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Sample records for allied health educational

  1. ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENT GRANTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Arlington, VA.

    THE ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS PERSONNEL ACT OF 1966 AUTHORIZES THE SURGEON GENERAL TO MAKE GRANTS TO EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVING PROGRAMS WHICH QUALIFY STUDENTS (1) FOR THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE OR ITS EQUIVALENT OR THE MASTER'S DEGREE TO THE EXTENT REQUIRED FOR BASIC PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION, REGISTRATION, OR LICENSURE…

  2. Kentucky Allied Health Project Final Report: A State System for Allied Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Council on Higher Education, Frankfort.

    The accomplishments of the Kentucky Allied Health Project, which implemented a model articulated system of allied health education, are described. The system included plans to promote transition from one education level to another and articulation in educational planning and resource utilization. The project has greatly increased…

  3. Developing Interdisciplinary Education in Allied Health Programs. Issues and Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, Tom, Jr.; Clark, Dan

    By definition allied health education operates in a dynamic environment influenced by the diciplines it represents, the educational system in which it resides, and the complexities of the health care delivery system which it serves. Well-designed and implemented interdisciplinary programs would assist allied health administrators in answering the…

  4. Allied Health Education Programs in Junior Colleges/1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Allied Health Manpower.

    This directory of allied health programs in junior colleges was compiled to provide a comprehensive source of allied health training programs in two-year colleges and to provide data on which to establish national, regional, State, and local priorities for health manpower education. It may also serve as a supplementary reference for guidance…

  5. Administrative Competencies in Education and the Allied Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Margaret K., Ed.; Canfield, Albert A., Ed.

    A 2-day conference was designed by the staff of the University of Florida Center for Allied Health Instructional Personnel to identify competencies of department chairmen, clinical supervisors, deans of schools of allied health professions, administrators or coordinators of health agencies, and educational leaders in professional or governmental…

  6. The perceptual domain: a taxonomy for allied health educators.

    PubMed

    Hooker, E Z

    1981-08-01

    A taxonomy of the perceptual domain was proposed over a decade ago. It is hierarchical, as are the taxonomies in the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains. Perception involves extraction of information from presenting stimuli, and there is progression of information extraction as the hierarchy is ascended. Perceptual performance at the higher levels of the taxonomy assumes perceptual abilities at the lower levels. A modified version of the perceptual taxonomy applicable to allied health education is presented. Methods concerning application of the taxonomy are suggested. Use of the taxonomy of the perceptual domain would help allied health educators plan instruction and evaluate teaching.

  7. A Reaction to: What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Lori W.; Knol, Linda; Meyer, Mary Kay

    2012-01-01

    "What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals" describes an important issue in health care that is the provision of nutrition education. Obesity and chronic disease rates are rapidly increasing. Due to increase in the prevalence rates of obesity and nutrition-related chronic diseases, there is a growing need for…

  8. Allied Health Education/Transfer of Credit: Recommendations of the North Carolina Articulation Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boatman, Ralph H., Ed.; Huther, John W., Ed.

    The North Carolina Allied Health Articulation Project was launched to develop procedures which would enable an individual to transfer credit from an allied health education program in one setting to some program in higher education. In 1972-73, study committees were appointed to deal with the allied health professions of physical therapy,…

  9. 42 CFR 413.85 - Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cost of approved nursing and allied health... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.85 Cost of approved nursing and allied health... methodology for Medicare payment of the costs of approved nursing and allied health education activities....

  10. 42 CFR 413.85 - Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cost of approved nursing and allied health... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.85 Cost of approved nursing and allied health... methodology for Medicare payment of the costs of approved nursing and allied health education activities....

  11. 42 CFR 413.85 - Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cost of approved nursing and allied health... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.85 Cost of approved nursing and allied health... methodology for Medicare payment of the costs of approved nursing and allied health education activities....

  12. 42 CFR 413.85 - Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cost of approved nursing and allied health... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.85 Cost of approved nursing and allied health... methodology for Medicare payment of the costs of approved nursing and allied health education activities....

  13. ADEA/AAL Institute for Allied Health Educators: Program Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Overman, Pamela R; Grzesikowski, Tami; Tucker-Lively, Felicia; Weinstein, George; Haden, N Karl

    2015-05-01

    Revised accreditation standards for dental and dental hygiene education programs have increased emphasis on faculty development that can improve teaching and learning, foster curricular change including use of teaching and learning technologies, and enhance retention and satisfaction of faculty. The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and Academy for Academic Leadership (AAL) established the Institute for Allied Health Educators (IAHE) in 2007 to address faculty development needs for allied dental and allied health educators. In 2009, it was transitioned to an online program, which resulted in increased enrollment and diversity of participants. After seven years, a comprehensive program evaluation was warranted. The authors developed an online questionnaire based on Kirkpatrick's four-level model of training evaluation; for this study, levels one (satisfaction), two (knowledge and skill acquisition), and three (behavior change) were examined. Of the 400 program participants invited to take part in the study, a 38% response rate was achieved, with the majority indicating full-time faculty status. Nearly all (95-97%) of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed the program contributed to their teaching effectiveness, and 88-96% agreed or strongly agreed it enhanced their knowledge of educational concepts and strategies. In addition, 83% agreed or strongly agreed the program helped them develop new skills and confidence with technology, with 69% agreeing or strongly agreeing that it helped them incorporate technology into their own educational setting. Nearly 90% were highly positive or positive in their overall assessment of the program; 95% indicated they would recommend it to a colleague; and 80% agreed or strongly agreed they had discussed what they learned with faculty colleagues at their home institutions who had not attended the program. Positive findings from this evaluation provide evidence that the IAHE has been able to meet its goals.

  14. 42 CFR 413.87 - Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.87 Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... reimbursement for approved nursing and allied health education programs and the methodology for determining...

  15. 42 CFR 413.87 - Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.87 Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... reimbursement for approved nursing and allied health education programs and the methodology for determining...

  16. 42 CFR 413.87 - Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.87 Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... reimbursement for approved nursing and allied health education programs and the methodology for determining...

  17. 42 CFR 413.87 - Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.87 Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... reimbursement for approved nursing and allied health education programs and the methodology for determining...

  18. 42 CFR 413.87 - Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.87 Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... reimbursement for approved nursing and allied health education programs and the methodology for determining...

  19. Survey of Current and Proposed Allied Health Education Programs in New Mexico Post-Secondary Institutions, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, James L.; Burr, Marjorie

    In spring 1991, the Council of Chief Instructional Officers of New Mexico two-year institutions compiled information on current and proposed allied health programs in order to foster cooperation and planning in allied health education among the 17 institutions in the state. In summer 1991, the compilation was updated to include allied health…

  20. Four Characteristics for Regional Continuing Education in Medical Allied Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koewing, J. Robert; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Program (created under the Comprehensive Health Manpower Act of 1971) is briefly described followed by a discussion of the University of North Carolina's regional planning efforts for continuing education. Major planning problems--aggregate numbers, continuing education suppliers, geographic distribution,…

  1. Connecting Allied Health Students to Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guion, W. Kent; Mishoe, Shelley C.; Taft, Arthur A.; Campbell, Carol A.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Statewide studies indicate a continuing shortfall of personnel in several allied health disciplines in rural Georgia. National trends indicate lagging enrollment in allied health education programs, suggesting that the workforce shortages will worsen. Purpose: This article describes the efforts of the School of Allied Health Sciences at…

  2. National Assessment of Clinical Education of Allied Health Manpower: Volume IV: Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booz Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The document is the last volume of a four-part report of a study conducted to evaluate and assess the national state of clinical education and training of allied health manpower. It presents a bibliography of all significant clinical education materials, documentary materials and ongoing studies, through August 30, 1973 but after 1965. The…

  3. Vocational Instructional Materials for Allied Health Education Available from Federal Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Carol L., Comp.

    This listing of federally produced curriculum and instructional materials for allied health education is one of eight annotated bibliographies that provide information for vocational educators at the secondary, postsecondary, and adult levels. Introductory information given includes a description of how to use the listing and sources and ordering…

  4. Arthritis Research and Education in Nursing and Allied Health: A Forum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    A summary of proceedings of the Forum on Arthritis Research and Education in Nursing and Allied Health is presented. The keynote address, "The Burden of Arthritis," by Dorothy P. Rice, provides data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics on the prevalence of arthritis, the burden it imposes, and the volume, type, and cost…

  5. The Effectiveness of Distance Education in Allied Health Science Programs: A Meta-Analysis of Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Stacy L.

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive meta-analysis of the research following Glass, McGraw, and Smith's (1981) technique integrated findings from twenty-five comparative studies from 1990 to 2003 targeting student achievement and distance education in allied health professions. Student achievement was assessed through course grades and resulted in an overall effect…

  6. Allied health disaster volunteering.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Alphonso; Wilson, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Allied health practitioners will play an important role in providing medical care following a disaster. The clinical and laboratory skills possessed by allied health practitioners will be of extreme importance in the processing of disaster victims. The degree that allied health practitioners can help process disaster victims will play a large role in helping stabilize survivors of man-made or natural disasters. Those allied health practitioners skilled in triage, patient assessment, and emergency treatment of those injured can make a large difference in improving the utilization of human resources at an emergency site and thereby potentially improve treatment outcomes. Failure of a health professional to preregister as a health volunteer can affect the quality and responsiveness of a community's surge capacity. The rationale for advance registration ensures that the time-intensive effort of identifying professional credentials and licenses does not consume or divert resources that are necessary for mitigation of the immediate emergency. Of equal importance for allied health practitioners are the liability issues that exist in providing health care services outside of a formal employment agreement.

  7. EDUCATION FOR THE ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS AND SERVICES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Health Council, Washington, DC.

    THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE IN HEALTH OCCUPATIONS WILL PROBABLY INCREASE FROM 2.8 TO 3.8 MILLION PERSONS BY 1975. RECENT SURVEYS OF HOSPITALS AND NURSING HOMES SHOWED THAT OVER 300,000 ADDITIONAL HEALTH WORKERS WERE NEEDED TO PROVIDE OPTIMUM PATIENT CARE. SHORTAGES EXISTED FOR MEDICAL RECORD LIBRARIANS, DENTAL HYGIENISTS, MEDICAL AND RADIOLOGIC…

  8. What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ettienne-Gittens, Reynolette; Lisako, E.; McKyer, J.; Goodson, Patricia; Guidry, Jeffrey; Outley, Corliss

    2012-01-01

    Background: Health educators are critical members of the health care team who may be called upon to provide nutrition education. However, are health educators prepared for this task? What have scholars concluded regarding this pertinent topic? Purpose: This study has three purposes: (1) to determine the definition of and criteria for nutrition…

  9. Allied health: integral to transforming health.

    PubMed

    Lizarondo, Lucylynn; Turnbull, Catherine; Kroon, Tracey; Grimmer, Karen; Bell, Alison; Kumar, Saravana; McEvoy, Maureen; Milanese, Steve; Russell, Mary; Sheppard, Lorraine; Walters, Julie; Wiles, Louise

    2016-04-01

    Objective South Australia is taking an innovative step in transforming the way its healthcare is organised and delivered to better manage current and future demands on the health system. In an environment of transforming health services, there are clear opportunities for allied health to assist in determining solutions to various healthcare challenges. A recent opinion piece proposed 10 clinician-driven strategies to assist in maximising value and sustainability of healthcare in Australia. The present study aimed to seek the perspectives of allied health clinicians, educators, researchers, policy makers and managers on these strategies and their relevance to allied health. Methods A survey of allied health practitioners was undertaken to capture their perspectives on the 10 clinician-driven strategies for maximising value and sustainability of healthcare in Australia. Survey findings were then layered with evidence from the literature. Results Highly relevant across allied health are the strategies of discontinuation of low value practices, targeting clinical interventions to those getting greatest benefit, active involvement of patients in shared decision making and self-management and advocating for integrated systems of care. Conclusions Allied health professionals have been involved in the South Australian healthcare system for a prolonged period, but their services are poorly recognised, often overlooked and not greatly supported in existing traditional practices. The results of the present study highlight ways in which healthcare services can implement strategies not only to improve the quality of patient outcomes, but also to offer innovative solutions for future, sustainable healthcare. The findings call for concerted efforts to increase the utilisation of allied health services to ensure the 'maximum value for spend' of the increasingly scarce health dollar. What is known about the topic? In medicine, clinician-driven strategies have been proposed to

  10. Attitudes on Barriers and Benefits of Distance Education among Mississippi Delta Allied Health Community College Faculty, Staff, and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayfield-Johnson, Susan; Mohn, Richard S.; Mitra, Amal K.; Young, Rebekah; McCullers, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Online distance education creates increased opportunities for continuing education and advanced training for allied health professionals living in underserved and geographically isolated areas. The purpose of this article was to explore attitudes on barriers and benefits of distance education technology among underrepresented minority allied…

  11. [Educational program in the Medical Science Course, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences].

    PubMed

    Kitasato, Hidero; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Ohbu, Makoto; Obata, Fumiya; Ogawa, Zensuke; Sato, Yuichi; Hattori, Manabu; Saito-Taki, Tatsuo; Hara, Kazuya; Okano, Tetsuroh; Kubo, Makoto; Maruyama, Hiroko; Tsuchiya, Benio; Okazaki, Toshio; Ishii, Naohito; Nishimura, Yukari; Takada, Nobukazu; Abe, Michiko; Hachimura, Kazuo; Tanigawa, Kozo; Katagiri, Masato

    2008-07-01

    The aim of education in the Medical Laboratory Science course, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences, is to bring up train students who have Kitasato spirit, for careers in laboratory medicine of hospital or scientific staff of medical companies or as researchers. General and enlightening education concerning "Kitasato spirit" and professional education composed of major subjects was carried out in the first and during the 2nd and two third of 3rd grade, respectively. Medical practice and research training were alternatively carried out for 6 months between November of the 3rd year and November of the 4th year, in order to gain practical experience. Two problem-based learning (PBL) tutorial courses, "Infectious Diseases Course" and "Team Medical Care--Interprofessional Collaborations" were also carried out at the end of the 3rd and beginning of the 4th years, respectively, in order to convert a memory to knowledge. Team medical care course enrolls 1000 students at the School of Allied Health Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy and Kitasato College Applied Clinical Dietetics Course, is now one of special courses available at our university. This attempt is thought to result in a way of thinking that recognizes the importance of co-operation as a team member and personal contributions to actual team medical care.

  12. Learning style preferences of allied health practitioners in a teacher education program.

    PubMed

    Vittetoe, M C; Hooker, E

    1983-02-01

    This article reports findings of a three-year study of learning style preferences of allied health practitioners in a university teacher education program. The Learning Preference Inventory (LPI) designed by Rezler and French was used as the survey instrument. Ten health fields were represented in the total population of 309 students who participated in the study. Analysis of variance was used to test the significance of the differences of the six LPI mean scores on abstract/concrete, teacher-centered/student-centered, and individual/interpersonal categories across the variables of age, sex, teaching experience, class location, class standing, and health field. Results of this study paralleled the findings of the 1975 Rezler and French study regarding medical technologists and physical therapists in that these two groups indicated they preferred concrete and teacher centered learning styles. Several other significant differences between health fields and other variables are discussed.

  13. Horizons in Health (Allied Health Careers)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emphasis Career Education, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The latest conditions affecting job demand, advancement, and compensation potential; educational requirements; and job descriptions are reported for allied health careers in the laboratory and hospital as physician assistants; therapists; nurses and nurses aids; dieticians and nutritionists; and dental assistants, hygienists, and laboratory…

  14. Allied Health Careers Instructional Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Betty

    This instructional workbook contains 24 units to be used by beginning students in allied health care occupations courses. The units are organized in four sections that cover the following topics: introduction to allied health careers, health/wellness, basic sciences, and basic anatomy and physiology. Each unit contains a unit objective, specific…

  15. Report on Health Manpower and Programs in Ohio: Part Two. Allied Health, Area Health Education Centers, Dentistry, Emergency Medical Services, Nursing, Optometry, Pharmacy, Podiatry, and Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus.

    Information on health occupations educational programs in Ohio and current and projected employment needs for health professionals are presented. The following health fields are examined: allied health, dentistry, emergency medical service, nursing, optometry, pharmacy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine. Issues and trends affecting each field are…

  16. Differences between African-American and Caucasian Students on Enrollment Influences and Barriers in Kinesiology-Based Allied Health Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barfield, J. P.; Cobler, D. C.; Lam, Eddie T. C.; Zhang, James; Chitiyo, George

    2012-01-01

    Kinesiology departments have recently started to offer allied health education programs to attract additional students to teacher education units (9). Although allied health professions offer increased work opportunities, insufficient enrollment and training of minority students in these academic fields contribute to underrepresentation in the…

  17. Barriers and Enablers to Clinical Fieldwork Education in Rural Public and Private Allied Health Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Phoebe; Stagnitti, Karen; Schoo, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to maximise rural clinical fieldwork placement to build health workforce capacity. This study investigated allied health professionals' (AHPs) experience of supervising students as part of work-integrated learning in public and private rural health settings. An anonymous postal questionnaire with 30 questions was used to collect…

  18. Developing eLearning Technologies to Implement Competency Based Medical Education: Experiences from Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagunwa, Thomas; Lwoga, Edda

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the practical experience of developing an eLearning technology as a tool to implement Competency-based Medical Education (CBME) in Tanzania medical universities, with a specific focus on Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences. The paper provides a background to eLearning and the early attempt to adopt it in 2006 at…

  19. Teaching clinical reasoning by making thinking visible: an action research project with allied health clinical educators

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical reasoning is fundamental to all forms of professional health practice, however it is also difficult to teach and learn because it is complex, tacit, and effectively invisible for students. In this paper we present an approach for teaching clinical reasoning based on making expert thinking visible and accessible to students. Methods Twenty-one experienced allied health clinical educators from three tertiary Australian hospitals attended up to seven action research discussion sessions, where they developed a tentative heuristic of their own clinical reasoning, trialled it with students, evaluated if it helped their students to reason clinically, and then refined it so the heuristic was targeted to developing each student’s reasoning skills. Data included participants’ written descriptions of the thinking routines they developed and trialed with their students and the transcribed action research discussion sessions. Content analysis was used to summarise this data and categorise themes about teaching and learning clinical reasoning. Results Two overriding themes emerged from participants’ reports about using the ‘making thinking visible approach’. The first was a specific focus by participating educators on students’ understanding of the reasoning process and the second was heightened awareness of personal teaching styles and approaches to teaching clinical reasoning. Conclusions We suggest that the making thinking visible approach has potential to assist educators to become more reflective about their clinical reasoning teaching and acts as a scaffold to assist them to articulate their own expert reasoning and for students to access and use. PMID:24479414

  20. Student Recruitment in Allied Health Educational Programs: The Importance of Initial Source of Contact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Alphonso; Agho, Augustine O.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of 1,809 students found that information influencing their decision to enroll in allied health programs came from a variety of sources. Practicing health professionals were the most influential. Only physical therapy and dental hygiene students identified high school counselors as an important source. (Contains 20 references.) (JOW)

  1. Leadership in athletic training: implications for practice and education in allied health care.

    PubMed

    Kutz, Matthew R

    2010-01-01

    Leadership behaviors are an important aspect of athletic training and are needed within all allied health care disciples. A two-phase, exploratory, non-experimental research study using a Delphi technique and a randomly selected sample of athletic trainers (n = 161) was conducted to determine leadership competencies perceived to be important for athletic training practice and education. The Delphi technique (phase one) resulted in the Leadership Development in Athletic Training instrument (LDAT). In the national survey (phase two), respondents used the LDAT to rate the importance of leadership competencies for athletic training practice and for athletic training education. Coefficient alphas ranged from α = 0.83 to 0.97 and provided satisfactory estimates of internal consistency. Concurrent, construct, and convergent validity were established. Forty-nine leadership competencies were rated important for practice and 48 for education (M = 1.5, p ≤ 0.001). Exploratory factor analysis revealed that leadership competencies were organized by four constructs (with six emphases): 1) personality characteristics, 2) diagnosing context and people skills, 3) communication and initiative, and 4) strategic thinking. Repeated measures ANOVA with Sidak post-hoc adjustments indicated each leadership construct significantly increased in importance as the level of the ATEP progressed.

