Science.gov

Sample records for allied diseases association

  1. National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Reviewed are the history and organization, purpose and programs, and public services of the National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association, an organization geared toward eradicating Tay-Sachs disease (a hereditary disorder affecting primarily Jewish infants which generally leads to deterioration and death by the child's fifth year). (SBH)

  2. The National Tay Sachs and Allied Diseases Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeitlin, Paula

    1986-01-01

    The National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association is involved in education, research, and prevention of Tay-Sachs, an inherited metabolic disorder which destroys the central nervous system, and over 30 related disorders. The group features a parent peer group network and a support group for carrier couples. (CL)

  3. Heat pump associations, alliances, and allies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Associations, Alliances, and Allies, a seminar and workshop sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute, was held in Memphis, Tennessee, April 10--11, 1991. The focus of the meeting was relationships forged between electric utilities and trade allies that sell residential heat pumps. one hundred and seven representatives of electric utilities, dealer/contractors, manufacturers, and consultants attended. Electric utility trade ally programs run the gamut from coop advertising to heat pump association to elaborate technician training programs. All utility participants recognize the important programs, since it is the trade ally who sells, installs, and services heat pumps, while it is the electric utility who gets blamed if the heat pumps fail to operate properly or are inefficient. Heat pumps are efficient and effective, but their efficiency and effectiveness depends critically upon the quality of installation and maintenance. A utility can thus help to ensure satisfied customers and can also help to achieve its own load shape objectives by working closely with its trade allies, the dealers, contractors, manufacturers, and distributors. Attendees spent the morning sessions of the two day meeting in plenary sessions, hearing about utility and dealer heat pump programs and issues. Afternoon roundtable discussions provided structured forums to discuss: Advertising; Heat pump association startup and operation; Rebates and incentives; Technician training school and centers; Installation inspection and dealer qualification; and Heat pump association training. These proceedings report on the papers presented in the morning plenary sessions and summarize the main points discussed in the afternoon workshops.

  4. Ally

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ally ; CASRN 74223 - 64 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  5. Role of the Chronic Dental Disease Scheme in Enhanced Primary Care: allied health or allied outlier?

    PubMed

    Lam, Raymond; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to provide a comparative analysis of the Chronic Dental Disease Scheme (CDSS) and the Allied Health Profession (AHP) program as they related to the greater Enhanced Primary Care Scheme introduced by the Australian Government to manage patients with chronic and complex diseases. A retrospective analysis of data pertaining to Medicare items related to dentistry and the allied health professions were extracted from the Medicare Benefits Schedule database online, and formed the basis of this study. The highest proportion of services was provided in the state of New South Wales. There appears to be synergy in the utilisation of services with jurisdictions either overutilising or underutilising services. Costs to the Enhanced Primary Care Scheme under the CDSS model (fee for service) were up to 40 times more expensive compared with the AHP model (fee per visit). Costs and treatment associated with the CDSS experienced an increase of 13350% during the period 2007-08, coincident with an increase in subsidization. Reconstructive dentistry accounted for the majority of the increase. Gender disparities in dentistry were less distinct when compared with AHPs and were postulated to be due to males presenting with conditions that were more progressive requiring more invasive treatment. A comparative analysis indicates significant differences in costs, nature of treatment and the manner of remuneration between dentistry and the AHPs. A fee for service schedule as evidenced by the CDSS is dependent on the degree of financial incentive as indicated by patterns in utilisation over time. The amount of treatment considered necessary may be influenced by the level of subsidy with treatment that may not reflect disease management. The AHP model, which is based around a fee for visit schedule, is not without its deficiencies but has not experienced significant rises in cost compared with the CDSS.

  6. Graves’ disease allied with multiple pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Housni, Brahim; Elharroudi, Tijani; Soufi, Mehdi; Bouziane, Mohammed; Azzouzi, Abderahim

    2013-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is an uncommon cause of high blood pressure touching adults. The combination of severe hypertension in the triad of headache, sweating, and tachycardia should suggest this diagnosis; this clinical picture is similar to that of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 22-year-old patient with multiple pheochromocytoma associated with Graves’ disease revealed by malignant hypertension and discussed the difficulties of the diagnosis and the treatment approach. PMID:23776912

  7. Factors associated with sense of community among allied health students.

    PubMed

    Haar, Mindy; Scanlan, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a substantial increase in online education in the health professions, as well as growing recognition that teamwork and collaboration are essential to success. While the impact of students' sense of community on factors such as course satisfaction and retention has been studied among college enrollees in general, there is little research exploring this concept among allied health students. To address this shortcoming, a convenience sample of students enrolled in a large northeastern school of health-related professions was surveyed to gather information on their demographics, curriculum and selected course attributes, perceived instructor teaching perspectives, and sense of community. Univariate analysis indicated that entry-level students experienced a greater sense of community than post-professional students. Multivariate analysis revealed that instructor-determined factors of encouraging discussion, encouraging expression of opinions, and specifying response times best predicted sense of community. With all other variables controlled, perceptions of community were significantly lower in online courses, among students for whom English was their second language, and in courses where instructors were perceived as focused primarily on content delivery. This study supports promoting selected course and instructor-related attributes associated with sense of community in allied health education, with a particular focus on both non-native English speakers and post-professional students. Enhancement of online courses with strategies that increase instructor presence, better engage students, and facilitate interaction also are warranted.

  8. Health Promotion Disease Prevention: A Challenge to Allied Health Curriculum Designers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, David

    1986-01-01

    Presents a model curriculum on health promotion and disease prevention for allied health students. Suggested program elements include (1) promoting personal health patterns, (2) fitting health promotion into daily routines, (3) using persuasion, (4) working with support groups and individuals, and (5) serving as a clearinghouse. (CH)

  9. The sagging rope sign in Perthes' disease and allied disorders.

    PubMed

    Apley, A G; Wientroub, S

    1981-02-01

    The sagging rope sign is the term used to describe the radiographic appearances which sometimes occur after Perthes' disease. It is severe examples of that disease and indicates damage to the growth plate with a marked metaphysial reaction. The same appearance follows severe epiphysitis after forcible reduction of a congenitally dislocated hip, and certain rare epiphysial dysplasias. The origin and significance of the sign are discussed.

  10. Effect of health insurance on the utilisation of allied health services by people with chronic disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Elizabeth H; Foster, Michele; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Haynes, Michele; O'Flaherty, Martin; Haines, Terry P

    2014-01-01

    Allied health services benefit the management of many chronic diseases. The effects of health insurance on the utilisation of allied health services has not yet been established despite health insurance frequently being identified as a factor promoting utilisation of medical and hospital services among people with chronic disease. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to establish the effects of health insurance on the utilisation of allied health services by people with chronic disease. Medline (Ovid Medline 1948 to Present with Daily Update), EMBASE (1980 to 1 April 2011), CINAHL, PsychINFO and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched to 12 April 2011 inclusive. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they were published in English, randomised controlled trials, quasi-experimental trials, quantitative observational studies and included people with one or more chronic diseases using allied health services and health insurance. A full-text review was performed independently by two reviewers. Meta-analyses were conducted. One hundred and fifty-eight citations were retrieved and seven articles were included in the meta-analyses. The pooled odds ratio (95% CI) of having insurance (versus no insurance) on the utilisation of allied health services among people with chronic disease was 1.33 (1.16-1.52; P<0.001). There was a significant effect of insurance on the utilisation of non-physiotherapy services, pooled odds ratio (95% CI) 4.80 (1.46-15.79; P=0.01) but having insurance compared with insurance of a lesser coverage was not significantly associated with an increase in physiotherapy utilisation, pooled odds ratio (95% CI) 1.53 (0.81-2.91; P=0.19). The presence of co-morbidity or functional limitation and higher levels of education increased utilisation whereas gender, race, marital status and income had a limited and variable effect, according to the study population. The review was limited by the considerable

  11. First Universities Allied for Essential Medicines (UAEM) Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium.

    PubMed

    Musselwhite, Laura W; Maciag, Karolina; Lankowski, Alex; Gretes, Michael C; Wellems, Thomas E; Tavera, Gloria; Goulding, Rebecca E; Guillen, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Universities Allied for Essential Medicines organized its first Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium to address expanding roles of public sector research institutions in innovation in research and development of biomedical technologies for treatment of diseases, particularly neglected tropical diseases. Universities and other public research institutions are increasingly integrated into the pharmaceutical innovation system. Academic entities now routinely undertake robust high-throughput screening and medicinal chemistry research programs to identify lead compounds for small molecule drugs and novel drug targets. Furthermore, product development partnerships are emerging between academic institutions, non-profit entities, and biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to create diagnostics, therapies, and vaccines for diseases of the poor. With not for profit mission statements, open access publishing standards, open source platforms for data sharing and collaboration, and a shift in focus to more translational research, universities and other public research institutions are well-placed to accelerate development of medical technologies, particularly for neglected tropical diseases.

  12. Sexual counselling for individuals with cardiovascular disease and their partners: a consensus document from the American Heart Association and the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP).

    PubMed

    Steinke, Elaine E; Jaarsma, Tiny; Barnason, Susan A; Byrne, Molly; Doherty, Sally; Dougherty, Cynthia M; Fridlund, Bengt; Kautz, Donald D; Mårtensson, Jan; Mosack, Victoria; Moser, Debra K

    2013-11-01

    After a cardiovascular event, patients and their families often cope with numerous changes in their lives, including dealing with consequences of the disease or its treatment on their daily lives and functioning. Coping poorly with both physical and psychological challenges may lead to impaired quality of life. Sexuality is one aspect of quality of life that is important for many patients and partners that may be adversely affected by a cardiac event. The World Health Organization defines sexual health as '… a state of physical, emotional, mental and social well-being in relation to sexuality; it is not merely the absence of disease, dysfunction or infirmity. Sexual health requires a positive and respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships, as well as the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences ….'(1(p4)) The safety and timing of return to sexual activity after a cardiac event have been well addressed in an American Heart Association scientific statement, and decreased sexual activity among cardiac patients is frequently reported.(2) Rates of erectile dysfunction (ED) among men with cardiovascular disease (CVD) are twice as high as those in the general population, with similar rates of sexual dysfunction in females with CVD.(3) ED and vaginal dryness may also be presenting signs of heart disease and may appear 1-3 years before the onset of angina pectoris. Estimates reflect that only a small percentage of those with sexual dysfunction seek medical care;(4) therefore, routine assessment of sexual problems and sexual counselling may be of benefit as part of effective management by physicians, nurses, and other healthcare providers.

  13. Sleep and mood disorders in dry eye disease and allied irritating ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Ayaki, Masahiko; Kawashima, Motoko; Negishi, Kazuno; Kishimoto, Taishiro; Mimura, Masaru; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate sleep and mood disorders in patients with irritating ocular diseases. The study design was a cross-sectional/case-control study conducted in six eye clinics. Out of 715 outpatients diagnosed with irritating ocular surface diseases and initially enrolled, 301 patients with dry eye disease (DED) and 202 age-matched control participants with other ocular surface diseases were analyzed. The mean Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) scores were 6.4 ± 3.2 and 11.1 ± 5.7 for severe DED (n = 146), 5.5 ± 3.3 and 9.8 ± 4.0 for mild DED (n = 155), 5.5 ± 3.1 and 9.5 ± 6.6 for chronic conjunctivitis (n = 124), and 5.0 ± 3.3 and 8.9 ± 5.3 for allergic conjunctivitis (n = 78). There were significant differences among these diagnostic groups for PSQI (P < 0.05). Regression analysis of patients with DED revealed the PSQI and HADS scores were significantly correlated with the severity of DED (P < 0.05). Our results demonstrate that sleep quality in patients with DED is significantly worse than in patients with other irritating ocular surface diseases and it is correlated with the severity of DED.

  14. Sleep and mood disorders in dry eye disease and allied irritating ocular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ayaki, Masahiko; Kawashima, Motoko; Negishi, Kazuno; Kishimoto, Taishiro; Mimura, Masaru; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate sleep and mood disorders in patients with irritating ocular diseases. The study design was a cross-sectional/case-control study conducted in six eye clinics. Out of 715 outpatients diagnosed with irritating ocular surface diseases and initially enrolled, 301 patients with dry eye disease (DED) and 202 age-matched control participants with other ocular surface diseases were analyzed. The mean Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) scores were 6.4 ± 3.2 and 11.1 ± 5.7 for severe DED (n = 146), 5.5 ± 3.3 and 9.8 ± 4.0 for mild DED (n = 155), 5.5 ± 3.1 and 9.5 ± 6.6 for chronic conjunctivitis (n = 124), and 5.0 ± 3.3 and 8.9 ± 5.3 for allergic conjunctivitis (n = 78). There were significant differences among these diagnostic groups for PSQI (P < 0.05). Regression analysis of patients with DED revealed the PSQI and HADS scores were significantly correlated with the severity of DED (P < 0.05). Our results demonstrate that sleep quality in patients with DED is significantly worse than in patients with other irritating ocular surface diseases and it is correlated with the severity of DED. PMID:26927330

  15. Astronomy Allies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewelling, Heather; Alatalo, Katherine A.

    2017-01-01

    Imagine you are a grad student, at your first conference, and a prominent senior scientist shows interest in your work, and he makes things get way too personal? What would you do? Would you report it? Or would you decide, after a few other instances of harassment, that maybe you shouldn't pursue astronomy? Harassment is under-reported, the policies can be difficult to understand or hard to find, and it can be very intimidating as a young scientist to report it to the proper individuals. The Astronomy Allies Program is designed to help you with these sorts of problems. We are a group of volunteers that will help by doing the following: provide safe walks home during the conference, someone to talk to confidentially, as an intervener, as a resource to report harassment. The Allies are a diverse group of scientists committed to acting as mentors, advocates, and liaisons. The Winter 2015 AAS meeting was the first meeting that had Astronomy Allies, and Astronomy Allies provided a website for information, as well as a twitter, email, and phone number for anyone who needs our help or would like more information. We posted about the Astronomy Allies on the Women In Astronomy blog, and this program resonates with many people: either they want to help, or they have experienced harassment in the past and don't want to see it in the future. Harassment may not happen to most conference participants, but it's wrong, it's against the AAS anti-harassment policy ( http://aas.org/policies/anti-harassment-policy ), it can be very damaging, and if it happens to even one person, that is unacceptable. We intend to improve the culture at conferences to make it so that harassers feel they can't get away with their unprofessional behavior.

  16. Astronomy Allies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewelling, Heather; Alatalo, Katherine

    2015-08-01

    Imagine you are a grad student, at your first conference, and a prominent senior scientist shows interest in your work, and he makes things get way too personal? What would you do? Would you report it? Or would you decide, after a few other instances of harassment, that maybe you shouldn't pursue astronomy? Harassment is under-reported, the policies can be difficult to understand or hard to find, and it can be very intimidating as a young scientist to report it to the proper individuals. The Astronomy Allies Program is designed to help you with these sorts of problems. We are a group of volunteers that will help by doing the following: provide safe walks home during the conference, someone to talk to confidentially, as an intervener, as a resource to report harassment. The Allies are a diverse group of scientists committed to acting as mentors, advocates, and liaisons. The Winter 2015 AAS meeting was the first meeting that had Astronomy Allies, and Astronomy Allies provided a website for information, as well as a twitter, email, and phone number for anyone who needs our help or would like more information. We posted about the Astronomy Allies on the Women In Astronomy blog, and this program resonates with many people: either they want to help, or they have experienced harassment in the past and don't want to see it in the future. Harassment may not happen to most conference participants, but it's wrong, it's against the AAS anti-harassment policy ( http://aas.org/policies/anti-harassment-policy ), it can be very damaging, and if it happens to even one person, that is unacceptable. We intend to improve the culture at conferences to make it so that harassers feel they can't get away with their unprofessional behavior.

  17. Astronomy Allies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewelling, Heather; Alatalo, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Imagine you are a grad student, at your first conference, and a prominent senior scientist shows interest in your work, and he makes things get way too personal? What would you do? Would you report it? Or would you decide, after a few other instances of harassment, that maybe you shouldn't pursue astronomy? Harassment is under-reported, the policies can be difficult to understand or hard to find, and it can be very intimidating as a young scientist to report it to the proper individuals. The Astronomy Allies Program is designed to help you with these sorts of problems. We are a group of volunteers that will help by doing the following: provide safe walks home during the conference, someone to talk to confidentially, as an intervener, as a resource to report harassment. The Allies are a diverse group of scientists committed to acting as mentors, advocates, and liaisons. The Winter 2015 AAS meeting was the first meeting that had Astronomy Allies, and Astronomy Allies provided a website for information, as well as a twitter, email, and phone number for anyone who needs our help or would like more information. We posted about the Astronomy Allies on the Women In Astronomy blog, and this program resonates with many people: either they want to help, or they have experienced harassment in the past and don't want to see it in the future. Harassment may not happen to most conference participants, but it's wrong, it's against the AAS anti-harassment policy ( http://aas.org/policies/anti-harassment-policy ), it can be very damaging, and if it happens to even one person, that is unacceptable. We intend to improve the culture at conferences to make it so that harassers feel they can't get away with their unprofessional behavior.

  18. Potato psyllids and their bacterial allies: Two fronts in the war against zebra chip disease.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato psyllid is a major pest of potato in the western United States that transmits the pathogen that causes zebra chip disease. Potato psyllids, like all psyllids, have close associations with bacterial endosymbionts living within them. These endosymbionts may be obligate or facultative, and the...

  19. American Behcet's Disease Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awareness Day May 20th is Behcet's Awareness Day Behcet's Disease Awareness Share your story and educate others about ... org/en/community/behcet-s-syndrome Upcoming Events American Behcet's Disease Association PO BOX 80576 Rochester, MI 48308 Contact ...

  20. Kennedy's Disease Association

    MedlinePlus

    Kennedy's Disease Association A Public Benefit, Non-Profit Organization Register GTranslate GTranslate Javascript is required to use ... worldwide. Males generally inherit the disease symptoms and females are the carriers. Help Us Find A Cure! ...

  1. Use of metabolomics for the chemotaxonomy of legume-associated Ascochyta and allied genera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemotaxonomy and the comparative analysis of metabolic features of fungi have the potential to provide valuable information relating to ecology and evolution, but have not been fully explored in fungal biology. Here, we investigated the chemical diversity of legume-associated Ascochyta and Phoma sp...

  2. Use of metabolomics for the chemotaxonomy of legume-associated Ascochyta and allied genera

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wonyong; Peever, Tobin L.; Park, Jeong-Jin; Park, Chung-Min; Gang, David R.; Xian, Ming; Davidson, Jenny A.; Infantino, Alessandro; Kaiser, Walter J.; Chen, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Chemotaxonomy and the comparative analysis of metabolic features of fungi have the potential to provide valuable information relating to ecology and evolution, but have not been fully explored in fungal biology. Here, we investigated the chemical diversity of legume-associated Ascochyta and Phoma species and the possible use of a metabolomics approach using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for their classification. The metabolic features of 45 strains including 11 known species isolated from various legumes were extracted, and the datasets were analyzed using chemometrics methods such as principal component and hierarchical clustering analyses. We found a high degree of intra-species consistency in metabolic profiles, but inter-species diversity was high. Molecular phylogenies of the legume-associated Ascochyta/Phoma species were estimated using sequence data from three protein-coding genes and the five major chemical groups that were detected in the hierarchical clustering analysis were mapped to the phylogeny. Clusters based on similarity of metabolic features were largely congruent with the species phylogeny. These results indicated that evolutionarily distinct fungal lineages have diversified their metabolic capacities as they have evolved independently. This whole metabolomics approach may be an effective tool for chemotaxonomy of fungal taxa lacking information on their metabolic content. PMID:26847260

  3. Wilson's Disease Association International

    MedlinePlus

    ... Connect with Wilson Disease Association Send Email Physician Contacts List of Physicians and Institutions in Your Area View Contacts Support Contacts Individuals who can offer Support and Information View ...

  4. [Rural endemic diseases, health and development: Emmanuel Dias and the construction of a network of allies against Chagas disease].

    PubMed

    Kropf, Simone Petraglia

    2016-11-01

    The scope of this article is to analyze the trajectory of Emmanuel Dias (1908-1962), a researcher at the Oswaldo Cruz Institute (OCI) and director of the Center for Studies and Prophylaxis of Chagas Disease (OCI outpost established in 1943 in the city of Bambuí, Minas Gerais), as a key actor in the acknowledgement of Chagas disease as a public health problem in Brazil and the Americas. It seeks to show that the conquest of this acknowledgement, the cornerstone of which was the staging of the first campaign to combat the disease in Brazil in 1950, was made possible by the intense political mobilization of Dias together with the various social groups, such as physicians, politicians and residents of rural areas, public health officials, governments and international organizations. This mobilization occurred during the 1940s and 1950s in a historical context marked by intense debate about the relationship between health and development and helped to construct a network of alliances that was critical for the recognition of Chagas disease as a chronic cardiopathy, which threatened the productivity of rural workers and represented a medical and social problem that merited public health actions and programs geared to get it under control.

  5. Tech-Prep/Associate Degree Program Guide: Tech Prep Associate Degree Program, Business Administration Associate Degree Program, Office Administration Associate Degree Program, Allied Health Associate Degree Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmaras, Judy; Neri, Pat

    The Tech-Prep Associate Degree Program (TPAD) at the Community College of Rhode Island (CCRI) in Warwick, is a high school/community college partnership providing high school students with an alternative program of study focused on goal setting, basic academic skills development, and the skills needed to pursue a career in a technical, business or…

  6. Exercise physiologists emerge as allied healthcare professionals in the era of non-communicable disease pandemics: a report from Australia, 2006-2012.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Birinder S; Robergs, Robert A; Askew, Christopher D

    2014-07-01

    Exercise can be prescribed to prevent, manage, and treat many leading non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and underlying risk factors. However, surprisingly, Australia is one of only a few countries where allied healthcare professionals with specialized university education and training in exercise prescription and delivery provide services within a government-run healthcare system (Medicare). This article presents data on Medicare-funded services provided by accredited exercise physiologists (AEPs) from the inclusion of the profession in the allied healthcare model (January, 2006) to the end of 2012. We conceptualize these data in relation to current NCD trends, and outline recommendations that can potentially help curtail the current chronic disease burden through the further integration of exercise professionals into the healthcare system in Australia, and internationally. From 2006 to 2012, the number of AEPs in Australia has increased 563 %. This rise in AEPs has been paralleled by increased delivery of services for eligible patients with a chronic medical condition (+614 %), type 2 diabetes mellitus (+211 to 230 %), and of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent (+343 %). These trends, which were developed through the "early years" of the profession, are encouraging and suggest that AEPs have taken up a vital position within the healthcare system. However, the total number of services provided by AEPs currently remains very low in relation to the prevalence of overweight-obesity and type 2 diabetes in Australia. Furthermore, services for Aboriginal Australians are very low considering the extreme burden of chronic diseases in these vulnerable populations. We provide some recommendations that may help the exercise physiology profession play a greater role in tackling the NCD burden and shift the healthcare model in a direction that is more proactive and focused on disease prevention and health, including the early identification and treatment of major

  7. Allied health disaster volunteering.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Alphonso; Wilson, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Allied health practitioners will play an important role in providing medical care following a disaster. The clinical and laboratory skills possessed by allied health practitioners will be of extreme importance in the processing of disaster victims. The degree that allied health practitioners can help process disaster victims will play a large role in helping stabilize survivors of man-made or natural disasters. Those allied health practitioners skilled in triage, patient assessment, and emergency treatment of those injured can make a large difference in improving the utilization of human resources at an emergency site and thereby potentially improve treatment outcomes. Failure of a health professional to preregister as a health volunteer can affect the quality and responsiveness of a community's surge capacity. The rationale for advance registration ensures that the time-intensive effort of identifying professional credentials and licenses does not consume or divert resources that are necessary for mitigation of the immediate emergency. Of equal importance for allied health practitioners are the liability issues that exist in providing health care services outside of a formal employment agreement.

  8. Allies in the struggle.

    PubMed

    Draughn, Tricia; Elkins, Becki; Roy, Rakhi

    2002-10-01

    SUMMARY Providing a community that is committed to standards, diversity, and enhancement of the academic environment is often difficult. Offering an Allies or Safe Zone program is among of the first steps an institution can take to achieve a community that embraces diversity and creates a learning environment that is accepting of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered individuals. While there are many opportunities in institutional group settings to address these issues, they often go either unnoticed or untapped. How can being an ally impact the greater institutional environment? This paper will discuss the campus environment for LGBT students, examine existing Allies and Safe Zone programs, and offer a framework to assist program coordinators and participants in establishing comprehensive programs to change the campus climate and develop institutional environments that are gay affirmative.

  9. Allied Health Leadership in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Invitational Conference Proceedings (Williamsburg, Virginia, April 17-19, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kra, Eleanor, Ed.

    The following papers are included: "Opening Remarks" (McTernan); "Conference Goals and Plans" (Douglas); "Challenge to Leadership" (Pearson); "Implications of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention for the Practice of Respiratory Care" (Axton); "Health Promotion Strategies in Dietetic Practice"…

  10. The Nexus Between Patient-Centered Care and Complementary Medicine: Allies in the Era of Chronic Disease?

    PubMed

    Foley, Hope; Steel, Amie

    2017-03-03

    Complementary medicine (CM) holds an established place of value for health care consumers around the world. Consumers seek CM specifically for the type of clinical care provided by CM practitioners, which is perceived as holistic and individualized. The holistic approach of CM has been described as patient-centered and there are indeed many parallels between the philosophy of holism and the paradigm of patient-centered care (PCC). In light of the contemporary movement toward PCC as a means of improving health care delivery, it is worth exploring CM as a potential existing resource of PCC. This is of particular interest with consideration to the growing burden of chronic disease, the emphasis of PCC in chronic disease management, and the high representation of chronic disease sufferers among CM users. However, there has been minimal investigation into the question of whether the holistic philosophies of CM are translated by CM practitioners into practical, clinical application. The changing landscape of CM practice necessitates a deeper understanding of the nature of CM clinical care to assess the role of CM in the contemporary health care environment.

  11. A Seat at the Table that I Set: Beyond Social Justice Allies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Toby

    2009-01-01

    An ally, as defined by dictionary.com, is "a person, group, or nation that is associated with others for some common cause or purpose." Therefore, allies are people whose orientation is "outside" of the oppressed group. An ally is often a person who recognizes her privileges and works in alliance with members of oppressed…

  12. Celiac disease and gluten-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Helms, Steve

    2005-09-01

    Celiac disease develops from an autoimmune response to specific dietary grains that contain gluten. Diagnosis can be made based on the classical presentation of diarrhea, fatty stools, and abdominal bloating and cramping, as well as the presence of specific serum antibodies. In addition, gluten ingestion has increasingly been found to be associated with other conditions not usually correlated with gluten intolerance. The subsequent diversity of the clinical presentation in these cases can complicate decision-making and delay treatment initiation in conditions such as ataxia, headaches, arthritis, neuropathy, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and others. This review explores the etiology and pathology of celiac disease, presents support for the relationship between gluten and other diseases, and provides effective screening and treatment protocols.

  13. Educators' Guide to Ally Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), 2010

    2010-01-01

    An ally is an individual who speaks out and stands up for a person or group that is targeted and/or discriminated against. An ally works to end oppression by supporting and advocating for people who are stigmatized, or treated unfairly because of who they are. In this context, Allies are referred to as people who do not identify as LGBT (lesbian,…

  14. Clinical associations of Dupuytren's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hart, M; Hooper, G

    2005-01-01

    Dupuytren's disease (DD) is a common progressive fibrotic condition affecting the palmar and digital fascia. Although its management is undertaken by hand surgeons, it is commonly seen by other doctors as an incidental finding. In many cases it is believed to be associated with other medical conditions, although the evidence for such associations is not always clear. This review considers the evidence behind these associations and discusses the aetiology of DD. By doing so, it is hoped that this review will permit a better understanding of the relevance of DD as a clinical sign. PMID:15998816

  15. G4-associated human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Maizels, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has established clear connections between G-quadruplexes and human disease. Features of quadruplex structures that promote genomic instability have been determined. Quadruplexes have been identified as transcriptional, translational and epigenetic regulatory targets of factors associated with human genetic disease. An expandable GGGGCC motif that can adopt a G4 structure, located in the previously obscure C9ORF72 locus, has been shown to contribute to two well-recognized neurodegenerative diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). This review focuses on these advances, which further dispel the view that genomic biology is limited to the confines of the canonical B-form DNA duplex, and show how quadruplexes contribute spatial and temporal dimensionalities to linear sequence information. This recent progress also has clear practical ramifications, as prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease depend on understanding the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26150098

  16. Diseases associated with genomic imprinting.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Jon F; Úbeda, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is the phenomenon where the expression of a locus differs between the maternally and paternally inherited alleles. Typically, this manifests as transcriptional silencing of one of the alleles, although many genes are imprinted in a tissue- or isoform-specific manner. Diseases associated with imprinted genes include various cancers, disorders of growth and metabolism, and disorders in neurodevelopment, cognition, and behavior, including certain major psychiatric disorders. In many cases, the disease phenotypes associated with dysfunction at particular imprinted loci can be understood in terms of the evolutionary processes responsible for the origin of imprinting. Imprinted gene expression represents the outcome of an intragenomic evolutionary conflict, where natural selection favors different expression strategies for maternally and paternally inherited alleles. This conflict is reasonably well understood in the context of the early growth effects of imprinted genes, where paternally inherited alleles are selected to place a greater demand on maternal resources than are maternally inherited alleles. Less well understood are the origins of imprinted gene expression in the brain, and their effects on cognition and behavior. This chapter reviews the genetic diseases that are associated with imprinted genes, framed in terms of the evolutionary pressures acting on gene expression at those loci. We begin by reviewing the phenomenon and evolutionary origins of genomic imprinting. We then discuss diseases that are associated with genetic or epigenetic defects at particular imprinted loci, many of which are associated with abnormalities in growth and/or feeding behaviors that can be understood in terms of the asymmetric pressures of natural selection on maternally and paternally inherited alleles. We next described the evidence for imprinted gene effects on adult cognition and behavior, and the possible role of imprinted genes in the etiology of certain

  17. Allied Health Careers Instructional Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Betty

    This instructional workbook contains 24 units to be used by beginning students in allied health care occupations courses. The units are organized in four sections that cover the following topics: introduction to allied health careers, health/wellness, basic sciences, and basic anatomy and physiology. Each unit contains a unit objective, specific…

  18. Radiation-associated valvular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.G.; Mayfield, W.R.; Normann, S.; Alexander, J.A. )

    1991-03-01

    The prevalence of radiation-associated cardiac disease is increasing due to prolonged survival following mediastinal irradiation. Side effects of radiation include pericarditis, accelerated coronary artery disease, myocardial fibrosis and valvular injury. We evaluated the cases of three young patients with evidence of significant valvular disease following mediastinal irradiation. One patient underwent the first reported successful aortic and mitral valve replacement for radiation-associated valvular disease (RAVD) as well as concurrent coronary artery revascularization. A review of the literature revealed 35 reported cases of RAVD, with only one successful case of valve replacement that was limited to the aortic valve. Asymptomatic RAVD is diagnosed 11.5 years after mediastinal irradiation compared with 16.5 years for symptomatic patients, emphasizing that long-term follow-up is important for patients receiving mediastinal irradiation. This study defines a continuum of valvular disease following radiation that begins with mild asymptomatic valvular thickening and progresses to severe valvular fibrosis with hemodynamic compromise requiring surgical intervention. 32 refs.

  19. Travel-associated skin disease.

    PubMed

    Morris-Jones, Rachael; Morris-Jones, Stephen

    2012-09-01

    Travel associated skin disease is extremely common and a frequent cause of the returning traveller seeking medical attention. Widespread cutaneous eruptions usually represent reactive rashes, indicating an underlying systemic infection or allergic reaction. Patients with disseminated or spreading rashes following travel often present with fever and malaise. In contrast, those presenting with localised skin disease such as a blister, nodule, plaque, ulcer etc are usually well in themselves but have sustained a bite/sting/penetrating injury or introduction of infection directly into the skin at the affected site. As a general rule widespread rashes are investigated with blood tests/serology and localised lesions with a skin biopsy for culture and histology.

  20. Phenotypic characterization of Sodalis praecaptivus sp. nov., a close non-insect-associated member of the Sodalis-allied lineage of insect endosymbionts

    PubMed Central

    Oakeson, Kelly F.; Enomoto, Shinichiro; Jackson, D. Grant; Fisher, Mark A.; Dale, Colin

    2015-01-01

    A Gram-stain-negative bacterium, isolated from a human wound was previously found to share an unprecedentedly close relationship with Sodalis glossinidius and other members of the Sodalis-allied clade of insect symbionts. This relationship was inferred from sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and genomic comparisons and suggested the strain belonged to a novel species. Biochemical and genetic analyses supported this suggestion and demonstrated that the organism has a wide repertoire of metabolic properties, which is consistent with the presence of a relatively large gene inventory. Among members of the Sodalis-allied clade, this is the first representative that has sufficient metabolic capabilities to sustain growth in minimal media. On the basis of the results of this study, we propose that this organism be classified as a representative of a novel species, Sodalis praecaptivus sp. nov. (type strain HST = DSM 27494T = ATCC BAA-2554T). PMID:25782768

  1. 22 CFR 123.27 - Special licensing regime for export to U.S. allies of commercial communications satellite...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... allies of commercial communications satellite components, systems, parts, accessories, attachments and... export to U.S. allies of commercial communications satellite components, systems, parts, accessories... associated technical data for commercial communications satellites, and who are so registered with...

  2. 22 CFR 123.27 - Special licensing regime for export to U.S. allies of commercial communications satellite...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... allies of commercial communications satellite components, systems, parts, accessories, attachments and... export to U.S. allies of commercial communications satellite components, systems, parts, accessories... associated technical data for commercial communications satellites, and who are so registered with...

  3. 22 CFR 123.27 - Special licensing regime for export to U.S. allies of commercial communications satellite...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... allies of commercial communications satellite components, systems, parts, accessories, attachments and... export to U.S. allies of commercial communications satellite components, systems, parts, accessories... associated technical data for commercial communications satellites, and who are so registered with...

  4. 22 CFR 123.27 - Special licensing regime for export to U.S. allies of commercial communications satellite...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... allies of commercial communications satellite components, systems, parts, accessories, attachments and... export to U.S. allies of commercial communications satellite components, systems, parts, accessories... associated technical data for commercial communications satellites, and who are so registered with...

  5. 22 CFR 123.27 - Special licensing regime for export to U.S. allies of commercial communications satellite...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... allies of commercial communications satellite components, systems, parts, accessories, attachments and... licensing regime for export to U.S. allies of commercial communications satellite components, systems, parts... and certain associated technical data for commercial communications satellites, and who are...

  6. Diseases associated with leaky hemichannels

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Mauricio A.; Reyes, Edison P.; García, Isaac E.; Pinto, Bernardo; Martínez, Agustín D.; González, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Hemichannels (HCs) and gap junction channels (GJCs) formed by protein subunits called connexins (Cxs) are major pathways for intercellular communication. While HCs connect the intracellular compartment with the extracellular milieu, GJCs allow the interchange of molecules between cytoplasm of two contacting cells. Under physiological conditions, HCs are mostly closed, but they can open under certain stimuli allowing the release of autocrine and paracrine molecules. Moreover, some pathological conditions, like ischemia or other inflammation conditions, significantly increase HCs activity. In addition, some mutations in Cx genes associated with human diseases, such as deafness or cataracts, lead to the formation of more active HCs or “leaky HCs.” In this article we will revise cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the appearance of leaky HCs, and the consequences of their expression in different cellular systems and animal models, in seeking a common pattern or pathological mechanism of disease. PMID:26283912

  7. Selected list of books and journals in allied health sciences.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1984-01-01

    This list of 450 books and 67 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs and personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Due to the necessity of limiting the scope of coverage because of the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused mainly on the twenty-six educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, in addition to programs in allied dental health and medical secretarial skills. Books are categorized by broad subject followed by an author/editor index; journals are listed alphabetically by title. To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for annual (1984) journal subscriptions would require a total expenditure of approximately $15,000. PMID:6388696

  8. Utilization of virtual learning environments in the allied health professions.

    PubMed

    Butina, Michelle; Brooks, Donna; Dominguez, Paul J; Mahon, Gwendolyn M

    2013-01-01

    Multiple technology based tools have been used to enhance skill development in allied health education, which now includes virtual learning environments. The purpose of this study was to explore whether, and how, this latest instructional technology is being adapted in allied health education. An online survey was circulated to all Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP) member institutions and focused on three broad areas of virtual learning environments: the uses of, the perceived pros and cons of, and the outcomes of utilizing them. Results show 40% (17 of 42) of the respondent use some form of the technology. The use of virtual learning technology in other healthcare professions (e.g., medicine) demonstrates the potential benefits to allied health education.

  9. Turning gadflies into allies.

    PubMed

    Yaziji, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Multinational companies are the driving force behind globalization, but they are also the source of many of its most painful consequences, including currency crises, cross-border pollution, and overfishing. These problems remain unsolved because they are beyond the scope of individual governments; transnational organizations have also proved unequal to the task. Nonprofit, nongovernmental organizations have leaped into the breach. To force policy changes, they have seized on all forms of modern persuasion to influence public sentiment toward global traders, manufacturers, and investors. By partnering with NGOs instead of opposing them, companies can avoid costly conflict and can use NGOs' assets to gain competitive advantage. So far, however, most companies have proved ill equipped to deal with NGOs. Large companies know how to compete on the basis of product attributes and price. But NGO attacks focus on production methods and their spillover effects, which are often noneconomic. Similarly, NGOs are able to convert companies' standard competitive strengths--such as size and wide market awareness of their brands--into liabilities. That's because the wealthier and better known a company is, the juicier the target it makes. Emboldened by their successes, NGOs continue to take on new causes. By partnering with NGOs instead of reflexively opposing them, companies could draw on NGOs' key strengths--legitimacy, awareness of social forces, distinct networks, and specialized technical expertise--which most companies could use more of. And with NGOs as allies and guides, companies should also be able to accelerate innovation, foresee shifts in demand, shape legislation affecting them, and, in effect, set technical and regulatory standards for their industries.

  10. Molecular mechanistic associations of human diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The study of relationships between human diseases provides new possibilities for biomedical research. Recent achievements on human genetic diseases have stimulated interest to derive methods to identify disease associations in order to gain further insight into the network of human diseases and to predict disease genes. Results Using about 10000 manually collected causal disease/gene associations, we developed a statistical approach to infer meaningful associations between human morbidities. The derived method clustered cardiometabolic and endocrine disorders, immune system-related diseases, solid tissue neoplasms and neurodegenerative pathologies into prominent disease groups. Analysis of biological functions confirmed characteristic features of corresponding disease clusters. Inference of disease associations was further employed as a starting point for prediction of disease genes. Efforts were made to underpin the validity of results by relevant literature evidence. Interestingly, many inferred disease relationships correspond to known clinical associations and comorbidities, and several predicted disease genes were subjects of therapeutic target research. Conclusions Causal molecular mechanisms present a unifying principle to derive methods for disease classification, analysis of clinical disorder associations, and prediction of disease genes. According to the definition of causal disease genes applied in this study, these results are not restricted to genetic disease/gene relationships. This may be particularly useful for the study of long-term or chronic illnesses, where pathological derangement due to environmental or as part of sequel conditions is of importance and may not be fully explained by genetic background. PMID:20815942

  11. Selected list of books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. health care system of the twenty-first century will be information driven; allied health literature will be a dynamic part of that information. This list of 415 books and 76 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either a health care or academic setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, focus has been directed primarily to the twenty-eight educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation (CAHEA) of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, medical secretarial, nutrition, and speech pathology/audiology programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (177 books and 32 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1994 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $25,300. PMID:7920334

  12. Selected list of books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1994-07-01

    The U.S. health care system of the twenty-first century will be information driven; allied health literature will be a dynamic part of that information. This list of 415 books and 76 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either a health care or academic setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, focus has been directed primarily to the twenty-eight educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation (CAHEA) of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, medical secretarial, nutrition, and speech pathology/audiology programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (177 books and 32 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1994 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $25,300.

  13. Heterosexual Allies: A Descriptive Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Susan B.; Davis, Denise S.

    2010-01-01

    Forty-six heterosexual members of a college-based gay/straight alliance organization were surveyed to investigate characteristics of students who commit to acting as allies in reducing sexual prejudice. Assessment focused on the students' history of intergroup contact and exposure to sexual prejudice prior to joining the gay/straight alliance,…

  14. Emerging Innovation: Allied Health Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Janell B.

    2004-01-01

    This article takes a closer look at emerging fields in the allied health arena. The relatively new field of Health Information Technology is one of the exciting prospects, surging with growth opportunities. These individuals are medical language experts who interpret, process, store and retrieve health information for research and data collection.…

  15. Chemical Waste and Allied Products.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yung-Tse; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Ramli, Siti Fatihah; Yeh, Ruth Yu-Li; Liu, Lian-Huey; Huhnke, Christopher Robert

    2016-10-01

    This review of literature published in 2015 focuses on waste related to chemical and allied products. The topics cover the waste management, physicochemical treatment, aerobic granular, aerobic waste treatment, anaerobic granular, anaerobic waste treatment, chemical waste, chemical wastewater, fertilizer waste, fertilizer wastewater, pesticide wastewater, pharmaceutical wastewater, ozonation. cosmetics waste, groundwater remediation, nutrient removal, nitrification denitrification, membrane biological reactor, and pesticide waste.

  16. Chemical Waste and Allied Products.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yung-Tse; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Yusoff, Mohd Suffian; Kamaruddin, Mohamad Anuar; Yeh, Ruth Yu-Li; Liu, Lian-Huey; Huhnke, Christopher Robert; Fu, Yen-Pei

    2015-10-01

    This review of literature published in 2014 focuses on waste related to chemical and allied products. The topics cover the waste management practices, hospital waste, pesticide waste, chemical wastewater, pesticide wastewater and pharmaceutical wastewater. The other topics include aerobic treatment, anaerobic treatment, sorption and ozonation.

  17. Connecting Allied Health Students to Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guion, W. Kent; Mishoe, Shelley C.; Taft, Arthur A.; Campbell, Carol A.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Statewide studies indicate a continuing shortfall of personnel in several allied health disciplines in rural Georgia. National trends indicate lagging enrollment in allied health education programs, suggesting that the workforce shortages will worsen. Purpose: This article describes the efforts of the School of Allied Health Sciences at…

  18. Nosocomial (Health Care-Associated) Legionnaire's Disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shanu; Abell, Virginia; File, Thomas M

    2017-03-01

    Nosocomial Legionnaire's disease is most frequently associated with presence of the organism in hospital water systems. Patients are often susceptible as a result of age, underlying comorbidities, or immunosuppression. Prevention focuses on reducing the reservoir within water systems and includes super heating, ultraviolent light, chlorination, silver-copper ionization, and distal filtration. This article reviews the epidemiology of health care-associated Legionnaire's disease, reviews characteristics of several health care-associated outbreaks, and discusses strategies to prevent health care-associated infection.

  19. Selected list of books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1992-01-01

    This list of 396 books and 77 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Due to the necessity of limiting the scope of coverage because of the large number and wide range of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the twenty-eight programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, medical secretarial, nutrition, and speech pathology/audiology. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals is followed by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (194 books and 31 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1992 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $22,800. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $10,850. PMID:1525616

  20. Selected list of books and journals in allied health sciences.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1990-01-01

    This list of 453 books and 74 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the twenty-six educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, medical secretarial, and nutrition programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (179 books and 29 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1990 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $21,650. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $9,250. PMID:2393755

  1. Collaborative Research in Allied Health. Proceedings of Collaborative Research in Allied Health Symposium (Columbus, Ohio, September 20, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, M. Rosita, Ed.; And Others

    The following papers are included: "Consortia and Collaborative Research: Getting Started" (Hansen); "Coordination of the Health Care System in the State of Michigan" (Burian, Boyden, Herbert); "Health Promotion and Disease Prevention in Allied Health" (Doiron, Douglas); "Interprofessional Collaboration in the Analysis of Public Policy" (Dunn);…

  2. Targeting podocyte-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Leeuwis, Jan Willem; Nguyen, Tri Q; Dendooven, Amélie; Kok, Robbert J; Goldschmeding, Roel

    2010-11-30

    Injury to the podocytes is the initiating cause of many renal diseases, leading to proteinuria with possible progression to end-stage renal disease. Podocytes are highly specialized cells, with an important role in maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier and producing growth factors for both mesangial cells and endothelial cells. With their foot processes they cover the glomerular basement membrane, and form slit diaphragms with neighboring podocytes. Human podocytopathies include focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis, minimal change disease, membranous nephropathy, collapsing glomerulopathy and diabetic nephropathy. Research in the last two decades has demonstrated great progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to podocytopathies. These include single gene defects in slit diaphragm proteins, but also discovery of apoptotic, enzymatic and other pathways involved in podocyte injury. With this progress, a great number of animal models is now available to study either specific podocytopathies, e.g. in mouse models with single gene mutations, or more general podocyte injury patterns, such as the lipopolysaccharide or protamine sulfate model of foot process effacement. In this review, the morphology of the glomerulus will be discussed, with a focus on the podocyte, its interactions with surrounding cells, and the highly differentiated slit diaphragm separating the apical from the basal membrane. We also provide an overview of human podocytopathies and animal models to study these diseases. In the last part we discuss targeted therapies addressing pathways and proteins affected in podocyte injury.

  3. FGF23 associated bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Liao, Eryuan

    2013-03-01

    Recently, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) has sparked widespread interest because of its potential role in regulating phosphate and vitamin D metabolism. In this review, we summarized the FGF superfamily, the mechanism of FGF23 on phosphate and vitamin D metabolism, and the FGF23 related bone disease.

  4. Pemphigus vulgaris-associated interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yi-Xiu; Chu, Jin-Gang; Xiao, Ting; Chen, Hong-Duo

    2016-07-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases (AIBDs)-associated interstitial lung disease (ILD) is extremely rare. Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an intraepidermal autoimmune blistering disease caused by circulating autoantibodies against desmoglein. To date, PV-associated ILD has rarely been reported in English literature. We report a rare association of PV and ILD. A 53-year-old Chinese female with PV for 8 months developed ILD after a relapse of PV for 2 months due to discontinuation of oral prednisone by herself. She was successfully treated by systemic methylprednisolone. Taken previously reported bullous pemphigoid-associated ILD and linear IgA/IgG bullous dermatosis-associated ILD together, in general, AIBDs-associated ILD occurs when AIBDs relapse or are not controlled, responds well to systemic corticosteroids, and has a relatively better prognosis when compared with rheumatoid arthritis- or dermatomyositis-associated ILD.

  5. Nursing Skills for Allied Health Services. Volume 2. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Lucile A., Ed.

    Guidelines for teaching nursing skills to allied health personnel at different levels (on-the-job training, associate degree in nursing, adult education, or staff development programs) are the focus of the document. It presents general considerations for planning an effective management system for the utilization of Level 1 (entry-level nursing…

  6. Nursing Skills for Allied Health Services. Volume 1. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Lucile A., Ed.

    Guidelines for teaching nursing skills to allied health personnel at different levels (on-the-job training, associate degree in nursing, adult education, or staff development programs) are the focus of the document. It presents general considerations for planning an effective management system for the utilization of Level 1 (entry-level nursing…

  7. Cystic fibrosis-associated liver disease.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Ulrike; Dockter, Gerd; Lammert, Frank

    2010-10-01

    Liver disease is increasingly common in cystic fibrosis (CF). As new therapeutic options emerge, life expectancy increases and common hepatobiliary manifestations impact on quality of life and survival of CF patients. Hepatobiliary abnormalities in CF vary in nature and range from defects attributable to the underlying CFTR gene defect to those related to systemic disease and malnutrition. Today complications of liver disease represent the third most frequent cause of disease-related death in patients with CF. Here we review molecular and clinical genetics of CF, including genetic modifiers of CF-associated liver disease, and provide practical recommendations for genetic testing, diagnosis and treatment of hepatobiliary manifestations in CF.

  8. Autoimmune diseases associated with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Arti

    2008-01-01

    Associations of autoimmune diseases with neurofibromatosis type 1 have been rarely described. In the present report, we describe two patients of neurofibromatosis type 1 having an association with vitiligo in one, and alopecia areata and autoimmune thyroiditis in another. The associations of neurofibromatosis type 1 with vitiligo, alopecia areata, and autoimmune thyroiditis have not been reported earlier. Whether these associations reflect a causal relationship with neurofibromatosis type 1 or are coincidental needs to be settled.

  9. Connective Tissue Disease-Associated Interstitial Lung Diseases: Unresolved Issues.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Irene Jarana; Lee, Joyce S

    2016-06-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) complicating connective tissue disorders, such as scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Progress has been made in our understanding of these collective diseases; however, there are still many unanswered questions. In this review, we describe the current views on epidemiology, clinical presentation, treatment, and prognosis in patients with connective tissue disease (CTD)-associated ILD. We also highlight several areas that remain unresolved and in need of further investigation, including interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features, histopathologic phenotype, and pharmacologic management. A multidisciplinary and multidimensional approach to diagnosis, management, and investigation of CTD-associated ILD patients is essential to advance our understanding of the epidemiology and pathobiology of this challenging group of diseases.

  10. Watermelon lycopene and allied health claims

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Ambreen; Butt, Masood Sadiq; Sultan, Muhammad Tauseef; Qayyum, Mir Muhammad Nasir; Niaz, Rai Shahid

    2014-01-01

    Presently, functional foods and nutraceuticals are gaining immense importance in the prevention of various maladies through dietary regimen module. Consumption of fruits and vegetables based diet has pursuit a range of bioactive components, especially phytochemicals targeting life threatening ailments. In this context, lycopene is an extensively studied antioxidant potentially present in watermelon, tomato, pink guava etc. Watermelon is one of the unique sources having readily available cis-isomeric lycopene. The distinctive aroma of watermelon is imparted by medium- and short-chain fatty acids along with geranial, ß-ionone and neral. Its consumption has been escalated owing to rich nutritional profile and allied health benefits. It is effective in reducing the extent of cancer insurgence, cardiovascular disorders, diabetes and macular diseases. The structural characteristics, physiochemical properties and therapeutic effects of lycopene are the limelight of the manuscript. However, further research investigations are still needed to address the health enhancing potential of watermelon lycopene. PMID:26417290

  11. Celiac Disease and Autoimmune-Associated Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lauret, Eugenia; Rodrigo, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is frequently accompanied by a variety of extradigestive manifestations, thus making it a systemic disease rather than a disease limited to the gastrointestinal tract. This is primarily explained by the fact that CD belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases. The only one with a known etiology is related to a permanent intolerance to gluten. Remarkable breakthroughs have been achieved in the last decades, due to a greater interest in the diagnosis of atypical and asymptomatic patients, which are more frequent in adults. The known presence of several associated diseases provides guidance in the search of oligosymptomatic cases as well as studies performed in relatives of patients with CD. The causes for the onset and manifestation of associated diseases are diverse; some share a similar genetic base, like type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D); others share pathogenic mechanisms, and yet, others are of unknown nature. General practitioners and other specialists must remember that CD may debut with extraintestinal manifestations, and associated illnesses may appear both at the time of diagnosis and throughout the evolution of the disease. The implementation of a gluten-free diet (GFD) improves the overall clinical course and influences the evolution of the associated diseases. In some cases, such as iron deficiency anemia, the GFD contributes to its disappearance. In other disorders, like T1D, this allows a better control of the disease. In several other complications and/or associated diseases, an adequate adherence to a GFD may slow down their evolution, especially if implemented during an early stage. PMID:23984314

  12. Celiac disease and autoimmune-associated conditions.

    PubMed

    Lauret, Eugenia; Rodrigo, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is frequently accompanied by a variety of extradigestive manifestations, thus making it a systemic disease rather than a disease limited to the gastrointestinal tract. This is primarily explained by the fact that CD belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases. The only one with a known etiology is related to a permanent intolerance to gluten. Remarkable breakthroughs have been achieved in the last decades, due to a greater interest in the diagnosis of atypical and asymptomatic patients, which are more frequent in adults. The known presence of several associated diseases provides guidance in the search of oligosymptomatic cases as well as studies performed in relatives of patients with CD. The causes for the onset and manifestation of associated diseases are diverse; some share a similar genetic base, like type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D); others share pathogenic mechanisms, and yet, others are of unknown nature. General practitioners and other specialists must remember that CD may debut with extraintestinal manifestations, and associated illnesses may appear both at the time of diagnosis and throughout the evolution of the disease. The implementation of a gluten-free diet (GFD) improves the overall clinical course and influences the evolution of the associated diseases. In some cases, such as iron deficiency anemia, the GFD contributes to its disappearance. In other disorders, like T1D, this allows a better control of the disease. In several other complications and/or associated diseases, an adequate adherence to a GFD may slow down their evolution, especially if implemented during an early stage.

  13. Histopathological lesions associated with equine periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Cox, Alistair; Dixon, Padraic; Smith, Sionagh

    2012-12-01

    Equine periodontal disease (EPD) is a common and painful condition, the aetiology and pathology of which are poorly understood. To characterise the histopathological lesions associated with EPD, the skulls of 22 horses were assessed grossly for the presence of periodontal disease, and a standard set of interdental tissues taken from each for histopathological examination. Histological features of EPD included ulceration and neutrophilic inflammation of the gingival epithelium. Mononuclear and eosinophilic inflammation of the gingival lamina propria and submucosa was commonly present irrespective of the presence or degree of periodontal disease. Gingival hyperplasia was present to some degree in all horses, and was only weakly associated with the degree of periodontal disease. In all horses dental plaque was present at the majority of sites examined and was often associated with histological evidence of peripheral cemental erosion. Bacteria (including spirochaetes in four horses) were identified in gingival samples by Gram and silver impregnation techniques and were significantly associated with the presence of periodontal disease. This is the first study to describe histological features of EPD, and the first to identify associated spirochaetes in some cases. Histological features were variable, and there was considerable overlap of some features between the normal and diseased gingiva. Further investigation into the potential role of bacteria in the pathogenesis and progression of EPD is warranted.

  14. Ciliate communities consistently associated with coral diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, M. J.; Séré, M. G.

    2016-07-01

    Incidences of coral disease are increasing. Most studies which focus on diseases in these organisms routinely assess variations in bacterial associates. However, other microorganism groups such as viruses, fungi and protozoa are only recently starting to receive attention. This study aimed at assessing the diversity of ciliates associated with coral diseases over a wide geographical range. Here we show that a wide variety of ciliates are associated with all nine coral diseases assessed. Many of these ciliates such as Trochilia petrani and Glauconema trihymene feed on the bacteria which are likely colonizing the bare skeleton exposed by the advancing disease lesion or the necrotic tissue itself. Others such as Pseudokeronopsis and Licnophora macfarlandi are common predators of other protozoans and will be attracted by the increase in other ciliate species to the lesion interface. However, a few ciliate species (namely Varistrombidium kielum, Philaster lucinda, Philaster guamense, a Euplotes sp., a Trachelotractus sp. and a Condylostoma sp.) appear to harbor symbiotic algae, potentially from the coral themselves, a result which may indicate that they play some role in the disease pathology at the very least. Although, from this study alone we are not able to discern what roles any of these ciliates play in disease causation, the consistent presence of such communities with disease lesion interfaces warrants further investigation.

  15. Selected list of books and journals in allied health sciences.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1988-01-01

    This list of 435 books and 76 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs and/or health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility pf covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the twenty-six educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, nutrition, and medical secretarial programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (176 books and 29 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1988 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $19,000. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $7,900. PMID:3066428

  16. Professional allies: the storying of allies to LGBTQ students on a college campus.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Maura; Broad, K L; Walsh, Clare F; Nutter, Kathryn L

    2013-01-01

    This article details the narratives of faculty and staff involved in a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) ally organization at a large southeastern state university. We illustrate how interview participants diverged from organizational literature on how to be an ally by offering a different narrative, one of professional responsibility to a diverse student body. We expound upon how this notion of professional responsibility differs from most models for understanding ally development and action. We suggest that from an organizational standpoint, these professional ally self-concepts make sense and should be taken into account when building ally organizations in educational settings.

  17. How Allies Collaborate; The NATO Training Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandevanter, E., Jr.

    A survey was made of North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) coordination of training programs for allied military forces and its implications about collaboration among allies in peacetime. Three types of training were analyzed: (1) higher training, or the coordination of large military formations; (2) unit training of smaller teams; (3)…

  18. Allied Dental Education: Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVore, Linda Rubinstein

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the status of the three allied dental disciplines (dental assisting, dental technology, and dental hygiene) gives a historical overview on allied dental programs, assesses their current status and enrollment trends, identifies critical issues affecting educational programs, and outlines a framework for innovation in recruitment and…

  19. ADARs: allies or enemies? The importance of A-to-I RNA editing in human disease: from cancer to HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Angela; Locatelli, Franco

    2012-02-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) are enzymes that convert adenosine (A) to inosine (I) in nuclear-encoded RNAs and viral RNAs. The activity of ADARs has been demonstrated to be essential in mammals and serves to fine-tune different proteins and modulate many molecular pathways. Recent findings have shown that ADAR activity is altered in many pathological tissues. Moreover, it has been shown that modulation of RNA editing is important for cell proliferation and migration, and has a protective effect on ischaemic insults. This review summarises available recent knowledge on A-to-I RNA editing and ADAR enzymes, with particular attention given to the emerging role played by these enzymes in cancer, some infectious diseases and immune-mediated disorders.

  20. Periodontal disease may associate with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Söder, Birgitta; Yakob, Maha; Meurman, Jukka H; Andersson, Leif C; Klinge, Björn; Söder, Per-Östen

    2011-06-01

    The main purpose was to evaluate the association between periodontal disease and the incidence of breast cancer in a prospective study of 3273 randomly selected subjects aged 30-40 years at baseline. Breast cancer incidence was registered from 1985 to 2001 according to the WHO International Classification of Diseases criteria. At baseline, 1676 individuals also underwent a clinical oral examination (Group A) whereas 1597 subjects were not clinically examined but were registered (Group B). The associations between breast cancer, periodontal disease, and missing molars were determined using multiple logistic regression models with several background variables and known risk factors for cancer. In total 26 subjects in group A and 15 subjects in group B had breast cancer. The incidence of breast cancer was 1.75% in subjects who had periodontal disease and/or any missing molars, and 0 in subjects who had periodontal disease but had no missing molars. For periodontally healthy subjects with no missing teeth the breast cancer incidence was 1%. For group B the respective incidence was 0.94%. Female gender (odds ratio (OR) 13.08) and missing any molar in the mandible (OR 2.36) were explanatory variables for breast cancer. Of the subjects with periodontal disease and any missing molars in the mandible 5.5% had breast cancer in comparison to 0.5% of the subjects who had periodontal disease but no missing molars in the mandible (P < 0.02). Chronic periodontal disease indicated by missing molars seemed to associate statistically with breast cancer.

