salt varies during the normal menstrual cycle, suggesting that female sex hormones play a role (direct or indirect) in the regulation of renal haemodynamics.

  11. The impact of self-perceived job stress on menstrual patterns among Taiwanese nurses.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Tsui; Lin, Li-Chan; Shiao, Judith S C

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of self-reported job stress on menstrual patterns among nurses. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of nursing staff from five psychiatric institutions and four general hospitals in Taiwan. A total of 746 participants were eligible for the final analysis, among whom, 72.3% were ascertained as having a self-perceived high level of job stress. Self-perceived high job stress was significantly associated with irregular menstrual cycles [Adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 4.8, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.3-7.2] and longer menstrual bleeding periods (more than 7 d) [AOR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.7-3.7], but was not significantly related to long or short menstrual cycles. Overall, this study suggests that nurses' self-perceived job stress may be associated with certain aspects of menstrual dysfunction. Further investigations with prospective follow-up studies and urine hormonal measurements are now recommended to provide additional insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms of our findings.

  12. The menstrual cycle regularization following D-chiro-inositol treatment in PCOS women: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    La Marca, Antonio; Grisendi, Valentina; Dondi, Giulia; Sighinolfi, Giovanna; Cianci, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is characterized by irregular cycles, hyperandrogenism, polycystic ovary at ultrasound and insulin resistance. The effectiveness of D-chiro-inositol (DCI) treatment in improving insulin resistance in PCOS patients has been confirmed in several reports. The objective of this study was to retrospectively analyze the effect of DCI on menstrual cycle regularity in PCOS women. This was a retrospective study of patients with irregular cycles who were treated with DCI. Of all PCOS women admitted to our centre, 47 were treated with DCI and had complete medical charts. The percentage of women reporting regular menstrual cycles significantly increased with increasing duration of DCI treatment (24% and 51.6% at a mean of 6 and 15 months of treatment, respectively). Serum AMH levels and indexes of insulin resistance significantly decreased during the treatment. Low AMH levels, high HOMA index, and the presence of oligomenorrhea at the first visit were the independent predictors of obtaining regular menstrual cycle with DCI. In conclusion, the use of DCI is associated to clinical benefits for many women affected by PCOS including the improvement in insulin resistance and menstrual cycle regularity. Responders to the treatment may be identified on the basis of menstrual irregularity and hormonal or metabolic markers.

  13. Prolonged menstruation and increased menstrual blood with generalized δ electroencephalogram power: A case report.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fenghua; Zhang, Lianping

    2014-03-01

    Estradiol changes associated with the menstrual cycle have a great impact on brain activation. δ frequency mainly appears during normal sleep status or brain injury diseases, including encephalitis and mental confusion. The current case report presents a 51-year-old female with prolonged menstruation and increased menstrual blood volume whose electroencephalogram (EEG) recording demonstrated a rare generalized 3 Hz δ frequency band in the waking status. The patient had been suffering from heart palpitations and dizziness for 6 months and was receiving treatment in the Department of Neurology (Second Xiangya Hospital). The individual had been experiencing prolonged menstruation and increased menstrual blood volume for 6 years. Gynecologial examination revealed secondary anemia and hysteromyoma. Hemoglobin levels were decreased to 69 g/l. Physical and neurological examinations, and computed tomography results appeared normal. The EEG recording indicated a generalized 3 Hz δ frequency band with 30-80 μV power and a long-range δ frequency band when the patient was hyperventilating. The prolonged menstruation and increased menstrual blood volume may have induced the generalized δ frequency without brain injury. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first formal case report of prolonged menstruation and increased menstrual blood volume with the abnormality of δ EEG power.

  14. Diabetic neuropathic pain: Physiopathology and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Anne K; Nones, Carina FM; Reis, Renata C; Chichorro, Juliana G; Cunha, Joice M

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, which affects over 90% of the diabetic patients. Although pain is one of the main symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, its pathophysiological mechanisms are not yet fully known. It is widely accepted that the toxic effects of hyperglycemia play an important role in the development of this complication, but several other hypotheses have been postulated. The management of diabetic neuropathic pain consists basically in excluding other causes of painful peripheral neuropathy, improving glycemic control as a prophylactic therapy and using medications to alleviate pain. First line drugs for pain relief include anticonvulsants, such as pregabalin and gabapentin and antidepressants, especially those that act to inhibit the reuptake of serotonin and noradrenaline. In addition, there is experimental and clinical evidence that opioids can be helpful in pain control, mainly if associated with first line drugs. Other agents, including for topical application, such as capsaicin cream and lidocaine patches, have also been proposed to be useful as adjuvants in the control of diabetic neuropathic pain, but the clinical evidence is insufficient to support their use. In conclusion, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying diabetic neuropathic pain will contribute to the search of new therapies, but also to the improvement of the guidelines to optimize pain control with the drugs currently available. PMID:25897354

  15. Pregnancy-related low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Katonis, P; Kampouroglou, A; Aggelopoulos, A; Kakavelakis, K; Lykoudis, S; Makrigiannakis, A; Alpantaki, K

    2011-01-01

    Pregnancy related low back pain is a common complaint among pregnant women. It can potentially have a negative impact on their quality of life. The aim of this article is to present a current review of the literature concerning this issue. By using PubMed database and low back pain, pelvic girdle pain, pregnancy as keywords, abstracts and original articles in English investigating the diagnosis treatment of back pain during pregnancy were searched and analyzed Low back pain could present as either a pelvic girdle pain between the posterior iliac crest and the gluteal fold or as a lumbar pain over and around the lumbar spine. The source of the pain should be diagnosed and differentiated early.The appropriate treatment aims to reduce the discomfort and the impact on the pregnant womans quality of life. This article reveals the most common risk factors, as well as treatment methods, which may help to alleviate the pain. Some suggestions for additional research are also discussed. PMID:22435016

  16. [Facial pain].

    PubMed

    Makhinov, K A; Barinov, A N; Zhestikova, M G; Mingazova, L R; Parkhomenko, E V

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of facial pain is a problem for physicians of different specialties (neurologists, dentists, surgeons, oculists, otolaryngologists and psychiatrists). A classification of this pathology is far from ideal and an interdisciplinary comprehensive approach is needed. Current approaches to etiotropic, symptomatic and pathogenetic treatment of patients with most frequent variants of orofacial pain are presented.

  17. [Heel pain].

    PubMed

    Cizmár, I; Svizenská, I; Pilný, J; Repko, M; Ira, D

    2005-01-01

    Heel pain is quite frequent clinical symptom in our population. Successful therapy derives from the problem aetiology. The most frequent source of pain is the mechanical basis, both on dorsal and plantar side of calcaneum. Therapy includes a variety of procedures, from routine measures to surgical intervention.

  18. Sensitivity of the late positive potentials evoked by emotional pictures to neuroticism during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Zhou, Renlai; Wang, Qingguo; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Yanfeng

    2013-10-11

    The present event-related potentials (ERPs) study set out to investigate the effect of neuroticism on emotion evaluation during the menstrual cycle, with high and low neuroticism females viewing and evaluating valence and arousal of emotional pictures in the menstruation, late follicular and luteal phases. Behavioral results revealed no group or phase effect. ERPs data showed modulations of the menstrual cycle and neuroticism on the late positive potential (LPP), with the larger LPP (300-1000 ms post-stimulus) during the late follicular phase than that during the luteal phase and larger LPP (1000-3000 ms post-stimulus) in the high neuroticism group than that in the low neuroticism group. Furthermore, significant positive correlations between the LPP amplitudes and valence and arousal evaluations were observed mainly in the high neuroticism group. The present study provides electrophysiological evidences that the LPP evoked by emotional pictures are modulated both by the menstrual cycle and neuroticism.

  19. Reusable sanitary towels: promoting menstrual hygiene in post-earthquake Nepal.

    PubMed

    Budhathoki, Shyam Sundar; Bhattachan, Meika; Pokharel, Paras K; Bhadra, Madhurima; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2016-08-09

    It is a normal human tendency to 'run for your life' when an earthquake occurs. Adolescent girls and women of reproductive age leave their homes with only the clothes they are wearing to save their own and their families' lives. Immediate disaster relief aid with its (unintentional) lack of gender sensitivity has little or no materials for the appropriate management of menstrual hygiene. The biological needs of disaster-affected women will not change despite the dire need for basic food, shelter and security. Timely identification and preparation beforehand with appropriate and culturally sensitive techniques and locally available materials that are reusable can help introduce sustainable and acceptable means of managing menstrual hygiene in a crisis. The use of reusable sanitary towels is well accepted for menstrual hygiene management in non-disaster situations and is appropriate in post-earthquake relief in Nepal.

  20. [Vitex Agnus Castus in the treatment of hyperprolactinemia and menstrual disorders - a case report].

    PubMed

    Męczekalski, Błażej; Czyżyk, Adam

    2015-07-01

    We describe a patient with mild hyperprolactinemia and menstrual disorders (oligomenorrhea). She presented relative hypoestrogenism in laboratory tests. Magnetic resonans excluded the presence of pituitary adenoma. Because patient developed a bromocriptine intolerance, the Vitex Agnus Castus (VAC) extract has been introduced. The VAC therapy was effective, with symptoms relief and improvement of hormonal tests. The VAC medicines are indicated for the treatment of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), mastalgia, menstrual disorders and mild hyperprolactinemia. The mechanism of action is not fully understood, but it is related to dopaniergic activity of diterpenes and castacin in VAC. The randomized clinical trials revealed efficacy of VAC extract in the treatmet of hyperprolactinemia, menstrual disorders, PMS and mastalgia. Good tolerability, lack of serious side-effects and drug interactions are the advantages of the VAC preparations.

  1. Menstruation in girls and adolescents: using the menstrual cycle as a vital sign.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Angela; Laufer, Marc R; Breech, Lesley L

    2006-11-01

    Young patients and their parents often are unsure about what represents normal menstrual patterns, and clinicians also may be unsure about normal ranges for menstrual cycle length and amount and duration of flow through adolescence. It is important to be able to educate young patients and their parents regarding what to expect of a first period and about the range for normal cycle length of subsequent menses. It is equally important for clinicians to have an understanding of bleeding patterns in girls and adolescents, the ability to differentiate between normal and abnormal menstruation, and the skill to know how to evaluate young patients' conditions appropriately. Using the menstrual cycle as an additional vital sign adds a powerful tool to the assessment of normal development and the exclusion of pathological conditions.

  2. Cervicogenic headache alleviation after cervical coblation nucleoplasty

    PubMed Central

    He, Liangliang; Yue, Jianning; Yang, Liqiang; Wu, Baishan; Cao, Guoqing; Guo, Yuna; Lai, Guanghui; Tang, Yuanzhang; Ni, Jiaxiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A degenerative cervical disc is a pain generator for headaches, and headaches can benefit from cervical prolapse surgery. However, as an alternative intervention for open cervical surgery, no study has reported whether headaches can benefit from cervical nucleoplasty. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cervical coblation nucleoplasty in the treatment of cervicogenic headaches. In a prospective cohort study performed between December 2013 and August 2015, 20 patients with cervicogenic headaches undergoing cervical nucleoplasty for shoulder-arm pain were recruited into group C, and 20 patients with cervicogenic headaches undergoing lumbar nucleoplasty for low back pain, matched for age and sex, were recruited into group L. Cervicogenic pain was diagnosed according to the International Headache Society criteria. During the 24-month follow-up, pain visual analog scale (VAS) scores were collected as the primary outcomes, and significant pain relief rate, Neck Disability Index (NDI) headache scores, and Patients Satisfaction Index (PSI) scores were recorded as secondary outcomes to evaluate headache severity and physical function postoperatively. During the 24-month follow-up, a significant decrease in headache VAS scores was observed in group C but not in group L. NDI and PSI scores in group C were better than those in group L. In comparison with the final follow-up, no significant differences in the NDI and PSI scores were found in all observations after surgery. In comparison to group L, ≥50% pain relief was significantly better in group C. No serious complications were observed except for ≤20% of ecchymoma at the needle insertion site. This prospective study indicated that cervicogenic headaches may benefit from nucleoplasty. PMID:27684803

  3. Targeting temporomandibular disorder pain treatment to hormonal fluctuations: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Turner, Judith A; Mancl, Lloyd; Huggins, Kimberly Hanson; Sherman, Jeffrey J; Lentz, Gretchen; LeResche, Linda

    2011-09-01

    Mounting evidence supports the importance of hormonal fluctuations in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain among women. Stabilizing influential hormones or having a plan and skills for coping with hormonally related increases in TMD pain, therefore, may be beneficial for women with TMD pain. This randomized clinical trial evaluated the short- and long-term efficacy of 3 interventions for women with TMD pain: (1) dental hygienist-delivered pain self-management training (SMT; n=59); (2) the same dental hygienist-delivered pain self-management training, but with a focus on menstrual cycle-related changes in pain and other symptoms (targeted SMT, or TSMT; n=55); and (3) continuous oral contraceptive therapy (6-month trial) aimed at stabilizing hormones believed to be influential in TMD pain (COCT; n=57). Study participants completed outcome (pain, activity interference, depression) and process (pain beliefs, catastrophizing, coping effectiveness) measures before randomization, and 6 and 12months later. Intent-to-treat analyses supported the benefits of the SMT and TSMT interventions relative to COCT. Targeting the self-management treatment to menstrual cycle-related symptoms did not increase the treatment's efficacy. The benefits of the self-management interventions relative to COCT for pain and activity interference were statistically significant at 12 months, but not at 6 months, whereas the benefits for the process measures generally were apparent at both time points. COCT was associated with multiple adverse events (none serious). The study provides further support for long-term benefits of a safe, low-intensity (2 in-person sessions and 6 brief telephone contacts), dental hygienist-delivered self-management treatment for TMD pain.

  4. Targeting Temporomandibular Disorder Pain Treatment to Hormonal Fluctuations: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Judith A.; Mancl, Lloyd; Huggins, Kimberly Hanson; Sherman, Jeffrey J.; Lentz, Gretchen; LeResche, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports the importance of hormonal fluctuations in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain among women. Stabilizing influential hormones or having a plan and skills for coping with hormonally-related increases in TMD pain therefore may be beneficial for women with TMD pain. This randomized clinical trial evaluated the short- and long-term efficacy of three interventions for women with TMD pain: (1) dental hygienist-delivered pain self-management training (SMT; n = 59); (2) the same dental hygienist-delivered pain self-management training, but with a focus on menstrual cycle-related changes in pain and other symptoms (targeted SMT, or TSMT; n = 55); and (3) continuous oral contraceptive therapy (6 month trial), aimed at stabilizing hormones believed to be influential in TMD pain (COCT; n = 57). Study participants completed outcome (pain, activity interference, depression) and process (pain beliefs, catastrophizing, coping effectiveness) measures before randomization, and 6 and 12 months later. Intent-to-treat analyses supported the benefits of the SMT and TSMT interventions relative to COCT. Targeting the self-management treatment to menstrual cycle-related symptoms did not increase the treatment’s efficacy. The benefits of the self-management interventions relative to COCT for pain and activity interference were statistically significant at 12 months, but not at 6 months, whereas the benefits for the process measures generally were apparent at both timepoints. COCT was associated with multiple adverse events (none serious). The study provides further support for long-term benefits of a safe, low intensity (two in-person sessions and six brief telephone contacts), dental hygienist-delivered self-management treatment for TMD pain. PMID:21680092

  5. [Musculoskeletal pain].

    PubMed

    Casser, H-R; Schaible, H-G

    2015-10-01

    Among the clinically relevant pain conditions, pain in the musculoskeletal system is most frequent. This article reports extensive epidemiological data on musculoskeletal system pain in Germany and worldwide. Since back pain is most frequent, the diagnostics and therapeutic algorithms of acute, recurring, and chronic lower back pain in Germany will be particularly addressed. The importance of the physiologic-organic, the cognitive-emotional, the behavioral, and the social level to diagnostics and treatment will be discussed. We will also focus on osteoarthritic pain and address its epidemiology, clinical importance, and significance for the health care system. This article will list some reasons why the musculoskeletal system in particular is frequently the site of chronic pain. The authors believe that these reasons are to be sought in the complex structures of the musculoskeletal system; in the particular sensitivity of the deep somatic nociceptive system for long-term sensitization processes, as well as the ensuing nervous system reactions; and in the interactions between the nervous and immune systems. The article will give some insights into the research carried out on this topic in Germany.

  6. Fetal pain?

    PubMed

    Vanhatalo, S; van Nieuwenhuizen, O

    2000-05-01

    During the last few years a vivid debate, both scientifically and emotionally, has risen in the medical literature as to whether a fetus is able to feel pain during abortion or intrauterine surgery. This debate has mainly been inspired by the demonstration of various hormonal or motor reactions to noxious stimuli at very early stages of fetal development. The aims of this paper are to review the literature on development of the pain system in the fetus, and to speculate about the relationship between "sensing" as opposed to "feeling" pain and the number of reactions associated with painful stimuli. While a cortical processing of pain theoretically becomes possible after development of the thalamo-cortical connections in the 26th week of gestation, noxious stimuli may trigger complex reflex reactions much earlier. However, more important than possible painfulness is the fact that the noxious stimuli, by triggering stress responses, most likely affect the development of an individual at very early stages. Hence, it is not reasonable to speculate on the possible emotional experiences of pain in fetuses or premature babies. A clinically relevant aim is rather to avoid and/or treat any possibly noxious stimuli, and thereby prevent their potential adverse effects on the subsequent development.

  7. Body temperature and physical activity correlates of the menstrual cycle in Chacma Baboons (Papio hamadryas ursinus).

    PubMed

    Nyakudya, Trevor T; Fuller, Andrea; Meyer, Leith C R; Maloney, Shane K; Mitchell, Duncan

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the temporal relationship between abdominal temperature, physical activity, perineal swelling, and urinary progesterone and estradiol concentrations over the menstrual cycle in unrestrained captive baboons. Using a miniature temperature-sensitive data logger surgically implanted in the abdominal cavity and an activity data logger implanted subcutaneously on the trunk, we measured, continuously over 6 months at 10-min intervals, abdominal temperature and physical activity patterns in four female adult baboons Papio hamadryas ursinus (12.9-19.9 kg), in cages in an indoor animal facility (22-25°C). We monitored menstrual bleeding and perineal swelling changes, and measured urinary progesterone and estradiol concentrations, daily for up to 6 months, to ascertain the stage and length of the menstrual cycle. The menstrual cycle was 36 ± 2 days (mean ± SD) long and the baboons exhibited cyclic changes in perineal swellings, abdominal temperature, physical activity, urinary progesterone, and estradiol concentrations over the cycle. Mean 24-hr abdominal temperature during the luteal phase was significantly higher than during the periovulatory phase (ANOVA, F((2, 9)) = 4.7; P = 0.04), but not different to that during the proliferative phase. Physical activity followed a similar pattern, with mean 24-hr physical activity almost twice as high in the luteal than in the periovulatory phase (ANOVA, P = 0.58; F((2, 12)) = 5.8). We have characterized correlates of the menstrual cycle in baboons and shown, for the first time, a rhythm of physical activity and abdominal temperature over the menstrual cycle, with a nadir of temperature and activity at ovulation.

  8. Enhanced response to ozone exposure during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, S D; Adams, W C; Brookes, K A; Lasley, B L

    1993-01-01

    Exposure to ozone (O3), a toxic component of photochemical smog, results in significant airway inflammation, respiratory discomfort, and pulmonary function impairment. These effects can be reduced via pretreatment with anti-inflammatory agents. Progesterone, a gonadal steroid, is known to reduce general inflammation in the uterine endometrium. However, it is not known whether fluctuations in blood levels of progesterone, which are experienced during the normal female menstrual cycle, could alter O3 inflammatory-induced pulmonary responses. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that young, adult females are more responsive to O3 inhalation with respect to pulmonary function impairment during their follicular (F) menstrual phase when progesterone levels are lowest than during their mid-luteal (ML) phase when progesterone levels are highest. Nine subjects with normal ovarian function were exposed in random order for 1 hr each to filtered air and to 0.30 ppm O3 in their F and ML menstrual phases. Ozone responsiveness was measured by percent change in pulmonary function from pre- to postexposure. Significant gas concentration effects (filtered air versus O3) were observed for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), and forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% of FVC (FEF25-75; p < .05). More importantly, the pulmonary function flow rates, FEV1 and FEF25-75, showed a significant menstrual phase and gas concentration interaction effect, with larger decrements observed in the F menstrual phase when progesterone concentrations were significantly lower. We conclude that young, adult females appear to be more responsive to acute O3 exposure during the F phase than during the ML phase of their menstrual cycles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. PMID:8404762

  9. Menstrual function among women exposed to polybrominated biphenyls: A follow-up prevalence study

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Stephanie I; Blanck, Heidi Michels; Hertzberg, Vicki S; Tolbert, Paige E; Rubin, Carol; Cameron, Lorraine L; Henderson, Alden K; Marcus, Michele

    2005-01-01

    Background Alteration in menstrual cycle function is suggested among rhesus monkeys and humans exposed to polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and structurally similar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The feedback system for menstrual cycle function potentially allows multiple pathways for disruption directly through the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis and indirectly through alternative neuroendocrine axes. Methods The Michigan Female Health Study was conducted during 1997–1998 among women in a cohort exposed to PBBs in 1973. This study included 337 women with self-reported menstrual cycles of 20–35 days (age range: 24–56 years). Current PBB levels were estimated by exponential decay modeling of serum PBB levels collected from 1976–1987 during enrollment in the Michigan PBB cohort. Linear regression models for menstrual cycle length and the logarithm of bleed length used estimated current PBB exposure or enrollment PBB exposure categorized in tertiles, and for the upper decile. All models were adjusted for serum PCB levels, age, body mass index, history of at least 10% weight loss in the past year, physical activity, smoking, education, and household income. Results Higher levels of physical activity were associated with shorter bleed length, and increasing age was associated with shorter cycle length. Although no overall association was found between PBB exposure and menstrual cycle characteristics, a significant interaction between PBB exposures with past year weight loss was found. Longer bleed length and shorter cycle length were associated with higher PBB exposure among women with past year weight loss. Conclusion This study suggests that PBB exposure may impact ovarian function as indicated by menstrual cycle length and bleed length. However, these associations were found among the small number of women with recent weight loss suggesting either a chance finding or that mobilization of PBBs from lipid stores may be important. These results should be

  10. Free vitamin D does not vary through the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Franasiak, J M; Wang, X; Molinaro, T A; Green, K; Sun, W; Werner, M D; Juneau, C R; Scott, R T

    2016-07-01

    The importance of vitamin D (25OHD) in general health and reproductive success has been a focus in the setting of the 25OHD deficiency epidemic. However, there are challenges to understanding 25OHD's effects. The free and bioavailable levels are affected by 25OHD binding protein (DBP) and it is not known how estradiol fluctuations during the menstrual cycle affect these binding parameters. This may impact the most appropriate time to measure 25OHD when determining deficiency. This study characterizes 25OHD throughout the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Patients undergoing natural cycle IVF were included. Serum was drawn throughout the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle; 25OHD, DBP, albumin, and estrogen levels were determined for each time point allowing for mathematical calculation of free and bioavailable 25OHD. Early, mid, and late follicular phases were designated by estrogen tertiles among patients. Mean Levels of 25OHD (total, free, bioavailable) and DBP for each tertile were compared with Kruskil-Wallis test for non-parametric groups. Linear regression with GEE was employed due to repeated measures within participants. A total of 33 patients were included with 202 total serum measurements. There was no difference in mean levels of 25OHD (p = 0.77), free 25OHD (p = 0.91), and bioavailable 25OHD (p = 0.76) when measured throughout the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Vitamin D metabolism does not fluctuate as estradiol changes in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. This data indicates that assessment of 25OHD, in particular when assessed for associations with reproductive outcomes, can be measured reliably at any point during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle.