  2. Emerging Innovation: Allied Health Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Janell B.

    2004-01-01

    This article takes a closer look at emerging fields in the allied health arena. The relatively new field of Health Information Technology is one of the exciting prospects, surging with growth opportunities. These individuals are medical language experts who interpret, process, store and retrieve health information for research and data collection.…

  3. Development of Articulation Models for Allied Health Statewide Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Joanne; And Others

    Under the auspices of the Kentucky Council on Higher Education and with the aim of delineating issues in allied health education and making recommendations for alleviating the issues, an in-depth, two-year study was completed in 1975. The primary recommendations pertained to the development of a statewide plan for allied health education that…

  4. Allied Health Core Curriculum: Its Time Has Come

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, M. LaCheeta

    2004-01-01

    There is lack of a clear definition regarding an allied health core curriculum. The Pew Health Professions Commission and the Bureau of Health Professions use the following to define a core curriculum: "A set of interdisciplinary courses, clinical training, and other educational exposures designed to provide allied health students at each level…

  5. Nursing and Allied Health Shortages: TBR Responds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berryman, Treva

    Staff members of the Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) and the Tennessee Higher Education Commission worked jointly to establish a task force to investigate and develop recommendations for addressing the workforce shortages in nursing and allied health in Tennessee. The investigation established that Tennessee already has a workforce shortage of…

  6. Preadmission Criteria as Predictors of Academic Success in Entry-Level Athletic Training and Other Allied Health Educational Programs

    PubMed Central

    Turocy, Paula Sammarone; McGlumphy, Barry E.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate preadmission criteria, Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores, and high school grade point average (HSGPA) and to determine the ability of those criteria to predict the college grade point average (CGPA) of graduates from programs in athletic training and 5 other allied health disciplines. Design and Setting: Descriptive data, including age, sex, year of graduation, HSGPA, CGPA, and SAT scores (SAT mathematics [SATM], SAT verbal [SATV], and SAT total) were gathered from the files of graduates (1992 to 1997) of allied health education programs. Subjects: The complete records of 373 graduates (244 women and 129 men) of 6 allied health education programs in athletic training, health management systems, occupational therapy, perfusion technology, physician assistant, and physical therapy were used in this study. Subjects with incomplete files were excluded from this study. Measurements: We collected data from official college transcripts, official high school transcripts, and SAT scores reported to the university. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, Pearson correlation, and stepwise forward regression analyses were used to determine the ability of SATV score, SATM score, and HSGPA to predict CGPA. Results: Both SATV score and HSGPA were found to predict 14% of the variance in student success (CGPA) in all allied health programs; however, only HSGPA was predictive of student success in athletic training (P = .00). Both SATV score and HSGPA were predictive of CGPA in both physical (P = .02 and .03, respectively) and occupational (P = .02 and .00, respectively) therapy graduates; however, they predicted only 12% and 21%, respectively, of the variance in CGPA. The SATM score was predictive of CGPA in both perfusion technology (P = .05) and physician assistant (P = .00) graduates, accounting for 7% and 18% of the variance in outcomes. Conclusions: Overall, HSGPA and SATV score were predictive of student success (CGPA) in the allied health

  7. A Study of Tenure among Allied Health Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'pt Holt, Timothy B.

    1991-01-01

    Responses from 47 percent of 310 deans/directors of allied health education programs revealed an average of 35.5 percent of allied health faculty achieving tenure, compared to 58.2 percent for campuses generally. Most noted a trend toward more rigorous tenure criteria. (SK)

  8. Peterson's Guide to Colleges for Careers in Allied Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson's Guides, Inc., Princeton, NJ.

    This guide contains guidelines for evaluating a career in allied health, for selecting a college. The guide profiles undergraduate programs at approximately 750 institutions of higher education in the United States. The directory is divided into five main sections. The first section offers guidelines for evaluating a career in allied health. It…

  9. Development of a Scale to Determine Enrollment Barriers into Allied Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barfield, J. P.; Folio, M. Rhonda; Lam, Eddie T. C.; Zhang, James J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop the Scale of Allied Health Education Barriers to identify factors limiting enrollment in college/university allied health education programs. Development of the Scale of Allied Health Education Barriers was conducted through the following four stages: (1) review of literature, (2) focus group studies, (3)…

  10. Interdisciplinary allied health education in treating older adults with low vision.

    PubMed

    Newsham Beckley, Margaret; Teaford, Margaret H; Kegelmeyer, Deborah; Balaswamy, Shantha; Flom, Roanne; Raasch, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    In 2000, the number of elderly citizens in the United States was 35 million, an increase of 3.7 million (11%) since 1990. Of these older adults, approximately 1.3 million (4%) have a low vision impairment. Older adults make up two-thirds of those diagnosed with a visual impairment. Low vision impairment, which is different from the typical vision changes associated with aging, occurs because of a chronic visual disorder that cannot be corrected medically, surgically, or with conventional eyeglasses, most often resulting in disability. The leading causes of low vision impairment are diabetic retinopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration. Combined with the other physical changes associated with aging, the development of a low vision impairment further challenges the functional performance and safety of those 65 and older. Furthermore, the psychological impact from the physical changes accompanying aging is compounded for those with a low vision impairment. In response to the health needs of all age groups, Healthy People 2010 has established overarching goals to increase quality and years of healthy life and eliminate health disparities. An interdisciplinary course for allied health students was developed to support future health care providers in improving quality of life for older adults with low vision and help decrease health disparities in this population. This paper reports on the pilot experience with this course.

  11. Factors affecting allied health faculty job satisfaction: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Romig, Barbara; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie; Denmark, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    Evidence in the literature suggests job satisfaction can make a difference in keeping qualified workers on the job, but little research has been conducted focusing specifically on allied health faculty. In order to attract and retain top quality faculty, colleges and universities should understand the variables impacting faculty satisfaction and develop a plan to enhance satisfaction. An integrative literature review (CINHAL, ERIC, Journal of Allied Health, Chronicle of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, and current books on job satisfaction) of faculty job satisfaction and dissatisfaction produced a variety of publications presenting the key determinants of job satisfaction by allied health faculty in the United States. The purpose of the analysis was to examine the various factors that influence job satisfaction, especially by allied health faculty, in institutions of higher education in the U.S. The procedure used for this analysis consisted of reviewing allied health and higher education faculty studies to identify factors influencing job satisfaction, research questions, sample size reported, instruments used for measurement of job satisfaction, and job satisfaction results. While the theoretical models of allied health and higher education faculty job satisfaction exist separately in the literature, their remarkable similarities permit the prospect of a contemporary framework of the essential components of job satisfaction. Potential opportunities for continuing research on the personal and professional variables impacting job satisfaction of allied health faculty and similar disciplines are presented.

  12. Implications of Lengthened Health Education: Nursing and the Allied Health Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galambos, Eva C.

    Health care is demanding increasing resources and attention in numbers of health care workers, in levels of skills required, in time spent in training, and in dollars expended. A greater spectrum of skills is required to cope with increasing health care demands, yet trends toward specialization and fracturing of responsibilities assigned to health…

  13. Selected list of books and journals in allied health sciences.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1984-01-01

    This list of 450 books and 67 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs and personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Due to the necessity of limiting the scope of coverage because of the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused mainly on the twenty-six educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, in addition to programs in allied dental health and medical secretarial skills. Books are categorized by broad subject followed by an author/editor index; journals are listed alphabetically by title. To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for annual (1984) journal subscriptions would require a total expenditure of approximately $15,000. PMID:6388696

  14. Integrating public health and allied health education through a core curriculum: an action research approach.

    PubMed

    Fish, Dale R; Tona, Janice; Burton, Harold; Wietig, Paul T; Trevisan, Maurizio; Ohtake, Patricia J

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the use of an action research model to effect curricular change--specifically, to develop a core curriculum that prepares public health and health professions students to meet emerging needs in today's health care environment. The action research process is based on a series of steps wherein the problem is identified, data are collected and interpreted, action is taken, and action is reflected upon. These steps are then repeated. Consensus building proceeds as participants engage in continual analysis and implementation of changes, followed by more analysis. This process led to the emergence of three core content focus areas: Population, Wellness and Disability; Evidence-Based Practice; and Communication and Professionalism. "Focus Area Working Groups" were established to further delineate each content area. These groups initially developed 62 learning objectives across the three focus areas. Those objectives were subsequently distilled and refined, resulting in 25 "Core Essentials" that now define the core curriculum and serve as content guides rather than prescriptive learning objectives. The action research model proved to be beneficial in helping faculty from diverse health disciplines build consensus as they identified common professional and interprofessional learning needs.

  15. Utilization of virtual learning environments in the allied health professions.

    PubMed

    Butina, Michelle; Brooks, Donna; Dominguez, Paul J; Mahon, Gwendolyn M

    2013-01-01

    Multiple technology based tools have been used to enhance skill development in allied health education, which now includes virtual learning environments. The purpose of this study was to explore whether, and how, this latest instructional technology is being adapted in allied health education. An online survey was circulated to all Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP) member institutions and focused on three broad areas of virtual learning environments: the uses of, the perceived pros and cons of, and the outcomes of utilizing them. Results show 40% (17 of 42) of the respondent use some form of the technology. The use of virtual learning technology in other healthcare professions (e.g., medicine) demonstrates the potential benefits to allied health education.

  16. Differences between African-American and Caucasian students on enrollment influences and barriers in kinesiology-based allied health education programs.

    PubMed

    Barfield, J P; Cobler, D C; Lam, Eddie T C; Zhang, James; Chitiyo, George

    2012-06-01

    Kinesiology departments have recently started to offer allied health education programs to attract additional students to teacher education units (9). Although allied health professions offer increased work opportunities, insufficient enrollment and training of minority students in these academic fields contribute to underrepresentation in the workforce (3). To improve workforce diversity, kinesiology departments must understand how enrollment influences and barriers differ by race among prospective students. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify differences in allied health education enrollment influences and enrollment barriers between minority and Caucasian students. Participants (n = 601) consisted of students enrolled in kinesiology-based allied health education programs. Multivariate ANOVA was used to compare group differences in enrollment decision making. "Personal influence," "career opportunity," and "physical self-efficacy" were all significantly stronger enrollment influences among African-American students than among Caucasian students, and "social influence," "experiential opportunity," "academic preparation," and "physical self-efficacy" were all perceived as significantly greater barriers compared with Caucasian students. Findings support the need to recruit African-American students through sport and physical education settings and to market program-based experiential opportunities.

  17. Handbook of Health Professions Education. Responding to New Realities in Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Nursing, Allied Health, and Public Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Christine H.; And Others

    The evolution, present status, future directions, and external forces affecting health professions education are reviewed in this 25 chapter book. Guidelines are set forth for sound practices and policies for innovative and responsive health care. The authors assess how major economic, social, political, demographic, and technological changes are…

  18. Selected list of books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. health care system of the twenty-first century will be information driven; allied health literature will be a dynamic part of that information. This list of 415 books and 76 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either a health care or academic setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, focus has been directed primarily to the twenty-eight educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation (CAHEA) of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, medical secretarial, nutrition, and speech pathology/audiology programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (177 books and 32 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1994 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $25,300. PMID:7920334

  19. Selected list of books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1994-07-01

    The U.S. health care system of the twenty-first century will be information driven; allied health literature will be a dynamic part of that information. This list of 415 books and 76 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either a health care or academic setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, focus has been directed primarily to the twenty-eight educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation (CAHEA) of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, medical secretarial, nutrition, and speech pathology/audiology programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (177 books and 32 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1994 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $25,300.

  20. Current status of cardiac surgery allied health professionals in Asia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Ye, W

    2011-01-01

    More and more allied health professions are getting involved in clinical health care. One estimate reported allied health personnel makes up 60 percent of the total health workforce. In Asia, in the field of cardiothoracic surgery, allied health personnel includes perfusionists, physician assistants, physiotherapist, intensivists, rehabilitation therapists, nutritionists and social workers. They work in collaboration with surgeons to provide a range of diagnostic, technical, therapeutic, cardiac care and support services to the patients and their families.Some allied health professions are more specialized. They must adhere to national training and education standards and their professional scope of practice. For example, the training of perfusionists consists of at least five years of academic in medical schools and another three-year-long clinical training in the hospital. The cardiac intensivists usually are medical doctors with a background in cardiology. They spend 3-4 years rotating in Internal Medicine, Anesthesiology, Emergency Rooms and Intensive Care Units. There have specialized medical societies to grant certified credentials and to provide continuing education. Other allied health professions require no special training or credentials and are trained for their work by the hospitals through on-the-job training. Many young health care providers are getting involved in the allied health personnel projects. They consider this as a career ladder because of the opportunities for advancement within specific fields.

  1. Allied Health Occupations I (Health Assistant). Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a first-year course in allied health occupations education that is intended to prepare students for entry-level employment in such allied health occupations as nurse's aide and health assistant. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: health worker…

  2. Allied Health Field, Ninth Grade. Introduction to Allied Health and the Health Care Team. Operation TACT [Toward an Allied Health Career Today] Curriculum [and Teachers' Handbook].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Univ., Storrs. School of Allied Health Professions.

    The two-part set consists of a student handbook and a related teachers' handbook in allied health education for use at the ninth grade level. The student handbook contains nine units which focus on the science curriculum: (1) introduction, (2) weights and measures, (3) human body, (4) chemistry, (5) electricity and magnetism, (6) heat and its…

  3. Allied Health Field, Tenth Grade. Introduction to Allied Health and the Health Care Team. Operation TACT [Toward an Allied Health Career Today] Curriculum [and Teachers' Handbook].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Tracy

    The two-part set consists of a student handbook and a related teachers' handbook in allied health education for use at the tenth grade level. The student handbook consists of seven units which focus on the biology curriculum: (1) community water examination, (2) bacteriological examination of water, (3) the microscope, (4) microbes and man, (5)…

  4. Index of Graduate Theses and Projects in Allied Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Allied Health, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Contains 1,073 entries from 91 institutions, giving author, institution, year, degree, emphasis, discipline, and title, arranged by topic: allied health, biocommunication arts, child development/care, clinical psychology, dentistry, environmental health, exercise science, food service, health education, health services, medical laboratories, nurse…

  5. Educators' Guide to Ally Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), 2010

    2010-01-01

    An ally is an individual who speaks out and stands up for a person or group that is targeted and/or discriminated against. An ally works to end oppression by supporting and advocating for people who are stigmatized, or treated unfairly because of who they are. In this context, Allies are referred to as people who do not identify as LGBT (lesbian,…

  6. Articulation for Allied Health. Final Report. Omnibus Dissemination Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havens, Cheryl C.

    There exists in health occupations education, two types of educational institutions. One type prepares students for a certificate, and the other for a degree. The objective of the Articulation Project for Allied Health was to establish and document a procedure by which students with technical certificates could receive college credit, recommending…

  7. Allied Dental Education: Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVore, Linda Rubinstein

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the status of the three allied dental disciplines (dental assisting, dental technology, and dental hygiene) gives a historical overview on allied dental programs, assesses their current status and enrollment trends, identifies critical issues affecting educational programs, and outlines a framework for innovation in recruitment and…

  8. Applying Innovative Educational Principles when Classes Grow and Resources Are Limited: Biochemistry Experiences at Muhimbili University of Allied Health Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omer, Selma; Hickson, Gilles; Tache, Stephanie; Blind, Raymond; Masters, Susan; Loeser, Helen; Souza, Kevin; Mkony, Charles; Debas, Haile; O'Sullivan, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Teaching to large classes is often challenging particularly when the faculty and teaching resources are limited. Innovative, less staff intensive ways need to be explored to enhance teaching and to engage students. We describe our experience teaching biochemistry to 350 students at Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) under…

  9. Curricular transformation of health professions education in Tanzania: the process at Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (2008-2011).

    PubMed

    Ngassapa, Olipa D; Kaaya, Ephata E; Fyfe, Molly V; Lyamuya, Eligius F; Kakoko, Deodatus C; Kayombo, Edmund J; Kisenge, Rodrick R; Loeser, Helen; Mwakigonja, Amos R; Outwater, Anne H; Martin-Holland, Judy; Mwambete, Kennedy D; Kida, Irene; Macfarlane, Sarah B

    2012-01-01

    Tanzania requires more health professionals equipped to tackle its serious health challenges. When it became an independent university in 2007, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) decided to transform its educational offerings to ensure its students practice competently and contribute to improving population health. In 2008, in collaboration with the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), all MUHAS's schools (dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and public health and social sciences) and institutes (traditional medicine and allied health sciences) began a university-wide process to revise curricula. Adopting university-wide committee structures, procedures, and a common schedule, MUHAS faculty set out to: (i) identify specific competencies for students to achieve by graduation (in eight domains, six that are inter-professional, hence consistent across schools); (ii) engage stakeholders to understand adequacies and inadequacies of current curricula; and (iii) restructure and revise curricula introducing competencies. The Tanzania Commission for Universities accredited the curricula in September 2011, and faculty started implementation with first-year students in October 2011. We learned that curricular revision of this magnitude requires: a compelling directive for change, designated leadership, resource mobilization inclusion of all stakeholders, clear guiding principles, an iterative plan linking flexible timetables to phases for curriculum development, engagement in skills training for the cultivation of future leaders, and extensive communication.

  10. Ally

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ally ; CASRN 74223 - 64 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  11. Selected list of books and journals in allied health sciences.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1990-01-01

    This list of 453 books and 74 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the twenty-six educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, medical secretarial, and nutrition programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (179 books and 29 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1990 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $21,650. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $9,250. PMID:2393755

  12. Selected list of books and journals in allied health *

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Alfred N.; Hill, Dorothy R.