  1. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis associated with autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Zand, Ladan; Fervenza, Fernando C; Nasr, Samih H; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2014-04-01

    Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) has been classified based on its pathogenesis into immune complex-mediated and complement-mediated MPGN. The immune complex-mediated type is secondary to chronic infections, autoimmune diseases or monoclonal gammopathy. There is a paucity of data on MPGN associated with autoimmune diseases. We reviewed the Mayo Clinic database over a 10-year period and identified 12 patients with MPGN associated with autoimmune diseases, after exclusion of systemic lupus erythematosus. The autoimmune diseases included rheumatoid arthritis, primary Sjögren's syndrome, undifferentiated connective tissue disease, primary sclerosing cholangitis and Graves' disease. Nine of the 12 patients were female, and the mean age was 57.9 years. C4 levels were decreased in nine of 12 patients tested. The serum creatinine at time of renal biopsy was 2.2 ± 1.0 mg/dl and the urinary protein was 2,850 ± 3,543 mg/24 h. Three patients required dialysis at the time of renal biopsy. Renal biopsy showed an MPGN in all cases, with features of cryoglobulins in six cases; immunoglobulin (Ig)M was the dominant Ig, and both subendothelial and mesangial electron dense deposits were noted. Median follow-up was 10.9 months. Serum creatinine and proteinuria improved to 1.6 ± 0.8 mg/dl and 428 ± 677 mg/24 h, respectively, except in 3 patients with end-stage renal disease. In summary, this study describes the clinical features, renal biopsy findings, laboratory evaluation, treatment and prognosis of MPGN associated with autoimmune diseases.

  2. Graves Disease Is Associated With Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuk, Jin-Sung; Park, Eun-Ju; Seo, Yong-Soo; Kim, Hee Jin; Kwon, Seon-Young; Park, Won I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare the prevalence of thyroid diseases between women with and without endometriosis. We established the endometriosis group according to diagnosis codes, surgery codes, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist codes using the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service—National Inpatients Sample (HIRA-NIS) from 2009 to 2011. Four controls were randomly matched to each endometriosis case. Thyroid disease cases were selected using the thyroid disease diagnosis code (E0X). Among the 1,843,451 women sampled, 5615 had endometriosis; 22,460 controls were matched to the endometriosis cases. After adjustment for age and sampling year, Graves disease was associated with endometriosis (odds ratio [OR]: 2.52; 95% CI: 1.30–4.88; P < 0.01), while hypothyroidism was not (OR: 1.17; 95% CI: 0.90–1.52; P = 0.25). Autoimmune hypothyroidism was also not associated with endometriosis (OR: 1.61; 95% CI: 0.88–2.94; P = 0.12). This study revealed an association between Graves disease and endometriosis. PMID:26962803

  3. Candidatus liberibacter associated diseases: challenges and opportunities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’ species are Gram-negative, phloem-limited bacteria which are members of the Rhizobiaceae a-Proteobacteria. These bacteria are naturally transmitted by psyllid insects. Most of the disease-associated Liberibacters are designated ‘Candidatus’ species because they have not bee...

  4. Treating KSHV-Associated Multicentric Castleman Disease

    Cancer.gov

    In this study, patients with KSHV-associated multicentric Castleman disease will receive IV tocilizumab every other week for up to 12 weeks. Patients who do not benefit may go on to receive high-dose AZT and valganciclovir as well.

  5. Sleep Disorders Associated with Primary Mitochondrial Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Ryan J.; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Primary mitochondrial diseases are caused by heritable or spontaneous mutations in nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA. Such pathological mutations are relatively common in humans and may lead to neurological and neuromuscular complication that could compromise normal sleep behavior. To gain insight into the potential impact of primary mitochondrial disease and sleep pathology, we reviewed the relevant English language literature in which abnormal sleep was reported in association with a mitochondrial disease. Design: We examined publications reported in Web of Science and PubMed from February 1976 through January 2014, and identified 54 patients with a proven or suspected primary mitochondrial disorder who were evaluated for sleep disturbances. Measurements and Results: Both nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA mutations were associated with abnormal sleep patterns. Most subjects who underwent polysomnography had central sleep apnea, and only 5 patients had obstructive sleep apnea. Twenty-four patients showed decreased ventilatory drive in response to hypoxia and/or hypercapnia that was not considered due to weakness of the intrinsic muscles of respiration. Conclusions: Sleep pathology may be an underreported complication of primary mitochondrial diseases. The probable underlying mechanism is cellular energy failure causing both central neurological and peripheral neuromuscular degenerative changes that commonly present as central sleep apnea and poor ventilatory response to hypercapnia. Increased recognition of the genetics and clinical manifestations of mitochondrial diseases by sleep researchers and clinicians is important in the evaluation and treatment of all patients with sleep disturbances. Prospective population-based studies are required to determine the true prevalence of mitochondrial energy failure in subjects with sleep disorders, and conversely, of individuals with primary mitochondrial diseases and sleep pathology. Citation: Ramezani RJ

  6. [Syringomyelia and associated bone and joint diseases].

    PubMed

    Alnot, J-Y; Rossarie, R; Welby, F

    2007-05-01

    Syringomyelia can occur in patients presenting bone and joint diseases of various origins. When joint destruction of the shoulder or elbow produces little pain, a neurological cause might be involved. In this case, the disease history can be of utmost importance because an initial diagnosis of rheumatoid polyarthritis, polyosteoarthritis, or destructive joint disease can be misleading before the syringomyelic origin of the bone and joint disease becomes patent. We report two cases illustrating this association and the diagnostic pitfalls which can delay recognition of the syringomyelia. Better awareness of the prevalence of this condition should be helpful in establishing the diagnosis and in selecting patients who can benefit from neurosurgical treatment. The two cases presented here suggest that syringomyelia could be underdiagnosed in certain patients with an initially atypical presentation. A review of the current knowledge of syringomyelia suggests that arthroplasty is generally not advisable for destroyed dislocated syringomyelic joints.

  7. [Endogenous retroviruses are associated with autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Jensen, Sara B; Hansen, Bettina; Laska, Magdalena J

    2016-06-13

    Retroviruses can be transmitted in two fundamentally different ways: 1) They can be horizontally transmitted as infectious virus, or 2) they can integrate in the germ line and be transmitted to offspring and the offsprings' offspring as DNA. The latter is called endogenous viruses. The mode of transmission is called vertical. Viral variants of importance for development of disease must be more frequent among diseased persons than among healthy individuals. Multiple sclerosis, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are all associated with sets of endogenouos retroviruses but not the same sets. If a virus grows and this contributes to disease, one should be able to alleviate disease with antiretroviral drugs. We call for clinical trials to elucidate this issue.

  8. [Crohn's disease associated with Berger's disease. A rare complication].

    PubMed

    López Barbarín, J M; Lafuente Martínez, P; García Campos, F; Ibarra Peña, B; Díaz de Otazu, R

    1990-10-01

    We report the case of a male patient with Crohn's disease associated with IgA nephropathy. He was treated surgically for the intestinal disorder and then with corticoids and sulfasalazine. Six years after treatment the patient was asymptomatic. As the intestinal situation improved there was concomitant normalization of urinary sediment, maintaining renal function. The fact that the digestive mucosa is one of the body's major sources of secretory IgA may account for the existence of a common for Crohn's disease and certain forms of IgA nephropathy.

  9. Association-rule-based tuberculosis disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asha, T.; Natarajan, S.; Murthy, K. N. B.

    2010-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It usually spreads through the air and attacks low immune bodies such as patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). This work focuses on finding close association rules, a promising technique in Data Mining, within TB data. The proposed method first normalizes of raw data from medical records which includes categorical, nominal and continuous attributes and then determines Association Rules from the normalized data with different support and confidence. Association rules are applied on a real data set containing medical records of patients with TB obtained from a state hospital. The rules determined describes close association between one symptom to another; as an example, likelihood that an occurrence of sputum is closely associated with blood cough and HIV.

  10. Osteoporosis Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Reiko; Inoue, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have revealed that osteoporosis is closely associated with common chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disorders, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a chronic inflammatory airway disease but now well known to be associated with various systemic comorbidities including osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are extremely common in COPD patients, which have significant impacts on their quality of life (QOL), activities of daily life (ADL), respiratory function, and possibly their prognosis. COPD-associated osteoporosis is however extremely under-recognized, hence undertreated. Recent studies have suggested that both decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality compromise bone strength causing fractures in COPD. In COPD patients, various general clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are present including smoking, older age, low body weight, and physical inactivity. In addition, disease-related risk factors such as decreased pulmonary function, inflammation, glucocorticoid use and vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency have been linked to the development of osteoporosis in COPD. Increased awareness of osteoporosis in COPD, especially that of high prevalence of vertebral fractures is called upon among general physicians as well as pulmonologists. Routine screening for osteoporosis and risk assessment of fractures will enable physicians to diagnose COPD patients with comorbid osteoporosis at an early stage. Timely prevention of developing osteoporosis together with appropriate treatment of established osteoporosis may improve QOL and ADL of the COPD patients, preserve their lung function and eventually result in better prognosis in these patients. PMID:27622174

  11. Autoimmune neuropathies associated to rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Alberto R M; Faber, Ingrid; Nucci, Anamarli; Appenzeller, Simone; França, Marcondes C

    2017-04-01

    Systemic manifestations are frequent in autoimmune rheumatic diseases and include peripheral nervous system damage. Neuron cell body, axons and myelin sheath may all be affected in this context. This involvement results in severe and sometimes disabling symptoms. Sensory, motor and autonomic features may be present in different patterns that emerge as peculiar clinical pictures. Prompt recognition of these neuropathies is pivotal to guide treatment and reduce the risks of long term disability. In this review, we aim to describe the main immune-mediated neuropathies associated to rheumatic diseases: sensory neuronopathies, multiple mononeuropathies and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, with an emphasis on clinical features and therapeutic options.

  12. Allied dental personnel: will there be enough?

    PubMed

    Waldman, H Barry; Perlman, Steven P

    2008-11-01

    The escalating number and size of dental practices mean greater dependency on a ready supply of allied dental personnel. However, despite the increasing number of entry places in allied dental training programs, many places remain unfilled and large numbers of individuals do not complete the course of studies. A review of the changes in dental practice sizes and dental assistant, dental hygienist and dental laboratory technician programs raises concerns as to whether there will be enough allied dental personnel to meet the future needs of the profession. The need for increasing attention to this potential eventuality is stressed.

  13. [Crohn's disease associated with focal pulmonare lesion].

    PubMed

    Tagle, Martín; Barriga, José; Piñeiro, Andrés

    2003-01-01

    40 year-old male recently diagnosed with Crohn's disease. A routine chest X ray showed a round, well defined opacity in right lung field. A chest CT scan confirmed the finding and also described bronchiectasis. Patient had no respiratory symptoms. He was prescribed with oral sulfasalazine and corticosteroids with rapid improvement of intestinal symptoms as well as resolution of the pulmonary opacity. We describe the clinical presentation of a male newly diagnosed with Crohn's disease who was found to have an asymptomatic pulmonary lesion on imaging studies. Pulmonary complications have been previously described in inflamatory bowel disease being more common in ulcerative colitis than in Crohn's disease; these can involve the lung parenchyma, the tracheobronchial tree, and the pleura. The true prevalence and etiology of these lesions is currently unknown and are not necessarily associated with bowel disease activity. Abnormal pulmonary functions test have been reported during inflammatory bowel disease exacerbations, and although pulmonary findings can present with a variety of symptoms, subclinical presentations have also been described. Pulmonary manifestations are usually steoid-responsive, as was the case in our patients.

  14. Schistosomiasis-associated kidney disease: A review

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Geraldo Bezerra; Duarte, Daniella Bezerra; Barros, Elvino José Guardão; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease caused by organisms from the genus Schistosoma. The disease is endemic in tropical areas, where there are currently millions of people living in areas with transmission risk. Schistosomiasis-associated kidney disease is not frequently described in literature. The disease has a chronic evolution, with variable severity. Glomerulonephritis is described in 10-12% in autopsy studies. Proteinuria is reported in 20% of patients with S. mansoni infection. Schistosomal glomerulopathy generally occur in young patients, male, with hepato-splenomegaly. The glomerular lesion in schistosomiasis has an immunological nature. Antigens from the parasite seem to be related to glomerulopathy and have been found in the sera of humans and animals infected by the S. mansoni. Vesical involvement is common in the infection by S. haematobium, a parasitic disease prevalent in African countries. In the S. haematobium infection, hematuria and dysuria can be observed due to inflammation and ulceration in the bladder mucosa, generaly occuring 3 to 4 months after primary infection. Specific antiparasitic treatment is indicated to all patients infected by Schistosoma. There are 2 drugs available for treatment, praziquantel and oxamniquine. We revise the general aspects of the disease and describe the features of renal involvement in schistosomiasis.

  15. Association of spirochetal infection with Morgellons disease.

    PubMed

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Burugu, Divya; Poruri, Akhila; Burke, Jennie; Mayne, Peter J; Sapi, Eva; Kahn, Douglas G; Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease (MD) is an emerging multisystem illness characterized by skin lesions with unusual filaments embedded in or projecting from epithelial tissue. Filament formation results from abnormal keratin and collagen expression by epithelial-based keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Recent research comparing MD to bovine digital dermatitis, an animal infectious disease with similar skin features, provided clues that spirochetal infection could play an important role in the human disease as it does in the animal illness. Based on histological staining, immunofluorescent staining, electron microscopic imaging and polymerase chain reaction, we report the detection of Borrelia spirochetes in dermatological tissue of  four randomly-selected MD patients. The association of MD with spirochetal infection provides evidence that this infection may be a significant factor in the illness and refutes claims that MD lesions are self-inflicted and that people suffering from this disorder are delusional. Molecular characterization of the Borrelia spirochetes found in MD patients is warranted.

  16. Association of spirochetal infection with Morgellons disease

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease (MD) is an emerging multisystem illness characterized by skin lesions with unusual filaments embedded in or projecting from epithelial tissue. Filament formation results from abnormal keratin and collagen expression by epithelial-based keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Recent research comparing MD to bovine digital dermatitis, an animal infectious disease with similar skin features, provided clues that spirochetal infection could play an important role in the human disease as it does in the animal illness. Based on histological staining, immunofluorescent staining, electron microscopic imaging and polymerase chain reaction, we report the detection of Borrelia spirochetes in dermatological tissue of  four randomly-selected MD patients. The association of MD with spirochetal infection provides evidence that this infection may be a significant factor in the illness and refutes claims that MD lesions are self-inflicted and that people suffering from this disorder are delusional. Molecular characterization of the Borrelia spirochetes found in MD patients is warranted. PMID:24715950

  17. Neuromuscular Diseases Associated with HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Robinson-Papp, Jessica; Simpson, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are common in HIV, occurring at all stages of disease and affecting all parts of the peripheral nervous system. These disorders have diverse etiologies including HIV itself, immune suppression and dysregulation, co-morbid illnesses and infections, and side effects of medications. In this article, we review the following HIV-associated conditions: distal symmetric polyneuropathy, inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, mononeuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex, autonomic neuropathy, progressive polyradiculopathy due to cytomegalovirus, herpes zoster, myopathy and other rarer disorders. PMID:19771594

  18. Whiteness in Social Work Education Authentic White Allies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornung, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is guided by the following questions: How do People of Color define and experience White people as "authentic" allies? What does a White ally look like to People of Color? How do White allies view themselves as "authentic" White allies? What experiences lead White people to anti-racism and anti-racist praxis?…

  19. Connective Tissue Disease-associated Interstitial Lung Disease: A review

    PubMed Central

    Gutsche, Markus; Rosen, Glenn D.; Swigris, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is commonly encountered in patients with connective tissue diseases (CTD). Besides the lung parenchyma, the airways, pulmonary vasculature and structures of the chest wall may all be involved, depending on the type of CTD. As a result of this so-called multi-compartment involvement, airflow limitation, pulmonary hypertension, vasculitis and extrapulmonary restriction can occur alongside fibro-inflammatory parenchymal abnormalities in CTD. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic sclerosis (SSc), poly-/dermatomyositis (PM/DM), Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and undifferentiated (UCTD) as well as mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) can all be associated with the development of ILD. Non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) is the most commonly observed histopathological pattern in CTD-ILD, but other patterns including usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), organizing pneumonia (OP), diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP) may occur. Although the majority of patients with CTD-ILD experience stable or slowly advancing ILD, a small yet significant group exhibits a more severe and progressive course. Randomized placebo-controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of immunomodulatory treatments have been conducted only in SSc-associated ILD. However, clinical experience suggests that a handful of immunosuppressive medications are potentially effective in a sizeable portion of patients with ILD caused by other CTDs. In this manuscript, we review the clinical characteristics and management of the most common CTD-ILDs. PMID:23125954

  20. Associations between B Vitamins and Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang

    2015-08-27

    B vitamins may correlate with Parkinson's disease (PD) through regulating homocysteine level. However, there is no comprehensive assessment on the associations between PD and B vitamins. The present study was designed to perform a meta-analytic assessment of the associations between folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 and PD, including the status of B vitamins in PD patients compared with controls, and associations of dietary intakes of B vitamins and risk of PD. A literature search using Medline database obtained 10 eligible studies included in the meta-analyses. Stata 12.0 statistical software was used to perform the meta-analysis. Pooled data revealed that there was no obvious difference in folate level between PD patients and healthy controls, and PD patients had lower level of vitamin B12 than controls. Available data suggested that higher dietary intake of vitamin B6 was associated with a decreased risk of PD (odds ratio (OR) = 0.65, 95% confidence intervals (CI) = (0.30, 1.01)), while no significant association was observed for dietary intake of folate and vitamin B12 and risk of PD. PD patients had lower level of vitamin B12 and similar level of folate compared with controls. Dietary intake of vitamin B6 exhibited preventive effect of developing PD based on the available data. As the number of included studies is limited, more studies are needed to confirm the findings and elucidate the underpinning underlying these associations.

  1. Radiation-associated valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ong, Daniel S; Aertker, Robert A; Clark, Alexandra N; Kiefer, Todd; Hughes, G Chad; Harrison, J Kevin; Bashore, Thomas M

    2013-11-01

    Therapeutic ionizing radiation, such as that used in the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma, can cause cardiac valvular damage that may take several years to manifest as radiation-associated valvular heart disease. Treatment can be complicated by comorbid radiation injury to other cardiac and mediastinal structures that lead to traditional surgical valve replacement or repair becoming high-risk. A representative case is presented that demonstrates the complexity of radiation-associated valvular heart disease and its successful treatment with percutaneous transcatheter valve replacement. The prevalence and pathophysiologic mechanism of radiation-associated valvular injury are reviewed. Anthracycline adjuvant therapy appears to increase the risk of valvular fibrosis. Left-sided heart valves are more commonly affected than right-sided heart valves. A particular pattern of calcification has been noted in some patients, and experimental data suggest that radiation induction of an osteogenic phenotype may be responsible. A renewed appreciation of the cardiac valvular effects of therapeutic ionizing radiation for mediastinal malignancies is important, and the treatment of such patients may be assisted by the development of novel, less-invasive approaches.

  2. RET mutations in MEN 2 associated diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstra, R.M.W.; Stelwagen, T.; Stulp, R.P.

    1994-09-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) comprises three clinically distinct dominantly inherited cancer syndromes namely MEN 2A, MEN 2B and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC). Germline (point) mutations of the RET proto-oncogene have been reported to occur in all these syndromes. In MEN 2A and FMTC patients the mutations occurred within codons specifying cysteine residues in the transition of the RET extracellular and transmembrane domains, while in MEN 2B patients we could detect a single RET mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain in all patients. Also in patients suffering from Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR), mutations in the RET gene have been found. These mutations are spread all over the gene. Several families have been described in which MEN 2 and HSCR are associated. MEN 2A is also found associated with cutaneous lichen amyloidosis (CLA). It might be that specific RET mutations correlate with these disease associations. We therefore scanned DNA from patients from a family with MEN 2A and HSCR, MEN 2A and CLA and CLA only for RET mutations. Results obtained thus far do not support the existence of specific correlations.

  3. Allied health: integral to transforming health.

    PubMed

    Lizarondo, Lucylynn; Turnbull, Catherine; Kroon, Tracey; Grimmer, Karen; Bell, Alison; Kumar, Saravana; McEvoy, Maureen; Milanese, Steve; Russell, Mary; Sheppard, Lorraine; Walters, Julie; Wiles, Louise

    2016-04-01

    Objective South Australia is taking an innovative step in transforming the way its healthcare is organised and delivered to better manage current and future demands on the health system. In an environment of transforming health services, there are clear opportunities for allied health to assist in determining solutions to various healthcare challenges. A recent opinion piece proposed 10 clinician-driven strategies to assist in maximising value and sustainability of healthcare in Australia. The present study aimed to seek the perspectives of allied health clinicians, educators, researchers, policy makers and managers on these strategies and their relevance to allied health. Methods A survey of allied health practitioners was undertaken to capture their perspectives on the 10 clinician-driven strategies for maximising value and sustainability of healthcare in Australia. Survey findings were then layered with evidence from the literature. Results Highly relevant across allied health are the strategies of discontinuation of low value practices, targeting clinical interventions to those getting greatest benefit, active involvement of patients in shared decision making and self-management and advocating for integrated systems of care. Conclusions Allied health professionals have been involved in the South Australian healthcare system for a prolonged period, but their services are poorly recognised, often overlooked and not greatly supported in existing traditional practices. The results of the present study highlight ways in which healthcare services can implement strategies not only to improve the quality of patient outcomes, but also to offer innovative solutions for future, sustainable healthcare. The findings call for concerted efforts to increase the utilisation of allied health services to ensure the 'maximum value for spend' of the increasingly scarce health dollar. What is known about the topic? In medicine, clinician-driven strategies have been proposed to

  4. Is running associated with degenerative joint disease

    SciTech Connect

    Panush, R.S.; Schmidt, C.; Caldwell, J.R.; Edwards, N.L.; Longley, S.; Yonker, R.; Webster, E.; Nauman, J.; Stork, J.; Pettersson, H.

    1986-03-07

    Little information is available regarding the long-term effects, if any, of running on the musculoskeletal system. The authors compared the prevalence of degenerative joint disease among 17 male runners with 18 male nonrunners. Running subjects (53% marathoners) ran a mean of 44.8 km (28 miles)/wk for 12 years. Pain and swelling of hips, knees, ankles and feet and other musculoskeletal complaints among runners were comparable with those among nonrunners. Radiologic examinations (for osteophytes, cartilage thickness, and grade of degeneration) also were without notable differences among groups. They did not find an increased prevalence of osteoarthritis among the runners. Our observations suggest that long-duration, high-mileage running need to be associated with premature degenerative joint disease in the lower extremities.

  5. Pediatric Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Israelite, Jill C

    Pediatric parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is typically defined as a decrease in bile flow that is independent of a mechanical obstruction and of any other underlying liver disease. It is most often seen in pediatric patients receiving parenteral nutrition support. Up to 50% to 66% of children receiving long-term parenteral nutrition are reported to be diagnosed with PNALD. The goal of treatment for PNALD is advancement to full enteral nutrition and elimination of dependence on parenteral nutrition support. Achieving this goal is not always possible, especially in patients with short bowel syndrome. The following review article highlights some of the current treatment strategies focused on prevention or correction of PNALD as noted in current American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition guidelines.

  6. Kentucky Allied Health Project Final Report: A State System for Allied Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Council on Higher Education, Frankfort.

    The accomplishments of the Kentucky Allied Health Project, which implemented a model articulated system of allied health education, are described. The system included plans to promote transition from one education level to another and articulation in educational planning and resource utilization. The project has greatly increased…

  7. A Call for Action: Advocating for Increased Funding for the Allied Health Professions: ASAHP Leadership Development Program.

    PubMed

    Demo, David H; Fry, Donna; Devine, Nancy; Butler, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Allied health professionals are a diverse group of health care workers who provide necessary services to patients in addition to, or in place of, services provided by physicians, nurses, and medical paraprofessionals. Two forces generating increased demand for allied health professionals are the aging of the US population and health care reform associated with the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Although the allied health professions comprise nearly 60% of the health care workforce, the funding to support workforce training, faculty development, and research in the allied health fields lags substantially behind funding for the physician and nursing professions. Increased advocacy efforts are needed to increase the awareness of what the allied health professions contribute to health care and to expand funding across all health care professions.

  8. A Reaction to: What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Lori W.; Knol, Linda; Meyer, Mary Kay

    2012-01-01

    "What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals" describes an important issue in health care that is the provision of nutrition education. Obesity and chronic disease rates are rapidly increasing. Due to increase in the prevalence rates of obesity and nutrition-related chronic diseases, there is a growing need for…

  9. Juvenile-Onset Macular Degeneration and Allied Disorders

    PubMed Central

    North, Victoria; Gelman, Rony; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    While age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of central vision loss among the elderly, many inherited diseases that present earlier in life share features of AMD. These diseases of juvenile-onset macular degeneration include Stargardt disease, Best disease, retinitis pigmentosa, X-linked retinoschisis, and other allied disorders. In particular, they can be accompanied by the appearance of drusen, geographic atrophy, macular hyperpigmentation, choroidal neovascularization, and disciform scarring just as in AMD, and often may be confused for the adult form of the disease. Diagnosis based on funduscopic findings alone can be challenging. However, the use of diagnostic studies such as electroretinography, electrooculography, optical coherence tomography, and fundus autofluorescence in conjunction with genetic testing can lead to an accurate diagnosis. PMID:24732760

  10. Periodontal disease associated to systemic genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Nualart Grollmus, Zacy Carola; Morales Chávez, Mariana Carolina; Silvestre Donat, Francisco Javier

    2007-05-01

    A number of systemic disorders increase patient susceptibility to periodontal disease, which moreover evolves more rapidly and more aggressively. The underlying factors are mainly related to alterations in immune, endocrine and connective tissue status. These alterations are associated with different pathologies and syndromes that generate periodontal disease either as a primary manifestation or by aggravating a pre-existing condition attributable to local factors. This is where the role of bacterial plaque is subject to debate. In the presence of qualitative or quantitative cellular immune alterations, periodontal disease may manifest early on a severe localized or generalized basis--in some cases related to the presence of plaque and/or specific bacteria (severe congenital neutropenia or infantile genetic agranulocytosis, Chediak-Higiashi syndrome, Down syndrome and Papillon-Lefévre syndrome). In the presence of humoral immune alterations, periodontal damage may result indirectly as a consequence of alterations in other systems. In connective tissue disorders, bacterial plaque and alterations of the periodontal tissues increase patient susceptibility to gingival inflammation and alveolar resorption (Marfan syndrome and Ehler-Danlos syndrome). The management of periodontal disease focuses on the control of infection and bacterial plaque by means of mechanical and chemical methods. Periodontal surgery and even extraction of the most seriously affected teeth have also been suggested. There are variable degrees of consensus regarding the background systemic disorder, as in the case of Chediak-Higiashi syndrome, where antibiotic treatment proves ineffective; in severe congenital neutropenia or infantile genetic agranulocytosis, where antibiotic prophylaxis is suggested; and in Papillon-Lefévre syndrome, where an established treatment protocol is available.

  11. Statin myalgia is not associated with reduced muscle strength, mass or protein turnover in older male volunteers, but is allied with a slowing of time to peak power output, insulin resistance and differential muscle mRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    Mallinson, Joanne E.; Marimuthu, Kanagaraj; Murton, Andrew; Selby, Anna; Smith, Kenneth; Constantin‐Teodosiu, Dumitru; Rennie, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Key points Statins cause muscle‐specific side effects, most commonly muscle aches/weakness (myalgia), particularly in older people. Furthermore, evidence has linked statin use to increased risk of type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanisms involved are unknown.This is the first study to measure muscle protein turnover rates and insulin sensitivity in statin myalgic volunteers and age‐matched, non‐statin users under controlled fasting and fed conditions using gold standard methods.We demonstrate in older people that chronic statin myalgia is not associated with deficits in muscle strength and lean mass or the dysregulation of muscle protein turnover compared to non‐statin users. Furthermore, there were no between‐group differences in blood or muscle inflammatory markers.Statin users did, however, show blunting of muscle power output at the onset of dynamic exercise, increased abdominal adiposity, whole body and leg insulin resistance, and clear differential expression of muscle genes linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis, which warrant further investigation. Abstract Statins are associated with muscle myalgia and myopathy, which probably reduce habitual physical activity. This is particularly relevant to older people who are less active, sarcopaenic and at increased risk of statin myalgia. We hypothesised that statin myalgia would be allied to impaired strength and work capacity in older people, and determined whether differences aligned with divergences in lean mass, protein turnover, insulin sensitivity and the molecular regulation of these processes. Knee extensor strength and work output during 30 maximal isokinetic contractions were assessed in healthy male volunteers, nine with no statin use (control 70.4 ± 0.7 years) and nine with statin myalgia (71.5 ± 0.9 years). Whole body and leg glucose disposal, muscle myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) and leg protein breakdown (LPB) were measured during fasting (≈5 mU l−1 insulin

  12. Biomedical Information Extraction: Mining Disease Associated Genes from Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Disease associated gene discovery is a critical step to realize the future of personalized medicine. However empirical and clinical validation of disease associated genes are time consuming and expensive. In silico discovery of disease associated genes from literature is therefore becoming the first essential step for biomarker discovery to…

  13. Cr laser research at AlliedSignal

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    The Applied Physics Laboratory of AlliedSignal, Inc. has been developing Cr lasers and applications for a number of years. This operation has resulted in new laser designs and in improved engineering and packaging which are critical to acceptable performance in the field. Although most of the work has been part of military programs, AlliedSignal, with partners, has recently been offering its lasers to commercial programs as a supplier to the OEM market. This paper will present several laser systems which have recently been developed at AlliedSignal. These systems will include those based on alexandrite and Cr:LiSAF. The examples chosen will show the versatility of these laser materials.

  14. Travel associated legionnaires' disease in Europe: 2002.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, K; Joseph, C

    2004-02-01

    Twenty countries reported 676 cases of travel associated legionnaires' disease to the EWGLINET surveillance scheme, and 94 clusters were detected. 80.5% of all cases were diagnosed by the urinary antigen test. On average there were 20.5 days between onset and report of cases, compared with 51.5 days in 1993. Between the introduction of the EWGLI investigation guidelines (on 1st July 2002) and the end of 2002, 37 six-week investigation reports were accepted as satisfactory and on time by the coordinating centre. 274 sites were investigated in total in 2002. The travel patterns of the main reporters in EWGLINET influenced the months of peak activity, and helped to determine which countries bore the greatest investigation burden.

  15. Vinyl chloride-associated liver disease.

    PubMed

    Berk, P D; Martin, J F; Young, R S; Creech, J; Selikoff, I J; Falk, H; Watanabe, P; Popper, H; Thomas, L

    1976-06-01

    Although polyvinyl chloride has been produced from vinyl chlride monomer for more than 40 years, recognition of toxicity among vinyl chloride polymerization workers is more recent. In the mid 1960s, workers involved in cleaning polymerization tanks were found to have acro-osteolysis. In 1974, the same population of workers was found to be at risk for an unusual type of hepatic fibrosis and angiosarcoma of the liver. We describe two cases of vinyl chloride-associated liver injury, one of hepatic fibrosis and one of angiosarcoma. Histologic features of these lesions are similar to the hepatic fibrosis and angiosarcomas resulting from chronic exposure to inorganic arsenicals. Preliminary studies suggest that the toxicity of vinyl chloride may result from formation, during high-dose exposure, of active metabolites by mixed function oxidases of the liver. Epidemiologic studies indicate an increased incidence not only of liver disease, but also of cancers of the brain, lung, and possibly other organs.

  16. Travel associated legionnaires' disease in Europe: 2003.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, K; Joseph, C

    2004-10-01

    Six hundred and thirty two cases of travel-associated legionnaires' disease with onset in 2003 were reported to the EWGLINET surveillance scheme by 24 countries. Eighty nine clusters were detected, 35 (39%) of which would not have been detected without the EWGLINET scheme. One hundred and seven accommodation sites were investigated and 22 sites were published on the EWGLI website. The proportion of cases diagnosed primarily by the urinary antigen test was 81.2%, and 48 positive cultures were obtained. Thirty eight deaths were reported to the EWGLINET scheme, giving a crude fatality rate of 6%. Countries are encouraged to inform the coordinating centre of cases that fall ill after travelling within their own country of residence ('internal travel'), and are also encouraged to obtain patient isolates for culture where at all possible.

  17. Golgi linked protein glycosylation and associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Ungar, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    One of the Golgi's main functions is the glycosylation of secreted proteins. A large variety of glycan chains can be synthesized in the Golgi, and it is increasingly clear that these are critical in basic cellular functions as well as the development of multicellular organisms. The structurally best-documented glycans are N-glycans, yet these are also the most enigmatic in their function. In contrast, O-glycan function is far better understood, but here the structures and biosynthetic pathways are very incomplete. The critical importance of glycans is highlighted by the broad spectrum of diseases they are associated with, such as a number of inherited diseases, but also cancers or diabetes. The molecular clues to these, however, are only just being elucidated. Although some glycan structures are known to be involved in signaling or adhesion to the extracellular matrix, for most the functions are not yet known. This review aims at summarizing current knowledge as much as to point out critical areas key for future progress.

  18. Celiac Disease-Associated Autoimmune Endocrinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Rajadhyaksha, Manoj; Wortsman, Jacobo

    2001-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder induced by gluten intake in genetically susceptible individuals. It is characterized by the presence of serum antibodies to endomysium, reticulin, gliadin, and tissue transglutaminase. The incidence of CD in various autoimmune disorders is increased 10- to 30-fold in comparison to the general population, although in many cases CD is clinically asymptomatic or silent. The identification of such cases with CD is important since it may help in the control of type I diabetes or endocrine functions in general, as well as in the prevention of long-term complications of CD, such as lymphoma. It is believed that CD may predispose an individual to other autoimmune disorders such as type I diabetes, autoimmune thyroid, and other endocrine diseases and that gluten may be a possible trigger. The onset of type I diabetes at an early age in patients with CD, compared to non-CD, and the prevention or delay in onset of diabetes by gluten-free diet in genetically predisposed individuals substantiates this antigen trigger hypothesis. Early identification of CD patients in highly susceptible population may result in the treatment of subclinical CD and improved control of associated disorders. PMID:11427410

  19. Tick-Associated Diseases: Symptoms, Treatment and Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Alice; Chaney, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are eleven tick-associated diseases prevalent in the United States. Most commonly diagnosed are Lyme disease, anaplasmosis (ehrlichiosis) and babeisois, with Lyme disease being the most common vector-borne disease in the country. In southeastern states, studies have shown the…

  20. Supervising allied health assistants: a concerning skill gap in allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, David

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss the problem of a skill gap in the training of allied health professionals. Allied health assistants are required to work under the supervision of allied health professionals. There is little evidence to suggest supervisory skills are routinely taught as part of the development of professional behavior. With increasing concern about a lack of supervisory skill, there is an opportunity for supervisory skills to be incorporated into the undergraduate curriculum. A combination of classroom and clinical experience is required to ensure this professional skill does not continue to be overlooked.

  1. Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation Associated with Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jung-Hoon; Yeon, Je Young; Park, Jae-Han

    2014-01-01

    The coexistence of moyamoya disease (MMD) with an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is exceedingly rare. We report two cases of AVM associated with MMD. The first case was an incidental AVM diagnosed simultaneously with MMD. This AVM was managed expectantly after encephalo-duro-arterio-synangiosis (EDAS) as the main feeders stemmed from the internal carotid artery, which we believed would be obliterated with the progression of MMD. However, the AVM persisted with replacement of the internal carotid artery feeders by new external carotid artery feeders from the EDAS site. The AVM was eventually treated with gamma knife radiosurgery considering an increasing steal effect. The second case was a de novo AVM case. The patient was initially diagnosed with MMD, and acquired an AVM eight years later that was slowly fed by the reconstituted anterior cerebral artery. Because the patient remained asymptomatic, the AVM is currently being closely followed for more than 2 years without further surgical intervention. Possible differences in the pathogenesis and the radiologic presentation of these AVMs are discussed with a literature review. No solid consensus exists on the optimal treatment of MMD-associated AVMs. Gamma knife radiosurgery appears to be an effective treatment option for an incidental AVM. However, a de novo AVM may be managed expectantly considering the possible risks of damaging established collaterals, low flow characteristics, and probably low risks of rupture. PMID:25371789

  2. Cerebral arteriovenous malformation associated with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jung-Hoon; Yeon, Je Young; Park, Jae-Han; Shin, Hyung Jin

    2014-10-01

    The coexistence of moyamoya disease (MMD) with an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is exceedingly rare. We report two cases of AVM associated with MMD. The first case was an incidental AVM diagnosed simultaneously with MMD. This AVM was managed expectantly after encephalo-duro-arterio-synangiosis (EDAS) as the main feeders stemmed from the internal carotid artery, which we believed would be obliterated with the progression of MMD. However, the AVM persisted with replacement of the internal carotid artery feeders by new external carotid artery feeders from the EDAS site. The AVM was eventually treated with gamma knife radiosurgery considering an increasing steal effect. The second case was a de novo AVM case. The patient was initially diagnosed with MMD, and acquired an AVM eight years later that was slowly fed by the reconstituted anterior cerebral artery. Because the patient remained asymptomatic, the AVM is currently being closely followed for more than 2 years without further surgical intervention. Possible differences in the pathogenesis and the radiologic presentation of these AVMs are discussed with a literature review. No solid consensus exists on the optimal treatment of MMD-associated AVMs. Gamma knife radiosurgery appears to be an effective treatment option for an incidental AVM. However, a de novo AVM may be managed expectantly considering the possible risks of damaging established collaterals, low flow characteristics, and probably low risks of rupture.

  3. [Clostridum difficile associated disease in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo; Sifuentes-Osornio, José

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium difficile associated disease (CDAD) has shown a sustained increase worldwide over the last ten years. However, there are few studies on this topic in Latin America. We conducted a comprehensive literature review using medical databases of Latin American countries. We found only seven recent papers in which clinical characteristics and risk factors were analyzed; some included outcome variables. Of these articles, only one was prospective, while the rest were either retrospective, cross-sectional or case-control studies. Most studies were done among hospitalized adult patients, even though patients 13+ years were also included in some reports. Only two recent clinical studies used cell culture to determine a cytopathic effect and the rest included immunoenzymatic assays. In general, all the studies we reviewed showed that the use of fluorquinolones, clindamycin, and cephalosporins were the antibiotics mostly associated with CDAD. Treatment schedules generally included metronidazol, although vancomycin was reported in one. Attributable mortality was lower than the mortality described in previous reports from hospitals in developed countries. Studies where this outcome was included did not surpass 4%, a significant difference from the findings from developed countries. In Latin America there are few studies that describe this clinical problem, they generally include small sample sizes and most are retrospective. There is a clear need to design and carry out prospective studies that will allow us to determine the true prevalence of this health problem

  4. Bilateral Ocular Myositis Associated with Whipple's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Parkash, Vivak; Mudhar, Hardeep Singh; Wagner, Bart E.; Raoult, Didier; Batty, Ruth; Lepidi, Hubert; Burke, John; Collini, Paul; de Silva, Thushan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical features of a Caucasian female patient with a history of treated gastrointestinal Whipple's disease (WD) who developed new-onset diplopia, with a description of the histopathological features of the extraocular muscle biopsies. Methods A previously fit 38-year-old Caucasian female presented with acute-onset diplopia after being on a sustained medication regime for biopsy-proven gastrointestinal WD. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of her orbits with gadolinium revealed diffuse enhancement of the bellies of the extraocular muscles bilaterally, particularly the medial rectus, superior rectus, and superior oblique muscles, consistent with an infiltrative myositis. She underwent unilateral extraocular muscle biopsies. Results The extraocular muscle biopsies contained macrophages between the muscle fibres. These contained periodic acid-Schiff-positive cytoplasmic granules. Immunohistochemistry with an antibody raised to Tropheryma whipplei showed positive staining of the same macrophages. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of effete T. whipplei cell membranes in lysosomes. Conclusion This case describes bilateral WD-associated extraocular muscle myositis. The exact mechanism for this unusual presentation is unclear, but both a WD-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and treatment failure are possibilities, with a good response observed to antibiotic therapy and adjunctive corticosteroids.

  5. Lessons of Allied Interoperability: A Portent for the Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-08-10

    Allied operations, coalition warfare, allied interoperobility, standardizatlon. rationliaaton, laisou, logistica , comand and control. doctrine, training...Staff College .1................... I Industrial College of the Armed Forces ....... ............... 2 Inter-American Defense College

  6. Coeliac Disease-Associated Antibodies in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Akbulut, Sabiye; Gür, Günes; Topal, Firdevs; Topal, Fatih Esad; Alli, Nuran; Saritas, Ülkü

    2013-01-01

    Background The possible relationship between psoriasis and coeliac disease (CD) has been attributed to the common pathogenic mechanisms of the two diseases and the presence of antigliadin antibodies in patients has been reported to increase the incidence of CD. Objective The aim of this report was to study CD-associated antibodies serum antigliadin antibody immunoglobulin (Ig)A, IgG, anti-endomysial antibody IgA and anti-transglutaminase antibody IgA and to demonstrate whether there is an increase in the frequency of those markers of CD in patients with psoriasis. Methods Serum antigliadin antibody IgG and IgA, antiendomysial antibody IgA and anti-transglutaminase antibody IgA were studied in 37 (19 males) patients with psoriasis and 50 (23 males) healthy controls. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and duodenal biopsies were performed in patients with at least one positive marker. Results Antigliadin IgA was statistically higher in the psoriasis group than in the controls (p<0.05). Serological markers were found positive in 6 patients with psoriasis and 1 person from the control group. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed in all these persons, with biopsies collected from the duodenum. The diagnosis of CD was reported in only one patient with psoriasis following the pathological examination of the biopsies. Whereas one person of the control group was found to be positive for antigliadin antibody IgA, pathological examination of the duodenal biopsies obtain from this patient were found to be normal. Conclusion Antigliadin IgA prominently increases in patients diagnosed with psoriasis. Patients with psoriasis should be investigated for latent CD and should be followed up. PMID:24003271

  7. Turning Parents from Critics to Allies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagarese, Margaret M.; Giannetti, Charlene C.

    1998-01-01

    Authors of "The Roller Coaster Years" (1997) advise how middle-level educators can turn wary, disinterested parents into allies. Teachers should welcome parents, advertise their own expertise, implement an early-warning system, portray children positively, convey shared values, reassure parents about children's safety, demonstrate insider…

  8. Mastery Learning: A Model for Allied Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, James A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reports the methods and philosophy used in developing a mastery learning model at the University of Missouri-Columbia to insure that allied health students in the physical therapy and occupational therapy programs learn the concepts of anatomy essential to the rest of the curriculum. (MF)

  9. Ugruayaaglu Avilaitqatiglu (Alli and His Friends).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Mary L.; And Others

    This third grade elementary language text, designed for children in bilingual Inupiat-English programs in the Alaskan village of Barrow and several small villages near Barrow, contains one story about the adventures of an animal named Alli and his friends. The material is presented with many illustrations depicting the events in the story. The…

  10. Horizons in Health (Allied Health Careers)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emphasis Career Education, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The latest conditions affecting job demand, advancement, and compensation potential; educational requirements; and job descriptions are reported for allied health careers in the laboratory and hospital as physician assistants; therapists; nurses and nurses aids; dieticians and nutritionists; and dental assistants, hygienists, and laboratory…

  11. ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENT GRANTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Arlington, VA.

    THE ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS PERSONNEL ACT OF 1966 AUTHORIZES THE SURGEON GENERAL TO MAKE GRANTS TO EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVING PROGRAMS WHICH QUALIFY STUDENTS (1) FOR THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE OR ITS EQUIVALENT OR THE MASTER'S DEGREE TO THE EXTENT REQUIRED FOR BASIC PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION, REGISTRATION, OR LICENSURE…

  12. Chemistry for the Allied Health Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Donald H.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the literature concerning the content of chemistry courses for allied health students. Contains the content outline of a two-semester course offered at Hope College (Michigan) and discusses the rationale for organizing the course for this audience. (TW)

  13. Nursing and Allied Health Shortages: TBR Responds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berryman, Treva

    Staff members of the Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) and the Tennessee Higher Education Commission worked jointly to establish a task force to investigate and develop recommendations for addressing the workforce shortages in nursing and allied health in Tennessee. The investigation established that Tennessee already has a workforce shortage of…

  14. Allied Health Technologies. Preceptor/Mentor Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing. Office of Career and Technical Education.

    This handbook is designed to assist preceptors/mentors in a local allied health technology program, a school/industry partnership focused on training students for entry-level employment in the health care field by means of a work internship/externship. It draws heavily on the Secretary of Labor's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS)…

  15. 27 CFR 24.322 - Allied products record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allied products record. 24..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Records and Reports § 24.322 Allied products record. A proprietor who uses fruit, fruit juice or concentrated fruit juice in the production of allied products shall...

  16. Shape of allied health: an environmental scan of 27 allied health professions in Victoria.

    PubMed

    Nancarrow, Susan A; Young, Gretchen; O'Callaghan, Katy; Jenkins, Mathew; Philip, Kathleen; Barlow, Kegan

    2016-08-11

    Objective In 2015, the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services commissioned the Victorian Allied Health Workforce Research Program to provide data on allied health professions in the Victorian public, private and not-for-profit sectors. Herein we present a snapshot of the demographic profiles and distribution of these professions in Victoria and discuss the workforce implications.Methods The program commenced with an environmental scan of 27 allied health professions in Victoria. This substantial scoping exercise identified existing data, resources and contexts for each profession to guide future data collection and research. Each environmental scan reviewed existing data relating to the 27 professions, augmented by an online questionnaire sent to the professional bodies representing each discipline.Results Workforce data were patchy but, based on the evidence available, the allied health professions in Victoria vary greatly in size (ranging from just 17 child life therapists to 6288 psychologists), are predominantly female (83% of professions are more than 50% female) and half the professions report that 30% of their workforce is aged under 30 years. New training programs have increased workforce inflows to many professions, but there is little understanding of attrition rates. Professions reported a lack of senior positions in the public sector and a concomitant lack of senior specialised staff available to support more junior staff. Increasing numbers of allied health graduates are being employed directly in private practice because of a lack of growth in new positions in the public sector and changing funding models. Smaller professions reported that their members are more likely to be professionally isolated within an allied health team or larger organisations. Uneven rural-urban workforce distribution was evident across most professions.Conclusions Workforce planning for allied health is extremely complex because of the lack of data, fragmented

  17. Allied health personnel's attitudes and perceptions of teamwork supporting children with developmental concerns.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Peggy A; Malone, D Michael

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the attitudes and perceptions of allied health personnel toward the efficacy and performance characteristics of school-based teams supporting children with developmental concerns. Sixty-three allied health personnel were asked to complete the Attitudes About Teamwork Survey, the Team Characteristics Survey, and the Team Process Perception Survey. Respondents held a generally positive attitude about teamwork. Respondents' beliefs about the efficacy of the team process were moderately associated with critical performance characteristics. Effect sizes associated with these data suggest that the results were not only statistically significant but also noteworthy. Respondents also provided their perspectives on the benefits, limitations, supports, and recommendations of teamwork. Results were consistent with both the general teamwork literature and that focused on allied health professions. The authors describe practical implications of the results and directions for further investigation on this topic.

  18. Phenotypic expansion of DGKE-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Westland, Rik; Bodria, Monica; Carrea, Alba; Lata, Sneh; Scolari, Francesco; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; D'Agati, Vivette D; Lifton, Richard P; Gharavi, Ali G; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone

    2014-07-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is usually characterized by uncontrolled complement activation. The recent discovery of loss-of-function mutations in DGKE in patients with aHUS and normal complement levels challenged this observation. DGKE, encoding diacylglycerol kinase-ε, has not been implicated in the complement cascade but hypothetically leads to a prothrombotic state. The discovery of this novel mechanism has potential implications for the treatment of infants with aHUS, who are increasingly treated with complement blocking agents. In this study, we used homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing to identify a novel truncating mutation in DGKE (p.K101X) in a consanguineous family with patients affected by thrombotic microangiopathy characterized by significant serum complement activation and consumption of the complement fraction C3. Aggressive plasma infusion therapy controlled systemic symptoms and prevented renal failure, suggesting that this treatment can significantly affect the natural history of this aggressive disease. Our study expands the clinical phenotypes associated with mutations in DGKE and challenges the benefits of complement blockade treatment in such patients. Mechanistic studies of DGKE and aHUS are, therefore, essential to the design of appropriate therapeutic strategies in patients with DGKE mutations.

  19. Phenotypic Expansion of DGKE-Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Westland, Rik; Bodria, Monica; Carrea, Alba; Lata, Sneh; Scolari, Francesco; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Lifton, Richard P.; Gharavi, Ali G.; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is usually characterized by uncontrolled complement activation. The recent discovery of loss-of-function mutations in DGKE in patients with aHUS and normal complement levels challenged this observation. DGKE, encoding diacylglycerol kinase-ε, has not been implicated in the complement cascade but hypothetically leads to a prothrombotic state. The discovery of this novel mechanism has potential implications for the treatment of infants with aHUS, who are increasingly treated with complement blocking agents. In this study, we used homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing to identify a novel truncating mutation in DGKE (p.K101X) in a consanguineous family with patients affected by thrombotic microangiopathy characterized by significant serum complement activation and consumption of the complement fraction C3. Aggressive plasma infusion therapy controlled systemic symptoms and prevented renal failure, suggesting that this treatment can significantly affect the natural history of this aggressive disease. Our study expands the clinical phenotypes associated with mutations in DGKE and challenges the benefits of complement blockade treatment in such patients. Mechanistic studies of DGKE and aHUS are, therefore, essential to the design of appropriate therapeutic strategies in patients with DGKE mutations. PMID:24511134

  20. Large-Scale Discovery of Disease-Disease and Disease-Gene Associations

    PubMed Central

    Gligorijevic, Djordje; Stojanovic, Jelena; Djuric, Nemanja; Radosavljevic, Vladan; Grbovic, Mihajlo; Kulathinal, Rob J.; Obradovic, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Data-driven phenotype analyses on Electronic Health Record (EHR) data have recently drawn benefits across many areas of clinical practice, uncovering new links in the medical sciences that can potentially affect the well-being of millions of patients. In this paper, EHR data is used to discover novel relationships between diseases by studying their comorbidities (co-occurrences in patients). A novel embedding model is designed to extract knowledge from disease comorbidities by learning from a large-scale EHR database comprising more than 35 million inpatient cases spanning nearly a decade, revealing significant improvements on disease phenotyping over current computational approaches. In addition, the use of the proposed methodology is extended to discover novel disease-gene associations by including valuable domain knowledge from genome-wide association studies. To evaluate our approach, its effectiveness is compared against a held-out set where, again, it revealed very compelling results. For selected diseases, we further identify candidate gene lists for which disease-gene associations were not studied previously. Thus, our approach provides biomedical researchers with new tools to filter genes of interest, thus, reducing costly lab studies. PMID:27578529

  1. Global Distribution of Outbreaks of Water-Associated Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; LeJeune, Jeffrey; Alsdorf, Doug; Lu, Bo; Shum, C. K.; Liang, Song

    2012-01-01

    Background Water plays an important role in the transmission of many infectious diseases, which pose a great burden on global public health. However, the global distribution of these water-associated infectious diseases and underlying factors remain largely unexplored. Methods and Findings Based on the Global Infectious Disease and Epidemiology Network (GIDEON), a global database including water-associated pathogens and diseases was developed. In this study, reported outbreak events associated with corresponding water-associated infectious diseases from 1991 to 2008 were extracted from the database. The location of each reported outbreak event was identified and geocoded into a GIS database. Also collected in the GIS database included geo-referenced socio-environmental information including population density (2000), annual accumulated temperature, surface water area, and average annual precipitation. Poisson models with Bayesian inference were developed to explore the association between these socio-environmental factors and distribution of the reported outbreak events. Based on model predictions a global relative risk map was generated. A total of 1,428 reported outbreak events were retrieved from the database. The analysis suggested that outbreaks of water-associated diseases are significantly correlated with socio-environmental factors. Population density is a significant risk factor for all categories of reported outbreaks of water-associated diseases; water-related diseases (e.g., vector-borne diseases) are associated with accumulated temperature; water-washed diseases (e.g., conjunctivitis) are inversely related to surface water area; both water-borne and water-related diseases are inversely related to average annual rainfall. Based on the model predictions, “hotspots” of risks for all categories of water-associated diseases were explored. Conclusions At the global scale, water-associated infectious diseases are significantly correlated with socio

  2. Infectious diseases associated with complement deficiencies.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, J E; Densen, P

    1991-01-01

    The complement system consists of both plasma and membrane proteins. The former influence the inflammatory response, immune modulation, and host defense. The latter are complement receptors, which mediate the cellular effects of complement activation, and regulatory proteins, which protect host cells from complement-mediated injury. Complement activation occurs via either the classical or the alternative pathway, which converge at the level of C3 and share a sequence of terminal components. Four aspects of the complement cascade are critical to its function and regulation: (i) activation of the classical pathway, (ii) activation of the alternative pathway, (iii) C3 convertase formation and C3 deposition, and (iv) membrane attack complex assembly and insertion. In general, mechanisms evolved by pathogenic microbes to resist the effects of complement are targeted to these four steps. Because individual complement proteins subserve unique functional activities and are activated in a sequential manner, complement deficiency states are associated with predictable defects in complement-dependent functions. These deficiency states can be grouped by which of the above four mechanisms they disrupt. They are distinguished by unique epidemiologic, clinical, and microbiologic features and are most prevalent in patients with certain rheumatologic and infectious diseases. Ethnic background and the incidence of infection are important cofactors determining this prevalence. Although complement undoubtedly plays a role in host defense against many microbial pathogens, it appears most important in protection against encapsulated bacteria, especially Neisseria meningitidis but also Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and, to a lesser extent, Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The availability of effective polysaccharide vaccines and antibiotics provides an immunologic and chemotherapeutic rationale for preventing and treating infection in patients with these deficiencies. PMID

  3. Selected list of books and journals in the allied health sciences.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1986-01-01

    This list of 450 books and 69 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs and/or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused mainly on the twenty-three educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, and medical secretarial programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (157 books and 27 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1986 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $16,700. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $6,700. PMID:3535953

  4. A conceptual model for recruitment and retention: allied health workforce enhancement in Western Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Schoo, Adrian M; Stagnitti, Karen E; Mercer, Catherine; Dunbar, James

    2005-01-01

    Attracting and retaining allied health professionals in rural areas is a recognised problem in both Australia and overseas. Predicted increases in health needs will require strategic actions to enhance the rural workforce and its ability to deliver the required services. A range of factors in different domains has been associated with recruitment and retention in the allied health workforce. For example, factors can be related to the nature of the work, the personal needs, or the way an organisation is led. Some factors cannot be changed (eg geographical location of extended family) whereas others can be influenced (eg education, support, management styles). Recruitment and retention of allied health professionals is a challenging problem that deserves attention in all domains and preparedness to actively change established work practices, both individually as well as collectively, in order to cater for current and predicted health needs. Changes to enhance workforce outcomes can be implemented and evaluated using a cyclic model. The Allied Health Workforce Enhancement Project of the Greater Green Triangle University Department of Rural Health (GGT UDRH) is working towards increasing the number of allied health professionals in the south west of Victoria. Based on themes identified in the literature, an interactive model is being developed that addresses recruitment and retention factors in three domains: (1) personal or individual; (2) organisation; and (3) community.

  5. ADEA/AAL Institute for Allied Health Educators: Program Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Overman, Pamela R; Grzesikowski, Tami; Tucker-Lively, Felicia; Weinstein, George; Haden, N Karl

    2015-05-01

    Revised accreditation standards for dental and dental hygiene education programs have increased emphasis on faculty development that can improve teaching and learning, foster curricular change including use of teaching and learning technologies, and enhance retention and satisfaction of faculty. The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and Academy for Academic Leadership (AAL) established the Institute for Allied Health Educators (IAHE) in 2007 to address faculty development needs for allied dental and allied health educators. In 2009, it was transitioned to an online program, which resulted in increased enrollment and diversity of participants. After seven years, a comprehensive program evaluation was warranted. The authors developed an online questionnaire based on Kirkpatrick's four-level model of training evaluation; for this study, levels one (satisfaction), two (knowledge and skill acquisition), and three (behavior change) were examined. Of the 400 program participants invited to take part in the study, a 38% response rate was achieved, with the majority indicating full-time faculty status. Nearly all (95-97%) of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed the program contributed to their teaching effectiveness, and 88-96% agreed or strongly agreed it enhanced their knowledge of educational concepts and strategies. In addition, 83% agreed or strongly agreed the program helped them develop new skills and confidence with technology, with 69% agreeing or strongly agreeing that it helped them incorporate technology into their own educational setting. Nearly 90% were highly positive or positive in their overall assessment of the program; 95% indicated they would recommend it to a colleague; and 80% agreed or strongly agreed they had discussed what they learned with faculty colleagues at their home institutions who had not attended the program. Positive findings from this evaluation provide evidence that the IAHE has been able to meet its goals.

  6. Association between Parkinson's Disease and Helicobacter Pylori

    PubMed Central

    Oğuz, Sıdıka

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) is a common infection of the gastrointestinal system that is usually related to peptic ulcers. However, recent studies have revealed relationships between HP and many other diseases. Although the exact mechanism is unknown, HP can prevent the absorption of certain drugs. A high prevalence of HP has been found in patients with Parkinson's disease, and this bacterium causes motor fluctuations by affecting the absorption of levodopa, which is the main drug used to treat Parkinson's disease. Eradicating HP from patients with Parkinson's disease by applying antibiotic treatment will increase the absorption of levodopa and decrease their motor fluctuations. PMID:26932258

  7. Fish and Shellfish Associated Disease Outbreaks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, M.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of disease outbreaks related to fish and shellfish, covering publications of 1976-77. This review covers the chemical, bacterial, and viral diseases that are transmitted by fish and shellfish. A list of 50 references is also presented. (HM)

  8. Brandon/Hill selected list of print books and journals in allied health*†

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Dorothy R.; Stickell, Henry N.

    2003-01-01

    This list of 434 books and 79 journals is intended as a selection guide for print literature to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number of and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and recognized by the American Medical Association and other accrediting bodies. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (169 books and 32 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (2002 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $36,744. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $14,465. PMID:12568155

  9. Brandon/Hill selected list of print books and journals in allied health*

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Dorothy R.; Stickell, Henry N.

    2000-01-01

    This list of 424 books and 77 journals is intended as a selection guide for print literature to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and recognized by the American Medical Association and other accrediting bodies. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (167 books and 31 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (2000 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $31,970. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $12,515. PMID:10928707

  10. Brandon/Hill selected list of print books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed

    Hill, D R; Stickell, H N

    2000-07-01

    This list of 424 books and 77 journals is intended as a selection guide for print literature to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and recognized by the American Medical Association and other accrediting bodies. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (167 books and 31 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (2000 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $31,970. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $12,515.

  11. Brandon/Hill selected list of print books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed

    Hill, Dorothy R; Stickell, Henry N

    2003-01-01

    This list of 434 books and 79 journals is intended as a selection guide for print literature to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number of and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and recognized by the American Medical Association and other accrediting bodies. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (169 books and 32 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (2002 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $36,744. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $14,465.

  12. Chronic granulomatous disease associated with atypical Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki-Nakashimada, M A; Ramírez-Vargas, N; De Rubens-Figueroa, J

    2008-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an infrequent inherited disorder characterized by recurrent infections and abnormal granuloma formation. Patients with CGD have an exuberant inflammatory response and an increased risk of developing autoimmunity. We present the case of a 1-year-old boy with CGD who developed several of the characteristic clinical features of Kawasaki Disease. His illness responded to intravenous immunoglobulin, aspirin, and corticosteroids.