  11. Enhanced response to ozone exposure during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, S.D.; Adams, W.C.; Brookes, K.A.; Lasley, B.L. )

    1993-08-01

    Exposure to ozone (O[sub 3]), a toxic component of photochemical smog, results in significant airway inflammation, respiratory discomfort, and pulmonary function impairment. These effects can be reduced via pretreatment with anti-inflammatory agents. Progesterone, a gonadal steroid, is known to reduce general inflammation in the uterine endometrium. However, it is not known whether fluctuation in blood levels of progesterone, which are experienced during the normal female menstrual cycle, could alter O[sub 3] inflammatory-induced pulmonary responses. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that young, adult females are more responsive to O[sub 3] inhalation with respect to pulmonary function impairment during their follicular (F) menstrual phase when progesterone levels are lowest that during their mid-luteal (ML) phase when progesterone levels are highest. Nine subjects with normal ovarian function were exposed in random order for 1 hour each to filtered air and to 0.30 ppm O[sub 3] in their F and ML menstrual phases. Ozone responsiveness was measured by percent change in pulmonary function from pre- to postexposure. Significant gas concentration effects (filtered air versus O[sub 3]) were observed for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV[sub 1]), and forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% of FVC (FEF[sub 25-75]), showed a significant menstrual phase and gas concentration interaction effect, with larger decrements observed in the F menstrual phase when progesterone concentrations were significantly lower. We conclude that young, adult females appear to be more responsive to acute O[sub 3] exposure during the F phase than during the ML phase of their menstrual cycles. This difference in pulmonary function response could be related to the anti-inflammatory effects of increased progesterone concentrations during the luteal phase.

  12. Academic stress and menstrual disorders among female undergraduates in Uyo, South Eastern Nigeria - the need for health education.

    PubMed

    Ekpenyong, C E; Davis, K J; Akpan, U P; Daniel, N E

    2011-12-20

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between academic stress and menstrual disorders among female undergraduates in Uyo, South Eastern Nigeria. Three hundred and ninety-three (393) female students of the University of Uyo, ages between 16 and 35 years were randomly selected from different departments in the University, and studied during the 2009/2010 academic session. Menstrual history and Student's Stress Assessment Questionnaire (SSAQ) were used for this assessment. They were distributed for participants to fill out. Prevalence of menstrual disorder among participants was 34.6%. A direct association between menstrual disorder and academic stress was observed. Commonest menstrual disorder was menorrhagia (37.5%). Others were: Pre-menstrual Syndrome (PMS 33.1%), Oligomenorrhea 19.9% and amenorrhea 5.9% (P<0.05). Those who experienced academic stress had about 2 times chances of having menstrual disorders (OR : 2.0, C.I = 1.224-2.837) at P<0.05. This study demonstrated a significant association between academic stress and menstrual disorder among females undergraduate in Uyo, South Eastern Nigeria.

  13. Relationship of menstrual cycle and vaginal infection in female rhesus macaques challenged with repeated, low doses of SIVmac251.

    PubMed

    Morris, Monica R; Byrareddy, Siddappa N; Villinger, Francois; Henning, Tara C; Butler, Katherine; Ansari, Aftab A; McNicholl, Janet M; Kersh, Ellen N

    2015-10-01

    Varying susceptibility during menstrual cycling could be a factor for S(H)IV infection risk in female rhesus macaques. We retrospectively determined vaginal SIV infection time points relative to the menstrual cycle in a group of rhesus macaques (n=11) enrolled in an HIV transmission trial. Eight of nine rhesus macaques became infected around menstruation time.

  14. Menstrual Cycle Effects on Perceptual Closure Mediate Changes in Performance on a Fragmented Objects Test of Implicit Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampson, E.; Finestone, J.M.; Levy, N.

    2005-01-01

    Healthy premenopausal women with regular menstrual cycles were assessed on a fragmented objects test of implicit memory. Testing took place at either the low estrogen (n=17) or the high estrogen (n=16) stages of the menstrual cycle. Concentrations of ovarian hormones were confirmed by saliva assays. Both groups of women exhibited a priming effect,…

  15. Association between vegetarian diet and menstrual problems in young women: a case presentation and brief review.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Joan; Omar, Hatim

    2003-10-01

    In the last twenty years, several studies have suggested the existence of an association between vegan diets and adolescent menstrual disorders. We share our experience with this problem and a review of the literature on the subject. We conclude that despite the existence of some evidence to the possible association between vegetarian diet and menstrual disorders, it is still not clear if this association is due solely to the vegetarian diet or due to the overall inadequate nutrition with decreased proportions of fat and protein in the diet. We believe that more prospective, well controlled studies are needed to truly explain this association.

  16. Glutathione alleviated peripheral neuropathy in oxaliplatin-treated mice by removing aluminum from dorsal root ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minji; Cho, Sungrae; Roh, Kangsan; Chae, Jisook; Park, Jin-Hee; Park, Jaehyun; Lee, Myung-Ah; Kim, Jinheung; Auh, Chung-Kyoon; Yeom, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sukchan

    2017-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a platinum-based anti-cancer drug, induces peripheral neuropathy as a side effect and causes cold hyperalgesia in cancer patients receiving anti-cancer chemotherapy. In oxaliplatin-treated mice, aluminum was accumulated in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and accumulated aluminum in DRG or other organs aggravated oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. To investigate whether aluminum oxalate, which is the compound of aluminum and oxaliplatin, might be the peripheral neuropathy inducer, the withdrawal responses of mice to coldness, the expression of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays in DRG were analyzed in mice administered with aluminum oxalate. In addition, the concentrations of aluminum in aluminum oxalate-treated mice were significantly increased compared to those of mice treated with aluminum chloride. To alleviate neuropathic pain, glutathione (GSH), known as an antioxidant and a metal chelator, was injected into oxaliplatin-treated mice. The concentrations of aluminum in the DRG were decreased by the chelation action of GSH. Taken together, behavioral and molecular analyses also supported that aluminum accumulation on the DRG might be a factor for neuropathic pain. This result also suggested that the aluminum chelation by GSH can provide an alleviatory remedy of neuropathic pain for cancer patients with oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:28386322

  17. Glutathione alleviated peripheral neuropathy in oxaliplatin-treated mice by removing aluminum from dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minji; Cho, Sungrae; Roh, Kangsan; Chae, Jisook; Park, Jin-Hee; Park, Jaehyun; Lee, Myung-Ah; Kim, Jinheung; Auh, Chung-Kyoon; Yeom, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sukchan

    2017-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a platinum-based anti-cancer drug, induces peripheral neuropathy as a side effect and causes cold hyperalgesia in cancer patients receiving anti-cancer chemotherapy. In oxaliplatin-treated mice, aluminum was accumulated in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and accumulated aluminum in DRG or other organs aggravated oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. To investigate whether aluminum oxalate, which is the compound of aluminum and oxaliplatin, might be the peripheral neuropathy inducer, the withdrawal responses of mice to coldness, the expression of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays in DRG were analyzed in mice administered with aluminum oxalate. In addition, the concentrations of aluminum in aluminum oxalate-treated mice were significantly increased compared to those of mice treated with aluminum chloride. To alleviate neuropathic pain, glutathione (GSH), known as an antioxidant and a metal chelator, was injected into oxaliplatin-treated mice. The concentrations of aluminum in the DRG were decreased by the chelation action of GSH. Taken together, behavioral and molecular analyses also supported that aluminum accumulation on the DRG might be a factor for neuropathic pain. This result also suggested that the aluminum chelation by GSH can provide an alleviatory remedy of neuropathic pain for cancer patients with oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain.

  18. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  19. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  20. Are oral contraceptive use and menstrual cycle phase related to anterior cruciate ligament injury risk in female recreational skiers?

    PubMed

    Ruedl, Gerhard; Ploner, Patrick; Linortner, Ingrid; Schranz, Alois; Fink, Christian; Sommersacher, Renate; Pocecco, Elena; Nachbauer, Werner; Burtscher, Martin

    2009-09-01

    Oral contraceptive use and menstrual cycle phase are suggested to influence the risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in female athletes. However, only few data are available for recreational sports. Therefore, female recreational skiers with a non-contact ACL injury and age-matched controls completed a self-reported questionnaire relating to menstrual history, oral contraceptive use and previous knee injuries. Menstrual history data were used to group subjects into either preovulatory or postovulatory phases of menstrual cycle. Our findings suggest that oral contraceptive use did not show any protective effect against ACL injuries nor did self-reported previous knee injuries show any association with ACL injury rate in recreational alpine skiing. Analysis of menstrual history data revealed that recreational skiers in the preovulatory phase were significantly more likely to sustain an ACL injury than were skiers in the postovulatory phase.

  1. The role of drugs in bone pain

    PubMed Central

    Marras, Francesco; Leali, Paolo Tranquilli

    2016-01-01

    Summary Painful symptomatology in the skeletal system can be found in various pathological conditions and can be either localised or diffused. Bone tenderness is common in those who are of an elderly age. Treatment strategy Patients should be informed of the possible causes of their pain and the different therapies that could alleviate it; furthermore they should be encouraged to have an active role in their therapy. It is necessary to prevent the onset of the pain (by the clock) by considering the biological half-life, the bioavailability and the duration of action of the therapy. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), pain treatment is based on a three-step ladder. Adjuvant therapies Adjuvant therapies are often associated with the drugs in the WHO three step ladder. This heterogeneous group of non-analgesic drugs is used in the treatment of bone pain by bettering the analgesia or reducing the side effects brought on by analgesics. Conclusion In the daily struggle that doctors face to treat their patients, pain management should not be disregarded. Among the various types of pain, bone pain, must not be underestimated but be fought against by using all means available. Patients need to be treated depending on the severity of their pain, NSAIDs should be the preferred choice of treatment for acute pain but not for that of chronic pain. In the case of chronic pain opioids should be used in their most recent fomulations as they can guarantee fewer side effects. Patients should also be prescribed adjuvant drugs as well as being given psychological support in order to ensure successful treatment. PMID:27920802

  2. Chronic Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Chronic Pelvic Pain Home For Patients Search FAQs Chronic Pelvic Pain ... Pain FAQ099, August 2011 PDF Format Chronic Pelvic Pain Gynecologic Problems What is chronic pelvic pain? What ...

  3. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org National ...

  4. Facing the experience of pain: A neuropsychological perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbro, Franco; Crescentini, Cristiano

    2014-09-01

    Pain is an experience that none of us would like to have but that each one of us is destined to experience in our lives. Despite its pervasiveness, the experience of pain remains problematic and complex in its depth. Pain is a multidimensional experience that involves nociception as well as emotional and cognitive aspects that can modulate its perception. Following a brief discussion of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying pain, the purpose of this review is to discuss the main psychological, neuropsychological, cultural, and existential aspects which are the basis of diverse forms of pain, like the pain of separation from caregivers or from ourselves (e.g., connected to the thought of our death), the suffering that we experience observing other people's pain, the pain of change and the existential pain connected to the temporal dimension of the mind. Finally, after a discussion of how the mind is able to not only create but also alleviate the pain, through mechanisms such as the expectation of the treatment and the hope of healing, we conclude by discussing neuropsychological research data and the attitude promoted by mindfulness meditation in relation to the pain. An attitude in which, instead to avoid and reject the pain, one learns to face mindfully the experience of pain.

  5. Insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Greig, Marni; Tesfaye, Solomon; Selvarajah, Dinesh; Wilkinson, Iain D

    2014-01-01

    Painful diabetic distal symmetrical polyneuropathy (painful DPN) is a puzzle with two important missing pieces: Firstly we still do not understand why only some patients with neuropathy experience painful symptoms; Secondly we still do not have a complete understanding of how nociception generated in the peripheral nervous system is processed by the central nervous system (CNS). Available treatments offer only symptom relief and there is currently no effective treatment based on arresting or reversing the progression of disease. Therefore the management of painful DPN remains less than optimal because the complex pathophysiology of nociception and pain perception in health and disease is incompletely understood. Studies of the peripheral nervous system are investigating the molecular processes involved in signal transduction that have the potential to be interrupted or modified to ease pain. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques are helping to elucidate central pain processing pathways and describe the translation of nociception to pain. Combining the knowledge from these two streams of enquiry we will soon be able to predict accurately who will develop painful DPN, how we can halt or reverse the condition, or who will respond to symptomatic treatments. Future developments in the treatment of painful DPN will be underpinned by decoding the peripheral and central mechanisms of pain. Research is focusing on these areas of enquiry in the hope that answers will lead to effective treatments to alleviate pain and reverse pathology for those suffering from painful DPN.

  6. Facing the experience of pain: a neuropsychological perspective.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Franco; Crescentini, Cristiano

    2014-09-01

    Pain is an experience that none of us would like to have but that each one of us is destined to experience in our lives. Despite its pervasiveness, the experience of pain remains problematic and complex in its depth. Pain is a multidimensional experience that involves nociception as well as emotional and cognitive aspects that can modulate its perception. Following a brief discussion of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying pain, the purpose of this review is to discuss the main psychological, neuropsychological, cultural, and existential aspects which are the basis of diverse forms of pain, like the pain of separation from caregivers or from ourselves (e.g., connected to the thought of our death), the suffering that we experience observing other people's pain, the pain of change and the existential pain connected to the temporal dimension of the mind. Finally, after a discussion of how the mind is able to not only create but also alleviate the pain, through mechanisms such as the expectation of the treatment and the hope of healing, we conclude by discussing neuropsychological research data and the attitude promoted by mindfulness meditation in relation to the pain. An attitude in which, instead to avoid and reject the pain, one learns to face mindfully the experience of pain.

  7. Changes in skin blood flow during the menstrual cycle: the influence of the menstrual cycle on the peripheral circulation in healthy female volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bartelink, M L; Wollersheim, H; Theeuwes, A; van Duren, D; Thien, T

    1990-05-01

    1. It is known that females have a lower skin perfusion than males. In women there are also differences in blood flow at different reproductive stages of their lives. As an initial investigation of the possible contribution of sex hormones to these differences, we studied skin and forearm blood flow during the natural changes in hormone levels which occur during the menstrual cycle. 2. Thirty-one healthy female volunteers were studied. The effect of a standardized finger cooling test (immersion of a gloved hand in a 16 degrees C water bath) on finger skin temperature and on laser Doppler flux in the finger, and forearm blood flow (strain gauge venous occlusion plethysmography) was assessed at four different times during one cycle: during menstruation, 1 day before ovulation, 2 days after ovulation and at the mid-luteal phase. Test days were determined by daily measurements of basal body temperature and were confirmed afterwards by determinations of serum luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, 17 beta-oestradiol and progesterone. 3. Peripheral skin circulation varied significantly within one menstrual cycle. The extremes were a mean finger skin temperature of 25.9 +/- 3.0 degrees C in the luteal phase compared with 28.4 +/- 3.7 degrees C in the pre-ovulatory phase (P = 0.002). The respective values for the mean laser Doppler flux were 18.4 +/- 10.9 compared with 29.2 +/- 16.4 arbitrary units (P = 0.003). 4. Baseline forearm muscle blood flow also varied significantly (P = 0.04) within one menstrual cycle, with low values in the menstrual phase compared with the other phases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Pain Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... analgesia, identify new targets for analgesic drugs, and test the efficacy and adverse reactions of newly developed or currently used drugs to treat pain. Researchers are currently using these technologies to discover the mechanisms by which drugs such ...

  9. Urination - painful

    MedlinePlus

    ... and vagina Other causes of painful urination include: Interstitial cystitis Prostate infection ( prostatitis ) Radiation cystitis - damage to the ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Bladder ... Cystitis Prostate Diseases Sexually Transmitted Diseases Urinary Tract Infections ...

  10. Joint pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may be done include: CBC or blood differential C-reactive protein Joint x-ray Sedimentation rate ... chap 256. Schaible H-G. Joint pain: basic mechanisms. In: McMahon SB, Koltzenburg M, Tracey I, Turk ...

  11. Testicle pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by a hernia or kidney stone. Testicular cancer is almost always painless. But any testicle lump ... Read More Abdominal pain Scrotum Testes Testicle lump Testicular cancer Testicular torsion Review Date 8/31/2015 Updated ...

  12. Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes Chest pain can also be caused by: Panic attack. If you have periods of intense fear accompanied ... fear of dying, you may be experiencing a panic attack. Shingles. Caused by a reactivation of the chickenpox ...

  13. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Strategy Current Research Research Funded by NINDS Basic Neuroscience Clinical Research Translational Research Research at NINDS Focus ... pain has done. Scientists believe that advances in neuroscience will lead to more and better treatments for ...

  14. [Abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Gschossmann, J M; Holtmann, G; Netzer, P; Essig, M; Balsiger, B M; Scheurer, U

    2005-10-01

    Abdominal pain can result from a variety of different intra- and extra-abdominal disorders. Given the wide variety of etiological triggers for this pain, the primary task during the first stage of the diagnostic work-up is to determine as soon as possible the underlying cause and the degree of emergency. The aim of this evaluation is to adapt the therapeutic measures which are necessary for a causal treatment to the individual situation. Contrary to somatic causes of abdominal pain, the availability of such a causal therapy for functional bowel disorders is still very limited. Given this dilemma, the therapeutic focus of abdominal pain associated with these functional syndromes has to be placed on symptom-oriented treatment.

  15. Fetal pain.

    PubMed

    Rokyta, Richard

    2008-12-01

    The fetus reacts to nociceptive stimulations through different motor, autonomic, vegetative, hormonal, and metabolic changes relatively early in the gestation period. With respect to the fact that the modulatory system does not yet exist, the first reactions are purely reflexive and without connection to the type of stimulus. While the fetal nervous system is able to react through protective reflexes to potentially harmful stimuli, there is no accurate evidence concerning pain sensations in this early period. Cortical processes occur only after thalamocortical connections and pathways have been completed at the 26th gestational week. Harmful (painful) stimuli, especially in fetuses have an adverse effect on the development of humans regardless of the processes in brain. Moreover, pain activates a number of subcortical mechanisms and a wide spectrum of stress responses influence the maturation of thalamocortical pathways and other cortical activation which are very important in pain processing.

  16. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... chocolate in your diet helps reduce breast pain. Vitamin E, thiamine, magnesium, and evening primrose oil are not harmful, but most studies have not shown any benefit. Talk to your health care provider before starting ...

  17. The Effects of Ovarian Hormones and Emotional Eating on Changes in Weight Preoccupation Across the Menstrual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Britny A.; Racine, Sarah E.; Keel, Pamela K.; Burt, S. Alexandra; Neale, Michael; Boker, Steven; Sisk, Cheryl L.; Klump, Kelly L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Previous research has shown that fluctuations in ovarian hormones (i.e., estradiol and progesterone) predict changes in binge eating and emotional eating across the menstrual cycle. However, the extent to which other eating disorder symptoms fluctuate across the menstrual cycle and are influenced by ovarian hormones remains largely unknown. The current study sought to examine whether levels of weight preoccupation vary across the menstrual cycle and whether changes in ovarian hormones and/or other factors (i.e., emotional eating, negative affect) account for menstrual-cycle fluctuations in this eating disorder phenotype. Method For 45 consecutive days, 352 women ages 15–25 provided daily ratings of weight preoccupation, negative affect, and emotional eating. Daily saliva samples also were collected and assayed for estradiol and progesterone levels using enzyme-immunoassay techniques. Results Weight preoccupation varied significantly across the menstrual cycle, with the highest levels in the pre-menstrual and menstrual phases. However, ovarian hormones did not account for within-person changes in weight preoccupation across the menstrual cycle. Instead, the most significant predictor of menstrual-cycle changes in weight preoccupation was changes in emotional eating. Discussion Fluctuations in weight preoccupation across the menstrual cycle appear to be influenced primarily by emotional eating rather than ovarian hormones. Future research should continue to examine relationships among ovarian hormones, weight preoccupation, emotional eating, and other core eating disorder symptoms (e.g., body dissatisfaction, compensatory behaviors) in an effort to more fully understand the role of these biological and behavioral factors for the full spectrum of eating pathology. PMID:24965609

  18. Rolling maneuver load alleviation using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Pototzky, Anthony S.

    1992-01-01

    Rolling Maneuver Load Alleviation (RMLA) was demonstrated on the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind tunnel model in the LaRC Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The design objective was to develop a systematic approach for developing active control laws to alleviate wing incremental loads during roll maneuvers. Using linear load models for the AFW wind-tunnel model which were based on experimental measurements, two RMLA control laws were developed based on a single-degree-of-freedom roll model. The RMLA control laws utilized actuation of outboard control surface pairs to counteract incremental loads generated during rolling maneuvers and roll performance. To evaluate the RMLA control laws, roll maneuvers were performed in the wind tunnel at dynamic pressures of 150, 200, and 250 psf and Mach numbers of .33, .38, and .44, respectively. Loads obtained during these maneuvers were compared to baseline maneuver loads. For both RMLA controllers, the incremental torsion moments were reduced by up to 60 percent at all dynamic pressures and performance times. Results for bending moment load reductions during roll maneuvers varied. In addition, in a multiple function test, RMLA and flutter suppression system control laws were operated simultaneously during roll maneuvers at dynamic pressures 11 percent above the open-loop flutter dynamic pressure.