    1996-01-01

    This list of 410 books and 76 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and described in the AMA's Allied Health and Rehabilitation Professions Education Directory, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, medical secretarial, nutrition, and speech pathology/audiology programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (163 books and 31 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1996 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $26,740. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $11,160. PMID:16018053

  13. Selected list of books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1992-01-01

    This list of 396 books and 77 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Due to the necessity of limiting the scope of coverage because of the large number and wide range of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the twenty-eight programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, medical secretarial, nutrition, and speech pathology/audiology. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals is followed by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (194 books and 31 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1992 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $22,800. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $10,850. PMID:1525616

  14. Allied Health Technologies. Preceptor/Mentor Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing. Office of Career and Technical Education.

    This handbook is designed to assist preceptors/mentors in a local allied health technology program, a school/industry partnership focused on training students for entry-level employment in the health care field by means of a work internship/externship. It draws heavily on the Secretary of Labor's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS)…

  15. Ethical experiential learning in medical, nursing and allied health education: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Grace, Sandra; Innes, Ev; Patton, Narelle; Stockhausen, Lynette

    2017-01-10

    Students enrolled in medical, nursing and health science programs often participate in experiential learning in their practical classes. Experiential learning includes peer physical examination and peer-assisted learning where students practise clinical skills on each other.

  16. Selected list of books and journals in allied health sciences.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1988-01-01

    This list of 435 books and 76 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs and/or health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility pf covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the twenty-six educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, nutrition, and medical secretarial programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (176 books and 29 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1988 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $19,000. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $7,900. PMID:3066428

  17. Professional Preparation of Allied Health Practitioners and Special Educators Using a Collaborative, Transdisciplinary Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Lou; Sable, Janet

    2001-01-01

    Presents a curriculum model that emphasizes the development of transdisciplinary teaming skills. The model provides students in communication disorders, early childhood/special education, occupational therapy, and therapeutic recreation discipline-specific knowledge and skills as well as a core of cross disciplinary courses and experiences which…

  18. Leadership content important in athletic training education with implications for allied health care.

    PubMed

    Kutz, Matthew R; Scialli, Joan

    2008-01-01

    A two-phase exploratory and comparative research study using a Delphi technique and a web-based national survey was done to determine leadership content (i.e., theories, styles, or practices) important to include in athletic training education. Eighteen athletic training experts participated in the Delphi technique, followed by 161 athletic trainers completing the national survey. Consensus of experts was reached after two rounds (77% interrater agreement, alpha = 0.80 and alpha = 0.93 per respective round) and identified 31 leadership content items important to include in athletic training education. The national sample then rated importance of each leadership content area for inclusion in four types of athletic training education programs (entry-level baccalaureate, entry-level master's degree, postgraduate certifications, and doctoral degree). The respondents ranked the leadership content in order of importance according to mean (mean = 1.53 +/- 0.84 to 2.55 +/- 0.55; scale, 0-3). Twenty-two content items (63%) were rated at least "very important" (mean > or = 2.0). Exploratory factor analysis established construct validity and organized leadership content by three factors: managerial leadership and knowledge management; leadership theories; and leadership issues, trends, and policies (alpha = 0.84-0.91). Repeated-measures analysis of variance (Sidak post-hoc adjustments) established criterion-related concurrent validity, which found increasing levels of importance as education type progressed (F = 4.88, p = 0.003-32.56, p = 0.000). Adding leadership content within athletic training enhances the professionalization of students, facilitates leadership competency among students and practicing professionals enrolled in postcertification educational programs, and facilitates job placement and role.

  19. Nursing Skills for Allied Health Services. Volume 2. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Lucile A., Ed.

    Guidelines for teaching nursing skills to allied health personnel at different levels (on-the-job training, associate degree in nursing, adult education, or staff development programs) are the focus of the document. It presents general considerations for planning an effective management system for the utilization of Level 1 (entry-level nursing…

  20. Nursing Skills for Allied Health Services. Volume 1. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Lucile A., Ed.

    Guidelines for teaching nursing skills to allied health personnel at different levels (on-the-job training, associate degree in nursing, adult education, or staff development programs) are the focus of the document. It presents general considerations for planning an effective management system for the utilization of Level 1 (entry-level nursing…

  1. Table Clinics: A Valuable Learning Experience for Allied Health Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Jimmie H.

    Table clinics, or short oral presentations on techniques related to some phase of research, diagnosis, or treatment, can be used to enrich allied health education. To present a table clinic, students must choose a topic which lends itself to a 5- to 7-minute presentation and which imparts knowledge that participants can take back to their…

  2. Supervising allied health assistants: a concerning skill gap in allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, David

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss the problem of a skill gap in the training of allied health professionals. Allied health assistants are required to work under the supervision of allied health professionals. There is little evidence to suggest supervisory skills are routinely taught as part of the development of professional behavior. With increasing concern about a lack of supervisory skill, there is an opportunity for supervisory skills to be incorporated into the undergraduate curriculum. A combination of classroom and clinical experience is required to ensure this professional skill does not continue to be overlooked.

  3. Mastery Learning: A Model for Allied Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, James A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reports the methods and philosophy used in developing a mastery learning model at the University of Missouri-Columbia to insure that allied health students in the physical therapy and occupational therapy programs learn the concepts of anatomy essential to the rest of the curriculum. (MF)

  4. Chemistry for the Allied Health Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Donald H.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the literature concerning the content of chemistry courses for allied health students. Contains the content outline of a two-semester course offered at Hope College (Michigan) and discusses the rationale for organizing the course for this audience. (TW)

  5. Shape of allied health: an environmental scan of 27 allied health professions in Victoria.

    PubMed

    Nancarrow, Susan A; Young, Gretchen; O'Callaghan, Katy; Jenkins, Mathew; Philip, Kathleen; Barlow, Kegan

    2016-08-11

    Objective In 2015, the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services commissioned the Victorian Allied Health Workforce Research Program to provide data on allied health professions in the Victorian public, private and not-for-profit sectors. Herein we present a snapshot of the demographic profiles and distribution of these professions in Victoria and discuss the workforce implications.Methods The program commenced with an environmental scan of 27 allied health professions in Victoria. This substantial scoping exercise identified existing data, resources and contexts for each profession to guide future data collection and research. Each environmental scan reviewed existing data relating to the 27 professions, augmented by an online questionnaire sent to the professional bodies representing each discipline.Results Workforce data were patchy but, based on the evidence available, the allied health professions in Victoria vary greatly in size (ranging from just 17 child life therapists to 6288 psychologists), are predominantly female (83% of professions are more than 50% female) and half the professions report that 30% of their workforce is aged under 30 years. New training programs have increased workforce inflows to many professions, but there is little understanding of attrition rates. Professions reported a lack of senior positions in the public sector and a concomitant lack of senior specialised staff available to support more junior staff. Increasing numbers of allied health graduates are being employed directly in private practice because of a lack of growth in new positions in the public sector and changing funding models. Smaller professions reported that their members are more likely to be professionally isolated within an allied health team or larger organisations. Uneven rural-urban workforce distribution was evident across most professions.Conclusions Workforce planning for allied health is extremely complex because of the lack of data, fragmented

  6. Clinical Instructor Characteristics, Behaviors and Skills in Allied Health Care Settings: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Linda S.; Sexton, Patrick; Willeford, K. Sean; Barnum, Mary G.; Guyer, M. Susan; Gardner, Greg; Fincher, A. Louise

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to compare both clinical instructor and student perceptions of helpful and hindering clinical instructor characteristics, behaviors and skills in athletic training and allied health care settings. Clinical education in athletic training is similar to that of other allied health care professions. Clinical…

  7. Applying innovative educational principles when classes grow and resources are limited: Biochemistry experiences at Muhimbili University of Allied Health Sciences.

    PubMed

    Omer, Selma; Hickson, Gilles; Taché, Stephanie; Blind, Raymond; Masters, Susan; Loeser, Helen; Souza, Kevin; Mkony, Charles; Debas, Haile; O'Sullivan, Patricia

    2008-11-01

    Teaching to large classes is often challenging particularly when the faculty and teaching resources are limited. Innovative, less staff intensive ways need to be explored to enhance teaching and to engage students. We describe our experience teaching biochemistry to 350 students at Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) under severe resource limitations and highlight our efforts to enhance the teaching effectiveness. We focus on peer assisted learning and present three pilot initiatives that we developed to supplement teaching and facilitate student interaction within the classroom. These included; instructor-facilitated small group activities within large group settings, peer-led tutorials to provide supplemental teaching and peer-assisted instruction in IT skills to enable access to online biochemistry learning resources. All our efforts were practical, low cost and well received by our learners. They may be applied in many different settings where faculties face similar challenges.

  8. An online learning module focused on smoking education and prevention for college students: implications for college health instructors and allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    D'Abundo, Michelle Lee; Marinaro, Laura Marie; Fiala, Kelly Ann

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to pilot-test the effectiveness of an online learning module focused on smoking for an undergraduate general education fitness and wellness course. Students enrolled in a required fitness and wellness course were given the opportunity to participate. Participants (n = 510) completed a brief demographic questionnaire and a 10-question pretest about the effects of smoking before viewing a 15-minute presentation about the effects of smoking and completing the same 10 questions as a post-test. Repeated measures ANOVAs were conducted to evaluate knowledge gains. An overall time effect was observed (pretest score 4.9 +/- 1.3, post-test score 7.2 +/- 2.1). Significantly greater knowledge gains were found in nonsmokers (2.1 +/- 2.2) than in smokers (1.1 +/- 2.2). Females (2.3 +/- 2.3) had significantly greater knowledge gains than males (1.5 +/- 2.2). Evidence supporting the effectiveness of the online learning module included significant knowledge gains for both smokers and nonsmokers, and the participants who smoked agreed the online learning module encouraged them to quit. In this research, students were also grouped by major (health-related majors vs non-health-related). There were 118 health-related majors in the sample, with 110 of those students completing the entire learning module. In this research, a learning module for college students was developed, but practical applications are provided not only for college health instructors but also for allied health professionals.

  9. Competency in Allied Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beemsterboer, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    Implications of competency-based education for dental assistants and hygienists are examined. Such an approach would provide assistance in defining evolving roles in delivery of dental care; help in defining national competencies and analyzing appropriateness of current care; and a mechanism for developing curriculum that responds to community…

  10. Watermelon lycopene and allied health claims

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Ambreen; Butt, Masood Sadiq; Sultan, Muhammad Tauseef; Qayyum, Mir Muhammad Nasir; Niaz, Rai Shahid

    2014-01-01

    Presently, functional foods and nutraceuticals are gaining immense importance in the prevention of various maladies through dietary regimen module. Consumption of fruits and vegetables based diet has pursuit a range of bioactive components, especially phytochemicals targeting life threatening ailments. In this context, lycopene is an extensively studied antioxidant potentially present in watermelon, tomato, pink guava etc. Watermelon is one of the unique sources having readily available cis-isomeric lycopene. The distinctive aroma of watermelon is imparted by medium- and short-chain fatty acids along with geranial, ß-ionone and neral. Its consumption has been escalated owing to rich nutritional profile and allied health benefits. It is effective in reducing the extent of cancer insurgence, cardiovascular disorders, diabetes and macular diseases. The structural characteristics, physiochemical properties and therapeutic effects of lycopene are the limelight of the manuscript. However, further research investigations are still needed to address the health enhancing potential of watermelon lycopene. PMID:26417290

  11. Personality Characteristics and Learning Style Preferences of Allied Health Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Rebecca

    Identifying personality types and learning style preferences of students and professionals in the allied health professions can aid college students in academic achievement and in career decision making. A literature review regarding personality types and learning style preferences of students enrolled in various allied health fields is presented.…

  12. Basis of Accreditation for Educational Programs in Allied Medical Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Medical Association, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Designed as a guide to accreditation for educational programs in the allied medical disciplines in Canada, this report provides educators with guidelines, general requirements and requirements for specific programs. Following information on the organization, structure, goals and terminology of accreditation of allied medical programs in Canada,…

  13. Collaborative Research in Allied Health. Proceedings of Collaborative Research in Allied Health Symposium, 1986 (Columbus, Ohio, September 18, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, M. Rosita, Ed.; And Others

    The following papers are included: "Collaborative Research: Lessons from the Tower of Babel" (Baldwin); "Establishing a Data Base for Intrainstitutional Research in the Allied Health Professions" (Von Son, Beiley); "Determining Research Needs in a School of Allied Health Professions" (Bottjen et al.); "Surveying Research Interests and Needs of…

  14. Factors associated with sense of community among allied health students.

    PubMed

    Haar, Mindy; Scanlan, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a substantial increase in online education in the health professions, as well as growing recognition that teamwork and collaboration are essential to success. While the impact of students' sense of community on factors such as course satisfaction and retention has been studied among college enrollees in general, there is little research exploring this concept among allied health students. To address this shortcoming, a convenience sample of students enrolled in a large northeastern school of health-related professions was surveyed to gather information on their demographics, curriculum and selected course attributes, perceived instructor teaching perspectives, and sense of community. Univariate analysis indicated that entry-level students experienced a greater sense of community than post-professional students. Multivariate analysis revealed that instructor-determined factors of encouraging discussion, encouraging expression of opinions, and specifying response times best predicted sense of community. With all other variables controlled, perceptions of community were significantly lower in online courses, among students for whom English was their second language, and in courses where instructors were perceived as focused primarily on content delivery. This study supports promoting selected course and instructor-related attributes associated with sense of community in allied health education, with a particular focus on both non-native English speakers and post-professional students. Enhancement of online courses with strategies that increase instructor presence, better engage students, and facilitate interaction also are warranted.

  15. Research culture in allied health: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Donna; McKinstry, Carol; Cotchett, Matthew; Williams, Cylie; Haines, Terry

    2016-06-07

    Research evidence is required to guide optimal allied health practice and inform policymakers in primary health care. Factors that influence a positive research culture are not fully understood, and nor is the impact of a positive research culture on allied health professionals. The aim of this systematic review was to identify factors that affect allied health research culture and capacity. An extensive search of 11 databases was conducted in June 2015. Studies were included if they were published in English, had full-text availability and reported research findings relating to allied health professions. Study quality was evaluated using the McMaster Critical Review Forms. Fifteen studies were eligible for inclusion. A meta-analysis was not performed because of heterogeneity between studies. Allied health professionals perceive that their individual research skills are lower in comparison to their teams and organisation. Motivators for conducting research for allied health professionals include developing skills, increasing job satisfaction and career advancement. Barriers include a lack of time, limited research skills and other work roles taking priority. Multilayered strategies, such as collaborations with external partners and developing research leadership positions, aimed at addressing barriers and enablers, are important to enhance allied health research culture and capacity.

  16. Influencers of career choice among allied health students.

    PubMed

    Brown-West, A P

    1991-01-01

    This study focused on the factors that influence students' choice of an allied health profession. A survey of 153 students in three allied health programs at the University of Connecticut revealed that "the need to help others," "prestige," "professional autonomy," "opportunities for advancement," "income potential," and "the effect of the specialty on family and personal life," were the major influencers of career choice among allied health students. Only a few students regarded malpractice suits and AIDS as negative influencers. While medical laboratory science majors regarded these as important factors, dietetics and physical therapy majors did not. The article suggests further use of these findings by program directors and career counselors.

  17. A Proposed Curriculum on Death and Dying for the Allied Health Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Marie C.

    1980-01-01

    This article summarizes the existing curricular models on death education for health professions students. A proposed course design for allied health professions students modified from Bloch's medical education objectives for a thanatology course is presented. The development of listening skills is given special emphasis. (Author/CT)

  18. Allied Health Chemistry Laboratory: Amino Acids, Insulin, Proteins, and Skin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, David F.

    1975-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment specifically designed for allied health students. The students construct molecular models of amino acids, extract amino acids from their skin with hot water, and chromatographically analyze the skin extract and hydrolyzed insulin. (MLH)

  19. Selected list of books and journals in the allied health sciences.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1986-01-01

    This list of 450 books and 69 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs and/or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused mainly on the twenty-three educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, and medical secretarial programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (157 books and 27 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1986 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $16,700. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $6,700. PMID:3535953

  20. Improving health services in developing countries with new types of public and allied health personnel.

    PubMed

    Blayney, K D; Trulove, J W

    1982-10-01

    Allied health manpower in developing countries should be able to serve the specific needs of these countries in solving malnutrition, diarrheal disease, and other health problems. Disease patterns tend to evolve in stages with each stage requiring a special type of health manpower: 1) the 1st stage where infectious diseases are linked to poverty, malnutrition, and poor personal hygiene for which personnel trained to improve health through providing safe water supplies, improving sanitation, and immunizing the population are needed; 2) in the 2nd stages, diseases such as cancer, arthritis, and cardiac diseases exist, requiring extensive technology such as is available in the US; and 3) the 3rd stage relates to an awareness of health hazards (caused by the environment, by the lifestyle dysfunctions of the society, and an emphasis on health promotion) and implies a responsibility for one's own health by the individual; this is a difficult stage to apply to developing countries since the ability to bring about change assumes literacy on the part of the population which is not always the case. Since most developing countries need to cause change in the 1st stage, more public health personnel such as sanitarians and generalist workers are needed. Training of these personnel should include on-the-job education; traditionally trained US allied health professionals are not always equipped to deal with health problems in developing countries. Health educators should look to the lessons learned by the US in the allied health movement: 1) the system of control that national membership organizations have over schooling and the job environment has contributed to an increased cost of health care delivery, unnecessary prolonged curricula, overspecialization, extreme protectionism for membership, and inappropriate fractionalization of health care delivery; 2) the emphasis on prolonged curricula sometimes causes the student to lose sight of the supposed direct relationship between

  1. Brandon/Hill selected list of print books and journals in allied health*†

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Dorothy R.; Stickell, Henry N.

    2003-01-01

    This list of 434 books and 79 journals is intended as a selection guide for print literature to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number of and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and recognized by the American Medical Association and other accrediting bodies. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (169 books and 32 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (2002 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $36,744. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $14,465. PMID:12568155

  2. Brandon/Hill selected list of print books and journals in allied health*

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Dorothy R.; Stickell, Henry N.

    2000-01-01

    This list of 424 books and 77 journals is intended as a selection guide for print literature to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and recognized by the American Medical Association and other accrediting bodies. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (167 books and 31 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (2000 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $31,970. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $12,515. PMID:10928707

  3. Brandon/Hill selected list of print books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed

    Hill, D R; Stickell, H N

    2000-07-01

    This list of 424 books and 77 journals is intended as a selection guide for print literature to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and recognized by the American Medical Association and other accrediting bodies. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (167 books and 31 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (2000 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $31,970. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $12,515.