  13. AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database is a resource from the Health Care Information Service of the British Library. AMED offers access to complementary and alternative medicine topics, such as acupuncture, chiropractic, herbalism, homeopathy, hospice care, hypnosis, palliative care, physiotherapy, podiatry, and rehabilitation. This column features a sample search to demonstrate the type of information available within AMED. AMED is available through the EBSCOhost and OVID platforms.

  14. The Revolution in Military Affairs: Allied Perspectives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-01

    seek to understand the American debate and to identify opportunities for and the risks to themselves in variant patterns of development of the...key industrial allies. In effect , the United States is, de facto, trying to set in place a new regional networking strategy. Broad global military...to deal with regional goals and networking requirements. 2 erolo~ue For the United States to develop an effective interallied RMA strategy, it

  15. Delayed puberty associated with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, Anne B; Savage, Martin O; Sanderson, Ian R

    2003-02-01

    Delayed puberty frequently complicates the clinical course of young patients with inflammatory bowel disease, more often in Crohn's disease than ulcerative colitis. Undernutrition has been thought to be the main reason for delayed puberty in these patients. However, puberty may be delayed despite a normal nutritional status. Observations in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and in rats with experimental colitis suggest that inflammatory mediators may have a direct adverse influence, independent of undernutrition, on the onset and progression of puberty. Serum androgens are consistently reported to be reduced in patients with delayed puberty and inflammatory bowel disease. This reduction is not necessarily secondary to a reduction in gonadotrophins as serum concentrations of gonadotrophins have been reported to be normal or even increased in some studies. Management of delayed puberty involves calorie supplements to correct undernutrition and treatment of inflammation. Observations in boys with delayed puberty and controlled studies in experimental models of intestinal inflammation suggest that testosterone therapy can accelerate puberty.

  16. Pulmonary hypertension associated with connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Karen A; Badesch, David B

    2002-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a life threatening complication of several connective tissue diseases including scleroderma (both diffuse and limited scleroderma, or the CREST syndrome--calcinosis cutis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysfunction, sclerodactyly, and telangectasia), systemic lupus erythomatosis (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), and less commonly, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and dermatomyositis/polymyositis. This report reviews the occurrence of this complication, potential etiologies, clinical presentation, and treatment options.

  17. A National Study of Student Selection Practices in the Allied Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Marie C.; Crowley, Judeth A.

    1982-01-01

    Reports the outcomes of a 1978 national survey of candidate selection practices in 4 baccalaureate level and 7 associate degree level allied health disciplines. Found that few programs conducted evaluation of their admissions activities and that physical therapy and dental hygiene programs were the most structured in student selection. (JOW)

  18. Occupational Analysis: Hospital Radiologic Technologist. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Glenn D.; And Others

    In an effort to meet the growing demand for skilled radiologic technologists and other supportive personnel educated through the associate degree level, a national survey was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project to determine the tasks performed by personnel in the field and lay the groundwork for development of…

  19. Policy and System Change and Community Coalitions: Outcomes from Allies against Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Noreen M.; Lachance, Laurie; Doctor, Linda Jo; Gilmore, Lisa; Kelly, Cindy; Krieger, James; Lara, Marielena; Meurer, John; Friedman Milanovich, Amy; Nicholas, Elisa; Rosenthal, Michael; Stoll, Shelley C.; Wilkin, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We assessed policy and system changes and health outcomes produced by the Allies Against Asthma program, a 5-year collaborative effort by 7 community coalitions to address childhood asthma. We also explored associations between community engagement and outcomes. Methods: We interviewed a sample of 1,477 parents of children with asthma…

  20. 59 FR- Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-02-03

    ... Vietnam era and the subsequent development of Hodgkin's disease and porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT). The... consistent with chloracne Hodgkin's disease Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Porphyria cutanea tarda Soft-tissue... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AG69 Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents...

  1. Infectious Disease Risk Associated with Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation opens with views of the shuttle in various stages of preparation for launch, a few moments after launch prior to external fuel tank separation, a few pictures of the earth,and several pictures of astronomical interest. The presentation reviews the factors effecting the risks of infectious disease during space flight, such as the crew, water, food, air, surfaces and payloads and the factors that increase disease risk, the factors affecting the risk of infectious disease during spaceflight, and the environmental factors affecting immunity, such as stress. One factor in space infectious disease is latent viral reactivation, such as herpes. There are comparisons of the incidence of viral reactivation in space, and in other analogous situations (such as bed rest, or isolation). There is discussion of shingles, and the pain and results of treatment. There is a further discussion of the changes in microbial pathogen characteristics, using salmonella as an example of the increased virulence of microbes during spaceflight. A factor involved in the risk of infectious disease is stress.

  2. Redefining Ceratocystis and allied genera

    PubMed Central

    de Beer, Z.W.; Duong, T.A.; Barnes, I.; Wingfield, B.D.; Wingfield, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Ceratocystis was established in 1890 and accommodates many important fungi. These include serious plant pathogens, significant insect symbionts and agents of timber degradation that result in substantial economic losses. Virtually since its type was described from sweet potatoes, the taxonomy of Ceratocystis has been confused and vigorously debated. In recent years, particulary during the last two decades, it has become very obvious that this genus includes a wide diversity of very different fungi. These have been roughly lumped together due to their similar morphological structures that have clearly evolved through convergent evolution linked to an insect-associated ecology. As has been true for many other groups of fungi, the emergence of DNA-based sequence data and associated phylogenetic inferences, have made it possible to robustly support very distinct boundaries defined by morphological characters and ecological differences. In this study, DNA-sequence data for three carefully selected gene regions (60S, LSU, MCM7) were generated for 79 species residing in the aggregate genus Ceratocystis sensu lato and these data were subjected to rigorous phylogenetic analyses. The results made it possible to distinguish seven major groups for which generic names have been chosen and descriptions either provided or emended. The emended genera included Ceratocystis sensu stricto, Chalaropsis, Endoconidiophora, Thielaviopsis, and Ambrosiella, while two new genera, Davidsoniella and Huntiella, were described. In total, 30 new combinations have been made. This major revision of the generic boundaries in the Ceratocystidaceae will simplify future treatments and work with an important group of fungi including distantly related species illogically aggregated under a single name. PMID:25492989

  3. The effectiveness of allied health care in patients with ataxia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fonteyn, Ella M R; Keus, Samyra H J; Verstappen, Carla C P; Schöls, Ludger; de Groot, Imelda J M; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C

    2014-02-01

    Many patients with cerebellar ataxia have serious disabilities in daily life, while pharmacological treatment options are absent. Therefore, allied health care is considered to be important in the management of these patients. The goal of this review is to evaluate scientific evidence for allied health care in cerebellar ataxia, to identify effective treatment strategies, and to give recommendations for clinical practice and further research. A systematic search for clinical trials concerning allied health care in cerebellar ataxias was conducted using the electronic databases of PubMed, Medline, Embase, Cinahl and Pedro, and references lists of articles, in the time period from 1980 up to and including December 2011 in English and Dutch. We identified 14 trials, of which the four best studies were formally of moderate methodological quality. There was a wide variation in disease entities and interventions. The combined data indicate that physical therapy may lead to an improvement of ataxia symptoms and daily life functions in patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxia (level 2), and in other diseases causing cerebellar ataxia (level 3). When added to physical therapy, occupational therapy might improve global functional status, and occupational therapy alone may diminish symptoms of depression (level 3). There are insufficient data for speech and language therapy. Despite the widespread use of allied health care interventions in cerebellar ataxia, there is a lack of good quality studies that have evaluated such interventions. We found some support for the implementation of physical therapy and occupational therapy, but more research is needed to develop recommendations for clinical practice.

  4. Sleep Disturbances Associated with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Iwanami, Masaoki; Hirata, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common problems affecting the quality life of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and are often underestimated. The causes of sleep disturbances are multifactorial and include nocturnal motor disturbances, nocturia, depressive symptoms, and medication use. Comorbidity of PD with sleep apnea syndrome, restless legs syndrome, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, or circadian cycle disruption also results in impaired sleep. In addition, the involvement of serotoninergic, noradrenergic, and cholinergic neurons in the brainstem as a disease-related change contributes to impaired sleep structures. Excessive daytime sleepiness is not only secondary to nocturnal disturbances or dopaminergic medication but may also be due to independent mechanisms related to impairments in ascending arousal system and the orexin system. Notably, several recent lines of evidence suggest a strong link between rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and the risk of neurodegenerative diseases such as PD. In the present paper, we review the current literature concerning sleep disorders in PD. PMID:21876839

  5. Treatment of dysautonomia associated with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mostile, Giovanni; Jankovic, Joseph

    2009-12-01

    Non-motor symptoms are increasingly recognized to adversely impact on the quality of life of patients with in Parkinson's disease (PD), particularly as the disease progresses. Autonomic symptom severity in patients with PD seems to correlate with older age, greater disease severity, psychiatric complications, sleep disorders, and higher doses of dopaminergic medication. The following therapeutic strategies are frequently used in the treatment of PD-related dysautonomia: 1. Orthostatic hypotension: fludrocortisone, midodrine, and droxidopa; 2. Sialorrhea: glycopyrrolate and botulinun toxin injections; 3. Constipation: symbiotic yogurt and bulking agents, macrogol, lubiprostone, mosapride citrate and tegaserod, pyridostigmine bromide, botulinum toxin injections and sacral nerve stimulation; 4. Urinary frequency: oxybutynin, tolterodine, solifenacin, darifenacin, botulinum toxin injections; 5. Erectile dysfunction: sildenafil and other phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. More effective symptomatic and pathogenesis-targeted therapies are needed to ameliorate the non-motor symptoms of PD that usually do not respond well to dopaminergic medications.

  6. [Celiac disease associated with Helicobacter pylori infection].

    PubMed

    Cârdei, E; Moraru, D; Trandafir, Laura; Bozomitu, Laura; Mihăilă, Doina

    2003-01-01

    Celiac disease, also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is an autoimmune enteropathy caused by the ingestion of gluten-containing grains in susceptible subjects. The authors present a 3 years and 5 months old girl diagnosed with celiac disease at 1 year and 5 months old. Initially, the evolution after gluten-free diet was favorable. After 2 years the child presented abdominal pain and anorexia. The IgA antigliadin antibodies had normal values. The gastric biopsy found Helicobacter pylori gastritis. After treatment for Helicobacter pylori eradication the symptoms disappeared.

  7. Feline parvovirus infection and associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Stuetzer, Bianca; Hartmann, Katrin

    2014-08-01

    Feline panleukopenia, caused by the single-stranded DNA virus feline parvovirus (FPV), is a highly contagious and often lethal disease of cats and other Felidae. FPV, but also canine parvovirus (CPV) can be isolated from both healthy and diseased cats. In Germany, CPV was detected in only approximately 10% of feline samples, but in Southeast Asia, reports estimated that up to approximately 80% of diseased cats were infected with CPV. Infection spreads rapidly, especially in cells with high mitotic activity, such as bone marrow, lymphoid tissue and intestinal crypt cells. Anorexia, vomiting, diarrhoea, neutropenia and lymphopenia are common in clinically affected cases. In utero or neonatal infection can result in cerebellar hypoplasia. Depending on the severity of clinical signs, mortality ranges from 25 to 100%. Effective vaccination and thorough disinfection are of the utmost importance in the prevention of disease transmission in multi-cat households and animal shelters. If clinical signs develop, supportive treatment should be commenced. The efficacy of feline recombinant interferon and FPV antibodies has not been clearly demonstrated. Commercially available vaccines should induce protective immunity when administered according to current guidelines. Recent studies suggest that in some kittens, maternally derived antibodies (MDA) can persist for much longer than has been previously recognised. FPV serum antibody tests are available, but protection status needs to be interpreted with caution in kittens with MDA and a negative titre in adult cats does not necessarily denote lack of protection.

  8. Hematologic diseases: High risk of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Gweon, Tae-Geun; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Baeg, Myong Ki; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Lee, Dong-Gun; Park, Yeon Joon; Lee, Jong Wook

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the incidence and clinical outcome of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) associated diarrhea (CDAD) in patients with hematologic disease. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent C. difficile testing in a tertiary hospital in 2011. The incidence and risk factors for CDAD and its clinical course including recurrence and mortality were assessed in patients with hematologic disease and compared with those in patients with nonhematologic disease. RESULTS: About 320 patients were diagnosed with CDAD (144 patients with hematologic disease; 176 with nonhematologic disease). The incidence of CDAD in patients with hematologic disease was estimated to be 36.7 cases/10000 patient hospital days, which was higher than the 5.4 cases/10000 patient hospital days in patients with nonhematologic disease. Recurrence of CDAD was more frequent in patients with hematologic disease compared to those with nonhematologic disease (18.8% vs 8.5%, P < 0.01), which was associated with higher re-use of causative antibiotics for CDAD. Mortality due to CDAD did not differ between the two groups. Multivariate analysis showed that intravenous immunoglobulin was the only significant factor associated with a lower rate of recurrence of CDAD in patients with hematologic disease. CONCLUSION: The incidence and recurrence of CDAD was higher in patients with hematologic disease than in those with nonhematologic disease. PMID:24914383

  9. DNA viruses associated with diseases of marine and anadromous fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetrick, F. M.

    1984-03-01

    The association of DNA-containing viruses with diseases of marine and anadromous fish is reviewed. One section of the review describes those diseases with a proven viral etiology. Available information on the physical, chemical, and biological properties of the viruses is included. Another section deals with those diseases where a viral etiology is suspected but not established. The primary evidence associating viruses with many of these diseases is the observation of virus particles in electron micrographs of thin sections of tissue samples from diseased fish. Finally, the possible role of pollutants, and other stress factors, in predisposing fish to viral infection is discussed as are the problems associated with studying diseases of wild fish populations.

  10. Infectious diseases associated with molluscan shellfish consumption.

    PubMed Central

    Rippey, S R

    1994-01-01

    A history of shellfish-vectored illnesses (i.e., those associated with consumption of clams, oysters, mussels, and scallops) occurring in the past nine decades is presented. Typhoid fever was a significant public health problem among consumers of raw molluscan shellfish earlier in this century. The development of more effective sewage treatment procedures and the institution of a national program following these outbreaks led to a series of measures which eventually eliminated shellfish-associated typhoid fever. Present-day problems associated with this food source still involve some wastewaterborne bacterial illnesses. However, the principal public health concerns are with wastewater-derived viral pathogens and with bacterial agents of an environmental origin. The nature, occurrence, and magnitude of these public health problems are described. PMID:7834599

  11. Microbial agents associated with waterborne diseases.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, H; Schwartzbrod, L; Dei-Cas, E

    2002-01-01

    Many classes of pathogens excreted in feces are able to initiate waterborne infections. There are bacterial pathogens, including enteric and aquatic bacteria, enteric viruses, and enteric protozoa, which are strongly resistant in the water environment and to most disinfectants. The infection dose of viral and protozoan agents is lower than bacteria, in the range of one to ten infectious units or oocysts. Waterborne outbreaks of bacterial origin (particularly typhoid fever) in the developing countries have declined dramatically from 1900s. Therefore, some early bacterial agents such as Shigella sonnei remains prevalent and new pathogens of fecal origin such as zoonotic C. jejuni and E. coli O157:H7 may contaminate pristine waters through wildlife or domestic animal feces. The common feature of these bacteria is the low inoculum (a few hundred cells) that may trigger disease. The emergence in early 1992 of serotype O139 of V. cholerae with epidemic potential in Southeast Asia suggests that other serotypes than V. cholerae O1 could also getting on epidemic. Some new pathogens include environmental bacteria that are capable of surviving and proliferating in water distribution systems. Other than specific hosts at risk, the general population is refractory to infection with ingested P. aeruginosa. The significance of Aeromonas spp. in drinking water to the occurrence of acute gastroenteritis remains a debatable point and has to be evaluated in further epidemiological studies. Legionella and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are environmental pathogens that have found an ecologic niche in drinking and hot water supplies. Numerous studies have reported Legionnaires' disease caused by L. pneumophila occurring in residential and hospital water supplies. M. avium complex frequently causes disseminated infections in AIDS patients and drinking water has been suggested as a source of infection; in some cases the relationship has been proven. More and more numerous reports show

  12. Seals Research at AlliedSignal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullah, M. Rifat

    1996-01-01

    A consortium has been formed to address seal problems in the Aerospace sector of Allied Signal, Inc. The consortium is represented by makers of Propulsion Engines, Auxiliary Power Units, Gas Turbine Starters, etc. The goal is to improve Face Seal reliability, since Face Seals have become reliability drivers in many of our product lines. Several research programs are being implemented simultaneously this year. They include: Face Seal Modeling and Analysis Methodology; Oil Cooling of Seals; Seal Tracking Dynamics; Coking Formation & Prevention; and Seal Reliability Methods.

  13. Association between alcohol and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Xia; Chen, Wei-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by dense deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) protein in the brain, failure of the memory and dementia. At present, there is no cure for AD and current treatments only provide a temporary reduction of symptoms. Thus, there is a need for effective preventive/curative strategic approaches. Accordingly, epidemiological studies have reported a reduction in the prevalence of AD in individuals ingesting low amounts of alcohol, while a moderate consumption of ethanol may protect against Aβ. These data are conflicting with other observations that assigned detrimental effects of heavy alcohol use on brain function, which are apparently similar to those observed in AD. These discrepancies questioned whether or not alcohol is a protective agent against the development of AD, whether the probable protective effects are influenced by the quantity and/or frequency of drinking. These issues are addressed in this review with the aim to suggest the real risk of alcohol for developing or preventing AD. PMID:27588045

  14. Finding Queer Allies: The Impact of Ally Training and Safe Zone Stickers on Campus Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Stephanie L.; Bartle, Eli; Masequesmay, Gina

    2008-01-01

    To counter heterosexism, homophobia, and gender binarism in higher education, "safe zone" or "ally" programs are efforts by American universities to create a welcoming environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning (LGBTQ) members of the campus community. This study describes perceptions of campus…

  15. Factors associated with psychotic symptoms in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hirono, N.; Mori, E.; Yasuda, M.; Ikejiri, Y.; Imamura, T.; Shimomura, T.; Ikeda, M.; Hashimoto, M.; Yamashita, H.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Many clinical and biological factors have been reported to be associated with the presence of psychosis in patients with Alzheimer's disease, although the associations were variable. The aim of this study was to clarify factors associated with the presence of psychosis in patients with Alzheimer's disease.
METHODS—Psychiatric functioning was studied in 228 patients with Alzheimer's disease based on the results of the behavioural pathology in Alzheimer's disease rating scale or the neuropsychiatric inventory. The effects of sex, education level, age, duration of illness, cognitive function, and apolipoprotein E genotype were investigated for dichotomous psychotic status with a multiple logistic regression analysis.
RESULTS—Of the 228 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 118 (51.8%) showed evidence of delusions or hallucinations. Of these, 94 had delusions only, three had hallucinations only, and 21 had both. Older age, female sex, longer duration of illness, and more severe cognitive impairment were the factors independently associated with the presence of psychosis. The presence of psychosis was not significantly related to either educational level or apolipoprotein E genotype.
CONCLUSIONS—Age, sex, and severity of illness were independent factors associated with the presence of psychosis in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The reason why some patients with Alzheimer's disease develop psychosis remains unclear. There may be distinctive subtypes of Alzheimer's disease or the presence of individual factors which affect the development of psychosis.

 PMID:9598682

  16. Prospective associations between measures of adiposity and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Monik; Hu, Frank B; Marino, Miguel; Li, Yi; Joshipura, Kaumudi J

    2012-08-01

    Obesity induced inflammation may promote periodontal tissue destruction and bone resorption inducing tooth loss. We examined the association between measures of adiposity and self-reported periodontal disease, using data from 36,910 healthy male participants of the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS) who were free of periodontal disease at baseline and followed for ≤20 years (1986-2006). Self-reported height, weight, and periodontal disease data were collected at baseline, weight and periodontal disease were additionally collected on biennial follow-up questionnaires and waist and hip circumference were self-reported in 1987. These self-reported measures have been previously validated. The multivariable adjusted associations between BMI (kg/m(2)), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and first report of periodontal disease diagnosis were evaluated using time-varying Cox models. We observed 2,979 new periodontal disease diagnoses during 596,561 person-years of follow-up. Significant associations and trends were observed between all measures of adiposity and periodontal disease after adjusting for age, smoking, race, dental profession, physical activity, fruit and vegetable intake, alcohol consumption, and diabetes status at baseline. BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) compared to BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2) was significantly associated with greater risk of periodontal disease (hazard ratios (HR) = 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.17-1.45). Elevated WC and WHR were significantly associated with a greater risk of periodontal disease (HR for extreme quintiles: WC = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.11-1.46; WHR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.17-1.54). The associations of BMI and WC were significant even among nondiabetics and never smokers. Given the high prevalence of overweight, obesity, and periodontal disease this association may be of substantial public health importance.

  17. Genetic variants associated with celiac disease and the risk for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Henning; Willenborg, Christina; Schlesinger, Sabrina; Ferrario, Paola G; König, Inke R; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J; Lieb, Wolfgang; Schunkert, Heribert

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that patients with celiac disease are at increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Genetic-epidemiological analyses identified many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with celiac disease. If there is a causal relation between celiac disease and CAD, one might expect that risk alleles primarily associated with celiac disease also increase the risk of CAD. In this study we identified from literature 41 SNPs that have been previously described to be genome-wide associated with celiac disease (p < 5 × 10(-08)). These SNPs were evaluated for their association with CAD in the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis (CARDIoGRAM) dataset, a meta-analysis comprising genome-wide SNP association data from 22,233 CAD cases and 64,762 controls. 24 out of 41 (58.5 %) risk alleles for celiac disease displayed a positive association with CAD (CAD-OR range 1.001-1.081). The remaining risk alleles for celiac disease (n = 16) revealed CAD-ORs of ≤1.0 (range 0.951-1.0). The proportion of CAD associated alleles was greater but did not differ significantly from the proportion of 50 % expected by chance (p = 0.069). One SNP (rs653178 at the SH2B3/ATXN2 locus) displayed study-wise statistically significant association with CAD with directionality consistent effects on celiac disease and CAD. However, the effect of this locus is most likely driven by pleiotropic effects on multiple other diseases. In conclusion, this genetically based approach provided no convincing evidence that SNPs associated with celiac disease contribute to the risk of CAD. Hence, common non-genetic factors may play a more important role explaining the coincidence of these two complex disease conditions.

  18. Human papillomavirus molecular biology and disease association

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Griffin, Heather; Kranjec, Christian; Murakami, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Summary Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have evolved over millions of years to propagate themselves in a range of different animal species including humans. Viruses that have co‐evolved slowly in this way typically cause chronic inapparent infections, with virion production in the absence of apparent disease. This is the case for many Beta and Gamma HPV types. The Alpha papillomavirus types have however evolved immunoevasion strategies that allow them to cause persistent visible papillomas. These viruses activate the cell cycle as the infected epithelial cell differentiates in order to create a replication competent environment that allows viral genome amplification and packaging into infectious particles. This is mediated by the viral E6, E7, and E5 proteins. High‐risk E6 and E7 proteins differ from their low‐risk counterparts however in being able to drive cell cycle entry in the upper epithelial layers and also to stimulate cell proliferation in the basal and parabasal layers. Deregulated expression of these cell cycle regulators underlies neoplasia and the eventual progression to cancer in individuals who cannot resolve high‐risk HPV infection. Most work to date has focused on the study of high‐risk HPV types such as HPV 16 and 18, which has led to an understanding of the molecular pathways subverted by these viruses. Such approaches will lead to the development of better strategies for disease treatment, including targeted antivirals and immunotherapeutics. Priorities are now focused toward understanding HPV neoplasias at sites other than the cervix (e.g. tonsils, other transformation zones) and toward understanding the mechanisms by which low‐risk HPV types can sometimes give rise to papillomatosis and under certain situations even cancers. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25752814

  19. Array-based detection of genetic alterations associated with disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, Daniel; Albertson, Donna G.; Gray, Joe W.

    2007-09-11

    The present invention relates to DNA sequences from regions of copy number change on chromosome 20. The sequences can be used in hybridization methods for the identification of chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: uromodulin-associated kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions uromodulin-associated kidney disease uromodulin- ...

  1. PBHMDA: Path-Based Human Microbe-Disease Association Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhi-An; Chen, Xing; Zhu, Zexuan; Liu, Hongsheng; Yan, Gui-Ying; You, Zhu-Hong; Wen, Zhenkun

    2017-01-01

    With the advance of sequencing technology and microbiology, the microorganisms have been found to be closely related to various important human diseases. The increasing identification of human microbe-disease associations offers important insights into the underlying disease mechanism understanding from the perspective of human microbes, which are greatly helpful for investigating pathogenesis, promoting early diagnosis and improving precision medicine. However, the current knowledge in this domain is still limited and far from complete. Here, we present the computational model of Path-Based Human Microbe-Disease Association prediction (PBHMDA) based on the integration of known microbe-disease associations and the Gaussian interaction profile kernel similarity for microbes and diseases. A special depth-first search algorithm was implemented to traverse all possible paths between microbes and diseases for inferring the most possible disease-related microbes. As a result, PBHMDA obtained a reliable prediction performance with AUCs (The area under ROC curve) of 0.9169 and 0.8767 in the frameworks of both global and local leave-one-out cross validations, respectively. Based on 5-fold cross validation, average AUCs of 0.9082 ± 0.0061 further demonstrated the efficiency of the proposed model. For the case studies of liver cirrhosis, type 1 diabetes, and asthma, 9, 7, and 9 out of predicted microbes in the top 10 have been confirmed by previously published experimental literatures, respectively. We have publicly released the prioritized microbe-disease associations, which may help to select the most potential pairs for further guiding the experimental confirmation. In conclusion, PBHMDA may have potential to boost the discovery of novel microbe-disease associations and aid future research efforts toward microbe involvement in human disease mechanism. The code and data of PBHMDA is freely available at http://www.escience.cn/system/file?fileId=85214. PMID:28275370

  2. PBHMDA: Path-Based Human Microbe-Disease Association Prediction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi-An; Chen, Xing; Zhu, Zexuan; Liu, Hongsheng; Yan, Gui-Ying; You, Zhu-Hong; Wen, Zhenkun

    2017-01-01

    With the advance of sequencing technology and microbiology, the microorganisms have been found to be closely related to various important human diseases. The increasing identification of human microbe-disease associations offers important insights into the underlying disease mechanism understanding from the perspective of human microbes, which are greatly helpful for investigating pathogenesis, promoting early diagnosis and improving precision medicine. However, the current knowledge in this domain is still limited and far from complete. Here, we present the computational model of Path-Based Human Microbe-Disease Association prediction (PBHMDA) based on the integration of known microbe-disease associations and the Gaussian interaction profile kernel similarity for microbes and diseases. A special depth-first search algorithm was implemented to traverse all possible paths between microbes and diseases for inferring the most possible disease-related microbes. As a result, PBHMDA obtained a reliable prediction performance with AUCs (The area under ROC curve) of 0.9169 and 0.8767 in the frameworks of both global and local leave-one-out cross validations, respectively. Based on 5-fold cross validation, average AUCs of 0.9082 ± 0.0061 further demonstrated the efficiency of the proposed model. For the case studies of liver cirrhosis, type 1 diabetes, and asthma, 9, 7, and 9 out of predicted microbes in the top 10 have been confirmed by previously published experimental literatures, respectively. We have publicly released the prioritized microbe-disease associations, which may help to select the most potential pairs for further guiding the experimental confirmation. In conclusion, PBHMDA may have potential to boost the discovery of novel microbe-disease associations and aid future research efforts toward microbe involvement in human disease mechanism. The code and data of PBHMDA is freely available at http://www.escience.cn/system/file?fileId=85214.

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Assayag, Deborah; Lee, Joyce S; King, Talmadge E

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease affecting about 1% of the population. Interstitial lung disease is a serious and frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD) is characterized by several histopathologic subtypes. This article reviews the proposed pathogenesis and risk factors for RA-ILD. We also outline the important steps involved in the work-up of RA-ILD and review the evidence for treatment and prognosis.

  4. Lyme disease associated neuroretinitis - Case report.

    PubMed

    Vanya, Melinda; Fejes, Imre; Jako, Maria; Tula, Areta; Terhes, Gabriella; Janaky, Marta; Bartfai, Gyorgy

    2015-12-01

    We describe a rare case of Lyme disease complicated by unilateral neuroretinitis in the right eye. We report a case of a 27-year-old woman with blurred vision on her right eye. Because of the suspicion of optic neuritis (multiplex sclerosis) neurological examination was ordered. Surprisingly, computer tomography of the brain revealed incomplete empty sella, which generally results not monocular, but bilateral optic nerve swelling. Opthalmological examination (ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography) indicated not only monocular optic nerve, but retinal oedema next to the temporal part of the right optic disk. Visual evoked potentials (VEP) demonstrated no P100 latency delay and mild differences between the amplitudes of the responses of the left and right eye. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) demonstrated the swelling of the optic nerve head and oedematous retina at the temporal part of the disk. Suspicion of an inflammatory cause of visual disturbance blood tests was ordered. Doxycycline treatment was ordered till the result of the blood test arrived. The Western blot and ELISA test were positive for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. Following one week corticosteroide and ceftriaxone treatments, the patient displayed a clinical improvement. Unilateral neuroretinitis with optic disk swelling due to neuroborreliosis is a rare complication and in many cases it is difficult to distinguish between inflammatory and ischemic lesions. Further difficulty in the diagnosis can occur when intracranial alterations such as empty sella is demonstrated by CT examination.

  5. Inferring drug-disease associations based on known protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liang; Huang, Jianbin; Ma, Zhixin; Zhang, Jing; Zou, Yapeng; Gao, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Inferring drug-disease associations is critical in unveiling disease mechanisms, as well as discovering novel functions of available drugs, or drug repositioning. Previous work is primarily based on drug-gene-disease relationship, which throws away many important information since genes execute their functions through interacting others. To overcome this issue, we propose a novel methodology that discover the drug-disease association based on protein complexes. Firstly, the integrated heterogeneous network consisting of drugs, protein complexes, and disease are constructed, where we assign weights to the drug-disease association by using probability. Then, from the tripartite network, we get the indirect weighted relationships between drugs and diseases. The larger the weight, the higher the reliability of the correlation. We apply our method to mental disorders and hypertension, and validate the result by using comparative toxicogenomics database. Our ranked results can be directly reinforced by existing biomedical literature, suggesting that our proposed method obtains higher specificity and sensitivity. The proposed method offers new insight into drug-disease discovery. Our method is publicly available at http://1.complexdrug.sinaapp.com/Drug_Complex_Disease/Data_Download.html.

  6. Inferring drug-disease associations based on known protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Inferring drug-disease associations is critical in unveiling disease mechanisms, as well as discovering novel functions of available drugs, or drug repositioning. Previous work is primarily based on drug-gene-disease relationship, which throws away many important information since genes execute their functions through interacting others. To overcome this issue, we propose a novel methodology that discover the drug-disease association based on protein complexes. Firstly, the integrated heterogeneous network consisting of drugs, protein complexes, and disease are constructed, where we assign weights to the drug-disease association by using probability. Then, from the tripartite network, we get the indirect weighted relationships between drugs and diseases. The larger the weight, the higher the reliability of the correlation. We apply our method to mental disorders and hypertension, and validate the result by using comparative toxicogenomics database. Our ranked results can be directly reinforced by existing biomedical literature, suggesting that our proposed method obtains higher specificity and sensitivity. The proposed method offers new insight into drug-disease discovery. Our method is publicly available at http://1.complexdrug.sinaapp.com/Drug_Complex_Disease/Data_Download.html. PMID:26044949

  7. Inductive matrix completion for predicting gene–disease associations

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Nagarajan; Dhillon, Inderjit S.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Most existing methods for predicting causal disease genes rely on specific type of evidence, and are therefore limited in terms of applicability. More often than not, the type of evidence available for diseases varies—for example, we may know linked genes, keywords associated with the disease obtained by mining text, or co-occurrence of disease symptoms in patients. Similarly, the type of evidence available for genes varies—for example, specific microarray probes convey information only for certain sets of genes. In this article, we apply a novel matrix-completion method called Inductive Matrix Completion to the problem of predicting gene-disease associations; it combines multiple types of evidence (features) for diseases and genes to learn latent factors that explain the observed gene–disease associations. We construct features from different biological sources such as microarray expression data and disease-related textual data. A crucial advantage of the method is that it is inductive; it can be applied to diseases not seen at training time, unlike traditional matrix-completion approaches and network-based inference methods that are transductive. Results: Comparison with state-of-the-art methods on diseases from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database shows that the proposed approach is substantially better—it has close to one-in-four chance of recovering a true association in the top 100 predictions, compared to the recently proposed Catapult method (second best) that has <15% chance. We demonstrate that the inductive method is particularly effective for a query disease with no previously known gene associations, and for predicting novel genes, i.e. genes that are previously not linked to diseases. Thus the method is capable of predicting novel genes even for well-characterized diseases. We also validate the novelty of predictions by evaluating the method on recently reported OMIM associations and on associations recently

  8. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II ..beta..-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this ..beta..-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP ..beta..-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP ..beta..-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP..cap alpha..-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion.

  9. Association factor analysis between osteoporosis with cerebral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Eun-Sun; Jeong, Je Hoon; Lee, Bora; Im, Soo Bin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical association factors between osteoporosis and cerebral artery disease in Korean population. Two hundred nineteen postmenopausal women and men undergoing cerebral computed tomography angiography were enrolled in this study to evaluate the cerebral artery disease by cross-sectional study. Cerebral artery disease was diagnosed if there was narrowing of 50% higher diameter in one or more cerebral vessel artery or presence of vascular calcification. History of osteoporotic fracture was assessed using medical record, and radiographic data such as simple radiography, MRI, and bone scan. Bone mineral density was checked by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. We reviewed clinical characteristics in all patients and also performed subgroup analysis for total or extracranial/ intracranial cerebral artery disease group retrospectively. We performed statistical analysis by means of chi-square test or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables and Student's t-test or Wilcoxon's rank sum test for continuous variables. We also used univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the factors associated with the prevalence of cerebral artery disease. A two-tailed p-value of less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. All statistical analyses were performed using R (version 3.1.3; The R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria) and SPSS (version 14.0; SPSS, Inc, Chicago, Ill, USA). Of the 219 patients, 142 had cerebral artery disease. All vertebral fracture was observed in 29 (13.24%) patients. There was significant difference in hip fracture according to the presence or absence of cerebral artery disease. In logistic regression analysis, osteoporotic hip fracture was significantly associated with extracranial cerebral artery disease after adjusting for multiple risk factors. Females with osteoporotic hip fracture were associated with total calcified

  10. Allies and Competitors as Enscripted Audiences in Scientific Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Susan

    A set of much examined scientific papers which specifically portray a controversial topic and also manifest ally-peer and competitor-peer enscripted audiences are those written by James Watson and Francis Crick concerning their discovery of the structure of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA). The theoretical perspective of an ally-peer and…

  11. Standing "Straight" up to Homophobia: Straight Allies' Involvement in GSAs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapointe, Alicia Anne

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study captures the experiences of four straight allies' and one gay youth involvement in gay--straight alliances (GSAs) at their Ontario, Canada, high schools. Participants' motivations for becoming GSA members and their roles as allies are examined. Queer theoretical perspectives, as espoused by Britzman (1995, 1998) and Linville…

  12. A Study of Tenure among Allied Health Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'pt Holt, Timothy B.

    1991-01-01

    Responses from 47 percent of 310 deans/directors of allied health education programs revealed an average of 35.5 percent of allied health faculty achieving tenure, compared to 58.2 percent for campuses generally. Most noted a trend toward more rigorous tenure criteria. (SK)

  13. Developing Interdisciplinary Education in Allied Health Programs. Issues and Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, Tom, Jr.; Clark, Dan

    By definition allied health education operates in a dynamic environment influenced by the diciplines it represents, the educational system in which it resides, and the complexities of the health care delivery system which it serves. Well-designed and implemented interdisciplinary programs would assist allied health administrators in answering the…

  14. Factors Influencing the Ally Development of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munin, Art; Speight, Suzette L.

    2010-01-01

    Allies represent a crucial faction in the work for social justice; as members of the dominant population who advocate for the oppressed, they are important collaborators in this struggle. This qualitative inquiry investigated the ally development of 13 college students at a religiously affiliated institution in a Midwestern urban area. The…

  15. Allied Health Education Programs in Junior Colleges/1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Allied Health Manpower.

    This directory of allied health programs in junior colleges was compiled to provide a comprehensive source of allied health training programs in two-year colleges and to provide data on which to establish national, regional, State, and local priorities for health manpower education. It may also serve as a supplementary reference for guidance…

  16. Development of Articulation Models for Allied Health Statewide Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Joanne; And Others

    Under the auspices of the Kentucky Council on Higher Education and with the aim of delineating issues in allied health education and making recommendations for alleviating the issues, an in-depth, two-year study was completed in 1975. The primary recommendations pertained to the development of a statewide plan for allied health education that…

  17. Queer & Ally Youth Involvement in the Fair Wisconsin Campaign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiegler, Sam

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the role and experience of queer youth and allies in the Fair Wisconsin campaign that fought against the marriage amendment to that state's constitution. It illustrates how LGBT and ally youth involvement can be incorporated into other organizations. Following an explanation of the campaign, are narratives of two…

  18. Administrative Competencies in Education and the Allied Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Margaret K., Ed.; Canfield, Albert A., Ed.

    A 2-day conference was designed by the staff of the University of Florida Center for Allied Health Instructional Personnel to identify competencies of department chairmen, clinical supervisors, deans of schools of allied health professions, administrators or coordinators of health agencies, and educational leaders in professional or governmental…

  19. Peterson's Guide to Colleges for Careers in Allied Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson's Guides, Inc., Princeton, NJ.

    This guide contains guidelines for evaluating a career in allied health, for selecting a college. The guide profiles undergraduate programs at approximately 750 institutions of higher education in the United States. The directory is divided into five main sections. The first section offers guidelines for evaluating a career in allied health. It…

  20. Basis of Accreditation for Educational Programs in Allied Medical Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Medical Association, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Designed as a guide to accreditation for educational programs in the allied medical disciplines in Canada, this report provides educators with guidelines, general requirements and requirements for specific programs. Following information on the organization, structure, goals and terminology of accreditation of allied medical programs in Canada,…

  1. Personality Characteristics and Learning Style Preferences of Allied Health Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Rebecca

    Identifying personality types and learning style preferences of students and professionals in the allied health professions can aid college students in academic achievement and in career decision making. A literature review regarding personality types and learning style preferences of students enrolled in various allied health fields is presented.…

  2. Allied Health Core Curriculum: Its Time Has Come

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, M. LaCheeta

    2004-01-01

    There is lack of a clear definition regarding an allied health core curriculum. The Pew Health Professions Commission and the Bureau of Health Professions use the following to define a core curriculum: "A set of interdisciplinary courses, clinical training, and other educational exposures designed to provide allied health students at each level…

  3. Monoclonal gammopathy associated with heartworm disease in a dog.

    PubMed

    de Caprariis, Donato; Sasanelli, Mariateresa; Paradies, Paola; Otranto, Domenico; Lia, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    A 12-year-old, intact female, mixed Yorkshire terrier was evaluated for syncopal episodes, weakness, decreased appetite, and weight loss. Heartworm disease was diagnosed based on evidence of circulating microfilariae of Dirofilaria immitis on direct examination of blood smears and a positive SNAP heartworm antigen test. An immunoglobulin G (IgG) gammopathy, demonstrated by serum protein electrophoresis, was associated with heartworm disease in this dog. Response to treatment with both an adulticide and the microfilaricide ivermectin included remission of clinical signs and a decrease in the monoclonal gammopathy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an IgG gammopathy associated with heartworm disease in the dog.

  4. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus-Associated Disease in Feedlot Cattle.

    PubMed

    Larson, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDv) is associated with bovine respiratory disease complex and other diseases of feedlot cattle. Although occasionally a primary pathogen, BVDv's impact on cattle health is through the immunosuppressive effects of the virus and its synergism with other pathogens. The simple presence or absence of BVDv does not result in consistent health outcomes because BVDv is only one of many risk factors that contribute to disease syndromes. Current interventions have limitations and the optimum strategy for their uses to limit the health, production, and economic costs associated with BVDv have to be carefully considered for optimum cost-effectiveness.

  5. Juvenile granulosa cell tumor associated with Ollier disease

    PubMed Central

    Sampagar, Abhilasha Ashok; Jahagirdar, Rahul R.; Bafna, Vibha Sanjay; Bartakke, Sandip P.

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile granulosa cell tumor (JGCT) is a rare neoplasm of childhood. Interestingly, it is known to be associated with Ollier disease, which is a rare bone disease characterized by multiple enchondromatosis. There is paucity of literature about the co-occurence of these two conditions. However, this association is noteworthy because these two conditions share a common pathogenesis. We report a case of JGCT in a 2.5-year-old female child in which multiple enchondromas mimicking bony metastasis were an incidental finding during routine workup for tumor staging, thus leading to a diagnosis of Ollier disease. PMID:28144098

  6. Pulmonary hypertension associated with lung diseases and hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Cuttica, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary hypertension that develops in the setting of underlying lung diseases such as COPD or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is associated with decreased functional status, worsening hypoxemia and quality of life, and increased mortality. This complication of lung disease is complex in its origin and carries a unique set of diagnostic and therapeutic issues. This review attempts to provide an overview of mechanisms associated with the onset of pulmonary hypertension in COPD and IPF, touches on appropriate evaluation, and reviews the state of knowledge on treating pulmonary hypertension related to underlying lung disease.

  7. Cooccurrences of Putative Endogenous Retrovirus-Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Emmer, Alexander; Kornhuber, Malte E.

    2017-01-01

    At least 8% of the human genome is composed of endogenous retrovirus (ERV) sequences. ERVs play a role in placental morphogenesis and can sometimes protect the host against exogenous viruses. On the other hand, ERV reactivation has been found to be associated with different diseases, for example, multiple sclerosis (MS), schizophrenia, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D), or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Little is known about the cooccurrence of these diseases. If all these diseases are caused by ERV, antiretroviral therapy should perhaps also show some effects in the other diseases. Here, we summarize literature demonstrating that some ERV-associated diseases seem to appear together more often than expected, for example, MS and ALS, MS and T1D, MS and schizophrenia, or ALS and T1D. In contrast, some ERV-associated diseases seem to appear together less frequently than expected, for example, schizophrenia and T1D. Besides, some reports demonstrate amelioration of MS, ALS, or schizophrenia under antiretroviral therapy in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. If such results could be confirmed in larger studies, alternative therapy strategies for ERV-associated diseases like MS and schizophrenia might be possible. PMID:28326328

  8. Genetic variants associated with neurodegenerative Alzheimer disease in natural models.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Claudia; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Ardiles, Álvaro O; Ewer, John; Palacios, Adrián G

    2016-02-26

    The use of transgenic models for the study of neurodegenerative diseases has made valuable contributions to the field. However, some important limitations, including protein overexpression and general systemic compensation for the missing genes, has caused researchers to seek natural models that show the main biomarkers of neurodegenerative diseases during aging. Here we review some of these models-most of them rodents, focusing especially on the genetic variations in biomarkers for Alzheimer diseases, in order to explain their relationships with variants associated with the occurrence of the disease in humans.

  9. Association between celiac disease and chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Giovanni; Viganò, Davide; Romano Settanni, Carlo; Morelli, Olivia; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Baldini, Vittorio; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is characterized by a gluten-induced damage of the small bowel in sensitive individuals that may cause malabsorption. Non-intestinal inflammatory diseases may trigger immunologic gluten intolerance in susceptible people and the HCV virus may be considered as a suitable candidate. Interferon therapy could precipitate symptom onset in subjects with silent celiac disease. In fact, symptoms such as diarrhea, anemia, and weight loss may occur during interferon therapy and are associated with serological positivity of anti-tranglutaminase antibodies. To date, considering the available literature data, it is very difficult to support a firm association between HCV chronic hepatitis and celiac disease. Thus, such a serological screening in HCV patients before starting interferon therapy should not be recommended. However, serology for celiac disease must be considered in patients who develop diarrhea and/or weight loss during such therapy. PMID:27458507

  10. Carpal tunnel syndrome associated with Kienböck disease

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Takaaki; Nakamura, Ryogo; Nakao, Etsuhiro; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We retrospectively reviewed 12 patients (3 men and 9 women, with a mean age of 72 years) who were surgically treated for carpal tunnel syndrome associated with Kienböck disease. All patients except 1 were incidentally diagnosed with Kienböck disease and had little or no wrist pain. Radiographic tests revealed advanced Kienböck disease in all patients. Intraoperative findings indicated that the site of maximum compression on the median nerve was located at the level of the carpal tunnel inlet in 11 patients, and the volar dislocated fragment of the lunate was located proximally adjacent to the floor of the carpal tunnel inlet. This disorder is most prevalent in elderly women, and even advanced Kienböck disease can present without wrist pain. Our findings suggest that palmar protrusion of the lunate may be the primary cause of carpal tunnel syndrome associated with Kienböck disease. PMID:27578910

  11. The spectrum of nephrocutaneous diseases and associations: Inflammatory and medication-related nephrocutaneous associations.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Vanessa L; Fenves, Andrew Z; Wofford, Jay; Jackson, J Mark; Menter, Alan; Kimball, Alexandra Boer

    2016-02-01

    There are a significant number of dermatoses associated with renal abnormalities and disease, and dermatologists need to be keenly aware of their presence in order to avoid overlooking important skin conditions with potentially devastating renal complications. This review discusses important nephrocutaneous disease associations and recommendations for the appropriate urgency of referral to nephrology colleagues for diagnosis, surveillance, and early management of potential renal sequelae. Part II of this 2-part continuing medical education article addresses inflammatory and medication-related nephrocutaneous associations.

  12. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma associated with Gaucher's disease.

    PubMed

    Perales, M; Cervantes, F; Cobo, F; Montserrat, E

    1998-11-01

    Gaucher's disease is an uncommon disorder which has been reported to be associated with an increased risk of lymphoproliferative disorders, including Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). A new instance of such an association is described here. This was a 58 year-old-patient with adult type I Gaucher's disease who, one and a half year after the above diagnosis, presented with supraclavicular lymphadenopathy, massive splenomegaly, prominent retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy and increased serum LDH levels. This led to the diagnosis of large-cell NHL of B-cell type, successfully treated with chemotherapy. The previously published cases of Gaucher's disease associated with NHL as well as the possible mechanisms leading to this association are reviewed here.

  13. Discovering disease-disease associations by fusing systems-level molecular data.

    PubMed

    Žitnik, Marinka; Janjić, Vuk; Larminie, Chris; Zupan, Blaž; Pržulj, Nataša

    2013-11-15

    The advent of genome-scale genetic and genomic studies allows new insight into disease classification. Recently, a shift was made from linking diseases simply based on their shared genes towards systems-level integration of molecular data. Here, we aim to find relationships between diseases based on evidence from fusing all available molecular interaction and ontology data. We propose a multi-level hierarchy of disease classes that significantly overlaps with existing disease classification. In it, we find 14 disease-disease associations currently not present in Disease Ontology and provide evidence for their relationships through comorbidity data and literature curation. Interestingly, even though the number of known human genetic interactions is currently very small, we find they are the most important predictor of a link between diseases. Finally, we show that omission of any one of the included data sources reduces prediction quality, further highlighting the importance in the paradigm shift towards systems-level data fusion.

  14. Collaborative Research in Allied Health. Proceedings of Collaborative Research in Allied Health Symposium, 1986 (Columbus, Ohio, September 18, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, M. Rosita, Ed.; And Others

    The following papers are included: "Collaborative Research: Lessons from the Tower of Babel" (Baldwin); "Establishing a Data Base for Intrainstitutional Research in the Allied Health Professions" (Von Son, Beiley); "Determining Research Needs in a School of Allied Health Professions" (Bottjen et al.); "Surveying Research Interests and Needs of…

  15. Spatial prevalence and associations among respiratory diseases in Maine.

    PubMed

    Farah, Christopher; Hosgood, H Dean; Hock, Janet M

    2014-10-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases rank among the leading global disease burdens. Maine's respiratory disease prevalence exceeds the US average, despite limited urbanization/industrialization. To provide insight into potential etiologic factors among this unique, rural population, we analyzed the spatial distributions of, and potential associations among asthma, COPD, pneumonia, and URI adult outpatient data (n=47,099) from all outpatient transactions (n=5,052,900) in 2009 for Maine hospitals and affiliate clinics, using spatial scan statistic, geographic weighted regression (GWR), and a Delaunay graph algorithm. Non-random high prevalence regions were identified, the majority of which (84% of the population underlying all regions) exhibited clusters for all four respiratory diseases. GWR provided further evidence of spatial correlation (R(2)=0.991) between the communicable and noncommunicable diseases under investigation, suggesting spatial interdependence in risk. Sensitivity analyses of known respiratory disease risks did not fully explain our results. Prospective epidemiology studies are needed to clarify all contributors to risk.

  16. Associations between periodontitis and systemic inflammatory diseases: response to treatment.

    PubMed

    El-Shinnawi, Una; Soory, Mena

    2013-09-01

    There is a significant prevalence of subjects with periodontitis presenting with other inflammatory conditions such as coronary heart disease, insulin resistance and arthritis. This pattern of disease presentation underscores the importance of inflammatory loading from chronic diseases, in driving their pathogeneses in a multidirectional manner. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and other agents play an important role in this process; for example, a single nucleotide polymorphism of the TNF-α gene is associated with significant periodontal attachment loss in patients with coronary heart disease. Changes in gene expression associated with inflammation and lipid metabolism in response to oral infection with the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) have been demonstrated in mouse models, independent of the demonstration of atherosclerotic lesions. Insulin resistance is considered to be a chronic low-grade inflammatory condition, associated with altered glucose tolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, central obesity and coronary heart disease. It is accompanied by elevated levels of IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α also relevant to the progression of periodontitis. There is evidence that uncontrolled periodontal disease contributes to maintenance of systemic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with increased risk of periodontitis in subjects with RA. The periodontal pathogen Pg is significant in contributing to citrullination of proteins resulting in immune dysregulation and autoimmune responses, seen in RA. However, they are both multifactorial chronic diseases with complex etiopathogeneses that affect their presentation. Consistent but weak associations are seen for surrogate markers of periodontitis such as tooth loss, with multiple systemic conditions. Effective treatment of periodontitis would be important in reducing systemic inflammatory loading from chronic local inflammation and in achieving systemic health. Lack of a consistent cause and effect relationship

  17. Symbiodinium associations with diseased and healthy scleractinian corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, A. M. S.; Brandt, M. E.; Smith, T. B.; Thornhill, D. J.; Baker, A. C.

    2009-06-01

    Despite recent advances in identifying the causative agents of disease in corals and understanding the impact of epizootics on reef communities, little is known regarding the interactions among diseases, corals, and their dinoflagellate endosymbionts ( Symbiodinium spp.). Since the genotypes of both corals and their resident Symbiodinium contribute to colony-level phenotypes, such as thermotolerance, symbiont genotypes might also contribute to the resistance or susceptibility of coral colonies to disease. To explore this, Symbiodinium were identified using the internal transcribed spacer-2 region of ribosomal DNA from diseased and healthy tissues within individual coral colonies infected with black band disease (BB), dark spot syndrome (DSS), white plague disease (WP), or yellow blotch disease (YB) in the Florida Keys (USA) and the US Virgin Islands. Most of the diseased colonies sampled contained B1, B5a, or C1 (depending on host species), while apparently healthy colonies of the same coral species frequently hosted these types and/or additional symbiont diversity. No potentially “parasitic” Symbiodinium types, uniquely associated with diseased coral tissue, were detected. Within most individual colonies, the same dominant Symbiodinium type was detected in diseased and visually healthy tissues. These data indicate that specific Symbiodinium types are not correlated with the infected tissues of diseased colonies and that DSS and WP onset do not trigger symbiont shuffling within infected tissues. However, few diseased colonies contained clade D symbionts suggesting a negative correlation between hosting Symbiodinium clade D and disease incidence in scleractinian corals. Understanding the influence of Symbiodinium diversity on colony phenotypes may play a critical role in predicting disease resistance and susceptibility in scleractinian corals.

  18. Network analysis of genes and their association with diseases.

    PubMed

    Kontou, Panagiota I; Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Dimou, Niki L; Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Bagos, Pantelis G

    2016-09-15

    A plethora of network-based approaches within the Systems Biology universe have been applied, to date, to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms of various human diseases. In the present study, we perform a bipartite, topological and clustering graph analysis in order to gain a better understanding of the relationships between human genetic diseases and the relationships between the genes that are implicated in them. For this purpose, disease-disease and gene-gene networks were constructed from combined gene-disease association networks. The latter, were created by collecting and integrating data from three diverse resources, each one with different content covering from rare monogenic disorders to common complex diseases. This data pluralism enabled us to uncover important associations between diseases with unrelated phenotypic manifestations but with common genetic origin. For our analysis, the topological attributes and the functional implications of the individual networks were taken into account and are shortly discussed. We believe that some observations of this study could advance our understanding regarding the etiology of a disease with distinct pathological manifestations, and simultaneously provide the springboard for the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies and its underlying genetic mechanisms.

  19. Ischemic retinopathy associated with Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Rubens Camargo; Kaiser Junior, Roberto Luiz; Ruiz, Lilian Piron; Ruiz, Milton Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of a patient with ischemic retinopathy associated with Crohn’s disease. Case report This report presents a case of a 28-year-old female patient with Crohn’s disease and sudden decrease of visual acuity in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, and multifocal electroretinography confirmed the clinical features of ischemic retinopathy. After systemic corticosteroid treatment, the patient developed epiretinal membrane without significant improvement in visual acuity. Discussion The patient presented with ischemic retinopathy associated with Crohn’s disease with deficiency of central visual acuity. Periodic examination by a retina specialist is recommended for patients being treated for Crohn’s disease. PMID:27524921

  20. Characterization of disease-associated N-linked glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Hui

    2013-02-01

    N-linked glycoproteins play important roles in biological processes, including cell-to-cell recognition, growth, differentiation, and programmed cell death. Specific N-linked glycoprotein changes are associated with disease progression and identification of these N-linked glycoproteins has potential for use in disease diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of treatments. In this review, we summarize common strategies for N-linked glycoprotein characterization and applications of these strategies to identification of glycoprotein changes associated with disease states. We also review the N-linked glycoproteins altered in diseases such as breast cancer, lung cancer, and prostate cancer. Although assays for these glycoproteins have potential clinical utility, research is needed to translate these glycoproteins to clinical biomarkers.

  1. Inflammatory bowel disease associated neoplasia: A surgeon’s perspective

    PubMed Central

    Althumairi, Azah A; Lazarev, Mark G; Gearhart, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The risk is known to increase with longer duration of the disease, family history of CRC, and history of primary sclerosing cholangitis. The diagnosis of the neoplastic changes associated with IBD is difficult owing to the heterogeneous endoscopic appearance and inter-observer variability of the pathological diagnosis. Screening and surveillance guidelines have been established which aim for early detection of neoplasia. Several surgical options are available for the treatment of IBD-associated neoplasia. Patients’ morbidities, risk factors for CRC, degree and the extent of neoplasia must be considered in choosing the surgical treatment. A multidisciplinary team including the surgeon, gastroenterologist, pathologist, and the patient who has a clear understanding of the nature of their disease is needed to optimize outcomes. PMID:26811640

  2. Yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Roger E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess those published cases of yellow fever (YF) vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease that meet the Brighton Collaboration criteria and to assess the safety of YF vaccine with respect to viscerotropic disease. Literature search Ten electronic databases were searched with no restriction of date or language and reference lists of retrieved articles. Methods All abstracts and titles were independently read by two reviewers and data independently entered by two reviewers. Results All serious adverse events that met the Brighton Classification criteria were associated with first YF vaccinations. Sixty-two published cases (35 died) met the Brighton Collaboration viscerotropic criteria, with 32 from the US, six from Brazil, five from Peru, three from Spain, two from the People’s Republic of China, one each from Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Ecuador, France, Germany, Ireland, New Zealand, Portugal, and the UK, and four with no country stated. Two cases met both the viscerotropic and YF vaccine-associated neurologic disease criteria. Seventy cases proposed by authors as viscerotropic disease did not meet any Brighton Collaboration viscerotropic level of diagnostic certainty or any YF vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease causality criteria (37 died). Conclusion Viscerotropic disease is rare in the published literature and in pharmacovigilance databases. All published cases were from developing countries. Because the symptoms are usually very severe and life threatening, it is unlikely that cases would not come to medical attention (but might not be published). Because viscerotropic disease has a highly predictable pathologic course, it is likely that viscerotropic disease post-YF vaccine occurs in low-income countries with the same incidence as in developing countries. YF vaccine is a very safe vaccine that likely confers lifelong immunity. PMID:27784992

  3. Genome-Wide Association Studies and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of the human genome has opened up many opportunities to learn about our own genetic susceptibilities to disease. In this Foreword to this issue of Seminars in Liver Disease, I provide some required background to understanding genome-wide association analyses in general, including a list of terms (Table 1) often used in such studies. Five areas of particular significance are then reviewed in detail in the articles that follow. PMID:26676811

  4. Von Hippel's disease in association with von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J V; Schwartz, P L; Gragoudas, E S

    1978-01-01

    Ten members of a large family who showed manifestations of either von Hippel-Lindau disease or von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis were examined. Three of 10 members were found to have retinal angiomas which had not been present on fundus examination 3 years previously. These angiomas were associated with ocular and systemic signs of neurofibromatosis. These cases show overlapping manifestations of different phakomatoses and provide support for the concept of a common aetiology for these diseases. Images PMID:101230

  5. An oral ulceration associated with Morgellons disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Grosskopf, Courtney; Desai, Bhavik; Stoopler, Eric T

    2011-08-01

    Morgellons disease is a psycho-dermatologic condition in which patients report fibers or filaments "growing" out of their skin. This case report highlights an oral ulceration in a young woman associated with Morgellons disease, a condition that has not been previously described in the dental literature. An increasing number of individuals are self-reporting this condition and oral health care providers must be familiar with this disorder.

  6. Factors affecting allied health faculty job satisfaction: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Romig, Barbara; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie; Denmark, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    Evidence in the literature suggests job satisfaction can make a difference in keeping qualified workers on the job, but little research has been conducted focusing specifically on allied health faculty. In order to attract and retain top quality faculty, colleges and universities should understand the variables impacting faculty satisfaction and develop a plan to enhance satisfaction. An integrative literature review (CINHAL, ERIC, Journal of Allied Health, Chronicle of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, and current books on job satisfaction) of faculty job satisfaction and dissatisfaction produced a variety of publications presenting the key determinants of job satisfaction by allied health faculty in the United States. The purpose of the analysis was to examine the various factors that influence job satisfaction, especially by allied health faculty, in institutions of higher education in the U.S. The procedure used for this analysis consisted of reviewing allied health and higher education faculty studies to identify factors influencing job satisfaction, research questions, sample size reported, instruments used for measurement of job satisfaction, and job satisfaction results. While the theoretical models of allied health and higher education faculty job satisfaction exist separately in the literature, their remarkable similarities permit the prospect of a contemporary framework of the essential components of job satisfaction. Potential opportunities for continuing research on the personal and professional variables impacting job satisfaction of allied health faculty and similar disciplines are presented.