  19. Evidence for menstrual cycle shifts in women's preferences for masculinity: a response to Harris (in press) “Menstrual cycle and facial preferences reconsidered”.

    PubMed

    DeBruine, Lisa; Jones, Benedict C; Frederick, David A; Haselton, Martie G; Penton-Voak, Ian S; Perrett, David I

    2010-12-10

    Over the last decade, a growing literature has shown that women in the fertile phase of the menstrual cycle demonstrate stronger preferences for men with masculine traits than they do when in the non-fertile phases of the cycle (see Gangestad and Thornhill, 2008 and Jones et al., 2008 for recent reviews). In a recent article, Harris (in press; Sex Roles) failed to replicate this increase in women's preferences for masculine faces when women are near ovulation. Harris represented her study as one of only three studies on the topic, and as the largest of the existing studies. There are, however, many more studies on menstrual cycle shifts in preferences for facial masculinity in the published literature, including one that is 2.5 times larger in size than the Harris study. In this article, we review the evidence for cyclic shifts in mate preferences and related behaviors and discuss weaknesses of Harris's methods. Considered as a whole, the evidence for menstrual cycle shifts in women's preferences and behaviors is compelling, despite the failure of replication reported by Harris.

  20. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  1. Neonatal pain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback.

  2. Optical properties of the breast during spontaneous and birth control pill-mediated menstrual cycles.

    PubMed

    Stahel, Michèle C; Wolf, Martin; Baños, Ana; Hornung, R

    2009-11-01

    Mastodynia is correlated with the menstrual cycle. Using frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy (FD-NIRS), we investigated changes in breast perfusion in women who were or were not using hormonal contraception. Healthy volunteers, on or not on hormonal contraception, were examined. Optical properties were measured in all quadrants of both breasts, and physiological parameters were calculated. Measurements were repeated every other day during one complete menstrual cycle. Measurements were comparable in all quadrants. Data remained unchanged during the entire cycle in patients using hormonal contraception. However, a biphasic variation of deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, total hemoglobin (tHb), and water content (H(2)O) was observed in women not using contraception. tHb and H(2)O distinctly increased during the ovulation period and remained elevated throughout the luteal phase. It was concluded that FD-NIRS allows accurate measurement of optical properties of human breasts. As opposed to the menstrual cycles of persons using oral contraception, spontaneous menstrual cycles exhibit biphasic variations of tissue perfusion parameters. These findings are important for the investigation of mastodynia.

  3. Sex Differences and Menstrual Cycle Dependent Changes in Cognitive Strategies during Spatial Navigation and Verbal Fluency.

    PubMed

    Scheuringer, Andrea; Pletzer, Belinda

    2017-01-01

    Men typically outperform women in spatial navigation tasks, while the advantage of women in verbal fluency is more controversial. Sex differences in cognitive abilities have been related to sex-specific cognitive strategies on the one hand and sex hormone influences on the other hand. However, sex hormone and menstrual cycle influences on cognitive strategies have not been previously investigated. In the present study we assessed cognitive strategy use during spatial navigation and verbal fluency in 51 men and 49 women. In order to evaluate sex hormone influences, all participants completed two test sessions, which were time-locked to the early follicular (low estradiol and progesterone) and mid-luteal cycle phase (high estradiol and progesterone) in women. As hypothesized, men outperformed women in navigation, whereas women outperformed men in phonemic verbal fluency. Furthermore, women switched more often between categories in the phonemic fluency condition, compared to men, indicating sex-specific strategy use. Sex differences in strategy use during navigation did, however, not follow the expected pattern. Menstrual cycle phase, however, did modulate strategy use during navigation as expected, with improved performance with the landmark strategy in the luteal, compared to the follicular phase. No menstrual cycle effects were observed on clustering or switching during verbal fluency. This suggests a modulation of cognitive strategy use during spatial navigation, but not during verbal fluency, by relative hormone increases during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle.

  4. Estradiol, SHBG and leptin interplay with food craving and intake across the menstrual cycle.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To understand the association between ovarian hormones, non-acute satiety hormones and craving calorie dense foods in the luteal phase. Methods: 17 premenopausal women, mean age 23.2 y, mean BMI 22.4 kg/m2 with regular menstrual cycles were studied during late follicular (FP) and luteal ...

  5. Interleukin-6 and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Do Not Vary during the Menstrual Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffin, Morgan E.; Berg, Kris E.; Meendering, Jessica R.; Llewellyn, Tamra L.; French, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Jeremy E.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a difference in interleukin-6 (IL-6) and delayed onset muscles soreness (DOMS) exists in two different phases of the menstrual cycle. Nine runners performed one 75-min high-intensity interval running session during the early follicular (EF) phase and once during the midluteal (ML) phase of the…

  6. Estimation of the biphasic property in a female's menstrual cycle from cutaneous temperature measured during sleep.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenxi; Kitazawa, Masumi; Togawa, Tatsuo

    2009-09-01

    This paper proposes a method to estimate a woman's menstrual cycle based on the hidden Markov model (HMM). A tiny device was developed that attaches around the abdominal region to measure cutaneous temperature at 10-min intervals during sleep. The measured temperature data were encoded as a two-dimensional image (QR code, i.e., quick response code) and displayed in the LCD window of the device. A mobile phone captured the QR code image, decoded the information and transmitted the data to a database server. The collected data were analyzed by three steps to estimate the biphasic temperature property in a menstrual cycle. The key step was an HMM-based step between preprocessing and postprocessing. A discrete Markov model, with two hidden phases, was assumed to represent higher- and lower-temperature phases during a menstrual cycle. The proposed method was verified by the data collected from 30 female participants, aged from 14 to 46, over six consecutive months. By comparing the estimated results with individual records from the participants, 71.6% of 190 menstrual cycles were correctly estimated. The sensitivity and positive predictability were 91.8 and 96.6%, respectively. This objective evaluation provides a promising approach for managing premenstrual syndrome and birth control.

  7. Comparative histopathology of the estrous or menstrual cycle in laboratory animals

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Junko; Nasu, Masahiro; Tsuchitani, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    Accurate analysis of female reproductive toxicity requires a thorough understanding the differences in and specifics of estrous or menstrual cycles between laboratory animals. There are some species differences such as the time of sex maturation, the length of the estrous or menstrual cycle, the length of the luteal phase, the number of dominant follicles or corpora lutea, the size of follicles, processes of luteinization, and hormonal changes during the estrous or menstrual cycle. Rodents have a short estrous cycle, and their ovarian cycling features are the same in both ovaries, which contain a large number of follicles and corpora lutea. The dog estrous cycle is much longer than those of other laboratory animals, and it includes a long anestrus phase. The duration of the menstrual cycle of monkeys is roughly 30 days, and their ovarian cycling features are different between the left and right ovaries. In both rodents and dogs, the theca cells invade the early luteum, mixing with granulosa cells during luteinization. However in monkeys, the theca layer dose not mix with the granulosa cells as it invaginates only slightly into the early luteum. In addition, we found that high progesterone levels after ovulation are sustained for a much shorter duration in rodents than in dogs and monkeys due to the comparatively rapid passage of the rodent luteal phase. Based on these species differences, animal species for use in ovarian toxicology studies need to be selected appropriately. PMID:27559240

  8. Menstrual Management and Women Who Have Intellectual Disabilities: Service Providers and Decision-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Glenys; Wilson, Jill

    1996-01-01

    Service providers (n=63) were interviewed regarding menstrual management decision making for women with intellectual disabilities. The interviews focused on decision-making bases, opinions about decision-making processes, enhancing practical support for the young women and their families, and reviewing staff training and service delivery.…

  9. Sex Differences and Menstrual Cycle Dependent Changes in Cognitive Strategies during Spatial Navigation and Verbal Fluency

    PubMed Central

    Scheuringer, Andrea; Pletzer, Belinda

    2017-01-01

    Men typically outperform women in spatial navigation tasks, while the advantage of women in verbal fluency is more controversial. Sex differences in cognitive abilities have been related to sex-specific cognitive strategies on the one hand and sex hormone influences on the other hand. However, sex hormone and menstrual cycle influences on cognitive strategies have not been previously investigated. In the present study we assessed cognitive strategy use during spatial navigation and verbal fluency in 51 men and 49 women. In order to evaluate sex hormone influences, all participants completed two test sessions, which were time-locked to the early follicular (low estradiol and progesterone) and mid-luteal cycle phase (high estradiol and progesterone) in women. As hypothesized, men outperformed women in navigation, whereas women outperformed men in phonemic verbal fluency. Furthermore, women switched more often between categories in the phonemic fluency condition, compared to men, indicating sex-specific strategy use. Sex differences in strategy use during navigation did, however, not follow the expected pattern. Menstrual cycle phase, however, did modulate strategy use during navigation as expected, with improved performance with the landmark strategy in the luteal, compared to the follicular phase. No menstrual cycle effects were observed on clustering or switching during verbal fluency. This suggests a modulation of cognitive strategy use during spatial navigation, but not during verbal fluency, by relative hormone increases during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. PMID:28367133

  10. Menstrual pattern, sexual behaviors, and contraceptive use among postpartum women in Nairobi urban slums.

    PubMed

    Ndugwa, Robert P; Cleland, John; Madise, Nyovani J; Fotso, Jean-Christophe; Zulu, Eliya M

    2011-06-01

    Postpartum months provide a challenging period for poor women. This study examined patterns of menstrual resumption, sexual behaviors and contraceptive use among urban poor postpartum women. Women were eligible for this study if they had a birth after the period September 2006 and were residents of two Nairobi slums of Korogocho and Viwandani. The two communities are under continuous demographic surveillance. A monthly calendar type questionnaire was administered retrospectively to cover the period since birth to the interview date and data on sexual behavior, menstrual resumption, breastfeeding patterns, and contraception were collected. The results show that sexual resumption occurs earlier than menses and postpartum contraceptive use. Out of all postpartum months where women were exposed to the risk of another pregnancy, about 28% were months where no contraceptive method was used. Menstrual resumption acts as a trigger for initiating contraceptive use with a peak of contraceptive initiation occurring shortly after the first month when menses are reported. There was no variation in contraceptive method choice between women who initiate use before and after menstrual resumption. Overall, poor postpartum women in marginalized areas such as slums experience an appreciable risk of unintended pregnancy. Postnatal visits and other subsequent health system contacts provide opportunities for reaching postpartum women with a need for family planning services.

  11. Using a Cyclical Diagram to Visualize the Events of the Ovulatory Menstrual Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Ivan Shun; Parmar, Navneet K.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, college textbooks in human anatomy and physiology have typically presented the events of the ovulatory menstrual cycle in a linear format, with time in days shown on the x-axis, and hormone levels, follicular development, and uterine lining on the y-axis. In addition, the various events are often shown over a 28-day cycle,…

  12. MULTIPLE STABLE PERIODIC SOLUTIONS IN A MODEL FOR THE HORMONAL REGULATION OF THE MENSTRUAL CYCLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The pituitary hormones, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and the ovarian hormones, estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), and inhibin (Ih), are five hormones important for the regulation and maintenance of the human menstrual cycle. The...

  13. COMPARISON OF GESTATIONAL AGE AT DELIVERY BASED ON LAST MENSTRUAL PERIOD AND EARLY ULTRASOUND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reported date of last menstrual period (LMP) is commonly used to estimate gestational age but may be unreliable if recall is inaccurate or time between menstruation and ovulation differs from the presumed 15-day interval. Early ultrasound is generally a more accurate method than ...

  14. SHORTER MENSTRUAL CYCLES ASSOCIATED WITH CHLORINATION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Shorter Menstrual Cycles Associated with Chlorination by-Products in Drinking Water.
    Gayle Windham, Kirsten Waller, Meredith Anderson, Laura Fenster, Pauline Mendola, Shanna Swan. California Department of Health Services.

    In previous studies of tap water consumption we...

  15. Correlation between menstrual cycle and cognitive performance in a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Inoue, Sana; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2011-02-01

    Extensive research on human subjects has tried to investigate whether there is a correlation between cognitive performance and the menstrual cycle. Less is known about the relationship between the menstrual cycle and task performance in other cognitive animals. We test whether the secretion of a sex hormone [luteinizing hormone(LH)] influences the performance of cognitive tasks by a female chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) who is part of a long-term cognition research program. We focus on two cognitive tasks: an "easy task," which consists of simple numerical ordering, and a "difficult task," which combines numerical ordering with memorizing the numerals' spatial location. Data on the performance of these cognitive tasks, urine samples, and sexual swelling over six menstrual cycles showed that the chimpanzee's performance accuracy decreased and that the intertrial interval was longer during the LH-surge of the menstrual cycle, but only for the performance of the difficult task. These performance attributes seem to reflect a decrease in attention or motivation during ovulation. In summary, the cognitive performance of a chimpanzee was disturbed by hormonal changes despite her long-term experience in the tasks.

  16. CHLORINATION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER AND MENSTRUAL CYCLE FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorination by-Products in Drinking Water and Menstrual Cycle Function

    Gayle C. Windham1, Kirsten Waller2, Meredith Anderson2, Laura Fenster1, Pauline Mendola3, Shanna Swan4

    1California Department of Health Services, Division of Environmental and Occupational Disea...

  17. Influence of menstrual status on fluid replacement after exercise induced dehydration in healthy young women.

    PubMed Central

    Maughan, R J; McArthur, M; Shirreffs, S M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether fluid replacement after exercise induced dehydration varies over the normal menstrual cycle. METHODS--Five subjects, with a regular menstrual cycle lasting 28 (SEM 2) d, were dehydrated by 1.8(0.1)% of their pre-exercise mass by cycle exercise in the heat. Trials were undertaken 2 d before (trial -2) and 5 and 19 d after the onset of menses (trials 6 and 20 respectively). After exercise, subjects ingested a fixed volume, equivalent to 150% of mass loss, of a commercially available sports drink over a 60 min period. RESULTS--Cumulative urine output [median (range)] over the 6 h following ingestion was the same on all trials: 714(469-750) ml on trial -2; 476(433-639) ml on trial 6; 534(195-852) ml on trial 20. There was no menstrual cycle effect on urinary electrolyte (Na+, K+, Cl-) excretion or serum electrolyte (Na+, K+, Cl-) concentrations. Plasma volume increased by 8-12% of the postexercise value following rehydration. The percentage of ingested fluid retained did not differ between trials at any time. Six hours after drink ingestion, net fluid balance was not different from the initial value on any of the trials. CONCLUSIONS--Acute replacement of exercise induced fluid losses is not affected by the normal menstrual cycle. PMID:8665117

  18. The File Drawer Effect and Publication Rates in Menstrual Cycle Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Barbara

    1987-01-01

    Surveyed investigators (N=91) studying the menstrual cycle. Showed the assumption that researchers are unable to publish studies with nonsignificant findings to be unwarranted. Found much of the research did not lend itself to a hypothesis-testing model. A more important contribution to the likelihood of publication was research productivity.…

  19. Ambivalent sexism, attitudes towards menstruation and menstrual cycle-related symptoms.

    PubMed

    Marván, Ma Luisa; Vázquez-Toboada, Rocío; Chrisler, Joan C

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between ambivalent sexism and beliefs and attitudes towards menstruation, and, in turn, to study the influence of these variables on menstrual cycle-related symptoms. One hundred and six Mexican women completed the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory, the Beliefs about and Attitudes toward Menstruation Questionnaire and the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire. The higher scores on benevolent sexism were associated with the most positive attitudes towards menstruation and also with the belief that a menstruating woman should or should not do some activities and that menstruation keeps women from their daily activities. The higher scores on hostile sexism were associated with rejection of menstruation as well as with feelings of embarrassment about it. Beliefs about and attitudes towards menstruation predicted menstrual cycle-related symptoms related to negative affect, impaired concentration and behavioural changes, but did not predict somatic symptoms. These results will be useful to health professionals and advocates who want to change the negative expectations and stereotypes of premenstrual and menstrual women and reduce the sexism and negative attitudes towards women that are evident in Mexican culture.

  20. Self-Injurious Behavior within the Menstrual Cycle of Women with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Derek V.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Catamenial and behavioral records of nine women with mental retardation who exhibited self-injurious behavior (SIB) were analyzed for six months. Analysis confirmed that SIB was cyclic across the menstrual cycle, with the highest frequency occurring in the early follicular and late follicular phases. (Author/JDD)

  1. Mood Management during the Menstrual Cycle through Selective Exposure to Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, James B., III; Laird, Elizabeth A.

    1995-01-01

    Finds that women's preferences for comedy television programs were strongest immediately prior to and during menses when negative affect was also most evident. Finds also that at the midpoint of the menstrual cycle, when positive affect proved the strongest, an elevated interest in suspense drama programs was apparent. (SR)

  2. APPLICATIONS OF A MODEL FOR THE HORMONAL REGULATION OF THE MENSTRUAL CYCLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    APPLICATIONS OF A MODEL FOR THE HORMONAL REGULATION OF THE MENSTRUAL CYCLE. Leona H. Clark1, Paul M. Schlosser2, and James F. Selgrade3. 1US Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, Research Triangle Park, NC; 2CIIT, Research Triangle Park, NC; 3North Carolina State Un...

  3. Social Stimulus Perception and Self-Evaluation: Effects of Menstrual Cycle Phase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alagna, Sheryle W.; Hamilton, Jean A.

    1986-01-01

    Women in different phases of the menstrual cycle were compared to men in their responses to a social interaction stimulus: a videotape depicting a female nurse interacting with a hospitalized patient. Sex differences and cycle-phase differences were found for both affective and cognitive dimensions. Premenstrual women differed from other women,…

  4. Menstrual Cycle Effects on Anaerobic Power, Muscular Strength, and Muscular Endurance in Trained and Untrained Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenburg, Beth S.; And Others

    A study determined if anaerobic power, isometric strength, and isometric endurance are affected by the menstrual cycle and if endurance trained females and untrained females are affected in the same manner on these performance parameters. Subjects were healthy, normally menstruating females, ages 18-34 years who were classified as either trained…

  5. Uterine uptake of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine during the menstrual phase of uterine cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Bomanji, J.; Britton, K.E.

    1987-08-01

    Radioiodinated I-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) has been used for diagnostic purposes for detection of apudomas. In this paper normal physiological uptake of I-123 MIBG by the uterus during the menstrual phase of the uterine cycle is reported. It is likely that I-123 MIBG can be used to evaluate some of the problems in this context.

  6. Menstrual Cycle-Related Changes of Functional Cerebral Asymmetries in Fine Motor Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Ulrike; Hausmann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuating sex hormone levels during the menstrual cycle have been shown to affect functional cerebral asymmetries in cognitive domains. These effects seem to result from the neuromodulatory properties of sex hormones and their metabolites on interhemispheric processing. The present study was carried out to investigate whether functional cerebral…

  7. Expectancy and the Menstrual Cycle: Effects on Performance and Self-Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altenhaus, Amy L.

    The impact of false information concerning the effect of the menstrual cycle on test performance and subjects' perception of the adequacy of that performance were investigated. Women (N=65) were studied either during the premenstrual or midcycle phase. Subjects were given one of three interpretations: (1) they should do well because of their…

  8. Menstrual and oral contraceptive use patterns among deployed military women by race and ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Deuster, Patricia A; Powell-Dunford, Nicole; Crago, Mark S; Cuda, Amanda S

    2011-01-01

    Menstrual cycle patterns and concerns and oral contraceptive use in the combat environment were examined in Caucasian, Asian, Hispanic, and African American women to guide the development of educational resources for women soldiers. An anonymous, questionnaire was completed by 455 U.S. Army women-Caucasian (CA: n = 141); Asian (AS: n = 67); Hispanic (HIS: n = 67); and African American (AA: n = 184) to compare menstrual patterns and concerns, dysmenorrhea, and oral contraceptive patterns. Total menstrual concerns were significantly lower among African Americans relative to Caucasians, Asians, or Hispanics; Asians and Hispanics reported the greatest concern. Overall, secondary amenorrhea was noted by 14.9% of women. Severe dysmenorrhea rates were significantly lower in African American (6.1%) compared to Caucasian (11.6%), Asian (20.9%) and Hispanic (19.7%) women. Asian women reported missing less work-only 9.3% with moderate to severe dysmenorrhea missed work compared to 25.1% of all other women. Only 9.2% of women with mild, compared to 25.8% with moderate to severe (OR = 3.44; p ≤ 0.0001) dysmenorrhea sought health care. Less than 50% of women took oral contraceptive, and less than half of those women took oral contraceptive continuously. African Americans seemed to experience menstruation as less bothersome than others, despite no difference in the proportion with menstrual irregularities, mean duration of menses, and/or mean time between cycles.