  4. Brandon/Hill selected list of print books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed

    Hill, Dorothy R; Stickell, Henry N

    2003-01-01

    This list of 434 books and 79 journals is intended as a selection guide for print literature to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number of and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and recognized by the American Medical Association and other accrediting bodies. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (169 books and 32 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (2002 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $36,744. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $14,465.

  5. Clinical Laboratory Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Education in the clinical laboratory sciences in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and…

  6. Dental Auxiliary Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Education for the dental auxiliary professions in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and…

  7. Radiological Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Radiological sciences education in Kentucky and articulation within this field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and resource…

  8. Effectiveness of a Service Learning Model with Allied Health Assistant Students in Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zulch, Debbie; Saunders, Rosemary; Peters, Judith; Quinlivan, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of a student learning activity involving service learning. As part of a vocational course in the Academy of Health Sciences at a Western Australian TAFE (Technical and Further Education) institute, Allied Health Assistant (AHA) students participated in a service learning program focused on work-based learning in…

  9. Allied Health Occupations II. Physical Therapy Aide Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by physical therapists and physical therapy assistants. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: the health team for…

  10. Undergraduate Allied Health Leadership Development: A Program Evaluation and Follow-up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedl, John J., Jr.; Glazer-Waldman, Hilda R.

    1988-01-01

    Reports the 15-year experience of an undergraduate program in preparing allied health professionals for educational leadership positions. Of 73 professionals receiving degrees, 34 percent were department chairs or the equivalent. The diversified settings and job titles reported indicate that curriculum is valid for a variety of health care…

  11. A conceptual model for recruitment and retention: allied health workforce enhancement in Western Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Schoo, Adrian M; Stagnitti, Karen E; Mercer, Catherine; Dunbar, James

    2005-01-01

    Attracting and retaining allied health professionals in rural areas is a recognised problem in both Australia and overseas. Predicted increases in health needs will require strategic actions to enhance the rural workforce and its ability to deliver the required services. A range of factors in different domains has been associated with recruitment and retention in the allied health workforce. For example, factors can be related to the nature of the work, the personal needs, or the way an organisation is led. Some factors cannot be changed (eg geographical location of extended family) whereas others can be influenced (eg education, support, management styles). Recruitment and retention of allied health professionals is a challenging problem that deserves attention in all domains and preparedness to actively change established work practices, both individually as well as collectively, in order to cater for current and predicted health needs. Changes to enhance workforce outcomes can be implemented and evaluated using a cyclic model. The Allied Health Workforce Enhancement Project of the Greater Green Triangle University Department of Rural Health (GGT UDRH) is working towards increasing the number of allied health professionals in the south west of Victoria. Based on themes identified in the literature, an interactive model is being developed that addresses recruitment and retention factors in three domains: (1) personal or individual; (2) organisation; and (3) community.

  12. Student Assessment System. Student Performance Record. Task Detailing. Allied Health Occupations/Practical Nursing. Georgia Vocational Education Program Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This booklet lists tasks and functions the health occupations student should be able to do upon entering an employment situation or a postsecondary school. (Listings are also available for the areas of cosmetology and transportation/automotive mechanics.) Tasks are coded to correspond to those on the Student Performance Record, which details a…

  13. Motivators, enablers, and barriers to building allied health research capacity

    PubMed Central

    Pager, Susan; Holden, Libby; Golenko, Xanthe

    2012-01-01

    Purpose A sound, scientific base of high quality research is needed to inform service planning and decision making and enable improved policy and practice. However, some areas of health practice, particularly many of the allied health areas, are generally considered to have a low evidence base. In order to successfully build research capacity in allied health, a clearer understanding is required of what assists and encourages research as well as the barriers and challenges. Participants and methods This study used written surveys to collect data relating to motivators, enablers, and barriers to research capacity building. Respondents were asked to answer questions relating to them as individuals and other questions relating to their team. Allied health professionals were recruited from multidisciplinary primary health care teams in Queensland Health. Eighty-five participants from ten healthcare teams completed a written version of the research capacity and culture survey. Results The results of this study indicate that individual allied health professionals are more likely to report being motivated to do research by intrinsic factors such as a strong interest in research. Barriers they identified to research are more likely to be extrinsic factors such as workload and lack of time. Allied health professionals identified some additional factors that impact on their research capacity than those reported in the literature, such as a desire to keep at the “cutting edge” and a lack of exposure to research. Some of the factors influencing individuals to do research were different to those influencing teams. These results are discussed with reference to organizational behavior and theories of motivation. Conclusion Supporting already motivated allied health professional individuals and teams to conduct research by increased skills training, infrastructure, and quarantined time is likely to produce better outcomes for research capacity building investment. PMID

  14. Collaborative Research in Allied Health. Proceedings of Collaborative Research in Allied Health Symposium (Columbus, Ohio, September 20, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, M. Rosita, Ed.; And Others

    The following papers are included: "Consortia and Collaborative Research: Getting Started" (Hansen); "Coordination of the Health Care System in the State of Michigan" (Burian, Boyden, Herbert); "Health Promotion and Disease Prevention in Allied Health" (Doiron, Douglas); "Interprofessional Collaboration in the Analysis of Public Policy" (Dunn);…

  15. Rural versus urban: Tennessee health administrators' strategies on recruitment and retention for allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Slagle, Derek R; Byington, Randy L; Verhovsek, Ester L

    2012-01-01

    Due to an increase in the need for allied health professionals, there is a growing interest to assess the allied health workforce and its employment needs. This is especially true in medically underserved rural areas where there is a critical shortage of allied health professionals. A survey was sent to allied health administrators across a variety of allied health disciplines working in Tennessee hospitals in order to gauge opinions on retention and recruitment strategies. Overall successful strategies for recruitment and retention of allied health professionals were reported as well as differences between urban and rural areas, differences of perceptions of strategy effectiveness among allied health disciplines, and key strategies for rural allied health recruitment. Little is known about organizational policies impacting recruitment and retention practices of allied health professionals in Tennessee hospitals. Understanding of this problem is vital to the prevention of a critical shortage of allied health professionals. Therefore, this study sought to compare rural and urban hospital in Tennessee with respect to recruitment and retention needs.

  16. Nursing Skills for Allied Health Services. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Lucile A., Ed.

    Volume 1 of the two-volume textbook on nursing skills presents instructional materials (units 1-20) based on 184 activities designated by the Allied Health Professions Projects national survey as those which are accomplished by all levels of nursing. Unit titles are: (1) the health worker and the law; (2) introduction to ethics in the healing…

  17. Trends in Allied Dental Education: An Analysis of the Past and a Look to the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haden, N. Karl; Morr, Kathleen E.; Valachovic, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Presents and discusses data on the allied dental workforce and allied dental education, including number of education programs; applications, first-year enrollment, and capacity; number of graduates; gender, race, and ethnicity; cost of education; and faculty. (EV)

  18. Tackling racism as a "wicked" public health problem: Enabling allies in anti-racism praxis.

    PubMed

    Came, Heather; Griffith, Derek

    2017-03-16

    Racism is a "wicked" public health problem that fuels systemic health inequities between population groups in New Zealand, the United States and elsewhere. While literature has examined racism and its effects on health, the work describing how to intervene to address racism in public health is less developed. While the notion of raising awareness of racism through socio-political education is not new, given the way racism has morphed into new narratives in health institutional settings, it has become critical to support allies to make informing efforts to address racism as a fundamental cause of health inequities. In this paper, we make the case for anti-racism praxis as a tool to address inequities in public health, and focus on describing an anti-racism praxis framework to inform the training and support of allies. The limited work on anti-racism rarely articulates the unique challenges or needs of allies or targets of racism, but we seek to help fill that gap. Our anti-racism praxis for allies includes five core elements: reflexive relational praxis, structural power analysis, socio-political education, monitoring and evaluation and systems change approaches. We recognize that racism is a modifiable determinant of health and racial inequities can be eliminated with the necessary political will and a planned system change approach. Anti-racism praxis provides the tools to examine the interconnection and interdependence of cultural and institutional factors as a foundation for examining where and how to intervene to address racism.

  19. Allied Health Occupations II. Medical Laboratory Assistant Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is intended to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by medical laboratory technicians and technologists. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: the value of…

  20. The Impact of Word Processing on Office Administration in the Medical and Allied Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Naomi Dornfeld

    The effect of word processing equipment on the future medical secretarial science curriculum was studied. A literature search focused on word processing and the medical and allied health professions, word processing and business education, and futuring of and changes in the secretarial science curriculum. Questionnaires to identify various aspects…

  1. Allied Health Occupations II. Radiologic Technologist Aide Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by the radiologic team and to enable them to acquire some basic skills used in the X-ray department. Addressed in the individual units of the course…

  2. Plagiarism: using a collaborative approach in an online allied health professions course.

    PubMed

    Pence, Patricia L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to increase the awareness and understanding of plagiarism among undergraduate students enrolled in an online allied health professions course in a community college in the Midwestern United States. The results suggested that the interventions were effective in educating students about how to avoid plagiarism.

  3. Occupational Analysis: Hospital Radiologic Technologist. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Glenn D.; And Others

    In an effort to meet the growing demand for skilled radiologic technologists and other supportive personnel educated through the associate degree level, a national survey was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project to determine the tasks performed by personnel in the field and lay the groundwork for development of…

  4. Allied Health Occupations II. Dental Assistant Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by dentists, dental hygienists, dental laboratory technicians, and dental assistants and also to help students acquire some basic dental assistant…

  5. Building interdisciplinary teamwork among allied health students through live clinical case simulations.

    PubMed

    Buelow, Janet R; Rathsack, Christi; Downs, David; Jorgensen, Kathy; Karges, Joy R; Nelson, Debralee

    2008-01-01

    A limited, yet growing, body of research suggests that health care students educated in interdisciplinary teamwork may become more collaborative professionals in the workplace, which, in turn, may foster more productive and satisfied health care professionals. Researchers also have identified lower mortality and morbidity rates, fewer hospitalizations, decreased costs, and improved function by patients among significant health benefits of interdisciplinary teamwork, especially when it is applied to underserved and geriatric populations. Such positive outcomes have prompted medical schools and accreditation boards of many allied health professions to add interdisciplinary education into their training requirements. Meeting these requirements has challenged universities, where there are multiple allied health programs and limited time, faculty, and financial resources to coordinate interdisciplinary education. The challenges have been magnified by insufficient research on the most effective methods to educate university students about interdisciplinary teamwork. This article presents the background, evolution, and key building blocks of one such method: a simulation-based workshop designed at our university over 7 years to educate its allied health students about various health professions through shared learning, interaction, and collaboration.

  6. 42 CFR 136.304 - Publication of a list of allied health professions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Publication of a list of allied health professions... of a list of allied health professions. The Secretary, acting through the Service, shall publish from time to time in the Federal Register a list of the allied health professions for consideration for...

  7. Suicide risk of your client: initial identification and management for the allied health professional.

    PubMed

    Donley, Euan

    2013-01-01

    Allied health professionals treat clients in varying degrees of distress with complex needs in a wide range of services. A client could be experiencing a chronic or life-changing illness, have a trauma from a critical event, have preexisting mental illness, be dealing with significant health or personal loss, be using substances, or experiencing a depression. At some point an allied health professional will treat a client who may have a diagnosed depression, appear depressed, or have thoughts of suicide. Mental health of clients is everyone's responsibility, especially those working in health. This article aims to increase allied health professionals' understanding of some risk factors and clinical features a client at risk may have and will discuss some initial options of management. It is recommended the allied health professional and organisation be aware of risk factors for suicide but not rely too heavily on risk screening. The worker should have basic skills in recognising poor mood and have a list of useful questions to ask in a crisis. Know your local crisis and supportive mental health services, create links with them, have ongoing professional education and protocols for managing clients at-risk, and be acutely aware of your role and limitations.

  8. An Aging Game Simulation Activity for Allied Health Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, Carolinda; Henry, Beverly W.; Kostiwa, Irene M.

    2008-01-01

    The Aging Game, a simulation activity, has been used successfully with medical students in the development of empathetic attitudes toward older adults. To date, the Aging Game has not been used extensively with allied health students. It has been viewed as too costly, time-consuming and labor-intensive. The purpose of this study was to examine the…

  9. Health Planning that Magnifies the Community's Voice: Allies against Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfoss, Frances D.; Kelly, Cynthia; Taylor-Fishwick, Jude

    2005-01-01

    Allies Against Asthma, a working group of the Consortium for Infant and Child Health (CINCH), conducted a comprehensive asthma needs assessment in Hampton Roads, Virginia, in 2001. Results from extant data and parent surveys indicated that asthma prevalence was high (15% to 18%), 45% to 50% of children received primary care for asthma in the…

  10. Nursing Skills for Allied Health Services. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Lucile A., Ed.

    Volume 2 of the two-volume textbook on nursing skills presents instructional materials (units 21-36) on nursing skills based on 184 activities designated by the Allied Health Professions Projects national survey as those which are accomplished by all levels of nursing. Unit titles are: (21) urine elimination; (22) bowel elimination; (23)…

  11. Analysis of Sex and Gender Content in Allied Health Professions' Curricula.

    PubMed

    Stickley, Lois; Sechrist, Dawndra; Taylor, LesLee

    2016-01-01

    Sex and gender differences in rehabilitation are important because more than half of patients seen by allied health professionals are female. Sex- and gender-specific curricula should be audited to enhance interprofessional education in women's health. The research question was: What is the extent of information about sex and gender differences that is included in selected allied health professions curricula? Student scholars from allied health programs audited courses in real time for references to sex and gender differences. The data were analyzed using content analysis. The emphasis of instruction included primarily statements of facts for the physical and occupational therapy programs and brief discussions in the athletic training program. There was a significant difference among the categories of emphasis for the programs (X2 = 391.23, p<0.05). The individual disciplines identified the majority of content in the same rank order: body systems, health statistics, and health conditions. There were significant differences in the content areas related to sex and gender differences among the three disciplines (X2 = 70.67, p<0.05). This study provided the first content analysis of sex and gender differences in selected allied health professions. No textual inferences were made, but the study reported on the topics discussed and the extent of the sharing of information.

  12. Allied Health Care Employees' Workplace Skills and Competencies: Are They Prepared?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Clifford R.; McClain, Mildred A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which allied health care providers considered the Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS, 1991) and competencies as those that are necessary for entry level employment in the allied health care industry. The extent that allied health care supervisors and managers…

  13. Student criminal background checks in colleges of allied health.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Diane; Aziz, Hassan; Mahoney, Sherry; Gilman, Frances H

    2008-01-01

    The demand that criminal background checks be performed for students in allied health schools and programs has soared in recent years. The need for criminal background checks on students entering the health care professions has emerged as a critical issue largely due to requirements by clinical affiliate training sites. The Joint Commission published a standard stating, "for staff, students and volunteers who work in the same capacity as staff who provide care, treatment, and services, at Elements of Performance 5 states criminal background checks are verified when required by law and regulation and organization policy." More simply stated, this means that criminal background check records must be verifiable if required by some authoritative entity such as state law. However, whether by misinterpretation of the standard or through conscious decision by organization policy makers, many health care organizations suddenly began to require criminal background checks as part of their affiliation agreements with health related schools or programs. The focus of this study was to identify current practices of allied health institutions regarding their conduct of criminal background checks on students entering the allied health professions.

  14. Clinical supervision for allied health staff: necessary but not sufficient.

    PubMed

    Leggat, Sandra G; Phillips, Bev; Pearce, Philippa; Dawson, Margaret; Schulz, Debbie; Smith, Jenni

    2015-09-28

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to explore the perspectives of allied health professionals on appropriate content for effective clinical supervision of staff.Methods A set of statements regarding clinical supervision was identified from the literature and confirmed through a Q-sort process. The final set was administered as an online survey to 437 allied health professionals working in two Australian health services.Results Of the 120 respondents, 82 had experienced six or more clinical supervision sessions and were included in the analysis. Respondents suggested that clinical supervision was beneficial to both staff and patients, and was distinct from line management performance monitoring and development. Curiously, some of the respondents did not agree that observation of the supervisee's clinical practice was an aspect of clinical supervision.Conclusions Although clinical supervision is included as a pillar of clinical governance, current practice may not be effective in addressing clinical risk. Australian health services need clear organisational policies that outline the relationship between supervisor and supervisee, the role and responsibilities of managers, the involvement of patients and the types of situations to be communicated to the line managers.What is known about the topic? Clinical supervision for allied health professionals is an essential component of clinical governance and is aimed at ensuring safe and high-quality care. However, there is varied understanding of the relationship between clinical supervision and performance management.What does this paper add? This paper provides the perspectives of allied health professionals who are experienced as supervisors or who have experienced supervision. The findings suggest a clear role for clinical supervision that needs to be better recognised within organisational policy and procedure.What are the implications for practitioners? Supervisors and supervisees must remember their duty of

  15. The Heart of Rural Health Care: Programs Supply Nurses, Allied Health Workers to Nation's Most Remote Locales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Corey; Fulcher, Roxanne

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that across the United States, rural communities rely on local community colleges to provide a steady pipeline of emergency responders, well-educated qualified nurses, and allied health professionals capable of staffing local medical centers and hospitals and complementing physicians in the delivery of care, from emergency…

  16. Pre-implementation investigation of the readiness of allied health professionals to adopt electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Hailey, David; Yu, Ping; Munyisia, Esther

    2014-01-01

    There has been limited uptake of electronic health records (EHR) by allied health professionals. Yet, not much attention has been given to their information needs. For EHR to work for these health professionals, it is essential to understand their current practice of information management and their perceptions towards EHR. A qualitative interview study was thus conducted with four managers in four allied health practices in Sydney to understand their perceptions for the adoption and use of a new Australian e-health standards compliant EHR system. We found that these allied health professionals were highly confident with the use of electronic information system and were enthusiastically expecting the introduction of the EHR system to support their information management and practice. A number of issues related to the use of EHR in practice for small, independent allied health practices were also discussed. It appears that allied health professionals today are information technology (IT) savvy and ready to adopt EHR. EHR for allied health practices in Australia are long overdue. The health informatics community can no longer ignore the need and want of allied health professionals for EHR that are tailored and built to support their information and practice management.

  17. Future of specialised roles in allied health practice: who is responsible?

    PubMed

    Skinner, Elizabeth H; Kimberley, J Haines; Hayes, Kate; Seller, Daniel; Toohey, Jessica C; Reeve, Julie C; Holdsworth, Clare; Haines, Terry P

    2015-06-01

    Allied health professions have developed specialised advanced and extended scope roles over the past decade, for the benefit of patient outcomes, allied health professionals' satisfaction and to meet labour and workforce demands. There is an essential need for formalised, widely recognised training to support these roles, and significant challenges to the delivery of such training exist. Many of these roles function in the absence of specifically defined standards of clinical practice and it is unclear where the responsibility for training provision lies. In a case example ofphysiotherapy practice in the intensive care unit, clinical placements and independence of practice are not core components of undergraduate physiotherapy degrees. Universities face barriers to the delivery of postgraduate specialised training and, although hospital physiotherapy departments are ideally placed, resources for training are lacking and education is not traditionally considered part of healthcare service providers' core business. Substantial variability in training, and its evaluation, leads to variability in practice and may affect patient outcomes. Allied health professionals working in specialised roles should develop specific clinical standards ofpractice, restructure models ofhealth care delivery to facilitate training, continue to develop the evidence base for their roles and target and evaluate training efficacy to achieve independent practice in a cost-effective manner. Healthcare providers must work with universities, the vocational training sector and government to optimise the ability of allied health to influence decision making and care outcomes for patients.