  7. Research culture in allied health: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Donna; McKinstry, Carol; Cotchett, Matthew; Williams, Cylie; Haines, Terry

    2016-06-07

    Research evidence is required to guide optimal allied health practice and inform policymakers in primary health care. Factors that influence a positive research culture are not fully understood, and nor is the impact of a positive research culture on allied health professionals. The aim of this systematic review was to identify factors that affect allied health research culture and capacity. An extensive search of 11 databases was conducted in June 2015. Studies were included if they were published in English, had full-text availability and reported research findings relating to allied health professions. Study quality was evaluated using the McMaster Critical Review Forms. Fifteen studies were eligible for inclusion. A meta-analysis was not performed because of heterogeneity between studies. Allied health professionals perceive that their individual research skills are lower in comparison to their teams and organisation. Motivators for conducting research for allied health professionals include developing skills, increasing job satisfaction and career advancement. Barriers include a lack of time, limited research skills and other work roles taking priority. Multilayered strategies, such as collaborations with external partners and developing research leadership positions, aimed at addressing barriers and enablers, are important to enhance allied health research culture and capacity.

  8. Membranous Nephropathy Associated With Immunological Disorder-Related Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dauvergne, Maxime; Moktefi, Anissa; Rabant, Marion; Vigneau, Cécile; Kofman, Tomek; Burtey, Stephane; Corpechot, Christophe; Stehlé, Thomas; Desvaux, Dominique; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Rouvier, Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Frouget, Thierry; Daugas, Eric; Jablonski, Mathieu; Dahan, Karine; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Remy, Philippe; Grimbert, Philippe; Lang, Philippe; Chazouilleres, Oliver; Sahali, Dil; Audard, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The association between membranous nephropathy (MN) and immunological disorder-related liver disease has not been extensively investigated, and the specific features of this uncommon association, if any, remain to be determined. We retrospectively identified 10 patients with this association. We aimed to describe the clinical, biological, and pathological characteristics of these patients and their therapeutic management. The possible involvement of the phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) in these apparent secondary forms of MN was assessed by immunohistochemistry with renal and liver biopsy specimens. The mean delay between MN and liver disease diagnoses was 3.9 years and the interval between the diagnosis of the glomerular and liver diseases was <1.5 years in 5 patients. MN was associated with a broad spectrum of liver diseases including primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). AIH whether isolated (n = 3) or associated with PBC (n = 2) or PSC (n = 2) was the most frequent autoimmune liver disease. Circulating PLA2R antibodies were detected in 4 out of 9 patients but the test was performed under specific immunosuppressive treatment in 3 out of 9 patients. Seven of the 9 patients with available renal tissue specimens displayed enhanced expression of PLA2R in glomeruli whereas PLA2R was not expressed in liver parenchyma from these patients or in normal liver tissue. The study of immunoglobulin (Ig) subclasses of deposits in glomeruli revealed that the most frequent pattern was the coexistence of IgG1 and IgG4 immune deposits with IgG4 predominating. Detection of PLA2R antibodies in glomeruli but not in liver parenchyma is a common finding in patients with MN associated with autoimmune liver disease, suggesting that these autoantibodies are not exclusively detected in idiopathic MN. PMID:26222864

  9. Association between Polymorphisms in Antioxidant Genes and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Rosa; Grácio, Daniela; Silva, Marco; Peixoto, Armando; Lago, Paula; Pereira, Márcia; Catarino, Telmo; Pinho, Salomé; Teixeira, João Paulo; Macedo, Guilherme; Annese, Vito

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation is the driving force in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and its link to oxidative stress and carcinogenesis has long been accepted. The antioxidant system of the intestinal mucosa in IBD is compromised resulting in increased oxidative injury. This defective antioxidant system may be the result of genetic variants in antioxidant genes, which can represent susceptibility factors for IBD, namely Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the antioxidant genes SOD2 (rs4880) and GPX1 (rs1050450) were genotyped in a Portuguese population comprising 436 Crohn’s disease and 367 ulcerative colitis patients, and 434 healthy controls. We found that the AA genotype in GPX1 is associated with ulcerative colitis (OR = 1.93, adjusted P-value = 0.037). Moreover, we found nominal significant associations between SOD2 and Crohn’s disease susceptibility and disease subphenotypes but these did not withstand the correction for multiple testing. These findings indicate a possible link between disease phenotypes and antioxidant genes. These results suggest a potential role for antioxidant genes in IBD pathogenesis and should be considered in future association studies. PMID:28052094

  10. Mitochondrial Haplotypes Associated with Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, Perry G.; Koop, Andre; Maxwell, Taylor J.; Bailey, Matthew H.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Kauwe, John S. K.; Honea, Robyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Various studies have suggested that the mitochondrial genome plays a role in late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, although results are mixed. We used an endophenotype-based approach to further characterize mitochondrial genetic variation and its relationship to risk markers for Alzheimer’s disease. We analyzed longitudinal data from non-demented, mild cognitive impairment, and late-onset Alzheimer’s disease participants in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative with genetic, brain imaging, and behavioral data. We assessed the relationship of structural MRI and cognitive biomarkers with mitochondrial genome variation using TreeScanning, a haplotype-based approach that concentrates statistical power by analyzing evolutionarily meaningful groups (or clades) of haplotypes together for association with a phenotype. Four clades were associated with three different endophenotypes: whole brain volume, percent change in temporal pole thickness, and left hippocampal atrophy over two years. This is the first study of its kind to identify mitochondrial variation associated with brain imaging endophenotypes of Alzheimer’s disease. Our results provide additional evidence that the mitochondrial genome plays a role in risk for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:24040196

  11. Association between Polymorphisms in Antioxidant Genes and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Costa Pereira, Cristiana; Durães, Cecília; Coelho, Rosa; Grácio, Daniela; Silva, Marco; Peixoto, Armando; Lago, Paula; Pereira, Márcia; Catarino, Telmo; Pinho, Salomé; Teixeira, João Paulo; Macedo, Guilherme; Annese, Vito; Magro, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation is the driving force in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and its link to oxidative stress and carcinogenesis has long been accepted. The antioxidant system of the intestinal mucosa in IBD is compromised resulting in increased oxidative injury. This defective antioxidant system may be the result of genetic variants in antioxidant genes, which can represent susceptibility factors for IBD, namely Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the antioxidant genes SOD2 (rs4880) and GPX1 (rs1050450) were genotyped in a Portuguese population comprising 436 Crohn's disease and 367 ulcerative colitis patients, and 434 healthy controls. We found that the AA genotype in GPX1 is associated with ulcerative colitis (OR = 1.93, adjusted P-value = 0.037). Moreover, we found nominal significant associations between SOD2 and Crohn's disease susceptibility and disease subphenotypes but these did not withstand the correction for multiple testing. These findings indicate a possible link between disease phenotypes and antioxidant genes. These results suggest a potential role for antioxidant genes in IBD pathogenesis and should be considered in future association studies.

  12. Characterization of Disease-Associated Mutations in Human Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, János; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane protein coding genes are commonly associated with human diseases. We characterized disease causing mutations and natural polymorphisms in transmembrane proteins by mapping missense genetic variations from the UniProt database on the transmembrane protein topology listed in the Human Transmembrane Proteome database. We found characteristic differences in the spectrum of amino acid changes within transmembrane regions: in the case of disease associated mutations the non-polar to non-polar and non-polar to charged amino acid changes are equally frequent. In contrast, in the case of natural polymorphisms non-polar to charged amino acid changes are rare while non-polar to non-polar changes are common. The majority of disease associated mutations result in glycine to arginine and leucine to proline substitutions. Mutations to positively charged amino acids are more common in the center of the lipid bilayer, where they cause more severe structural and functional anomalies. Our analysis contributes to the better understanding of the effect of disease associated mutations in transmembrane proteins, which can help prioritize genetic variations in personal genomic investigations. PMID:26986070

  13. A case of Amyopathic Dermatomyositis associated with Interstitial Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Ugan, Y; Sahin, M; Dogru, A; Bayram, D; Ceyhan, A M; Tunc, S E

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory myopathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases with unknown etiology characterized by inflammation of the skeletal muscles and proximal muscle weakness. Dermatomyositis (DM) is an idiopathic inflammatory myopathy with characteristic cutaneous findings such as heliotrope rash, Gottron's sign, Gottron's papules, shawl sign and machinist hand. Amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM) is a rare but well-recognized clinical subtype of DM, constituting aproximately 10-20% of patients with this disease. It generally manifests only pathognomonic skin findings without clinical and laboratory evidence of muscle involvement. In this report, we present a rare case of ADM associated with interstitial pulmonary disease.

  14. [Liver disease associated with hereditary defects of hepatobiliary transporters].

    PubMed

    Wendum, Dominique

    2010-12-01

    The identification of biliary tranporters has enhanced our understanding of bile formation and some liver diseases. In this review, we first describe the main hepatobiliary transporters and their function. Then, some liver diseases related to mutations of biliary tranporters (FIC1/ATP8B1, BSEP/ABCB11, MDR3 /ABCB4 and MRP2/ABCC2) will be described with a focus on the pathological aspects. These diseases include progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC), benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC), intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, Dubin-Johnson's syndrome and low phospholipid associated cholelithiasis (LPAC).

  15. Problems associated with fluid biomarkers for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nyhlén, Jakob; Constantinescu, Radu; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2010-10-01

    This article focuses on biochemical markers that may be used in the diagnostics of Parkinson's disease and associated disorders, and to identify early cases and stratify patients into subgroups. We present an updated account of some currently available candidate fluid biomarkers, and discuss their diagnostic performance and limitations. We also discuss some of the general problems with Parkinson's disease biomarkers and possible ways of moving forward. It may be concluded that a diagnostically useful fluid biomarker for Parkinson's disease is yet to be identified. However, some interesting candidates exist and may prove useful in the future, alone or when analyzed together in patterns.

  16. Oral lesions associated with human immunodeficiency virus disease.

    PubMed

    Patton, Lauren L

    2013-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated oral disease among people living with HIV infection includes oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, oral warts, herpes simplex virus ulcers, major aphthous ulcers or ulcers not otherwise specified, HIV salivary gland disease, and atypical gingival and periodontal diseases. Diagnosis of some oral lesions is based on clinical appearance and behavior, whereas others require biopsy, culture, or imaging for definitive diagnosis. Management strategies including pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches are discussed in this article. Dentists also need to be cognizant of the potential oral side effects of HIV antiretroviral medications.

  17. Hyperparathyroidism and thyroid disease. A study of their association

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffer, S.S.; Szpunar, W.E.; Block, M.

    1982-06-01

    The incidence of hyperparathyroidism was prospectively evaluated in a group of patients with thyroid disease, and the incidence of thyroid disease was retrospectively evaluated in a group of patients specifically referred for evaluation of hyperparathyroidism. Hyperparathyroidism was ten times more frequent in thyroid patients than expected in a general medical population and was especially prevalent in patients with nodular goiter. The incidence of thyroid disease in patients with hyperparathyroidism was 38.8%. Although radiation therapy was shown to be a factor in these associations, it alone could not explain the observed frequency.

  18. Improving health services in developing countries with new types of public and allied health personnel.

    PubMed

    Blayney, K D; Trulove, J W

    1982-10-01

    Allied health manpower in developing countries should be able to serve the specific needs of these countries in solving malnutrition, diarrheal disease, and other health problems. Disease patterns tend to evolve in stages with each stage requiring a special type of health manpower: 1) the 1st stage where infectious diseases are linked to poverty, malnutrition, and poor personal hygiene for which personnel trained to improve health through providing safe water supplies, improving sanitation, and immunizing the population are needed; 2) in the 2nd stages, diseases such as cancer, arthritis, and cardiac diseases exist, requiring extensive technology such as is available in the US; and 3) the 3rd stage relates to an awareness of health hazards (caused by the environment, by the lifestyle dysfunctions of the society, and an emphasis on health promotion) and implies a responsibility for one's own health by the individual; this is a difficult stage to apply to developing countries since the ability to bring about change assumes literacy on the part of the population which is not always the case. Since most developing countries need to cause change in the 1st stage, more public health personnel such as sanitarians and generalist workers are needed. Training of these personnel should include on-the-job education; traditionally trained US allied health professionals are not always equipped to deal with health problems in developing countries. Health educators should look to the lessons learned by the US in the allied health movement: 1) the system of control that national membership organizations have over schooling and the job environment has contributed to an increased cost of health care delivery, unnecessary prolonged curricula, overspecialization, extreme protectionism for membership, and inappropriate fractionalization of health care delivery; 2) the emphasis on prolonged curricula sometimes causes the student to lose sight of the supposed direct relationship between

  19. Comments on a special issue of the Journal of Allied Health.

    PubMed

    Elwood, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 Annual Conference of the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP) will be conducted in Charlotte, North Carolina, on October 20-22. The theme for this event is "Through an Interdisciplinary Looking Glass: Achieving Quality Outcomes through Research, Education, and Practice." Although the terms interdisciplinary and interprofessional differ from one another, they are close enough to justify an intent to have copies of this special issue of the Journal prepared and distributed in advance of the conference.

  20. Oxytocin modulates selection of allies in intergroup conflict.

    PubMed

    De Dreu, Carsten K W; Greer, Lindred L; Handgraaf, Michel J J; Shalvi, Shaul; Van Kleef, Gerben A

    2012-03-22

    In intergroup competition and conflict, humans benefit from coalitions with strong partners who help them to protect their in-group and prevail over competing out-groups. Here, we link oxytocin, a neuropeptide produced in the hypothalamus, to ally selection in intergroup competition. In a double-blind placebo-controlled experiment, males self-administered oxytocin or placebo, and made selection decisions about six high-threat and six low-threat targets as potential allies in intergroup competition. Males given oxytocin rather than placebo viewed high-threat targets as more useful allies and more frequently selected them into their team than low-threat targets.

  1. Influencers of career choice among allied health students.

    PubMed

    Brown-West, A P

    1991-01-01

    This study focused on the factors that influence students' choice of an allied health profession. A survey of 153 students in three allied health programs at the University of Connecticut revealed that "the need to help others," "prestige," "professional autonomy," "opportunities for advancement," "income potential," and "the effect of the specialty on family and personal life," were the major influencers of career choice among allied health students. Only a few students regarded malpractice suits and AIDS as negative influencers. While medical laboratory science majors regarded these as important factors, dietetics and physical therapy majors did not. The article suggests further use of these findings by program directors and career counselors.

  2. Measuring heterosexual LGBT ally development: a Rasch analysis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Peter; Fujimoto, Ken

    2013-01-01

    An instrument was developed that measured heterosexual persons' level of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) ally identity. Using a Rasch analysis, 2 dimensions were observed: (a) internal and interpersonal and (b) activity. Persons with high levels of LGBT ally identities endorsed items about having LGBT knowledge, attitudes, and skills; having interpersonal experiences with LGBT communities; and including LGBT ally as part of their identities. The instrument met criteria for the content, substantive, structural, generalizability, and responsiveness validity. The instrument can be used to assist persons to develop their abilities to support and advocate for equality for LGBT communities.

  3. The photosynthetic capacity in 35 ferns and fern allies: mesophyll CO2 diffusion as a key trait.

    PubMed

    Tosens, Tiina; Nishida, Keisuke; Gago, Jorge; Coopman, Rafael Eduardo; Cabrera, Hernán Marino; Carriquí, Marc; Laanisto, Lauri; Morales, Loreto; Nadal, Miquel; Rojas, Roke; Talts, Eero; Tomas, Magdalena; Hanba, Yuko; Niinemets, Ülo; Flexas, Jaume

    2016-03-01

    Ferns and fern allies have low photosynthetic rates compared with seed plants. Their photosynthesis is thought to be limited principally by physical CO2 diffusion from the atmosphere to chloroplasts. The aim of this study was to understand the reasons for low photosynthesis in species of ferns and fern allies (Lycopodiopsida and Polypodiopsida). We performed a comprehensive assessment of the foliar gas-exchange and mesophyll structural traits involved in photosynthetic function for 35 species of ferns and fern allies. Additionally, the leaf economics spectrum (the interrelationships between photosynthetic capacity and leaf/frond traits such as leaf dry mass per unit area or nitrogen content) was tested. Low mesophyll conductance to CO2 was the main cause for low photosynthesis in ferns and fern allies, which, in turn, was associated with thick cell walls and reduced chloroplast distribution towards intercellular mesophyll air spaces. Generally, the leaf economics spectrum in ferns follows a trend similar to that in seed plants. Nevertheless, ferns and allies had less nitrogen per unit DW than seed plants (i.e. the same slope but a different intercept) and lower photosynthesis rates per leaf mass area and per unit of nitrogen.

  4. Epigenome-Wide Association Studies for common human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rakyan, Vardhman K.; Down, Thomas A.; Balding, David J.; Beck, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Despite the success of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in identifying loci associated with common diseases, a significant proportion of the causality remains unexplained. Recent advances in genomic technologies have placed us in a position to initiate large-scale studies of human disease-associated epigenetic variation, specifically variation in DNA methylation (DNAm). Such Epigenome-Wide Association Studies (EWAS) present novel opportunities but also create new challenges that are not encountered in GWAS. We discuss EWAS study design, cohort and sample selections, statistical significance and power, confounding factors, and follow-up studies. We also discuss how integration of EWAS with GWAS can help to dissect complex GWAS haplotypes for functional analysis. PMID:21747404

  5. Hypokinesia of associated movement in Parkinson's disease: a symptom in early stages of the disease.

    PubMed

    Hoshiyama, M; Kaneoke, Y; Koike, Y; Takahashi, A; Watanabe, S

    1994-08-01

    We compared the degrees of impairment between intended voluntary movement and its simultaneous automatic associated movement in Parkinson's disease (PD). We studied wrist dorsiflexion as a movement associated with grip in 20 patients with PD and in 20 normal controls. The patients showed a significantly smaller dorsiflexion as compared with the controls. The decrease in associated movement was related to the severity of clinical stage of the disease, while gripping was performed well in each stage. The temporal relationship between grip and associated movement was the same for both groups of subjects. The patients showed no disturbance of amplitude or velocity for a single motor act of wrist dorsiflexion. Persons with PD have a greater reduction of automatic associated movement than intended voluntary movement. This may be one of the bases of clinical symptoms of PD patients in early stages of the disease.

  6. Association between polychlorinated biphenyls and Parkinson’s disease neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher-Martin, Jaime M.; Gearing, Marla; Steenland, Kyle; Levey, Allan I.; Miller, Gary W.; Pennell, Kurt D.

    2012-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are synthetic chemicals primarily used as coolants and insulators in electrical equipment. Although banned for several decades, PCBs continue to exist in the environment because of their long half-life, continued presence in items produced before the ban, and poor disposal practices. Epidemiological and experimental studies have identified exposure to PCBs as a potential risk factor for Parkinson’s disease, perhaps more so in females. The objective of this work was to examine the association between PCB levels in post-mortem human brain tissue and the diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, as well as the degree of nigral depigmentation. We also sought to determine if this association was more significant when patients were stratified by sex. Post-mortem brain samples from control patients and those diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease were obtained from the Emory University Brain Bank and from the Nun Study. Concentrations of eight prevalent PCB congeners were extracted from post-mortem brain tissue and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. PCB congeners 153 and 180 were significantly elevated in the brains of Parkinson’s disease patients. When stratified by sex, the female Parkinson’s disease group demonstrated significantly elevated concentrations of total PCBs and specifically congeners 138, 153, and 180 compared to controls, whereas PCB concentrations in males were not significantly different between control and Parkinson’s disease groups. In a separate population of women (Nun Study) who had no clinical signs or symptoms of PD, elevated concentrations total PCB and congeners 138, 153 and 180 were also observed in post-mortem brain tissue exhibiting moderate nigral depigmentation compared to subjects with mild or no depigmentation. These quantitative data demonstrate an association between brain PCB levels and Parkinson’s disease-related pathology. Furthermore, these data support epidemiological and

  7. Pneumonitis associated with occult heartworm disease in dogs.

    PubMed

    Calvert, C A; Losonsky, J M

    1985-05-15

    Nine of 69 dogs with occult heartworm disease (13%) had allergic pneumonitis characterized by consistent clinical and radiographic signs. Although the clinical signs were severe, the degree of radiographic pulmonary arterial abnormalities was mild. Corticosteroid therapy resulted in rapid resolution of clinical and radiographic signs; thiacetarsamide therapy was then given without complications. This syndrome may not be recognized as heartworm-associated and may be confused with other disorders, some being associated with a poor prognosis and requiring different therapy.

  8. Policy and system change and community coalitions: outcomes from allies against asthma.

    PubMed

    Clark, Noreen M; Lachance, Laurie; Doctor, Linda Jo; Gilmore, Lisa; Kelly, Cindy; Krieger, James; Lara, Marielena; Meurer, John; Milanovich, Amy Friedman; Nicholas, Elisa; Rosenthal, Michael; Stoll, Shelley C; Wilkin, Margaret

    2014-10-01

    Objectives. We assessed policy and system changes and health outcomes produced by the Allies Against Asthma program, a 5-year collaborative effort by 7 community coalitions to address childhood asthma. We also explored associations between community engagement and outcomes. Methods. We interviewed a sample of 1,477 parents of children with asthma in coalition target areas and comparison areas at baseline and 1 year to assess quality-of-life and symptom changes. An extensive tracking and documentation procedure and a survey of 284 participating individuals and organizations were used to ascertain policy and system changes and community engagement levels. Results. A total of 89 policy and system changes were achieved, ranging from changes in interinstitutional and intrainstitutional practices to statewide legislation. Allies children experienced fewer daytime (P = .008) and nighttime (P = .004) asthma symptoms than comparison children. In addition, Allies parents felt less helpless, frightened, and angry (P = .01) about their child's asthma. Type of community engagement was associated with number of policy and system changes. Conclusions. Community coalitions can successfully achieve asthma policy and system changes and improve health outcomes. Increased core and ongoing community stakeholder participation rather than a higher overall number of participants was associated with more change.

  9. [Association between periodontal disease and cerebrovascular disease. A review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Leira, Yago; Blanco, Miguel; Blanco, Juan; Castillo, José

    2015-07-01

    Periodontal disease and cerebrovascular disease are two of the most prevalent processes in elderly people. Various studies have shown an association between them, although some methodological differences exist and this difficult the data interpretation. The aim of this paper is to conduct a critical review of the studies published about this association. Eleven prospective studies and 11 retrospective studies are included in this review. We analyse the different methodological outcomes (study population, periodontal diagnosis, cerebrovascular disease definition, adjusted outcomes and odds ratio/relative risk). Furthermore, we review several pathogenic mechanisms implicated in the progression and the relationship between both processes.

  10. Diseases in marine invertebrates associated with mariculture and commercial fisheries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, Michael J.; Bateman, Kelly S.

    2015-10-01

    Diseases in marine invertebrates are increasing in both frequency and intensity around the globe. Diseases in individuals which offer some commercial value are often well documented and subsequently well studied in comparison to those wild groups offering little commercial gain. This is particularly the case with those associated with mariculture or the commercial fisheries. Specifically, these include many Holothuroidea, and numerous crustacea and mollusca species. Pathogens/parasites consisting of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes from all groups have been associated with diseases from such organisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa. Viral pathogens in particular, appear to be an increasingly important group and research into this group will likely highlight a larger number of diseases and pathogens being described in the near future. Interestingly, although there are countless examples of the spread of disease usually associated with transportation of specific infected hosts for development of aquaculture practices, this process appears to be continuing with no real sign of effective management and mitigation strategies being implicated. Notably, even in well developed countries such as the UK and the US, even though live animal trade may be well managed, the transport of frozen food appears to be less well so and as evidence suggests, even these to have the potential to transmit pathogens when used as a food source for example.

  11. Takayasu’s arteritis associated with Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, You-shi; Fang, You-hong; Ruan, Ling-xiang; Li, You-ming; Li, Lin; Jiang, Ling-ling

    2009-01-01

    Takayasu’s arteritis (TA), also known as the “pulseless disease,” is a chronic vasculitis of the aorta and aortic branches. TA with Crohn’s disease is rare and has not been documented in China before. In this paper we report on a case of Takayasu’s arteritis associated with concurrent Crohn’s disease. A 17-year-old Chinese male developed upper limb sourness and a sensation of fatigue, and his upper limb pulses were absent. He was diagnosed with TA and underwent an axillary artery bypass with autologous great saphenous vein on the left subclavian artery. After the surgery, he regained the normal blood pressure. This patient also had years of diarrhea and developed an anal canal ulcer, and was diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease and ulcerative colitis before. Five months after the TA surgery, he was hospitalized for severe stomachache and diarrhea and was finally diagnosed with Crohn’s disease. The possible pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for concurrent existence of TA and Crohn’s disease may be associated with immune disorders, especially autoimmunity. PMID:19650203

  12. A PubMed-Wide Associational Study of Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sintchenko, Vitali; Anthony, Stephen; Phan, Xuan-Hieu; Lin, Frank; Coiera, Enrico W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Computational discovery is playing an ever-greater role in supporting the processes of knowledge synthesis. A significant proportion of the more than 18 million manuscripts indexed in the PubMed database describe infectious disease syndromes and various infectious agents. This study is the first attempt to integrate online repositories of text-based publications and microbial genome databases in order to explore the dynamics of relationships between pathogens and infectious diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein we demonstrate how the knowledge space of infectious diseases can be computationally represented and quantified, and tracked over time. The knowledge space is explored by mapping of the infectious disease literature, looking at dynamics of literature deposition, zooming in from pathogen to genome level and searching for new associations. Syndromic signatures for different pathogens can be created to enable a new and clinically focussed reclassification of the microbial world. Examples of syndrome and pathogen networks illustrate how multilevel network representations of the relationships between infectious syndromes, pathogens and pathogen genomes can illuminate unexpected biological similarities in disease pathogenesis and epidemiology. Conclusions/Significance This new approach based on text and data mining can support the discovery of previously hidden associations between diseases and microbial pathogens, clinically relevant reclassification of pathogenic microorganisms and accelerate the translational research enterprise. PMID:20224767

  13. [Alveolar hemorrhage associated with intestinal inflammatory disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Rabec, C; Barcat, J; Rey, D

    2003-06-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is characterized by diffuse bleeding into alveolar spaces. Three histopathological patterns may be seen: 1) pulmonary capillaritis due to immunological aggression to the membrane, 2) diffuse alveolar damage within the context of acute respiratory distress syndrome, and 3) and "bland" DAH without alveolar or capillary damage. In the first two groups, pulmonary damage usually occurs within the context of a systemic disease. In the last, injury is usually found only in the lung, an entity called pulmonary hemosiderosis. We present a case of DAH with neither capillaritis nor diffuse alveolar damage in association with inflammatory bowel disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis. The case is interesting both because the association has not yet been described in the literature and because the presence of alveolar bleeding without evident tissue damage within the context of known autoimmune diseases may extend the field to include a new pathophysiological mechanism of pulmonary hemorrhage.

  14. Association of Heart Block with Uncommon Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Yahalom, Malka; Roguin, Nathan; Antonelli, Dante; Suleiman, Khaled; Turgeman, Yoav

    2013-01-01

    A variety of diseases, other than the common Lev-Lenègre disease, are associated with cardiac conduction system abnormalities. These include acute processes, such as acute rheumatic fever, and other disorders, such as sarcoidosis, connective tissue disorders, neoplasms, and bacterial endocarditis with cardiac abscess formation. The purpose of the study is to raise awareness of these rare conditions. We present 10 adult patients (4 males and 6 females) with a mean age of 47 years (range: 19-69), with various rare diseases associated with heart block, who needed temporary or permanent pacemaker therapy in the past two decades. These conditions included acute rheumatic carditis, Wegener granulomatosis, cardiac involvement of metastatic breast cancer, bacterial endocarditis, sarcoidosis, S/P chest radiotherapy, and quadriplegia with syringomyelia postspinal cord injury, and adult congenital heart block. We conclude that patients with these disorders should be followed periodically, to allow for early detection and treatment of cardiac conduction disturbances, with pacemaker therapy. PMID:24436606

  15. DISEASES: text mining and data integration of disease-gene associations.

    PubMed

    Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Pallejà, Albert; Tsafou, Kalliopi; Binder, Janos X; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2015-03-01

    Text mining is a flexible technology that can be applied to numerous different tasks in biology and medicine. We present a system for extracting disease-gene associations from biomedical abstracts. The system consists of a highly efficient dictionary-based tagger for named entity recognition of human genes and diseases, which we combine with a scoring scheme that takes into account co-occurrences both within and between sentences. We show that this approach is able to extract half of all manually curated associations with a false positive rate of only 0.16%. Nonetheless, text mining should not stand alone, but be combined with other types of evidence. For this reason, we have developed the DISEASES resource, which integrates the results from text mining with manually curated disease-gene associations, cancer mutation data, and genome-wide association studies from existing databases. The DISEASES resource is accessible through a web interface at http://diseases.jensenlab.org/, where the text-mining software and all associations are also freely available for download.

  16. Disease-Concordant Twins Empower Genetic Association Studies.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qihua; Li, Weilong; Vandin, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies with moderate sample sizes are underpowered, especially when testing SNP alleles with low allele counts, a situation that may lead to high frequency of false-positive results and lack of replication in independent studies. Related individuals, such as twin pairs concordant for a disease, should confer increased power in genetic association analysis because of their genetic relatedness. We conducted a computer simulation study to explore the power advantage of the disease-concordant twin design, which uses singletons from disease-concordant twin pairs as cases and ordinary healthy samples as controls. We examined the power gain of the twin-based design for various scenarios (i.e., cases from monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs concordant for a disease) and compared the power with the ordinary case-control design with cases collected from the unrelated patient population. Simulation was done by assigning various allele frequencies and allelic relative risks for different mode of genetic inheritance. In general, for achieving a power estimate of 80%, the sample sizes needed for dizygotic and monozygotic twin cases were one half and one fourth of the sample size of an ordinary case-control design, with variations depending on genetic mode. Importantly, the enriched power for dizygotic twins also applies to disease-concordant sibling pairs, which largely extends the application of the concordant twin design. Overall, our simulation revealed a high value of disease-concordant twins in genetic association studies and encourages the use of genetically related individuals for highly efficiently identifying both common and rare genetic variants underlying human complex diseases without increasing laboratory cost.

  17. Neurological diseases associated with viral and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections

    PubMed Central

    Assaad, F.; Gispen, R.; Kleemola, M.; Syrůček, L.; Esteves, K.

    1980-01-01

    In 1963 the World Health Organization established a system for the collection and dissemination of information on viral infections and by 1976, laboratories in 49 countries were participating in this scheme. The present study is in two parts: part 1 is an analysis of almost 60 000 reports on neurological disease associated with viral and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections reported during the 10-year period 1967-76. This analysis showed a steady increase in the yearly number of reports of viral neurological diseases, which closely followed the general increase in the overall reporting of virus diseases. Likewise, the seasonal pattern was similar to that seen in general for any given virus. Over 75% of the cases were in children. Over half of all viral neurological diseases were associated with enteroviruses, while the myxoviruses accounted for almost 30%. Among the myxoviruses, mumps virus was by far the most frequently reported. The polioviruses were the agents most commonly detected in cases of paralytic disease. The other enteroviruses, mumps virus, and the herpesviruses were the most frequently reported viruses in cases of aseptic meningitis or encephalitis. On the other hand, one-third to over one-half of the reports on the myxoviruses (excluding mumps and measles) related to ill-defined clinical conditions. Part 2 of the study deals in particular with viruses whose role in neurological disease is less well documented. One laboratory reported an outbreak of adenoviral aseptic meningitis in Czechoslovakia, while another described neurological disease associated with M. pneumoniae infection in Finland. Part 2 also includes a detailed appraisal of viral infections diagnosed in the Netherlands during the period 1973-76. The results are very similar to those routinely reported. PMID:6249511

  18. [Ankylosing spondylarthritid and Berger's disease. A fortuitous association?].

    PubMed

    Dougados, M; Oudart, F; Jungers, P; Vallée, P; Chevrot, A; Amor, B

    1987-03-01

    Fifteen cases of ankylosing spondylarthritis, associated to an IgA nephropathy have been reported in the literature. This association may be fortuitous, or on the contrary suggest a common pathogenic link between the two diseases and the authors have compared the incidence of radiological abnormalities of the sacro-iliac joints as well as the incidence of rheumatoid clinical signs in 186 patients suffering from an IgA nephropathy to those observed in 192 reference patients. This study could not demonstrate any difference between the two groups and, therefore, suggests that the cases reported in the literature are secondary to a simple fortuitous association.

  19. Allied Health Chemistry Laboratory: Amino Acids, Insulin, Proteins, and Skin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, David F.

    1975-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment specifically designed for allied health students. The students construct molecular models of amino acids, extract amino acids from their skin with hot water, and chromatographically analyze the skin extract and hydrolyzed insulin. (MLH)

  20. Exercise a Powerful Ally for Breast Cancer Survivors

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163706.html Exercise a Powerful Ally for Breast Cancer Survivors Those ... 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For breast cancer survivors, exercise may help lower their chances of dying from ...

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases associated with copper imbalance.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Luisa; Lombardo, Marco F; Ciriolo, Maria R; Rotilio, Giuseppe

    2004-03-01

    Copper is an essential transition metal ion for the function of key metabolic enzymes, but its uncontrolled redox reactivity is source of reactive oxygen species. Therefore a network of transporters strictly controls the trafficking of copper in living systems. Deficit, excess, or aberrant coordination of copper are conditions that may be detrimental, especially for neuronal cells, which are particularly sensitive to oxidative stress. Indeed, the genetic disturbances of copper homeostasis, Menkes' and Wilson's diseases, are associated with neurodegeneration. Furthermore, copper interacts with the proteins that are the hallmarks of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, prion diseases, and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In all cases, copper-mediated oxidative stress is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction, which is a common feature of neurodegeneration. In particular we recently demonstrated that in copper deficiency, mitochondrial function is impaired due to decreased activity of cytochrome c oxidase, leading to production of reactive oxygen species, which in turn triggers mitochondria-mediated apoptotic neurodegeneration.

  2. Alzheimer's disease and chronic periodontitis: is there an association?

    PubMed

    Gaur, Sumit; Agnihotri, Rupali

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease, an affliction of old age, is one of the leading causes for dementia worldwide. Various risk factors including family history, genetics and infections have been implicated in its pathogenesis. The cognitive decline in this condition is mainly a result of the formation of amyloid deposits that provoke neuroinflammation, ultimately resulting in cell death. Recently, an association between peripheral inflammation and Alzheimer's disease was hypothesized. It was suggested that chronic systemic inflammation worsened the inflammatory processes in the brain. This was mainly attributed to increased levels of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as interleukin-1, interleukin -6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the plasma. As chronic periodontitis is a widespread peripheral immunoinflammatory condition, it has been proposed to play a significant role in the aggravation of Alzheimer's disease. With this background, the current review focuses on the relationship between Alzheimer's disease and chronic periodontitis, and its therapeutic implications.

  3. Brain expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) identifies human disease-associated variants.

    PubMed

    Zou, Fanggeng; Chai, High Seng; Younkin, Curtis S; Allen, Mariet; Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Rowley, Christopher N; Nair, Asha A; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Kouri, Naomi; Kolbert, Christopher P; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Farrer, Lindsay A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Petersen, Ronald C; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Dickson, Dennis W; Younkin, Steven G; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants that modify brain gene expression may also influence risk for human diseases. We measured expression levels of 24,526 transcripts in brain samples from the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD, cerebellar n=197, temporal cortex n=202) and with other brain pathologies (non-AD, cerebellar n=177, temporal cortex n=197). We conducted an expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) using 213,528 cisSNPs within ± 100 kb of the tested transcripts. We identified 2,980 cerebellar cisSNP/transcript level associations (2,596 unique cisSNPs) significant in both ADs and non-ADs (q<0.05, p=7.70 × 10(-5)-1.67 × 10(-82)). Of these, 2,089 were also significant in the temporal cortex (p=1.85 × 10(-5)-1.70 × 10(-141)). The top cerebellar cisSNPs had 2.4-fold enrichment for human disease-associated variants (p<10(-6)). We identified novel cisSNP/transcript associations for human disease-associated variants, including progressive supranuclear palsy SLCO1A2/rs11568563, Parkinson's disease (PD) MMRN1/rs6532197, Paget's disease OPTN/rs1561570; and we confirmed others, including PD MAPT/rs242557, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis IRF5/rs4728142, and type 1 diabetes mellitus RPS26/rs1701704. In our eGWAS, there was 2.9-3.3 fold enrichment (p<10(-6)) of significant cisSNPs with suggestive AD-risk association (p<10(-3)) in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium GWAS. These results demonstrate the significant contributions of genetic factors to human brain gene expression, which are reliably detected across different brain regions and pathologies. The significant enrichment of brain cisSNPs among disease-associated variants advocates gene expression changes as a mechanism for many central nervous system (CNS) and non-CNS diseases. Combined assessment of expression and disease GWAS may provide complementary information in discovery of human disease variants with functional implications. Our findings

  4. Brain Expression Genome-Wide Association Study (eGWAS) Identifies Human Disease-Associated Variants

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V. Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Rowley, Christopher N.; Nair, Asha A.; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G.; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Kouri, Naomi; Kolbert, Christopher P.; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Younkin, Steven G.; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants that modify brain gene expression may also influence risk for human diseases. We measured expression levels of 24,526 transcripts in brain samples from the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD, cerebellar n = 197, temporal cortex n = 202) and with other brain pathologies (non–AD, cerebellar n = 177, temporal cortex n = 197). We conducted an expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) using 213,528 cisSNPs within ±100 kb of the tested transcripts. We identified 2,980 cerebellar cisSNP/transcript level associations (2,596 unique cisSNPs) significant in both ADs and non–ADs (q<0.05, p = 7.70×10−5–1.67×10−82). Of these, 2,089 were also significant in the temporal cortex (p = 1.85×10−5–1.70×10−141). The top cerebellar cisSNPs had 2.4-fold enrichment for human disease-associated variants (p<10−6). We identified novel cisSNP/transcript associations for human disease-associated variants, including progressive supranuclear palsy SLCO1A2/rs11568563, Parkinson's disease (PD) MMRN1/rs6532197, Paget's disease OPTN/rs1561570; and we confirmed others, including PD MAPT/rs242557, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis IRF5/rs4728142, and type 1 diabetes mellitus RPS26/rs1701704. In our eGWAS, there was 2.9–3.3 fold enrichment (p<10−6) of significant cisSNPs with suggestive AD–risk association (p<10−3) in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium GWAS. These results demonstrate the significant contributions of genetic factors to human brain gene expression, which are reliably detected across different brain regions and pathologies. The significant enrichment of brain cisSNPs among disease-associated variants advocates gene expression changes as a mechanism for many central nervous system (CNS) and non–CNS diseases. Combined assessment of expression and disease GWAS may provide complementary information in discovery of human disease variants with

  5. Risk for travel-associated legionnaires' disease, Europe, 2009.

    PubMed

    Beauté, Julien; Zucs, Phillip; de Jong, Birgitta

    2012-11-01

    Legionnaires' disease is underreported in Europe; notification rates differ substantially among countries. Approximately 20% of reported cases are travel-associated. To assess the risk for travel-associated Legionnaires' disease (TALD) associated with travel patterns in European countries, we retrieved TALD surveillance data for 2009 from the European Surveillance System, and tourism denominator data from the Statistical Office of the European Union. Risk (number cases reported/number nights spent) was calculated by travel country. In 2009, the network reported 607 cases among European travelers, possibly associated with 825 accommodation sites in European Union countries. The overall risk associated with travel abroad was 0.3 cases/million nights. We observed an increasing trend in risk from northwestern to southeastern Europe; Greece had the highest risk (1.7). Our findings underscore the need for countries with high TALD risks to improve prevention and control of legionellosis; and for countries with high TALD risks, but low notification rates of Legionnaires' disease to improve diagnostics and reporting.

  6. Intergenerational Associations of Chronic Disease and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Michael J.; Marino, Jennifer L.; Willson, Kristyn J.; March, Wendy A.; Moore, Vivienne M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common female endocrine disorder of heterogeneous clinical presentation, high disease burden, and unknown aetiology. The disease and associated conditions cluster in families, suggesting that PCOS may be the reproductive consequence of underlying chronic disease susceptibility. Objective To determine whether parents of young women with PCOS were more likely to have a history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease in later adult life. Design, Setting and Participants Structured interviews with 715 members of a cohort constructed by tracing female infants born at a single general hospital in Adelaide between 1973 and 1975. Participants were asked whether they had a pre-existing medical diagnosis of PCOS, and whether each parent had ever had high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, stroke, or heart disease. Maternal high blood pressure during pregnancy was taken from the medical record of the pregnancy with the study participant. Results and Conclusions Mothers of women with PCOS were more likely than mothers of other women to have any cardiovascular disease (RR 1.78, 95% CI 1.29, 2.47), and nearly twice as likely to have high blood pressure (RR 1.95, 95% CI 1.38, 2.76). Fathers of women with PCOS were more than twice as likely to have heart disease (RR 2.36, 95% CI 1.44, 3.88) and over four times as likely to have had a stroke (RR 4.37, 95% CI 1.97, 9.70). Occurrence of cardiovascular disease in both mother and father are associated with the risk of PCOS in daughters. Further detailed study is required to elucidate the precise pathways that may be causally related to the observations. PMID:21991389

  7. Association of maternal chronic disease with risk of congenital heart disease in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsin-Hsu; Chiou, Meng-Jiun; Liang, Fu-Wen; Chen, Lea-Hua; Lu, Tsung-Hsueh; Li, Chung-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Information about known risk factors for congenital heart disease is scarce. In this population-based study, we aimed to investigate the relation between maternal chronic disease and congenital heart disease in offspring. Methods: The study cohort consisted of 1 387 650 live births from 2004 to 2010. We identified chronic disease in mothers and mild and severe forms of congenital heart disease in their offspring from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance medical claims. We used multivariable logistic regression analysis to assess the associations of all cases and specific types of congenital heart disease with various maternal chronic diseases. Results: For mothers with the following chronic diseases, the overall prevalence of congenital heart disease in their children was significantly higher than for mothers without these diseases: diabetes mellitus type 1 (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.66–3.25), diabetes mellitus type 2 (adjusted OR 2.85, 95% CI 2.60–3.12), hypertension (adjusted OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.69–2.07), congenital heart defects (adjusted OR 3.05, 95% CI 2.45–3.80), anemia (adjusted OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.25–1.38), connective tissue disorders (adjusted OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.19–1.62), epilepsy (adjusted OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.08–1.74) and mood disorders (adjusted OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.11–1.41). The same pattern held for mild forms of congenital heart disease. A higher prevalence of severe congenital heart disease was seen only among offspring of mothers with congenital heart defects or type 2 diabetes. Interpretation: The children of women with several kinds of chronic disease appear to be at risk for congenital heart disease. Preconception counselling and optimum treatment of pregnant women with chronic disease would seem prudent. PMID:27729382

  8. Travel-associated Legionnaires' disease in Europe, 2010.

    PubMed

    de Jong, B; Payne Hallström, L; Robesyn, E; Ursut, D; Zucs, P

    2013-06-06

    In 2010, the European surveillance network for travel-associated Legionnaires' disease (ELDSNet, previously EWGLINET) received reports of 864 cases of travel-associated Legionnaires' disease, of whom 24 were reported to have had a fatal outcome. As in previous years, a very low proportion of clinical isolates were obtained (45 cases, 5.6%). In the 2010 dataset, male cases outnumbered female cases by 2.6:1 and had a median age of 61 years (range: 21-96), while the median age for women was 63 years (range: 12-95). The network identified 100 new clusters in 2010, of which 44 involved only one case from each reporting country and would probably not have been detected by national surveillance schemes alone. The largest cluster (having 14 cases) was associated with a cruise ship. Legionella species were detected at 61 of the 100 accommodation site clusters investigated. The names of five accommodation sites were published on the ECDC website.

  9. Travel-associated legionnaires' disease in Europe: 2004.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, K D; McNaught, B; Joseph, C A

    2006-01-01

    Six hundred and fifty five cases of travel-associated legionnaires' disease with onset in 2004 have been reported to the EWGLINET surveillance scheme by 25 countries. A total of 84.9% of cases were diagnosed by the urinary antigen test, and 37 cultures were obtained. Thirty seven deaths were reported, giving a case fatality rate of 5.6%. Eighty six new clusters were detected, 45% of which would not have been detected without the EWGLINET scheme. Ninety four accommodation sites were investigated and the names of four sites were published on the EWGLI website. Fifteen sites were associated with additional cases after a report was received to say that investigations and control measures had been satisfactorily carried out. Further improvements could be made in the data collected on deaths due to travel-associated legionnaires' disease, and on the number of samples taken for culture throughout Europe.

  10. Al-Li alloys and ultrahigh-strength steels for U. S. Navy aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.W.; Neu, C.E.; Kozol, J. )

    1990-05-01

    An evaluation is made of the development status and prospective performance advantages and cost reductions obtainable through the application of state-of-the-art Al-Li alloys to naval aircraft airframes and ultrahigh strength Ni-Co alloy steels to their landing gears. Structural weight fractions are expected to be reduced by 8-10 percent through substitution of high-stiffness Al-Li for conventional Al alloys. Ni-Co alloy steels enhance landing gear damage tolerance and resistance to environmental degradation, without associated weight penalty, when supplanting conventional low-alloy steels. Both materials are judged ready for immediate application to existing and next-generation U.S. Navy aircraft. 8 refs.

  11. Allie Abrahamson: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    The APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology is awarded on an annual basis by the APA Board of Professional Affairs (BPA) and the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS) to a graduate student who has demonstrated outstanding practice and application of psychology. A qualified candidate must demonstrate exemplary performance in working with an underserved population in an applied setting or have developed an innovative method for delivering health services to an underserved population. This year there are joint recipients of the award, Allie Abrahamson and Rebeccah A. Bernard. Their vision, creativity, courage, and dedication led them to create the Human Rights Forum at Chestnut Hill College to promote human rights education, awareness, and community service opportunities for doctoral students. Allie Abrahamson's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  12. Current status of cardiac surgery allied health professionals in Asia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Ye, W

    2011-01-01

    More and more allied health professions are getting involved in clinical health care. One estimate reported allied health personnel makes up 60 percent of the total health workforce. In Asia, in the field of cardiothoracic surgery, allied health personnel includes perfusionists, physician assistants, physiotherapist, intensivists, rehabilitation therapists, nutritionists and social workers. They work in collaboration with surgeons to provide a range of diagnostic, technical, therapeutic, cardiac care and support services to the patients and their families.Some allied health professions are more specialized. They must adhere to national training and education standards and their professional scope of practice. For example, the training of perfusionists consists of at least five years of academic in medical schools and another three-year-long clinical training in the hospital. The cardiac intensivists usually are medical doctors with a background in cardiology. They spend 3-4 years rotating in Internal Medicine, Anesthesiology, Emergency Rooms and Intensive Care Units. There have specialized medical societies to grant certified credentials and to provide continuing education. Other allied health professions require no special training or credentials and are trained for their work by the hospitals through on-the-job training. Many young health care providers are getting involved in the allied health personnel projects. They consider this as a career ladder because of the opportunities for advancement within specific fields.

  13. Articulation Assistance for Columbus State Community College. Add-on Task #2: Pre-Tech for Allied Health. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, S. Judith; And Others

    This guide is intended for use in helping high school and entry-level community college students in acquiring the practical science skills necessary to ensure successful completion of an associate-level allied health program. The guide was originally developed to provide an articulation model for high school students interested in entering the…

  14. Methodological Orientations of Articles Appearing in Allied Health's Top Journals: Who Publishes What and Where

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alderman, Pamela Lea McCloud

    2012-01-01

    This study examined articles published in the major peer-reviewed journals, either hard copy, web, or both formats, in five allied health professions from January 2006 to December 2010. Research journals used in this study include: "Journal of Dental Hygiene," "Journal of the American Dietetic Association," "Journal of…

  15. Clinical care ratios: quantifying clinical versus non-clinical care for allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Cherie; Govier, Adam; Semciw, Adam Ivan

    2016-07-04

    Objective Clinical care ratios (CCRs) are a useful tool that can be used to quantify and benchmark the clinical and non-clinical workloads of allied health professionals. The purpose of this study was to determine if CCRs are influenced by level of seniority, type of role or profession. This will provide meaningful information for allied health service managers to better manage service demand and capacity.Method Data was collected from 2036 allied health professionals from five professions across 11 Australian tertiary hospitals. Mean (95% confidence intervals) CCRs were calculated according to profession, seniority and role type. A two-way ANOVA was performed to assess the association of CCRs (dependent variable) with seniority level and profession (independent variables). Post-hoc pairwise comparisons identified where significant main or interaction effects occurred (α = 0.05).Results Significant main effects for seniority level and profession were identified (P < 0.05), but there was no interaction effect. Post-hoc comparisons revealed significant differences between all tier combinations (P < 0.05) with more senior staff having the lowest CCRs.Conclusion The direct and non-direct clinical components of the allied health professional's workload can be quantified and benchmarked with like roles and according to seniority. The benchmarked CCRs for predominantly clinical roles will enable managers to compare and evaluate like roles and modify non-direct clinical components according to seniority and discipline.What is known about the topic? CCRs are a useful tool to quantify, monitor and compare workloads of allied health professionals. They are thought to change with increased seniority of roles. The CCRs for different allied health professional roles has yet to be defined in the literature.What does this paper add? CCRs decrease as level of seniority increases, indicating higher seniority increases non-clinical time. CCRs differ across professions, suggesting

  16. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A: spotlight on kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Kalousová, Marta; Tesař, Vladimír; Muravská, Alexandra; Zima, Tomáš

    2012-03-24

    Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) is a biomarker routinely used in screening for Down syndrome in the first trimester of pregnancy. It is also present in very small amounts in men and non-pregnant women. PAPP-A is a key regulator of local insulin-like growth factor (IGF) bioavailability - IGFs are essential for normal body size during fetal development, but they are associated with aging and age-related diseases. Measurement of circulating PAPP-A can provide valuable information not only in pregnant women (chromosomal anomalies and adverse pregnancy outcomes) but also in patients with coronary artery disease (contribution to diagnosis, prognostic value) and in patients with kidney diseases. PAPP-A is associated with renal function and proteinuria, is increased mainly in dialysis patients and decreases after kidney transplantation. It is an independent mortality predictor of hemodialysis patients and indicator of adverse outcome of transplanted patients. PAPP-A levels can be influenced by various chemicals and drugs, among them mainly heparin. Various assays for PAPP-A exist and the type of assay used in a study should be considered. This article reviews the data summarizing basic information about PAPP-A with a particular focus on the significance of PAPP-A in renal diseases.

  17. Phytotoxins produced by fungi associated with grapevine trunk diseases.

    PubMed

    Andolfi, Anna; Mugnai, Laura; Luque, Jordi; Surico, Giuseppe; Cimmino, Alessio; Evidente, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Up to 60 species of fungi in the Botryosphaeriaceae family, genera Cadophora, Cryptovalsa, Cylindrocarpon, Diatrype, Diatrypella, Eutypa, Eutypella, Fomitiporella, Fomitiporia, Inocutis, Phaeoacremonium and Phaeomoniella have been isolated from decline-affected grapevines all around the World. The main grapevine trunk diseases of mature vines are Eutypa dieback, the esca complex and cankers caused by the Botryospheriaceae, while in young vines the main diseases are Petri and black foot diseases. To understand the mechanism of these decline-associated diseases and the symptoms associated with them, the toxins produced by the pathogens involved in these diseases were isolated and characterised chemically and biologically. So far the toxins of only a small number of these decline fungi have been studied. This paper presents an overview of the toxins produced by the most serious of these vine wood pathogens: Eutypa lata, Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, Phaeoacremonium aleophilum and some taxa in the Botryosphaeriaceae family, and examines how these toxins produce decline symptoms. The chemical structure of these metabolites and in some cases their vivotoxin nature are also discussed.

  18. Noncoding RNA Profiles in Tobacco- and Alcohol-Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Soares do Amaral, Nayra; Cruz e Melo, Natalia; de Melo Maia, Beatriz; Malagoli Rocha, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco and alcohol are the leading environmental risk factors in the development of human diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and liver injury. Despite the copious amount of research on this topic, by 2030, 8.3 million deaths are projected to occur worldwide due to tobacco use. The expression of noncoding RNAs, primarily microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), is modulated by tobacco and alcohol consumption. Drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes can modulate the expression of miRNAs and lncRNAs through various signaling pathways, such as apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inflammatory pathways—primarily interleukin 6 (IL-6)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which seems to play a major role in the development of diseases associated with these risk factors. Since they may be predictive and prognostic biomarkers, they can be used both as predictors of the response to therapy and as a targeted therapy. Further, circulating miRNAs might be valuable noninvasive tools that can be used to examine diseases that are related to the use of tobacco and alcohol. This review discusses the function of noncoding RNAs in cancer and other human tobacco- and alcohol-associated diseases. PMID:28025544

  19. Phytotoxins Produced by Fungi Associated with Grapevine Trunk Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Andolfi, Anna; Mugnai, Laura; Luque, Jordi; Surico, Giuseppe; Cimmino, Alessio; Evidente, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Up to 60 species of fungi in the Botryosphaeriaceae family, genera Cadophora, Cryptovalsa, Cylindrocarpon, Diatrype, Diatrypella, Eutypa, Eutypella, Fomitiporella, Fomitiporia, Inocutis, Phaeoacremonium and Phaeomoniella have been isolated from decline-affected grapevines all around the World. The main grapevine trunk diseases of mature vines are Eutypa dieback, the esca complex and cankers caused by the Botryospheriaceae, while in young vines the main diseases are Petri and black foot diseases. To understand the mechanism of these decline-associated diseases and the symptoms associated with them, the toxins produced by the pathogens involved in these diseases were isolated and characterised chemically and biologically. So far the toxins of only a small number of these decline fungi have been studied. This paper presents an overview of the toxins produced by the most serious of these vine wood pathogens: Eutypa lata, Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, Phaeoacremonium aleophilum and some taxa in the Botryosphaeriaceae family, and examines how these toxins produce decline symptoms. The chemical structure of these metabolites and in some cases their vivotoxin nature are also discussed. PMID:22295177

  20. Disease-associated repeat instability and mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Monika H M; Pearson, Christopher E

    2016-02-01

    Expanded tandem repeat sequences in DNA are associated with at least 40 human genetic neurological, neurodegenerative, and neuromuscular diseases. Repeat expansion can occur during parent-to-offspring transmission, and arise at variable rates in specific tissues throughout the life of an affected individual. Since the ongoing somatic repeat expansions can affect disease age-of-onset, severity, and progression, targeting somatic expansion holds potential as a therapeutic target. Thus, understanding the factors that regulate this mutation is crucial. DNA repair, in particular mismatch repair (MMR), is the major driving force of disease-associated repeat expansions. In contrast to its anti-mutagenic roles, mammalian MMR curiously drives the expansion mutations of disease-associated (CAG)·(CTG) repeats. Recent advances have broadened our knowledge of both the MMR proteins involved in disease repeat expansions, including: MSH2, MSH3, MSH6, MLH1, PMS2, and MLH3, as well as the types of repeats affected by MMR, now including: (CAG)·(CTG), (CGG)·(CCG), and (GAA)·(TTC) repeats. Mutagenic slipped-DNA structures have been detected in patient tissues, and the size of the slip-out and their junction conformation can determine the involvement of MMR. Furthermore, the formation of other unusual DNA and R-loop structures is proposed to play a key role in MMR-mediated instability. A complex correlation is emerging between tissues showing varying amounts of repeat instability and MMR expression levels. Notably, naturally occurring polymorphic variants of DNA repair genes can have dramatic effects upon the levels of repeat instability, which may explain the variation in disease age-of-onset, progression and severity. An increasing grasp of these factors holds prognostic and therapeutic potential.

  1. Association of age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Neelesh; Smith, R Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of adult blindness in the developed world. Thus, major endeavors to understand the risk factors and pathogenesis of this disease have been undertaken. Reticular macular disease is a proposed subtype of age-related macular degeneration correlating histologically with subretinal drusenoid deposits located between the retinal pigment epithelium and the inner segment ellipsoid zone. Reticular lesions are more prevalent in females and in older age groups and are associated with a higher mortality rate. Risk factors for developing age-related macular degeneration include hypertension, smoking, and angina. Several genes related to increased risk for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease are also associated with cardiovascular disease. Better understanding of the clinical and genetic risk factors for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease has led to the hypothesis that these eye diseases are systemic. A systemic origin may help to explain why reticular disease is diagnosed more frequently in females as males suffer cardiovascular mortality at an earlier age, before the age of diagnosis of reticular macular disease and age-related macular degeneration.

  2. Diseases and pathogens associated with mortality in Ontario beef feedlots.

    PubMed

    Gagea, Mihai I; Bateman, Kenneth G; van Dreumel, Tony; McEwen, Beverly J; Carman, Susy; Archambault, Marie; Shanahan, Rachel A; Caswell, Jeff L

    2006-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of diseases and pathogens associated with mortality or severe morbidity in 72 Ontario beef feedlots in calves that died or were euthanized within 60 days after arrival. Routine pathologic and microbiologic investigations, as well as immunohistochemical staining for detection of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) antigen, were performed on 99 calves that died or were euthanized within 60 days after arrival. Major disease conditions identified included fibrinosuppurative bronchopneumonia (49%), caseonecrotic bronchopneumonia or arthritis (or both) caused by Mycoplasma bovis (36%), viral respiratory disease (19%), BVDV-related diseases (21%), Histophilus somni myocarditis (8%), ruminal bloat (2%), and miscellaneous diseases (8%). Viral infections identified were BVDV (35%), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (9%), bovine herpesvirus-1 (6%), parainfluenza-3 virus (3%), and bovine coronavirus (2%). Bacteria isolated from the lungs included M. bovis (82%), Mycoplasma arginini (72%), Ureaplasma diversum (25%), Mannheimia haemolytica (27%), Pasteurella multocida (19%), H. somni (14%), and Arcanobacterium pyogenes (19%). Pneumonia was the most frequent cause of mortality of beef calves during the first 2 months after arrival in feedlots, representing 69% of total deaths. The prevalence of caseonecrotic bronchopneumonia caused by M. bovis was similar to that of fibrinosuppurative bronchopneumonia, and together, these diseases were the most common causes of pneumonia and death. M. bovis pneumonia and polyarthritis has emerged as an important cause of mortality in Ontario beef feedlots.