  9. Menstrual Cycle Phase Effects in the Gender Dimorphic Stress Cue Reactivity of Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Wray, Jennifer M.; Carpenter, Matthew J.; McClure, Erin A.; LaRowe, Steven D.; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P.; Gray, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We previously reported that female smokers evidence greater subjective craving and stress/emotional reactivity to personalized stress cues than males. The present study employed the same dataset to assess whether females in the follicular versus luteal phase of the menstrual cycle accounted for the gender differences. Methods: Two objective criteria, onset of menses and luteinizing hormone surge (evaluated via home testing kits), were used to determine whether female smokers were in either the follicular (n = 22) or the luteal (n = 15) phase of their menstrual cycle, respectively. The females and a sample of male smokers (n = 53) were then administered a laboratory-based cue reactivity paradigm that involved assessment of craving, stress, and emotional reactivity in response to counterbalanced presentations of both a personalized stress script and neutral/relaxed script. Results: While there were no significant differences between females in the follicular versus luteal phase on any outcome measure, females in the luteal menstrual phase reported greater craving than males whereas females in the follicular phase reported greater stress and arousal than males and perceived the stress cues as more emotionally aversive than males. Conclusions: This preliminary investigation suggests that gender differences in craving versus affective responding to stress cues may, in part, be explained variation by menstrual cycle phase. Study limitations and implications of the findings for future research and treatment are briefly discussed. PMID:25324432

  10. Oxytocin and the modulation of pain experience: Implications for chronic pain management.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Lincoln M; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Gibson, Stephen J; Giummarra, Melita J

    2015-08-01

    In an acute environment pain has potential protective benefits. However when pain becomes chronic this protective effect is lost and the pain becomes an encumbrance. Previously unheralded substances are being investigated in an attempt to alleviate the burden of living with chronic pain. Oxytocin, a neuropeptide hormone, is one prospective pharmacotherapeutic agent gaining popularity. Oxytocin has the potential to modulate the pain experience due to its ubiquitous involvement in central and peripheral psychological and physiological processes, and thus offers promise as a therapeutic agent. In this review, we discuss previous effective applications of oxytocin in pain-free clinical populations and its potential use in the modulation of pain experience. We also address the slowly growing body of literature investigating the administration of oxytocin in clinical and experimentally induced pain in order to investigate the potential mechanisms of its reported analgesic actions. We conclude that oxytocin offers a potential novel avenue for modulating the experience of pain, and that further research into this area is required to map its therapeutic benefit.

  11. Inviting pain? Pain, dualism and embodiment in narratives of self-injury.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Amy

    2013-06-01

    The role of pain in the practice of self-injury is not straightforward. Existing accounts suggest that self-injury does not cause 'physical' pain, however self-injury is also said to alleviate 'emotional' pain by inflicting 'physical' pain. This article explores these tensions using sociological theories regarding the socio-cultural and subjective nature of pain. Analysis derives from in-depth, life-story interviews carried out in the UK with people who had self-injured. Findings contribute to on-going debates within social science regarding the nature of pain. Participants' narratives about pain and self-injury both drew on and challenged dualistic models of embodiment. I suggest that self-injury offers a unique case on which to extend existing theoretical work, which has tended to focus on pain as an unwanted and uninvited entity. In contrast, accounts of self-injury can feature pain as a central aspect of the practice, voluntarily invited into lived experience.

  12. Opioids for chronic noncancer pain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The recent American Academy of Neurology position paper by Franklin, “Opioids for chronic noncancer pain,” suggests that the benefits of opioid treatment are very likely to be substantially outweighed by the risks and recommends avoidance of doses above 80–120 mg/day morphine equivalent. However, close reading of the primary literature supports a different conclusion: opioids have been shown in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to be highly effective in the treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain; long-term follow-up studies have shown that this effectiveness can be maintained; and effectiveness has been limited in many clinical trials by failure to take into account high variability in dose requirements, failure to adequately treat depression, and use of suboptimal outcome measures. Frequency of side effects in many RCTs has been inflated by overly rapid dose titration and failure to appreciate the high interindividual variability in side effect profiles. The recent marked increase in incidence of opioid overdose is of grave concern, but there is good reason to believe that it has been somewhat exaggerated. Potential causes of overdose include inadequately treated depression; inadequately treated pain, particularly when compounded by hopelessness; inadvertent overdose; concurrent use of alcohol; and insufficient practitioner expertise. Effective treatment of pain can enable large numbers of patients to lead productive lives and improve quality of life. Effective alleviation of suffering associated with pain falls squarely within the physician's professional obligation. Existing scientific studies provide the basis for many improvements in pain management that can increase effectiveness and reduce risk. Many potentially useful areas of further research can be identified. PMID:26138946

  13. [Studies on relationship between shape of uterine cavity on hysterosalpingography and menstrual disorder].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, M; Douchi, T; Nozaki, M; Yoshimitsu, K; Otsuka, H; Nagata, Y

    1983-07-01

    Eight hundred and twenty five infertility patients were investigated to reassess the association between uterine mild anomaly and menstrual disorder proposed as a new syndrome by Sørensen. A hysterosalpingogram we classified the shape of the uterine cavity into 4 types: Normal uterus, T-shaped uterus, arcuate uterus and others (included septate uterus, bicornuate uterus,--), and also classified the size of the uterine cavity into 3 groups; large uterus, medium-sized uterus and small uterus. After classification of uterine shape and size, menstrual disorder in each patient was reviewed and the correlation between uterine anomaly and menstrual disorder was examined. Five hundred and twenty eight out of 770 patients (68.6%) were assigned to normal uterus, 75(7.9%) to T-shape uterus, 148(19.2%) to arcuate uterus and 19(2.5%) to others. Their incidences of menstrual disorder were 31.4%, 37.2%, 39.2% and 42.1%, respectively, and no significant difference was found among them. There were 55 patients (7.3%) with a large uterus, 655(87.2%) with a medium-sized uterus and 41(5.5%) with a small uterus. The incidences of menstrual disorder were 16.4%, 35% and 34.1%, respectively, and there was significant difference in incidence between large uterus and medium-sized uterus. The uterine fundal depression index (FDI) was used as a parameter to evaluate uterine mild anomaly. The incidences of menstrual disorder were 29.8% in the FDI-0 group, 32.9% in the FDI-1 approximately 10 group, 42.7% in the FDI-11 approximately 20 group, 45.5% in the FDI-21 approximately 30 group and 22.2% in the FDI-over 31 group. However, it was difficult to find a difference in the pregnancy rate or delivery rate among different classifications of uterine shape, size or FDI. From these results, it can be said that mild uterine anomaly is hardly associated at all with menstrual disorder clinically.

  14. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andrew M; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-08-05

    Neuropathic pain is a significant unmet medical need in patients with variety of injury or disease insults to the nervous system. Neuropathic pain often presents as a painful sensation described as electrical, burning, or tingling. Currently available treatments have limited effectiveness and narrow therapeutic windows for safety. More powerful analgesics, e.g., opioids, carry a high risk for chemical dependence. Thus, a major challenge for pain research is the elucidation of the mechanisms that underlie neuropathic pain and developing targeted strategies to alleviate pathological pain. The mechanistic link between dendritic spine structure and circuit function could explain why neuropathic pain is difficult to treat, since nociceptive processing pathways are adversely "hard-wired" through the reorganization of dendritic spines. Several studies in animal models of neuropathic pain have begun to reveal the functional contribution of dendritic spine dysgenesis in neuropathic pain. Previous reports have demonstrated three primary changes in dendritic spine structure on nociceptive dorsal horn neurons following injury or disease, which accompany chronic intractable pain: (I) increased density of dendritic spines, particularly mature mushroom-spine spines, (II) redistribution of spines toward dendritic branch locations close to the cell body, and (III) enlargement of the spine head diameter, which generally presents as a mushroom-shaped spine. Given the important functional implications of spine distribution, density, and shape for synaptic and neuronal function, the study of dendritic spine abnormality may provide a new perspective for investigating pain, and the identification of specific molecular players that regulate spine morphology may guide the development of more effective and long-lasting therapies.

  15. Low back pain - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Backache; Low back pain; Lumbar pain; Pain - back; Acute back pain; Back pain - new; Back pain - short-term; Back strain - new ... lower back supports most of your body's weight. Low back pain is the number two reason that Americans see ...

  16. Attitudes toward menstruation, menstrual-related symptoms, and premenstrual syndrome among adolescent girls: a rural school-based survey.

    PubMed

    Wong, Li Ping

    2011-06-21

    Folk culture surrounding menstrual-related matters has considerable implications for symptom expression and treatment-seeking behavior. A cross-sectional survey of 1,295 rural adolescent girls aged 13 to 19 years was conducted between February 4 and April 16, 2009 to examine these associations. With a higher score indicating a more positive attitude toward menstruation, the mean attitude score was 3.84 (SD ± 1.62) out of a maximum of six. No significant association was observed between the severity of menstrual symptoms and attitudes. Most (63.1%) of the participants identified themselves as having premenstrual symptoms, and 61.1% viewed premenstrual symptoms as a normal part of menstrual cycle. Participants with a higher severity of symptoms in the premenstrual (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.10) and menstrual phase (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.07), were more likely to consult a physician for premenstrual symptoms, and having a divorced/separated parents was associated with a reduced odds of consulting a physician compared to those having parents that were married (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.05-0.83). The findings imply the need for education to help adolescent girls manage menstrual symptoms and increase awareness of the benefit of treating them. Given that menstrual-related information was widely available from mothers, family, and social culture are potentially important in shaping good menstrual attitudes.

  17. Iron-dependent erythropoiesis in women with excessive menstrual blood losses and women with normal menses.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Mariasanta; Dolce, Alberto; Celenza, Giuseppe; Grandone, Elvira; Perilli, Maria Grazia; Siragusa, Sergio; Carta, Gaspare; Orecchioni, Assunta; Mariani, Guglielmo

    2014-04-01

    In women of fertile age, iron loss consequent to excessive menstrual discharge is by far the most frequent cause of iron-deficient anemia. However, the relationship between menstrual discharge and iron loss is poorly understood. In this prospective study, total menstrual and iron losses were assayed in a large cohort of non-anemic women and women with excessive menstrual blood losses (menorrhagia) in order to provide data useful for intervention. One hundred and five Caucasian women aged 20-45 years were recruited. Blood cell count and serum ferritin (SF) levels were determined in each case before menses. Menstrual fluid losses (MFL) were determined using a standardized pads' weight method. Hematin concentration was assayed by a variant of the Alkaline Hematin Method from which iron concentration was calculated. Mean SF levels were 36.2 (range 8.6-100) ng/ml in healthy women and 6.4 (range 5-14) ng/ml in patients with menorrhagia. Median values of iron lost/cycle were 0.87 mg in healthy women and 5.2 mg in patients with menorrhagia (ranges 0.102-2.569 and 1.634-8.665 mg, respectively, p < 0.001). In women with menorrhagia, iron lost/cycle strongly correlated (0.789, p < 0.001) with MFL. In conclusion, healthy women with normal menses lose, on average, 1 mg iron/cycle. Average iron losses in patients with menorrhagia are, at least in our cohort, on average, five-to-six times higher than normal. Most women with menorrhagia had totally depleted iron stores. Indirect, quantitative evaluation of iron lost with menses may be useful to assess the risk of developing iron-deficient anemia in individual patients.

  18. Idealised versus tainted femininity: discourses of the menstrual experience in Australian magazines that target young women.

    PubMed

    Raftos, M; Jackson, D; Mannix, J

    1998-09-01

    Information and messages concerning health-related issues are not confined to material provided by official figures or sources. Much information exists in the community and comes from a variety of sources. One such source is the media. This paper reports the findings of a study conducted over a 12-month period of advertisements for menstrual products in a selection of four monthly Australian magazines (n = 48) directed towards young women. The study examined the way in which menstruation and the menstrual experience were depicted in terms of page space, textual content and visual images. Findings revealed that advertisements for menstrual products provided confusing, conflicting and paradoxical messages. These included stressing the normality of menstruation while also emphasising the importance of keeping it hidden and secret. Menstruation was depicted as being a state of tainted (idealised) femininity because of the potential for the menstrual silence to be shattered by people finding out. Protection failure was depicted as being the ultimate in tainted femininity and a result of a woman's incorrect choice of product. Choosing menstrual-care products was depicted as simple but, paradoxically, complex and confusing. Women were depicted as liberated and sophisticated but images and language related to infancy were used. Freedom and liberation were conferred by the use of the advertised product. Overall, in common with previous studies, menstruation was depicted as a crisis of hygiene that is a risk to femininity. Advertisements for pantyliners suggest that femininity itself poses a threat to (idealised) femininity. This study demonstrates the crucial role of the media as a source of health information for young women.

  19. India moves towards menstrual hygiene: subsidized sanitary napkins for rural adolescent girls-issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Garg, Rajesh; Goyal, Shobha; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2012-05-01

    The onset of menstruation is one of the most important physiological changes occurring among girls during the adolescent years. Menstruation heralds the onset of physiological maturity in girls. It becomes the part and parcel of their lives until menopause. Apart from personal importance, this phenomenon also has social significance. In India, menstruation is surrounded by myths and misconceptions with a long list of "do's" and "don'ts" for women. Hygiene-related practices of women during menstruation are of considerable importance, as it may increase vulnerability to Reproductive Tract Infections (RTI's). Poor menstrual hygiene is one of the major reasons for the high prevalence of RTIs in the country and contributes significantly to female morbidity. Most of the adolescent girls in villages use rags and old clothes during menstruation, increasing susceptibility to RTI's. Adolescents constitute one-fifths of India's population and yet their sexual health needs remain largely unaddressed in the national welfare programs. Poor menstrual hygiene in developing countries has been an insufficiently acknowledged problem. In June 2010, the Government of India proposed a new scheme towards menstrual hygiene by a provision of subsidized sanitary napkins to rural adolescent girls. But there are various other issues like awareness, availability and quality of napkins, regular supply, privacy, water supply, disposal of napkins, reproductive health education and family support which needs simultaneous attention for promotion of menstrual hygiene. The current article looks at the issue of menstrual hygiene not only from the health point of view, but also considers social and human rights values attached to it.

  20. Pubertal timing, menstrual irregularity, and mental health: results of a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Toffol, Elena; Koponen, Päivikki; Luoto, Riitta; Partonen, Timo

    2014-04-01

    Reproductive events have a significant impact on women's lives. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of age at menarche and current menstrual irregularity on psychological well-being and psychopathology. Data were collected in the context of the Finnish population-based Health 2000 study with self-administered questionnaires, a home interview, and a clinical health examination. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-21), the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (M-CIDI) were used to assess psychopathology. The relationships between age at menarche and current menstrual flow irregularity vs. BDI-21 and GHQ-12 scores and M-CIDI diagnoses were studied among 4,391 women aged 30 years and over. Negative, nonsignificant associations were found between age at menarche and BDI-21 and GHQ-12 scores. Young age at menarche was associated with increased risks of any recent mental disorder (OR = 0.894, p < 0.01), major depressive episode (OR = 0.900, p < 0.05), major depressive disorder (OR = 0.888; p < 0.05), and anxiety disorder (OR = 0.892; p < 0.05). Menstrual irregularity was associated with BDI-21 (p < 0.001) and GHQ-12 (p < 0.05) scores, but not with any recent psychiatric diagnosis. Age at menarche and menstrual irregularity have an influence on mental health, particularly on mood and anxiety symptoms. Reproductive features (age at menarche and menstrual irregularity) should be paid attention to during psychiatric evaluations.

  1. Peripheral haemodynamics and renal function in relation to the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    van Beek, E; Houben, A J; van Es, P N; Willekes, C; Korten, E C; de Leeuw, P W; Peeters, L L

    1996-08-01

    1. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle differs from the follicular phase by the development of a state of general vascular relaxation. 2. Once in the follicular and once in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, we measured by non-invasive techniques: arterial blood pressure (by finger blood pressure measurements), vascular tone (by pulse-wave velocity and plethysmography), blood flow to skin (by laser-Doppler), blood flow to forearm (by plethysmography) and blood flow to kidneys (by para-aminohippurate clearance), and the glomerular filtration rate (by inulin clearance). The data points obtained in the luteal phase were compared with those in the follicular phase by non-parametric tests. 3. Arterial blood pressure, vascular tone and the blood flows to the forearm and kidneys were comparable in the two phases of the menstrual cycle. In contrast, the blood flow to the skin was consistently lower, and the glomerular filtration rate higher in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. 4. The results of the present study do not support our hypothesis of a general vascular relaxation in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. The lower skin flow in the luteal phase may be an adaptation needed to ensure the higher core temperature of 0.3-0.5 degree C in the luteal phase. The higher glomerular filtration rate was in most case paralleled by a higher renal blood flow in the luteal phase. This suggests that the higher glomerular filtration rate is secondary to a selective vasorelaxation of the afferent renal arterioles.

  2. Mechanism of action of narcotics in the production of menstrual dysfunction in women.

    PubMed

    Santen, F J; Sofsky, J; Bilic, N; Lippert, R

    1975-06-01

    The ability of morphine to block ovulation in animals prompted investigation of the frequency and mechanisms of menstrual abnormalities in women addicted to narcotic analgesics. Menstrual histories obtained from 76 former heroin addicts receiving daily methadone maintenance revealed that more than one-half of these women had experienced menstrual abnormalities while taking heroin or methadone. In order to determine the specific physiologic effects of narcotic analgesics on reproductive function, detailed endocrinologic studies were carried out in seven of these patients who complained of amenorrhea or irregular menses while receiving methadone. Four of the seven women manifested abnormalities of the control of gonadotropin secretion. Three of these four failed to exhibit cyclic gonadotropin release, as evidenced by an absence of increased levels of follicular phase follicle-stimulating hormone, midcycle gonadotropin peaks or luteal phase progesterone increments. In the fourth patient a prolonged follicular phase (30 days) of the menstrual cycle was detected. One of these four patients also had low basal gonadotropin levels and failed to exhibit luteinizing hormone increments greater than control levels in response to ethinyl estradiol (positive feedback). The remaining three women exhibited normal patterns of gonadotropin secretion during the observation period. In these women, menstrual bleeding occurred in response to withdrawal from luteal phase (10 to 20 ng/ml) progesterone levels and to exogenous ethinyl estradiol, suggesting normal uterine responsivity to progesterone and estrogen. Although not documented, it is likely that oligo-ovulation was the cause of the irregular menses in these three patients. Amenorrhea is commonly associated with methadone ingestion or heroin addiction and appears to be related to an alteration of the hypothalamic mechanisms controlling gonadotropin secretion. Tolerance to these effects of methadone may develop after chronic

  3. Pharmacokinetics of omeprazole and its metabolites in three phases of menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Shabnam; Iqbal, Zafar; Ahmad, Lateef; Shah, Yasar; Nasir, Fazli

    2015-03-01

    Omeprazole (OMP) is effective in the treatment of gastric hyperacidity and is metabolized by CYP2C19 and CYP3A4. These enzymes are modulated by estrogen and progesterone which regulate the menstrual cycle. The variations in the pharmacokinetics (PK) of many drugs like amphetamine, benzodiazepines and caffeine have been reported during menstrual cycle. In present study, the PK of the omeprazole and its metabolites was investigated during various phases of the menstrual cycle. A single oral dose, open-label, non-controlled, pharmacokinetic study of omeprazole was conducted in healthy young/premenopausal females (n = 16). The PK of omeprazole, 5-hydroxy-omeprazole and omeprazole sulphone was evaluated in three phases of menstrual cycle. The blood samples were analyzed using reversed-phase HPLC coupled with UV detector and the PK data were evaluated. The activities of CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 were determined as AUC(OH-OMP)/AUC(OMP) and AUC(OMP-SUL)/AUC(OMP), respectively. Omeprazole showed significantly (p < 0.05) higher [Formula: see text] and CL/F in follicular and menstrual phases, respectively. The [Formula: see text] of 5-hydroxy omeprazole was also significantly (p < 0.05) higher in follicular phase. The metabolic ratios (MR) of 5-hydroxy omeprazole and omeprazole sulphone were lower in follicular phase compared with the luteal phase. The present study suggests that high estrogen levels of follicular phase may result in increased absorption of omeprazole. The lower MR for 5-hydroxy omeprazole and omeprazole sulphone in follicular phase as compared to luteal phase suggests that metabolism of omeprazole is low in follicular phase as compared to luteal phase, which is progesterone-dominant phase. However, the clinical significance for these findings needs to be determined.

  4. Menstrual cycle perturbation by organohalogens and elements in the Cree of James Bay, Canada.

    PubMed

    Wainman, Bruce C; Kesner, James S; Martin, Ian D; Meadows, Juliana W; Krieg, Edward F; Nieboer, Evert; Tsuji, Leonard J

    2016-04-01

    Persistent organohalogens (POHs) and metals have been linked to alterations in menstrual cycle function and fertility in humans. The Cree First Nations people living near James Bay in Ontario and Quebec, Canada, have elevated levels of POHs, mercury and lead compared to other Canadians. The present study examines the interrelationships between selected POHs and elements on menstrual cycle function in these Cree women. Menstrual cycle characteristics were derived from structured daily diaries and endocrine measurements from daily urine samples collected during one cycle for 42 women age 19-42. We measured 31 POHs in blood plasma and 18 elements in whole blood, for 31 of the participants. POHs and elements detected in ≥ 70% of the participants were transformed by principal component (PC) analysis to reduce the contaminant exposure data to fewer, uncorrelated PCA variables. Multiple regression analysis revealed that, after adjusting for confounders, PC-3 values showed significant negative association with cycle length, after adjusting for confounders (p = 0.002). PC-3 accounted for 9.2% of the variance and shows positive loadings for cadmium, selenium, and PBDE congeners 47 and 153, and a negative loading for copper. Sensitivity analysis of the model to quantify likely effect sizes showed a range of menstrual cycle length from 25.3 to 28.3 days using the lower and upper 95% confidence limits of mean measured contaminant concentrations to predict cycle length. Our observations support the hypothesis that the menstrual cycle function of these women may be altered by exposure to POHs and elements from their environment.