  18. Brandon/Hill selected list of books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, D R; Stickell, H N

    1998-01-01

    This list of 410 books and 78 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and described in the AMA's Health Professions Education Directory, 1997-1998, plus physical therapist and medical secretary. Some programs do not have their own specific literatures. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (160 books and 31 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1998 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $29,180. The cost of only the asterisked items total $11,390. PMID:9803286

  19. Brandon/Hill selected list of books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed

    Hill, D R; Stickell, H N

    1998-10-01

    This list of 410 books and 78 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and described in the AMA's Health Professions Education Directory, 1997-1998, plus physical therapist and medical secretary. Some programs do not have their own specific literatures. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (160 books and 31 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1998 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $29,180. The cost of only the asterisked items total $11,390.

  20. Evaluation of a post-professional master's program in allied health.

    PubMed

    Murray, C; Judd, D; Snyder, P

    2001-01-01

    Changes in allied health education have precipitated a need to review existing educational programs. As more disciplines require a graduate degree for professional entry, it becomes important to articulate the benefits of advanced, post-professional graduate education for allied health professionals. This article reports results from a study of one interdisciplinary Master of Health Sciences (MHS) program. The intent of the study was to 1) analyze graduates' satisfaction with components of the MHS program; 2) explore the perceived impact of the MHS program on graduates' professional practices; and 3) examine employers' perceptions of the program's effect on graduates' professional behaviors. An investigator-developed written questionnaire was used to gather perspectives from 53 graduates and 27 of their employers. Graduates believed the MHS program had had a positive influence on their employment. Graduates' employers concurred, giving high marks to graduates' skill levels and job performances. Program graduates were active in professional organizations, but few were involved in scholarly activities such as research. Implications for curriculum design of advanced master's programs in allied health are discussed.

  1. Role of the Chronic Dental Disease Scheme in Enhanced Primary Care: allied health or allied outlier?

    PubMed

    Lam, Raymond; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to provide a comparative analysis of the Chronic Dental Disease Scheme (CDSS) and the Allied Health Profession (AHP) program as they related to the greater Enhanced Primary Care Scheme introduced by the Australian Government to manage patients with chronic and complex diseases. A retrospective analysis of data pertaining to Medicare items related to dentistry and the allied health professions were extracted from the Medicare Benefits Schedule database online, and formed the basis of this study. The highest proportion of services was provided in the state of New South Wales. There appears to be synergy in the utilisation of services with jurisdictions either overutilising or underutilising services. Costs to the Enhanced Primary Care Scheme under the CDSS model (fee for service) were up to 40 times more expensive compared with the AHP model (fee per visit). Costs and treatment associated with the CDSS experienced an increase of 13350% during the period 2007-08, coincident with an increase in subsidization. Reconstructive dentistry accounted for the majority of the increase. Gender disparities in dentistry were less distinct when compared with AHPs and were postulated to be due to males presenting with conditions that were more progressive requiring more invasive treatment. A comparative analysis indicates significant differences in costs, nature of treatment and the manner of remuneration between dentistry and the AHPs. A fee for service schedule as evidenced by the CDSS is dependent on the degree of financial incentive as indicated by patterns in utilisation over time. The amount of treatment considered necessary may be influenced by the level of subsidy with treatment that may not reflect disease management. The AHP model, which is based around a fee for visit schedule, is not without its deficiencies but has not experienced significant rises in cost compared with the CDSS.

  2. Comments on a special issue of the Journal of Allied Health.

    PubMed

    Elwood, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 Annual Conference of the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP) will be conducted in Charlotte, North Carolina, on October 20-22. The theme for this event is "Through an Interdisciplinary Looking Glass: Achieving Quality Outcomes through Research, Education, and Practice." Although the terms interdisciplinary and interprofessional differ from one another, they are close enough to justify an intent to have copies of this special issue of the Journal prepared and distributed in advance of the conference.

  3. Carotenoids: potential allies of cardiovascular health?

    PubMed Central

    Gammone, Maria Alessandra; Riccioni, Graziano; D'Orazio, Nicolantonio

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are a class of natural, fat-soluble pigments found principally in plants. They have potential antioxidant biological properties because of their chemical structure and interaction with biological membranes. Epidemiologic studies supported the hypothesis that antioxidants could be used as an inexpensive means of both primary and secondary cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention. In fact, the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) in the vessels plays a key role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. The resistance of LDL to oxidation is increased by high dietary antioxidant intake, so that carotenoids, as part of food patterns such as the Mediterranean diet, may have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health too. Further properties of carotenoids leading to a potential reduction of cardiovascular risk are represented by lowering of blood pressure, reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and markers of inflammation (such as C-reactive protein), and improvement of insulin sensitivity in muscle, liver, and adipose tissues. In addition, recent nutrigenomics studies have focused on the exceptional ability of carotenoids in modulating the expression of specific genes involved in cell metabolism. The aim of this review is to focus attention to this effect of some carotenoids to prevent CVD. PMID:25660385

  4. The South Australian Allied Health Workforce survey: helping to fill the evidence gap in primary health workforce planning.

    PubMed

    Whitford, Deirdre; Smith, Tony; Newbury, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of detailed evidence about the allied health workforce to inform proposed health care reforms. The South Australian Allied Health Workforce (SAAHW) survey collected data about the demographic characteristics, employment, education and recruitment and retention of allied health professionals in South Australia. The SAAHW questionnaire was widely distributed and 1539 responses were received. The average age of the sample was 40 years; males were significantly older than females, the latter making up 82% of respondents. Three-quarters of the sample worked in the city; 60% worked full time and the remainder in part-time, casual or locum positions. 'Work-life balance' was the most common attraction to respondents' current jobs and 'Better career prospects' the most common reason for intending to leave. Practice in a rural location was influenced by rural background and rural experience during training. A greater proportion of Generation Y (1982-2000) respondents intended to leave within 2 years than Generation X (1961-81) or Baby Boomers (1943-60). Most respondents were satisfied with their job, although some reported lack of recognition of their knowledge and skills. Systematic, robust allied health workforce data are required for integrated and sustainable primary health care delivery.

  5. Accreditation of Allied Medical Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Medical Association, Chicago, IL. Council on Medical Education.

    Prepared by the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association with the cooperation of collaborating organizations, this document is a collection of guidelines for accredited programs for medical assistants, nuclear medicine technology, orthopedic assistants, radiation therapy technology, and radiologic technologists. The…

  6. Promoting Health in American-Occupied Japan Resistance to Allied Public Health Measures, 1945-1952

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    As soon as the authority of the Public Health and Welfare Section (PHW) of the Supreme Commander for Allied Powers waned in May 1951, the Japanese government overturned several measures it had implemented. Although the PHW contributed greatly toward improving public health conditions, not all of its activities were models of cooperative success. Many Japanese perceived some measures—terminated pensions for wounded Japanese veterans, lack of support for segregated orphanages for mixed-race children, and suppression of Japanese atomic bomb medical reports—as promoting US national interest at the expense of Japanese public health needs. Similarly, the PHW's upgrade of nursing education and separation of the professions of medicine and pharmacy were reversed because neither professionals nor the public saw these measures as urgent. Their reinstitution toward the end of the twentieth century suggests that the progressive measures were sound, but broke too sharply with Japanese tradition and were enforced prematurely. PMID:19542032

  7. Becoming an Academic: The Reconstruction of Identity by Recently Appointed Lecturers in Nursing, Midwifery and the Allied Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Caroline; Boyd, Pete

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the workplace learning experiences of recently appointed lecturers in UK higher education in nursing, midwifery and the allied health professions. Health care practitioners, appointed to academic posts in Universities, are experts in their respective clinical fields and hold strong practitioner identities developed through…

  8. Geriatric assessment in daily oncology practice for nurses and allied health care professionals: Opinion paper of the Nursing and Allied Health Interest Group of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG).

    PubMed

    Burhenn, Peggy S; McCarthy, Alexandra L; Begue, Aaron; Nightingale, Ginah; Cheng, Karis; Kenis, Cindy

    2016-09-01

    The management of older persons with cancer has become a major public health concern in developed countries because of the aging of the population and the steady increase in cancer incidence with advancing age. Nurses and allied health care professionals are challenged to address the needs of this growing population. The International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) Nursing and Allied Health (NAH) Interest Group described key issues that nurses and allied health care professionals face when caring for older persons with cancer. The domains of the Geriatric Assessment (GA) are used as a guiding framework. The following geriatric domains are described: demographic data and social support, functional status, cognition, mental health, nutritional status, fatigue, comorbidities, polypharmacy, and other geriatric syndromes (e.g. falls, delirium). In addition to these geriatric domains, quality of life (QoL) is described based on the overall importance in this particular population. Advice for integration of assessment of these geriatric domains into daily oncology practice is made. Research has mainly focused on the role of treating physicians but the involvement of nurses and allied health care professionals is crucial in the care of older persons with cancer through the GA process. The ability of nurses and allied health care professionals to perform this assessment requires specialized training and education beyond standard oncology knowledge.

  9. Whiteness in Social Work Education Authentic White Allies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornung, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is guided by the following questions: How do People of Color define and experience White people as "authentic" allies? What does a White ally look like to People of Color? How do White allies view themselves as "authentic" White allies? What experiences lead White people to anti-racism and anti-racist praxis?…

  10. Allied Health Applications Integrated into Developmental Mathematics Using Problem Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Mark; Shore, JoAnna; Boggs, Stacey

    2004-01-01

    For this FIPSE funded project, mathematics faculty attended allied health classes and allied health faculty attended developmental mathematics courses to incorporate health examples into the developmental mathematics curriculum. Through the course of this grant a 450-page developmental mathematics book was written with many problems from a variety…

  11. Integrating Information Competencies into the Allied Health Curriculum at Gavilan College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausrath, Don; Auyeung, Shuk-Chun; Howell, Jo Anne; Bedell, Kaye

    2003-01-01

    Describes a new program at Gavilan College, California, that introduces Allied Health students and faculty to information technologies. States that the program's goal is to reconfigure Allied Health curriculum to reflect the impact of information technology on the health professions by inserting information competency components into courses.…

  12. Health Promotion Disease Prevention: A Challenge to Allied Health Curriculum Designers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, David

    1986-01-01

    Presents a model curriculum on health promotion and disease prevention for allied health students. Suggested program elements include (1) promoting personal health patterns, (2) fitting health promotion into daily routines, (3) using persuasion, (4) working with support groups and individuals, and (5) serving as a clearinghouse. (CH)

  13. Student Perceptions and Learning Outcomes of Blended Learning in a Massive First-Year Core Physiology for Allied Health Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Janelle; Meehan-Andrews, Terri; Weerakkody, Nivan; Hughes, Diane L.; Rathner, Joseph A.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence shows that factors contributing to success in physiology education for allied health students at universities include not only their high school achievement and background but also factors such as confidence with their teachers and quality of their learning experience, justifying intensive and continued survey of students' perceptions of…

  14. Projected Allied Health and Nursing Training Needs for a Seven-County Area in West Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertram, Charles L.; And Others

    This report describes a project that developed and field tested a model for projecting state-wide manpower needs in the allied health and nursing occupations in West Virginia and presents projections made for sixteen allied health and nursing occupations in the Charleston area. The content of the report is presented in three sections. The first…

  15. Strategies for Reorganization in Allied Health and Nursing Programs: The Endless Metamorphosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scigliano, Virginia; Scigliano, John A.

    Four alternative organizational structures are discussed with regard to their applicability to the reorganization of community college allied health programs. After introductory material noting the complexities, multiple interfaces, and high costs that make allied health and nursing programs prime targets for reorganization, the four models of…

  16. The College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions. Reflections while Moving across the Grain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacher, Gerald E.; Barr, Judith T.

    1980-01-01

    Academic pharmacy is seen as in transition. The merging of colleges of pharmacy with various allied health programs to form a new governance structure--the college of pharmacy and allied health professions--is described Institutional savings are achieved through shared administration, staff, equipment, space, other resources, and occasionally…

  17. Cystic fibrosis research in allied health and nursing professions.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Judy M; Madge, Susan; Morton, Alison M; Quittner, Alexandra L; Elborn, J Stuart

    2012-09-01

    This report is the result of the "Allied Health and Nursing Professions Working Group" meeting which took place in Verona, Italy, November 2009, which was organised by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society, and involved 32 experts. The meeting was designed to provide a "roadmap" of high priority research questions that can be addressed by Allied Health Professionals (AHP) and nursing. The other goal was to identify research skills that would be beneficial to AHP and nursing researchers and would ultimately improve the research capacity and capability of these professions. The following tasks were accomplished: 1) a Delphi survey was used to identify high priority research areas and themes, 2) common research designs used in AHP and nursing research were evaluated in terms of their strengths and weaknesses, 3) methods for assessing the clinimetric and psychometric properties, as well as feasibility, of relevant outcome measures were reviewed, and 4) a common skill set for AHPs and nurses undertaking clinical research was agreed on and will guide the planning of future research opportunities. This report has identified important areas and themes for future research which include: adherence; physical activity/exercise; nutritional interventions; interventions for the newborn with CF and evaluation of outcome measures for use in AHP and nursing research. It has highlighted the significant challenges AHPs and nurses experience in conducting clinical research, and proposes strategies to overcome these challenges. It is hoped that this report will encourage research initiatives that assess the efficacy/effectiveness of AHP and nursing interventions in order to improve the evidence base. This should increase the quality of research conducted by these professions, justify services they currently provide, and expand their skills in new areas, with the ultimate goal of improving care for patients with CF.

  18. Allied Health, Nursing and Health-Related Manpower Supply and Demand in Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawadski, Alfonso S.

    The status of postsecondary allied health and health-related programs in Pennsylvania was studied. Among the data presented are the following: types of awards offered in 1976-77 by program at four-year institutions; the average number of graduates for 1969-73 and the number projected for 1974-78 by program, and 1973 enrollments by sex; programs…

  19. Antecedents and consequences of workplace aggression in the allied health context.

    PubMed

    Demir, Defne; Rodwell, John; Flower, Rebecca L

    2014-01-01

    Workplace aggression research has typically focused on groups in the health care industry considered to be high risk (e.g., nursing); however, aggression also occurs among other health care professional groups, such as those in allied health. This study aimed to investigate the antecedents and consequences of workplace aggression among allied health professionals. Allied health professionals working for an Australian health care organization were surveyed, with 134 (49%) responding. The largest group of allied health professionals surveyed were social workers (49%). Job demands, job control, and social support were linked to different types of aggression. Different sources of aggression were linked to various employee outcomes. The importance of considering stressors surrounding employee work conditions is highlighted.

  20. The Middle School Mentoring Program in Allied Health: A Proposed Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Lori Stewart; Kearns, Ellen Hope; Lafferty, Sharon; Lampignano, John; Pappas, Virginia M.

    2000-01-01

    A model mentoring program to interest middle school students in allied health careers incorporates features of tech prep, career academies, and the Yes I Can program. Activities include speakers, service learning, career day, interdisciplinary presentations, and job shadowing. (SK)

  1. A rural-urban comparison of allied health professionals' average hourly wage.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Indira; Slifkin, Rebecca; Randolph, Randy; Holmes, George M

    2010-01-01

    Nationwide, demand for allied health services is projected to grow significantly in the next several decades, and there is evidence that allied health shortages already exist in many states. Given the longstanding history of health professional shortages in rural areas, the existing and impending shortages in allied health professions may be particularly acute in these areas. To assess whether rural areas are potentially at a recruiting disadvantage because of relative wages, this report uses data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to describe the extent to which rural-urban differentials exist in wages for eight allied health professions, focusing on professions that are both likely to be found in rural communities and have adequate data to support hourly wage estimates. Overall the data show that the national average wage of each of the eight allied health professions is higher in metropolitan than nonmetropolitan areas. On average, the unadjusted rural hourly wage is 10.3% less than the urban wage, although the extent of the difference varies by profession and by geographic area. Adjustment for the cost of living narrows the discrepancy, but does not eliminate it. It is likely that rural providers in areas with the greatest wage discrepancies find it more difficult to recruit allied health professionals, but the extent to which this is the case needs to be assessed through further research with data on workforce vacancy rates.

  2. Caucasion allied health students' attitudes towards African Americans: implications for instruction and research.

    PubMed

    Steed, Robin

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine Caucasian allied health student racial attitudes towards the African American population, students and faculty of a Southern school of allied health professions were surveyed using the Racial Argument Scale (RAS). A one way ANOVA found a significant difference between allied health programs, p = .008, and post hoc testing found the Occupational Therapy Program's scores to be significantly lower (less negative towards Blacks) than the Physical Therapy and Physician Assistant Program's scores (p = .008 and p = .041 respectively). Student scores overall were significantly higher than faculty scores on the RAS (p = .014). The Speech-Language Pathology, Physician Assistant, and Physical Therapy Programs' scores as well the overall allied health student scores were found to be significantly higher than the population mean, thus indicating a higher negativity towards African Americans. The overall results of this study indicate that negative racial bias may be a serious problem in some allied health programs. Future instruction in cultural competency in allied health programs should address racial bias specifically, taking into account cognitive-perceptual errors that may perpetuate negative racial attitudes.

  3. Audio-Visual Aids and Computer Assisted and Programmed Instruction in Allied Health Occupation Education. (Updates Literature Search 72-13).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Geraldine D.

    National Library of Medicine (NLM) Literature Searches are selected computer-generated bibliographies produced by the Library's Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (MEDLARS). Selection is made on the basis of a significant current interest of the subject matter to a substantial audience of health professionals. Each Literature Search…

  4. A Bookshelf in Public Health, Medical Care, and Allied Fields

    PubMed Central

    La Rocco, August; Jones, Barbara

    1972-01-01

    This bibliography of nonserial publications consists of 610 annotations. It is intended as a guide to the development of a collection for librarians and for health professionals in research and education. References are mostly to publications from 1960. Titles are in English. Both primary and secondary sources are cited. PMID:4554218

  5. Patchwork of scope-of-practice regulations prevent allied health professionals from fully participating in patient care.