  3. IDENTIFICATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS ASSOCIATED WITH THE DEVELOPMENT OF TOXICANT ASSOCIATED FATTY LIVER DISEASE IN RODENTS

    PubMed Central

    Al-Eryani, Laila; Wahlang, Banrida; Falkner, K.C.; Guardiola, J. J.; Clair, H.B.; Prough, R.A.; Cave, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Toxicant associated fatty liver disease (TAFLD) is a recently identified form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) associated with exposure to industrial chemicals and environmental pollutants. Numerous studies have been conducted to test the association between industrial chemicals/ environmental pollutants and fatty liver disease both in vivo and in vitro. Objectives The objective of the paper is to report a list of chemicals associated with TAFLD. Methods Two federal databases of rodent toxicology studies– ToxRefDB (Environmental Protection Agency) and Chemical Effects in Biological Systems (CEBS, National Toxicology Program) were searched for liver endpoints. Combined, these two databases archive nearly 2000 rodent studies. TASH descriptors including fatty change, fatty necrosis, Oil red O positive staining, steatosis and lipid deposition were queried. Results Using these search terms, 123 chemicals associated with fatty liver were identified. Pesticides and solvents were the most frequently identified chemicals, while PCBs/dioxins were the most potent. About 44% of identified compounds were pesticides or their intermediates, and nearly 10% of pesticide registration studies in ToxRefDB were associated with fatty liver. Fungicides and herbicides were more frequently associated with fatty liver than insecticides. Conclusions More research on pesticides, solvents, metals and PCBs/dioxins in NAFLD/TAFLD is warranted due to their association with liver damage. PMID:25326588

  4. [Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, association with cardiovascular disease snd treatment. (I). Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and its association with cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Brea, Ángel; Pintó, Xavier; Ascaso, Juan F; Blasco, Mariano; Díaz, Ángel; González-Santos, Pedro; Hernández Mijares, Antonio; Mantilla, Teresa; Millán, Jesús; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2016-09-27

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a series of histologically lesions similar to those induced by alcohol consumption in people with very little or no liver damage. The importance of NAFLD is its high prevalence in the Western world and, from the point of view of the liver, in its gradual progression from steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. During the last decade it has been observed that NAFLD leads to an increased cardiovascular risk with acceleration of arteriosclerosis and events related to it, being the main cause of its morbidity and mortality. This review, updated to January 2016, consists of two parts, with the first part analysing the association of NAFLD with cardiovascular disease.

  5. Updated Mechanisms of Sickle Cell Disease-Associated Chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Brianna; Meiler, Steffen E.; Bekker, Alex; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), a hemoglobinopathy, causes sickling of red blood cells, resulting in vessel blockage, stroke, anemia, inflammation, and extreme pain. A vast majority of SCD patients experience pain on a chronic basis, and many turn to opioids to provide limited relief. The side effects that come with chronic opioid use push for research into understanding the specific mechanisms of SCD-associated chronic pain. Current advances in SCD-associated pain have focused on alterations in the pain pathway including nociceptor sensitization and endogenous pain inducers. This article reviews the underlying pathophysiology of SCD, potential pain mechanisms, current treatments and their mechanism of action, and future directions of SCD-associated pain management. The information provided could help propel research in SCD-associated chronic pain and uncover novel treatment options for clinicians. PMID:26301256

  6. Fatty Liver Disease is Associated with Underlying Cardiovascular Disease in HIV-Infected Persons

    PubMed Central

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy; Krause, David; Wessman, Dylan; Medina, Sheila; Stepenosky, James; Brandt, Carolyn; Boswell, Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is an increasing concern among HIV-infected persons and their providers. We determined if fatty liver disease is a marker for underlying coronary atherosclerosis among HIV-infected persons. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study among HIV-infected adults to evaluate the prevalence of and factors, including fatty liver disease, associated with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. All participants underwent computed tomography for determination of coronary artery calcium (CAC; positive defined as a score >0) and fatty liver disease (defined as a liver-to-spleen ratio <1.0). Factors associated with CAC were determined using multivariate logistic regression models. Results We studied 223 HIV-infected adults with a median age of 43 years (IQR 36–50), 96% were male, and 49% were Caucasian. Median CD4 count was 586 cells/mm3, and 83% were receiving antiretroviral medications. Seventy-five (34%) had a positive CAC score, and 29 (13%) subjects had fatty liver disease. Among those with CAC scores of 0, 1–100, >100, the percentage with concurrent fatty liver disease was 8%, 18%, and 41%, respectively (p=0.001). In the multivariate model, CAC was associated with increasing age (OR 4.3 per 10 years, p<0.01), hypertension (OR 2.6, p<0.01), and fatty liver disease (OR 3.8, p<0.01). Conclusions Coronary atherosclerosis as detected by CAC is prevalent among young HIV-infected persons. The detection of fatty liver disease among HIV-infected adults should prompt consideration for assessment for underlying cardiovascular disease and risk factor reduction. PMID:21251186

  7. Noncompaction myocardium in association with type Ib glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Goeppert, Benjamin; Lindner, Martin; Vogel, Monika Nadja; Warth, Arne; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Renner, Marcus; Schnabel, Philipp; Schirmacher, Peter; Autschbach, Frank; Weichert, Wilko

    2012-10-15

    Noncompaction myocardium is a rare disorder assumed to occur as an arrest of the compaction process during the normal development of the heart. Left ventricular noncompaction has been reported to be associated with a variety of cardiac and extracardiac, especially neuromuscular abnormalities. Moreover, it has been suggested that metabolic alterations could be responsible for the noncompaction. However, no association of noncompaction myocardium with type Ib glycogen storage disease (GSD) has been reported so far. Type Ib GSD is due to a defect of a transmembrane protein which results, similar to type Ia GSD, in hypoglycemia, a markedly enlarged liver and, additionally, in neutropenia, recurrent infections, and inflammatory bowel disease. Until now, no muscular or cardiac involvement has been described in type Ib GSD patients. The present case represents the first report of a noncompaction myocardium in a child with type Ib GSD who died of sudden clinical deterioration at the age of four.

  8. Pathogenesis and treatment of the ophthalmopathy associated with Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Velkeniers, B; Salu, P

    1992-01-01

    The pathogenesis and etiology of the ophthalmopathy associated with Graves' disease still remains to be elucidated. There is, however, general consensus that the extraocular muscles are the principal site of the autoimmune response and that the main changes are in the interstitium. The primary target seems to be the fibroblasts which are stimulated as a result of cytokine release by the activated T-cells that accumulate in the muscles. Increased production of glycosaminoglycans and collagen by fibroblasts, attracts water to the interstitium and produces interstitial oedema. The frequent association of Graves' thyroid disease and ophthalmopathy favours the hypothesis of antibodies cross-reacting with antigens of orbit and thyroid. Although cross-reactivity is very attractive, the nature of the involved antigen remains unknown. Since Graves' ophthalmopathy is an autoimmune disorder, many immunomodulatory agents have been used in the treatment of this disorder. Anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive treatment modalities will be reviewed.

  9. The spectrum of MOG autoantibody-associated demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Reindl, Markus; Di Pauli, Franziska; Rostásy, Kevin; Berger, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) has been identified as a target of demyelinating autoantibodies in animal models of inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Numerous studies have aimed to establish a role for MOG antibodies in patients with MS, although the results have been controversial. Cell-based immunoassays using MOG expressed in mammalian cells have demonstrated the presence of high-titre MOG antibodies in paediatric patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, MS, aquaporin-4-seronegative neuromyelitis optica, or isolated optic neuritis or transverse myelitis, but only rarely in adults with these disorders. These studies indicate that MOG antibodies could be associated with a broad spectrum of acquired human CNS demyelinating diseases. This Review article discusses the current literature on MOG antibodies, their potential clinical relevance, and their role in the pathogenesis of MOG antibody-associated demyelinating disorders.

  10. Multiple facets of HIV-associated renal disease

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, D.R.; Gluz, I.C.; Kurz, J.; Thomé, G.G.; Zancan, R.; Bringhenti, R.N.; Schaefer, P.G.; dos Santos, M.; Barros, E.J.G.; Veronese, F.V.

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection has a broad spectrum of renal manifestations. This study examined the clinical and histological manifestations of HIV-associated renal disease, and predictors of renal outcomes. Sixty-one (64% male, mean age 45 years) HIV patients were retrospectively evaluated. Clinical presentation and renal histopathology were assessed, as well as CD4 T-cell count and viral load. The predictive value of histological lesion, baseline CD4 cell count and viral load for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or death were determined using the Cox regression model. The outcomes of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and ESRD or death were evaluated by baseline CD4 cell count. The percent distribution at initial clinical presentation was non-nephrotic proteinuria (54%), acute kidney injury (28%), nephrotic syndrome (23%), and chronic kidney disease (22%). Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (28%), mainly the collapsing form (HIVAN), acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) (26%), and immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) (25%) were the predominant renal histology. Baseline CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/mm3 was a protective factor against CKD (hazard ratio=0.997; 95%CI=0.994-0.999; P=0.012). At last follow-up, 64% of patients with baseline CD4 ≥200 cells/mm3 had eGFR >60 mL·min-1·(1.73 m2)-1 compared to the other 35% of patients who presented with CD4 <200 cells/mm3 (log rank=9.043, P=0.003). In conclusion, the main histological lesion of HIV-associated renal disease was HIVAN, followed by AIN and ICGN. These findings reinforce the need to biopsy HIV patients with kidney impairment and/or proteinuria. Baseline CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/mm3 was associated with better renal function after 2 years of follow-up. PMID:27007656

  11. A new causal model of dental diseases associated with endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Drangsholt, M T

    1998-07-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a serious disease that is associated with dental diseases and treatment. The objective of this study was to summarize the epidemiological information about IE and reevaluate previous causal models in light of this evidence. The world biomedical literature was searched from 1930 to 1996 for descriptive and analytic epidemiological studies of IE. Multiple searching strategies were performed on 9 databases, including MEDLINE, CATLINE, and WORLDCAT. Results show that: 1) the incidence of IE varies between 0.70 to 6.8 per 100,000 person-years: 2) the incidence of IE increases 20 fold with advancing age: 3) over 50% of all IE cases are not associated with either an obvious procedural or infectious event 3 months prior to developing symptoms; 4) about 8% of all IE cases are associated with periodontal or dental disease without a dental procedure: 5) the time from the diagnosis of heart valve deformities to the development of IE approaches 20 years: 6) the median time from identifiable procedures to the onset of IE symptoms is about 2 to 4 weeks: 7) the risk of IE after a dental procedure is probably in the range of 1 per 3,000 to 5,000 procedures: and 8) over 80% of all IE cases are acquired in the community, and the bacteria are part of the host's endogenous flora. The synthesis of these data demonstrates that IE is a disorder with the epidemiological picture of a chronic disease such as cancer, instead of an acute infectious disease, with a long latent period and possibly several definable intermediates or stages. A new causal model is proposed that includes early bacteremias that may "prime" the endothelial surface of the heart valves over many years, and a late bacteremia over days to weeks that allows adherence and colonization of the valve, resulting in the characteristic fulminant infection.

  12. Optimal Trend Tests for Genetic Association Studies of Heterogeneous Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Chung

    2016-01-01

    The Cochran-Armitage trend test is a standard procedure in genetic association studies. It is a directed test with high power to detect genetic effects that follow the gene-dosage model. In this paper, the author proposes optimal trend tests for genetic association studies of heterogeneous diseases. Monte-Carlo simulations show that the power gain of the optimal trend tests over the conventional Cochran-Armitage trend test is striking when the genetic effects are heterogeneous. The easy-to-use R 3.1.2 software (R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria) code is provided. The optimal trend tests are recommended for routine use. PMID:27278756

  13. Tight junctions in inflammatory bowel diseases and inflammatory bowel disease associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landy, Jonathan; Ronde, Emma; English, Nick; Clark, Sue K; Hart, Ailsa L; Knight, Stella C; Ciclitira, Paul J; Al-Hassi, Hafid Omar

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterised by inflammation that compromises the integrity of the epithelial barrier. The intestinal epithelium is not only a static barrier but has evolved complex mechanisms to control and regulate bacterial interactions with the mucosal surface. Apical tight junction proteins are critical in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function and control of paracellular permeability. The characterisation of alterations in tight junction proteins as key players in epithelial barrier function in inflammatory bowel diseases is rapidly enhancing our understanding of critical mechanisms in disease pathogenesis as well as novel therapeutic opportunities. Here we give an overview of recent literature focusing on the role of tight junction proteins, in particular claudins, in inflammatory bowel diseases and inflammatory bowel disease associated colorectal cancer. PMID:27003989

  14. Autoantibodies against CD28 are associated with atopic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Neuber, K; Mähnss, B; Hübner, C; Gergely, H; Weichenthal, M

    2006-01-01

    The B7-1/B7-2-CD28/CTLA-4 pathway is crucial in regulating T cell activation and tolerance. Autoantibodies to surface molecules on lymphocytes have already been described in various immune conditions, such as autoimmune diseases, infections and blood transfusions. The objective of this study was to test sera from healthy individuals and from patients for association of CD28 autoantibodies with inflammatory and non-inflammatory diseases. First, CD28 was obtained by digestion of CD28-Ig fusion protein with trypsin. The cleavage products were separated by sodium dodecyl sulphate–page gel electrophoresis. Additionally, a CD28/GST fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and was used to establish an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of autoantibodies against CD28. Sera from healthy individuals (n = 72) and patients with different inflammatory and non-inflammatory skin diseases (n = 196) were tested for the presence of autoantibodies against CD28. Using mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR), purified autoantibodies against CD28 were tested for their effects on CTLA-4-Ig-induced T cell anergy. In this study, for the first time, we describe the existence of autoantibodies against CD28 in humans which are associated with atopic diseases, e.g. allergic rhinitis and asthma. These antibodies stimulate T cells and overcome the CTLA-4-Ig-induced anergy of T cells in an MLR. The existence of autoantibodies against CD28, which may have a T cell-stimulating function, has been shown. The data indicate that autoantibodies against CD28 could be a new immunological mechanism in allergic inflammation. Additionally, autoantibodies against CD28 could be an important new marker to discriminate between atopic diseases and other inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:17034578

  15. Memantine-associated hyperkalaemia in a patient with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tatsuo; Yamada, Hidetaka; Uchimura, Naohisa

    2013-09-01

    Memantine is an N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist that may improve cognitive functions in patients with Alzheimer's disease. It is predominantly excreted unchanged via the kidneys, and patients with decreased creatinine clearance must be treated with lower doses of memantine. However, it is unclear whether memantine itself can lead to renal dysfunction and/or hyperkalaemia. We report a patient with renal impairment and hyperkalaemia possibly associated with memantine administration.

  16. Metabolomic signatures associated with disease severity in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Cristina; Agirrezabal, Ion; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina; Zubizarreta, Irati; Pulido-Valdeolivas, Irene; Saiz, Albert; Comabella, Manuel; Montalban, Xavier; Villar, Luisa; Alvarez-Cermeño, Jose Carlos; Fernández, Oscar; Alvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Arroyo, Rafael; Castro, Azucena

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To identify differences in the metabolomic profile in the serum of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) compared to controls and to identify biomarkers of disease severity. Methods: We studied 2 cohorts of patients with MS: a retrospective longitudinal cohort of 238 patients and 74 controls and a prospective cohort of 61 patients and 41 controls with serial serum samples. Patients were stratified into active or stable disease based on 2 years of prospective assessment accounting for presence of clinical relapses or changes in disability measured with the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Metabolomic profiling (lipids and amino acids) was performed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in serum samples. Data analysis was performed using parametric methods, principal component analysis, and partial least square discriminant analysis for assessing the differences between cases and controls and for subgroups based on disease severity. Results: We identified metabolomics signatures with high accuracy for classifying patients vs controls as well as for classifying patients with medium to high disability (EDSS >3.0). Among them, sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylethanolamine were the metabolites that showed a more robust pattern in the time series analysis for discriminating between patients and controls. Moreover, levels of hydrocortisone, glutamic acid, tryptophan, eicosapentaenoic acid, 13S-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid, lysophosphatidylcholines, and lysophosphatidylethanolamines were associated with more severe disease (non-relapse-free or increase in EDSS). Conclusions: We identified metabolomic signatures composed of hormones, lipids, and amino acids associated with MS and with a more severe course. PMID:28180139

  17. Crohn’s disease and schistosomiasis: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Limaiem, Faten; Sassi, Asma; Mzabi, Sabeh

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronic enteropathogenic disease caused by blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma. Coexistence of schistosomiasis with Crohn's disease is very rare. To the best of our knowledge, this association has been described in literature only once. A 20-year-old male patient with a past medical history of appendectomy and ileocecal Crohn's disease, presented with abdominal pain and vomiting. Ileocolonoscopy showed an ulcerated and congested appearance of the upper rectum and sigmoid. Computed tomography scan revealed a circumferential thickening of the terminal ileum with luminal stenosis. Histopathological examination of the biopsy specimens revealed a focally ulcerated colonic epithelium. The lamina propria was fibrous harbouring a polymorphic inflammatory infiltrate including lymphocytes and plasma cells organized in lymphoid follicles admixed with eosinophils and neutrophils. In the submucosa, there were two well-preserved schistosoma eggs surrounded by a thick shell with a barely visible terminal spine. The final pathological diagnosis was colonic schistosomiasis associated with Crohn's disease. The patient underwent an ileocecal resection for stenosis of the terminal ileum complicated with enterocutaneous fistula. The postoperative course was uneventful. A stool examination and serology tests were planned for this patient who was lost to follow-up. PMID:28292086

  18. [Celiac disease associated with major thalassemia. A case report].

    PubMed

    Mangiagli, A; Campisi, S

    1996-09-01

    The spectrum of clinical manifestations of coeliac disease, the most common chronic intestinal disorder in children, has widened considerably over the past years and new associations with other diseases, both immunological and non-immunological, have been described. AGA and EMA have proved to be an efficient screening method both in populations with gastrointestinal pathologies and in groups of pauci- or even asymptomatic subjects. The clinical picture of beta-thalassemia has gradually altered over the years owing to improved treatment. However, growth is still affected in a considerable proportion of thalassemic patients. A number of hormonal and other causes, combined in varying ways, contribute to determining this clinical condition. The authors report a case of coeliac disease in an adolescent with thalassemia major characterised by anorexia, arrest of weight gain and low stature. The identification of a new association between coeliac disease and thalassemia major highlights the need to search for this pathology in all thalassemic patients who present scarce growth in stature and weight.

  19. Cardiovascular disease associated with human immunodeficiency virus: a review.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luísa Amado; Almeida, Ana G

    2015-01-01

    The cardiovascular manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have changed significantly following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens. On one hand, HAART has altered the course of HIV disease, with longer survival of HIV-infected patients, and cardiovascular complications of HIV infection such as myocarditis have been reduced. On the other hand, HAART is associated with an increase in the prevalence of both peripheral and coronary arterial disease. As longevity increases in HIV-infected individuals, long-term effects, such as cardiovascular disease, are emerging as leading health issues in this population. In the present review article, we discuss HIV-associated cardiovascular disease, focusing on epidemiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, prognosis, management and therapy. Cardiovascular involvement in treatment-naive patients is still important in situations such as non-adherence to treatment, late initiation of treatment, and/or limited access to HAART in developing countries. We therefore describe the cardiovascular consequences in treatment-naive patients and the potential effect of antiretroviral treatment on their regression, as well as the metabolic and cardiovascular implications of HAART regimens in HIV-infected individuals.

  20. Association of Peripheral Arterial and Cardiovascular Diseases in Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carolina; Miname, Marcio; Makdisse, Marcia; Kalil, Roberto; Santos, Raul D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an elevation in the serum levels of total cholesterol and of low-density lipoproteins (LDL- c). Known to be closely related to the atherosclerotic process, FH can determine the development of early obstructive lesions in different arterial beds. In this context, FH has also been proposed to be a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Objective This observational cross-sectional study assessed the association of PAD with other manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease, in patients with heterozygous FH. Methods The diagnosis of PAD was established by ankle-brachial index (ABI) values ≤ 0.90. This study assessed 202 patients (35% of men) with heterozygous FH (90.6% with LDL receptor mutations), mean age of 51 ± 14 years and total cholesterol levels of 342 ± 86 mg /dL. Results The prevalences of PAD and previous CVD were 17% and 28.2 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, an independent association between CVD and the diagnosis of PAD was observed (OR = 2.50; 95% CI: 1.004 - 6.230; p = 0.049). Conclusion Systematic screening for PAD by use of ABI is feasible to assess patients with FH, and it might indicate an increased risk for CVD. However, further studies are required to determine the role of ABI as a tool to assess the cardiovascular risk of those patients. PMID:25029472

  1. Calcified Granulomatous Disease: Occupational Associations and Lack of Familial Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Robert M.; Amoroso, Anthony; Hashmi, Salman; Kligerman, Seth; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Netzer, Giora

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The acute host response to histoplasma capsulatum infection varies according to exposure and susceptibility. Late sequelae include calcifications in the lung, thoracic lymphatics, and spleen. Determinants of calcified granuloma formation are poorly studied and may differ from those affecting acute response. We examined the occupational associations and familial aggregation of radiographic calcified granulomatous disease to characterize the determinants of calcified granuloma formation. Methods We analyzed prospectively collected cross-sectional data including computed tomograms from 872 adult members of the Old Order Amish of Lancaster County. Results Granulomas were present in 71 % of participants. Granulomas were present in the lung of 57 % of participants, in the hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes of 55 % of participants, and in the spleen of 29 % of participants. No significant differences were observed in the presence of granulomas between men and women. Each year of age was associated with 4 % higher odds of splenic calcifications, and a primary occupation of farming was associated with an 84 % higher odds of splenic calcifications. A compelling pattern of familial aggregation was not observed. Conclusions Calcified granulomatous disease does not appear to aggregate in families. Determinants influencing patterns of granulomatous disease include occupation, age, and geographic location. PMID:25038755

  2. Association mapping of disease resistance traits in rainbow trout using restriction site associated DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Nathan R; LaPatra, Scott E; Overturf, Ken; Towner, Richard; Narum, Shawn R

    2014-10-28

    Recent advances in genotyping-by-sequencing have enabled genome-wide association studies in nonmodel species including those in aquaculture programs. As with other aquaculture species, rainbow trout and steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are susceptible to disease and outbreaks can lead to significant losses. Fish culturists have therefore been pursuing strategies to prevent losses to common pathogens such as Flavobacterium psychrophilum (the etiological agent for bacterial cold water disease [CWD]) and infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) by adjusting feed formulations, vaccine development, and selective breeding. However, discovery of genetic markers linked to disease resistance offers the potential to use marker-assisted selection to increase resistance and reduce outbreaks. For this study we sampled juvenile fish from 40 families from 2-yr classes that either survived or died after controlled exposure to either CWD or IHNV. Restriction site-associated DNA sequencing produced 4661 polymorphic single-nucleotide polymorphism loci after strict filtering. Genotypes from individual survivors and mortalities were then used to test for association between disease resistance and genotype at each locus using the program TASSEL. After we accounted for kinship and stratification of the samples, tests revealed 12 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers that were highly associated with resistance to CWD and 19 markers associated with resistance to IHNV. These markers are candidates for further investigation and are expected to be useful for marker assisted selection in future broodstock selection for various aquaculture programs.

  3. Association between environmental exposure to pesticides and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Parrón, Tesifón; Requena, Mar; Hernández, Antonio F; Alarcón, Raquel

    2011-11-01

    Preliminary studies have shown associations between chronic pesticide exposure in occupational settings and neurological disorders. However, data on the effects of long-term non-occupational exposures are too sparse to allow any conclusions. This study examines the influence of environmental pesticide exposure on a number of neuropsychiatric conditions and discusses their underlying pathologic mechanisms. An ecological study was conducted using averaged prevalence rates of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, cerebral degeneration, polyneuropathies, affective psychosis and suicide attempts in selected Andalusian health districts categorized into areas of high and low environmental pesticide exposure based on the number of hectares devoted to intensive agriculture and pesticide sales per capita. A total of 17,429 cases were collected from computerized hospital records (minimum dataset) between 1998 and 2005. Prevalence rates and the risk of having Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and suicide were significantly higher in districts with greater pesticide use as compared to those with lower pesticide use. The multivariate analyses showed that the population living in areas with high pesticide use had an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease and suicide attempts and that males living in these areas had increased risks for polyneuropathies, affective disorders and suicide attempts. In conclusion, this study supports and extends previous findings and provides an indication that environmental exposure to pesticides may affect the human health by increasing the incidence of certain neurological disorders at the level of the general population.

  4. Update on persistent symptoms associated with Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Carlos R.; Shapiro, Eugene D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Lyme disease, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common vector-borne illness in the United States. The pathogenesis, ecology, and epidemiology of Lyme disease have been well described, and antimicrobial treatment is very effective. There has been controversy about whether infection can persist and cause chronic symptoms despite treatment with antimicrobials. This review summarizes recent studies that have addressed this issue. Recent findings The pathogenesis of persistent nonspecific symptoms in patients who were treated for Lyme disease is poorly understood, and the validity of results of attempts to demonstrate persistent infection with B. burgdorferi has not been established. One study attempted to use xenodiagnosis to detect B. burgdorferi in patients who have been treated for Lyme disease. Another study assessed whether repeated episodes of erythema migrans were due to the same or different strains of B. burgdorferi. A possible cause of persistent arthritis in some treated patients is slow clearance of nonviable organisms that may lead to prolonged inflammation. The results of all of these studies continue to provide evidence that viable B. burgdorferi do not persist in patients who receive conventional antimicrobial treatment for Lyme disease. Summary Patients with persistent symptoms possibly associated with Lyme disease often provide a challenge for clinicians. Recent studies have provided additional evidence that viable B. burgdorferi do not persist after conventional treatment with antimicrobials, indicating that ongoing symptoms in patients who received conventional treatment for Lyme disease should not be attributed to persistent active infection. Video abstract http://links.lww.com/MOP/A23 PMID:25490690

  5. Allied Health Field, Ninth Grade. Introduction to Allied Health and the Health Care Team. Operation TACT [Toward an Allied Health Career Today] Curriculum [and Teachers' Handbook].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Univ., Storrs. School of Allied Health Professions.

    The two-part set consists of a student handbook and a related teachers' handbook in allied health education for use at the ninth grade level. The student handbook contains nine units which focus on the science curriculum: (1) introduction, (2) weights and measures, (3) human body, (4) chemistry, (5) electricity and magnetism, (6) heat and its…

  6. Allied Health Field, Tenth Grade. Introduction to Allied Health and the Health Care Team. Operation TACT [Toward an Allied Health Career Today] Curriculum [and Teachers' Handbook].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Tracy

    The two-part set consists of a student handbook and a related teachers' handbook in allied health education for use at the tenth grade level. The student handbook consists of seven units which focus on the biology curriculum: (1) community water examination, (2) bacteriological examination of water, (3) the microscope, (4) microbes and man, (5)…

  7. Possible association of cutaneous Rosai-Dorfman disease and chronic Crohn disease: a case series report.

    PubMed

    Salva, Katrin A; Stenstrom, Melissa; Breadon, Jonith Y; Odland, Paul Blair; Bennett, Daniel; Longley, Jack; Wood, Gary S

    2014-02-01

    IMPORTANCE Cutaneous Rosai-Dorfman disease (CRDD), a variant of Rosai-Dorfman disease limited to the skin, has a wide range of clinical presentations. Rosai-Dorfman disease is believed to result from an aberrant response to antigens, caused by immunosuppressive macrophages. Macrophage-mediated immunosuppression is also implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn disease, linking these otherwise unrelated entities. To our knowledge, the coexistence of these disorders has been described in only 2 cases, 1 of them confined to the skin and soft tissue. OBSERVATIONS We present a series of 3 patients who developed purely CRDD in the context of long-standing Crohn disease. Statistical estimates suggested that the association of these 2 disorders is not due to chance (P<.001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our case series provides the clinical correlate to the pathogenetic parallels between CRDD and Crohn disease. Crohn disease is frequently complicated by various skin manifestations, which may be mimicked by CRDD. Therefore, it may be prudent for clinicians to include CRDD in the list of differential diagnoses when examining skin lesions in patients with Crohn disease.

  8. Vascular disease and risk factors are associated with cognitive decline in the alzheimer disease spectrum.

    PubMed

    Lorius, Natacha; Locascio, Joseph J; Rentz, Dorene M; Johnson, Keith A; Sperling, Reisa A; Viswanathan, Anand; Marshall, Gad A

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between vascular disease and risk factors versus cognitive decline cross-sectionally and longitudinally in normal older control, mild cognitive impairment, and mild Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia subjects. A total of 812 participants (229 normal older control, 395 mild cognitive impairment, 188 AD) underwent cognitive testing, brain magnetic resonance imaging, and clinical evaluations at baseline and over a period of 3 years. General linear, longitudinal mixed-effects, and Cox proportional hazards models were used. Greater homocysteine level and white matter hyperintensity volume were associated with processing speed impairment (homocysteine: P=0.02; white matter hyperintensity: P<0.0001); greater Vascular Index score was associated with memory impairment (P=0.007); and greater number of apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE4) alleles was associated with global cognitive impairment (P=0.007) at baseline. Apolipoprotein E ε4 was associated with greater rate of increase in global cognitive impairment (P=0.002) and processing speed impairment (P=0.001) over time, whereas higher total cholesterol was associated with greater rate of increase in global cognitive impairment (P=0.02) and memory impairment (P=0.06) over time. These results suggest a significant association of increased vascular disease and risk factors with cognitive impairment at baseline and over time in the AD spectrum in a sample that was selected to have low vascular burden at baseline.

  9. Association of atopic dermatitis with cardiovascular risk factors and diseases.

    PubMed

    Standl, Marie; Tesch, Falko; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Rodríguez, Elke; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Gieger, Christian; Peters, Annette; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; Kronenberg, Florian; Schulz, Holger; Koletzko, Sibylle; Schikowski, Tamara; von Berg, Andrea; Lehmann, Irina; Berdel, Dietrich; Heinrich, Joachim; Schmitt, Jochen; Weidinger, Stephan

    2016-12-20

    Epidemiological studies suggested an association between atopic dermatitis (AD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, we investigate associations and potential underlying pathways of AD and CVD in large cohort studies: the AOK PLUS cohort (n=1.2Mio), the GINIplus/LISAplus birth cohorts (n=2286), and the KORA F4 cohort (n=2990). Additionally, metabolomics in KORA F4 and established cardiovascular risk loci in genome-wide data on 10,788 AD cases and 30,047 controls were analyzed. Longitudinal analysis of AD patients in AOK PLUS showed slightly increased risk for incident angina pectoris (AP) (adjusted risk ratio 1.17; 95%-confidence interval 1.12-1.23), hypertension (1.04 (1.02-1.06)) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) (1.15 (1.11-1.19)) but not for myocardial infarction (MI) (1.05 (0.99-1.12) and stroke (1.02 (0.98-1.07)). In KORA F4 and GINIplus/LISAplus, AD was not associated with cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) and no differences in metabolite levels were detected. There was no robust evidence for shared genetic risk variants of AD and CVD. This study indicates only a marginally increased risk for AP, hypertension and PAD and no increased risk for MI or stroke in AD patients. Relevant associations of AD with CVRFs reported in US-populations could not be confirmed. Likewise, AD patients did not have increased genetic risk factors for CVD.

  10. Influenza-Associated Hospitalizations for Cardiovascular Diseases in the Tropics.

    PubMed

    Ang, Li Wei; Yap, Jonathan; Lee, Vernon; Chng, Wei Qiang; Jaufeerally, Fazlur Rehman; Lam, Carolyn Su Ping; Cutter, Jeffery; Yeo, Khung Keong; Ma, Stefan

    2017-02-25

    Influenza is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. We aimed to examine the influenza-associated hospitalization rates and proportions for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in tropical Singapore. Hospital admissions for ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF), and overall CVD were obtained from the national inpatient database for the period of 2010-2014. We used, as the key indicator of influenza virus activity, the overall proportion of specimens from outpatients with influenza-like illness in the community that tested positive for influenza as part of the national influenza surveillance program. The annual influenza-associated hospitalization rates per 100,000 person-years ranged from 9.5 to 12.2 for IHD, 7.7 to 9.1 for CHF, and 15.8 to 19.2 for overall CVD. The influenza-associated hospitalization rates increased with increasing age. Influenza was significantly associated with excess hospitalizations in elderly persons aged ≥80 years, with an excess hospitalization rate per 100,000 person-years of 242.7 for IHD (P = 0.02), 271.8 for CHF (P = 0.01), and 497.2 for overall CVD (P < 0.001). In the tropics, influenza accounts for excess cardiovascular-related hospitalizations, especially in the elderly.

  11. Travel-associated Legionnaires disease in Europe in 2008.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, K; Joseph, C A; Yadav, R

    2010-05-27

    In 2008, the European Surveillance Scheme for Travel Associated Legionnaires Disease (EWGLINET) received reports of 866 cases of travel-associated Legionnaires disease, 42 of whom were reported to have died. 824 of the cases were classified as confirmed and 42 were presumptive. As in previous years, a very low proportion of clinical isolates were obtained (63 cases, 7.3%). Males outnumbered females by 2.8:1 in the 2008 dataset and had a median age of 60 years compared with women, whose median age was 63 years. Travel outside Europe was reported for 12% of the cases. The scheme identified 108 new clusters in 2008. Sixteen were located in countries outside EWGLINET and 38 (35.2%) involved only one case from each reporting country, and would not ordinarily have been detected by national surveillance schemes alone. The largest cluster (six cases) was associated with travel to Spain. The 108 clusters were associated with 144 environmental investigations, 35 of which were at re-offending sites, (sites which had previously been investigated and where additional cases had subsequently occurred). At 61 (42.1%) of the sites Legionella species were detected. The names of 12 sites were published on the EWGLINET website.

  12. Travel-associated Legionnaires disease in Europe: 2006.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, K D; Yadav, R; Joseph, C A

    2008-07-17

    Twenty countries reported 921 cases of travel-associated Legionnaires' disease to EWGLINET (the European Surveillance Scheme for Travel-Associated Legionnaires' Disease) with onset during 2006; 875 confirmed and 46 presumptive. Thirty three cases died, giving a case fatality rate of 3.6%. Of the 124 new clusters detected in 2006, 43 would not have been identified without the EWGLINET scheme. A total of 146 investigations were conducted at cluster sites according to the standards of the EWGLINET investigation guidelines; 111 of these investigations were associated with the new clusters while 35 investigations were associated with re-offending sites (where additional cases had onset after a report was received to say that investigations and control measures had been satisfactorily conducted). The names of four accommodation sites were published on the EWGLI website. Overall, there has been an upwards trend in case numbers since the scheme was founded, which has implications for the work load of public health authorities across Europe and for the tour industry. Despite this increasing pressure on public health authorities, environmental investigations are being conducted in a timely manner.

  13. Encephalopathy Associated with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease: A Potentially Reversible Condition

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Inês; Marques, Inês B.; Ferreira, Rogério; Sousa, Lívia

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease may occasionally associate with unspecific neurological symptoms, which are more commonly insidious, include cognitive or behavioural symptoms, and may associate with tremor, myoclonus, or ataxia. We report a 61-year-old female patient who presented with chronic headache, insidious mood, and cognitive disturbance which evolved in a few months to dementia associated with exuberant limb myoclonus. Diagnostic workup revealed high anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody titers and an inflammatory CSF profile, and it was negative for other possible etiologies. Treatment with steroids induced significant improvement. The diagnosis of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease is still controversial given the fact that the clinical presentation and diagnostic workup are unspecific, the pathophysiology is still undetermined, and the diagnosis is mostly of exclusion. No direct correlation is found between anti-thyroid antibody titers and clinical presentation, and it is currently speculated that other still unrecognized antibodies may be responsible for this clinical entity. It is extremely important to recognize this entity because it is potentially treatable with immunotherapies. It is also increasingly recognized that clinical improvement with first-line treatment with steroids may be absent or incomplete, and other immunotherapies as immunosuppressants, intravenous immunoglobulin, or plasma exchange must be attempted in the clinical suspicion of EEAT. PMID:27127515

  14. Association of Wolbachia with heartworm disease in cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Patricia; Levy, Julie K; Kramer, Laura H; Johnson, Calvin M; Lappin, Michael R; Greiner, Ellis C; Courtney, Charles H; Tucker, Sylvia J; Morchon, Rodrigo

    2010-05-28

    Although the presence of adult Dirofilaria immitis in the pulmonary arteries and its associated arteritis and thromboembolic disease can explain some of the manifestations of canine and feline heartworm disease, the cause of other findings remains unclear. Cats with D. immitis antibodies but lacking adult parasites in the pulmonary arteries frequently develop histological lesions of the airways, resulting in a condition termed Heartworm-Associated Respiratory Disease. All D. immitis parasites harbor Wolbachia pipientis bacteria and D. immitis-infected animals can have circulating Wolbachia antibodies and pro-inflammatory Wolbachia antigens (WSP) deposited in tissues. Little is known about the role that Wolbachia plays in lung disease of animals naturally infected with D. immitis. The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of Wolbachia to the pathogenesis of natural heartworm disease in cats and dogs. We hypothesized that animals having sufficient Wolbachia burden to be detected in lung tissue by immunohistochemistry and/or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) would have more severe pulmonary disease than those with bacteria below the limits of detection. We further hypothesized that animals that were immunoreactive to pro-inflammatory WSP would have more severe pulmonary lesions than those that were seronegative for WSP antibodies. Blood and lung tissue samples were collected from cats and dogs representing three different D. immitis infection statuses: heartworm-free, heartworm-exposed, heartworm-infected. There was a positive but weak correlation between the magnitude of D. immitis antibody titers and WSP titers in cats (r=0.57, p<0.001) and in dogs (r=0.39, p<0.001). Pulmonary lesions were more common in HW-infected animals than in HW-free animals. Pulmonary arteriolar occlusion was more common in HW-infected cats (57%; p=0.003) than in HW-infected dogs (17%). Although pulmonary lesions were most common in HW-infected animals, there was no clear

  15. Clinical relevance of epigenetic dysregulation in chronic kidney disease-associated cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Adam M; Rogacev, Kyrill S; Heine, Gunnar H

    2013-07-01

    Across the spectrum of clinical medicine, the field of epigenetics has gained substantial scientific interest in recent years. Epigenetics refers to modifications in gene expression which are not explained by changes in DNA sequence. Classical components of epigenetic regulation comprise DNA methylation, histone modifications and RNA interference. In chronic kidney disease (CKD), several features of uraemia, such as hyperhomocysteinemia and inflammation, may contribute to changes in epigenetic gene regulation. It has been suggested that these changes may affect genes related to cardiovascular disease. Thereby, a uraemia-associated disturbance in epigenetic regulation may contribute to the substantial increase in cardiovascular morbidity in CKD patients. The present review aims to summarize current knowledge of epigenetic dysregulation in cardiovascular disease from a nephrological perspective, with a special focus on DNA methylation. We first describe the impact of altered epigenetic regulation in non-CKD-associated arteriosclerosis, and next characterize uraemic features which may affect epigenetic gene regulation in the context of cardiovascular disease. Finally, we conclude that substantial additional work is needed before epigenetic regulatory mechanisms may become therapeutic targets in CKD-associated cardiovascular disease.

  16. Belching during gastroscopy and its association with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, B S; Lee, S H; Jang, D K; Chung, K H; Hwang, J H; Jang, S E; Cha, B H; Ryu, J K; Kim, Y-T

    2016-05-01

    Belching may result from transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation; therefore, it has been proposed that belching may be a manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This study was conducted to investigate the frequency of belching during esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and its association with GERD. A retrospective review was performed on prospectively collected clinical and endoscopic data from 404 subjects who underwent EGD without sedation from December 2012 to May 2013 in a training hospital in Korea. All detectable belching events during endoscopy were counted. Frequency and severity of belching events were compared between the group with and without GERD using an ordinal logistic regression model. There were 145 GERD patients (26 erosive reflux disease and 119 nonerosive reflux disease [NERD]). In the multivariable analysis, GERD was significantly associated with a higher frequency of belching events (odds ratio = 6.59, P < 0.001). Central obesity, female, and younger age were also risk factors for frequent belching during EGD. Subgroup analyses were performed in subjects without erosive reflux disease (n = 378) and NERD (n = 293). NERD was also a predictive factor for frequent belching during EGD (odds ratio = 6.61, P < 0.001), and the frequency of belching was significantly correlated with GERD severity according to the Los Angeles classification (P < 0.05). Frequent belching during EGD was associated with GERD, including NERD. Future research should focus on its adjuvant role in the diagnosis of GERD/NERD and the necessity for applying differentiated endoscopy strategies for GERD patients, leading to less discomfort during EGD in patients at risk for intolerability.

  17. 3Disease Browser: A Web server for integrating 3D genome and disease-associated chromosome rearrangement data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruifeng; Liu, Yifang; Li, Tingting; Li, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangement (CR) events have been implicated in many tumor and non-tumor human diseases. CR events lead to their associated diseases by disrupting gene and protein structures. Also, they can lead to diseases through changes in chromosomal 3D structure and gene expression. In this study, we search for CR-associated diseases potentially caused by chromosomal 3D structure alteration by integrating Hi-C and ChIP-seq data. Our algorithm rediscovers experimentally verified disease-associated CRs (polydactyly diseases) that alter gene expression by disrupting chromosome 3D structure. Interestingly, we find that intellectual disability may be a candidate disease caused by 3D chromosome structure alteration. We also develop a Web server (3Disease Browser, http://3dgb.cbi.pku.edu.cn/disease/) for integrating and visualizing disease-associated CR events and chromosomal 3D structure. PMID:27734896

  18. Treatment strategies for aneurysms associated with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Xu, Kan; Zhang, Yandong; Wang, Xin; Yu, Jinlu

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of aneurysms associated with moyamoya disease (MMD) is difficult for neurosurgeons, and little is known of strategy options. This report constitutes a comprehensive review of the literature. We summarize the known treatments and their clinical outcomes according to the site of the aneurysm: in major arteries, peripheral arteries, moyamoya vessels, meningeal arteries, or at the site of anastomosis. The literature review indicates that the treatment of MMD-associated aneurysms varies according to the site of the aneurysm and its hemodynamic characteristics. In particular, the treatment for basilar tip aneurysms remains challenging, since both endovascular embolization and direct clipping are difficult. The potential risk for ischemia should be considered in selecting endovascular or surgical approaches. Revascularization surgery, which is important for the treatment of MMD, also determines the clinical treatment outcome of aneurysms associated with MMD.

  19. Selected list of books and journals in allied health *

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Alfred N.; Hill, Dorothy R.

    1996-01-01

    This list of 410 books and 76 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and described in the AMA's Allied Health and Rehabilitation Professions Education Directory, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, medical secretarial, nutrition, and speech pathology/audiology programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (163 books and 31 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1996 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $26,740. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $11,160. PMID:16018053

  20. Associations between Early Markers of Parkinson's Disease and Sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Drey, Michael; Hasmann, Sandra E.; Krenovsky, Jan-Peter; Hobert, Markus A.; Straub, Stefanie; Elshehabi, Morad; von Thaler, Anna-Katharina; Fallgatter, Andreas J.; Eschweiler, Gerhard W.; Suenkel, Ulrike; Berg, Daniela; Maetzler, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Sarcopenia and Parkinson's disease (PD) are both common age-related syndromes, and there is preliminary evidence that the probability of the co-occurrence of these syndromes within one individual is higher than expected. However, it is unclear to date whether one of the syndromes induces the other, or whether there may be common underlying causes. This pilot study thus aimed at investigating the association of the features of increased risk for PD with early stage sarcopenia (ESS). Method: Two hundred and fifty-five community-dwelling individuals were recruited from the Tübinger evaluation of Risk factors for Early detection of NeuroDegeneration (TREND) study. The following features that are associated with an increased risk for future PD were evaluated: the motor part of the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS-III), hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra, prevalence of lifetime depression, hyposmia, REM sleep behavior disorder and the recently introduced probability score for prodromal PD. Sarcopenia was defined according to the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People, which was adapted to this cohort of healthy adults. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to identify associations of PD-related features with ESS. Results: The UPDRS-III score was significantly associated with ESS. The result remained significant after the adjustment for age, gender and physical activity. No association was found between the other PD-related features and ESS. Conclusion: The significant association of the UPDRS-III score with ESS in this cohort might indicate a common and early pathway in both diseases and supports the existence of an “extended neurodegenerative overlap syndrome.” Moreover, the potential of EES to serve as a prodromal marker of PD should be evaluated in future studies. PMID:28326036

  1. Familial associations of lymphoma and myeloma with autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, K; Försti, A; Sundquist, K; Sundquist, J; Li, X

    2017-01-01

    Many B-cell neoplasms are associated with autoimmune diseases (AIDs) but most evidence is based on a personal rather than a family history of AIDs. Here we calculated risks for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and multiple myeloma (MM) when family members were diagnosed with any of 44 different AIDs, or, independently, risk for AIDs when family members were diagnosed with a neoplasm. A total of 64 418 neoplasms and 531 155 AIDs were identified from Swedish nationwide health care records. NHL was associated with a family history of five AIDs, all increasing the risk, HL was associated with one AID increasing and three AIDs decreasing the risk while MM had no association. A family history of NHL was associated with eight, HL with seven and MM with seven different AIDs, nine increasing and 13 decreasing the risk. The present family data on B-cell neoplasms and AIDs show an approximately equal number of associations for risk increase and risk decrease, suggesting that inherited genes or gene-environment interactions may increase the risk or be protective. These results differed from published data on personal history of AID, which only report increased risks, often vastly higher and for different AIDs compared with the present data. PMID:28157190

  2. Associations between B Vitamins and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Liang

    2015-01-01

    B vitamins may correlate with Parkinson’s disease (PD) through regulating homocysteine level. However, there is no comprehensive assessment on the associations between PD and B vitamins. The present study was designed to perform a meta-analytic assessment of the associations between folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 and PD, including the status of B vitamins in PD patients compared with controls, and associations of dietary intakes of B vitamins and risk of PD. A literature search using Medline database obtained 10 eligible studies included in the meta-analyses. Stata 12.0 statistical software was used to perform the meta-analysis. Pooled data revealed that there was no obvious difference in folate level between PD patients and healthy controls, and PD patients had lower level of vitamin B12 than controls. Available data suggested that higher dietary intake of vitamin B6 was associated with a decreased risk of PD (odds ratio (OR) = 0.65, 95% confidence intervals (CI) = (0.30, 1.01)), while no significant association was observed for dietary intake of folate and vitamin B12 and risk of PD. PD patients had lower level of vitamin B12 and similar level of folate compared with controls. Dietary intake of vitamin B6 exhibited preventive effect of developing PD based on the available data. As the number of included studies is limited, more studies are needed to confirm the findings and elucidate the underpinning underlying these associations. PMID:26343714

  3. Familial associations of lymphoma and myeloma with autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, K; Försti, A; Sundquist, K; Sundquist, J; Li, X

    2017-01-06

    Many B-cell neoplasms are associated with autoimmune diseases (AIDs) but most evidence is based on a personal rather than a family history of AIDs. Here we calculated risks for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and multiple myeloma (MM) when family members were diagnosed with any of 44 different AIDs, or, independently, risk for AIDs when family members were diagnosed with a neoplasm. A total of 64 418 neoplasms and 531 155 AIDs were identified from Swedish nationwide health care records. NHL was associated with a family history of five AIDs, all increasing the risk, HL was associated with one AID increasing and three AIDs decreasing the risk while MM had no association. A family history of NHL was associated with eight, HL with seven and MM with seven different AIDs, nine increasing and 13 decreasing the risk. The present family data on B-cell neoplasms and AIDs show an approximately equal number of associations for risk increase and risk decrease, suggesting that inherited genes or gene-environment interactions may increase the risk or be protective. These results differed from published data on personal history of AID, which only report increased risks, often vastly higher and for different AIDs compared with the present data.

  4. Aortic Disease Presentation and Outcome Associated with ACTA2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Regalado, Ellen S.; Guo, Dongchuan; Prakash, Siddharth; Bensend, Tracy A.; Flynn, Kelly; Estrera, Anthony; Safi, Hazim; Liang, David; Hyland, James; Child, Anne; Arno, Gavin; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Braverman, Alan; Moran, Rocio; Morisaki, Takayuki; Morisaki, Hiroko; Consortium, Montalcino Aortic; Pyeritz, Reed; Coselli, Joseph; LeMaire, Scott; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2015-01-01

    Background ACTA2 mutations are the major cause of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. We sought to characterize these aortic diseases in a large case series of individuals with ACTA2 mutations. Methods and Results Aortic disease, management, and outcome associated with the first aortic event (aortic dissection or aneurysm repair) were abstracted from the medical records of 277 individuals with 41 various ACTA2 mutations. Aortic events occurred in 48% of these individuals, with the vast majority presenting with thoracic aortic dissections (88%) associated with 25% mortality. Type A dissections were more common than type B dissections (54% versus 21%), but the median age of onset of type B dissections was significantly younger than type A dissections (27 years, IQR 18–41 versus 36 years, IQR 26–45). Only 12% of aortic events were repair of ascending aortic aneurysms, which variably involved the aortic root, ascending aorta and aortic arch. Overall cumulative risk of an aortic event at age 85 years was 0.76 (95% CI 0.64, 0.86). After adjustment for intra-familial correlation, gender and race, mutations disrupting p.R179 and p.R258 were associated with significantly increased risk for aortic events, whereas p.R185Q and p.R118Q mutations showed significantly lower risk of aortic events compared to other mutations. Conclusions ACTA2 mutations are associated with high risk of presentation with an acute aortic dissection. The lifetime risk for an aortic event is only 76%, suggesting that additional environmental or genetic factors play a role in expression of aortic disease in individuals with ACTA2 mutations. PMID:25759435

  5. Collective judgment predicts disease-associated single nucleotide variants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years the number of human genetic variants deposited into the publicly available databases has been increasing exponentially. The latest version of dbSNP, for example, contains ~50 million validated Single Nucleotide Variants (SNVs). SNVs make up most of human variation and are often the primary causes of disease. The non-synonymous SNVs (nsSNVs) result in single amino acid substitutions and may affect protein function, often causing disease. Although several methods for the detection of nsSNV effects have already been developed, the consistent increase in annotated data is offering the opportunity to improve prediction accuracy. Results Here we present a new approach for the detection of disease-associated nsSNVs (Meta-SNP) that integrates four existing methods: PANTHER, PhD-SNP, SIFT and SNAP. We first tested the accuracy of each method using a dataset of 35,766 disease-annotated mutations from 8,667 proteins extracted from the SwissVar database. The four methods reached overall accuracies of 64%-76% with a Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.38-0.53. We then used the outputs of these methods to develop a machine learning based approach that discriminates between disease-associated and polymorphic variants (Meta-SNP). In testing, the combined method reached 79% overall accuracy and 0.59 MCC, ~3% higher accuracy and ~0.05 higher correlation with respect to the best-performing method. Moreover, for the hardest-to-define subset of nsSNVs, i.e. variants for which half of the predictors disagreed with the other half, Meta-SNP attained 8% higher accuracy than the best predictor. Conclusions Here we find that the Meta-SNP algorithm achieves better performance than the best single predictor. This result suggests that the methods used for the prediction of variant-disease associations are orthogonal, encoding different biologically relevant relationships. Careful combination of predictions from various resources is therefore a good strategy

  6. Elevated Pulse Pressure is Associated with Hemolysis, Proteinuria and Chronic Kidney Disease in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Novelli, Enrico M.; Hildesheim, Mariana; Rosano, Caterina; Vanderpool, Rebecca; Simon, Marc; Kato, Gregory J.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    A seeming paradox of sickle cell disease is that patients do not suffer from a high prevalence of systemic hypertension in spite of endothelial dysfunction, chronic inflammation and vasculopathy. However, some patients do develop systolic hypertension and increased pulse pressure, an increasingly recognized major cardiovascular risk factor in other populations. Hence, we hypothesized that pulse pressure, unlike other blood pressure parameters, is independently associated with markers of hemolytic anemia and cardiovascular risk in sickle cell disease. We analyzed the correlates of pulse pressure in patients (n  =  661) enrolled in a multicenter international sickle cell trial. Markers of hemolysis were analyzed as independent variables and as a previously validated hemolytic index that includes multiple variables. We found that pulse pressure, not systolic, diastolic or mean arterial pressure, independently correlated with high reticulocyte count (beta  =  2.37, p  =  0.02) and high hemolytic index (beta  =  1.53, p = 0.002) in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease in two multiple linear regression models which include the markers of hemolysis as independent variables or the hemolytic index, respectively. Pulse pressure was also independently associated with elevated serum creatinine (beta  =  3.21, p  =  0.02), and with proteinuria (beta  =  2.52, p  =  0.04). These results from the largest sickle cell disease cohort to date since the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease show that pulse pressure is independently associated with hemolysis, proteinuria and chronic kidney disease. We propose that high pulse pressure may be a risk factor for clinical complications of vascular dysfunction in sickle cell disease. Longitudinal and mechanistic studies should be conducted to confirm these hypotheses. PMID:25478953

  7. Association between environmental exposure to pesticides and neurodegenerative diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Parron, Tesifon; Requena, Mar; Hernandez, Antonio F.; Alarcon, Raquel

    2011-11-15

    Preliminary studies have shown associations between chronic pesticide exposure in occupational settings and neurological disorders. However, data on the effects of long-term non-occupational exposures are too sparse to allow any conclusions. This study examines the influence of environmental pesticide exposure on a number of neuropsychiatric conditions and discusses their underlying pathologic mechanisms. An ecological study was conducted using averaged prevalence rates of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, cerebral degeneration, polyneuropathies, affective psychosis and suicide attempts in selected Andalusian health districts categorized into areas of high and low environmental pesticide exposure based on the number of hectares devoted to intensive agriculture and pesticide sales per capita. A total of 17,429 cases were collected from computerized hospital records (minimum dataset) between 1998 and 2005. Prevalence rates and the risk of having Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and suicide were significantly higher in districts with greater pesticide use as compared to those with lower pesticide use. The multivariate analyses showed that the population living in areas with high pesticide use had an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease and suicide attempts and that males living in these areas had increased risks for polyneuropathies, affective disorders and suicide attempts. In conclusion, this study supports and extends previous findings and provides an indication that environmental exposure to pesticides may affect the human health by increasing the incidence of certain neurological disorders at the level of the general population. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental exposure to pesticides and neurodegenerative-psychiatric disorders. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased risk for Alzheimer's disease and suicide attempts in high exposure areas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Males from

  8. Histopathological study on myocardial hypertrophy associated with ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, M

    1990-06-01

    The mode and causes of myocardial hypertrophy occurring in association with ischemic heart disease were studied. The investigation involved autopsied hearts (15 cases of subendocardial infarction, 27 of transmural infarction, 20 of non-infarcted three vessel disease and 17 controls) and biopsied materials obtained during coronary-aorta bypass graft surgery (23 patients with angina pectoris and 46 with myocardial infarction). The subendocardial infarction group showed most marked myocardial hypertrophy that reflected extensive infarction and fibrosis, dilatation of the left ventricular cavity and the loss of myocytes. Despite a marked decrease in the number of myocyte layers, the residual myocardium of the left ventricle was uniformly hypertrophic, accompanied by an increase in the heart weight. The larger the area of fibrosis, the more marked was myocardial hypertrophy irrespective of the luminal diameter of the responsible coronary artery. These findings indicate that myocardial hypertrophy associated with ischemic heart disease is enhanced by the compensatory mechanisms for a decrease in the contractile myocardium due to fibrosis.

  9. Systemic oxidative stress associated with the neurological diseases of aging.

    PubMed

    Serra, Jorge A; Domínguez, Raúl O; Marschoff, Enrique R; Guareschi, Eduardo M; Famulari, Arturo L; Boveris, Alberto

    2009-12-01

    Markers of oxidative stress were measured in blood samples of 338 subjects (965 observations): Alzheimer's, vascular dementia, diabetes (type II) superimposed to dementias, Parkinson's disease and controls. Patients showed increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (+21%; P < 0.05), copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (+64%; P < 0.001) and decreased antioxidant capacity (-28%; P < 0.001); pairs of variables resulted linearly related across groups (P < 0.001). Catalase and glutathione peroxidase, involved in discrimination between diseases, resulted non-significant. When diabetes is superimposed with dementias, changes resulted less marked but significant. Also, superoxide dismutase resulted not linearly correlated with any other variable or age-related (pure Alzheimer's peaks at 70 years, P < 0.001). Systemic oxidative stress was significantly associated (P < 0.001) with all diseases indicating a disbalance in peripheral/adaptive responses to oxidative disorders through different free radical metabolic pathways. While other changes - methionine cycle, insulin correlation - are also associated with dementias, the responses presented here show a simple linear relation between prooxidants and antioxidant defenses.

  10. Neuropsychiatric characteristics of GBA-associated Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Swan, Matthew; Doan, Nancy; Ortega, Robert A; Barrett, Matthew; Nichols, William; Ozelius, Laurie; Soto-Valencia, Jeannie; Boschung, Sarah; Deik, Andres; Sarva, Harini; Cabassa, Jose; Johannes, Brooke; Raymond, Deborah; Marder, Karen; Giladi, Nir; Miravite, Joan; Severt, William; Sachdev, Rivka; Shanker, Vicki; Bressman, Susan; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel

    2016-11-15

    Mutations in GBA1 are a well-established risk factor for Parkinson disease (PD). GBA-associated PD (GBA-PD) may have a higher burden of nonmotor symptoms than idiopathic PD (IPD). We sought to characterize the relationship between GBA-PD and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Subjects were screened for common GBA1 mutations. GBA-PD (n=31) and non-carrier (IPD; n=55) scores were compared on the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the State-Trait Anxiety Index (STAI). In univariate comparisons, GBA-PD had a greater prevalence of depression (33.3%) versus IPD (13.2%) (p<0.05). In regression models controlling for age, sex, disease duration, motor disability, and MoCA score, GBA-PD had an increased odds of depression (OR 3.66, 95% CI 1.13-11.8) (p=0.03). Post-hoc analysis stratified by sex showed that, among men, GBA-PD had a higher burden of trait anxiety and depression than IPD; this finding was sustained in multivariate models. Among women, GBA-PD did not confer greater psychiatric morbidity than IPD. These results suggest that GBA1 mutations confer greater risk of neuropsychiatric morbidity in PD, and that sex may affect this association.

  11. Under pressure: pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease.

    PubMed

    Farber, Harrison W; Gibbs, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with left heart disease (PH-LHD) is the most common type of PH, but its natural history is not well understood. PH-LHD is diagnosed by right heart catheterisation with a mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥25 mmHg and a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure >15 mmHg. The primary causes of PH-LHD are left ventricular dysfunction of systolic and diastolic origin, and valvular disease. Prognosis is poor and survival rates are low. Limited progress has been made towards specific therapies for PH-LHD, and management focuses on addressing the underlying cause of the disease with supportive therapies, surgery and pharmacological treatments. Clinical trials of therapies for pulmonary arterial hypertension in patients with PH-LHD have thus far been limited and have provided disappointing or conflicting results. Robust, long-term clinical studies in appropriate target populations have the potential to improve the outlook for patients with PH-LHD. Herein, we discuss the knowledge gaps in our understanding of PH-LHD, and describe the current unmet needs and challenges that are faced by clinicians when identifying and managing patients with this disease.

  12. Evaluation and Diagnosis of HIV-Associated Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Maximous, Stephanie; Huang, Laurence; Morris, Alison

    2016-04-01

    There are myriad pulmonary conditions associated with HIV, ranging from acute infections to chronic noncommunicable diseases. The epidemiology of these diseases has changed significantly in the era of widespread antiretroviral therapy. Evaluation of the HIV-infected patient involves assessment of the severity of illness and a thorough yet efficient pursuit of definitive diagnosis, which may involve multiple etiologies simultaneously. Important clues to a diagnosis include medical and social history, demographic details such as travel and geography of residence, substance use, sexual practices, and domiciliary and incarceration status. CD4 cell count is a tremendously useful measure of immune function and risk for HIV-related diseases, and helps narrow down the differential. Careful history of current symptoms and physical examination with particular attention to extrapulmonary signs are crucial early steps. Many adjunctive laboratory studies can suggest or rule out particular diagnoses. Pulmonary function testing (PFT) may aid in characterization of several chronic noninfectious illnesses accelerated by HIV. Chest radiograph and computed tomography (CT) scan allow for classification of diseases by pathognomonic imaging patterns, although many infectious conditions present atypically, particularly with lower CD4 counts. Ultimately, definitive diagnosis with sputum, bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, or lung tissue is often needed. It is of utmost importance to maintain a high degree of suspicion for HIV in otherwise undiagnosed patients, as the first presentation of HIV may be via an acute pulmonary illness.