  5. Comprehensive analysis of leukocytes, vascularization and matrix metalloproteinases in human menstrual xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yong; He, Bin; Xu, Xiangbo; Wang, Jiedong

    2011-02-17

    In our previous study, menstrual-like changes in mouse were provoked through the pharmacologic withdrawal of progesterone with mifepristone following induction of decidualization. However, mouse is not a natural menstruation animal, and the menstruation model using external stimuli may not truly reflect the occurrence and development of the human menstrual process. Therefore, we established a model of menstruation based on human endometrial xenotransplantation. In this model, human endometrial tissues were transplanted subcutaneously into SCID mice that were ovarectomized and supplemented with estrogen and progestogen by silastic implants with a scheme imitating the endocrinological milieu of human menstrual cycle. Morphology, hormone levels, and expression of vimentin and cytokeratin markers were evaluated to confirm the menstrual-like changes in this model. With 28 days of hormone treatment, transplanted human endometrium survived and underwent proliferation, differentiation and disintegration, similar to human endometrium in vivo. Human CD45+ cells showed a peak of increase 28 days post-transplantation. Three days after progesterone withdrawal, mouse CD45+ cells increased rapidly in number and were significantly greater than human CD45+ cell counts. Mouse CD31+ blood vascular-like structures were detected in both transplanted and host tissues. After progesterone withdrawal, the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 1, 2, and 9 were increased. In summary, we successfully established a human endometrial xenotransplantation model in SCID mice, based on the results of menstrual-like changes in which MMP-1, 2 and 9 are involved. We showed that leukocytes are originated from in situ proliferation in human xenografts and involved in the occurrence of menstruation. This model will help to further understand the occurrence, growth, and differentiation of the endometrium and the underlying mechanisms of menstruation.

  6. Menstrual cycle characteristics and reproductive hormone levels in women exposed to atrazine in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Cragin, Lori A; Kesner, James S; Bachand, Annette M; Barr, Dana Boyd; Meadows, Juliana W; Krieg, Edward F; Reif, John S

    2011-11-01

    Atrazine is the most commonly used herbicide in the U.S. and a wide-spread groundwater contaminant. Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence exists that atrazine disrupts reproductive health and hormone secretion. We examined the relationship between exposure to atrazine in drinking water and menstrual cycle function including reproductive hormone levels. Women 18-40 years old residing in agricultural communities where atrazine is used extensively (Illinois) and sparingly (Vermont) answered a questionnaire (n=102), maintained menstrual cycle diaries (n=67), and provided daily urine samples for analyses of luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol and progesterone metabolites (n=35). Markers of exposures included state of residence, atrazine and chlorotriazine concentrations in tap water, municipal water and urine, and estimated dose from water consumption. Women who lived in Illinois were more likely to report menstrual cycle length irregularity (odds ratio (OR)=4.69; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.58-13.95) and more than 6 weeks between periods (OR=6.16; 95% CI: 1.29-29.38) than those who lived in Vermont. Consumption of >2 cups of unfiltered Illinois water daily was associated with increased risk of irregular periods (OR=5.73; 95% CI: 1.58-20.77). Estimated "dose" of atrazine and chlorotriazine from tap water was inversely related to mean mid-luteal estradiol metabolite. Atrazine "dose" from municipal concentrations was directly related to follicular phase length and inversely related to mean mid-luteal progesterone metabolite levels. We present preliminary evidence that atrazine exposure, at levels below the US EPA MCL, is associated with increased menstrual cycle irregularity, longer follicular phases, and decreased levels of menstrual cycle endocrine biomarkers of infertile ovulatory cycles.

  7. Mechanisms of Acupuncture-Electroacupuncture on Persistent Pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruixin; Lao, Lixing; Ren, Ke; Berman, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, preclinical investigations of electroacupuncture mechanisms on persistent tissue-injury (inflammatory), nerve-injury (neuropathic), cancer, and visceral pain have increased. These studies show that electroacupuncture activates the nervous system differently in health than in pain conditions, alleviates both sensory and affective inflammatory pain, and inhibits inflammatory and neuropathic pain more effectively at 2–10 Hz than at 100 Hz. Electroacupuncture blocks pain by activating a variety of bioactive chemicals through peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal mechanisms. These include opioids, which desensitize peripheral nociceptors and reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines peripherally and in the spinal cord, and serotonin and norepinephrine, which decrease spinal n-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit GluN1 phosphorylation. Additional studies suggest that electroacupuncture, when combined with low dosages of conventional analgesics, provides effective pain management that can forestall the side effects of often-debilitating pharmaceuticals. PMID:24322588

  8. Twice-Daily Subcutaneous Injection of Kisspeptin-54 Does Not Abolish Menstrual Cyclicity in Healthy Female Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Jayasena, C. N.; Comninos, A. N.; Nijher, G. M. K.; Abbara, A.; De Silva, A.; Veldhuis, J. D.; Ratnasabapathy, R.; Izzi-Engbeaya, C.; Lim, A.; Patel, D. A.; Ghatei, M. A.; Bloom, S. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Kisspeptin is a critical hypothalamic regulator of reproductive function. Chronic kisspeptin administration causes profound tachyphylaxis in male monkeys and in women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea. The pharmacological effects of chronic kisspeptin exposure in healthy women with normal menstrual cycles have not been studied previously. Aim: Our aim was to determine the effects of follicular-phase kisspeptin-54 treatment on menstrual cyclicity in healthy women. Methods: We performed a prospective, single-blinded, 1-way crossover study. Healthy women received twice-daily sc injections of kisspeptin (6.4 nmol/kg) or 0.9% saline during menstrual days 7–14 (n = 5 per treatment arm). Serial assessments of basal reproductive hormones, ultrasound parameters, LH pulsatility, and acute sensitivity to GnRH and kisspeptin-54 injection were performed. Results: Menstrual cyclicity persisted in all women after follicular-phase kisspeptin-54 treatment. Chronic exposure to kisspeptin-54 did not abolish acute stimulation of LH after injection of kisspeptin-54 or GnRH. In addition, kisspeptin-54 treatment was associated with a shorter mean length of the menstrual cycle (mean length of menstrual cycle was 28.6 ± 1.4 days with saline vs 26.8 ± 3.1 days with kisspeptin, P < .01), earlier onset of highest recorded serum LH (mean menstrual day of highest LH was 15.2 ± 1.3 with saline vs 13.0 ± 1.9 with kisspeptin, P < .05), and earlier onset of the luteal phase (mean menstrual day of progesterone increase was 18.0 ± 2.1 with saline vs 15.8 ± 0.9 with kisspeptin, P < .05). Conclusion: Our data suggest that 1 week of exogenous kisspeptin-54 does not abolish menstrual cyclicity in healthy women. Further work is needed to determine whether kisspeptin could be used to treat certain anovulatory disorders. PMID:24030945

  9. Assessment of Musculoskeletal Strength and Levels of Fatigue during Different Phases of Menstrual Cycle in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    D Souza, Urban John; Shivaprakash, G

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Some of the physiological factors and athletic performance might show variation along the phases of menstrual cycle. The alterations seen in these physiological parameters of various systems relating to oscillations in hormonal levels do affect the autonomic nervous system and metabolic functions. Former studies heave inconclusively about the influence of hormones on exercise performance, predominantly muscle strength and rate of fatigue during different phases of the menstrual cycle. Studies regarding influence of these variations during bleeding phase were not done. Aim To evaluate the muscle strength variations and also the rate of fatigue during various phases of the menstrual cycle in young adults. Materials and Methods This was a prospective study conducted among 100 healthy adult female volunteers aged 18-24 years, with normal regular menstrual cycles persistent between 26- 32 days (average of 28 days), for a minimum of last 6 months. Muscle strength was assessed by calculating the work done and fatigue rate using Mosso’s ergograph and by handgrip dynamometer strength. Each subject was evaluated consecutively for two menstrual cycles in all three phases which were classified as Phase 1- Menstrual phase, Phase 2- Follicular phase and Phase 3- Luteal phase. The data obtained was analysed by statistical tool One-way ANOVA followed by a post-hoc Tukeys test. A p-value of ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Results The amount of work done and handgrip strength was significantly higher in phase 2 (p<0.001) and relatively reduced in phase 1 and 3 (p<0.001) of menstrual cycle. In terms of fatigue rate percentage, phase 2 showed significantly lesser values (p<0.001) as compared to phase 1 and 3 of menstrual cycle. Conclusion We conclude that the cyclical variation in endogenous reproductive hormones increases the muscle strength in follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Thus provide support for the influence of these hormones in regulation of these

  10. The impact of birth weight and maternal history on acne, hirsutism, and menstrual disorder symptoms in Turkish adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Hızlı, Deniz; Köşüş, Aydın; Köşüş, Nermin; Kamalak, Zeynep; Ak, Dilek; Turhan, Nilgün Ö

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the association between birthweight, maternal medical history and acne, hirsutism, and menstrual disorder symptoms in Turkish adolescent population. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to all volunteer female students at 15 secondary schools. The subjects' body mass index, birthweight, age at menarche, pattern of menstrual cycle, and presence of acne or hirsutism problems were recorded. Maternal obstetric parameters, menstrual cycle, presence of acne or hirsutism at present and at adolescent period were also asked. The impact of birthweight and maternal history on acne, hirsutism, and menstrual disorder symptoms was evaluated. The results of the study showed that after exclusion of subjects born prematurely, total of 1,309 students filled the questionnaires properly and included in the study. Of these students, 174 had low birthweight (LBW) (<2,500 g), 925 had appropriate (2,500-4,000 g), and 210 had high birthweight (>4,000 g). LBW students had higher incidence of menstrual disorder and acne problems (P = 0.032 and P = 0.011, respectively). Maternal acne and hirsutism problems were significantly often in LBW group. Multivariate analysis showed that LBW was a predictor of acne, hirsutism, and menstrual disorder at adolescent period (P = 0.001; P = 0.01, and 0.02, respectively). In addition, maternal menstrual disorder was also a predictor of menstrual disorder (P = 0.035). We concluded that LBW is a good predictor of acne, hirsutism, and menstrual disorder problems in Turkish adolescent population.

  11. Association between the CLOCK gene 3111 T > C polymorphism and an irregular menstrual cycle in Korean adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kye-Hyun; Kim, Yunsin; Ha, Juwon; Shin, Dong-Won; Shin, Young-Chul; Oh, Kang-Seob; Woo, Hee-Yeon; Lim, Se-Won

    2015-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is an example of a human infradian rhythm, but an altered sleep-wake cycle or a disrupted circadian rhythm can change the regularity of the menstrual cycle. In this study, we investigated whether an irregular menstrual cycle is associated with polymorphisms in the CLOCK (3111T > C) and/or PER3 (variable number tandem repeat, VNTR) genes, which are known to have an impact on the circadian rhythm. One hundred ninety-seven postmenarchal, adolescent girls from two girls' high schools in Seoul, Korea, were studied. All participants were requested to complete the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) to assess the emotional distress that might cause menstrual irregularity. Every participant donated a blood sample from which DNA was extracted and genotyped for the CLOCK 3111T > C and PER3 VNTR polymorphisms. A significant association was found between the CLOCK 3111T > C genotype and irregular menstrual cycles. Subjects with the 3111T > C genotype had a high risk of an irregular menstrual cycle compared with 3111T/T homozygous subjects (odds ratio [OR] = 2.88; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.26-6.55). When multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to adjust for age, PSS, STAI, BDI and BMI, subjects with the 3111T > C polymorphism showed a significantly increased OR for irregular menstrual cycles (OR = 3.09; 95% CI: 1.32-7.21). There was no significant association between the PER3 VNTR polymorphism and the irregularity of the menstrual cycle (p > 0.05). The results of this study suggest that the CLOCK 3111T > C polymorphism could be an independent risk factor for irregular menstrual cycles, irrespective of psychological distress and endocrine or metabolic conditions, and could be used as a molecular marker for gynecological studies on this aspect.

  12. Evidence for a central mode of action for etoricoxib (COX-2 inhibitor) in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Petersen, Kristian Kjær

    2016-08-01

    The COX-2 inhibitor etoricoxib modulates the peripheral and central nociceptive mechanisms in animals. This interaction has not been studied in patients with pain. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-way crossover, 4-week treatment study investigated the pain mechanisms modulated by etoricoxib in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis. Patients were randomized to group A (60 mg/d etoricoxib followed by placebo) or B (placebo followed by 60 mg/d etoricoxib). The quantitative, mechanistic pain biomarkers were pressure pain thresholds, temporal summation (TS), and conditioning pain modulation. Clinical readouts were Brief Pain Inventory, WOMAC, painDETECT questionnaire (PD-Q), and time and pain intensity during walking and stair climbing. Etoricoxib as compared with placebo significantly modulated the pressure pain thresholds (P = 0.012, localized sensitization) at the knee and leg (control site) (P = 0.025, spreading sensitization) and TS assessed from the knee (P = 0.038) and leg (P = 0.045). Conditioning pain modulation was not modulated. The Brief Pain Inventory (pain scores), PD-Q, WOMAC, and walking and stair climbing tests were all significantly improved by etoricoxib. Based on a minimum of 30% or 50% pain alleviation (day 0-day 28), responders and nonresponders were defined. The nonresponders showed a significant association between increased facilitation of TS and increased pain alleviation. None of the other parameters predicted the degree of pain alleviation. Generally, a responder to etoricoxib has the most facilitated TS. In conclusion, etoricoxib (1) modulated central pain modulatory mechanisms and (2) improved pain and function in painful osteoarthritis. Stronger facilitation of TS may indicate a better response to etoricoxib, supporting the central mode-of-action of the drug.

  13. Emerging Relationships between Exercise, Sensory Nerves, and Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Michael A.; Kluding, Patricia M.; Wright, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of physical activity as a therapeutic tool is rapidly growing in the medical community and the role exercise may offer in the alleviation of painful disease states is an emerging research area. The development of neuropathic pain is a complex mechanism, which clinicians and researchers are continually working to better understand. The limited therapies available for alleviation of these pain states are still focused on pain abatement and as opposed to treating underlying mechanisms. The continued research into exercise and pain may address these underlying mechanisms, but the mechanisms which exercise acts through are still poorly understood. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of how the peripheral nervous system responds to exercise, the relationship of inflammation and exercise, and experimental and clinical use of exercise to treat pain. Although pain is associated with many conditions, this review highlights pain associated with diabetes as well as experimental studies on nerve damages-associated pain. Because of the global effects of exercise across multiple organ systems, exercise intervention can address multiple problems across the entire nervous system through a single intervention. This is a double-edged sword however, as the global interactions of exercise also require in depth investigations to include and identify the many changes that can occur after physical activity. A continued investment into research is necessary to advance the adoption of physical activity as a beneficial remedy for neuropathic pain. The following highlights our current understanding of how exercise alters pain, the varied pain models used to explore exercise intervention, and the molecular pathways leading to the physiological and pathological changes following exercise intervention. PMID:27601974

  14. Perioperative Factors Contributing the Post-Craniotomy Pain: A Synthesis of Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Tumul; Garg, Rakesh; Sheshadri, Veena; Venkatraghavan, Lakshmi; Bergese, Sergio Daniel; Cappellani, Ronald B.; Schaller, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    The perioperative management of post-craniotomy pain is controversial. Although the concept of pain control in non-neurosurgical fields has grown substantially, the understanding of neurosurgical pain and its causative factors in such a population is inconclusive. In fact, the organ that is the center of pain and its related mechanisms receives little attention to alleviate distress during neurosurgical procedures. In contrast to the old belief that pain following intracranial surgery is minimal, recent data suggest the exact opposite. Despite the evolution of various multimodal analgesic techniques for optimal pain control, the concern of post-craniotomy pain remains. This paradox could be due to the lack of thorough understanding of different perioperative factors that can influence the incidence and intensity of pain in post-craniotomy population. Therefore, this review aims to give an in-depth insight into the various aspects of pain and its related factors in adult neurosurgical patients. PMID:28299313

  15. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... call your doctor. In Spanish— Dolor abdominal en niños menores de 12 años What is recurrent abdominal ... Functional abdominal pain (FAP) typically affects kids ages 4-12, and is quite common, affecting up to ...

  16. [Elbow pain].

    PubMed

    Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Miintyselkii, Pekka; Havulinna, Jouni

    2010-01-01

    Pain and disability in the elbow are not as common as in the neck, shoulder or wrist, for example. The elbow may, however, present disorders that may in a prolonged state be difficult and cause significant loss of working capacity. These include epicondylitis, osteoarthritis and entrapment of the ulnar nerve.

  17. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  18. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck. If neck pain involves compression of your nerves, you may feel numbness, tingling, or weakness in your arm or ... When to Contact a Medical Professional ... fever and headache, and your neck is so stiff that you cannot touch your chin to your chest. This may be ...

  19. Nurse's role in controlling cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Mahfudh, Salma Said

    2011-10-01

    Nurses spend more time with patients than any other member of the healthcare team. They play a critical, active and very important part in controlling cancer patients' pain and alleviating suffering. In controlling cancer pain the nurse needs to understand the psychological state of the cancer patient, cancer pain, cancer pain treatment, deleterious effects of unrelieved cancer pain and patient's socio cultural background. She needs to understand that there are two types of pain, nociceptive and neuropathic pains and that 80% of the cancer patients in pain could have 2 or more than 4 different pains at the same time. Nurses' role in controlling cancer pain include believing the patient, assessing pain, identifying the root of the problem, planning the care, administering medication, evaluating effectiveness, ensuring good pain control and individualizing treatment. It also includes nursing interventions such as giving tender nursing care, preventing pain, educating, advocating, communicating, comforting, supporting, and counseling the patient. The nurse must use both pharmacological and non pharmacological treatments to individualize treatment, know all the drugs that are used for the treatment of Cancer Pain, how these drugs relieve pain and what their side effects are. She must use the WHO guidelines to treat pain and must choose the right drug, right dose, given at the right times, with the right intervals and to the right patient. She must evaluate effectiveness of treatment, give PRN doses for breakthrough pain and recommend for specific changes. The role of the nurse is to anticipate the patient's pain needs, advocate for the patient for what feels appropriate for him within his cultural context and incorporate the patient's belief. The nurse can physically relieve pain by promoting comfort, support painful area, gentleness in handling the patient and use nursing treatments. The nurse can recommend physiotherapy, (TENS)/Acupuncture, Occupational therapy

  20. Successful management of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 using single injection interscalene brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Fallatah, Summayah M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type 1 of the upper limb is a painful and debilitating condition. Interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) in conjugation with other modalities was shown to be a feasible therapy with variable success. We reported a case of CRPS type 1 as diagnosed by International Association for the Study of Pain criteria in which pharmacological approaches failed to achieve adequate pain relief and even were associated with progressive dysfunction of the upper extremity. Single injection ISB, in combination with physical therapy and botulinum toxin injection, was successful to alleviate pain with functional restoration. PMID:25422619

  1. Anxiety sensitivity and catastrophizing: Associations with pain and somatization in non-clinical children

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Jennie C. I.; Allen, Laura B.; Evans, Subhadra; Lu, Qian; Myers, Cynthia D.; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among anxiety sensitivity (AS), catastrophizing, somatization, and pain in 240 non-clinical children (121 girls; mean age = 12.7 years). Children with pain problems (n = 81; 33.8%) reported greater AS and catastrophizing (p’s < .01) relative to children without pain problems. AS but not catastrophizing was significantly associated with current pain. However, both AS and catastrophizing were significantly associated with somatization. AS and catastrophizing represent related but partially distinct cognitive constructs that may be targeted by interventions aimed at alleviating pain and somatization in children. PMID:19858329

  2. Core strength training for patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Dien; Lin, Hung-Yu; Lai, Ping-Tung

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] Through core strength training, patients with chronic low back pain can strengthen their deep trunk muscles. However, independent training remains challenging, despite the existence of numerous core strength training strategies. Currently, no standardized system has been established analyzing and comparing the results of core strength training and typical resistance training. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review of the results of previous studies to explore the effectiveness of various core strength training strategies for patients with chronic low back pain. [Methods] We searched for relevant studies using electronic databases. Subsequently, we evaluated their quality by analyzing the reported data. [Results] We compared four methods of evaluating core strength training: trunk balance, stabilization, segmental stabilization, and motor control exercises. According to the results of various scales and evaluation instruments, core strength training is more effective than typical resistance training for alleviating chronic low back pain. [Conclusion] All of the core strength training strategies examined in this study assist in the alleviation of chronic low back pain; however, we recommend focusing on training the deep trunk muscles to alleviate chronic low back pain.