    PubMed

    Elwood, Thomas W

    2013-11-01

    "Allied health" is a label used to describe part of the health workforce generally distinct from physicians, dentists, nurses, or pharmacists. However, the field lacks a single definition, and many disagree on which professions should be included under that rubric. Apart from challenges in developing an informative taxonomy, many allied health professions possess skill sets that may overlap with those of other professions. In addition, states have enacted scope-of-practice laws that may prevent allied health professionals from applying their skills in patient care. This article discusses how certain allied health professions are affected by varying scope-of-practice regulations.

  6. Allied Health Manpower Training Model. Final Report. June 27, 1973-January 31, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutheran Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY.

    The purpose of the Allied Health Manpower Training Model Project has been to develop a comprehensive manpower development program for health professionals that will serve as a model for other training institutions and health care organizations as they undertake continuing manpower planning and reorganization to meet the changing requirements for…

  7. Effect of health insurance on the utilisation of allied health services by people with chronic disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Elizabeth H; Foster, Michele; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Haynes, Michele; O'Flaherty, Martin; Haines, Terry P

    2014-01-01

    Allied health services benefit the management of many chronic diseases. The effects of health insurance on the utilisation of allied health services has not yet been established despite health insurance frequently being identified as a factor promoting utilisation of medical and hospital services among people with chronic disease. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to establish the effects of health insurance on the utilisation of allied health services by people with chronic disease. Medline (Ovid Medline 1948 to Present with Daily Update), EMBASE (1980 to 1 April 2011), CINAHL, PsychINFO and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched to 12 April 2011 inclusive. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they were published in English, randomised controlled trials, quasi-experimental trials, quantitative observational studies and included people with one or more chronic diseases using allied health services and health insurance. A full-text review was performed independently by two reviewers. Meta-analyses were conducted. One hundred and fifty-eight citations were retrieved and seven articles were included in the meta-analyses. The pooled odds ratio (95% CI) of having insurance (versus no insurance) on the utilisation of allied health services among people with chronic disease was 1.33 (1.16-1.52; P<0.001). There was a significant effect of insurance on the utilisation of non-physiotherapy services, pooled odds ratio (95% CI) 4.80 (1.46-15.79; P=0.01) but having insurance compared with insurance of a lesser coverage was not significantly associated with an increase in physiotherapy utilisation, pooled odds ratio (95% CI) 1.53 (0.81-2.91; P=0.19). The presence of co-morbidity or functional limitation and higher levels of education increased utilisation whereas gender, race, marital status and income had a limited and variable effect, according to the study population. The review was limited by the considerable

  8. Systematic review of knowledge translation strategies in the allied health professions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Knowledge translation (KT) aims to close the research-practice gap in order to realize and maximize the benefits of research within the practice setting. Previous studies have investigated KT strategies in nursing and medicine; however, the present study is the first systematic review of the effectiveness of a variety of KT interventions in five allied health disciplines: dietetics, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physiotherapy, and speech-language pathology. Methods A health research librarian developed and implemented search strategies in eight electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, PASCAL, EMBASE, IPA, Scopus, CENTRAL) using language (English) and date restrictions (1985 to March 2010). Other relevant sources were manually searched. Two reviewers independently screened the titles and abstracts, reviewed full-text articles, performed data extraction, and performed quality assessment. Within each profession, evidence tables were created, grouping and analyzing data by research design, KT strategy, targeted behaviour, and primary outcome. The published descriptions of the KT interventions were compared to the Workgroup for Intervention Development and Evaluation Research (WIDER) Recommendations to Improve the Reporting of the Content of Behaviour Change Interventions. Results A total of 2,638 articles were located and the titles and abstracts were screened. Of those, 1,172 full-text articles were reviewed and subsequently 32 studies were included in the systematic review. A variety of single (n = 15) and multiple (n = 17) KT interventions were identified, with educational meetings being the predominant KT strategy (n = 11). The majority of primary outcomes were identified as professional/process outcomes (n = 25); however, patient outcomes (n = 4), economic outcomes (n = 2), and multiple primary outcomes (n = 1) were also represented. Generally, the studies were of low methodological quality. Outcome reporting bias was

  9. A Call for Action: Advocating for Increased Funding for the Allied Health Professions: ASAHP Leadership Development Program.

    PubMed

    Demo, David H; Fry, Donna; Devine, Nancy; Butler, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Allied health professionals are a diverse group of health care workers who provide necessary services to patients in addition to, or in place of, services provided by physicians, nurses, and medical paraprofessionals. Two forces generating increased demand for allied health professionals are the aging of the US population and health care reform associated with the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Although the allied health professions comprise nearly 60% of the health care workforce, the funding to support workforce training, faculty development, and research in the allied health fields lags substantially behind funding for the physician and nursing professions. Increased advocacy efforts are needed to increase the awareness of what the allied health professions contribute to health care and to expand funding across all health care professions.

  10. Types of social media (Web 2.0) used by Australian allied health professionals to deliver early twenty-first-century practice promotion and health care.

    PubMed

    Usher, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Types of social media (Web 2.0) usage associated with eight of Australia's major allied health professions (AHPs, n = 935) were examined. Australian AHPs are interacting with Web 2.0 technologies for personal use but are failing to implement such technologies throughout their health professions to deliver health care. Australian AHPs are willing to undertake online educational courses designed to up skill them about how Web 2.0 may be used for practice promotion and health care delivery in the early twenty-first century. Participants in this study indicated that educational courses that were offered online would be the preferred mode of delivery.

  11. Mapping competencies for the multiskilled health care professional: an allied health curriculum reform project.

    PubMed

    Sherrill, Windsor W; Keels-Williams, Frankie

    2005-01-01

    Health care organizations increasingly face the pressures of meeting the needs of patients while responding to the financial pressures of cost containment and quality optimization. One strategy that health care providers use to adapt to the changing environment is multiskilling. Multi-skilled health care technicians are trained to perform multiple tasks so that they can be deployed more efficiently within health care organizations. Multiskilling can provide numerous benefits to providers, organizations, and patients, but appropriate training for such individuals is critical. The Multiskilled Competencies Development Project was initiated to identify professional standards for entry-level multi-skilled health care technicians. The project was designed to meet the training needs of multiskilled workers through improved allied health curricula. The results of the DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) competency profile for multiskilled health care technicians are presented.

  12. Building an Education Infrastructure for Allied Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lankes, R. David; Bonner, Hugh W.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a five-part framework for an information infrastructure: (1) aggregating (digital storage); (2) organizing (imposing higher-level structure); (3) using (retrieval processes); (4) tool building (designing and developing technologies for steps 1-3); and (5) policy making (metadata, selection criteria, use policies). Applies the framework to…

  13. Evidence-based practice curriculum in allied health professions for teaching-research-practice nexus.

    PubMed

    Asokan, G V

    2012-11-01

    Allied healthcare workers are from diverse professions and the key skill required is providing evidence-based care but this concept has not permeated enough for using it skillfully in their professions. A well structured curriculum in allied health professions is needed to strengthen concerted teaching, research, and practice to empower their professionals and make considerable differences in the lives of people by adopting evidence-based practice. Information sources for allied health professionals have relied on advice of their supervisors and colleagues, personal experiences, authoritative theory and texts for practice. Because of "research-practice" gap, often the use of evidence is not reflected in an individual day to day professional practice. Although allied health professionals work in resource and evidence challenged settings, there are certain barriers and facilitators, which need to be addressed. To implement practice-related research findings and uptake of evidence requires two essential components, namely, practical component and knowledge component. Research bench marking and research metrics for quality assurance and standardization through evidence-based practice will promote academic status and credibility of allied health profession.

  14. Allied health personnel's attitudes and perceptions of teamwork supporting children with developmental concerns.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Peggy A; Malone, D Michael

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the attitudes and perceptions of allied health personnel toward the efficacy and performance characteristics of school-based teams supporting children with developmental concerns. Sixty-three allied health personnel were asked to complete the Attitudes About Teamwork Survey, the Team Characteristics Survey, and the Team Process Perception Survey. Respondents held a generally positive attitude about teamwork. Respondents' beliefs about the efficacy of the team process were moderately associated with critical performance characteristics. Effect sizes associated with these data suggest that the results were not only statistically significant but also noteworthy. Respondents also provided their perspectives on the benefits, limitations, supports, and recommendations of teamwork. Results were consistent with both the general teamwork literature and that focused on allied health professions. The authors describe practical implications of the results and directions for further investigation on this topic.

  15. Enhancing Discipline-Specific Training across Allied Health Professions through Reflective Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Elaine; Wightman, Barbara; Rosenthal, Harold

    2010-01-01

    The professional preparation of allied health professionals typically focuses on the acquisition of knowledge in a particular area of expertise with less consideration of training on social-emotional development and on how to engage parents in the clinical process, parent-child relationships, or principles of mental health. The authors explore how…

  16. An Annotated Bibliography on Inservice Training for Allied Professionals and Nonprofessionals in Community Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    This annotated bibliography, the second in the series of four, pertains to the inservice training of allied professionals and nonprofessionals for community mental health. The period of emphasis is 1960-1967. Materials citing experiences of formal community health centers are included. Also included are references on inservice mental health…

  17. Impact of Community College of Philadelphia Allied Health Programs on the Philadelphia Region. Report #117.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia Community Coll., PA.

    This report discusses the Allied Health programs at Community College of Philadelphia (CCP): (1) Clinical Laboratory Technician; (2) Dental Assisting Hygiene; (3) Dental Assisting Certificate; (4) Diagnostic Medical Imaging; (5) Dietetic Technician; (6) Health Information Technology; (7) Medical Assisting and Office Management; (8) Nursing; and…

  18. Using self-determination theory to describe the academic motivation of allied health professional-level college students.

    PubMed

    Ballmann, Jodi M; Mueller, Jill J

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the various reasons that allied health students believe they are currently attending college. The Academic Motivation Scale was administered to a convenience sample of 222 upperclassmen and graduate-level students (162 women, 46 men). The Academic Motivation Scale proposes various reasons for continued engagement in academic pursuits that may be characteristic of personal and current reasons for persistence in a subject's particular academic program. The results showed that students portrayed themselves as currently attending college for both intrinsically and extrinsically motivated reasons. The most frequently endorsed motivational styles were identified (autonomous) extrinsic motivation and externally regulated (nonautonomous) extrinsic motivation. This study showed that this sample of professional-level college students was not completely self-determined in their end-stage academic pursuits. One conclusion that may be drawn from this study is that allied health programs that provide students with an educational context that supports self-determination may encourage future allied health professionals to develop the ability to support the self-determination of their future clients.

  19. Pairing of opposite learning styles among allied health students: effects on collaborative performance.

    PubMed

    Sandmire, David A; Boyce, Pauline F

    2004-01-01

    To understand better determinants of effective collaboration in allied health education, students were paired by similar and opposite learning styles to work on a simulated clinical case exercise. Fifty-six sophomore and junior students enrolled in an anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology course from a variety of allied health programs were assigned randomly in pairs to one of three subsets based on their Kolb Learning Style Inventory scores (concrete versus abstract learners). The students read the history and physical examination findings of an immunocompromised patient with an abscess in an undisclosed spinal cord location, then answered a series of case questions. Analysis of variance revealed that mismatched pairs (concrete/abstract) performed significantly better than matched concrete pairs (F2,21 = 3.83, p < 0.05) and slightly better than matched abstract pairs. This higher performance of the mismatched group was not attributed to differences in either general or specific level of academic preparation among the groups, as measured by cumulative grade point average and prior course examination scores, respectively (F2,21 = 2.15, p > 0.05 and F2,21 = 3.04, p > 0.05). Collapsing of all three subset groups into one cohort revealed that case exercise performance was correlated moderately, however, to cumulative grade point average (r = 0.49, p < 0.01) and correlated strongly to prior course exam scores (r = 0.76, p < 0.001). These findings suggest that clinical collaboration skills are enhanced not only by individual level of academic preparation but also by intentional pairing of concrete with abstract learners.

  20. Library tutorials in an allied health evidence-based practice class.

    PubMed

    Hoberecht, Toni; Randall, Ken; Schweikhard, April J

    2015-01-01

    This column describes a collaboration between faculty members in an Allied Health program and academic librarians to provide information literacy instruction to students enrolled in an evidence-based practice course. The process of collaboration is described beginning with the inception of the idea to collaborate, which grew out of an informal conversation between librarians and Allied Health faculty. Implementation of the project is described as well as future plans for the collaboration. The column also discusses initial impressions of student outcomes as well as plans for a more rigorous study of those outcomes.

  1. Sharing: The Key of Networking. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the National Society of Allied Health (Houston, Texas, March 30-31, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Harry E., III

    The topic covered at the 1984 annual meeting of the National Society of Allied Health (NSAH) was networking among schools of allied health and health related professionals concerned with increasing the numbers of minorities (Blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans) in the allied health and health related fields. This booklet is a compilation of the…

  2. Weight Management Advice for Clients with Overweight or Obesity: Allied Health Professional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Snodgrass, Suzanne J.; Guest, Maya; Kable, Ashley K.; James, Carole; Ashby, Samantha E.; Plotnikoff, Ronald C.; Collins, Clare E.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing. The potential for allied health professionals to intervene through the provision of lifestyle advice is unknown. This study aimed to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of health professionals in the provision of dietary and physical activity advice for clients with overweight or obesity. Dietitians, exercise physiologists, nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists and psychologists (n = 296) working in New South Wales were surveyed using paper-based and online methods. The majority of health professionals (71%) believed that providing weight management advice was within their scope of practice; 81% provided physical activity advice but only 57% provided dietary advice. Other than dietitians, few had received training in client weight management during their professional qualification (14%) or continuing education (16%). Providing dietary advice was associated with: believing it was within their scope of practice (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.9–7.9, p < 0.01), training during their entry-level qualification (OR 7.2, 3.2–16.4, p < 0.01) and having departmental guidelines (OR 4.7, 2.1–10.9, p < 0.01). Most health professionals are willing to provide lifestyle advice to clients with overweight or obesity but few have received required training. Developing guidelines and training for in client weight management may potentially impact on rising obesity levels. PMID:27854252

  3. Identification of Barriers and Proposed Solutions to the Attainment of Equal Representation in Post-Secondary Allied Health Programs for Minorities. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittington, Marna C.; Benson, Stephen D.

    The study identified the barriers which prevent application, matriculation, and/or completion of allied health postsecondary education programs by blacks, Spanish-surnamed Americans, and Native Americans and recommended means of reducing or eliminating the barriers. Only those barriers which could be resolved or reduced through programs of public…

  4. What constitutes an excellent allied health care professional? A multidisciplinary focus group study

    PubMed Central

    Paans, Wolter; Wijkamp, Inge; Wiltens, Egbert; Wolfensberger, Marca V

    2013-01-01

    Background Determining what constitutes an excellent allied health care professional (AHCP) is important, since this is what will guide the development of curricula for training future physical therapists, oral hygienists, speech therapists, diagnostic radiographers, and dietitians. This also determines the quality of care. Aim To describe perspectives of AHCPs on which characteristics are commonly associated with an excellent AHCP. Methods AHCPs’ perspectives were derived from three focus group discussions. Twenty-one health care professionals participated. The final analysis of the focus group discussions produced eight domains, in which content validity was obtained through a Delphi panel survey of 27 contributing experts. Results According to the survey, a combination of the following characteristics defines an excellent AHCP: (1) cognizance, to obtain and to apply knowledge in a broad multidisciplinary health care field; (2) cooperativity, to effectively work with others in a multidisciplinary context; (3) communicative, to communicate effectively at different levels in complex situations; (4) initiative, to initiate new ideas, to act proactively, and to follow them through; (5) innovative, to devise new ideas and to implement alternatives beyond current practices; (6) introspective, to self-examine and to reflect; (7) broad perspective, to capture the big picture; and (8) evidence-driven, to find and to use scientific evidence to guide one’s decisions. Conclusion The AHCPs perspectives can be used as a reference for personal improvement for supervisors and professionals in clinical practice and for educational purposes. These perspectives may serve as a guide against which talented students can evaluate themselves. PMID:24049449

  5. A Study of the Clinical Laboratory Occupations. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Div. of Vocational Education.

    The objectives of this study which was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project were: (1) to determine the percent of medical laboratory workers who perform a comprehensive list of tasks and procedures; (2) to evaluate this performance in terms of certification and specialty area; and (3) on the basis of these data, to make…

  6. The Development of an Integrated Science Core Curriculum for Allied Health Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sesney, John; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The article describes the development of BioMedical Sciences Core at Weber State College in Ogden, Utah for introductory level allied health students. The design of the "Core" curriculum is to integrate the disciplines of physics, chemistry, anatomy, physiology, and microbiology as they relate to the human body rather than teaching the traditional…

  7. Improving College Faculty Instruction in the Basic and Allied Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washton, Nathan S.

    A project to improve college instruction in the basic and allied health sciences at New York Chiropractic College and the New York Institute of Technology is described. Attention was directed to: the kinds of resources colleges and professional schools provide to improve instruction; motivation of faculty to explore innovative or strategic…

  8. Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Allied Health Occupations/Practical Nursing. Volume II: Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Gene, Comp.; Simpson, Bruce, Comp.

    These written domain referenced tests (DRTs) for the area of allied health occupations/practical nursing test cognitive abilities or knowledge of theory. Introductory materials describe domain referenced testing and test development. Each multiple choice test includes a domain statement, describing the behavior and content of the domain, and a…

  9. The Use of Individualized Contract Plans as a Method of Performance Evaluation for Allied Health Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitcham, Maralynne D.; Vericella, Biagio J.

    1985-01-01

    Results from a two-year study of the individualized contract plan (ICP) approach to faculty evaluation indicate this is a workable method of performance evaluation for allied health faculty. The ICP was found to be individualized, systematic, flexible, and objective. Five major recommendations were made regarding the continued use of the ICP and…

  10. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Allied Health (Program CIP: 51.1699--Nursing, Other). Secondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which reflects Mississippi's statutory requirement that instructional programs be based on core curricula and performance-based assessment, contains outlines of the instructional units required in local instructional management plans and daily lesson plans for allied health I and II. Presented first are a program description and…

  11. Task Analysis for Curriculum Design and Validation. Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Bruce B.; And Others

    This report contains an outline of the method and the rationale for a project whose purpose is to develop training programs which are relevant to the specific requirements of technical occupations in nine allied health professions. The nine professions are in (a) nursing, (b) inhalation therapy, (c) radiology (technician level), (d) clinical…

  12. Pathways to Nursing: A Guide to Library and Online Research in Nursing and Allied Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Dennis C.; Craig, Paula

    2004-01-01

    This timely book provides a foundation in library and electronic research in the fields of nursing and allied health. It explains essential sources and techniques that can be used by nursing students, healthcare researchers, and nurse practitioners who need to gather information independently. Pathways to Nursing covers both physical libraries and…

  13. Strengthening Geriatric Knowledge and Use of Interdisciplinary Teams among Allied Health Students and Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrader, Susan L.; Blue, Rebecca; Miller, Doreen; Jensen, Gwenneth; Zawada, Edward T., Jr.; Hill, Paula; Johannsen, Gail; Elsberry, Dorothy Anne; Nelson, Debralee; Lockwood, Dean

    1999-01-01

    In a three-year collaborative venture between a hospital and a university, an interdisciplinary team trained 684 allied health professionals and students in geriatrics. Outcomes included increased geriatric knowledge, more graduates serving rural underserved areas, and more interdisciplinary clinical initiatives. (SK)

  14. Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Allied Health Occupations/Practical Nursing. Volume 1: Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Bruce; And Others

    These performance tests for the area of allied health occupations/practical nursing consist of a sampling technique (domain referenced tests) which covers all the possible performance situations. When used in total, they may also serve as a comprehensive test. Introductory materials discuss domain referenced testing, determining the domains, and…

  15. The Recruitment and Retention of Minority and Disadvantaged Allied Health Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Jeffrey; Lyons, Barbara Ann

    1989-01-01

    Describes the student recruitment and retention programs in the School of Allied Health Sciences at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. The programs are supported by federal grants and have assisted in enrolling over 575 minority students with a retention rate of above 90 percent. The programs are adaptable and have been used as…

  16. A National Study of Student Selection Practices in the Allied Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Marie C.; Crowley, Judeth A.