  13. Factors Associated with Periodontal Disease in Pregnant Diabetic Women.

    PubMed

    Anwar, N; Zaman, N; Nimmi, N; Chowdhury, T A; Khan, M H

    2016-04-01

    There have been an association between systemic diseases and hormonal changes particularly diabetes which has been cited as a risk factor in the progression of periodontitis in pregnant women. The incidence and severity of periodontal diseases are increasing at a higher rate and a common condition in pregnant diabetic women among Bangladeshi population. This cross sectional study included 200 pregnant women who were selected from gynecological department and examined at the dental unit. The clinical parameters used were the Silness and Loe plaque index (PI), gingival scores and periodontal status and any relationship to socio demographic variables (age, occupation, level of education and urban or rural residence) and clinical variables (gestation period, previous pregnancy, type of diabetes and periodontal maintenance) were evaluated. The results showed that these clinical parameters increased concomitantly with an increase in the stage of pregnancy and in women with multiple pregnancies. Increased age, lower level of education, unemployment and patients residing in rural areas were associated with significantly higher gingival scores and periodontal measures. Women with increased age and multiple pregnancies usually have less interest to frequent periodontal maintenance showing a significant statistical relation between an increased age and changes in gingival and periodontal status; however no significant association was found between increased age and plaque index. It is concluded that gingival inflammatory symptoms are aggravated during pregnancy in diabetic women and are related to different clinical and demographic variables.

  14. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Sandoval Zárate, Julio; Beltrán Gámez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. The prevalence in our country remains unknown, based on birthrate, it is calculated that 12,000 to 16,000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction secondary to an imbalance in vasoactive mediators which promotes vasoconstriction, inflammation, thrombosis, cell proliferation, impaired apotosis and fibrosis. The progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart provocated reversal of the shunt may arise with the development of Eisenmenger' syndrome the most advanced form de Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. The prevalence of Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD has fallen in developed countries in recent years that is not yet achieved in developing countries therefore diagnosed late as lack of hospital infrastructure and human resources for the care of patients with CHD. With the development of targeted medical treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension, the concept of a combined medical and interventional/surgical approach for patients with Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD is a reality. We need to know the pathophysiological factors involved as well as a careful evaluation to determine the best therapeutic strategy.

  15. Genomewide association study for onset age in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Latourelle, Jeanne C; Pankratz, Nathan; Dumitriu, Alexandra; Wilk, Jemma B; Goldwurm, Stefano; Pezzoli, Gianni; Mariani, Claudio B; DeStefano, Anita L; Halter, Cheryl; Gusella, James F; Nichols, William C; Myers, Richard H; Foroud, Tatiana

    2009-01-01

    Background Age at onset in Parkinson disease (PD) is a highly heritable quantitative trait for which a significant genetic influence is supported by multiple segregation analyses. Because genes associated with onset age may represent invaluable therapeutic targets to delay the disease, we sought to identify such genetic modifiers using a genomewide association study in familial PD. There have been previous genomewide association studies (GWAS) to identify genes influencing PD susceptibility, but this is the first to identify genes contributing to the variation in onset age. Methods Initial analyses were performed using genotypes generated with the Illumina HumanCNV370Duo array in a sample of 857 unrelated, familial PD cases. Subsequently, a meta-analysis of imputed SNPs was performed combining the familial PD data with that from a previous GWAS of 440 idiopathic PD cases. The SNPs from the meta-analysis with the lowest p-values and consistency in the direction of effect for onset age were then genotyped in a replication sample of 747 idiopathic PD cases from the Parkinson Institute Biobank of Milan, Italy. Results Meta-analysis across the three studies detected consistent association (p < 1 × 10-5) with five SNPs, none of which reached genomewide significance. On chromosome 11, the SNP with the lowest p-value (rs10767971; p = 5.4 × 10-7) lies between the genes QSER1 and PRRG4. Near the PARK3 linkage region on chromosome 2p13, association was observed with a SNP (rs7577851; p = 8.7 × 10-6) which lies in an intron of the AAK1 gene. This gene is closely related to GAK, identified as a possible PD susceptibility gene in the GWAS of the familial PD cases. Conclusion Taken together, these results suggest an influence of genes involved in endocytosis and lysosomal sorting in PD pathogenesis. PMID:19772629

  16. Dropped head associated with amantadine in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroshi; Ueno, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The antiviral agent amantadine has been used to manage Parkinson's disease or levodopa-induced dyskinesias for nearly 5 decades. Amantadine is often associated with hallucinations as an adverse effect, but a long-term study reported no serious motor complications. We describe an unusual patient who had Parkinson's disease with dropped head syndrome (DHS) caused by amantadine. When the patient, who had DHS while receiving only 2 kinds of antiparkinsonian drugs, was rechallenged with amantadine, DHS developed, accompanied by increased muscle tone in the neck muscles on surface electromyogram. The DHS resolved after the withdrawal of amantadine. Moreover, an intravenous infusion of levodopa did not alter the DHS. These findings collectively suggest that the DHS in our patient was most likely caused directly by amantadine. Our findings suggest that amantadine may carry the risk of augmenting dystonic syndrome in humans.

  17. The pathogenesis of Hirschsprung's disease-associated enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Austin, Kelly Miller

    2012-11-01

    Hirschsprung's disease-associated enterocolitis (HAEC) remains the most life-threatening complication in Hirschsprung disease (HD) patients. The pathogenesis of HAEC has not been determined and many hypotheses regarding the etiology of HAEC have been proposed. These include a possible causal relationship between the abnormal enteric nervous system development in HD and the development of enterocolitis. Based on the complex genetic causes of HD that have been discovered and the resultant heterogeneous group of patients that exists, the causes of HAEC are likely multiple. New insights regarding the relationship of the role of the enteric nervous system and its interaction between intestinal barrier function, innate host immunity, and commensal microflora have been discovered, which may shed light on this perplexing problem. This review presents current known risk factors of HAEC and the proposed theories and supporting evidence for the potential etiologies of HAEC.

  18. Membranous nephropathy PLA2R+ associated with Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Vanessa dos Santos; Viero, Rosa Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) — a tropical parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi — is a major health problem in Latin America. The immune response against the parasite is responsible for chronic CD lesions. Currently, there are no reports of an association between CD and membranous nephropathy (MN). The detection of the phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) as a target antigen in idiopathic MN can improve the differential diagnosis of primary and secondary forms of MN. The authors report the case of a male patient with positive serology for CD who presented sudden death and underwent autopsy. Histological sections of the heart showed multifocal inflammatory infiltrate composed mainly of mononuclear cells, leading to myocardiocytes necrosis and interstitial fibrosis. The kidneys showed a MN with positive expression for PLA2R. As far as we know, this is the first report of a case of primary MN in a patient with CD, with severe chronic cardiomyopathy and heart failure. PMID:26558244

  19. The association between nuclear receptors and ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Zou, Chang; Qin, Bo

    2017-02-07

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) are one of the most abundant transcription factors in the human cells. They regulate expression of genes via interactions with corresponding ligands, co-activators, and co-repressors. These molecular pathways play important roles in the development, cell differentiation, and physiologic and metabolic processes. Increasingly, targeting nuclear receptors is becoming a promising strategy for new drug development. The aim of this review is to discuss the association between nuclear receptors and eye development, and expand their role in various ocular diseases such as keratitis, cataract, glaucoma, uveitis, retinopathy, and ophthalmic tumors. Recent studies in this area are highlighted as well as future research directions and potential clinical applications. Finally, various strategies will be elucidated to inspire more targeted therapies for ocular diseases through the use of nuclear receptors.

  20. AlliedSignal solid oxide fuel cell technology

    SciTech Connect

    Minh, N.; Barr, K.; Kelly, P.; Montgomery, K.

    1996-12-31

    AlliedSignal has been developing high-performance, lightweight solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology for a broad spectrum of electric power generation applications. This technology is well suited for use in a variety of power systems, ranging from commercial cogeneration to military mobile power sources. The AlliedSignal SOFC is based on stacking high-performance thin-electrolyte cells with lightweight metallic interconnect assemblies to form a compact structure. The fuel cell can be operated at reduced temperatures (600{degrees} to 800{degrees}C). SOFC stacks based on this design has the potential of producing 1 kW/kg and 1 ML. This paper summarizes the technical status of the design, manufacture, and operation of AlliedSignal SOFCs.

  1. Diabetic foot disease is associated with reduced erythrocyte deformability.

    PubMed

    Cahn, Avivit; Livshits, Leonid; Srulevich, Ariel; Raz, Itamar; Yedgar, Shaul; Barshtein, Gregory

    2016-08-01

    The pathogenesis of diabetic foot disease is multifactorial and encompasses microvascular and macrovascular pathologies. Abnormal blood rheology may also play a part in its development. Using a cell flow analyser (CFA), we examined the association between erythrocyte deformability and diabetic foot disease. Erythrocytes from diabetic patients with no known microvascular complications (n = 11) and patients suffering from a diabetic foot ulcer (n = 11) were isolated and their average elongation ratio (ER) as well as the ER distribution curve were measured. Average ER was decreased in the diabetic foot patients compared with the patients with diabetes and no complications (1·64 ± 0·07 versus 1·71 ± 0·1; P = 0·036). A significant rise in the percentage of minimally deformable red blood cells RBCs in diabetic foot patients compared with the patients with no complications was observed (37·89% ± 8·12% versus 30·61% ± 10·17%; P = 0·039) accompanied by a significant decrease in the percentage of highly deformable RBCs (12·47% ± 4·43% versus 17·49% ± 8·17% P = 0·046). Reduced erythrocyte deformability may slow capillary flow in the microvasculature and prolong wound healing in diabetic foot patients. Conversely, it may be the low-grade inflammatory state imposed by diabetic foot disease that reduces erythrocyte deformability. Further study of the rheological changes associated with diabetic foot disease may enhance our understanding of its pathogenesis and aid in the study of novel therapeutic approaches.

  2. Italian Registry of Haemophilia and Allied Disorders. Objectives, methodology and data analysis.

    PubMed

    Iorio, A; Oliovecchio, E; Morfini, M; Mannucci, P M

    2008-05-01

    National haemophilia registries are powerful instruments to support health care and research. A national registry was established in Italy by the Ministry of Health until 1999. Since 2003 the Italian Association of Haemophilia Centres (AICE) started a new programme aiming at building up the Italian Registry of Haemophilia and Allied Disorders. The AICE identified an expert panel to steer the registry. A computer software to assist patient management was developed and all the AICE-affiliated haemophilia treatment centres (HTC) were prompted to adopt it. Twice a year a predefined set of anonymized data is centralized and merged into a national database. Duplicated entries are managed through a confidentiality sparing mechanism. The database covers sociodemographic, clinical, laboratory and treatment data. A subset of data are shared with the Ministry of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità,ISS).Overall, data were collected six times by 43 of 49 HTC; 41 centres updated their patients' records up to December 2006. The database contains 6632 unique records, 442 of them referring to dead patients. Database growth and missing data clearance showed a constantly positive trend over time. The database has collected records of the following alive patients - haemophilia A: 1364 severe, 398 moderate and 935 mild; haemophilia B: 231 severe, 138 moderate and 204 mild; von Willebrand's disease: 1208 type 1, 346 type 2 and 96 type 3. Inhibitor patients were 296 (of which 194 high responders and 65 low responders).The Italian registry run by AICE adds to the list of the available national haemophilia registries and is intended to establish treatment guidelines and foster research projects in Italy.

  3. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases III: Manganese, neurological diseases, and associated pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Samsel, Anthony; Seneff, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an often overlooked but important nutrient, required in small amounts for multiple essential functions in the body. A recent study on cows fed genetically modified Roundup®-Ready feed revealed a severe depletion of serum Mn. Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup®, has also been shown to severely deplete Mn levels in plants. Here, we investigate the impact of Mn on physiology, and its association with gut dysbiosis as well as neuropathologies such as autism, Alzheimer's disease (AD), depression, anxiety syndrome, Parkinson's disease (PD), and prion diseases. Glutamate overexpression in the brain in association with autism, AD, and other neurological diseases can be explained by Mn deficiency. Mn superoxide dismutase protects mitochondria from oxidative damage, and mitochondrial dysfunction is a key feature of autism and Alzheimer’s. Chondroitin sulfate synthesis depends on Mn, and its deficiency leads to osteoporosis and osteomalacia. Lactobacillus, depleted in autism, depend critically on Mn for antioxidant protection. Lactobacillus probiotics can treat anxiety, which is a comorbidity of autism and chronic fatigue syndrome. Reduced gut Lactobacillus leads to overgrowth of the pathogen, Salmonella, which is resistant to glyphosate toxicity, and Mn plays a role here as well. Sperm motility depends on Mn, and this may partially explain increased rates of infertility and birth defects. We further reason that, under conditions of adequate Mn in the diet, glyphosate, through its disruption of bile acid homeostasis, ironically promotes toxic accumulation of Mn in the brainstem, leading to conditions such as PD and prion diseases. PMID:25883837

  4. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases III: Manganese, neurological diseases, and associated pathologies.

    PubMed

    Samsel, Anthony; Seneff, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an often overlooked but important nutrient, required in small amounts for multiple essential functions in the body. A recent study on cows fed genetically modified Roundup(®)-Ready feed revealed a severe depletion of serum Mn. Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup(®), has also been shown to severely deplete Mn levels in plants. Here, we investigate the impact of Mn on physiology, and its association with gut dysbiosis as well as neuropathologies such as autism, Alzheimer's disease (AD), depression, anxiety syndrome, Parkinson's disease (PD), and prion diseases. Glutamate overexpression in the brain in association with autism, AD, and other neurological diseases can be explained by Mn deficiency. Mn superoxide dismutase protects mitochondria from oxidative damage, and mitochondrial dysfunction is a key feature of autism and Alzheimer's. Chondroitin sulfate synthesis depends on Mn, and its deficiency leads to osteoporosis and osteomalacia. Lactobacillus, depleted in autism, depend critically on Mn for antioxidant protection. Lactobacillus probiotics can treat anxiety, which is a comorbidity of autism and chronic fatigue syndrome. Reduced gut Lactobacillus leads to overgrowth of the pathogen, Salmonella, which is resistant to glyphosate toxicity, and Mn plays a role here as well. Sperm motility depends on Mn, and this may partially explain increased rates of infertility and birth defects. We further reason that, under conditions of adequate Mn in the diet, glyphosate, through its disruption of bile acid homeostasis, ironically promotes toxic accumulation of Mn in the brainstem, leading to conditions such as PD and prion diseases.

  5. Motivators, enablers, and barriers to building allied health research capacity

    PubMed Central

    Pager, Susan; Holden, Libby; Golenko, Xanthe

    2012-01-01

    Purpose A sound, scientific base of high quality research is needed to inform service planning and decision making and enable improved policy and practice. However, some areas of health practice, particularly many of the allied health areas, are generally considered to have a low evidence base. In order to successfully build research capacity in allied health, a clearer understanding is required of what assists and encourages research as well as the barriers and challenges. Participants and methods This study used written surveys to collect data relating to motivators, enablers, and barriers to research capacity building. Respondents were asked to answer questions relating to them as individuals and other questions relating to their team. Allied health professionals were recruited from multidisciplinary primary health care teams in Queensland Health. Eighty-five participants from ten healthcare teams completed a written version of the research capacity and culture survey. Results The results of this study indicate that individual allied health professionals are more likely to report being motivated to do research by intrinsic factors such as a strong interest in research. Barriers they identified to research are more likely to be extrinsic factors such as workload and lack of time. Allied health professionals identified some additional factors that impact on their research capacity than those reported in the literature, such as a desire to keep at the “cutting edge” and a lack of exposure to research. Some of the factors influencing individuals to do research were different to those influencing teams. These results are discussed with reference to organizational behavior and theories of motivation. Conclusion Supporting already motivated allied health professional individuals and teams to conduct research by increased skills training, infrastructure, and quarantined time is likely to produce better outcomes for research capacity building investment. PMID

  6. Associations between the consumption of carbonated beverages and periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, In-Seok; Han, Kyungdo; Ko, Youngkyung; Park, Yong-Gyu; Ryu, Jae-Jun; Park, Jun-Beom

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Consumption of carbonated beverages was reported to be associated with obesity and other adverse health consequences. This study was performed to assess the relationship between the consumption of carbonated beverages and periodontal disease using nationally representative data. The data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted between 2008 and 2010 were used; the analysis in this study was confined to a total of 5517 respondents >19 years old who had no missing values for the consumption of carbonated beverages or outcome variables. The community periodontal index greater than or equal to code 3 was defined as periodontal disease. The odds ratios of the percentage of individuals with periodontal treatment needs tended to increase with the consumption of carbonated beverages. Adjusted odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals adjusted for various factors including age, sex, body mass index, smoking, drinking, exercise, metabolic syndrome, frequency of tooth brushing per day, use of secondary oral products, dental checkup within a year, consumption of coffee of the individuals with the consumption of carbonated beverages once or less per month, once or less per week and twice or more per week were 1.109(0.804,1.528), 1.404(1.035,1.906), and 1.466(1.059,2.029), respectively. A subgroup analysis revealed that in individuals with body mass index < 25 or waist circumference < 90 cm for males or < 80 cm for females, the prevalence of periodontal disease increased with higher consumption of carbonated beverages (P for trend < 0.05). Consumption of carbonated beverages was positively associated with the risk of periodontal disease in Korean adults. In a subgroup analysis, the individuals consuming carbonated beverages with body mass index < 25 or waist circumference < 90 cm for males or < 80 cm for females were more likely to have periodontal disease. Consumption of carbonated beverages may be considered to be

  7. A new ophiovirus is associated with blueberry mosaic disease.

    PubMed

    Thekke-Veetil, Thanuja; Ho, Thien; Keller, Karen E; Martin, Robert R; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E

    2014-08-30

    Blueberry mosaic disease (BMD) was first described more than 60 years ago and is caused by a yet unidentified graft transmissible agent. A combination of traditional methods and next generation sequencing disclosed the presence of a new ophiovirus in symptomatic plants. The virus was detected in all BMD samples collected from several production areas of North America and was thus named blueberry mosaic associated virus. Phylogenetic analysis, supported by high bootstrap values, places the virus within the family Ophioviridae. The genome organization resembles that of citrus psorosis virus, the type member of the genus Ophiovirus. The implications of this discovery in BMD control and blueberry virus certification schemes are also discussed.

  8. Impulsive Behavior and Associated Clinical Variables in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abosch, Aviva; Gupte, Akshay; Eberly, Lynn E.; Tuite, Paul J.; Nance, Martha; Grant, Jon E.

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a degenerative brain disorder accompanied by the loss of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of motor and non-motor symptoms. We performed a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based analysis of impulsive behavior in our PD clinic population to assess prevalence and associated characteristics. We found a higher prevalence of impulsive behavior (29.7%) than previously reported, and found multiple, concurrent impulsive behaviors in 26% of subjects reporting impulsive behavior. Our findings contribute to the growing awareness of impulsive behavior in PD, and support the need for longitudinal studies to assess changes in impulsive behaviors in Parkinson's patients. PMID:21300194

  9. Zoonotic diseases associated with reptiles and amphibians: an update.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Mark A

    2011-09-01

    Reptiles and amphibians are popular as pets. There are increased concerns among public health officials because of the zoonotic potential associated with these animals. Encounters with reptiles and amphibians are also on the rise in the laboratory setting and with wild animals; in both of these practices, there is also an increased likelihood for exposure to zoonotic pathogens. It is important that veterinarians remain current with the literature as it relates to emerging and reemerging zoonotic diseases attributed to reptiles and amphibians so that they can protect themselves, their staff, and their clients from potential problems.

  10. Inflammatory bowel disease associations with HLA Class II genes

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, R.; Yang, H.; Targan, S.

    1994-09-01

    A PCR-SSOP assay has been used to analyze HLA-Class II DRB1 and DQB1 alleles in 378 Caucasians from a population in Southern California. The data has been analyzed separately for the Ashkenasi Jews and non-Jewish patients (n=286) and controls (n=92). Two common clinical forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been studied: ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn`s disease (CD). In CD, we observed a susceptible effect with the rare DR1 allele - DRB*0103 [O.R.=4.56; 95% CI (0.96, 42.97); p=0.03]; a trend for an increase in DRB1*0103 was also observed in UC patients. A susceptible effect with DRB1*1502 [O.R.=5.20; 95% CI (1.10, 48.99); p=0.02] was observed in non-Jewish UC patients. This susceptible effect was restricted to UC ANCA-positive (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) patients. In addition, a significant association with DRB1*1101-DQB1*0301 [O.R.=9.46; 95% CI (1.30, 413.87); p=0.01] was seen with UC among non-Jewish patients: this haplotype was increased with CD among non-Jewish patients. Two protective haplotypes were detected among CD non-Jewish patients: DRB1*1301-DQB1*0603 [O.R.=0.34; 95% CI (0.09, 1.09); p=0.04], and DRB*0404-DQB1*0302 [O.R.=<0.08; 95% CI (0.0, 0.84); p=0.01]. When the same data were analyzed at the serology level, we observed a positive association in UC with DR2 [O.R.6.77; 95% CI (2.47, 22.95); p=2 x 10{sup -4}], and a positive association in CD with DR1 [O.R.=2.63; 95% CI (1.14, 6.62); p=0.01] consistent with previous reports. Thus, some IBD disease associations appear to be common to both UC and CD, while some are unique to one disease.

  11. Acrolein Exposure Is Associated With Increased Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    DeJarnett, Natasha; Conklin, Daniel J.; Riggs, Daniel W.; Myers, John A.; O'Toole, Timothy E.; Hamzeh, Ihab; Wagner, Stephen; Chugh, Atul; Ramos, Kenneth S.; Srivastava, Sanjay; Higdon, Deirdre; Tollerud, David J.; DeFilippis, Andrew; Becher, Carrie; Wyatt, Brad; McCracken, James; Abplanalp, Wes; Rai, Shesh N.; Ciszewski, Tiffany; Xie, Zhengzhi; Yeager, Ray; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2014-01-01

    Background Acrolein is a reactive aldehyde present in high amounts in coal, wood, paper, and tobacco smoke. It is also generated endogenously by lipid peroxidation and the oxidation of amino acids by myeloperoxidase. In animals, acrolein exposure is associated with the suppression of circulating progenitor cells and increases in thrombosis and atherogenesis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acrolein exposure in humans is also associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Methods and Results Acrolein exposure was assessed in 211 participants of the Louisville Healthy Heart Study with moderate to high (CVD) risk by measuring the urinary levels of the major acrolein metabolite—3‐hydroxypropylmercapturic acid (3‐HPMA). Generalized linear models were used to assess the association between acrolein exposure and parameters of CVD risk, and adjusted for potential demographic confounders. Urinary 3‐HPMA levels were higher in smokers than nonsmokers and were positively correlated with urinary cotinine levels. Urinary 3‐HPMA levels were inversely related to levels of both early (AC133+) and late (AC133−) circulating angiogenic cells. In smokers as well as nonsmokers, 3‐HPMA levels were positively associated with both increased levels of platelet–leukocyte aggregates and the Framingham Risk Score. No association was observed between 3‐HPMA and plasma fibrinogen. Levels of C‐reactive protein were associated with 3‐HPMA levels in nonsmokers only. Conclusions Regardless of its source, acrolein exposure is associated with platelet activation and suppression of circulating angiogenic cell levels, as well as increased CVD risk. PMID:25099132

  12. The spectrum of nephrocutaneous diseases and associations: Genetic causes of nephrocutaneous disease.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Jay; Fenves, Andrew Z; Jackson, J Mark; Kimball, Alexa B; Menter, Alan

    2016-02-01

    There are a significant number of diseases and treatment considerations of considerable importance relating to the skin and renal systems. This emphasizes the need for dermatologists in practice or in clinical training to be aware of these associations. Part I of this 2-part continuing medical education article reviews the genetic syndromes with both renal and cutaneous involvement that are most important for the dermatologist to be able to identify, manage, and appropriately refer to nephrology colleagues. Part II reviews the inflammatory syndromes with relevant renal manifestations and therapeutic agents commonly used by dermatologists that have drug-induced effects on or require close consideration of renal function. In addition, we will likewise review therapeutic agents commonly used by nephrologists that have drug-induced effects on the skin that dermatologists are likely to encounter in clinical practice. In both parts of this continuing medical education article, we discuss diagnosis, management, and appropriate referral to our nephrology colleagues in the context of each nephrocutaneous association. There are a significant number of dermatoses associated with renal abnormalities and disease, emphasizing the need for dermatologists to be keenly aware of their presence in order to avoid overlooking important skin conditions with potentially devastating renal complications. This review discusses important nephrocutaneous disease associations with recommendations for the appropriate urgency of referral to nephrology colleagues for diagnosis, surveillance, and early management of potential renal sequelae.

  13. The perceptual domain: a taxonomy for allied health educators.

    PubMed

    Hooker, E Z

    1981-08-01

    A taxonomy of the perceptual domain was proposed over a decade ago. It is hierarchical, as are the taxonomies in the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains. Perception involves extraction of information from presenting stimuli, and there is progression of information extraction as the hierarchy is ascended. Perceptual performance at the higher levels of the taxonomy assumes perceptual abilities at the lower levels. A modified version of the perceptual taxonomy applicable to allied health education is presented. Methods concerning application of the taxonomy are suggested. Use of the taxonomy of the perceptual domain would help allied health educators plan instruction and evaluate teaching.

  14. Natural antisense transcripts of Alzheimer's disease associated genes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-Hu; Cheng, Hai-Peng; Yu, Long; Zhao, Shouyuan

    2006-04-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs), also named endogenous antisense transcripts, are a class of genes whose role in controlling gene expression is becoming more and more relevant. NATs might play important roles in gene expression and translation regulation. Present work investigated the presence of NATs of Alzheimer's disease associated genes including PRESENILIN1, PRESENILIN2, BACE1, BACE2, APP, APOE, TAU (MAPT), PRION, alpha-SYNUCLEIN (SNCA), NICASTRIN, PEN2, APH1A, APH1B as well as CD147 (BASIGIN), and the results revealed that APP, BACE2, APH1A, TAU, CD147 and alpha-SYNUCLEIN contain natural antisense transcripts. These NATs were characterized according to the sense-antisense overlapping information and potential functional mechanisms were proposed. Present findings provide preliminary but important information about transcription regulation of AD associated genes, which would further our understanding of the gene expression regulation of AD, and also suggest a novel potential strategy for the therapy of AD.

  15. Synovial fat necrosis associated with ischemic pancreatic disease.

    PubMed

    Smukler, N M; Schumacher, H R; Pascual, E; Brown, S; Ryan, W E; Sadeghian, M R

    1979-05-01

    A 59-year-old man with ischemic pancreatic disease, polyarthritis, and cutaneous nodules has shown histopathologic findings indicative of disseminated fat necrosis in a percutaneous biopsy specimen from the right knee. The histopathologic findings in the synovium included necrotic fat cells, distorted fat cells and adjacent lymphocytes, lipid laden histiocytes, and giant cells. In prior histopathologic studies of the joint involvement associated with this disorder, fat cell necrosis has been found only in the periarticular tissues, and the synovium has appeared normal or showed nonspecific inflammation. However, the present study shows that the synovial membrane may also be the site of fat necrosis and an associated inflammatory reaction; thus patients with this disorder may manifest arthritis in addition to periarthritis.

  16. Association between celiac disease and primary lactase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Basso, M S; Luciano, R; Ferretti, F; Muraca, M; Panetta, F; Bracci, F; Ottino, S; Diamanti, A

    2012-12-01

    Primary lactase deficiency (PLD) is a common inherited condition caused by a reduced activity of lactase. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms C/T(-13910) and G/A(-22018) upstream of the lactase gene are associated with lactase nonpersistence. In celiac disease (CD) patients, lactose intolerance could be due to secondary lactase deficiency and to PLD. The aim of this study were to evaluate the association of PLD and CD using genetic test, and to define the prevalence of PLD in celiac subjects compared with a control population. A total of 188 controls and 92 biopsy-proven CD patients were included in the study. More than 70% of all subjects were found homozygous for the polymorphisms. Differences in the prevalence of PLD were not found between CD patients and controls.In conclusions, the hereditary lactase deficiency is frequent in Italian CD children as in control population.

  17. Interstitial Lung Disease with ANCA-associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Katsumata, Yasuhiro; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    The association between interstitial lung disease (ILD) and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV), particularly microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), has been described in a number of case reports and case series reports in the last 2 decades. In addition, patients with pulmonary fibrosis and ANCA positivity but without other manifestations of systemic vasculitis have also been reported. Pulmonary fibrosis was clinically manifested at the time of diagnosis in the majority of AAV patients that developed this condition. Moreover, ANCA-positive conversion occurs in patients initially diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and as a result, other manifestations of systemic vasculitis develop in some of these patients. There is significant predominance of myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA and MPA in patients with AAV and ILD. Radiological and pathological findings generally demonstrate usual interstitial pneumonia (pattern) in the lungs of these patients. In most studies, AAV patients with ILD have a worse prognosis than those without it. PMID:26448696

  18. Impulsive-compulsive behaviors in parkin-associated Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Alfonso; Ginevrino, Monia; Petrucci, Simona; Ricciardi, Lucia; Bove, Francesco; Criscuolo, Chiara; Moccia, Marcello; De Rosa, Anna; Sorbera, Chiara; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Barone, Paolo; De Michele, Giuseppe; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Valente, Enza Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this multicenter, case-control study was to investigate the prevalence and severity of impulsive-compulsive behaviors (ICBs) in a cohort of patients with parkin-associated Parkinson disease (PD) compared to a group of patients without the mutation. Methods: We compared 22 patients with biallelic parkin mutations (parkin-PD) and 26 patients negative for parkin, PINK1, DJ-1, and GBA mutations (PD-NM), matched for age at onset, disease duration, levodopa, and dopamine agonist equivalent daily dose. A semistructured interview was used to diagnose each of the following ICBs: compulsive sexual behavior, compulsive buying, binge eating, punding, hobbyism, and compulsive medication use. The Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease–Rating Scale (QUIP-RS) was adopted to rate ICB severity. Results: Frequency of patients with at least one ICB was comparable between parkin-PD and PD-NM. Nevertheless, when analyzing the distribution of specific ICBs, a higher frequency of compulsive shopping, binge eating, and punding/hobbyism was found in the parkin-PD group. Compared to PD-NM, parkin-PD patients with ICB had younger onset age and higher frequency of smokers; in 5 patients, ICB had predated PD onset. Total and partial (compulsive buying, compulsive sexual behavior, binge eating, hobbyism/punding) QUIP-RS scores were higher in patients with parkin-PD compared to patients with PD-NM. Logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of parkin mutations was associated with smoking status and higher QUIP-RS total score. Conclusions: Our data expand the parkin-associated phenotypic spectrum demonstrating higher frequency and severity of specific ICBs, and suggesting an association between the parkin genotype, smoking status, and ICB severity. PMID:27590295

  19. The association between periodontal disease parameters and severity of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ketabi, Mohammad; Meybodi, Fatemeh Rashidi; Asgari, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerosis is the most common cause for heart attack and stroke. In the last decade, several epidemiological studies have found an association between periodontal infection and atherosclerosis. The aim of this research was to determine the possible association between chronic periodontal disease and severity of atherosclerosis. Materials and Methods: Eighty-two subjects that were referred to Chamran Heart Hospital in Isfahan for angiography were involved in this study. Fifty-nine subjects had coronary artery obstruction (CAO) and 23 showed no obstruction after angiography. The severity of CAO was assessed. Periodontal parameters including pocket depth (PD), gingival recession (R), clinical attachment level (CAL), and bleeding on probing (BOP) of all subjects were recorded. The decayed-missing-filled (DMF) index of all subjects was also measured. For statistical analysis, Pearson correlation test, Chi-square, and independent t-test were used. Results: There were significant positive correlation between variables R, PD, CAL, decayed (D), missing (M), DMF, BOP, and degree of CAO. However, there were no significant differences between filling variable degree of CAO (left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right coronary artery). Independent t-test showed that the mean of variables R, PD, AL, D, M, and DMF in patients with obstructed arteries were significantly higher than subjects without CAO. But there were no significant differences between variable F in two groups. Conclusion: The results of this cross-section analytical study showed an association between periodontal disease and dental parameters with the severity of CAO measured by angiography. However, this association must not interpret as a cause and effect relationship. PMID:27274346

  20. Critical Allies and Feminist Praxis: Rethinking Dis-Ease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGloin, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    In Australian universities, non-Indigenous educators teaching Indigenous studies and/or Indigenous content must engage critically with anti-colonialism, not simply as lip service to syllabus content, but also, as an ethical consideration whereby consultation and collaboration with Indigenous scholars must necessarily direct praxis. Such an…

  1. Epstein-Barr Virus Association with Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-Mondragón, María G.; Torres, Javier; Flores-Luna, Lourdes; Carreón-Talavera, Ricardo; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) use are considered the main risk to develop peptic ulcer disease (PUD). However, PUD also occurs in the absence of HP infection and/or NSAID use. Recently, we have found evidence that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation increases the risk to develop premalignant and malignant gastric lesions. Objective. To study a possible association between EBV and PUD. Methods. Antibodies against an EBV reactivation antigen, HP, and the HP virulence factor CagA were measured in sera from 207 Mexican subjects, controls (healthy individuals, n = 129), and PUD patients (n = 78, 58 duodenal and 20 gastric ulcers). Statistical associations were estimated. Results. Duodenal PUD was significantly associated with high anti-EBV IgG titers (p = 0.022, OR = 2.5), while anti-EBV IgA was positively associated with gastric PUD (p = 0.002, OR = 10.1). Conclusions. Our study suggests that EBV reactivation in gastric and duodenal epithelium increases the risk to develop PUD. PMID:26199856

  2. Insects and allies associated with bromeliads: a review

    PubMed Central

    Frank, J. H.; Lounibos, L. P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Bromeliads are a Neotropical plant family (Bromeliaceae) with about 2,900 described species. They vary considerably in architecture. Many impound water in their inner leaf axils to form phytotelmata (plant pools), providing habitat for terrestrial arthropods with aquatic larvae, while their outer axils provide terraria for an assemblage of fully terrestrial arthropods. Many bromeliads are epiphytic. Dominant terrestrial arthropods with aquatic larvae inhabiting bromeliad phytotelmata are typically larvae of Diptera, of which at least 16 families have been reported, but in some circumstances are Coleoptera, of which only three families have been reported. Other groups include crabs and the insect orders Odonata, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera, plus Hemiptera with adults active on the water surface. The hundreds of arthropod species are detritivores or predators and do not harm their host plants. Many of them are specialists to this habitat. Terrestrial arthropods with terrestrial larvae inhabiting bromeliad terraria include many more arachnid and insect orders, but relatively few specialists to this habitat. They, too, are detritivores or predators. Arthropod herbivores, especially Curculionidae (Coleoptera) and Lepidoptera, consume leaves, stems, flowers, pollen, and roots of bromeliads. Some herbivores consume nectar, and some of these and other arthropods provide pollination and even seed-dispersal. Ants have complex relationships with bromeliads, a few being herbivores, some guarding the plants from herbivory, and some merely nesting in bromeliad terraria. A few serve as food for carnivorous bromeliads, which also consume other terrestrial insects. Bromeliads are visited by far more species of arthropods than breed in them. This is especially notable during dry seasons, when bromeliads provide moist refugia. PMID:20209047

  3. Neurochemistry changes associated with mutations in familial Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Siddique, M M; Tan, E K

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a common neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by the progressive loss of dopamine neurons and the accumulation of Lewy bodies and neurites. The exact role of genetic and environmental factors in the pathogenesis of PD has frequently been debated. The association of MPTP (methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6- tetrahydropyridine) and toxins (such as rotenone) with parkinsonism highlights the potential etiologic role of environmental toxins in disease causation. The recent discoveries of monogenic (such as α-synuclein, Parkin, UCHL1, PINK1, DJ-1, LRRK2) forms of PD have provided considerable insights into its pathophysiology. Parkin, an ubiquitin protein ligase assists in the degradation of toxic substrates via the ubiquitin proteasome system. It can also mediate a nondegradative form of ubiquitination. PINK1 and LRRK2 are possibly involved in the phosphorylation of substrates important for various cellular functions. Some toxins could interact with α-synuclein, an endogenous protein that is implicated in pathology of PD. Increasing in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that deficits in mitochondrial function, oxidative and nitrosative stress, the accumulation of aberrant or misfolded proteins, and ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction underpin the pathogenesis of sporadic and familial forms of PD. Elucidation of the functions of the proteins encoded by the diseasecausing genes will provide an opportunity for identification of specific pathways that could be targeted in neurotherapeutics.

  4. Antioxidant Supplementation in the Treatment of Aging-Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Valeria; Izzo, Viviana; Corbi, Graziamaria; Russomanno, Giusy; Manzo, Valentina; De Lise, Federica; Di Donato, Alberto; Filippelli, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is generally considered as the consequence of an imbalance between pro- and antioxidants species, which often results into indiscriminate and global damage at the organismal level. Elderly people are more susceptible to oxidative stress and this depends, almost in part, from a decreased performance of their endogenous antioxidant system. As many studies reported an inverse correlation between systemic levels of antioxidants and several diseases, primarily cardiovascular diseases, but also diabetes and neurological disorders, antioxidant supplementation has been foreseen as an effective preventive and therapeutic intervention for aging-associated pathologies. However, the expectations of this therapeutic approach have often been partially disappointed by clinical trials. The interplay of both endogenous and exogenous antioxidants with the systemic redox system is very complex and represents an issue that is still under debate. In this review a selection of recent clinical studies concerning antioxidants supplementation and the evaluation of their influence in aging-related diseases is analyzed. The controversial outcomes of antioxidants supplementation therapies, which might partially depend from an underestimation of the patient specific metabolic demand and genetic background, are presented. PMID:26903869

  5. [Transfusion associated graft versus host disease following cardiovascular surgery].

    PubMed

    Aybey, Bekir; Coşkun, Diler; Aytaç, Jale

    2006-01-01

    In this report, a case of transfusion-associated graft versus host disease that developed following coronary arter bypass grafting and mitral annuloplasty operations, has been presented. The diagnosis of 62 year-old male patient was based on the presence of typical findings as fever, liver function disorders, skin rash and hypoplastic bone marrow findings that began ten days after the operation; with the exclusion of other pathologies (e.g. drug eruptions, viral infections, septicemia, scalded skin syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis) and histopathological findings of skin biopsy. There was a history of five units of blood transfusion of which one was from a close relative. The blood from the relative was thought to be responsible for the disease. With this case, we wanted to emphasize once more that transfusion of the blood of a relative must be avoided in patients who have undergone major operations such as cardiovascular surgery. The irradiation of these bloods before transfusion may be effective to prevent graft versus host disease.

  6. Yellow fever vaccine-associated neurological disease, a suspicious case.

    PubMed

    Beirão, Pedro; Pereira, Patrícia; Nunes, Andreia; Antunes, Pedro

    2017-03-02

    A 70-year-old man with known cardiovascular risk factors, presented with acute onset expression aphasia, agraphia, dyscalculia, right-left disorientation and finger agnosia, without fever or meningeal signs. Stroke was thought to be the cause, but cerebrovascular disease investigation was negative. Interviewing the family revealed he had undergone yellow fever vaccination 18 days before. Lumbar puncture revealed mild protein elevation. Cultural examinations, Coxiella burnetti, and neurotropic virus serologies were negative. Regarding the yellow fever virus, IgG was identified in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), with negative IgM and virus PCR in CSF. EEG showed an encephalopathic pattern. The patient improved gradually and a week after discharge was his usual self. Only criteria for suspect neurotropic disease were met, but it's possible the time spent between symptom onset and lumbar puncture prevented a definite diagnosis of yellow fever vaccine-associated neurological disease. This gap would have been smaller if the vaccination history had been collected earlier.

  7. Skin diseases associated with Agent Orange and other organochlorine exposures.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Andrew T; Kaffenberger, Benjamin H; Keller, Richard A; Elston, Dirk M

    2016-01-01

    Organochlorine exposure is an important cause of cutaneous and systemic toxicity. Exposure has been associated with industrial accidents, intentional poisoning, and the use of defoliants, such as Agent Orange in the Vietnam War. Although long-term health effects are systematically reviewed by the Institute of Medicine, skin diseases are not comprehensively assessed. This represents an important practice gap as patients can present with cutaneous findings. This article provides a systematic review of the cutaneous manifestations of known mass organochlorine exposures in military and industrial settings with the goal of providing clinically useful recommendations for dermatologists seeing patients inquiring about organochlorine effects. Patients with a new diagnosis of chloracne, porphyria cutanea tarda, cutaneous lymphomas (non-Hodgkin lymphoma), and soft-tissue sarcomas including dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans and leiomyosarcomas should be screened for a history of Vietnam service or industrial exposure. Inconclusive evidence exists for an increased risk of other skin diseases in Vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange including benign fatty tumors, melanomas, nonmelanoma skin cancers, milia, eczema, dyschromias, disturbance of skin sensation, and rashes not otherwise specified. Affected veterans should be informed of the uncertain data in those cases. Referral to Department of Veterans Affairs for disability assessment is indicated for conditions with established associations.

  8. Clinical characteristics of immune thrombocytopenia associated with autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Shiju; Sun, Yuechi; Lin, Qingyan; Liao, Xining; Zhang, Junhui; Luo, Jiao; Qian, Hongyan; Duan, Lihua; Shi, Guixiu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To clarify clinical characteristics of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) subsets associated with autoimmune diseases (AIDs). Five thousand five hundred twenty patients were reviewed retrospectively. One hundred four ITP patients were included for analysis. Clinical manifestations at first thrombocytopenic episode were recorded. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and primary Sjogren syndrome (pSS) accounted for a large part in AIDs associated with secondary ITP. SLE-ITP, pSS-ITP, and primary ITP (pITP) patients were different in several aspects in clinical and immunological characteristics. A subgroup of patients in pITP patients with some obvious autoimmune features (defined as AIF-ITP) such as positive ANA but failing to meet the diagnosis criteria now used for a specific kind of connective tissue diseases were also different with other pITP patients in some immunological features, indicating the difference in the pathogenesis mechanism of those autoimmune featured ITP patients. ITP patients were heterogeneous in clinical characteristics. Further study about the different pathogenesis of ITP subsets especially those AIF-ITP patients who only presented with thrombocytopenia will help us have a better understanding of pathogenesis of ITP and a better management of ITP patients. PMID:27977588

  9. Association Between Autonomic Impairment and Structural Deficit in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Pei-Chin; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Yang, I-Hsiao; Yu, Chiun-Chieh; Lin, Wei-Che

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) have impaired autonomic function and altered brain structure. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship of gray matter volume (GMV) determined by voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to autonomic impairment in patients with PD. Whole-brain VBM analysis was performed on 3-dimensional T1-weighted images in 23 patients with PD and 15 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. The relationship of cardiovascular autonomic function (determined by survey) to baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) (determined from changes in heart rate and blood pressure during the early phase II of the Valsalva maneuver) was tested using least-squares regression analysis. The differences in GMV, autonomic parameters, and clinical data were correlated after adjusting for age and sex. Compared with controls, patients with PD had low BRS, suggesting worse cardiovascular autonomic function, and smaller GMV in several brain locations, including the right amygdala, left hippocampal formation, bilateral insular cortex, bilateral caudate nucleus, bilateral cerebellum, right fusiform, and left middle frontal gyri. The decreased GMVs of the selected brain regions were also associated with increased presence of epithelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in the circulation. In patients with PD, decrease in cardiovascular autonomic function and increase in circulating EPC level are associated with smaller GMV in several areas of the brain. Because of its possible role in the modulation of the circulatory EPC pool and baroreflex control, the left hippocampal formation may be a bio-target for disease-modifying therapy and treatment monitoring in PD. PMID:26986144

  10. Premature Ovarian Failure: An Association with Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Vandana; Goswami, Deepti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Premature Ovarian Failure (POF) is the cessation of ovarian function before the age of 40 years. POF is reported to be associated with autoimmune diseases in 20-30% of cases. Aim Patients presenting with idiopathic POF were screened for the presence of autoimmune disorders. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with idiopathic POF were included in the study. Baseline investigation in all subjects included fasting serum FSH, LH, E2, progesterone, free T3, free T4, Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) and Anti-Thyroperoxidase (anti-TPO) antibodies, testosterone and Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEAS) levels. Fasting and post-glucose (2 hours after 75g of oral glucose) serum calcium and phosphate were estimated using appropriate assays in biochemistry laboratory. Results Seven patients (35%), who presented with secondary amenorrhea, had thyroid disorders and were already on thyroxine replacement therapy. One patient also had vitiligo. There was no history of adrenal disorder. Anti-TPO levels were elevated in two (10%) patients of secondary amenorrhea group. The levels of serum testosterone were low in three patients. Serum DHEAS levels were low in 13 patients. Blood sugar levels (fasting and 2 hour post 75g glucose load) and fasting insulin levels were normal. Serum calcium and phosphate levels were normal in all the patients. Conclusion Thyroid autoimmunity is the most common autoimmune disease associated with POF. The finding of low DHEAS in a large percentage of patients (65%), suggests possibility of adrenal dysfunction. This requires further testing for adrenal reserve and adrenal autoantibodies. PMID:27891401

  11. Travel-associated Legionnaires disease in Europe in 2007.

    PubMed

    Joseph, C A; Yadav, R; Ricketts, K D

    2009-05-07

    Nine hundred and forty six cases of travel-associated Legionnaires disease were reported to the European Surveillance Scheme for Travel Associated Legionnaires Disease (EWGLINET) with onset during 2007; 890 were confirmed and 56 were presumptive. Twenty eight cases died, giving a case fatality rate of 3.0%. 8.2% of cases were diagnosed by culture, an important increase from 5.2% in 2006. One hundred and twelve new clusters were identified; the largest involved nine cases. Sixteen of these clusters (14.3%) occurred in countries outside EWGLINET, and three involved cruise ships. Twenty nine of the new clusters (25.9%) would not have been detected without the EWGLINET scheme. A total of 151 investigations were conducted in Europe, 42 of which were conducted at re-offending sites (where additional cases had onset after a report was received to say that investigations and control measures had been satisfactorily conducted). The names of 13 accommodation sites were published on the European Working Group for Legionella Infections (EWGLI) website; 11 of these were situated in Turkey.

  12. Associations between peripheral vertigo and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Viliušytė, Edita; Macaitytė, Raminta; Vaitkus, Antanas; Rastenytė, Daiva

    2015-09-01

    We hypothesize that peripheral vertigo is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Two mechanisms could be considered – gastric acids may directly irritate the respiratory mucosa and cause inflammation, or Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) could be present and cause local infection. Reflux material (Hydrochloric acid (HCl) and pepsin) could get into the middle ear via Eustachian tube and affect osseous structures directly. Disturbance of ossicles could cause tinnitus, which is more common for peripheral vertigo. H. pylori could also get in the esophagus and in the upper respiratory tract via gastroesophageal reflux, and could cause tympanosclerosis and fixation of ossicles. In our study group, 120 of 153 (78.4%) patients had gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Diagnostic tests of H. pylori (rapid urease test or blood antibody test) were performed for 96 of 120 (80%) patients with GERD and were found positive for 32 of 96 (33.3%) patients. Peripheral vertigo was present in 93 of 120 (77.6%) patients with GERD compared to 33 of 126 (26%) patients without GERD (χ(2)=9.016, p=0.003). H. pylori and peripheral vertigo coexisted in 26 of 126 patients (20.6%) (OR 1.36; 95% CI 0.49-3.74, p=0.55). Our study demonstrated statistically significant association between peripheral vertigo and GERD but not between peripheral vertigo and H. pylori. Further more extensive investigations are needed in order to explore our hypothesis.

  13. Peripheral neuropathy associated with mitochondrial disease in children.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Manoj P; Ouvrier, Robert A

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial diseases in children are often associated with a peripheral neuropathy but the presence of the neuropathy is under-recognized because of the overwhelming involvement of the central nervous system (CNS). These mitochondrial neuropathies are heterogeneous in their clinical, neurophysiological, and histopathological characteristics. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of childhood mitochondrial neuropathy. Early recognition of neuropathy may help with the identification of the mitochondrial syndrome. While it is not definite that the characteristics of the neuropathy would help in directing genetic testing without the requirement for invasive skin, muscle or liver biopsies, there appears to be some evidence for this hypothesis in Leigh syndrome, in which nuclear SURF1 mutations cause a demyelinating neuropathy and mitochondrial DNA MTATP6 mutations cause an axonal neuropathy. POLG1 mutations, especially when associated with late-onset phenotypes, appear to cause a predominantly sensory neuropathy with prominent ataxia. The identification of the peripheral neuropathy also helps to target genetic testing in the mitochondrial optic neuropathies. Although often subclinical, the peripheral neuropathy may occasionally be symptomatic and cause significant disability. Where it is symptomatic, recognition of the neuropathy will help the early institution of rehabilitative therapy. We therefore suggest that nerve conduction studies should be a part of the early evaluation of children with suspected mitochondrial disease.

  14. Association Between Genetic Traits for Immune-Mediated Diseases and Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Jennifer S.; Wang, Yunpeng; Schork, Andrew J.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Karch, Celeste M.; Cruchaga, Carlos; McEvoy, Linda K.; Witoelar, Aree; Chen, Chi-Hua; Holland, Dominic; Brewer, James B.; Franke, Andre; Dillon, William P.; Wilson, David M.; Mukherjee, Pratik; Hess, Christopher P.; Miller, Zachary; Bonham, Luke W.; Shen, Jeffrey; Rabinovici, Gil D.; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Karlsen, Tom H.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Dale, Anders M.; Desikan, Rahul S.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, places a large burden on families and society. Although epidemiological and clinical evidence suggests a relationship between inflammation and AD, their relationship is not well understood and could have implications for treatment and prevention strategies. OBJECTIVE To determine whether a subset of genes involved with increased risk of inflammation are also associated with increased risk for AD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In a genetic epidemiology study conducted in July 2015, we systematically investigated genetic overlap between AD (International Genomics of Alzheimer’s Project stage 1) and Crohn disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, and psoriasis using summary data from genome-wide association studies at multiple academic clinical research centers. P values and odds ratios from genome-wide association studies of more than 100 000 individuals were from previous comparisons of patients vs respective control cohorts. Diagnosis for each disorder was previously established for the parent study using consensus criteria. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome was the pleiotropic (conjunction) false discovery rate P value. Follow-up for candidate variants included neuritic plaque and neurofibrillary tangle pathology; longitudinal Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale cognitive subscale scores as a measure of cognitive dysfunction (Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative); and gene expression in AD vs control brains (Gene Expression Omnibus data). RESULTS Eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms (false discovery rate P < .05) were associated with both AD and immune-mediated diseases. Of these, rs2516049 (closest gene HLA-DRB5; conjunction false discovery rate P = .04 for AD and psoriasis, 5.37 × 10−5 for AD, and 6.03 × 10−15 for psoriasis) and rs12570088 (closest gene IPMK; conjunction false discovery rate P = .009 for

  15. 75 FR 60865 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Allied World Reinsurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Allied World Reinsurance Company AGENCY.... 9305 to the following company: Allied World Reinsurance Company (NAIC 22730). Business Address:...

  16. 22. ASSEMBLY OF 9700 H.P. ALLIS CHALMERS TURBINE, CENTERVILLE P.H. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. ASSEMBLY OF 9700 H.P. ALLIS CHALMERS TURBINE, CENTERVILLE P.H. Drawing no. 50153, traced from Allis Chalmers drawing #699, April 24, 1906. - Centerville Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse, Butte Creek, Centerville, Butte County, CA

  17. Trends in Allied Dental Education: An Analysis of the Past and a Look to the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haden, N. Karl; Morr, Kathleen E.; Valachovic, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Presents and discusses data on the allied dental workforce and allied dental education, including number of education programs; applications, first-year enrollment, and capacity; number of graduates; gender, race, and ethnicity; cost of education; and faculty. (EV)

  18. Age-Associated Chronic Diseases Require Age-Old Medicine: Role of Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Sung, Bokyung; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2012-01-01

    Most chronic diseases - such as cancer, cardiovascular disease (CVD), Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, arthritis, diabetes and obesity - are becoming leading causes of disability and death all over the world. Some of the most common causes of these age-associated chronic diseases are lack of physical activity, poor nutrition, tobacco use, and excessive alcohol consumption. All the risk factors linked to these chronic diseases have been shown to up-regulate inflammation. Therefore, downregulation of inflammation-associated risk factors could prevent or delay these age-associated diseases. Although modern science has developed several drugs for treating chronic diseases, most of these drugs are enormously expensive and are associated with serious side effects and morbidity. In this review, we present evidence on how chronic inflammation leads to age-associated chronic disease. Furthermore, we discuss diet and lifestyle as solutions for age-associated chronic disease. PMID:22178471

  19. Collagenous gastritis: histopathologic features and association with other gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Leung, Stanley T; Chandan, Vishal S; Murray, Joseph A; Wu, Tsung-Teh

    2009-05-01

    Collagenous gastritis (CG) characterized by the deposition of a subepithelial collagen band and accompanying inflammatory infiltrate is a rare disorder. The natural history and pathogenesis of CG remain unclear. We describe the histologic features (23 gastric, 18 duodenal, and 4 colonic biopsies) and clinical findings of an additional 12 cases. Histologic features including active or chronic inflammation, surface epithelial injury, intraepithelial lymphocytosis, intestinal metaplasia, and Helicobacter pylori, and measurement of thickness of subepithelial collagenous band were evaluated in gastric biopsies. The clinical features, endoscopic findings, and follow-up were obtained and correlated with histologic features. There was an even number of males (n=6) and females (n=6). Four patients were children/young adults, 3 of whom (75%) presented with anemia and gastric nodularity. Eight patients were adults, 6 of whom (75%) had an associated autoimmune disease (1 with Hashimoto thyroiditis and polymyositis) or other intestinal disease (3 with celiac sprue, 1 with collagenous colitis, 1 with collagenous sprue), in contrast to none in the 4 children/young adults, P=0.06. The range of subepithelial collagen thickness was 15 to 120 microm in CG. The collagenous layer showed surface epithelial injury and entrapped inflammatory cells. On presentation, the thickened collagen distribution in the antrum and body was variably patchy and diffuse. Four (33%) patients showed lymphocytic gastritis (3 within the same biopsy); one of these patients also had celiac sprue and another had collagenous sprue. Three (25%) patients had celiac sprue (2 had duodenal biopsy proven and 1 had a clinical diagnosis of celiac sprue). An additional patient had duodenal biopsies showing collagenous sprue. Four patients had follow-up biopsies during a 3 to 119-month period after the diagnosis of CG. CG persisted on the follow-up gastric biopsies in 3 (75%) of the 4 patients, and the other patient had

  20. Resveratrol: a multitargeted agent for age-associated chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil B; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2008-04-15

    Extensive research within the last decade has revealed that most chronic illnesses such as cancer, cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, neurological diseases, diabetes, and autoimmune diseases exhibit dysregulation of multiple cell signaling pathways that have been linked to inflammation. Thus mono-targeted therapies developed for the last two decades for these diseases have proven to be unsafe, ineffective and expensive. Although fruits and vegetables are regarded to have therapeutic potential against chronic illnesses, neither their active component nor the mechanism of action is well understood. Resveratrol (trans-3, 5, 4'-trihydroxystilbene), a component of grapes, berries, peanuts and other traditional medicines, is one such polyphenol that has been shown to mediate its effects through modulation of many different pathways. This stilbene has been shown to bind to numerous cell-signaling molecules such as multi drug resistance protein, topoisomerase II, aromatase, DNA polymerase, estrogen receptors, tubulin and F1-ATPase. Resveratrol has also been shown to activate various transcription factor (e.g; NFkappaB, STAT3, HIF-1alpha, beta-catenin and PPAR-gamma), suppress the expression of antiapoptotic gene products (e.g; Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L), XIAP and survivin), inhibit protein kinases (e.g; src, PI3K, JNK, and AKT), induce antioxidant enzymes (e,g; catalase, superoxide dismutase and hemoxygenase-1), suppress the expression of inflammatory biomarkers (e.g., TNF, COX-2, iNOS, and CRP), inhibit the expression of angiogenic and metastatic gene products (e.g., MMPs, VEGF, cathepsin D, and ICAM-1), and modulate cell cycle regulatory genes (e.g., p53, Rb, PTEN, cyclins and CDKs). Numerous animal studies have demonstrated that this polyphenol holds promise against numerous age-associated diseases including cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer, cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. In view of these studies, resveratrol's prospects for use in the clinics are rapidly accelerating

  1. Travel-associated Legionnaires disease in Europe in 2009.

    PubMed

    Joseph, C A; Ricketts, K D; Yadav, R; Patel, S

    2010-10-14

    A total of 818 cases of Legionnaires' disease with onset of illness in 2009 were reported from 22 European and two non-European countries to the European Surveillance Scheme for Travel-Associated Legionnaires' Disease (EWGLINET). This is a decrease of 52 cases compared with 2008 and 129 fewer than in 2007 - the peak year of reporting to date. A total of 794 (97.1%) cases were reported as confirmed and 24 as presumptive cases. Outcome of illness was reported for 561 (68.6%) cases. Of these cases 28 (5%) were reported to have died. More than half, of the cases in 2009 (n=469, 57.3%) were reported within 20 days of symptom onset. Cases visited 53 countries and were infected in all months of the year, with a peak in September (n=146). By country of residence of the cases, the United Kingdom (UK) reported the highest number of cases (n=173). Italy reported the second highest number of cases (n=169) and was also the country associated with the most cases by country of infection (n=209). A total of 88 new clusters (75 in Europe and 13 outside Europe) were detected in 2009 and were associated with 196 cases. The largest cluster occurred in Italy and involved seven cases. Without the scheme's international database, thirty three (37.5%) of the newly detected clusters would not have been identified. In 49 of the accommodation sites with clusters of cases, environmental samples were found to be positive for Legionella spp. Details of 10 sites were published on the European Working Group for Legionella Infections (EWGLI) website for failure to return information on the status of environmental investigations.