  3. Core strength training for patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Dien; Lin, Hung-Yu; Lai, Ping-Tung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Through core strength training, patients with chronic low back pain can strengthen their deep trunk muscles. However, independent training remains challenging, despite the existence of numerous core strength training strategies. Currently, no standardized system has been established analyzing and comparing the results of core strength training and typical resistance training. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review of the results of previous studies to explore the effectiveness of various core strength training strategies for patients with chronic low back pain. [Methods] We searched for relevant studies using electronic databases. Subsequently, we evaluated their quality by analyzing the reported data. [Results] We compared four methods of evaluating core strength training: trunk balance, stabilization, segmental stabilization, and motor control exercises. According to the results of various scales and evaluation instruments, core strength training is more effective than typical resistance training for alleviating chronic low back pain. [Conclusion] All of the core strength training strategies examined in this study assist in the alleviation of chronic low back pain; however, we recommend focusing on training the deep trunk muscles to alleviate chronic low back pain. PMID:25931693

  4. Analgesics as Reinforcers with Chronic Pain: Evidence from Operant Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ewan, Eric E.; Martin, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Previously preclinical pain research has focused on simple behavioral endpoints to assess the efficacy of analgesics in acute and chronic pain models, primarily reflexive withdrawal from an applied mechanical or thermal stimulus. However recent research has been aimed at investigating other behavioral states in the presence of pain, including spontaneous, non-elicited pain. One approach is to investigate the reinforcing effects of analgesics in animals with experimental pain, which should serve as reinforcers by virtue of their ability to alleviate the relevant subjective states induced by pain. The gold standard for assessing drug reinforcement is generally accepted to be drug self-administration, and this review highlights the ability of drugs to serve as reinforcers in animals with experimental neuropathic pain, and the extent to which this behavior is altered in chronic pain states. Additionally, intracranial self-stimulation is an operant procedure that has been used extensively to study drug reinforcement mechanisms and the manner in which neuropathic pain alters the ability of drugs to serve as reinforcers in this paradigm will also be discussed. Drug self-administration and intracranial self-stimulation have promise as tools to investigate behavioral effects of analgesics in animals with chronic pain, particularly regarding the mechanisms through which these drugs motivate consumption in a chronic pain state. PMID:23973302

  5. Analgesics as reinforcers with chronic pain: Evidence from operant studies.

    PubMed

    Ewan, Eric E; Martin, Thomas J

    2013-12-17

    Previously preclinical pain research has focused on simple behavioral endpoints to assess the efficacy of analgesics in acute and chronic pain models, primarily reflexive withdrawal from an applied mechanical or thermal stimulus. However recent research has been aimed at investigating other behavioral states in the presence of pain, including spontaneous, non-elicited pain. One approach is to investigate the reinforcing effects of analgesics in animals with experimental pain, which should serve as reinforcers by virtue of their ability to alleviate the relevant subjective states induced by pain. The gold standard for assessing drug reinforcement is generally accepted to be drug self-administration, and this review highlights the ability of drugs to serve as reinforcers in animals with experimental neuropathic pain, and the extent to which this behavior is altered in chronic pain states. Additionally, intracranial self-stimulation is an operant procedure that has been used extensively to study drug reinforcement mechanisms and the manner in which neuropathic pain alters the ability of drugs to serve as reinforcers in this paradigm will also be discussed. Drug self-administration and intracranial self-stimulation have promise as tools to investigate behavioral effects of analgesics in animals with chronic pain, particularly regarding the mechanisms through which these drugs motivate consumption in a chronic pain state.

  6. Employees with Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Chronic Pain By Beth Loy, Ph.D. Preface Introduction Information ... at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Chronic Pain How prevalent is chronic pain? Chronic pain has ...

  7. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  8. When Sex Is Painful

    MedlinePlus

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS FAQ020 When Sex Is Painful • How common is painful sex? • What causes pain during sex? • Where is pain during sex felt? • When should ...

  9. Fasting ghrelin levels in physically active women: relationship with menstrual disturbances and metabolic hormones.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Mary Jane; Leidy, Heather J; O'Donnell, Emma; Lasley, Bill; Williams, Nancy I

    2004-07-01

    Recent findings support a role for ghrelin in the regulation of energy homeostasis and possibly reproductive function. The primary purpose of this study was to test whether differences in fasting ghrelin levels exist in exercising women with differing menstrual and metabolic status. Menstrual cycle status was defined as sedentary ovulatory (SedOvul; n = 10, cycles = 26), exercising ovulatory (ExOvul; n = 11, cycles = 22), exercising luteal phase defect/anovulatory (ExLPD/Anov; n = 11, cycle = 27), and exercising amenorrheic (ExAmen; n = 8, cycle = 16). Subjects were 27.7 +/- 1.2 yr of age, weighed 60.2 +/- 3.3 kg, and had menstrual cycle lengths of 28.4 +/- 0.9 d. Blood was collected during the follicular phase (d 2-9) of each menstrual cycle and analyzed for total ghrelin, insulin, total T(3), and leptin. Ghrelin was significantly elevated by approximately 85% in the ExAmen category (725.5 +/- 40.8 pmol/liter) when compared with all other categories (P < 0.001; SedOvul = 393.6 +/- 32.0 pmol/liter, ExOvul = 418.9 +/- 34.8 pmol/liter, and ExLPD/Anov = 381.1 +/- 314 pmol/liter). Leptin levels were lower in all groups vs. SedOvul (P < 0.001). Insulin was lower in both the ExLPD/Anov and ExAmen categories vs. SedOvul and ExOvul (P < 0.018), and total T(3) was lower in ExAmen compared with all other groups (P < 0.001), with concentrations in ExLPD/Anov and ExOvul exceeding those in SedOvul (P < 0.05). These data clearly indicate a metabolic hormonal profile consistent with chronic energy deficiency in exercising women across a range in menstrual status and introduces ghrelin as a potential supplementary indicator that uniquely discriminates amenorrheic athletes from athletes with other menstrual disturbances.

  10. The Influence of Early Life Sexual Abuse on Oxytocin Concentrations and Premenstrual Symptomatology in Women with a Menstrually Related Mood Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Shannon K.; Pedersen, Cort A.; Leserman, Jane; Girdler, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    Oxytocin (OT), associated with affiliation and social bonding, social salience, and stress/pain regulation, may play a role in the pathophysiology of stress-related disorders, including menstrually-related mood disorders (MRMD's). Adverse impacts of early life sexual abuse (ESA) on adult attachment, affective regulation, and pain sensitivity suggest ESA-related OT dysregulation in MRMD pathophysiology. We investigated the influence of ESA on plasma OT, and the relationship of OT to the clinical phenomenology of MRMD's. Compared to MRMD women without ESA (n=40), those with ESA (n=20) displayed significantly greater OT [5.39 pg/mL (SD, 2.4) vs. 4.36 pg/mL (SD, 1.1); t (58) = −2.26, p =.03]. In women with ESA, OT was significantly, inversely correlated with premenstrual psychological and somatic symptoms (r's = −.45 to −.64, p's < .05). The relationship between OT and premenstrual symptomatology was uniformly low and non-significant in women without ESA. In women with ESA, OT may positively modulate MRMD symptomatology. PMID:25892085

  11. Wakeful rest alleviates interference-based forgetting.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Retroactive interference (RI)--the disruptive influence of events occurring after the formation of a new memory--is one of the primary causes of forgetting. Placing individuals within an environment that postpones interference should, therefore, greatly reduce the likelihood of information being lost from memory. For example, a short period of wakeful rest should diminish interference-based forgetting. To test this hypothesis, participants took part in a foreign language learning activity and were shown English translations of 20 Icelandic words for immediate recall. Half of the participants were then given an 8-min rest before completing a similar or dissimilar interfering distractor task. The other half did not receive a rest until after the distractor task, at which point interference had already taken place. All participants were then asked to translate the Icelandic words for a second time. Results revealed that retention was significantly worse at the second recall test, but being allowed a brief rest before completing the distractor task helped reduce the amount of forgetting. Taking a short, passive break can shield new memories from RI and alleviate forgetting.

  12. An Advanced Buffet Load Alleviation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnham, Jay K.; Pitt, Dale M.; White, Edward V.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Moses, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an advanced buffet load alleviation (BLA) system that utilizes distributed piezoelectric actuators in conjunction with an active rudder to reduce the structural dynamic response of the F/A-18 aircraft vertical tails to buffet loads. The BLA system was defined analytically with a detailed finite-element-model of the tail structure and piezoelectric actuators. Oscillatory aerodynamics were included along with a buffet forcing function to complete the aeroservoelastic model of the tail with rudder control surface. Two single-input-single-output (SISO) controllers were designed, one for the active rudder and one for the active piezoelectric actuators. The results from the analytical open and closed loop simulations were used to predict the system performance. The objective of this BLA system is to extend the life of vertical tail structures and decrease their life-cycle costs. This system can be applied to other aircraft designs to address suppression of structural vibrations on military and commercial aircraft.

  13. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 alleviates aluminium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Leilei; Zhai, Qixiao; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Zhao, Jianxin; Narbad, Arjan; Zhang, Hao; Tian, Fengwei; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Aluminium (Al) is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. Al exposure can cause a variety of adverse physiological effects in humans and animals. Our aim was to demonstrate that specific probiotic bacteria can play a special physiologically functional role in protection against Al toxicity in mice. Thirty strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were tested for their aluminium-binding ability, aluminium tolerance, their antioxidative capacity, and their ability to survive the exposure to artificial gastrointestinal (GI) juices. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 was selected for animal experiments because of its excellent performance in vitro. Forty mice were divided into four groups: control, Al only, Al plus CCFM639, and Al plus deferiprone (DFP). CCFM639 was administered at 10(9) CFU once daily for 10 days, followed by a single oral dose of aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 5.14 mg aluminium (LD50) for each mouse. The results showed that CCFM639 treatment led to a significant reduction in the mortality rates with corresponding decrease in intestinal aluminium absorption and in accumulation of aluminium in the tissues and amelioration of hepatic histopathological damage. This probiotic treatment also resulted in alleviation of hepatic, renal, and cerebral oxidative stress. The treatment of L. plantarum CCFM639 has potential as a therapeutic dietary strategy against acute aluminium toxicity.

  14. Alleviating spatial conflict between people and biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Luck, Gary W.; Ricketts, Taylor H.; Daily, Gretchen C.; Imhoff, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Human settlements are expanding in species-rich regions and pose a serious threat to biodiversity conservation. We quantify the degree to which this threat manifests itself in two contrasting continents, Australia and North America, and suggest how it can be substantially alleviated. Human population density has a strong positive correlation with species richness in Australia for birds, mammals, amphibians, and butterflies (but not reptiles) and in North America for all five taxa. Nevertheless, conservation investments could secure locations that harbor almost all species while greatly reducing overlap with densely populated regions. We compared two conservation-planning scenarios that each aimed to represent all species at least once in a minimum set of sampling sites. The first scenario assigned equal cost to each site (ignoring differences in human population density); the second assigned a cost proportional to the site's human population density. Under the equal-cost scenario, 13–40% of selected sites occurred where population density values were highest (in the top decile). However, this overlap was reduced to as low as 0%, and in almost all cases to <10%, under the population-cost scenario, when sites of high population density were avoided where possible. Moreover, this reduction of overlap was achieved with only small increases in the total amount of area requiring protection. As densely populated regions continue to expand rapidly and drive up land values, the strategic conservation investments of the kind highlighted in our analysis are best made now. PMID:14681554

  15. Eutectic mixture of local anaesthetics (EMLA) 5% cream as a primary dressing on a painful lower leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Purcell, A; Marshall, A; King, J; Buckley, T

    2012-07-01

    Patients living with chronic leg ulceration may frequently experience moderate to severe wound-related pain, which may not be alleviated by oral analgesics alone. Poorly controlled leg ulcer pain can prevent timely and effective wound management strategies being implemented, and increase wound healing times. Furthermore, patients with poorly controlled leg ulcer pain can experience continuous pain, which significantly affects quality of life. This case report introduces an innovative way of using the eutectic mixture of local anaesthetics (EMLA) 5% cream to reduce wound-related pain, reduce oral analgesic intake, and improve health-related quality of life for a patient with a painful, chronic lower leg ulcer.

  16. Extreme thermal noxious stimuli induce pain responses in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Malafoglia, Valentina; Colasanti, Marco; Raffaeli, William; Balciunas, Darius; Giordano, Antonio; Bellipanni, Gianfranco

    2014-03-01

    Exposing tissues to extreme high or low temperature leads to burns. Burned animals sustain several types of damage, from the disruption of the tissue to degeneration of axons projecting through muscle and skin. Such damage causes pain due to both inflammation and axonal degeneration (neuropathic-like pain). Thus, the approach to cure and alleviate the symptoms of burns must be twofold: rebuilding the tissue that has been destroyed and alleviating the pain derived from the burns. While tissue regeneration techniques have been developed, less is known on the treatment of the induced pain. Thus, appropriate animal models are necessary for the development of the best treatment for pain induced in burned tissues. We have developed a methodology in the zebrafish aimed to produce a new animal model for the study of pain induced by burns. Here, we show that two events linked to the onset of burn-induced inflammation and neuropathic-like pain in mammals, degeneration of axons innervating the affected tissues and over-expression of specific genes in sensory tissues, are conserved from zebrafish to mammals.

  17. Clinical effectiveness of vitamin E and vitamin B6 for improving pain severity in cyclic mastalgia

    PubMed Central

    Shobeiri, Fatemeh; Oshvandi, Khodayar; Nazari, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent attempts have been focused on employing chemical and natural supplemental agents for treatment of cyclic mastalgia. Among various agents, the potential effects of vitamins remain questionable. In the present study, we examined the efficacy of two types of these vitamin supplements (vitamin E and vitamin B6) in improving pain severity in cyclic mastalgia. Materials and Methods: In a randomized double-blinded clinical trial, 80 patients suffering from cyclic mastalgia were randomly assigned to receive 200 IU of vitamin E daily or 40 mg/day of vitamin B6 for 2 months. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Severity of breast pain was detected by the Cardiff breast pain score during one menstrual cycle before and two menstrual cycles after the intervention. Data were analyzed using t-test, Chi-squared test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and regression with SPSS version 19 and P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: There was no significant difference in the mean of severity of cyclic mastalgia during one menstrual cycle before the intervention between the vitamin E and B6 groups (9.1 ± 2.1 and 8.4 ± 3.1, respectively), but the difference was significant during the first cycle (5.1 ± 1.6 and 5.2 ± 2.5, respectively) and the second menstrual cycle (2.3 ± 1.0 and 2.6 ± 2.0, respectively) in the two groups after the intervention. The trend of changes in pain severity score showed significant downward trend of pain severity score within the study period in both the treatment groups (P < 0.001), while these trends were similar in both groups when examined by the repeated-measure ANOVA test. By multivariable linear regression analysis adjusted for baseline variables, we found that both the treatment regimens resulted in similar reduction in breast pain severity (P = 0.067). Conclusions: Both regimens containing vitamin E and vitamin B6 are similar in reducing breast pain severity in cyclic mastalgia. PMID:26793260

  18. From convenience to hazard: a short history of the emergence of the menstrual activism movement, 1971-1992.

    PubMed

    Bobel, Chris

    2008-08-01

    In this article, I explore the early history of contemporary menstrual activism in the United States by looking through the lens of the first seven editions of the feminist women's health classic, Our Bodies, Ourselves (OBOS). This analysis illustrates the development of a critical menstrual consciousness as three key phases of the emerging movement, offers a representation of the dynamic nature of feminist health consciousness, and highlights the importance of linking current activism to its past.

  19. Menstrual blood cells display stem cell-like phenotypic markers and exert neuroprotection following transplantation in experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Borlongan, Cesar V; Kaneko, Yuji; Maki, Mina; Yu, Seong-Jin; Ali, Mohammed; Allickson, Julie G; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Sanberg, Paul R

    2010-04-01

    Cell therapy remains an experimental treatment for neurological disorders. A major obstacle in pursuing the clinical application of this therapy is finding the optimal cell type that will allow benefit to a large patient population with minimal complications. A cell type that is a complete match of the transplant recipient appears as an optimal scenario. Here, we report that menstrual blood may be an important source of autologous stem cells. Immunocytochemical assays of cultured menstrual blood reveal that they express embryonic-like stem cell phenotypic markers (Oct4, SSEA, Nanog), and when grown in appropriate conditioned media, express neuronal phenotypic markers (Nestin, MAP2). In order to test the therapeutic potential of these cells, we used the in vitro stroke model of oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) and found that OGD-exposed primary rat neurons that were co-cultured with menstrual blood-derived stem cells or exposed to the media collected from cultured menstrual blood exhibited significantly reduced cell death. Trophic factors, such as VEGF, BDNF, and NT-3, were up-regulated in the media of OGD-exposed cultured menstrual blood-derived stem cells. Transplantation of menstrual blood-derived stem cells, either intracerebrally or intravenously and without immunosuppression, after experimentally induced ischemic stroke in adult rats also significantly reduced behavioral and histological impairments compared to vehicle-infused rats. Menstrual blood-derived cells exemplify a source of "individually tailored" donor cells that completely match the transplant recipient, at least in women. The present neurostructural and behavioral benefits afforded by transplanted menstrual blood-derived cells support their use as a stem cell source for cell therapy in stroke.

  20. A microfluidic culture model of the human reproductive tract and 28-day menstrual cycle

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shuo; Coppeta, Jonathan R.; Rogers, Hunter B.; Isenberg, Brett C.; Zhu, Jie; Olalekan, Susan A.; McKinnon, Kelly E.; Dokic, Danijela; Rashedi, Alexandra S.; Haisenleder, Daniel J.; Malpani, Saurabh S.; Arnold-Murray, Chanel A.; Chen, Kuanwei; Jiang, Mingyang; Bai, Lu; Nguyen, Catherine T.; Zhang, Jiyang; Laronda, Monica M.; Hope, Thomas J.; Maniar, Kruti P.; Pavone, Mary Ellen; Avram, Michael J.; Sefton, Elizabeth C.; Getsios, Spiro; Burdette, Joanna E.; Kim, J. Julie; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Woodruff, Teresa K.

    2017-01-01

    The endocrine system dynamically controls tissue differentiation and homeostasis, but has not been studied using dynamic tissue culture paradigms. Here we show that a microfluidic system supports murine ovarian follicles to produce the human 28-day menstrual cycle hormone profile, which controls human female reproductive tract and peripheral tissue dynamics in single, dual and multiple unit microfluidic platforms (Solo-MFP, Duet-MFP and Quintet-MPF, respectively). These systems simulate the in vivo female reproductive tract and the endocrine loops between organ modules for the ovary, fallopian tube, uterus, cervix and liver, with a sustained circulating flow between all tissues. The reproductive tract tissues and peripheral organs integrated into a microfluidic platform, termed EVATAR, represents a powerful new in vitro tool that allows organ–organ integration of hormonal signalling as a phenocopy of menstrual cycle and pregnancy-like endocrine loops and has great potential to be used in drug discovery and toxicology studies. PMID:28350383

  1. Comfortably, Safely, and Without Shame: Defining Menstrual Hygiene Management as a Public Health Issue.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Marni; Hirsch, Jennifer S; Nathanson, Constance; Parker, Richard G

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, the menstrual hygiene management challenges facing schoolgirls in low-income-country contexts have gained global attention. We applied Gusfield's sociological analysis of the culture of public problems to better understand how this relatively newly recognized public health challenge rose to the level of global public health awareness and action. We similarly applied the conceptualization by Dorfman et al. of the role of public health messaging in changing corporate practice to explore the conceptual frames and the news frames that are being used to shape the perceptions of menstrual hygiene management as an issue of social justice within the context of public health. Important lessons were revealed for getting other public health problems onto the global-, national-, and local-level agendas.

  2. "Bitten By Shyness": Menstrual Hygiene Management, Sanitation, and the Quest for Privacy in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Scorgie, Fiona; Foster, Jennifer; Stadler, Jonathan; Phiri, Thokozile; Hoppenjans, Laura; Rees, Helen; Muller, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how menstruation is managed in low-income settings and whether existing sanitation systems meet women's needs. Using the 'Photovoice' method with 21 women in participatory workshops and in-depth interviews, we collected data on menstrual hygiene management in three sites in Durban, South Africa. All women reported using disposable sanitary pads. Although they were aware that disposable pads were nonbiodegradable, incompatible with waterborne flush systems, and fill up pit latrines, they had little experience with reusable products. Considerable energy was devoted to concealing and containing 'menstrual waste,' and women expressed concern about inadequate privacy during menstruation. All sites lacked discreet disposal options and reliable water access, while outdoor sanitation facilities were considered unsafe. Findings highlight the need for advocacy to improve safety and privacy of facilities for women in this setting.

  3. The effect of the menstrual cycle on exercise metabolism: implications for exercise performance in eumenorrhoeic women.

    PubMed

    Oosthuyse, Tanja; Bosch, Andrew N

    2010-03-01

    The female hormones, oestrogen and progesterone, fluctuate predictably across the menstrual cycle in naturally cycling eumenorrhoeic women. Other than reproductive function, these hormones influence many other physiological systems, and their action during exercise may have implications for exercise performance. Although a number of studies have found exercise performance - and in particular, endurance performance - to vary between menstrual phases, there is an equal number of such studies reporting no differences. However, a comparison of the increase in the oestrogen concentration (E) relative to progesterone concentration (P) as the E/P ratio (pmol/nmol) in the luteal phase in these studies reveals that endurance performance may only be improved in the mid-luteal phase compared with the early follicular phase when the E/P ratio is high in the mid-luteal phase. Furthermore, the late follicular phase, characterized by the pre-ovulatory surge in oestrogen and suppressed progesterone concentrations, tends to promote improved performance in a cycling time trial and future studies should include this menstrual phase. Menstrual phase variations in endurance performance may largely be a consequence of changes to exercise metabolism stimulated by the fluctuations in ovarian hormone concentrations. The literature suggests that oestrogen may promote endurance performance by altering carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism, with progesterone often appearing to act antagonistically. Details of the ovarian hormone influences on the metabolism of these macronutrients are no longer only limited to evidence from animal research and indirect calorimetry but have been verified by substrate kinetics determined with stable tracer methodology in eumenorrhoeic women. This review thoroughly examines the metabolic perturbations induced by the ovarian hormones and, by detailed comparison, proposes reasons for many of the inconsistent reports in menstrual phase comparative research

  4. The receptivity of women to courtship solicitation across the menstrual cycle: a field experiment.

    PubMed

    Gueguen, Nicolas

    2009-03-01

    Research has demonstrated that women's behaviors toward men or sexual interest are different across the menstrual cycle. However, this effect was only found on verbal interest and the receptivity of women to a courtship solicitation had never been tested before. In a field experiment, 455 (200 with normal cycles and 255 pill-users) 18-25-year-old women were approached by 20-year-old male-confederates who solicited them for their phone number. A survey was administered to the women solicited 1 min later in order to obtain information about the number of days since the onset of their last menses. It was found that women in their fertile phase, but not pill-users, agreed more favorably to the request than women in their luteal phase or in their menstrual phase.