    1982-01-01

    Reports the outcomes of a 1978 national survey of candidate selection practices in 4 baccalaureate level and 7 associate degree level allied health disciplines. Found that few programs conducted evaluation of their admissions activities and that physical therapy and dental hygiene programs were the most structured in student selection. (JOW)

  17. The Allied Health Care Professional's Role in Assisting Medical Decision Making at the End of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Heather

    2012-01-01

    As a patient approaches the end of life, he or she faces a number of very difficult medical decisions. Allied health care professionals, including speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and occupational therapists (OTs), can be instrumental in assisting their patients to make advance care plans, although their traditional job descriptions do not…

  18. Making Tactile Charts on a Personal Computer for Blind Students in the Allied Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshida, Tsuguo; Ohtake, Nobuyuki

    2002-01-01

    This article describes how to make tactile charts for students who are blind and in the allied health professions on the basis of medical images and how students who are blind evaluate these charts. Editing rules for creating the charts are discussed. (Contains references.) (CR)

  19. Plotting Careers in Aged Care: Perspectives of Medical, Nursing, Allied Health Students and New Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Natalie; McCall, Louise

    2007-01-01

    The research reported in this article explored the impact of the undergraduate placement experience on medical, nursing, and allied health students' perceptions of careers in aged care. Data were collected from undergraduate students (48) and graduates (26) via individual (46) and group (7) interviews; data were thematically analyzed.…

  20. The effectiveness of allied health care in patients with ataxia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fonteyn, Ella M R; Keus, Samyra H J; Verstappen, Carla C P; Schöls, Ludger; de Groot, Imelda J M; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C

    2014-02-01

    Many patients with cerebellar ataxia have serious disabilities in daily life, while pharmacological treatment options are absent. Therefore, allied health care is considered to be important in the management of these patients. The goal of this review is to evaluate scientific evidence for allied health care in cerebellar ataxia, to identify effective treatment strategies, and to give recommendations for clinical practice and further research. A systematic search for clinical trials concerning allied health care in cerebellar ataxias was conducted using the electronic databases of PubMed, Medline, Embase, Cinahl and Pedro, and references lists of articles, in the time period from 1980 up to and including December 2011 in English and Dutch. We identified 14 trials, of which the four best studies were formally of moderate methodological quality. There was a wide variation in disease entities and interventions. The combined data indicate that physical therapy may lead to an improvement of ataxia symptoms and daily life functions in patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxia (level 2), and in other diseases causing cerebellar ataxia (level 3). When added to physical therapy, occupational therapy might improve global functional status, and occupational therapy alone may diminish symptoms of depression (level 3). There are insufficient data for speech and language therapy. Despite the widespread use of allied health care interventions in cerebellar ataxia, there is a lack of good quality studies that have evaluated such interventions. We found some support for the implementation of physical therapy and occupational therapy, but more research is needed to develop recommendations for clinical practice.

  1. Allied Health Students' Learning-Styles Identified with Two Different Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton-Rias, Dawn; Dunn, Rita; Terregrossa, Ralph; Geisert, Gene; Mangione, Robert; Ortiz, Samuel; Honigsfeld, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    This research identified and compared the learning styles of 154 ethnically diverse, upper division undergraduate and graduate students in Allied Health utilizing the "Building Excellence" (BE) (Rundle & Dunn, 2000) and the "Productivity Environmental Preference Survey" (PEPS) (Dunn, Dunn, & Price, 1996). Relationships among age, class standing,…

  2. A Learner-Centered Molecular Modeling Exercise for Allied Health Majors in a Biochemistry Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Terace M.; Ershler, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Learner-centered molecular modeling exercises in college science courses can be especially challenging for nonchemistry majors as students typically have a higher degree of anxiety and may not appreciate the relevance of the work. This article describes a learner-centered project given to allied health majors in a Biochemistry course. The project…

  3. Investing in Academic Science for Allied Health Students: Challenges and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packard, Becky Wai-Ling; Gagnon, Janelle L.; Moring-Parris, Riana

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the experiences of allied health CTE students and teachers in a new academic science class designed to strengthen science preparation and postsecondary pathways. Situated within a partnership between the community hospital and an urban school district, this case study drew upon the perspectives of the students, the hospital…

  4. Developing Allies to Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming Youth: Training for Counselors and Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Kim A.; Meier, S. Colton

    2014-01-01

    Lack of training regarding transgender youth leaves K-12 educators unprepared to become allies to this disenfranchised community and attend to their needs. This article explores the pedagogical strategies of two professional workshop models (GLSEN Houston training and the Gender Infinity practitioner training), which provide skills and resources…

  5. Allied Educators (Learning and Behavioural Support) in Singapore's Mainstream Schools: First Steps towards Inclusivity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Sirene May-Yin; Wong, Meng Ee; Tan, Denise

    2014-01-01

    It is arguable whether Singapore's mainstream schools are moving towards "inclusion" by providing support for students with mild to moderate disabilities through the provision of a newly created para-professional called the Allied Educators (Learning and Behavioural) [AED(LBS)]. Since 2005, the government has provided an incremental…

  6. Building LGBTQ Awareness and Allies in Our Teacher Education Community and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Laura-Lee; Kukner, Jennifer Mitton; Tompkins, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    In this article we share the impact of a training program (Positive Space I and Positive Space II) on pre-service teachers' understandings of and abilities to create safe spaces for Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Transgendered and Queering/Questioning (LGBTQ) youth and allies in our teacher-education program and in schools. Research has demonstrated…

  7. LGBTQ Awareness and Allies: Building Capacity in a Bachelor of Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Laura-Lee; Mitton-Kukner, Jennifer; Tompkins, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    This research describes the impact of an integrated training program (Positive Space I and Positive Space II) on pre-service teachers' understandings of and abilities to create safe spaces for lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgendered, two-spirited, queering and/or questioning (LGBTQ) youth and allies in schools. Our Bachelor of Education program…

  8. Integration of Practice Experiences into the Allied Health Curriculum: Curriculum and Pedagogic Considerations Before, during and after Work-Integrated Learning Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagarajan, Srivalli Vilapakkam; McAllister, Lindy

    2015-01-01

    Work-integrated learning (WIL) is an essential component of all allied health university courses. In allied health, learning that occurs during WIL experiences and the relationship between academic and WIL experiences are not well understood. Good integration of WIL experiences into the allied health curriculum is key to realizing the full…

  9. Clinical care ratios: quantifying clinical versus non-clinical care for allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Cherie; Govier, Adam; Semciw, Adam Ivan

    2016-07-04

    Objective Clinical care ratios (CCRs) are a useful tool that can be used to quantify and benchmark the clinical and non-clinical workloads of allied health professionals. The purpose of this study was to determine if CCRs are influenced by level of seniority, type of role or profession. This will provide meaningful information for allied health service managers to better manage service demand and capacity.Method Data was collected from 2036 allied health professionals from five professions across 11 Australian tertiary hospitals. Mean (95% confidence intervals) CCRs were calculated according to profession, seniority and role type. A two-way ANOVA was performed to assess the association of CCRs (dependent variable) with seniority level and profession (independent variables). Post-hoc pairwise comparisons identified where significant main or interaction effects occurred (α = 0.05).Results Significant main effects for seniority level and profession were identified (P < 0.05), but there was no interaction effect. Post-hoc comparisons revealed significant differences between all tier combinations (P < 0.05) with more senior staff having the lowest CCRs.Conclusion The direct and non-direct clinical components of the allied health professional's workload can be quantified and benchmarked with like roles and according to seniority. The benchmarked CCRs for predominantly clinical roles will enable managers to compare and evaluate like roles and modify non-direct clinical components according to seniority and discipline.What is known about the topic? CCRs are a useful tool to quantify, monitor and compare workloads of allied health professionals. They are thought to change with increased seniority of roles. The CCRs for different allied health professional roles has yet to be defined in the literature.What does this paper add? CCRs decrease as level of seniority increases, indicating higher seniority increases non-clinical time. CCRs differ across professions, suggesting

  10. Promoting the place of the allied health professions in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Rothan-Tondeur, Monique; Courcier, Soizic; Béhier, Jehan-Michel; Leblanc, Judith; Peoch, Nadia; Lefort, Marie-Claude; Barthélémy, Philippe; Bassompierre, François; Bilbault, Pascal; Déal, Cécile; Diebolt, Vincent; Fraleux, Michèle; François, Bruno; Gambotti, Laetitia; Lévy-Marchal, Claire; Misse, Christophe; Roussel, Christophe; Sibenaler, Claire; Simon, Tabassome; Tavernier, Blanche; Thoby, Frédérique

    2014-01-01

    Clinical research is of major importance to today's society, as scientific evidence is increasingly demanded as a basis for progress, whether this involves developing new healthcare products, improving clinical practice and care protocols or progress in prevention. Clinical research therefore requires professionals who are both experienced and increasingly well trained. Against this background, allied health professionals are becoming involved more and more, both as team members supporting clinical research projects and as managers or coordinators of projects in their own field. Clinical research activities provide an ideal opportunity for continuing professional development. All of this means that the professional skills of the allied health professions and clinical research support professions must be enhanced, their role promoted in the context of lecturer status and in the longer term, their status recognised by the supervisory authorities.

  11. Nutrition economics - food as an ally of public health.

    PubMed

    Lenoir-Wijnkoop, I; Jones, P J; Uauy, R; Segal, L; Milner, J

    2013-03-14

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are a major and increasing contributor to morbidity and mortality in developed and developing countries. Much of the chronic disease burden is preventable through modification of lifestyle behaviours, and increased attention is being focused on identifying and implementing effective preventative health strategies. Nutrition has been identified as a major modifiable determinant of NCD. The recent merging of health economics and nutritional sciences to form the nascent discipline of nutrition economics aims to assess the impact of diet on health and disease prevention, and to evaluate options for changing dietary choices, while incorporating an understanding of the immediate impacts and downstream consequences. In short, nutrition economics allows for generation of policy-relevant evidence, and as such the discipline is a crucial partner in achieving better population nutritional status and improvements in public health and wellness. The objective of the present paper is to summarise presentations made at a satellite symposium held during the 11th European Nutrition Conference, 28 October 2011, where the role of nutrition and its potential to reduce the public health burden through alleviating undernutrition and nutrition deficiencies, promoting better-quality diets and incorporating a role for functional foods were discussed.

  12. Elements of instruction in allied health: do faculty and students value the same things?

    PubMed

    Hoppes, Steve; Chesbro, Steven

    2003-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the importance placed on 15 elements of instruction in allied health by students and faculty and to identify similarities and differences in students' and faculty's views. A total of 145 students and 55 faculty in the College of Allied Health at the University of Oklahoma participated in an on-line survey. Focus groups subsequently were conducted to discuss areas of agreement and disagreement between students and faculty. Four common elements were contained in the top-five list of both groups: (1) the teacher's ability to relate course material to clinical situations, (2) the teacher's communication skills, (3) the teacher's preparation and organization, and (4) the teacher's knowledge of the subject. Five of the 15 items were significantly different: (1) the teachers' friendliness and respect for students, (2) the teacher's ability to motivate students, (3) the teacher's ability to challenge students intellectually, (4) the teacher's encouragement of discussion, and (5) the teacher's ability to use a number of teaching techniques. Results of this study will further understanding between allied health faculty and students concerning similarities and differences in instructional values.

  13. Rural speech-language pathologists' perceptions of working with allied health assistants.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Rachael; Byrne, Nicole; Mitchell, Rebecca; Ferguson, Alison

    2013-12-01

    Workforce shortages are forecast for speech-language pathology in Australia, and will have a more significant impact on rural and remote areas than on metropolitan areas. Allied health (AH) disciplines such as physiotherapy and occupational therapy address the problem of workforce shortages and growing clinical demand by employing allied health assistants (AHAs) to provide clinical and administrative support to AH professionals. Currently, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) don't work with discipline-specific allied health assistants in all states of Australia (e.g., New South Wales). This paper aims to provide insight into the perceptions of SLPs in one Australian state (NSW) regarding working with AHAs. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight rural SLPs. Qualitative analysis indicated that participants perceived they had deficits in skills and knowledge required to work with AHAs and identified further training needs. Participants perceived the SLP role to be misunderstood and were concerned about poor consultation regarding the introduction of AHAs into the profession. Ambivalence was evident in overall perceptions of working with AHAs, and tasks performed. While previous research identified benefits of working with AHAs, results from this study suggest that significant professional, economic, and organizational issues need addressing before such a change should be implemented in speech-language pathology.

  14. Introductory Chemical Education of Health Professionals: An Integrated Clinical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farina, Joseph; Frechette, Michael

    1979-01-01

    Reports the development of an integrated clinical approach to introductory chemistry education at the undergraduate level for students majoring in nursing and the allied health professions at the University of Lowell. (BT)

  15. "Allies," Alliance for Learning: Investing in the Education of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoaglund, Amy E.; Birkenfeld, Karen J.; Stone, Amanda; Rogers, Betsy

    2016-01-01

    Samford University's Initial Teacher Education program subscribes to the philosophy of developing teacher leaders to become a part of a K-12 faculty rather than a peripheral support system. The goal of the program is to acknowledge and develop desirable teacher leader abilities. Expertise, professionalism, enthusiasm, passion, and commitment are…

  16. [Potentials for research and innovations in allied health professions in Germany].

    PubMed

    Voigt-Radloff, Sebastian; Lang, Britta; Antes, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the increasing complexity and continuously changing needs and demands in the German healthcare system, there is a need to strengthen knowledge translation, evidence-based practice and the conduct of clinical trials in the field of allied health professions. An interdisciplinary working group representing the fields of nursing, midwifery, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy developed a guide and a concept for seminars to provide potential analyses for research and innovations in the allied health professions in Germany. These potential analyses compare the current state of health care delivery for specific health problems and the corpus of evidence for the effectiveness of related interventions. Thus innovations can be identified which might improve client-centred healthcare in Germany. The introductory paper briefly reports the activities and results of the working group, describes the international context of transferring research into practice and outlines possibilities for the future development of coordinated research strategies in Germany. The following papers consist of five potential analyses: (1) Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) in long-term care; (2) giving birth in an upright position; (3) treadmill training for patients with Parkinson's disease; (4) training of everyday activities after stroke; and (5) communication training for patients with aphasia.

  17. Caring for Hispanic patients interactively: simulations and practices for allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Schitai, Amit

    2004-01-01

    Healthcare providers have a new tool for navigating the challenges of cross-cultural communication when treating Hispanic patients: CHISPA e-learning environment. CHISPA, which means "spark" in Spanish, stands for Caring for the Hispanic Patient Interactively: Simulations and Practices for Allied Health Professionals. It is a computer-based training program that provides solutions to both cultural and linguistic barriers to care. The program allows users to interact with Hispanic patients in realistic patient-care scenarios and receive feedback on their choices, along with a wealth of information on cultural variables, advice on overcoming language barriers, and language exercises to facilitate learning medical terms and expressions in Spanish.

  18. The Statewide Conference of the Florida Allied Health Articulation Project (Orlando, Florida, June 21, 1989). Proceedings and Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tallahassee Community Coll., FL.

    This document contains the proceedings of a conference on articulation in the allied health care field in Florida. The following presentations are included: "Welcome and Program Overview" (Laurey Stryker); "Health Care Challenges and Choices: Alternate Pathways to the 21st Century" (Robert E. Kinsinger); "Findings and…

  19. Impact of the Konstanz method of dilemma discussion on moral judgment in allied health students: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Lerkiatbundit, Sanguan; Utaipan, Parichat; Laohawiriyanon, Chonlada; Teo, Adisa

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of the Konstanz method of moral dilemma discussion (KMDD) on moral judgment in allied health students. The study employed the Moral Judgment Test, translated from English into Thai and validated in 247 students, as an moral judgment instrument. The scale satisfied four validity criteria: preference hierarchy, quasi-simplex structure of stage preference, affective-cognitive parallelism, and positive correlation between education and moral competence score (C-index). Test-retest reliability at a 1-month interval was 0.90. To investigate the impact of the KMDD, 83 pharmacy technician and dental nursing students were asked to participate in the study. The subjects were randomly assigned into control (n = 41) or experimental (n = 42) groups. The experimental group participated in a 90-min KMDD once a week for 6 consecutive weeks. Students in the control group also met once a week for 6 weeks to discuss the topics not related to ethics. All subjects completed the Moral Judgment Test before and after the intervention and again 6 months later. Split-plot ANOVA of the C-indexes at the beginning revealed that the experimental and control groups were not different (20.57 +/- 13.45 and 24.98 +/- 16.12). However, the experimental group scored significantly higher than the control group did after the intervention (35.18 +/- 10.96 and 24.20 +/- 14.70) and 6 months later (33.00 +/- 11.02 and 23.67 +/- 14.35). The KMDD appears to be a practical and effective intervention for developing moral judgment in allied health students. The effect on moral judgment remains at least 6 months after the intervention.

  20. Building competency in the novice allied health professional through peer coaching.

    PubMed

    Ladyshewsky, Richard K

    2010-01-01

    The development of competence is an ongoing journey, and one that is particularly punctuated in the early part of a health professional's career. These novice practitioners need to recognize that the challenges inherent in building competency might be resolved more readily by engaging with peers. This paper outlines what it means to be a novice practitioner, and how peer coaching can be used to support professional development in the allied health sciences. An overview of the reasoning process and how peer coaching and experiential learning can be used to build competence is described. A structured and formal approach to peer coaching is outlined in this paper. Novices who embrace this professional development strategy will find the model of coaching practice and underlying strategies described in this paper beneficial to their experience. The importance of formalizing the process and the underlying communication skills needed for coaching are described in detail with accompanying examples to illustrate the model in practice.