  2. Perianal Crohn’s Disease is associated with distal colonic disease, stricturing disease behavior, IBD-associated serologies and genetic variation in the JAK-STAT pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manreet; Panikkath, Deepa; Yan, Xiaofei; Liu, Zhenqiu; Berel, Dror; Li, Dalin; Vasiliauskas, Eric A.; Ippoliti, Andrew; Dubinsky, Marla; Shih, David Q.; Melmed, Gil Y.; Haritunians, Talin; Fleshner, Phillip; Targan, Stephan R.; McGovern, Dermot P.B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Perianal Crohn’s Disease (pCD) is a particularly severe phenotype associated with poor quality of life with a reported prevalence of 12%–40%. Previous studies investigating the etiology of pCD have been limited in the numbers of subjects and the intensity of genotyping. The aim of this study was to identify clinical, serological and genetic factors associated with pCD. METHODS We performed a case-control study comparing patients with (pCD+) and without perianal (pCD−) involvement in CD; defined as the presence of perianal abscesses or fistulae. Data on demographics and clinical features were obtained by chart review. IBD related serology were determined by ELISA. Genetic data were generated using Illumina genotyping platforms RESULTS We included 1721 patients with CD of which 524 (30.4%) were pCD+ and 1197 were pPCD−. Perianal CD was associated with distal colonic disease (OR 5.54 [3.23–9.52], p < 0.001), stricturing disease behavior (1.44 [1.14–1.81], p= 0.002) and family history of inflammatory bowel disease (4.98 [3.30–7.46], p < 0.001). Perianal CD was associated with higher ASCA IgA (p <0.001) and OmpC (p= 0.008) antibody levels. Perianal CD was associated with known IBD loci including KIF3B; CRTC3; TRAF3IP2; JAZF1; NRIP1; MST1; FUT2; and PTGER (all p<0.05). We also identified genetic association with genes involved in autophagy (DAPK1, p=5.11×10−5); TNF alpha pathways (NUCB2, p=8.68×10−5; DAPK1); IFNg pathways (DAPK1; NDFIP2, p=8.74×10−5) and extracellular matrix and scaffolding proteins (USH1C, p=8.68×10−5; NDFIP2; TMC07, p=8.87×10−5). Pathway analyses implicated the JAK/Stat pathway (pc = 3.72 × 10−5). CONCLUSION We have identified associations between perianal Crohn’s disease, more distal colonic inflammation, Crohn’s disease-associated serologies, and genetic variation in the JAK/Stat pathway PMID:26937622

  3. Prognostic Factors for Myositis-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Hozumi, Hironao; Kono, Masato; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Hashimoto, Dai; Nakamura, Yutaro; Inui, Naoki; Yokomura, Koshi; Koshimizu, Naoki; Toyoshima, Mikio; Shirai, Toshihiro; Yasuda, Kazumasa; Hayakawa, Hiroshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2014-01-01

    Background Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a common manifestation of polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), and clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis (CADM); however, little is known about the factors influencing the prognosis for PM/DM/CADM-associated ILD. (PM/DM/CADM-ILD). The aim of the present study is to assess prognostic factors for PM/DM/CADM-ILD. Methods The clinical features and survival of 114 consecutive patients diagnosed with PM/DM/CADM-ILD (39 men and 75 women; median age, 56 years) were analyzed retrospectively. Results The study group included 30 PM-associated ILD, 41 DM-associated ILD, and 43 CADM-associated ILD cases. The clinical presentation of ILD was acute/subacute form in 59 patients (51.8%) and chronic form in 55 patients (48.2%). The major pulmonary symptoms were dyspnea, cough, and fever. High-resolution computed tomography frequently revealed ground-glass opacities, traction bronchiectasis, and consolidation. Most of the patients were treated with corticosteroids or corticosteroids in combination with immunosuppressive agents. The all-cause mortality was 27.2%. Acute/subacute form, % forced vital capacity (FVC), age, % of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and a diagnosis of CADM (vs. PM) were significantly associated with poor outcome in univariate Cox proportional hazards models. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis validated acute/subacute ILD, %FVC, age, and diagnosis of CADM (vs. PM) as significant predictors of overall mortality. Patients with acute/subacute ILD had a much lower survival rate than those with the chronic form (p<0.001). Patients with CADM-ILD had a lower survival rate than those with PM-ILD (p = 0.034). Conclusions Acute/subacute form, older age, lower level of FVC and diagnosis of CADM predict poor outcome in PM/DM/CADM-ILD. PMID:24905449

  4. 22 CFR 120.32 - Major non-NATO ally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Major non-NATO ally. 120.32 Section 120.32 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS... the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq. and 22...

  5. 22 CFR 120.32 - Major non-NATO ally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Major non-NATO ally. 120.32 Section 120.32 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS... the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2751 et seq.) (22...

  6. 22 CFR 120.32 - Major non-NATO ally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Major non-NATO ally. 120.32 Section 120.32 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS... the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2751 et seq.) (22...

  7. 22 CFR 120.32 - Major non-NATO ally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Major non-NATO ally. 120.32 Section 120.32 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS... the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2751 et seq.) (22...

  8. 22 CFR 120.32 - Major non-NATO ally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Major non-NATO ally. 120.32 Section 120.32 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS... the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq. and 22...

  9. Joining the Struggle: White Men as Social Justice Allies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Christopher Edward; Mather, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the experience of White men as they sought to support individuals from oppressed groups and participate in a community with other allies like themselves. This research was conducted from a social constructivist epistemological paradigm and informed by a constructivist grounded theory methodology. The following research…

  10. Articulation for Allied Health. Final Report. Omnibus Dissemination Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havens, Cheryl C.

    There exists in health occupations education, two types of educational institutions. One type prepares students for a certificate, and the other for a degree. The objective of the Articulation Project for Allied Health was to establish and document a procedure by which students with technical certificates could receive college credit, recommending…

  11. 13. TROJAN MILL, INTERIOR SHOWING PRIMARY MILL No. 1 (ALLIS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. TROJAN MILL, INTERIOR SHOWING PRIMARY MILL No. 1 (ALLIS CHALMERS BALL MILL) FROM EAST, c. 1919. ELECTRIC MOTOR AND DRIVE SHAFT CLEARLY VISIBLE. CREDIT WR. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  12. Nursing Skills for Allied Health Services. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Lucile A., Ed.

    Volume 1 of the two-volume textbook on nursing skills presents instructional materials (units 1-20) based on 184 activities designated by the Allied Health Professions Projects national survey as those which are accomplished by all levels of nursing. Unit titles are: (1) the health worker and the law; (2) introduction to ethics in the healing…

  13. Safe Zones: Creating LGBT Safe Space Ally Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poynter, Kerry John; Tubbs, Nancy Jean

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses model LGBT Safe Space Ally programs. These programs, often called "Safe Zones," include self selected students, faculty, and employees who publicly show support by displaying stickers, signs, and other identifiable items. Issues covered in the article include history, development, training, membership, assessment, and…

  14. Rural Allied Medical Business Occupations (RAMBO). Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gloria

    A partnership was formed to address the crisis that rural health care facilities in rural Nebraska face in attracting and hiring trained health care workers. The Rural Allied Medical Business Occupations (RAMBO) project trained economically disadvantaged individuals in high technology medical fields. Five objectives were outlined in the project:…

  15. Table Clinics: A Valuable Learning Experience for Allied Health Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Jimmie H.

    Table clinics, or short oral presentations on techniques related to some phase of research, diagnosis, or treatment, can be used to enrich allied health education. To present a table clinic, students must choose a topic which lends itself to a 5- to 7-minute presentation and which imparts knowledge that participants can take back to their…

  16. An Aging Game Simulation Activity for Allied Health Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, Carolinda; Henry, Beverly W.; Kostiwa, Irene M.

    2008-01-01

    The Aging Game, a simulation activity, has been used successfully with medical students in the development of empathetic attitudes toward older adults. To date, the Aging Game has not been used extensively with allied health students. It has been viewed as too costly, time-consuming and labor-intensive. The purpose of this study was to examine the…

  17. Undocumented Student Allies and Transformative Resistance: A Ethnographic Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Angela Chuan-Ru; Rhoads, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines staff and faculty allies working to help meet the needs of undocumented students at a large research university in the western region of the U.S. Drawing on scholarly work rooted in critical race theory and ethnic studies, the authors highlight forms of transformative resistance. They focus on four key findings: (1) student…

  18. Index of Graduate Theses and Projects in Allied Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Allied Health, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Contains 1,073 entries from 91 institutions, giving author, institution, year, degree, emphasis, discipline, and title, arranged by topic: allied health, biocommunication arts, child development/care, clinical psychology, dentistry, environmental health, exercise science, food service, health education, health services, medical laboratories, nurse…

  19. Health Planning that Magnifies the Community's Voice: Allies against Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfoss, Frances D.; Kelly, Cynthia; Taylor-Fishwick, Jude

    2005-01-01

    Allies Against Asthma, a working group of the Consortium for Infant and Child Health (CINCH), conducted a comprehensive asthma needs assessment in Hampton Roads, Virginia, in 2001. Results from extant data and parent surveys indicated that asthma prevalence was high (15% to 18%), 45% to 50% of children received primary care for asthma in the…

  20. Nursing Skills for Allied Health Services. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Lucile A., Ed.

    Volume 2 of the two-volume textbook on nursing skills presents instructional materials (units 21-36) on nursing skills based on 184 activities designated by the Allied Health Professions Projects national survey as those which are accomplished by all levels of nursing. Unit titles are: (21) urine elimination; (22) bowel elimination; (23)…

  1. Genome-wide association interaction analysis for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gusareva, Elena S.; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Bellenguez, Céline; Cuyvers, Elise; Colon, Samuel; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Mahachie Johna, Jestinah M.; Bessonov, Kyrylo; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Williams, Julie; Amouyel, Philippe; Sleegers, Kristel; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Van Steen, Kristel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a minimal protocol for exhaustive genome-wide association interaction analysis that involves screening for epistasis over large-scale genomic data combining strengths of different methods and statistical tools. The different steps of this protocol are illustrated on a real-life data application for Alzheimer's disease (AD) (2259 patients and 6017 controls from France). Particularly, in the exhaustive genome-wide epistasis screening we identified AD-associated interacting SNPs-pair from chromosome 6q11.1 (rs6455128, the KHDRBS2 gene) and 13q12.11 (rs7989332, the CRYL1 gene) (p = 0.006, corrected for multiple testing). A replication analysis in the independent AD cohort from Germany (555 patients and 824 controls) confirmed the discovered epistasis signal (p = 0.036). This signal was also supported by a meta-analysis approach in 5 independent AD cohorts that was applied in the context of epistasis for the first time. Transcriptome analysis revealed negative correlation between expression levels of KHDRBS2 and CRYL1 in both the temporal cortex (β = −0.19, p = 0.0006) and cerebellum (β = −0.23, p < 0.0001) brain regions. This is the first time a replicable epistasis associated with AD was identified using a hypothesis free screening approach. PMID:24958192

  2. Variations in ORAI1 Gene Associated with Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Fukazawa, Ryuji; Yamamura, Kenichiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Kakimoto, Nobuyuki; Suenaga, Tomohiro; Takeuchi, Takashi; Hamada, Hiromichi; Honda, Takafumi; Yasukawa, Kumi; Terai, Masaru; Ebata, Ryota; Higashi, Kouji; Saji, Tsutomu; Kemmotsu, Yasushi; Takatsuki, Shinichi; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Kishi, Fumio; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Nagai, Toshiro; Hamamoto, Kunihiro; Sato, Yoshitake; Honda, Akihito; Kobayashi, Hironobu; Sato, Junichi; Shibuta, Shoichi; Miyawaki, Masakazu; Oishi, Ko; Yamaga, Hironobu; Aoyagi, Noriyuki; Yoshiyama, Megumi; Miyashita, Ritsuko; Murata, Yuji; Fujino, Akihiro; Ozaki, Kouichi; Kawasaki, Tomisaku; Abe, Jun; Seki, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Tohru; Arakawa, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Shunichi; Hara, Toshiro; Hata, Akira; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD; MIM#61175) is a systemic vasculitis syndrome with unknown etiology which predominantly affects infants and children. Recent findings of susceptibility genes for KD suggest possible involvement of the Ca(2+)/NFAT pathway in the pathogenesis of KD. ORAI1 is a Ca(2+) release activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channel mediating store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) on the plasma membrane. The gene for ORAI1 is located in chromosome 12q24 where a positive linkage signal was observed in our previous affected sib-pair study of KD. A common non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism located within exon 2 of ORAI1 (rs3741596) was significantly associated with KD (P = 0.028 in the discovery sample set (729 KD cases and 1,315 controls), P = 0.0056 in the replication sample set (1,813 KD cases vs. 1,097 controls) and P = 0.00041 in a meta-analysis by the Mantel-Haenszel method). Interestingly, frequency of the risk allele of rs3741596 is more than 20 times higher in Japanese compared to Europeans. We also found a rare 6 base-pair in-frame insertion variant associated with KD (rs141919534; 2,544 KD cases vs. 2,414 controls, P = 0.012). These data indicate that ORAI1 gene variations are associated with KD and may suggest the potential importance of the Ca(2+)/NFAT pathway in the pathogenesis of this disorder.

  3. Groundwater pesticide levels and the association with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    James, Katherine A; Hall, Deborah A

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether exposure to environmentally relevant levels of pesticides in groundwater is associated with an increased risk of Parkinson disease (PD). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between PD and pesticide levels in groundwater. This cross-sectional study included 332 971 Medicare beneficiaries, including 4207 prevalent cases of PD from the 2007 Colorado Medicare Beneficiary Database. Residential pesticide levels were estimated from a spatial model based on 286 well water samples with atrazine, simazine, alachlor, and metolachlor measurements. A logistic regression model with known PD risk factors was used to assess the association between residential groundwater pesticide levels and prevalent PD. We found that for every 1.0 µg/L of pesticide in groundwater, the risk of PD increases by 3% (odds ratio = 1.03; 95% confidence interval: 1.02-1.04) while adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and gender suggesting that higher age-standardized PD prevalence ratios are associated with increasing levels of pesticides in groundwater.

  4. Nutrigenomics and its Impact on Life Style Associated Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Shalika; Kumar, Shiv; Rathore, Nikita; Padwad, Yogendra; Bhushana, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Post-human genome revelation observes the emergence of ‘Nutigenomics’ as one of the exciting scientific advancement influencing mankind around the world. Food or more precisely 'nutrition' has the major impact in defining the cause-response interaction between nutrient (diet) and human health. In addition to substantial understanding of nutrition-human-health interaction, bases of 'nutrigenomic' development foster on advent in transcriptomics, genomics, proteomics and metabolomics as well as insight into food as health supplement. Interaction of selected nutrient with associated genes in specific organ or tissue necessary to comprehend that how individual's genetic makeup (DNA transcribed into mRNA and then to proteins) respond to particular nutrient. It provided new opportunities to incorporate natural bioactive compounds into food for specific group of people with similar genotype. As inception of diabetes associated with change in gene expression of, not limited to, protein kinase B, insulin receptor, duodenal homeobox and glucokinase, thus, targeting such proteins by modifying or improving the nutritional availability or uptake may help to devise novel food, supplements, or nutraceuticals. In this article, various aspects of R&D in nutrigenomics are reviewed to ascertain its impact on human health, especially with life-style associated diseases. PMID:27252592

  5. Allied Health Education/Transfer of Credit: Recommendations of the North Carolina Articulation Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boatman, Ralph H., Ed.; Huther, John W., Ed.

    The North Carolina Allied Health Articulation Project was launched to develop procedures which would enable an individual to transfer credit from an allied health education program in one setting to some program in higher education. In 1972-73, study committees were appointed to deal with the allied health professions of physical therapy,…

  6. 42 CFR 413.87 - Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.87 Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... reimbursement for approved nursing and allied health education programs and the methodology for determining...

  7. 42 CFR 413.87 - Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.87 Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... reimbursement for approved nursing and allied health education programs and the methodology for determining...

  8. 42 CFR 413.85 - Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cost of approved nursing and allied health... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.85 Cost of approved nursing and allied health... methodology for Medicare payment of the costs of approved nursing and allied health education activities....

  9. 42 CFR 413.85 - Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cost of approved nursing and allied health... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.85 Cost of approved nursing and allied health... methodology for Medicare payment of the costs of approved nursing and allied health education activities....

  10. 42 CFR 413.85 - Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cost of approved nursing and allied health... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.85 Cost of approved nursing and allied health... methodology for Medicare payment of the costs of approved nursing and allied health education activities....

  11. 42 CFR 413.87 - Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.87 Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... reimbursement for approved nursing and allied health education programs and the methodology for determining...

  12. 42 CFR 413.87 - Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.87 Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... reimbursement for approved nursing and allied health education programs and the methodology for determining...

  13. 42 CFR 413.87 - Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.87 Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... reimbursement for approved nursing and allied health education programs and the methodology for determining...

  14. 42 CFR 413.85 - Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cost of approved nursing and allied health... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.85 Cost of approved nursing and allied health... methodology for Medicare payment of the costs of approved nursing and allied health education activities....

  15. Development of a Scale to Determine Enrollment Barriers into Allied Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barfield, J. P.; Folio, M. Rhonda; Lam, Eddie T. C.; Zhang, James J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop the Scale of Allied Health Education Barriers to identify factors limiting enrollment in college/university allied health education programs. Development of the Scale of Allied Health Education Barriers was conducted through the following four stages: (1) review of literature, (2) focus group studies, (3)…

  16. 42 CFR 136.304 - Publication of a list of allied health professions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Publication of a list of allied health professions... of a list of allied health professions. The Secretary, acting through the Service, shall publish from time to time in the Federal Register a list of the allied health professions for consideration for...

  17. Allied Health Care Employees' Workplace Skills and Competencies: Are They Prepared?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Clifford R.; McClain, Mildred A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which allied health care providers considered the Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS, 1991) and competencies as those that are necessary for entry level employment in the allied health care industry. The extent that allied health care supervisors and managers…

  18. 49 CFR 583.11 - Allied suppliers of passenger motor vehicle equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allied suppliers of passenger motor vehicle... CONTENT LABELING § 583.11 Allied suppliers of passenger motor vehicle equipment. (a) For each unique type of passenger motor vehicle equipment which an allied supplier supplies to the manufacturer with...

  19. 49 CFR 583.11 - Allied suppliers of passenger motor vehicle equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allied suppliers of passenger motor vehicle... CONTENT LABELING § 583.11 Allied suppliers of passenger motor vehicle equipment. (a) For each unique type of passenger motor vehicle equipment which an allied supplier supplies to the manufacturer with...

  20. Introducing Astronomy Allies: We are here to help!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewelling, Heather; Alatalo, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Imagine you are a grad student, at your first conference, and a prominent senior scientist shows interest in your work, and he makes things get way too personal? What would you do? Would you report it? Or would you decide, after a few other instances of harassment, that maybe you shouldn't pursue astronomy? Harassment is under-reported, the policies can be difficult to understand or hard to find, and it can be very intimidating as a young scientist to report it to the proper individuals. The Astronomy Allies Program is designed to help you with these sorts of problems. We are a group of volunteers that will help by doing the following: provide safe walks home during the conference, someone to talk to confidentially, as an intervener, as a resource to report harassment. The Allies are a diverse group of scientists committed to acting as mentors, advocates, and liaisons. The Winter 2015 AAS meeting will be the first meeting that has Astronomy Allies, and Astronomy Allies will provide a website for information, as well as a twitter, email, and phone number for anyone who needs our help or would like more information. We posted about the Astronomy Allies on the Women In Astronomy blog, and this program resonates with many people: either they want to help, or they have experienced harassment in the past and don't want to see it in the future. Harassment may not happen to most conference participants, but it's wrong, it's against the AAS anti-harassment policy ( http://aas.org/policies/anti-harassment-policy ), it can be very damaging, and if it happens to even one person, that is unacceptable. We intend to improve the culture at conferences to make it so that harassers feel they can't get away with their unprofessional behavior.

  1. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker Candidates Associated with Human WNV Neuroinvasive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fraisier, Christophe; Papa, Anna; Granjeaud, Samuel; Hintzen, Rogier; Martina, Byron; Camoin, Luc; Almeras, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the epidemiology of WNV in humans has changed in the southern regions of Europe, with high incidence of West Nile fever (WNF) cases, but also of West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND). The lack of human vaccine or specific treatment against WNV infection imparts a pressing need to characterize indicators associated with neurological involvement. By its intimacy with central nervous system (CNS) structures, modifications in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition could accurately reflect CNS pathological process. Until now, few studies investigated the association between imbalance of CSF elements and severity of WNV infection. The aim of the present study was to apply the iTRAQ technology in order to identify the CSF proteins whose abundances are modified in patients with WNND. Forty-seven proteins were found modified in the CSF of WNND patients as compared to control groups, and most of them are reported for the first time in the context of WNND. On the basis of their known biological functions, several of these proteins were associated with inflammatory response. Among them, Defensin-1 alpha (DEFA1), a protein reported with anti-viral effects, presented the highest increasing fold-change (FC>12). The augmentation of DEFA1 abundance in patients with WNND was confirmed at the CSF, but also in serum, compared to the control individual groups. Furthermore, the DEFA1 serum level was significantly elevated in WNND patients compared to subjects diagnosed for WNF. The present study provided the first insight into the potential CSF biomarkers associated with WNV neuroinvasion. Further investigation in larger cohorts with kinetic sampling could determine the usefulness of measuring DEFA1 as diagnostic or prognostic biomarker of detrimental WNND evolution. PMID:24695528

  2. SLC6 Transporters: Structure, Function, Regulation, Disease Association and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Pramod Akula; Foster, James; Carvelli, Lucia; Henry, L. Keith

    2012-01-01

    The SLC6 family of secondary active transporters are integral membrane solute carrier proteins characterized by the Na+-dependent translocation of small amino acid or amino acid-like substrates. SLC6 transporters, which include the serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, GABA, taurine, creatine, as well as amino acid transporters, are associated with a number of human diseases and disorders making this family a critical target for therapeutic development. In addition, several members of this family are directly involved in the action of drugs of abuse such as cocaine, amphetamines, and ecstasy. Recent advances providing structural insight into this family have vastly accelerated our ability to study these proteins and their involvement in complex biological processes. PMID:23506866

  3. Rupture of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm associated with Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Umehara, Nobuhiro; Saito, Satoshi; Ishii, Hikaru; Aomi, Shigeyuki; Kurosawa, Hiromi

    2007-10-01

    Surgical treatment of arterial Behcet's disease (BD) has a higher incidence of graft-related complications such as anastomotic pseudoaneurysm or graft occlusion. A 64-year-old man presented with a rupture of the thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms associated with BD. Evaluation shows a large hematoma in the retroperitoneum and multiple aneurysms of the thoracoabdominal aorta. Physical examination and past history fulfills the diagnostic criteria of BD. The abdominal aorta was replaced with an allograft and the major branches were reconstructed with its branches. The postoperative course was uneventful. A 10-month follow-up computed tomographic scan did not show any graft-related complications. This case suggests the usefulness of an allograft for arterial involvement of BD.

  4. SLC6 transporters: structure, function, regulation, disease association and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Pramod, Akula Bala; Foster, James; Carvelli, Lucia; Henry, L Keith

    2013-01-01

    The SLC6 family of secondary active transporters are integral membrane solute carrier proteins characterized by the Na(+)-dependent translocation of small amino acid or amino acid-like substrates. SLC6 transporters, which include the serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, GABA, taurine, creatine, as well as amino acid transporters, are associated with a number of human diseases and disorders making this family a critical target for therapeutic development. In addition, several members of this family are directly involved in the action of drugs of abuse such as cocaine, amphetamines, and ecstasy. Recent advances providing structural insight into this family have vastly accelerated our ability to study these proteins and their involvement in complex biological processes.

  5. Cruise-ship--associated Legionnaires disease, November 2003-May 2004.

    PubMed

    2005-11-18

    More than 9.4 million passengers traveled on pleasure cruises departing from North American ports in 2004, an increase of 13% since 2003 and 41% since 2001. Cruise ships typically transport closed populations of thousands of persons, often from diverse parts of the world. Travelers are at risk for becoming ill while on board, most commonly from person-to-person spread of viral gastrointestinal illnesses. Certain environmental organisms, such as Legionella spp., pose a risk to vulnerable passengers. During November 2003-May 2004, eight cases of Legionnaires disease (LD) among persons who had recently traveled on cruise ships were reported to CDC. This report describes these cases to raise clinician awareness of the potential for cruise-ship--associated LD and to emphasize the need for identification and reporting of cases to facilitate investigation.

  6. Depressive symptoms associated with hereditary Alzheimer's disease: a case description.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Mónica Yicette Sánchez; Vargas, Paula Alejandra Osorio; Ramos, Lucero Rengifo; Velandia, Rafael Alarcón

    The authors describe a family group studied by the Centro de Biología Molecular y Biotecnología, and the Clínica de la Memoria, las Demencias y el Envejecimiento (Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira, Colombia), and evaluate the association of depressive symptoms with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This family presented a hereditary pattern for AD characterized by an early onset of dementia symptoms, a long preclinical depressive course, and, once the first symptoms of dementia appeared, a rapid progression to severe cognitive function impairment. The authors found a high prevalence of depressive symptoms in this family and propose that the symptoms could be an important risk factor for developing AD in the presence of other risk factors such as the APOE E4 allele.

  7. Marshall-Stickler phenotype associated with von Willebrand disease

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, M.R.; Baker, K.S.; Schaefer, G.B.

    1997-01-20

    We report on 6 individuals from three different kindreds with Marshall-Stickler (MS) phenotype, with characteristic orofacial abnormalities, arthropathy, deafness, and eye findings, all of whom were discovered to have a mild bleeding diathesis and coagulation-study findings consistent with mild von Willebrand disease (vWD). MS syndrome has been linked in some cases to the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1) on chromosome 12q, and to the collagen XI gene (COL11A2) on chromosome 6. The von Willebrand factor (vWF) is encoded by a 180-Kb gene located on the short arm of chromosome 12. This is the first reported association of these two disorders. 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Biology and disease associations of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, D H

    2001-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human herpesvirus which infects almost all of the world's population subclinically during childhood and thereafter remains in the body for life. The virus colonizes antibody-producing (B) cells, which, as relatively long-lived resting cells, are an ideal site for long-term residence. Here EBV evades recognition and destruction by cytotoxic T cells. EBV is passed to naive hosts in saliva, but how the virus gains access to this route of transmission is not entirely clear. EBV carries a set of latent genes that, when expressed in resting B cells, induce cell proliferation and thereby increase the chances of successful virus colonization of the B-cell system during primary infection and the establishment of persistence. However, if this cell proliferation is not controlled, or if it is accompanied by additional genetic events within the infected cell, it can lead to malignancy. Thus EBV acts as a step in the evolution of an ever-increasing list of malignancies which are broadly of lymphoid or epithelial cell origin. In some of these, such as B-lymphoproliferative disease in the immunocompromised host, the role of the virus is central and well defined; in others, such as Burkitt's lymphoma, essential cofactors have been identified which act in concert with EBV in the evolution of the malignant clone. However, in several diseases in which the presence of EBV has more recently been discovered, the role of the virus is unclear. This review describes recent views on the EBV life cycle and its interlinks with normal B-cell biology, and discusses how this interrelationship may be upset and result in EBV-associated disease. PMID:11313005

  9. Bacterial Community Associated with Black Band Disease in Corals

    PubMed Central

    Frias-Lopez, Jorge; Klaus, James S.; Bonheyo, George T.; Fouke, Bruce W.

    2004-01-01

    Black band disease (BBD) is a virulent polymicrobial disease primarily affecting massive-framework-building species of scleractinian corals. While it has been well established that the BBD bacterial mat is dominated by a cyanobacterium, the quantitative composition of the BBD bacterial mat community has not described previously. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis was used to characterize the infectious bacterial community of the bacterial mat causing BBD. These analyses revealed that the bacterial composition of the BBD mat does not vary between different coral species but does vary when different species of cyanobacteria are dominant within the mat. On the basis of the results of a new method developed to identify organisms detected by T-RFLP analysis, our data show that besides the cyanobacterium, five species of the division Firmicutes, two species of the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides (CFB) group, and one species of δ-proteobacteria are also consistently abundant within the infectious mat. Of these dominant taxa, six were consistently detected in healthy corals. However, four of the six were found in much higher numbers in BBD mats than in healthy corals. One species of the CFB group and one species of Firmicutes were not always associated with the bacterial communities present in healthy corals. Of the eight dominant bacteria identified, two species were previously found in clone libraries obtained from BBD samples; however, these were not previously recognized as important. Furthermore, despite having been described as an important component of the pathogenetic mat, a Beggiatoa species was not detected in any of the samples analyzed. These results will permit the dominant BBD bacteria to be targeted for isolation and culturing experiments aimed at deciphering the disease etiology. PMID:15466538

  10. Using CSF biomarkers to replicate genetic associations in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Schott, Jonathan M

    2012-07-01

    Defining cases and controls on the basis of biomarkers rather than clinical diagnosis may reduce sample sizes required for genetic studies. The aim of this study was to assess whether characterizing case/control status on the basis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile would increase power to replicate known genetic associations for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Independent of clinical diagnosis, Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) subjects with 2 CSF biomarkers for AD (Aβ1-42 < 192 pg/mL and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (p-tau) > 23 pg/mL, "CSF-positive") were compared with those without CSF evidence for AD (Aβ1-42 > 192 pg/mL and 181-phosphorylated tau < 23 pg/mL, "CSF-negative"). Minor allele frequency (MAF) and odds ratios (ORs) between these 2 groups were calculated for 7 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of interest. Two hundred thirty-two individuals were CSF-positive and 94 CSF-negative. There were no differences in age (74.7 ± 7.2 vs. 75.0 ± 6.5 years, p = 0.7), but significant differences in Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) (25.9 ± 2.6 vs. 28.2 ± 1.7, p < 0.001) between the CSF-positive and CSF-negative groups. Significant differences in MAF (p < 0.05, uncorrected) were seen for CR1 (rs1408077; OR, 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-2.49), PICALM (rs541458; OR, 0.68, 95% CI, 0.47-0.98), TOMM40 (rs2075650; OR, 4.30; 95% CI, 2.61-7.06); and possession of 1 or more APOE ε4 alleles (OR, 9.84; 95% CI, 5.48-17.67). These results suggest that using biomarkers of AD pathology to define case and control status may increase power in genetic association studies.

  11. The association between aluminum-containing products and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Graves, A B; White, E; Koepsell, T D; Reifler, B V; van Belle, G; Larson, E B

    1990-01-01

    The association between exposure to aluminum through the lifetime use of antiperspirants and antacids and Alzheimer's disease (AD) was explored in a case-control study of 130 matched pairs. Cases were clinically diagnosed between January 1980 and June 1985 at two geriatric psychiatric clinics in Seattle, Wash. Controls were friends or non-blood relatives of the case. Subjects were matched by age, sex, and the relationship between the case and his or her surrogate. For all antiperspirant/deodorant use, regardless of aluminum content, there was no association with AD (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.2, 95% CI = 0.6-2.4). For aluminum-containing antiperspirants, the overall adjusted OR was 1.6 (95% CI = 1.04-2.4) with a trend toward a higher risk with increasing frequency of use (p for trend = 0.03), the adjusted OR in the highest tertile being 3.2. For antacids regardless of aluminum content, the overall adjusted OR was 3.1 (95% CI = 1.2-7.9). Here, a steep dose-response gradient was found (p for trend = 0.009), with an adjusted OR for the highest tertile of 11.7. However, when only aluminum-containing antacids were analyzed, the overall adjusted OR was only 0.7 (95% CI = 0.3-2.0) and there was no significant dose-response trend. These results are provocative but inconclusive due to methodologic problems relating to the necessary use of surrogate respondents and the long time period of potential exposure for this dementing disease.

  12. Fluoride-related bone disease associated with habitual tea consumption.

    PubMed

    Hallanger Johnson, Julie E; Kearns, Ann E; Doran, Patric M; Khoo, Teck Kim; Wermers, Robert A

    2007-06-01

    Acquired osteosclerosis is a rare disorder of bone formation but an important consideration in adults with sclerotic bones or elevated bone density results. In such patients, malignancy, hepatitis C, and fluorosis should all be considered when making a diagnosis. We describe 4 patients evaluated at our Metabolic Bone Disease Clinic from May 1, 1997, to July 1, 2006, whose bone disorders resulted from chronic fluoride exposure due to excessive tea intake. Three of these patients had toxic serum fluoride levels (> 15 micromol/L). Although the clinical presentation of the patients varied, all 4 had an unexpectedly elevated spine bone mineral density that was proportionately higher than the bone mineral density at the hip. Other clinical features included gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and weight loss; lower extremity pain sometimes associated with stress fractures of the lower extremities; renal insufficiency; and elevated alkaline phosphatase levels. Readily available, tea often contains high levels of fluoride. Obsessive-compulsive drinking behaviors and renal insufficiency may predispose to excessive fluoride consumption and accumulation. The current cases show that fluoride-related bone disease is an important clinical consideration in patients with dense bones or gastrointestinal symptoms and a history of excessive tea consumption. Furthermore, fluoride excess should be considered in all patients with a history of excessive tea consumption, especially due to its insidious nature and nonspecific clinical presentation.

  13. Fibrocytes are associated with the fibrosis of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lei, Pu-Ping; Qu, Yong-Qiang; Shuai, Qun; Tao, Si-Ming; Bao, Yu-Xia; Wang, Yu; Wang, Shang-Wen; Wang, Dian-Hua

    2013-01-15

    Fibrocytes contribute significantly to fibrosis in many cardiac diseases. However, it is not clear whether fibrocytes are associated with the fibrosis in coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of this study was to determine whether fibrocytes are involved in cardiac fibrosis in CHD. We identified the presence of fibrocytes in CHD heart by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, examined the collagen volume fraction by Masson's Trichrome staining, and evaluated the correlation between fibrocytes and cardiac fibrosis. In conjunction, we examined the location of CXCL12, a homing factor and specific ligand for CXCR4, by immunohistochemistry. Fibrocytes were identified in 26 out of 27 CHD hearts and in 10 out of 11 normal hearts. Combinations, including CD34/αSMA, CD34/procollagen-I, CD45/αSMA, CXCR4/procollagen-I and CXCR4/αSMA, stained significantly more fibrocytes in CHD hearts as compared with those in normal hearts (p<0.05). There were positive correlations between the collagen volume fraction and the amount of fibrocytes (r=0.558; p=0.003<0.01) and between the number of CXCR4(+) fibrocytes and the CXCL12(+) cells (r=0.741; p=0.000<0.01) in CHD hearts. Based upon these findings, we conclude that fibrocytes, likely recruited through the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis, may contribute to the increase in the fibroblast population in CHD heart.

  14. Parsing the Interferon Transcriptional Network and Its Disease Associations.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Sara; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Moodley, Devapregasan; LeBoité, Hugo; Rothamel, Katherine; Raj, Towfique; Ye, Chun Jimmie; Chevrier, Nicolas; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Feng, Ting; Lee, Mark; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Clark, James D; Hegen, Martin; Telliez, Jean-Baptiste; Hacohen, Nir; De Jager, Philip L; Regev, Aviv; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2016-01-28

    Type 1 interferon (IFN) is a key mediator of organismal responses to pathogens, eliciting prototypical "interferon signature genes" that encode antiviral and inflammatory mediators. For a global view of IFN signatures and regulatory pathways, we performed gene expression and chromatin analyses of the IFN-induced response across a range of immunocyte lineages. These distinguished ISGs by cell-type specificity, kinetics, and sensitivity to tonic IFN and revealed underlying changes in chromatin configuration. We combined 1,398 human and mouse datasets to computationally infer ISG modules and their regulators, validated by genetic analysis in both species. Some ISGs are controlled by Stat1/2 and Irf9 and the ISRE DNA motif, but others appeared dependent on non-canonical factors. This regulatory framework helped to interpret JAK1 blockade pharmacology, different clusters being affected under tonic or IFN-stimulated conditions, and the IFN signatures previously associated with human diseases, revealing unrecognized subtleties in disease footprints, as affected by human ancestry.

  15. A novel alphaherpesvirus associated with fatal diseases in banded Penguins.

    PubMed

    Pfaff, Florian; Schulze, Christoph; König, Patricia; Franzke, Kati; Bock, Sabine; Hlinak, Andreas; Kämmerling, Jens; Ochs, Andreas; Schüle, André; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Höper, Dirk; Beer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    A novel avian alphaherpesvirus, preliminarily designated sphenicid alphaherpesvirus 1 (SpAHV-1), has been independently isolated from juvenile Humboldt and African penguins (Spheniscus humboldti and Spheniscus demersus) kept in German zoos suffering from diphtheroid oropharyngitis/laryngotracheitis and necrotizing enteritis (collectively designated as penguin-diphtheria-like disease). High-throughput sequencing was used to determine the complete genome sequences of the first two SpAHV-1 isolates. SpAHV-1 comprises a class D genome with a length of about 164 kbp, a G+C content of 45.6 mol% and encodes 86 predicted ORFs. Taxonomic association of SpAHV-1 to the genus Mardivirus was supported by gene content clustering and phylogenetic analysis of herpesvirus core genes. The presented results imply that SpAHV-1 could be the primary causative agent of penguin-diphtheria-like fatal diseases in banded penguins. These results may serve as a basis for the development of diagnostic tools in order to investigate similar cases of penguin diphtheria in wild and captive penguins.

  16. Apathy and associated factors in Mexican patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; González-Latapi, Paulina; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Martínez-Ramírez, Daniel; Velázquez-Osuna, Salvador; Camacho-Ordoñez, Azyadeh

    2014-05-01

    Apathy is one of the most common behavioral disturbances in Parkinson's disease (PD) with a reported prevalence of 17-51 %. Apathy has been associated with depression, cognitive deficits, and poor quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of apathy in Mexican subjects with PD and its correlation with clinical and demographic characteristics. A cross-sectional, descriptive, and analytic study was carried out. Consecutive subjects with PD attending the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery in Mexico City were included. Demographic and other relevant clinical data were collected. The Apathy Scale was applied to all subjects. A cut-off score of ≥ 14 was used. A total of 241 non-demented patients (52.7 % male) were included. Apathy was found in 43 % of subjects. Lower body mass index, older age of PD onset, cognitive decline and disease severity were all related to apathy. The use of dopamine agonists or rasagiline was more common in patients with low apathy scores. Our results show that the prevalence of apathy in Mexican subjects with PD is similar to other reports.

  17. Factors associated with West Nile virus disease fatalities in horses.

    PubMed

    Epp, Tasha; Waldner, Cheryl; West, Keith; Townsend, Hugh

    2007-11-01

    In 2003, the occurrence and location of horses with clinical signs of West Nile virus infection were identified in the southern portion of Saskatchewan with the help of veterinarians, owners, and the regional laboratory. A total of 133 clinical cases were reported between July 30 and September 19, 2003; however, postseason surveillance suggests that the number of cases was underestimated. The case fatality rate was 43.8% (95% CI 35.2, 52.4). Factors associated with fatality in clinical cases included sex, week of onset of clinical signs, and coat color. Reported clinical cases clustered within regional health authority districts, suggesting regional differences in geographic factors, potentially including climate and mosquito control, that could contribute to the risk of disease. However, most of the variation in the risk of fatality in clinical cases is explained at the individual level rather than the Regional Health Authority level, which suggests the outcome of clinical disease is primarily determined by characteristics of, or management factors affecting, the individual horse.

  18. Insights from Genome-Wide Association Analyses of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kahali, Bratati; Halligan, Brian; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is caused by hepatic steatosis, which can progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in the absence of excessive alcohol consumption. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease will become the number one cause of liver disease worldwide by 2020. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is correlated albeit imperfectly with obesity and other metabolic diseases such as diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and cardiovascular disease, but exactly how having one of these diseases contributes to the development of other metabolic diseases is only now being elucidated. Development of NAFLD and related metabolic diseases is genetically influenced in the population, and recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have discovered genetic variants that associate with these diseases. These GWAS-associated variants cannot only help us to identify individuals at high risk of developing NAFLD, but also to better understand its pathophysiology so that we can develop more effective treatments for this disease and related metabolic diseases in the future. PMID:26676813

  19. Monogenic diseases associated with intestinal inflammation: implications for the understanding of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, Holm H

    2013-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), encompassing Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, has multifactorial aetiology with complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Over 150 genetic loci are associated with IBD. The genetic contribution of the majority of those loci towards explained heritability is low. Recent studies have reported an increasing spectrum of human monogenic diseases that can present with IBD-like intestinal inflammation. A substantial proportion of patients with those genetic defects present with very early onset of intestinal inflammation. The 40 monogenic defects with IBD-like pathology selected in this review can be grouped into defects in intestinal epithelial barrier and stress response, immunodeficiencies affecting granulocyte and phagocyte activity, hyper- and autoinflammatory disorders as well as defects with disturbed T and B lymphocyte selection and activation. In addition, there are defects in immune regulation affecting regulatory T cell activity and interleukin (IL)-10 signalling. Related to the variable penetrance of the IBD-like phenotype, there is a likely role for modifier genes and gene-environment interactions. Treatment options in this heterogeneous group of disorders range from anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive therapy to blockade of tumour necrosis factor α and IL-1β, surgery, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation or gene therapy. Understanding of prototypic monogenic 'orphan' diseases cannot only provide treatment options for the affected patients but also inform on immunological mechanisms and complement the functional understanding of the pathogenesis of IBD.

  20. Effective diagnosis of genetic disease by computational phenotype analysis of the disease-associated genome

    PubMed Central

    Zemojtel, Tomasz; Köhler, Sebastian; Mackenroth, Luisa; Jäger, Marten; Hecht, Jochen; Krawitz, Peter; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard; Doelken, Sandra; Ehmke, Nadja; Spielmann, Malte; Øien, Nancy Christine; Schweiger, Michal R.; Krüger, Ulrike; Frommer, Götz; Fischer, Björn; Kornak, Uwe; Flöttmann, Ricarda; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; Moreau, Yves; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Haendel, Melissa; Smedley, Damian; Horn, Denise; Mundlos, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    Less than half of patients with suspected genetic disease receive a molecular diagnosis. We have therefore integrated next-generation sequencing (NGS), bioinformatics, and clinical data into an effective diagnostic workflow. We used variants in the 2741 established Mendelian disease genes [the disease-associated genome (DAG)] to develop a targeted enrichment DAG panel (7.1 Mb), which achieves a coverage of 20-fold or better for 98% of bases. Furthermore, we established a computational method [Phenotypic Interpretation of eXomes (PhenIX)] that evaluated and ranked variants based on pathogenicity and semantic similarity of patients’ phenotype described by Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) terms to those of 3991 Mendelian diseases. In computer simulations, ranking genes based on the variant score put the true gene in first place less than 5% of the time; PhenIX placed the correct gene in first place more than 86% of the time. In a retrospective test of PhenIX on 52 patients with previously identified mutations and known diagnoses, the correct gene achieved a mean rank of 2.1. In a prospective study on 40 individuals without a diagnosis, PhenIX analysis enabled a diagnosis in 11 cases (28%, at a mean rank of 2.4). Thus, the NGS of the DAG followed by phenotype-driven bioinformatic analysis allows quick and effective differential diagnostics in medical genetics. PMID:25186178

  1. Predictive association of copper metabolism proteins with Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease: a preliminary perspective.

    PubMed

    Pal, Amit; Kumar, Ashok; Prasad, Rajendra

    2014-02-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), constitute a major worldwide health problem. Several hypothesis have been put forth to elucidate the basis of onset and pathogenesis of AD and PD; however, till date, none of these seems to clearly elucidate the complex pathoetiology of these disorders. Notably, copper dyshomeostasis has been shown to underlie the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative diseases including AD and PD. Numerous studies have concluded beyond doubt that imbalance in copper homeostatic mechanisms in conjunction with aging causes an acceleration in the copper toxicity elicited oxidative stress, which is detrimental to the central nervous system. Amyloid precursor protein and α-synuclein protein involved in AD and PD are copper binding proteins, respectively. In this review, we have discussed the possible association of copper metabolism proteins with AD and PD along with briefly outlining the expanding proportion of "copper interactome" in human biology. Using network biology, we found that copper metabolism proteins, superoxide dismutase 1 and ceruloplasmin may represent direct and indirect link with AD and PD, respectively.

  2. Epstein–Barr virus is associated with periodontal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zilong; Lv, Juan; Wang, Min

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Some controversies still exist between the detection of Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)'s DNA and risks of periodontal diseases. Hence, a comprehensive meta-analysis on all available literatures was performed to clarify the relationship between EBV and preidontitis. A comprehensive search was conducted within the PUBMED, EMBASE, and WANFANG databases up to October 10th, 2016 according to inclusion and exclusion criteria and finally 21 case–control literatures were obtained. The outcomes including odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of associations. Publication bias was determined by Begg or Egger test. Sensitivity analysis was used to investigate reliability and stability of the results. According to the data from included trials, the association between overall increased risks of periodontitis and the detection of EBV was significant (OR = 6.199, 95% CI = 3.119–12.319, P < 0.001). In the disease-type analysis, the pooled ORs for chronic periodontitis and aggressive periodontitis were 6.586 (95% CI = 3.042–14.262, P < 0.001) and 8.361 (95% CI = 2.109–33.143, P = 0.003), respectively. In the subgroup analysis of ethnicity, our results suggested that high EBV-detecting frequencies were correlated with increased risks of periodontitis in Asians, Europeans, and Americans (P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis by the sample type showed that subgingival plaque (SgP) samples and tissue samples were available for EBV detecting (P < 0.001). Detecting EBV of samples in ≥5 (6) mm sites of periodontal pockets were easier than in ≤3-mm sites (P = 0.023). This meta-analysis indicates that high frequent detection of EBV correlates with increased risk of periodontal diseases. SgP and tissue are available for detecting EBV in patients of periodontitis. At last, our results suggest that detecting EBV of samples in =5 (6) mm sites of periodontal pockets are more sensitive than in ≤3

  3. Association of Vitamin D Deficiency with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Yash Paul; Bhadada, Sanjay Kumar; Sachdeva, Naresh; Sahu, Kamal Kant

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) is a major global health problem. Recent studies demonstrated that lower vitamin D level (<30ng/ml) is associated with higher blood pressure and directly or indirectly with CAD, due to vascular endothelial damage. However the results are inconsistent. Aim To find the association of vitamin D deficiency with CAD Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional observational study, serum vitamin D level was measured in 315 patients who underwent coronary angiography. Result The mean (±SD) vitamin D was 13.40ng/ml (±10.40). However, the patients with normal coronary artery had much lower mean vitamin D (11.30ng/ml±9.50) as compared to the patients with CAD (14.10ng/ml±10.70). The mean (±SD) vitamin D levels were 19.00ng/ml (±16.50), 14.10ng/ml (±11.10) and 13.20ng/ml (±8.80) in patients with CAD with 50%-70%, >70%-90% and >90% stenosis respectively (p= 0.46) and 15.20ng/ml (±13.00), 15.50ng/ml (±11.30) and 11.80ng/ml (±7.00) in patients with CAD with single, double and triple vessels disease respectively (p= 0.14). The frequency of vitamin D deficiency were 66.70%, 83.20 % and 83.10% in patients with CAD with 50% -70%, >70%-90% and >90% stenosis respectively and 81.40%, 80.00% and 83.50% in patients with single, double and triple vessel disease respectively, as compared to 89.30% in patients with normal coronary artery (p= 0.41 and 0.075). So, all the study groups of CAD had low serum vitamin D level and high frequency of vitamin D deficiency, which was statistically insignificant. Conclusion Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is very high in CAD, but it does not correlate with the angiographic severity of CAD. PMID:27790488

  4. Indolent systemic mastocytosis associated with light chain deposition disease

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Kotaro; Chang, Alice; Najafian, Behzad

    2012-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is characterized by infiltration of neoplastic mast cells in one or more organ systems. SM in association with plasma cell dyscrasia is very rare. We report a first case of indolent SM (ISM) associated with light chain deposition disease (LCDD) in a kidney biopsy from a 59-year-old female presenting with skin rash, elevated serum creatinine, hematuria and mild proteinuria. Subsequent workup demonstrated IgG kappa monoclonal protein in serum and urine. A bone marrow biopsy revealed neoplastic mast cells involving bone marrow without evidence of clonal myeloid or lymphoid proliferation. Kidney biopsy demonstrated modest mesangial expansion detected by light microscopy and unequivocal evidence of monoclonal kappa light chain deposition within glomerular capillaries, tubular basement membranes and vascular walls detected by immunofluorescence and/or electron microscopy, along with equivocal evidence of light chain cast nephropathy. Despite treatment with bortezomib and dexamethasone, her renal function was progressively declined over the next 6 months. This case is a reminder that SM can coincide with LCDD, which requires clinical suspicion and multimodality workup on a kidney biopsy including immunofluorescence and electron microscopy to reach the correct diagnosis. PMID:26019820

  5. Surgical treatment for scoliosis associated with rare disease.

    PubMed

    Greggi, T; Lolli, F; Maredi, E; Di Silvestre, M; Martikos, K; Vommaro, F; Giacomini, S; Baioni, A; Cioni, A

    2012-01-01

    This is a retrospective study of 11 patients, 7 females and 4 males, treated at Our Department for an early onset scoliosis (EOS) associated with rare syndromes with growing spinal implants (Growing Rod or VEPTR-like) from 2006 to 2011. Mean follow-up was 24 months (range, 12 to 36). The mean age at surgery was 7. Patients were affected by Escobar's syndrome (1), scoliosis associated to congenital heart disease (1), Arnold Chiari type 1 (1), syringomyelia (1), NF 1 (2), Prader-Willi syndrome (1), trisomy 8 (1), arthrogryposis (2) and spondylo-rib dysplasia (1). Each patient was studied from the genetic point of view, and were performed: brain-spine MRI, pulmonary function tests, Cardio-US and abdominal US, neuropsychiatric and neurological evaluation, C0-C2 CT scan. After first implant and lengthening procedures (11), the correction of the thoracic curve averaged 50%. Unfortunately, a little loss of correction of the lumbar curve occurred during the follow up. There were 8 post-operative complications, that required revision surgery in 2 cases. Our results confirmed the effectiveness and safety of growing spinal implants in the treatment of early-onset scoliosis in rare syndromes.

  6. Target SNP selection in complex disease association studies

    PubMed Central

    Wjst, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Background The massive amount of SNP data stored at public internet sites provides unprecedented access to human genetic variation. Selecting target SNP for disease-gene association studies is currently done more or less randomly as decision rules for the selection of functional relevant SNPs are not available. Results We implemented a computational pipeline that retrieves the genomic sequence of target genes, collects information about sequence variation and selects functional motifs containing SNPs. Motifs being considered are gene promoter, exon-intron structure, AU-rich mRNA elements, transcription factor binding motifs, cryptic and enhancer splice sites together with expression in target tissue. As a case study, 396 genes on chromosome 6p21 in the extended HLA region were selected that contributed nearly 20,000 SNPs. By computer annotation ~2,500 SNPs in functional motifs could be identified. Most of these SNPs are disrupting transcription factor binding sites but only those introducing new sites had a significant depressing effect on SNP allele frequency. Other decision rules concern position within motifs, the validity of SNP database entries, the unique occurrence in the genome and conserved sequence context in other mammalian genomes. Conclusion Only 10% of all gene-based SNPs have sequence-predicted functional relevance making them a primary target for genotyping in association studies. PMID:15248903

  7. Irritable bowel syndrome might be associated with dry eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Asproudis, Ioannis; Tsoumani, Anthoula T.; Katsanos, Konstantinos H.; Katsanos, Aristeidis H.; Theopistos, Vasileios; Paschidis, Konstantinos A.; Tsianos, Epameinondas V.; Christodoulou, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Background A possible association between dry eye disease (DED) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been hypothesized based on the fact that they both share an inflammatory pathogenesis. Methods Ninety-five patients with IBS and 276 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. All patients answered a questionnaire regarding DED symptoms and had a complete ophthalmic examination. DED signs were evaluated using Schirmer’s 1 and tear break-up time (tBUT) tests in both groups. Results Female IBS participants presented significantly lower Schirmer’s test and tBUT (P=0.002 and P<0.001 respectively) than controls. Both diagnostic tests in male IBS patients were also significantly lower than in controls (P<0.001). 72% of IBS patients gave at least 3 positive answers to the questionnaire compared with 42% of the control group (P<0.01). Conclusion Our results suggest a correlation between IBS and DED. DED symptoms can cause further complications in patients with IBS, and should be considered in their management. However, further research is needed to establish a possible pathophysiologic association. PMID:27708515

  8. Cortical gray and subcortical white matter associations in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Nicholas W; Du, Guangwei; Lewis, Mechelle M; Swavely, Steven; Kong, Lan; Styner, Martin; Huang, Xuemei

    2017-01-01

    Cortical atrophy has been documented in both Parkinson's disease (PD) and healthy aging, but its relationship to changes in subcortical white matter is unknown. This was investigated by obtaining T1- and diffusion-weighted images from 76 PD and 70 controls at baseline and 18 and 36 months, from which cortical volumes and underlying subcortical white matter axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), and fractional anisotropy (FA) were determined. Twelve of 69 cortical subregions had significant group differences, and for these, underlying subcortical white matter was explored. At baseline, higher cortical volumes were significantly correlated with lower underlying subcortical white matter AD, RD, and higher FA (ps ≤ 0.017) in PD. Longitudinally, higher rates of cortical atrophy in PD were associated with increased rates of change in AD RD, and FA values (ps ≤ 0.0013) in 2 subregions explored. The significant gray-white matter associations were not found in controls. Thus, unlike healthy aging, cortical atrophy and subcortical white matter changes may not be independent events in PD.

  9. DNA Microarray Characterization of Pathogens Associated with Sexually Transmitted Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Boyang; Wang, Suwei; Tian, Zhenyang; Hu, Pinliang; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    This study established a multiplex PCR-based microarray to detect simultaneously a diverse panel of 17 sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)-associated pathogens including Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma, Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, and Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 54 and 58. The target genes are 16S rRNA gene for N. gonorrhoeae, M. genitalium, M. hominism, and Ureaplasma, the major outer membrane protein gene (ompA) for C. trachomatis, the glycoprotein B gene (gB) for HSV; and the L1 gene for HPV. A total of 34 probes were selected for the microarray including 31 specific probes, one as positive control, one as negative control, and one as positional control probe for printing reference. The microarray is specific as the commensal and pathogenic microbes (and closely related organisms) in the genitourinary tract did not cross-react with the microarray probes. The microarray is 10 times more sensitive than that of the multiplex PCR. Among the 158 suspected HPV specimens examined, the microarray showed that 49 samples contained HPV, 21 samples contained Ureaplasma, 15 contained M. hominis, four contained C. trachomatis, and one contained N. gonorrhoeae. This work reports the development of the first high through-put detection system that identifies common pathogens associated with STDs from clinical samples, and paves the way for establishing a time-saving, accurate and high-throughput diagnostic tool for STDs. PMID:26208181

  10. DNA Microarray Characterization of Pathogens Associated with Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cao, Boyang; Wang, Suwei; Tian, Zhenyang; Hu, Pinliang; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    This study established a multiplex PCR-based microarray to detect simultaneously a diverse panel of 17 sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)-associated pathogens including Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma, Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, and Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 54 and 58. The target genes are 16S rRNA gene for N. gonorrhoeae, M. genitalium, M. hominism, and Ureaplasma, the major outer membrane protein gene (ompA) for C. trachomatis, the glycoprotein B gene (gB) for HSV; and the L1 gene for HPV. A total of 34 probes were selected for the microarray including 31 specific probes, one as positive control, one as negative control, and one as positional control probe for printing reference. The microarray is specific as the commensal and pathogenic microbes (and closely related organisms) in the genitourinary tract did not cross-react with the microarray probes. The microarray is 10 times more sensitive than that of the multiplex PCR. Among the 158 suspected HPV specimens examined, the microarray showed that 49 samples contained HPV, 21 samples contained Ureaplasma, 15 contained M. hominis, four contained C. trachomatis, and one contained N. gonorrhoeae. This work reports the development of the first high through-put detection system that identifies common pathogens associated with STDs from clinical samples, and paves the way for establishing a time-saving, accurate and high-throughput diagnostic tool for STDs.

  11. Recovery of uncommon bacteria from blood: association with neoplastic disease.

    PubMed

    Beebe, J L; Koneman, E W

    1995-07-01

    Table 6 is a summary of the organisms discussed with a listing of the environmental source, the endogenous source, the predisposing factors including neoplasms, and the postulated mechanisms by which the organism can gain access to the circulation. The evidence considered indicates that the entrance of one of these microorganisms into the bloodstream of a human being depends on the presence of multiplicity of predisposing factors. In the majority of cases of bacteremia due to one of these unusual organisms, two or more predisposing factors are present. Certain predisposing factors, such as cancer chemotherapy or intravenous catheterization, often provide a barrier break, while others, such as liver disease, may render the host immune system less capable of clearing organisms from the circulation. For organisms such as Campy-lobacter, Listeria, and Salmonella spp., attributes that allow the invasion of a healthy host are present and seem to be enhanced by the simultaneous presence of a predisposing condition, such as liver disease, in the host. Although somewhat fragmentary, a number of individual case reports describe bacteremia due to one of these organisms occurring weeks to years after surgery and after other therapeutic measures had effected a supposed cure of a cancer. It may be speculated that cancer patients, even after a cure, are still susceptible to bloodstream invasion by one of the aforementioned organisms by virtue of the presence of one or more predisposing metabolic, physiologic, or immunologic factors, even though these factors may be cryptic. The predominance of hematologic malignancies among cases of bacteremia due to these unusual organisms is also apparent. Although, as pointed out by Keusch (169), the reduction in the performance of immune function in hematologic malignancies compared with solid tumors is likely to be responsible, other associations of certain organisms with specific neoplasms warrant further examination. The frequency of

  12. Recovery of uncommon bacteria from blood: association with neoplastic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, J L; Koneman, E W

    1995-01-01

    Table 6 is a summary of the organisms discussed with a listing of the environmental source, the endogenous source, the predisposing factors including neoplasms, and the postulated mechanisms by which the organism can gain access to the circulation. The evidence considered indicates that the entrance of one of these microorganisms into the bloodstream of a human being depends on the presence of multiplicity of predisposing factors. In the majority of cases of bacteremia due to one of these unusual organisms, two or more predisposing factors are present. Certain predisposing factors, such as cancer chemotherapy or intravenous catheterization, often provide a barrier break, while others, such as liver disease, may render the host immune system less capable of clearing organisms from the circulation. For organisms such as Campy-lobacter, Listeria, and Salmonella spp., attributes that allow the invasion of a healthy host are present and seem to be enhanced by the simultaneous presence of a predisposing condition, such as liver disease, in the host. Although somewhat fragmentary, a number of individual case reports describe bacteremia due to one of these organisms occurring weeks to years after surgery and after other therapeutic measures had effected a supposed cure of a cancer. It may be speculated that cancer patients, even after a cure, are still susceptible to bloodstream invasion by one of the aforementioned organisms by virtue of the presence of one or more predisposing metabolic, physiologic, or immunologic factors, even though these factors may be cryptic. The predominance of hematologic malignancies among cases of bacteremia due to these unusual organisms is also apparent. Although, as pointed out by Keusch (169), the reduction in the performance of immune function in hematologic malignancies compared with solid tumors is likely to be responsible, other associations of certain organisms with specific neoplasms warrant further examination. The frequency of

  13. Association studies in late onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goate, A.M.; Lendon, C.; Talbot, C.