  5. Levonorgestrel intrauterine system: Current role in management of heavy menstrual bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Magon, Navneet; Chauhan, Monica; Goel, Poonam; Malik, Sonia; Kapur, Krishan; Kriplani, Alka; Dhaliwal, Lakhbir; Pandit, Suchitra N.

    2013-01-01

    A review of literature was conducted to report on the effectiveness of levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) in women with heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB). The relevant data were obtained by computerized searches of PubMed up to December 2012 and other references available with the authors. Information was obtained from references listed. Studies and case reports were excluded if they did not specifically provide information about LNG-IUS usage in women with HMB. After perusal, each relevant publication was summarized and appraised in terms of whether it contained information relevant to the stated objective. Available data shows that LNG-IUS therapy is effective and safe, providing significant reduction of menstrual bleeding in patients with HMB. LNG-IUS is a good strategy to reduce the number of hysterectomies in women with HMB. PMID:23833527

  6. Familial recurrent hypersomnia: two siblings with Kleine-Levin syndrome and menstrual-related hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Rocamora, Rodrigo; Gil-Nagel, Antonio; Franch, Oriol; Vela-Bueno, Antonio

    2010-11-01

    Kleine-Levin syndrome and menstrual-related hypersomnia are rare idiopathic sleep disorders occurring primarily in adolescence. They are characterized by intermittent periods of excessive sleepiness, cognitive disturbances, and behavioral abnormalities. In both, the etiology remains unknown but autoinmune, hormonal, infectious, and inflammatory mechanisms have been proposed. The authors describe, for the first time, the association of Kleine-Levin syndrome and menstrual-related hypersomnia in 2 adolescent siblings who shared the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci DQB1*0501. The same haplotype has been associated with sleepwalking and with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder. This gender differences in the manifestation of a probably genetic influenced sleep disorder suggests that hormonal mechanisms could be implicated in the phenotypical expression of this sleep disorder. The male sibling with Kleine-Levin syndrome was easily controlled with carbamazepine in low doses, but his sister could be only efficaciously treated with oral contraceptives.

  7. Menstrual discomfort as a biological setting event for severe problem behavior: assessment and intervention.

    PubMed

    Carr, Edward G; Smith, Christopher E; Giacin, Theresa A; Whelan, Bernadette M; Pancari, Joseph

    2003-03-01

    Assessment and intervention approaches for problem behavior need to be extended to deal with biological setting events. To meet assessment needs, we developed a strategy involving four components: interview, archival record review, direct observation, and functional analysis. Data indicated that problem behaviors (aggression, self-injury, and tantrums) were linked to both a biological setting event (menstrual discomfort) and certain discriminative stimuli (task demands). To meet intervention needs, we developed a multicomponent strategy that addressed both the biological context (menstrual discomfort) and the psychosocial context (task demands). Intervention reduced problem behaviors to near-zero levels, maintained for 15 to 22 months across 3 participants. We discuss the extension of our approach to other biological setting events as well as multiple motivational variables.

  8. Luteinizing hormone receptors in human ovarian follicles and corpora lutea during the menstrual cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Yamoto, M.; Nakano, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Ikoma, H.; Furukawa, K.

    1986-08-01

    The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled human luteinizing hormone (hLH) to the 2000-g fraction of human ovarian follicles and corpora lutea during the entire menstrual cycle was examined. Specific high affinity, low capacity receptors for hLH were demonstrated in the 2000-g fraction of both follicles and corpora lutea. Specific binding of /sup 125/I-labeled hLH to follicular tissue increased from the early follicular phase to the ovulatory phase. Specific binding of /sup 125/I-labeled hLH to luteal tissue increased from the early luteal phase to the midluteal phase and decreased towards the late luteal phase. The results of the present study indicate that the increase and decrease in receptors for hLH during the menstrual cycle might play an important role in the regulation of the ovarian cycle.

  9. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy

  10. Effects of Scaling and Root Planing on Gingival Status during Menstrual Cycle- A Cross-Sectional Analytical Study

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Shivani; Dev, Yash Paul; Singh, Preetinder; Basavaraj, Patthi; Gera, Karan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Variations in sex steroid hormones, noticeable through the menstrual cycle of women, may impact periodontal health. A relationship between female sex hormone levels and periodontal changes during puberty, pregnancy, and menopause has been reported. Little research on gingival status at different periods of menstrual cycle, but very less work has been done to observe the effect of scaling on gingival status during different periods of menstrual cycle. Materials and Methods Thirty female subjects, aged 18-25 years were selected for a three month study. In Stage 1, clinical parameters {Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI), Modified Sulcular Bleeding Index (mSBI) and Probing depth (PD)} were recorded at three different time intervals {OV (Ovulation), PM (Premenstruation), M (Menstruation)} of their menstrual cycle, without scaling and polishing. In Stage 2, all clinical parameters were recorded at their subsequent menstrual cycle after scaling and polishing. Results In interstage analysis, OV 1 > OV 2, PM 1 > PM 2 and M 1> M 2. In intrastage analysis, for PI, mean difference between all values was not statistically significant. For mSBI, PM 1 > OV 1 > M 1, also PM 2 > OV 2 > M 2. For GI, PM 1 > OV 1 > M 1, also PM 2 > OV 2 > M 2. For PD, mean difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion Ovarian hormones influence gingival status of females, with an increase observed primarily during PM and OV phases of menstrual cycle. Scaling leads to a subsequent decrease in gingival inflammation. PMID:26557613

  11. Evidence from neuroimaging for the role of the menstrual cycle in the interplay of emotion and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Sacher, Julia; Okon-Singer, Hadas; Villringer, Arno

    2013-01-01

    Women show increased predisposition for certain psychiatric disorders, such as depression, that are associated with disturbances in the integration of emotion and cognition. While this suggests that sex hormones need to be considered as modulating factors in the regulation of emotion, we still lack a sound understanding of how the menstrual cycle impacts emotional states and cognitive function. Though signals for the influence of the menstrual cycle on the integration of emotion and cognition have appeared as secondary findings in numerous behavioral and neuroimaging studies, this has only very rarely been the primary research goal. This review summarizes evidence: (1) that the menstrual cycle modulates the integration of emotional and cognitive processing on a behavioral level, and (2) that this change in behavior can be associated with functional, molecular and structural changes in the brain during a specific menstrual cycle phase. The growing evidence for menstrual cycle-specific differences suggests a modulating role for sex hormones on the neural networks supporting the integration of emotional and cognitive information. It will further be discussed what methodological aspects need to be considered to capture the role of the menstrual cycle in the emotion-cognition interplay more systematically. PMID:23898247

  12. Is my period normal? How college-aged women determine the normality or abnormality of their menstrual cycles.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jill M; Barthalow Koch, Patricia; Mansfield, Phyllis Kernoff

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive, qualitative study was to explore young adult women's conceptualizations of their menstruation experiences using a feminist approach. Grounded theory was used to understand how 15 college-aged women (ages 18-22 years, 86% white) evaluate their menstrual patterns as "normal" or "abnormal." Data analysis of the semi-structured interviews revealed four themes that the women used to judge the pattern of their menstruation (i.e., interval, duration, discomfort, and volume) as normal: (1) Pattern resembled learned norms, (2) consistent pattern discordant from learned norms, (3) predictably variable pattern, and (4) absence of problems. Two distinct themes informed their decisions to consider a menstrual pattern as abnormal: (1) Unpredictable variability, and (2) extreme experiences. The core variable emerging from data analysis, establishing a personal norm, illuminated the two major sources that women relied on in trying to interpret their menstrual patterns: the limited and often inaccurate information that they had been taught and their own menstrual experiences. Implications include the need to improve education about menstrual variability throughout the life cycle and about the diversity of women's normal menstrual patterns and experiences.

  13. Pain anticipatory phenomena in patients with central poststroke pain: a magnetoencephalography study.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Raghavan; Burgess, Richard C; Lempka, Scott F; Gale, John T; Floden, Darlene P; Machado, Andre G

    2016-09-01

    Central poststroke pain (CPSP) is characterized by hemianesthesia associated with unrelenting chronic pain. The final pain experience stems from interactions between sensory, affective, and cognitive components of chronic pain. Hence, managing CPSP will require integrated approaches aimed not only at the sensory but also the affective-cognitive spheres. A better understanding of the brain's processing of pain anticipation is critical for the development of novel therapeutic approaches that target affective-cognitive networks and alleviate pain-related disability. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to characterize the neural substrates of pain anticipation in patients suffering from intractable CPSP. Simple visual cues evoked anticipation while patients awaited impending painful (PS), nonpainful (NPS), or no stimulus (NOS) to their nonaffected and affected extremities. MEG responses were studied at gradiometer level using event-related fields analysis and time-frequency oscillatory analysis upon source localization. On the nonaffected side, significantly greater responses were recorded during PS. PS (vs. NPS and NOS) exhibited significant parietal and frontal cortical activations in the beta and gamma bands, respectively, whereas NPS (vs. NOS) displayed greater activation in the orbitofrontal cortex. On the affected extremity, PS (vs. NPS) did not show significantly greater responses. These data suggest that anticipatory phenomena can modulate neural activity when painful stimuli are applied to the nonaffected extremity but not the affected extremity in CPSP patients. This dichotomy may stem from the chronic effects of pain on neural networks leading to habituation or saturation. Future clinically effective therapies will likely be associated with partial normalization of the neurophysiological correlates of pain anticipation.

  14. Does the Menstrual Cycle Influence the Sensitivity of Vagally Mediated Baroreflexes?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    Venous distensibility during the menstrual cycle. Am. J. Obstet . Gynecol . 86, 640–645 10 Goldstein, D. S., Levinson, P. and Keiser, H. R. (1983...Plasma and urinary catecholamines during the human ovulatory cycle. Am. J. Obstet . Gynecol . 146, 824–829 11 Williams, J. K., Adams, M. R., Herrington, D...in women with normal pregnancy, preeclampsia, or gestational hypertension. Am. J. Obstet . Gynecol . 184, 1189–1195 19 Kent, B. B., Drane, J. W

  15. Eating behaviors, nutritional status, and menstrual function in elite female adolescent volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Beals, Katherine A

    2002-09-01

    Nutritional status, eating behaviors and menstrual function was examined in 23 nationally ranked female adolescent volleyball players using a health/weight/ dieting/menstrual history questionnaire, the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI), and the Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ). Nutrient and energy intakes (El) and energy expenditure (EE) were determined by 3-d weighed food records and activity logs. Iron (Fe), vitamins C, B12, and Folate status were assessed using serum and whole blood. Mean El (2248 +/- 414 kcal/d) was less than EE (2815 +/- 306 kcal/d). Mean carbohydrate (5.4 +/-1.0g/kg/d) and protein (1.1+/-0.3g/kg/d) intakes were below recommended levels for highly active women. Mean intakes for folate, Fe, Ca, Mg, and Zn were less than the respective RDAs/DRIs and almost 50% of the athletes were consuming less than the RDAs/DRIs for the B-complex vitamins and vitamin C. Three athletes presented with Fe deficiency anemia (Hb <12 mg/dL), while marginal vitamin B12 status (<200 pg/ml) and vitamin C status (<28 mmol/L) were found in 1 and 4 athletes, respectively. Approximately 1/2 of the athletes reported actively "dieting". Mean BSQ and EDI subscales scores were within the normal ranges; yet, elevated scores on these scales were reported by 26% and 35% of athletes, respectively. Past or present amenorrhea was reported by 17% of the athletes and 13% and 48%, reported past or present oligomenorrhea and "irregular" menstrual cycles, respectively. These results indicate that elite adolescent volleyball players are at risk for menstrual dysfunction and have energy and nutrient intakes that place them at risk for nutritional deficiencies and compromised performance.

  16. Menstrual Cycle Control in Female Astronauts and the Associated Risk of Venous Thromboembolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Varsha; Wotring, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common and serious condition affecting approximately 1-2 per 1000 people in the USA every year. There have been no documented case reports of VTE in female astronauts during spaceflight in the published literature. Some female astronauts use hormonal contraception to control their menstrual cycles and it is currently unknown how this affects their risk of VTE. Current terrestrial risk prediction models do not account for the spaceflight environment and the physiological changes associated with it. We therefore aim to estimate a specific risk score for female astronauts who are taking hormonal contraception for menstrual cycle control, to deduce whether they are at an elevated risk of VTE. A systematic review of the literature was conducted in order to identify and quantify known terrestrial risk factors for VTE. Studies involving analogues for the female astronaut population were also reviewed, for example, military personnel who use the oral contraceptive pill for menstrual suppression. Well known terrestrial risk factors, for example, obesity or smoking would not be applicable to our study population as these candidates would have been excluded during astronaut selection processes. Other risk factors for VTE include hormonal therapy, lower limb paralysis, physical inactivity, hyperhomocysteinemia, low methylfolate levels and minor injuries, all of which potentially apply to crew members LSAH data will be assessed to identify which of these risk factors are applicable to our astronaut population. Using known terrestrial risk data, an overall estimated risk of VTE for female astronauts using menstrual cycle control methods will therefore be calculated. We predict this will be higher than the general population but not significantly higher requiring thromboprophylaxis. This study attempts to delineate what is assumed to be true of our astronaut population, for example, they are known to be a healthy fit cohort of individuals, and

  17. Sex and menstrual cycle phase at encoding influence emotional memory for gist and detail.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Shawn E; Ahmed, Imran; Cahill, Larry

    2013-11-01

    Sex influences on emotional memory have received increasing interest over the past decade. However, only a subset of this previous work explored the influence of sex on memory for central information (gist) and peripheral detail in emotional versus neutral contexts. Here we examined the influence of sex and menstrual cycle phase at encoding on memory for either an emotional or neutral story, specifically with respect to the retention of gist and peripheral detail. Healthy naturally cycling women and men viewed a brief, narrated, three-phase story containing neutral or emotionally arousing elements. One week later, participants received a surprise free recall test for story elements. The results indicate that naturally cycling women in the luteal (high hormone) phase of the menstrual cycle at encoding show enhanced memory for peripheral details, but not gist, when in the emotional compared with neutral stories (p<.05). In contrast, naturally cycling women in the follicular (low hormone) phase of the menstrual cycle at encoding did not show enhanced memory for gist or peripheral details in the emotional compared with neutral stories. Men show enhanced memory for gist, but not peripheral details, in the emotional versus neutral stories (p<.05). In addition, these sex influences on memory cannot be attributed to differences in attention or arousal; luteal women, follicular women, and men performed similarly on measures of attention (fixation time percentage) and arousal (pupil diameter changes) during the most arousing phase of the emotional story. These findings suggest that sex and menstrual cycle phase at encoding influence long term memory for different types of emotional information.

  18. Increased impulsive choice for saccharin during PCP withdrawal in female monkeys: influence of menstrual cycle phase

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Marilyn E.; Kohl, Emily A.; Johnson, Krista M.; LaNasa, Rachel M.

    2013-01-01

    Background In previous studies with male and female rhesus monkeys withdrawal of access to oral phencyclidine (PCP) self administration reduced responding for food under a high fixed-ratio (FR) schedule more in males than females and with a delay discounting (DD) task with saccharin (SACC) as the reinforcer. Impulsive choice for SACC increased during PCP withdrawal more than females. Objectives The goal of the present study was to examine the effect of PCP (0.25 or 0.5 mg/ml) withdrawal on impulsive choice for SACC in females during the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Materials and methods In Component 1 PCP and water were available from 2 drinking spouts for 1.5 h sessions under concurrent FR 16 schedules. In Component 2 a SACC solution was available for 45 min under a DD schedule. Monkeys had a choice of one immediate SACC delivery (0.6 ml) or 6 delayed SACC deliveries, and the delay was increased by 1 sec after a response on the delayed lever and decreased by 1 sec after a response on the immediate lever. There was then a 10-day water substitution phase, or PCP-withdrawal, that occurred during the mid-folllicular phase (Days 7–11) or the late-luteal (Days 24–28) phase of the menstrual cycle. Access to PCP and concurrent water was then restored, and the PCP withdrawal procedure was repeated over several follicular and luteal menstrual phases. Results PCP deliveries were higher during the luteal vs the follicular phase. Impulsive choice was greater during the luteal (vs follicular) phase during withdrawal of the higher PCP concentration. Conclusions PCP withdrawal was associated with elevated impulsive choice for SACC, especially in the luteal (vs follicular) phase of the menstrual cycle in female monkeys. PMID:23344553

  19. Expression Patterns of VEGF and Flk-1 in Human Endometrium during the Menstrual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Tsung-Hsuan; Vlahos, Nikos; Shih, Ie-Ming; Zhao, Yulian

    2015-01-01

    Background The VEGF is essential in the process of tissue remodeling and angiogenesis. Limited data is available on the expression and regulation of VEGF and its receptors in the human endometrium. The aim of this study was evaluation of expression patterns of VEGF and Flk-1 in human endometrium during the menstrual cycle. Methods Sixty paraffin-embedded blocks of endometrial tissues from the patients with normal menstrual cycles were obtained. Tissue samples were assembled into tissue microarray slides and classified by histological dating into five phases: the proliferative (n = 14), peri-ovulatory (n = 9), early-secretory (n = 12), mid-secretory (n = 11) and late-secretory (n = 14) phases. Immunohistochemical staining was performed using VEGF or Flk-1 monoclonal antibodies. The intensity of immunostaining was evaluated by the semi-quantitative scoring method (HSCORE). Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance and Scheff's post-hoc test were used for statistical analysis. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results VEGF and Flk-1 were expressed in the three components of the endometrium at various phases of the menstrual cycle. In the stroma, the expression of VEGF varied among the phases (p < 0.05). The expression of Flk-1 in the luminal and glandular epithelium revealed stronger intensity of immunostaining as compared with the stroma at the different phases (p < 0.05). The level of Flk-1 expression also showed significant differences among the phases in the glandular epithelium with greatest expression at late-secretory phase (p < 0.05). Conclusion Temporal and spatial distribution of VEGF and Flk-1 expression in the three components of human endometrium during menstrual cycle suggests the functional role of angiogenesis in the remodeling process of endometrial tissue. PMID:25717429

  20. Modest changes in dietary intake across the menstrual cycle: implications for food intake research.

    PubMed

    Bryant, M; Truesdale, K P; Dye, L

    2006-11-01

    Food intake varies across the menstrual cycle in mammals, energy intake usually being greater in the premenstrual phase compared with the postmenstrual phase. Premenstrual increments in energy intake and a preferential selection of carbohydrate have been suggested to be greater in women with premenstrual syndrome (PMS), who may be more sensitive to cyclical hormonal or neurotransmitter fluctuations. This has direct implications for research within populations of women, especially where the primary outcome is diet or a change in energy balance. We aimed to determine whether: the premenstrual intake of energy and macronutrients differed from the postmenstrual intake; the change in intake across the menstrual cycle differed in women with PMS compared with controls; and the change in intake was related to the severity of premenstrual symptoms. We collected 3 d dietary intake data during the postmenstrual and premenstrual phases of the menstrual cycle in thirty-one women with PMS and twenty-seven control women. The consumption of energy and macronutrient intake were similar between the phases of the cycle in women with PMS. Conversely, intakes were usually greater premenstrually in control women, although not all differences were statistically significant. Exceptions were with non-milk extrinsic sugars and alcohol, which were both consumed in greater amounts in the premenstrual phase in women with PMS. Significant correlations were observed between the severity of symptoms and the change in the consumption of these nutrients. These data suggest that a consideration of the menstrual cycle phase and PMS in diet may not be warranted, especially in cross-sectional analysis, although it may need to be taken into account when examining change in intake during dietary interventions.

  1. Why May Allopregnanolone Help Alleviate Loneliness?

    PubMed Central

    Cacioppo, S.; Cacioppo, J. T.

    2015-01-01

    Impaired biosynthesis of Allopregnanolone (ALLO), a brain endogenous neurosteroid, has been associated with numerous behavioral dysfunctions, which range from anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors to aggressive behavior and changes in responses to contextual fear conditioning in rodent models of emotional dysfunction. Recent animal research also demonstrates a critical role of ALLO in social isolation. Although there are likely aspects of perceived social isolation that are uniquely human, there is also continuity across species. Both human and animal research show that perceived social isolation (which can be defined behaviorally in animals and humans) has detrimental effects on physical health, such as increased hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) activity, decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression, and increased depressive behavior. The similarities between animal and human research suggest that perceived social isolation (loneliness) may also be associated with a reduction in the synthesis of ALLO, potentially by reducing BDNF regulation and increasing HPA activity through the hippocampus, amygdala, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), especially during social threat processing. Accordingly, exogenous administration of ALLO (or ALLO precursor, such as pregnenolone), in humans may help alleviate loneliness. Congruent with our hypothesis, exogenous administration of ALLO (or ALLO precursors) in humans has been shown to improve various stress-related disorders that show similarities between animals and humans i.e., post-traumatic stress disorders, traumatic brain injuries. Because a growing body of evidence demonstrates the benefits of ALLO in socially isolated animals, we believe our ALLO hypothesis can be applied to loneliness in humans, as well. PMID:26365247

  2. Agent Reward Shaping for Alleviating Traffic Congestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Agogino, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Traffic congestion problems provide a unique environment to study how multi-agent systems promote desired system level behavior. What is particularly interesting in this class of problems is that no individual action is intrinsically "bad" for the system but that combinations of actions among agents lead to undesirable outcomes, As a consequence, agents need to learn how to coordinate their actions with those of other agents, rather than learn a particular set of "good" actions. This problem is ubiquitous in various traffic problems, including selecting departure times for commuters, routes for airlines, and paths for data routers. In this paper we present a multi-agent approach to two traffic problems, where far each driver, an agent selects the most suitable action using reinforcement learning. The agent rewards are based on concepts from collectives and aim to provide the agents with rewards that are both easy to learn and that if learned, lead to good system level behavior. In the first problem, we study how agents learn the best departure times of drivers in a daily commuting environment and how following those departure times alleviates congestion. In the second problem, we study how agents learn to select desirable routes to improve traffic flow and minimize delays for. all drivers.. In both sets of experiments,. agents using collective-based rewards produced near optimal performance (93-96% of optimal) whereas agents using system rewards (63-68%) barely outperformed random action selection (62-64%) and agents using local rewards (48-72%) performed worse than random in some instances.

  3. Frovatriptan: A Review of Pharmacology, Pharmacokinetics and Clinical Potential in the Treatment of Menstrual Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Balbisi, Ebrahim A

    2006-01-01

    Frovatriptan is an orally active 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor agonist which binds with high affinity to 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors. Earlier clinical trials demonstrated that frovatriptan 2.5 mg is significantly more effective than placebo in the acute management of migraine and its associated symptoms. More recently, frovatriptan was shown to be effective in the management of menstrual migraine. The incidence of menstrual migraine in subjects receiving frovatriptan 2.5 mg twice daily during the six day perimenstrual period was 41% compared with 67% with placebo. Frovatriptan treatment is generally well tolerated. The most commonly reported adverse effects were dizziness, paresthesia, dry mouth, and fatigue. Pharmacologic studies demonstrated that frovatriptan is cerebroselective. Its selectivity for cerebral vessels lessens the potential for undesirable peripheral effects. Frovatriptan has a terminal deposition half-life of approximately 26 hours, which appears to be independent of age, gender, and renal function. This imparts that frovatriptan may be particularly well suited to patients with prolonged migraines and those who suffer migraine recurrence. Frovatriptan does not alter cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes, as such it is unlikely to affect the metabolism of other drugs. No dosage adjustments are necessary based on age, renal, or mild to moderate hepatic impairment. Apart from its efficacy in the acute management of migraine, frovatriptan is an effective agent when used as either acute therapy or as intermittent prophylaxis therapy of menstrual migraines, particularly in women who do not respond to conventional therapies. PMID:18360605

  4. Menstrual cycle, race and task effects on blood pressure recovery from acute stress.

    PubMed

    Mills, P J; Berry, C C

    1999-05-01

    This study examined cardiovascular recovery from two standardized laboratory stressors in 68 healthy black and white normotensive women and men (mean age 33 years). Women were studied in a randomized order at the same time of day on two separate occasions, once during the follicular phase (days 7 to 10 following menses) and once during the luteal phase (days 7 to 10 following the leutenizing-hormone surge) of the menstrual cycle. Men were studied twice approximately 6 weeks apart. There were differential effects of the tasks on blood pressure recovery (change scores) with a mirror star task yielding poorer diastolic blood pressure recovery (p = 0.004) and an interpersonal speaking task yielding poorer systolic blood pressure recovery (p = 0.003). Across both tasks, blacks evidenced greater diastolic blood pressure recovery as compared to whites (p = 0.02). Black women showed greater diastolic blood pressure recovery in the luteal as compared to the follicular phase (p = 0.01), whereas white women evidenced no such change across the menstrual cycle. Correlation analysis across testing sessions generally revealed comparable temporal stability values for recovery as compared to reactivity measures. The findings support prior studies indicating racial differences in recovery from acute stress and extend these findings by suggesting that the menstrual cycle may differentially affect recovery in black versus white women.

  5. Knee Laxity Variations in the Menstrual Cycle in Female Athletes Referred to the Orthopedic Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Seyed Esmaeel; Peyvandi, Sepideh; Kariminasab, Mohamad Hosein; Shayesteh Azar, Masoud; Daneshpoor, Seyed Mohamad Mehdi; Khalilian, Alireza; Aghajantabar, Zeinab

    2016-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is the biggest concern for orthopedic surgeons who are involved in sports injuries, so most of ACL reconstruction surgeries are sports related. ACL injuries in female athletes are 2 - 8 times more common than male athletes in similar sport injuries. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare knee laxity changes in the menstrual cycle in female athletes referred to the orthopedic clinic of Imam Khomeini hospital in the north of Iran, Sari, 2013. Patients and Methods The present descriptive study was conducted on 40 female athletes that were referred to the orthopedic clinic. Hormone levels, such as estrogen and progesterone were assessed by one laboratory in 3 phases of the menstrual cycle. We used Lachman test and anterior drawer test for knee laxity rate. The descriptive statistics were calculated as indices of central distribution of bonds (x ± SD) and relative frequency distribution was used for qualitative variables. Results The results of the current study showed that there is no significant difference in ACL laxity in female athletes in three phases of menstrual cycle; namely menstruation time, ovulation time and mid-luteal phase. Conclusions Despite numerous studies and research in the field of knee laxity and effects of female hormones, many researchers do not agree about the effect of female hormones on knee laxity. The current study also reported no relationship between female hormones and knee laxity, while statistics show fundamental difference between male and female athletes. PMID:28144404

  6. Anxiety Sensitivity, the Menstrual Cycle, and Panic Disorder: A Putative Neuroendocrine and Psychological Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Nillni, Yael I.; Toufexis, Donna J.; Rohan, Kelly J.

    2011-01-01

    The 2:1 female-to-male sex difference in the prevalence of Panic Disorder (PD) suggests that there is a sex-specific vulnerability involved in the etiology and/or maintenance of this disorder. The purpose of this paper is to present a new conceptual model, which emphasizes the interaction between a cognitive vulnerability for PD, anxiety sensitivity, and the effects of progesterone and its metabolite, allopregnanolone, on behavioral and physiological responses to stress during the premenstrual phase. This interaction is proposed to be a potential sex-specific pathway that may initiate and/or maintain panic and anxiety symptoms in women. This review paper presents preliminary evidence from both the human and animal literatures to support this new model. Specific topics reviewed include: psychopathology related to the menstrual cycle, anxiety sensitivity and its relationship to the menstrual cycle, PMS, and PMDD, anxiety-modulating effects of progesterone and its neuroactive metabolite, allopregnanolone, and how results from the neuroendocrine literature relate to psychopathology or symptoms associated with the menstrual cycle. PMID:21855828

  7. Analytical and biological variation of biomarkers of oxidative stress during the menstrual cycle

    PubMed Central

    BROWNE, RICHARD W.; BLOOM, MICHAEL S.; SCHISTERMAN, ENRIQUE F.; HOVEY, KATHY; TREVISAN, MAURIZIO; WU, CHENGQING; LIU, AIYI; WACTAWSKI-WENDE, JEAN

    2008-01-01

    Little information is available on the intra-individual variability of oxidative stress biomarkers in healthy individuals and even less in the context of the menstrual cycle. The objective of this study was to characterize the analytical and biological variability of a panel of 21 markers of oxidative damage, antioxidant defence and micronutrients in nine healthy, regularly menstruating women aged 18–44 years. Analyses included measurement of lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant vitamins. Blood specimens were collected, processed and stored using standardized procedures on days 2, 7, 12, 13, 14, 18, 22 and 28 in one cycle for each subject. Replicate analyses of markers were performed and two-way nested random effects ANOVA was used to describe analytical, intra-individual and inter-individual variability. No statistically significant differences at α = 0.05, or temporal effects across the menstrual cycle were observed. Analytical variability was the smallest component of variance for all variables. The ICC among replicates ranged from 0.80 to 0.98. Imprecision based on quality control materials ranged from 1 to 11%. The critical differences between serial results varied greatly between assays ranging from 6 to 216% of the mean level. These results provide important initial information on the variability of biomarkers of oxidative stress, antioxidant defence and micronutrients across the menstrual cycle. PMID:18270869

  8. Effect of sex and menstrual cycle in women on starting speed, anaerobic endurance and muscle power.

    PubMed

    Wiecek, M; Szymura, J; Maciejczyk, M; Cempla, J; Szygula, Z

    2016-03-01

    The aim of our study was to compare the indicators of starting speed, anaerobic endurance and power in women as well as men, and to investigate whether the values of these indicators differ in women during the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. The studied group included 16 men and 16 women. The subjects performed the 20-second maximal cycling sprint test. The men performed the test twice at 14-day intervals. The women undertook the test 4 times: twice during the middle of follicular phase and twice in the middle of luteal phase in separate menstrual cycles. Hormonal changes during the menstrual cycle do not influence anaerobic performance, starting speed or anaerobic endurance in women. Anaerobic performance in men is higher than in women with similar aerobic performance expressed as VO2max/LBM (lean body mass). A lower power decrease with time was noted for women than men, with a similar time of maintaining power in both groups. This is evidence of women's better anaerobic endurance compared to men. At the same time, the men had significantly better starting speed rates than women.

  9. Association between paraben exposure and menstrual cycle in female university students in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nishihama, Yukiko; Yoshinaga, Jun; Iida, Ayaka; Konishi, Shoko; Imai, Hideki; Yoneyama, Miyuki; Nakajima, Daisuke; Shiraishi, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    Parabens have been known to have estrogenic activity in many in vivo and in vitro studies and biomonitoring data indicated ubiquitous exposure in general populations. However, there are few human studies on reproductive effects of parabens. In this study, menstrual cycle length and its intra-individual variation were investigated by bleeding record over the period of 5 months and urinary concentrations of parabens were measured for 128 female Japanese university students. We found significantly negative relationships between menstrual cycle length and urinary estrogen-equivalent total paraben (odds=0.73, 95% CI 0.56-0.96) and butyl paraben concentrations (odds=0.83, 0.70-0.99), which indicated shortened cycle length in women with high urinary paraben concentrations. This study indicated that paraben exposure at not excessive levels is associated with menstrual cycle length or its variability among general female subjects. These results suggest a possibility that parabens exposure is one of the environmental causes of human reproductive problem.

  10. Menstrual patterns, fertility and main pregnancy outcomes after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Sandra; Spinelli, Simonetta; Bruzzi, Paolo; Anserini, Paola; Di Grazia, Carmen; Bacigalupo, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Two-hundred and sixty-nine females aged ≤42 and undergoing an allogeneic stem cell transplant were retrospectively studied to assess the effect of age, conditioning regimen and chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) on resumption of stable menstrual cyclicity. Overall, a stable menstrual cyclicity was observed in 22% of cases. The cumulative probability of menses resumption was significantly age and conditioning regimen related. A statistically significant inverse correlation between cGVHD severity and menses resumption was observed only in univariate analysis. In patients with residual ovarian function, infertility was found in 43% and early menopause in 45%. An increased incidence of prematurity and low birth weight (LBW) was observed among the single spontaneous pregnancies. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and 17 beta-oestradiol levels were found to be inadequate to detect both early signs of menses resumption and menstrual stability. Our study confirms the crucial role of full dose total body irradiation (TBI) and age on menses recovery and fertility after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The impact of severe cGVHD remains unclear.

  11. Relationships between paranoid thinking, self-esteem and the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Brock, Rosalind; Rowse, Georgina; Slade, Pauline

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether paranoid experiences and levels of self-esteem fluctuate over the menstrual cycle and whether levels of self-esteem are lower when perceived persecution is felt to be deserved. Measures of anxiety, depression, persecution, deservedness and self-esteem were completed on-line by 278 women over their menstrual cycle. Responses were compared at the paramenstrual (3 days before and after menses onset) and mid-cycle phase. At the paramenstrual phase persecution, negative self-esteem, anxiety and depression were higher and positive self-esteem was lower than at mid-cycle. A greater proportion of women experienced persecution as deserved at the paramenstrual phase. This was associated with higher depression and negative self-esteem scores. Increased levels of deservedness significantly strengthened the relationship between persecution and negative, but not positive, self-esteem. These findings suggest that the paramenstrual phase is a time of vulnerability to increased paranoid experiences, an increased likelihood that feelings of persecution will feel deserved and lowered self-esteem. The findings support the view that interpersonal sensitivities may be key to menstrual cycle symptoms and have an impact on relationships. Further, the study illustrated that ideas developed for psychosis could make a valuable contribution to understanding and managing this aspect of menstruation-related distress.

  12. Hemispheric Specialization Varies with EEG Brain Resting States and Phase of Menstrual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Cacioppo, Stephanie; Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco; Bischof, Paul; DeZiegler, Dominique; Michel, Christoph M.; Landis, Theodor

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of behavioral studies has demonstrated that women’s hemispheric specialization varies as a function of their menstrual cycle, with hemispheric specialization enhanced during their menstruation period. Our recent high-density electroencephalogram (EEG) study with lateralized emotional versus neutral words extended these behavioral results by showing that hemispheric specialization in men, but not in women under birth-control, depends upon specific EEG resting brain states at stimulus arrival, suggesting that hemispheric specialization may be pre-determined at the moment of the stimulus onset. To investigate whether EEG brain resting state for hemispheric specialization could vary as a function of the menstrual phase, we tested 12 right-handed healthy women over different phases of their menstrual cycle combining high-density EEG recordings and the same lateralized lexical decision paradigm with emotional versus neutral words. Results showed the presence of specific EEG resting brain states, associated with hemispheric specialization for emotional words, at the moment of the stimulus onset during the menstruation period only. These results suggest that the pre-stimulus EEG pattern influencing hemispheric specialization is modulated by the hormonal state. PMID:23638185

  13. Von Hippel-Lindau gene expression on the human fallopian tube epithelium during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan-Yan; Zhu, Wei-Jie; Xie, Bao-Guo

    2015-06-01

    The Von Hippel-Lindau gene (VHL) is a tumor suppressor gene, which is widely expressed in kidney, lung, breast, ovary, and cervix. VHL gene mutations can induce VHL disease and tumorigenesis. However, whether this gene is expressed in the human fallopian tube has not been evaluated. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the VHL gene is expressed in human fallopian tube, and to investigate its expression changes during the menstrual cycle. Twenty‑seven patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy with adnexectomy for benign uterine disease were enrolled in the study. Human fallopian tubes were divided into proliferative stage (n=14) and secretory stage (n=13) according to the stage of the menstrual cycle they were isolated from. The expression of the VHL gene and protein was studied by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The results revealed positive expression of the VHL protein in the cytoplasm of ciliated cells of the human fallopian tube. The mRNA and protein expression of VHL in the fallopian tubes was higher in the proliferative compared to the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle, but this difference was not significant (P>0.05). Overall, this study presents data on the VHL mRNA and protein expression in the human fallopian tube, which may be relevant to the process of differentiation of ciliated and secretory cells.

  14. Dissecting the Biology of Menstrual Cycle-Associated Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Atashgaran, Vahid; Wrin, Joseph; Barry, Simon Charles; Dasari, Pallave; Ingman, Wendy V.

    2016-01-01

    Fluctuations in circulating estrogen and progesterone across the menstrual cycle lead to increased breast cancer susceptibility in women; however, the biological basis for this increased risk is not well understood. Estrogen and progesterone have important roles in normal mammary gland development, where they direct dynamic interactions among the hormonally regulated mammary epithelial, stromal, and immune cell compartments. The continuous fluctuations of estrogen and progesterone over a woman’s reproductive lifetime affect the turnover of mammary epithelium, stem cells, and the extracellular matrix, as well as regulate the phenotype and function of mammary stromal and immune cells, including macrophages and regulatory T cells. Collectively, these events may result in genome instability, increase the chance of random genetic mutations, dampen immune surveillance, and promote tolerance in the mammary gland, and thereby increase the risk of breast cancer initiation. This article reviews the current status of our understanding of the molecular and the cellular changes that occur in the mammary gland across the menstrual cycle and how continuous menstrual cycling may increase breast cancer susceptibility in women. PMID:28083513

  15. "More natural but less normal": reconsidering medicalisation and agency through women's accounts of menstrual suppression.

    PubMed

    Gunson, Jessica Shipman

    2010-10-01

    This paper revisits the concept of medicalisation and considers its value as a framework for understanding the ongoing development of new reproductive technologies, and their impact on women's reproductive decision-making. This evaluation is drawn from a qualitative discourse analysis of the public debate about the first extended cycle oral contraception (ECOC) to suppress menstruation in the United States of America in 2003/2004, and subsequent interviews with women living in Australia who had already extended their cycles without it being medically approved for widespread practice. Firstly, the debates about menstrual suppression are couched within a discussion of the ongoing usefulness of medicalisation as an analytical tool. It is posited that medicalisation occurs in a particular social and cultural moment, and is a dynamic process where dominant social relations can be both reproduced and challenged. Secondly, qualitative interviews with women about practices of menstrual suppression are used to explore the productive nature of agency in this particular medicalisation contest. Specifically, the ways in which these women engage with the discourses of 'risk', 'choice' and 'nature', as canvassed by menstrual suppression advocates, reveal accommodation and modification as much as resistance and contradiction. This paper suggests that if the concept of medicalisation is to have ongoing traction as a frame of analysis, such a critique must incorporate a generative discussion of agency.

  16. The impact of gastric bypass surgery on sex hormones and menstrual cycles in premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kjær, Mette Mandrup; Madsbad, Sten; Hougaard, David M; Cohen, Arieh S; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2017-02-01

    Obesity has adverse effects on ovulation, menstrual cyclicity and oocyte development leading to clinical symptoms such as infertility and menstrual disorders. The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) leads to weight loss, improved insulin sensitivity and may improve ovarian function. In 31 premenopausal women, 18 eu- and 13 oligo-/amenorrhoic, we followed the changes in follicular phase sex hormones 3, 6 and 12 month after RYGB. The average weight loss during the first postoperative year was 39.6 kg. The insulin sensitivity and serum insulin improved markedly especially within the first three postoperative months. SHBG increased progressively and was doubled after 12 months. In contrast, total and free androgens and DHEA declined about 50% during the first three postoperative months and remained fairly constant hereafter. One year after surgery, 85% (11/13) of the women with oligo-/amenorrhea gained regular menstrual cycles. Our results indicate that some of the endocrine changes related to regulation of ovarian function occur very early after bariatric surgery.

  17. Associations of menstrual cycle length with intake of soy, fat, and dietary fiber in Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Chisato; Oba, Shino; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2006-01-01

    A decreased risk of breast cancer has been reported among women who have longer menstrual cycles or anovulatory cycles. The present study examined the relationships between intake of fat, soy, and dietary fiber and length of menstrual cycle among 341 Japanese women aged 18 to 29 yr old at two colleges and three nursing schools. Intake of nutrients and foods including fats, dietary fiber, and soy products was estimated through the use of a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. The mean cycle length was determined for each women based on a prospective record of menstruation. Polyunsaturated fat intake was significantly inversely associated with cycle length; the means of cycle length were 33.2 and 31.0 days for the lowest and the highest quintiles of intake, respectively, after controlling for covariates (trend = 0.03). The odds ratio of a long cycle (> 35 days) for the highest vs. lowest quintile of dietary fiber intake was 2.12 (95% confidence interval 1.00-4.47), although the trend was not statistically significant. The data suggest that polyunsaturated fat and dietary fiber intake are associated with the parameters of menstrual cycle length, but further studies are required to better characterize these associations.

  18. Association between subjective and cortisol stress response depends on the menstrual cycle phase.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Annie; Pruessner, Jens C

    2013-12-01

    The relation between the physiologic and subjective stress responses is inconsistently reported across studies. Menstrual cycle phases variations have been found to influence the psychophysiological stress response; however little is known about possible cycle phase differences in the relationship between physiological and subjective stress responses. This study examined the effect of menstrual cycle phase in the association between subjective stress and physiological response. Forty-five women in either the follicular (n=21) or the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle were exposed to a psychosocial stress task. Salivary cortisol, cardiovascular, and subjective stress were assessed throughout the experiment. Results revealed a significant group difference in the association between peak levels of cortisol and post task subjective stress. In women in the follicular phase a negative association was observed (r(2)=0.199, p=0.04), while this relation was positive in the group of women in the luteal phase (r(2)=0.227, p=0.02). These findings suggest a possible role of sex hormones in modulating the cortisol stress response function in emotion regulation.

  19. Effects of age, socioeconomic status, and menstrual cycle on pulmonary response to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Seal, E. Jr.; McDonnell, W.F.; House, D.E.

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of age, socioeconomic status, and menstrual cycle phase on the pulmonary response to ozone exposure. Three hundred seventy-two healthy white and black young adults, between the ages of 18 and 35 y, were exposed only once to 0.0, 0.12, 0.18, 0.24, 0.30, or 0.40 ppm ozone for 2.3 h. Prior to and after exposure, pulmonary function tests were obtained. Prior to exposure, each subject completed a personal and family-history questionnaire. The response to this questionnaire were used to investigate age, socioeconomic status, and menstrual cycle phase effects on pulmonary responsiveness to ozone. We concluded that the ages of subjects, within the age range studied, had an effect on responsiveness (i.e., decrements in forced expiratory volume in 1 s decreased as the subjects` ages decreased). Socioeconomic status, as reflected by education of fathers, also appeared to affect forced expiratory volume in 1-s responsiveness to ozone, with the middle socioeconomic group being the most responsive. The phase of menstrual cycle did not have an impact on individual responsiveness to ozone. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Pain Management: Post-Amputation Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain Management Post-Amputation Pain Volume 8 · Issue 2 · March/April 1998 Text size Larger text Smaller text Java Required Print page Save and share ... by G. Edward Jeffries, MD, FACS Post-Amputation Pain Post-amputation pain is one of the most ...