    1994-09-01

    Alzheimer`s disease (AD) is characterized by an adult onset progressive dementia and the presence of numerous plaques and tangles within the brain at autopsy. The senile plaques are composed of a proteinaceous core surrounded by dystrophic neurites. The major protein component of the core is {beta}-amyloid but antibodies to many other proteins bind to senile plaques, e.g., antibodies to apolioprotein E (ApoE) and to {alpha}1-antichymotrypsin (AACT). Genetic studies have implicated mutations within the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein gene as the cause of AD in a small number of early onset AD families. More recently, assocition studies in late onset AD have demonstrated a positive association between ApoE-{epsilon}4 and AD. We report evidence for a negative association between ApoE-{epsilon}2 and AD in a large sample of sporadic late onset AD cases and matched controls supporting the role of ApoE in the etiology of AD. Ninety-three patients with sporadic AD (average age = 75 years, s.d. 8 yrs.) and 67 normal controls from the same ethnic background (age = 77 yrs., s.d. 10 yrs.) were recruited through the patient registry of the Washington University Alzheimer`s Disease Research Center. We found a statistically significant increase in ApoE-{epsilon}4 allele frequency in patients compared with controls ({chi}{sup 2}=7.75, 1 d.f., one tailed p=0.0027) and a significant decrease in {epsilon}2 allele frequency (Fisher`s exact test, one tailed p=0.0048), whereas the decreased frequency of {epsilon}3 in the patient groups was not statistically significant. Allele {epsilon}2 conferred a strong protective effect in our sample, with the odds ratio for AD for subjects possessing this allele being 0.08 (85% confidence interval 0.01-0.69). Similar studies using a polymorphism within the AACT gene showed no association with alleles at this locus in the entire AD sample or in AD cases homozygous for ApoE-{epsilon}3.

  14. Plasma sphingolipids in HIV-associated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Shane; Griffin, Timothy J; Reilly, Cavan; Harvey, Stephen; Witthuhn, Bruce A; Sandri, Brian J; Wendt, Chris H

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a significant cause of morbidity in persons living with HIV (PLWH) and HIV appears to uniquely cause COPD, independent of smoking. The mechanisms by which HIV leads to COPD are not clear. The objective of this study was to identify metabolomic biomarkers and potential mechanistic pathways of HIV-associated COPD (HIV-COPD). Methods We performed case–control metabolite profiling via mass spectrometry in plasma from 38 individuals with HIV-COPD (cases), comparing to matched controls with/without HIV and with/without COPD. Untargeted metabolites of interest were identified with liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (LC-MS/mass spectrometry (MS)), and targeted metabolomics for tryptophan (Trp) and kynurenine (Kyn) were measured by selective reaction monitoring (SRM) with LC-MS/MS. We used mixed-effects models to compare metabolite concentrations in cases compared with controls while controlling for relevant biological variables. Results We identified 1689 analytes associated with HIV-COPD at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 10%. In PLWH, we identified 263 analytes (10% FDR) between those with and without COPD. LC MS/MS identified Trp and 17 lipids, including sphingolipids and diacylglycerol. After adjusting for relevant covariates, the Kyn/Trp ratio measured by SRM was significantly higher in PLWH (p=0.022), but was not associated with COPD status (p=0.95). Conclusions There is a unique metabolite profile in HIV-COPD that includes sphingolipids. Trp metabolism is increased in HIV, but does not appear to independently contribute to HIV-COPD. Trial registration numbers NCT01810289, NCT01797367, NCT00608764.

  15. Disease-associated prion protein detected in lymphoid tissues from pigs challenged with the agent of chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a naturally-occurring, fatal neurodegenerative disease of cervids. We previously demonstrated that disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc) can be detected in the brain and retina from pigs challenged intracranially or orally with the CWD agent. In that study,...

  16. LAMBL’S EXCRESCENCES: ASSOCIATION WITH CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASE AND PATHOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Carlos A.; Schevchuck, Oleksandr; Tolstrup, Kirsten; Roldan, Paola C.; Macias, Leonardo; Qualls, Clifford R.; Greene, Ernest R.; Hayek, Reyaad; Charlton, Gerald; Sibbitt, Wilmer L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lambl’s excrescences (LEx) are detected by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and are characterized as thin, elongated, and hypermobile structures located at the leaflets’ coaptation point of the heart valves. The association of LEx with cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is still undefined and yet patients with LEx and suspected CVD receive unproven effective antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy or even undergo valve surgery. Also, the association of LEx with aging and atherogenic, inflammatory, or thrombogenic parameters has not been reported. Methods 77 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (71 women, age 37±12 years) and 26 age-and-sex matched healthy controls (22 women, age 34±11 years) prospectively underwent routine history and physical exam, transcranial Doppler, brain MRI, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), carotid duplex, and clinical and laboratory evaluations of atherogenesis, inflammation, platelet activity, coagulation, and fibrinolysis. Subjects without stroke/TIA on enrollment (with and without LEx) had a median follow-up of 57 months. Results On enrollment, 33 (43%) of 77 patients had CVD manifested as acute stroke/TIA (23 patients), cerebromicroembolism by transcranial Doppler (17 patients), or cerebral infarcts by MRI (14 patients). Mitral or aortic valve LEx were equally frequent in healthy controls (46%) as in patients with and without any CVD (39% and 43%), stroke/TIA (35% and 43%), cerebromicroembolism (41% and 42%), or cerebral infarcts (36% and 43%) (all p≥0.72). Also, other mechanisms for CVD other than LEx such as Libman-Sacks vegetations, patent foramen ovale or interatrial septal aneurysm, aortic or carotid atherosclerosis, or thrombogenesis were found in ≥94% of patients with CVD. In addition, 36 subjects with and 44 without LEx had similar low incidence of stroke/TIA [1(1.3%) and 2(2.5%), respectively, p=1.0] during follow-up. Finally, LEx were not associated with aging, atherogenic risk factors

  17. The association between chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease risk factors in atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Sera, Nobuko; Hida, Ayumi; Imaizumi, Misa; Nakashima, Eiji; Akahoshi, Masazumi

    2013-01-01

    Atomic bomb (A-bomb) radiation is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and metabolic CVD risk factors. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also known to be a risk factor for CVD and little is known whether CKD is associated with A-bomb radiation. To examine whether CKD is associated with CVD risk factors or with A-bomb radiation in A-bomb survivors, we classified renal dysfunction in 1,040 A-bomb survivors who were examined in 2004-2007 as normal [n = 121; estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥ 90 ml/min/1.73 m(2)]; mild (n = 686; eGFR 60-89 ml/min/1.73 m(2)); moderate (n = 217; eGFR 30-59 ml/min/1.73 m(2)); or severe (n = 16; eGFR <30 ml/min/1.73 m(2)). Also, we diagnosed subjects in the moderate and severe renal dysfunction groups as having CKD (n = 233; eGFR <59 ml/min/1.73 m(2)). After adjusting for age, gender, and smoking and drinking habits, we looked for an association between renal dysfunction and hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), hyperlipidemia, and metabolic syndrome (MetS), and between renal dysfunction and A-bomb radiation. Hypertension [odds ratio (OR), 1.57; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-2.20, P = 0.009]; DM (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.23-2.61, P = 0.002); hyperlipidemia (OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.12-2.14, P = 0.008); and MetS (OR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.32-2.63, P < 0.001) were associated with CKD (moderate/severe renal dysfunction), and hyperlipidemia and MetS were also associated with mild renal dysfunction. CKD (OR/Gy, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.01-1.63, P = 0.038) and severe renal dysfunction (OR/Gy, 3.19; 95% CI, 1.63-6.25, P < 0.001) were significantly associated with radiation dose. CKD associated with radiation may have played a role in the development of CVD among A-bomb survivors.

  18. Chronic Opisthorchis viverrini infection and associated hepatobiliary disease is associated with iron loaded M2-like macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bility, Moses T; Sripa, Banchob

    2014-12-01

    Chronic Opisthorchis viverrini-induced hepatobiliary disease is associated with significant leukocyte infiltration, including activated macrophages; however, the polarization of infiltrating macrophages remains to be fully characterized. In this study, we characterized macrophage polarization and phenotype in chronic O. viverrini-induced hepatobiliary disease in humans and hamsters using gene expression and histochemical analysis. Chronic O. viverrini infection and associated hepatobiliary diseases were associated with iron loaded M2-like macrophages in both humans and hamsters. This study provides suggestive evidence that iron loaded M2-like macrophages promote hepatobiliary disease in chronic O. viverrini infection.

  19. NK Cells: Uncertain Allies against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Asia-Sophia; Sherratt, Samuel; Riley, Eleanor M.

    2017-01-01

    Until recently, studies of natural killer (NK) cells in infection have focused almost entirely on their role in viral infections. However, there is an increasing awareness of the potential for NK cells to contribute to the control of a wider range of pathogens, including intracellular parasites such as Plasmodium spp. Given the high prevalence of parasitic diseases in the developing world and the devastating effects these pathogens have on large numbers of vulnerable people, investigating interactions between NK cells and parasitized host cells presents the opportunity to reveal novel immunological mechanisms with the potential to aid efforts to eradicate these diseases. The capacity of NK cells to produce inflammatory cytokines early after malaria infection, as well as a possible role in direct cytotoxic killing of malaria-infected cells, suggests a beneficial impact of NK cells in this disease. However, NK cells may also contribute to overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the consequent immunopathology. As comparatively little is known about the role of NK cells later in the course of infection, and growing evidence suggests that heterogeneity in NK cell responses to malaria may be influenced by KIR/HLA interactions, a better understanding of the mechanisms by which NK cells might directly interact with parasitized cells may reveal a new role for these cells in the course of malaria infection. PMID:28337195

  20. NK Cells: Uncertain Allies against Malaria.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Asia-Sophia; Sherratt, Samuel; Riley, Eleanor M

    2017-01-01

    Until recently, studies of natural killer (NK) cells in infection have focused almost entirely on their role in viral infections. However, there is an increasing awareness of the potential for NK cells to contribute to the control of a wider range of pathogens, including intracellular parasites such as Plasmodium spp. Given the high prevalence of parasitic diseases in the developing world and the devastating effects these pathogens have on large numbers of vulnerable people, investigating interactions between NK cells and parasitized host cells presents the opportunity to reveal novel immunological mechanisms with the potential to aid efforts to eradicate these diseases. The capacity of NK cells to produce inflammatory cytokines early after malaria infection, as well as a possible role in direct cytotoxic killing of malaria-infected cells, suggests a beneficial impact of NK cells in this disease. However, NK cells may also contribute to overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the consequent immunopathology. As comparatively little is known about the role of NK cells later in the course of infection, and growing evidence suggests that heterogeneity in NK cell responses to malaria may be influenced by KIR/HLA interactions, a better understanding of the mechanisms by which NK cells might directly interact with parasitized cells may reveal a new role for these cells in the course of malaria infection.

  1. The Differentiation of Intestinal-Failure-Associated Liver Disease from Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Buchman, Alan L; Naini, Bita V; Spilker, Bert

    2017-02-01

    Intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD), formerly known as parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease has often been listed in textbooks as an example of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the etiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, histology, and progression differ substantially between the conditions defined as NAFLD and the disease, IFALD. Therefore, IFALD should not be defined or considered as a type or a cause of nonalcoholic fatty liver or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, but rather as a distinct disease.

  2. Drug-disease association and drug-repositioning predictions in complex diseases using causal inference-probabilistic matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jihong; Li, Zheng; Fan, Xiaohui; Cheng, Yiyu

    2014-09-22

    The high incidence of complex diseases has become a worldwide threat to human health. Multiple targets and pathways are perturbed during the pathological process of complex diseases. Systematic investigation of complex relationship between drugs and diseases is necessary for new association discovery and drug repurposing. For this purpose, three causal networks were constructed herein for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, and neoplasms, respectively. A causal inference-probabilistic matrix factorization (CI-PMF) approach was proposed to predict and classify drug-disease associations, and further used for drug-repositioning predictions. First, multilevel systematic relations between drugs and diseases were integrated from heterogeneous databases to construct causal networks connecting drug-target-pathway-gene-disease. Then, the association scores between drugs and diseases were assessed by evaluating a drug's effects on multiple targets and pathways. Furthermore, PMF models were learned based on known interactions, and associations were then classified into three types by trained models. Finally, therapeutic associations were predicted based upon the ranking of association scores and predicted association types. In terms of drug-disease association prediction, modified causal inference included in CI-PMF outperformed existing causal inference with a higher AUC (area under receiver operating characteristic curve) score and greater precision. Moreover, CI-PMF performed better than single modified causal inference in predicting therapeutic drug-disease associations. In the top 30% of predicted associations, 58.6% (136/232), 50.8% (31/61), and 39.8% (140/352) hit known therapeutic associations, while precisions obtained by the latter were only 10.2% (231/2264), 8.8% (36/411), and 9.7% (189/1948). Clinical verifications were further conducted for the top 100 newly predicted therapeutic associations. As a result, 21, 12, and 32 associations have been studied and

  3. Unicentric Castleman’s disease associated with end stage renal disease caused by amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Eray; Kocyigit, Ismail; Unal, Aydin; Sipahioglu, Murat Hayri; Akgun, Hulya; Kaynar, Leylagul; Tokgoz, Bulent; Oymak, Oktay

    2017-01-01

    Castleman’s disease (CD), also known as angiofolicular lymph node hyperplasia, is a rare heterogenous group of lymphoproliferative disorders. Histologically, it can be classified as hyaline vascular type, plasma cell type, or mixed type. Clinically two different subtypes of the CD are present: Unicentric and multicentric. Unicentric CD is generally asymptomatic and associated with hyaline vascular type, and its diagnoses depend on the localized lymphadenopathy on examination or imaging studies. However, multicentric CD presents with generalized lymphadenopathy and systemic symptoms including malaise, fever, night sweats, weight loss, and it is associated with the plasma cell type and mix type. Herein, we report a patient with unicentric CD of the plasma cell type without systemic symptoms, who developed end stage renal failure caused by amyloidosis 6 years after onset of CD. PMID:28352636

  4. Myeloperoxidase deficient polymorphonuclear leucocytes in leukaemia and allied disorders.

    PubMed

    Bendix-Hansen, K

    1988-12-01

    This thesis is a survey of nine previously published articles on MPO deficient PMN. The incidences in leukaemia and allied disorders of the presence of this abnormal subpopulation of mature neutrophils and the relationship to clinical course in AML, susceptibility to infections in AML, FAB classification in AML and MDS, cytogenetically defined aberrations in MDS and morphometrical characteristics were investigated. The aims of the studies were to examine the diagnostic as well as the prognostic value of the parameter, to examine the usefulness of the parameter as an predictive indicator of CR and relapse in AML and to examine the concept that MPO deficient PMN may originate from leukaemic precursors. MPO deficient PMN were found to occur in a minor number (less than 4% of the total number of PMN) in normal humans and the incidences of an abnormal number (greater than 4%) were found to be about 40% in AML (I, II, III, IV, VIII), 60% in CML (I, VII), 30% in MPD other than CML (VII) and 30% in MDS (V). The highest incidences in AML were found in the FAB subtypes possessing the most myeloid differentiation potential i.e. FAB M2 and FAB M4 (IV). In ALL, CLL, HCL, Hodgkin's disease, anaemia not related to leukaemia and leukaemoid reactions the incidences all were 0% (I, unpublished data). The abnormal MPO deficient PMN subpopulation, if present, disappeared when CR was achieved and reappeared when relapse eventually was developed (II, VIII). In both situations serial determinations showed that the change occurred before the usual routine blood examinations predicted CR and relapse; several days and several months prior, respectively (VIII). The probability of obtaining CR was lower in the AML patients with the abnormal subpopulation and the risk of developing relapse higher than in AML patients without the anomaly (II, VIII). These differences were not statistically significant, however. AML patients, showing an increased number of MPO deficient PMN, revealed a

  5. Contributing factors to disease outbreaks associated with untreated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Wallender, Erika K; Ailes, Elizabeth C; Yoder, Jonathan S; Roberts, Virginia A; Brunkard, Joan M

    2014-01-01

    Disease outbreaks associated with drinking water drawn from untreated groundwater sources represent a substantial proportion (30.3%) of the 818 drinking water outbreaks reported to CDC's Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) during 1971 to 2008. The objectives of this study were to identify underlying contributing factors, suggest improvements for data collection during outbreaks, and inform outbreak prevention efforts. Two researchers independently reviewed all qualifying outbreak reports (1971 to 2008), assigned contributing factors and abstracted additional information (e.g., cases, etiology, and water system attributes). The 248 outbreaks resulted in at least 23,478 cases of illness, 390 hospitalizations, and 13 deaths. The majority of outbreaks had an unidentified etiology (n = 135, 54.4%). When identified, the primary etiologies were hepatitis A virus (n = 21, 8.5%), Shigella spp. (n = 20, 8.1%), and Giardia intestinalis (n = 14, 5.7%). Among the 172 (69.4%) outbreaks with contributing factor data available, the leading contamination sources included human sewage (n = 57, 33.1%), animal contamination (n = 16, 9.3%), and contamination entering via the distribution system (n = 12, 7.0%). Groundwater contamination was most often facilitated by improper design, maintenance or location of the water source or nearby waste water disposal system (i.e., septic tank; n = 116, 67.4%). Other contributing factors included rapid pathogen transport through hydrogeologic formations (e.g., karst limestone; n = 45, 26.2%) and preceding heavy rainfall or flooding (n = 36, 20.9%). This analysis underscores the importance of identifying untreated groundwater system vulnerabilities through frequent inspection and routine maintenance, as recommended by protective regulations such as Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Groundwater Rule, and the need for special consideration of the local hydrogeology.

  6. Association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hemorrhoids

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lih-Hwa; Siu, Justin Ji-Yuen; Liao, Po-Chi; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Chou, Pei-Chi; Chen, Huey-Yi; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Tsai, Ming-Yen; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Chen, Wen-Chi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory, a specific physiological and pathological relationship exists between the lungs and the large intestine. The aim of this study is to delineate the association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and hemorrhoids in order to verify the “interior–exterior” relationship between the lungs and the large intestine. A retrospective cohort study is conceived from the National Health Insurance Research Database, Taiwan. The 2 samples (COPD cohort and non-COPD cohort) were selected from the 2000 to 2003 beneficiaries of the NHI, representing patients age 20 and older in Taiwan, with the follow-up ending on December 31, 2011. The COPD cohort (n = 51,506) includes every patient newly diagnosed as having Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, ICD-9-CM: 490–492, 494, 496), who have made at least 2 confirmed visits to the hospital/clinic. The non-COPD cohort (n = 103,012) includes patients without COPD and is selected via a 1:2 (COPD: non-COPD) matching by age group (per 5 years), gender, and index date (diagnosis date of COPD for the COPD cohort). Compared with non-COPD cohorts, patients with COPD have a higher likelihood of having hemorrhoids and the age-, gender- and comorbidies-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for hemorrhoids is 1.56 (95% confidence intervals [CI]:1.50–1.62). The adjusted HR of hemorrhoids for females is 0.79 (95% CI: 0.77–0.83), which is significantly less than that for males. The elderly groups, 40 to 59 years and aged 60 or above, have higher adjusted HRs than younger age groups (20–39 years), 1.19 (95% CI: 1.14–1.26), and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.12–1.24), respectively. Patients with COPD may have a higher likelihood to have hemorrhoids in this retrospective cohort study. This study verifies the fundamental theorem of TCM that there is a definite pathogenic association between the lungs and large intestine. PMID:28272246

  7. Accreditation of Allied Medical Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Medical Association, Chicago, IL. Council on Medical Education.

    Prepared by the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association with the cooperation of collaborating organizations, this document is a collection of guidelines for accredited programs for medical assistants, nuclear medicine technology, orthopedic assistants, radiation therapy technology, and radiologic technologists. The…

  8. [Educational program in the Medical Science Course, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences].

    PubMed

    Kitasato, Hidero; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Ohbu, Makoto; Obata, Fumiya; Ogawa, Zensuke; Sato, Yuichi; Hattori, Manabu; Saito-Taki, Tatsuo; Hara, Kazuya; Okano, Tetsuroh; Kubo, Makoto; Maruyama, Hiroko; Tsuchiya, Benio; Okazaki, Toshio; Ishii, Naohito; Nishimura, Yukari; Takada, Nobukazu; Abe, Michiko; Hachimura, Kazuo; Tanigawa, Kozo; Katagiri, Masato

    2008-07-01

    The aim of education in the Medical Laboratory Science course, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences, is to bring up train students who have Kitasato spirit, for careers in laboratory medicine of hospital or scientific staff of medical companies or as researchers. General and enlightening education concerning "Kitasato spirit" and professional education composed of major subjects was carried out in the first and during the 2nd and two third of 3rd grade, respectively. Medical practice and research training were alternatively carried out for 6 months between November of the 3rd year and November of the 4th year, in order to gain practical experience. Two problem-based learning (PBL) tutorial courses, "Infectious Diseases Course" and "Team Medical Care--Interprofessional Collaborations" were also carried out at the end of the 3rd and beginning of the 4th years, respectively, in order to convert a memory to knowledge. Team medical care course enrolls 1000 students at the School of Allied Health Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy and Kitasato College Applied Clinical Dietetics Course, is now one of special courses available at our university. This attempt is thought to result in a way of thinking that recognizes the importance of co-operation as a team member and personal contributions to actual team medical care.

  9. [Potentials for research and innovations in allied health professions in Germany].

    PubMed

    Voigt-Radloff, Sebastian; Lang, Britta; Antes, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the increasing complexity and continuously changing needs and demands in the German healthcare system, there is a need to strengthen knowledge translation, evidence-based practice and the conduct of clinical trials in the field of allied health professions. An interdisciplinary working group representing the fields of nursing, midwifery, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy developed a guide and a concept for seminars to provide potential analyses for research and innovations in the allied health professions in Germany. These potential analyses compare the current state of health care delivery for specific health problems and the corpus of evidence for the effectiveness of related interventions. Thus innovations can be identified which might improve client-centred healthcare in Germany. The introductory paper briefly reports the activities and results of the working group, describes the international context of transferring research into practice and outlines possibilities for the future development of coordinated research strategies in Germany. The following papers consist of five potential analyses: (1) Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) in long-term care; (2) giving birth in an upright position; (3) treadmill training for patients with Parkinson's disease; (4) training of everyday activities after stroke; and (5) communication training for patients with aphasia.

  10. Bacterial protein signals are associated with Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Juste, Catherine; Kreil, David P; Beauvallet, Christian; Guillot, Alain; Vaca, Sebastian; Carapito, Christine; Mondot, Stanislas; Sykacek, Peter; Sokol, Harry; Blon, Florence; Lepercq, Pascale; Levenez, Florence; Valot, Benoît; Carré, Wilfrid; Loux, Valentin; Pons, Nicolas; David, Olivier; Schaeffer, Brigitte; Lepage, Patricia; Martin, Patrice; Monnet, Véronique; Seksik, Philippe; Beaugerie, Laurent; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Gibrat, Jean-François; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Doré, Joël

    2014-01-01

    Objective No Crohn’s disease (CD) molecular maker has advanced to clinical use, and independent lines of evidence support a central role of the gut microbial community in CD. Here we explore the feasibility of extracting bacterial protein signals relevant to CD, by interrogating myriads of intestinal bacterial proteomes from a small number of patients and healthy controls. Design We first developed and validated a workflow—including extraction of microbial communities, two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), and LC-MS/MS—to discover protein signals from CD-associated gut microbial communities. Then we used selected reaction monitoring (SRM) to confirm a set of candidates. In parallel, we used 16S rRNA gene sequencing for an integrated analysis of gut ecosystem structure and functions. Results Our 2D-DIGE-based discovery approach revealed an imbalance of intestinal bacterial functions in CD. Many proteins, largely derived from Bacteroides species, were over-represented, while under-represented proteins were mostly from Firmicutes and some Prevotella members. Most overabundant proteins could be confirmed using SRM. They correspond to functions allowing opportunistic pathogens to colonise the mucus layers, breach the host barriers and invade the mucosae, which could still be aggravated by decreased host-derived pancreatic zymogen granule membrane protein GP2 in CD patients. Moreover, although the abundance of most protein groups reflected that of related bacterial populations, we found a specific independent regulation of bacteria-derived cell envelope proteins. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence that quantifiable bacterial protein signals are associated with CD, which can have a profound impact on future molecular diagnosis. PMID:24436141

  11. End-stage renal disease associated with prophylactic lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Aiff, Harald; Attman, Per-Ola; Aurell, Mattias; Bendz, Hans; Schön, Staffan; Svedlund, Jan

    2014-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of lithium associated end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and to compare the relative risk of ESRD in lithium users versus non-lithium users. Second, the role of lithium in the pathogenesis of ESRD was evaluated. We used the Swedish Renal Registry to search for lithium-treated patients with ESRD among 2644 patients with chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT)-either dialysis or transplantation, within two defined geographical areas in Sweden with 2.8 million inhabitants. The prevalence date was December 31, 2010. We found 30 ESRD patients with a history of lithium treatment. ESRD with RRT was significantly more prevalent among lithium users than among non-lithium users (p<0.001). The prevalence of ESRD with RRT in the lithium user population was 15.0‰ (95% CI 9.7-20.3), and close to two percent of the RRT population were lithium users. The relative risk of ESRD with RRT in the lithium user population compared with the general population was 7.8 (95% CI 5.4-11.1). Out of those 30 patients, lithium use was classified, based on chart reviews, as being the sole (n=14) or main (n=10) cause of ESRD in 24 cases. Their mean age at the start of RRT was 66 years (46-82), their mean time on lithium 27 years (12-39), and 22 of them had been on lithium for 15 years or more. We conclude that lithium-associated ESRD is an uncommon but not rare complication of lithium treatment.

  12. Gram-negative bacterial molecules associate with Alzheimer disease pathology

    PubMed Central

    Stamova, Boryana; Jin, Lee-Way; DeCarli, Charles; Phinney, Brett; Sharp, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We determined whether Gram-negative bacterial molecules are associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathology given that previous studies demonstrate Gram-negative Escherichia coli bacteria can form extracellular amyloid and Gram-negative bacteria have been reported as the predominant bacteria found in normal human brains. Methods: Brain samples from gray and white matter were studied from patients with AD (n = 24) and age-matched controls (n = 18). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and E coli K99 pili protein were evaluated by Western blots and immunocytochemistry. Human brain samples were assessed for E coli DNA followed by DNA sequencing. Results: LPS and E coli K99 were detected immunocytochemically in brain parenchyma and vessels in all AD and control brains. K99 levels measured using Western blots were greater in AD compared to control brains (p < 0.01) and K99 was localized to neuron-like cells in AD but not control brains. LPS levels were also greater in AD compared to control brain. LPS colocalized with Aβ1-40/42 in amyloid plaques and with Aβ1-40/42 around vessels in AD brains. DNA sequencing confirmed E coli DNA in human control and AD brains. Conclusions: E coli K99 and LPS levels were greater in AD compared to control brains. LPS colocalized with Aβ1-40/42 in amyloid plaques and around vessels in AD brain. The data show that Gram-negative bacterial molecules are associated with AD neuropathology. They are consistent with our LPS-ischemia-hypoxia rat model that produces myelin aggregates that colocalize with Aβ and resemble amyloid-like plaques. PMID:27784770

  13. Characterization of weld imperfections in 2195 Al-Li alloy: Experimental approaches towards mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Anwer Arif

    1997-10-01

    2195 Al-Li alloy apparently offers significantly higher strength to weight ratio than the 2219 aluminum alloy. It was discovered that 2195 Al-Li has a greater tendency to crack, generates peculiar kind of porosity, and is vulnerable to deleterious microparticulate emission during welding than its 2219 predecessor. An experimental investigation has been carried to characterize these weld imperfections in 2195 Al-Li alloy. This work presents a scientific account of an analytical study and of the clues it has provided towards an understanding of the weld imperfections in 2195 Al-Li welds. The study begins with the observation of peculiar pore formation in 2195 welds, which occurs not as in the case of 2219 welds upon solidification, but in a thermal ageing process subsequent to solidification. An apparent reaction (DTA) between the fusion zone dendritic surface and nitrogen gas implies a porous fusion zone. Tiny surface melting sites, designated as Blisters, due to its resemblance to skin blisters, testify to the conjunction of outgassing and melting effects and suggest that porosity formation in the solid phase depends upon local melting as well as outgassing. The absence of a dark magnesium rich substance, designated as smut in the immediate vicinity of a crack opening next to a weld repair bead implies either an umbrella of gas emission keeping off a condensate evaporated under the welding arc or, possibly an expulsion of atomized, liquified metal from the crack itself in the form of microparticulate emission. These microparticulate emission from VPPA welds takes various forms herein labeled as smut, snow, and Lava. It is attributed to a gas generating reaction taking place at molten grain boundaries or crack surfaces. The reaction could only be release of hydrogen displaced from lithium hydrides by a coming influx of dissolved nitrogen. There appears to be a close link between porosity, cracking and microparticulate emission. Observations of melting on the surface

  14. Association of Diabetes and Tuberculosis Disease among US-Bound Adult Refugees, 2009–2014

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Edward W.; Jonnalagadda, Sasi; Phares, Christina R.; Zhou, Weigong; Painter, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with an increased risk for active tuberculosis (TB) disease. We conducted a case–control study and found a significant association between diabetes and TB disease among US-bound refugees. These findings underscore the value of collaborative management of both diseases. PMID:28221111

  15. Molecular Mechanisms and Treatment Strategies for Obesity-Associated Coronary Artery Disease, an Imminent Military Epidemic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    syndrome and type 2 diabetes. The major cause of death in people with insulin resistance syndromes is atherothrombotic vascular disease , including...Strategies for Obesity-Associated Coronary Artery Disease , an Imminent Military Epidemic PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ira Tabas, M.D., Ph.D...CONTRACT NUMBER Molecular Mechanisms and Treatment Strategies for Obesity-Associated Coronary Artery Disease , an Imminent Military Epidemic 5b

  16. Association Between Endocrine Diseases and Serous Otitis Media in Children

    PubMed Central

    Koçyiğit, Murat; Çakabay, Taliye; Örtekin, Safiye G.; Akçay, Teoman; Özkaya, Güven; Üstün Bezgin, Selin; Yıldız, Melek; Adalı, Mustafa Kemal

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Otitis media with effusion (OME) is a condition in which fluid is retained in the middle ear cavity. The association between endocrine disorders and OME has not yet been determined. This study aimed to investigate the presence of OME in children diagnosed with an endocrine disease and the relationship between these two conditions. Methods: The study was conducted on 918 pediatric patients (440 boys, 478 girls; mean age: 8.40, range 3-15 years) and 158 healthy controls (76 boys, 79 girls; mean age: 8.31, range 3-15 years). All children underwent an ear examination and a tympanometry performed by an otorhinolaryngologist. Tympanometry results were used to diagnose OME. Results: OME was detected in 205 (22.3%) of 918 patients and in 19 (12.0%) of 158 subjects in the control group. The difference in frequency of OME between the two groups was statistically significant (p=0.003). Conclusion: The results of the study reveal that there may be a tendency towards the occurrence of OME in pediatric endocrinology patients. PMID:27612192

  17. Fungi associated with drug recalls and rare disease outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Ahearn, Donald G; Doyle Stulting, R

    2014-11-01

    Fungi rarely cause disease outbreaks associated with use of microbe-contaminated drugs. These rare episodes typically involve a restricted spectrum of common environmental species with relatively low virulence, rather than classical pathogens. Review of data involving over-the-counter contact lens solutions and prescription drug-related recalls revealed six episodes during the past decade with significant adverse health and financial impact (including loss of vision and death). Contaminations involved fungi mostly identified with the genera Aspergillus, Exserohilum, Fusarium, Paecilomyces, and Rhizopus. These organisms are noted for their capacity to produce resistant morphotypes (chlamydoconidia, ascospores) under various adverse conditions, generally with temperature survival/tolerances markedly in excess of maximal growth temperatures. High constituent levels of melanin, trehalose and heat-shock proteins facilitate differential survival of morphotypes following exposures to toxic chemicals and temperatures above 80 °C. Adverse environmental factors that induce resistant morphotypes are suggested to occur more readily in situ than during in vitro testing. Rare unexplained, sporadic drug contamination episodes with select thermotolerant fungi may relate, in part, to resistant dormant stages.

  18. An emerging mycoplasma associated with trichomoniasis, vaginal infection and disease.

    PubMed

    Fettweis, Jennifer M; Serrano, Myrna G; Huang, Bernice; Brooks, J Paul; Glascock, Abigail L; Sheth, Nihar U; Strauss, Jerome F; Jefferson, Kimberly K; Buck, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Humans are colonized by thousands of bacterial species, but it is difficult to assess the metabolic and pathogenic potential of the majority of these because they have yet to be cultured. Here, we characterize an uncultivated vaginal mycoplasma tightly associated with trichomoniasis that was previously known by its 16S rRNA sequence as "Mnola." In this study, the mycoplasma was found almost exclusively in women infected with the sexually transmitted pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis, but rarely observed in women with no diagnosed disease. The genomes of four strains of this species were reconstructed using metagenome sequencing and assembly of DNA from four discrete mid-vaginal samples, one of which was obtained from a pregnant woman with trichomoniasis who delivered prematurely. These bacteria harbor several putative virulence factors and display unique metabolic strategies. Genes encoding proteins with high similarity to potential virulence factors include two collagenases, a hemolysin, an O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase and a feoB-type ferrous iron transport system. We propose the name "Candidatus Mycoplasma girerdii" for this potential new pathogen.

  19. Instrumentation and action spectra in light-associated diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Cripps, D.J.

    1981-07-01

    Instrumentation for studying action spectra in controls and various light-associated diseases is described. This study summarizes tests performed with a prism grating monochromator during the last 10 yr. There were 68 photodermatoses studied: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) (1), lupus erythematosus (LE) (12), polymorphous light eruption (PLE) (23), solar urticaria (4), actinic reticuloid (2), halogenated salicylanilide photosensitivity and persistent light reactors (11), psoralen photosensitivity (6), and porphyria (9). A normal minimal erythema dose in the UVB (below 320 nm) was generally observed in polymorphous light eruption and lupus erythematosus. The most exquisite photosensitivity for delayed erythema was observed in actinic reticuloid, which in one case was 25-35 times more sensitive in the UVB range which was also observed but to a lesser extent in XP and in persistent light reactors. Persistence of erythema and edema at test sites was observed in XP, PLE, LE, and actinic reticuloid. A delay in development of erythema reaching a maximum at 72 hr was observed in XP and psoralen phototoxicity. Maximum photosensitivity occurred in solar urticaria. Three patients had peak sensitivity in the range of 310-313 nm and the 4th at 460 nm. Photosensitivity in the visible range was detected in 2 patients with solar urticaria, one with actinic reticuloid, and confirmed in 9 patients with porphyria (405 nm). Photosensitivity in the UVA (above 320 nm) occurred to some degree in all groups.

  20. Chromogranin A Polymorphisms Are Associated With Hypertensive Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Rany M.; Cadman, Peter E.; Chen, Yuqing; Rao, Fangwen; Wen, Gen; Hamilton, Bruce A.; Rana, Brinda K.; Smith, Douglas W.; Stridsberg, Mats; Ward, Harry J.; Mahata, Manjula; Mahata, Sushi K.; Bowden, Donald W.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Freedman, Barry I.; Schork, Nicholas J.; O'Connor, Daniel T.

    2008-01-01

    Chromogranin A is released together with epinephrine and norepinephrine from catecholaminergic cells. Specific endopeptidases cleave chromogranin A into biologically active peptide fragments, including catestatin, which inhibits catecholamine release. Previous studies have suggested that a deficit in this sympathetic “braking” system might be an early event in the pathogenesis of human hypertension. Whether chromogranin A (CHGA) polymorphisms predict end-organ complications of hypertension, such as end-stage renal disease, is unknown. Among blacks, we studied common genetic variants spanning the CHGA locus in 2 independent case-control studies of hypertensive ESRD. Two haplotypes were significantly more frequent among subjects with hypertensive ESRD: 1) in the promoter (5′) region, G-462A→T-415C→C-89A, haplotype ATC (adjusted odds ratio = 2.65; P = 0.037), and 2) at the 3′-end, C11825T (3′-UTR, C+87T)→G12602C, haplotype TC (adjusted odds ratio = 2.73, P = 0.0196). Circulating levels of catestatin were lower among those with hypertensive ESRD than controls, an unexpected finding given that peptide levels are usually elevated in ESRD because of reduced renal elimination. We found that the 3′-UTR + 87T variant decreased reporter gene expression, providing a possible mechanistic explanation for diminished catestatin. In summary, common variants in chromogranin A associate with the risk of hypertensive ESRD in blacks. PMID:18235090

  1. Diseases associated with asbestos exposure. Diagnostic perspectives in forensic pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrenreich, T.; Selikoff, I.J.

    1983-03-01

    Asbestos, a fibrous mineral, has unique physical and chemical properties, including resistance to heat, acids, and other chemicals; flexibility; and great tensile strength. The fibers subdivide into unit fibrils of molecular dimensions, resulting in a vast mineral surface area which has a direct bearing on its unusual features and its numerous applications. Its biological effects, which include fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis, may be related to the cellular reaction, to its large specific surface, or to the size and shape of the fibers. Its oncogenic action may be multiplied by other carcinogens, principally cigarette smoking. There is clinical, pathologic, and epidemiologic evidence that exposure to asbestos, following a long latent period, constitutes an important health hazard. Direct occupational exposure, followed by a long lapsed period after the initial exposure, is associated with pleural plaques and pleural effusion, pulmonary parenchymal fibrosis (asbestosis), pulmonary carcinoma, pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma, and other neoplasms. Indirect exposure may also entail an increased risk of lung disease or mesothelioma or both. Medicolegal investigation of suspected cases includes a lifetime occupational history, clinical history including smoking habits, radiological findings, clinical evidence of asbestosis, and may require detection of asbestos tissue burden.

  2. Association between thyroid autoimmunity and fibromyalgic disease severity.

    PubMed

    Bazzichi, Laura; Rossi, Alessandra; Giuliano, Tiziana; De Feo, Francesca; Giacomelli, Camillo; Consensi, Arianna; Ciapparelli, Antonio; Consoli, Giorgio; Dell'osso, Liliana; Bombardieri, Stefano

    2007-12-01

    Our objectives were to investigate thyroid abnormalities and autoimmunity in 120 patients affected by fibromyalgia (FM) and to study their relationships with clinical data and symptoms. Thyroid assessment by means of antithyroglobulin antibodies, antithyroid peroxidase antibodies, free triiodo-thyronine, free thyroxine, and thyroid stimulating hormone analyses was carried out. The clinical parameters "Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire", pain, tender points, fatigue, and other symptoms, and the presence of depression or anxiety disorders were evaluated. The basal thyroid hormone levels of FM patients were in the normal range, while 41% of the patients had at least one thyroid antibody. Patients with thyroid autoimmunity showed a higher percentage of dry eyes, burning, or pain with urination, allodynia, blurred vision, and sore throat. Correlations found between thyroid autoimmunity and age or with the presence of depression or anxiety disorders were not significant. However, in the cohort of post-menopausal patients, the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity was higher with respect to pre-menopausal patients. In conclusion, autoimmune thyroiditis is present in an elevated percentage of FM patients, and it has been associated with the presence of typical symptoms of the disease.

  3. Association between cognitive impairment and urinary dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tkaczynska, Zuzanna; Pilotto, Andrea; Becker, Sara; Gräber-Sultan, Susanne; Berg, Daniela; Liepelt-Scarfone, Inga

    2017-02-17

    Urinary dysfunction (UD) is a common non-motor feature of Parkinson's disease (PD), and might be secondary to neurodegeneration involving cortical and subcortical brain areas. The possible link between UD and cognitive deficits has never been examined in frontal cortex impairment, and is still not completely understood in PD. In the present study, 94 PD patients underwent a comprehensive motor, cognitive and non-motor assessment. It was shown that 55.3% of patients reported UD, of which 17% needed specific urological treatment. Patients who reported UD performed worse on global cognition (PANDA, p = .05), visuo-constructive functions (CERAD/praxis, p = .03; and Figure Test, p = .03), and instrumental activities of daily living functions (IADL, p = .03), than patients without UD. The group with UD medication performed worse on global cognition (PANDA, p = .02) and visuo-constructive functions (CERAD/praxis, p = .05; CERAD/praxis recall, p = .05) than the UD group without medication, independent of anticholinergic treatment effect. Our findings suggest an association between cognitive impairment and UD in PD independent from symptomatic treatment.

  4. Alzheimer's Disease and Autistic Spectrum Disorder: Is there any Association?

    PubMed

    Khan, Sarah A; Khan, Shahida A; Narendra, A R; Mushtaq, Gohar; Zahran, Solafa A; Khan, Shahzad; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders respectively, with devastating effects not only on the individual but also the society. Collectively, a number of factors contribute to the expression of ASD and AD. It is of utmost curiosity that these disorders express at different stages of life and there is an involvement of certain susceptible genes. This genetic basis makes the background of common associations like memory deficits, cognition changes, demyelination, oxidative stress and inflammation, an integral part of both disorders. Modern technology resulting in genetically modified crops and increase in gadgets emitting electromagnetic frequencies have resulted in enhanced risks for neurological dysfunctions and disorders like ASD and AD. Subsequent advances in the psychological, pharmacological, biochemical and nutritional aspects of the disorders have resulted in the development of newer therapeutic approaches. The common clinical features like language impairment, executive functions, and motor problems have been discussed along with the patho-physiological changes, role of DNA methylation, myelin development, and heavy metals in the expression of these disorders. Psychopharmacological and nutritional approaches towards the reduction and management of risk factors have gained attention from the researchers in recent years. Current major therapies either target the inflammatory pathways or reduce cellular oxidative stress. This contribution focuses on the commonalities of the two disorders.

  5. Association between Bacterial Infection and Peripheral Vascular Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Budzyński, Jacek; Wiśniewska, Joanna; Ciecierski, Marek; Kędzia, Anna

    2015-01-01

    There are an increasing number of data showing a clinically important association between bacterial infection and peripheral artery disease (PAD). Bacteria suspected of being involved in PAD pathogenesis are: periodontal bacteria, gut microbiota, Helicobacter pylori, and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Infectious agents may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis via activation of a systemic or local host immunological response to contamination of extravascular tissues or the vascular wall, respectively. A systemic immunological reaction may damage vascular walls in the course of autoimmunological cross-reactions between anti-pathogen antibodies and host vascular antigens (immunological mimicry), pathogen burden mechanisms (nonspecific activation of inflammatory processes in the vascular wall), and neuroendocrine-immune cross-talk. Besides activating the inflammatory pathway, bacterial infection may trigger PAD progression or exacerbation by enhancement of platelet reactivity, by a stimulatory effect on von Willebrand factor binding, factor VIII, fibrinogen, P-selectin activation, disturbances in plasma lipids, increase in oxidative stress, and resistance to insulin. Local inflammatory host reaction and induction of atherosclerotic plaque progression and/or instability result mainly from atherosclerotic plaque colonization by microorganisms. Despite these premises, the role of bacterial infection in PAD pathogenesis should still be recognized as controversial, and randomized, controlled trials are required to evaluate the outcome of periodontal or gut bacteria modification (through diet, prebiotics, and probiotics) or eradication (using antibiotics) in hard and surrogate cardiovascular endpoints. PMID:26900306

  6. An Emerging Mycoplasma Associated with Trichomoniasis, Vaginal Infection and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fettweis, Jennifer M.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Huang, Bernice; Brooks, J. Paul; Glascock, Abigail L.; Sheth, Nihar U.; Strauss, Jerome F.; Jefferson, Kimberly K.; Buck, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Humans are colonized by thousands of bacterial species, but it is difficult to assess the metabolic and pathogenic potential of the majority of these because they have yet to be cultured. Here, we characterize an uncultivated vaginal mycoplasma tightly associated with trichomoniasis that was previously known by its 16S rRNA sequence as “Mnola.” In this study, the mycoplasma was found almost exclusively in women infected with the sexually transmitted pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis, but rarely observed in women with no diagnosed disease. The genomes of four strains of this species were reconstructed using metagenome sequencing and assembly of DNA from four discrete mid-vaginal samples, one of which was obtained from a pregnant woman with trichomoniasis who delivered prematurely. These bacteria harbor several putative virulence factors and display unique metabolic strategies. Genes encoding proteins with high similarity to potential virulence factors include two collagenases, a hemolysin, an O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase and a feoB-type ferrous iron transport system. We propose the name “Candidatus Mycoplasma girerdii” for this potential new pathogen. PMID:25337710

  7. Allies in the Shadows: Why We Need Operational Deception

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    deceivers executed elaborate campaigns throughout the rest of the war that often left Hitler puzzled about the actual size of allied forces; in fact...1941 through a complex deception system that took advantage of Stalin’s preexisting belief that Germany would not invade the Soviet Union. Hitler ... Enigma intercepts and human intelligence sources. Professional deceivers understand the capabilities and limitations of their art. At the strategic

  8. The Supreme Allied Commander’s Operational Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-22

    Europe, and, in conjunction with the other Allied Nations, undertake operations aimed at the heart of Germany and the destruction of her Armed Forces...design of the invasion “aimed at the heart of Germany” and the “destruction of her armed forces.” They recorded the outputs of their operational design...considered Germany’s wartime industry the heart of its ability to resist the Allies’ eastward assault. The German military industrial complexes located in

  9. Clinical supervision for allied health staff: necessary but not sufficient.

    PubMed

    Leggat, Sandra G; Phillips, Bev; Pearce, Philippa; Dawson, Margaret; Schulz, Debbie; Smith, Jenni

    2015-09-28

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to explore the perspectives of allied health professionals on appropriate content for effective clinical supervision of staff.Methods A set of statements regarding clinical supervision was identified from the literature and confirmed through a Q-sort process. The final set was administered as an online survey to 437 allied health professionals working in two Australian health services.Results Of the 120 respondents, 82 had experienced six or more clinical supervision sessions and were included in the analysis. Respondents suggested that clinical supervision was beneficial to both staff and patients, and was distinct from line management performance monitoring and development. Curiously, some of the respondents did not agree that observation of the supervisee's clinical practice was an aspect of clinical supervision.Conclusions Although clinical supervision is included as a pillar of clinical governance, current practice may not be effective in addressing clinical risk. Australian health services need clear organisational policies that outline the relationship between supervisor and supervisee, the role and responsibilities of managers, the involvement of patients and the types of situations to be communicated to the line managers.What is known about the topic? Clinical supervision for allied health professionals is an essential component of clinical governance and is aimed at ensuring safe and high-quality care. However, there is varied understanding of the relationship between clinical supervision and performance management.What does this paper add? This paper provides the perspectives of allied health professionals who are experienced as supervisors or who have experienced supervision. The findings suggest a clear role for clinical supervision that needs to be better recognised within organisational policy and procedure.What are the implications for practitioners? Supervisors and supervisees must remember their duty of

  10. CSF biomarkers associated with disease heterogeneity in early Parkinson's disease: the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ju-Hee; Mollenhauer, Brit; Coffey, Christopher S; Toledo, Jon B; Weintraub, Daniel; Galasko, Douglas R; Irwin, David J; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Chen-Plotkin, Alice S; Caspell-Garcia, Chelsea; Waligórska, Teresa; Taylor, Peggy; Shah, Nirali; Pan, Sarah; Zero, Pawel; Frasier, Mark; Marek, Kenneth; Kieburtz, Karl; Jennings, Danna; Tanner, Caroline M; Simuni, Tanya; Singleton, Andrew; Toga, Arthur W; Chowdhury, Sohini; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M

    2016-06-01

    The development of biomarkers to predict the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) from its earliest stage through its heterogeneous course is critical for research and therapeutic development. The Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) study is an ongoing international multicenter, prospective study to validate biomarkers in drug-naïve PD patients and matched healthy controls (HC). We quantified cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) alpha-synuclein (α-syn), amyloid-beta1-42 (Aβ1-42), total tau (t-tau), and tau phosphorylated at Thr181 (p-tau) in 660 PPMI subjects at baseline, and correlated these data with measures of the clinical features of these subjects. We found that CSF α-syn, t-tau and p-tau levels, but not Aβ1-42, were significantly lower in PD compared with HC, while the diagnostic value of the individual CSF biomarkers for PD diagnosis was limited due to large overlap. The level of α-syn, but not other biomarkers, was significantly lower in PD patients with non-tremor-dominant phenotype compared with tremor-dominant phenotype. In addition, in PD patients the lowest Aβ1-42, or highest t-tau/Aβ1-42 and t-tau/α-syn quintile in PD patients were associated with more severe non-motor dysfunction compared with the highest or lowest quintiles, respectively. In a multivariate regression model, lower α-syn was significantly associated with worse cognitive test performance. APOE ε4 genotype was associated with lower levels of Aβ1-42, but neither with PD diagnosis nor cognition. Our data suggest that the measurement of CSF biomarkers in early-stage PD patients may relate to disease heterogeneity seen in PD. Longitudinal observations in PPMI subjects are needed to define their prognostic performance.

  11. Association between Noninvasive Fibrosis Markers and Chronic Kidney Disease among Adults with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sesti, Giorgio; Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa; Arturi, Franco; Perticone, Maria; Sciacqua, Angela; Perticone, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are associated with an increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study we aimed to evaluate whether the severity of liver fibrosis estimated by NAFLD fibrosis score is associated with higher prevalence of CKD in individuals with NAFLD. To this end NAFLD fibrosis score and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were assessed in 570 White individuals with ultrasonography-diagnosed NAFLD. As compared with subjects at low probability of liver fibrosis, individuals at high and intermediate probability showed an unfavorable cardio-metabolic risk profile having significantly higher values of waist circumference, insulin resistance, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, uric acid and lower insulin-like growth factor-1 levels. Individuals at high and intermediate probability of liver fibrosis have lower eGFR after adjustment for gender, smoking, glucose tolerance status, homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR index), diagnosis of metabolic syndrome, statin therapy, anti-diabetes and anti-hypertensive treatments (P = 0.001). Individuals at high probability of liver fibrosis had a 5.1-fold increased risk of having CKD (OR 5.13, 95%CI 1.13–23.28; P = 0.03) as compared with individuals at low probability after adjustment for age, gender, and BMI. After adjustment for glucose tolerance status, statin therapy, and anti-hypertensive treatment in addition to gender, individuals at high probability of liver fibrosis had a 3.9-fold increased risk of CKD (OR 3.94, 95%CI 1.11–14.05; P = 0.03) as compared with individuals at low probability. In conclusion, advanced liver fibrosis, determined by noninvasive fibrosis markers, is associated with CKD independently from other known factors. PMID:24520400

  12. Th17 cells and Tregs: unlikely allies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Oppenheim, Joost J.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs and Th17 modified the historical Th1–Th2 paradigm. Currently, the Th17–Tregs dichotomy provides a dominant conceptual framework for the comprehension of immunity/inflammation and tolerance/immunosuppression in an increasing number of diseases. Targeting proinflammatory Th17 cells or immunosuppressive Tregs has been widely considered as a promising therapeutic strategy in the treatment of major human diseases, including autoimmunity and cancer. The efficacy and safety of such therapy rely on a thorough understanding of immunobiology and interaction of these two subsets of Th cells. In this article, we review recent progress concerning complicated interplay of Th17 cells and Tregs. There is compelling evidence that Tregs potently inhibit Th1 and Th2 responses; however, the inhibitory effect of Tregs on Th17 responses is a controversial subject. There is increasing evidence showing that Tregs actually promote the differentiation of Th17 cells in vitro and in vivo and consequently, enhanced the functional consequences of Th17 cells, including the protective effect in host defense, as well as detrimental effect in inflammation and in the support of tumor growth. On the other hand, Th17 cells were also the most potent Th subset in the stimulation and support of expansion and phenotypic stability of Tregs in vivo. These results indicate that these two subsets of Th cells reciprocally stimulate each other. This bidirectional crosstalk is largely dependent on the TNF–TNFR2 pathway. These mutual stimulatory effects should be considered in devising future Th17 cell- and Treg-targeting therapy. PMID:24563509

  13. Student criminal background checks in colleges of allied health.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Diane; Aziz, Hassan; Mahoney, Sherry; Gilman, Frances H

    2008-01-01

    The demand that criminal background checks be performed for students in allied health schools and programs has soared in recent years. The need for criminal background checks on students entering the health care professions has emerged as a critical issue largely due to requirements by clinical affiliate training sites. The Joint Commission published a standard stating, "for staff, students and volunteers who work in the same capacity as staff who provide care, treatment, and services, at Elements of Performance 5 states criminal background checks are verified when required by law and regulation and organization policy." More simply stated, this means that criminal background check records must be verifiable if required by some authoritative entity such as state law. However, whether by misinterpretation of the standard or through conscious decision by organization policy makers, many health care organizations suddenly began to require criminal background checks as part of their affiliation agreements with health related schools or programs. The focus of this study was to identify current practices of allied health institutions regarding their conduct of criminal background checks on students entering the allied health professions.

  14. Nice White Men or Social Justice Allies?: Using Critical Race Theory to Examine How White Male Faculty and Administrators Engage in Ally Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Lori D.; Bondi, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Numerous scholars have offered definitions and perspectives for White people to be or become social justice allies. The purpose of this study was to examine the complicated realities that social justice allies in higher education face when working on campus. Using a critical interpretivist approach grounded in critical race theory, the authors…

  15. Reduced serum myostatin concentrations associated with genetic muscle disease progression.

    PubMed

    Burch, Peter M; Pogoryelova, Oksana; Palandra, Joe; Goldstein, Richard; Bennett, Donald; Fitz, Lori; Guglieri, Michela; Bettolo, Chiara Marini; Straub, Volker; Evangelista, Teresinha; Neubert, Hendrik; Lochmüller, Hanns; Morris, Carl

    2017-01-10

    Myostatin is a highly conserved protein secreted primarily from skeletal muscle that can potently suppress muscle growth. This ability to regulate skeletal muscle mass has sparked intense interest in the development of anti-myostatin therapies for a wide array of muscle disorders including sarcopenia, cachexia and genetic neuromuscular diseases. While a number of studies have examined the circulating myostatin concentrations in healthy and sarcopenic populations, very little data are available from inherited muscle disease patients. Here, we have measured the myostatin concentration in serum from seven genetic neuromuscular disorder patient populations using immunoaffinity LC-MS/MS. Average serum concentrations of myostatin in all seven muscle disease patient groups were significantly less than those measured in healthy controls. Furthermore, circulating myostatin concentrations correlated with clinical measures of disease progression for five of the muscle disease patient populations. These findings greatly expand the understanding of myostatin in neuromuscular disease and suggest its potential utility as a biomarker of disease progression.

  16. 78 FR 54763 - Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents: Peripheral Neuropathy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AO32 Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents... peripheral neuropathy associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents. This amendment implements a... governing retroactive awards for certain diseases associated with herbicide exposure as required by...

  17. Carotenoids: potential allies of cardiovascular health?

    PubMed Central

    Gammone, Maria Alessandra; Riccioni, Graziano; D'Orazio, Nicolantonio

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are a class of natural, fat-soluble pigments found principally in plants. They have potential antioxidant biological properties because of their chemical structure and interaction with biological membranes. Epidemiologic studies supported the hypothesis that antioxidants could be used as an inexpensive means of both primary and secondary cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention. In fact, the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) in the vessels plays a key role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. The resistance of LDL to oxidation is increased by high dietary antioxidant intake, so that carotenoids, as part of food patterns such as the Mediterranean diet, may have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health too. Further properties of carotenoids leading to a potential reduction of cardiovascular risk are represented by lowering of blood pressure, reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and markers of inflammation (such as C-reactive protein), and improvement of insulin sensitivity in muscle, liver, and adipose tissues. In addition, recent nutrigenomics studies have focused on the exceptional ability of carotenoids in modulating the expression of specific genes involved in cell metabolism. The aim of this review is to focus attention to this effect of some carotenoids to prevent CVD. PMID:25660385

  18. Rural versus urban: Tennessee health administrators' strategies on recruitment and retention for allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Slagle, Derek R; Byington, Randy L; Verhovsek, Ester L

    2012-01-01

    Due to an increase in the need for allied health professionals, there is a growing interest to assess the allied health workforce and its employment needs. This is especially true in medically underserved rural areas where there is a critical shortage of allied health professionals. A survey was sent to allied health administrators across a variety of allied health disciplines working in Tennessee hospitals in order to gauge opinions on retention and recruitment strategies. Overall successful strategies for recruitment and retention of allied health professionals were reported as well as differences between urban and rural areas, differences of perceptions of strategy effectiveness among allied health disciplines, and key strategies for rural allied health recruitment. Little is known about organizational policies impacting recruitment and retention practices of allied health professionals in Tennessee hospitals. Understanding of this problem is vital to the prevention of a critical shortage of allied health professionals. Therefore, this study sought to compare rural and urban hospital in Tennessee with respect to recruitment and retention needs.

  19. Preclinical models of Graves' disease and associated secondary complications.

    PubMed

    Moshkelgosha, Sajad; So, Po-Wah; Diaz-Cano, Salvador; Banga, J Paul

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease is the most common organ-specific autoimmune disorder which consists of two opposing clinical syndromes, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' (hyperthyroidism) disease. Graves' disease is characterized by goiter, hyperthyroidism, and the orbital complication known as Graves' orbitopathy (GO), or thyroid eye disease. The hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease is caused by stimulation of function of thyrotropin hormone receptor (TSHR), resulting from the production of agonist antibodies to the receptor. A variety of induced mouse models of Graves' disease have been developed over the past two decades, with some reproducible models leading to high disease incidence of autoimmune hyperthyroidism. However, none of the models show any signs of the orbital manifestation of GO. We have recently developed an experimental mouse model of GO induced by immunization of the plasmid encoded ligand binding domain of human TSHR cDNA by close field electroporation that recapitulates the orbital pathology in GO. As in human GO patients, immune mice with hyperthyroid or hypothyroid disease induced by anti-TSHR antibodies exhibited orbital pathology and chemosis, characterized by inflammation of orbital muscles and extensive adipogenesis leading to expansion of the orbital retrobulbar space. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head region in immune mice showed a significant expansion of the orbital space, concurrent with proptosis. This review discusses the different strategies for developing mouse models in Graves' disease, with a particular focus on GO. Furthermore, it outlines how this new model will facilitate molecular investigations into pathophysiology of the orbital disease and evaluation of new therapeutic interventions.

  20. Identification of urinary proteins potentially associated with diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Marikanty, R K; Gupta, M K; Cherukuvada, S V B; Kompella, S S S; Prayaga, A K; Konda, S; Polisetty, R V; Idris, M M; Rao, P V; Chandak, G R; Dakshinamurty, K V

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease. Although several parameters are used to evaluate renal damage, in many instances, there is no pathological change until damage is already advanced. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a novel tool to identify newer diagnostic markers. To identify urinary proteins associated with renal complications in diabetes, we collected urine samples from 10 type 2 diabetes patients each with normoalbuminuria, micro- and macro-albuminuria and compared their urinary proteome with that of 10 healthy individuals. Urinary proteins were concentrated, depleted of albumin and five other abundant plasma proteins and in-gel trypsin digested after prefractionation on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The peptides were analyzed using a nanoflow reverse phase liquid chromatography system coupled to linear trap quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. We identified large number of proteins in each group, of which many were exclusively present in individual patient groups. A total of 53 proteins were common in all patients but were absent in the controls. The majority of the proteins were functionally binding, biologically involved in metabolic processes, and showed enrichment of alternative complement and blood coagulation pathways. In addition to identifying reported proteins such as α2-HS-glycoprotein and Vitamin D binding protein, we detected novel proteins such as CD59, extracellular matrix protein 1 (ECM1), factor H, and myoglobin in the urine of macroalbuminuria patients. ECM1 and factor H are known to influence mesangial cell proliferation, and CD59 causes microvascular damage by influencing membrane attack complex deposition, suggestive their biological relevance to DN. Thus, we have developed a proteome database where various proteins exclusively present in the patients may be further investigated for their role as stage-specific markers and possible therapeutic targets.