  1. Role, implementation, and effectiveness of advanced allied health assistants: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Stanhope, Jessica; Pearce, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness and implementation of advanced allied health assistant roles. Methods A systematic search of seven databases and Google Scholar was conducted to identify studies published in English peer-reviewed journals from 2003 to 2013 and reporting on the effectiveness and implementation of advanced allied health assistant (A/AHA) roles. Reference lists were also screened to identify additional studies, and the authors’ personal collections of studies were searched. Studies were allocated to the National Health and Medical Research Council hierarchy of evidence, and appraisal of higher-level studies (III-1 and above) conducted using the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine Systematic Review Critical Appraisal Sheet for included systematic reviews or the PEDro scale for level II and III-1 studies. Data regarding country, A/AHA title, disciplines, competencies, tasks, level of autonomy, clients, training, and issues regarding the implementation of these roles were extracted, as were outcomes used and key findings for studies investigating their effectiveness. Results Fifty-three studies were included, and most because they reported background information rather than investigating A/AHA roles, this representing low-level information. A/AHAs work in a range of disciplines, with a variety of client groups, and in a number of different settings. Little was reported regarding the training available for A/AHAs. Four studies investigated the effectiveness of these roles, finding that they were generally well accepted by clients, and provided more therapy time. Issues in integrating these new roles into existing health systems were also reported. Conclusion A/AHA roles are being implemented in a range of settings, and appear to be effective in terms of process measures and stakeholder perceptions. Few studies have investigated these roles, indicating a need for research to be conducted in this area to

  2. Mapping the literature of health education.

    PubMed

    Schloman, B F

    1997-07-01

    Health education is a relatively new multidisciplinary field concerned with educational programs that empower individuals and communities to play active roles in achieving, protecting, and sustaining their health. Its practitioners have bachelor's, master's, or doctoral degrees and work in educational, worksite, health facility, or agency settings. This bibliometric study was part of the Medical Library Association (MLA) Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section's Project for Mapping the Literature of Allied Health. It sought to identify the core journals in health education and to determine the extent to which these titles are covered by the standard indexing sources. Cited references appearing from 1991 through 1993 in articles of four journals published by the major professional associations in the field were analyzed. It was found that only thirteen journals supply one-third of all references in the study. Another eighty journals provide the second third. MEDLINE gives the best indexing coverage with nearly 69% of the journals receiving indexing for at least half of their articles, followed by EMBASE (52%) and PsycINFO (43%). Limited coverage is given by the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (16%) and ERIC (14%). The findings name titles that should be added by indexing services and those that should have more complete coverage.

  3. Review for librarians of evidence-based practice in nursing and the allied health professions in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kronenfeld, Michael; Stephenson, Priscilla L.; Nail-Chiwetalu, Barbara; Tweed, Elizabeth M.; Sauers, Eric L.; McLeod, Tamara C. Valovich; Guo, Ruiling; Trahan, Henry; Alpi, Kristine M.; Hill, Beth; Sherwill-Navarro, Pamela; Allen, Margaret (Peg); Stephenson, Priscilla L.; Hartman, Linda M.; Burnham, Judy; Fell, Dennis; Kronenfeld, Michael; Pavlick, Raymond; MacNaughton, Ellen W.; Nail-Chiwetalu, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This paper provides an overview of the state of evidence-based practice (EBP) in nursing and selected allied health professions and a synopsis of current trends in incorporating EBP into clinical education and practice in these fields. This overview is intended to better equip librarians with a general understanding of the fields and relevant information resources. Included Professions: Professions are athletic training, audiology, health education and promotion, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assisting, respiratory care, and speech-language pathology. Approach: Each section provides a description of a profession, highlighting changes that increase the importance of clinicians' access to and use of the profession's knowledgebase, and a review of each profession's efforts to support EBP. The paper concludes with a discussion of the librarian's role in providing EBP support to the profession. Conclusions: EBP is in varying stages of growth among these fields. The evolution of EBP is evidenced by developments in preservice training, growth of the literature and resources, and increased research funding. Obstacles to EBP include competing job tasks, the need for additional training, and prevalent attitudes and behaviors toward research among practitioners. Librarians' skills in searching, organizing, and evaluating information can contribute to furthering the development of EBP in a given profession. PMID:17971887

  4. The Predictive Value of Selected Extrinsic and Intrinsic Indicators of Overall Job Satisfaction in Diagnostic Radiological Technology, Radiation Therapy, and Nuclear Medicine Technology Allied Health Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beavers, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare is the largest industry in the United States and 60 percent of its 14 million workers are in allied health jobs. The need to attract and retain allied health faculty is critical to preparing a competent workforce in healthcare. This study reports the results of a survey of 259 faculty members working in diagnostic radiologic technology,…

  5. Section 1--The Value of Psychology in Health Professional Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upton, Dominic

    2008-01-01

    The education of nurses, midwives and allied health care professionals in the UK is guided by professional bodies and the over arching Health Professionals Council (HPC)/Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). Each of these professional bodies provides regulatory frameworks and guidance notes on the educational content of the degree level programmes…

  6. Attitudes Underlying Corneal Donation in a Group of Trainee Allied Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    McGlade, Donal; McClenahan, Carol; Pierscionek, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Background The focus of this study was to investigate factors that may influence personal willingness to register consent to donate corneal tissue upon death using the theory of planned behaviour in a relatively ethnically homogenous group of trainee allied health professionals. The attainment of this knowledge will be of paramount importance in relation to potential interventions that are designed to change donation-related behaviour. Methods A questionnaire-based study was undertaken with 92 pre-registration nurses (mean age 24.0 years (standard deviation ±5.6 years); female:male  = 89:3) enrolled at a University in Northern Ireland. Intention to register consent to donate corneal tissue upon death was assessed using both direct and belief-based measures found in the theory of planned behaviour. Descriptive statistics were used to assess demographic information, with correlation and regression analyses being used to identify factors influencing intentions. Results The majority of participants were religious (94.6%, n = 87) and mostly Protestant (58.7%, n = 54) or Catholic (35.9%, n = 33). Generally speaking, the theory of planned behaviour accounted for 84% of the variance in intention to register consent. In relation to the constructs found in the theory of planned behaviour, attitude was found to be the strongest predictor of intention to register consent, with subjective norm being the second strongest predictor. Perceived behavioural control did not significantly predict intention to register consent. Conclusions The theory of planned behaviour has allowed an understanding of the factors that influence the personal intentions of a group of future allied health professionals from the same ethnic group to register consent to donate their corneal tissue. PMID:23300937

  7. Articulation Assistance for Columbus State Community College. Add-on Task #2: Pre-Tech for Allied Health. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, S. Judith; And Others

    This guide is intended for use in helping high school and entry-level community college students in acquiring the practical science skills necessary to ensure successful completion of an associate-level allied health program. The guide was originally developed to provide an articulation model for high school students interested in entering the…

  8. Methodological Orientations of Articles Appearing in Allied Health's Top Journals: Who Publishes What and Where

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alderman, Pamela Lea McCloud

    2012-01-01

    This study examined articles published in the major peer-reviewed journals, either hard copy, web, or both formats, in five allied health professions from January 2006 to December 2010. Research journals used in this study include: "Journal of Dental Hygiene," "Journal of the American Dietetic Association," "Journal of…

  9. A Comparison of the First-Year Experience Programming to Enhance the Retention of Future Allied Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalen, Tina Forsythe

    2012-01-01

    This mixed-methods case study examined the effectiveness of a new first-year experience (FYE) curriculum for selected Choose Ohio First Scholars in the College of Allied Health Sciences (CAHS) and compared it with the effectiveness of the traditional FYE curriculum in CAHS. The quantitative phase of the study involved the collection and analysis…

  10. Does journal club membership improve research evidence uptake in different allied health disciplines: a pre-post study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although allied health is considered to be one 'unit' of healthcare providers, it comprises a range of disciplines which have different training and ways of thinking, and different tasks and methods of patient care. Very few empirical studies on evidence-based practice (EBP) have directly compared allied health professionals. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of a structured model of journal club (JC), known as iCAHE (International Centre for Allied Health Evidence) JC, on the EBP knowledge, skills and behaviour of the different allied health disciplines. Methods A pilot, pre-post study design using maximum variation sampling was undertaken. Recruitment was conducted in groups and practitioners such as physiotherapists, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, social workers, psychologists, nutritionists/dieticians and podiatrists were invited to participate. All participating groups received the iCAHE JC for six months. Quantitative data using the Adapted Fresno Test (McCluskey & Bishop) and Evidence-based Practice Questionnaire (Upton & Upton) were collected prior to the implementation of the JC, with follow-up measurements six months later. Mean percentage change and confidence intervals were calculated to compare baseline and post JC scores for all outcome measures. Results The results of this study demonstrate variability in EBP outcomes across disciplines after receiving the iCAHE JC. Only physiotherapists showed statistically significant improvements in all outcomes; speech pathologists and occupational therapists demonstrated a statistically significant increase in knowledge but not for attitude and evidence uptake; social workers and dieticians/nutritionists showed statistically significant positive changes in their knowledge, and evidence uptake but not for attitude. Conclusions There is evidence to suggest that a JC such as the iCAHE model is an effective method for improving the EBP knowledge and skills of allied

  11. How Do Allied Health Professionals Construe the Role of the Remote Workforce? New Insight into Their Recruitment and Retention

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Narelle; Eley, Diann S.; McAllister, Lindy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Allied health workforce recruitment and retention in remote areas is a global problem. Using case studies from the Australian allied health workforce, this paper adds new information by combining personality trait information with a detailed understanding of how the cases construe the demands of remote work, which may be useful in addressing this problem. Methods Four cases (two urban, two remote) are presented from a mixed methods study (n = 562), which used (1) the Temperament and Character Inventory to investigate personality traits of allied health professionals; and (2) repertory grid interviews to reveal quantitatively and qualitatively how the cases construed their Ideal work role compared with their Current and a Remote role. Cases also self-assessed their fit (‘suited’ or ‘not suited’) with remote. Findings Differences in the way cases construed their fit with remote work was related to prior experience. However all were satisfied with their work, perceiving their Current role as similar to their Ideal. All saw remote work as requiring generalist expertise and a reliance on relationships. Personality traits, especially Novelty Seeking and Harm Avoidance, fit with how allied health professionals perceived their role. Conclusions The combination of two distinct lines of investigation, illustrates what more can be revealed about allied health professional’s career choices by taking into account the fit or lack of fit between their personality tendencies, their construing of remote work and their life circumstances. Understanding the combined influence of perceptions and traits on an individual toward or away from remote work may enhance recruitment and retention internationally. PMID:27907073

  12. Partnerships in Health Promotion for Black Americans. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the National Society of Allied Health (Virginia Beach, VA, March 29-30, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Harry E., III, Comp.

    This conference report of the National Society of Allied Health focusses on the theme of health promotion for black Americans, with emphasis on creating cooperative partnerships to address the various social and environmental conditions adversely affecting minority group health status. The keynote speaker provided an historical perspective on…

  13. An evidence-based framework to measure quality of allied health care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is no standard way of describing the complexities of allied health (AH) care, or its quality. AH is an umbrella term which excludes medicine and nursing, and variably includes disciplines which provide therapy, diagnostic, or scientific services. This paper outlines a framework for a standard approach to evaluate the quality of AH therapy services. Methods A realist synthesis framework describing what AH does, how it does it, and what is achieved, was developed. This was populated by the findings of a systematic review of literature published since 1980 reporting concepts of quality relevant to AH. Articles were included on quality measurement concepts, theories, debates, and/or hypothetical frameworks. Results Of 139 included articles, 21 reported on descriptions of quality potentially relevant to AH. From these, 24 measures of quality were identified, with 15 potentially relating to what AH does, 17 to how AH delivers care, 8 relating to short term functional outcomes, and 9 relating to longer term functional and health system outcomes. Conclusions A novel evidence-based quality framework was proposed to address the complexity of AH therapies. This should assist in better evaluation of AH processes and outcomes, costs, and evidence-based engagement of AH providers in healthcare teams. PMID:24571857

  14. Achievements and challenges on policies for allied health professionals who use telehealth in the Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Hailey, D; Foerster, V; Nakagawa, B; Wapshall, T M; Murtagh, J A; Smitten, J; Steblecki, J A; Wong, G

    2005-01-01

    We formulated policies and procedures for allied health professionals (AHPs) who provide services using telehealth in Nunavut, Canada's newest Arctic territory. These are a supplement to the clinical policies and procedures already established for Nunavut physicians and nurses. The services were in the areas of audiology, dietetics/nutrition, midwifery, occupational therapy, ophthalmic services, pharmacy, physiotherapy, psychology, respiratory therapy, social work and speech therapy. Documents specific to each of the services were developed, drawing on information from Government of Nunavut data, Nunavut healthcare providers and links made through the Internet. Topics included the scope and limitations of telehealth services, staff responsibilities, training and reporting, professional standards and cultural considerations. We also considered generic policies covering common issues such as jurisdiction, licensing and liability. The policies and procedures for AHPs will enhance and expand the successes already achieved with telehealth in Nunavut. The challenges are to balance the preferred approaches to service provision with the realities of health care and communications in an Arctic setting.

  15. Student perceptions and learning outcomes of blended learning in a massive first-year core physiology for allied health subjects.

    PubMed

    Page, Janelle; Meehan-Andrews, Terri; Weerakkody, Nivan; Hughes, Diane L; Rathner, Joseph A

    2017-03-01

    Evidence shows that factors contributing to success in physiology education for allied health students at universities include not only their high school achievement and background but also factors such as confidence with their teachers and quality of their learning experience, justifying intensive and continued survey of students' perceptions of their learning experience. Here we report data covering a 3-yr period in a physiology subject that has been redesigned for blended and online presentation. Consistent with previous reports, we show that when we undertook a blended mode of delivery, students demonstrated better grades than traditional modes of teaching; however the absence of didactic teaching in this subject resulted in lower grades overall. Students have very strong positive attitudes to weekly quizzes (80% positive approval) but report ambivalent attitudes to online self-directed learning (61% negative perception), even though they had 2-h weekly facilitated workshops. Overwhelmingly, students who undertook the subject in a self-directed online learning mode requested more face-to-face-teaching (70% of comments). From these data, we suggest that there is a quantifiable benefit to didactic teaching in the blended teaching mode that is not reproduced in online self-directed learning, even when face-to-face guided inquiry-based learning is embedded in the subject.

  16. Characterization of health-related compounds in eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) lines derived from introgression of allied species.

    PubMed

    Mennella, Giuseppe; Rotino, Giuseppe L; Fibiani, Marta; D'Alessandro, Antonietta; Francese, Gianluca; Toppino, Laura; Cavallanti, Federica; Acciarri, Nazzareno; Lo Scalzo, Roberto

    2010-07-14

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the levels of either the nutraceutical and health-promoting compounds or the antioxidant properties of innovative eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) genotypes tolerant and/or resistant to fungi, derived from conventional and non-conventional breeding methodologies (i.e., sexual interspecific hybridization, interspecific protoplast electrofusion, androgenesis, and backcross cycles) in comparison with their allied and cultivated parents. Chemical measures of soluble refractometric residue (SRR), glycoalkaloids (solamargine and solasonine), chlorogenic acid (CA), delphinidin 3-rutinoside (D3R), total phenols (TP), polyphenoloxidase (PPO) activity, antiradical activity on superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical were carried out in raw fruit and peel of 57 eggplant advanced introgression lines (ILs), of three eggplant recurrent genotypes and of three allied species during 2005 and 2006. The majority of the ILs, obtained after several backcross cycles, showed positive characteristics with respect to the allied parents such as good levels of SRR, CA, D3R, TP, PPO activity, the scavenging activity against superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical and, in particular, significantly (p allied parents (i.e., resistance/tolerance to plant pathogen fungi) together with nutraceutical and antioxidant properties typical of the cultivated species.

  17. Issues in Selecting Methods of Evaluating Clinical Competence in the Health Professions: Implications for Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middlemas, David A.; Hensal, Carleton

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To examine methods used to evaluate the clinical competence and proficiency of students in medicine and allied health professions. To identify factors that would be valuable to educators in athletic training and other medical and allied health professions in the development and use of clinical assessment methods. Data Sources: We…

  18. Evaluating Health Education Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patty, Willard W.

    2001-01-01

    This 1949 paper considers the evaluation of health education outcomes. It describes the nature of health education, discusses whether it is possible to measure all health education outcomes, then examines how to evaluate student health habits and skills, health attitudes, and health knowledge. It concludes that it is important to evaluate health…

  19. A study of student perceptions of learning transfer from a human anatomy and physiology course in an allied health program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrell, Leigh S.

    The purpose of this study was two-fold. First the study was designed to determine student perceptions regarding the perceived degree of original learning from a human anatomy and physiology course, and the student perception of the use of the knowledge in an allied health program. Second, the intention of the study was to establish student beliefs on the characteristics of the transfer of learning including those factors which enhance learning transfer and those that serve as barriers to learning transfer. The study participants were those students enrolled in any allied health program at a community college in a Midwest state, including: nursing, radiology, surgical technology, health information technology, and paramedic. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed from the responses to the survey. A sub-group of participants were chosen to participate in semi-structured formal interviews. From the interviews, additional qualitative data were gathered. The data collected through the study demonstrated student perception of successful transfer experiences. The students in the study were able to provide specific examples of learning transfer experienced from the human anatomy and physiology course in their allied health program. Findings also suggested students who earned higher grades in the human anatomy and physiology course perceived greater understanding and greater use of the course's learning objectives in their allied health program. The study found the students believed the following learning activities enhances the transfer of learning: (1) Providing application of the information or skills being learned during the instruction of the course content enhances the transfer of learning. (2) Providing resource materials and activities which allow the students to practice the content being taught facilitates the transfer of learning. The students made the following recommendations to remove barriers to the transfer of learning: (1

  20. Implementation of a patient safety incident management system as viewed by doctors, nurses and allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Travaglia, Joanne F; Westbrook, Mary T; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2009-05-01

    Incident reporting systems have become a central mechanism of most health services patient safety strategies. In this article we compare health professionals' anonymous, free text responses in an evaluation of a newly implemented electronic incident management system. The professions' answers were compared using classic content analysis and Leximancer, a computer assisted text analysis package. The classic analysis identified issues which differentiated the professions. More doctors commented on lack of feedback following incidents and evaluated the system negatively. More allied health staff found that the system lacked fields necessary to report incidents. More nurses complained incident reporting was time consuming. The Leximancer analysis revealed that while the professions all used the more frequently employed concepts (which described basic components of the reporting system), nurses and allied health shared many additional concepts concerned with actual reporting. Doctors applied fewer and more unique (used only by one profession) concepts when writing about the system. Doctors' unique concepts centred on criticism of the incident management system and the broader implications of safety issues, while the other professions' unique concepts focused on more practical issues. The classic analysis identified specific problems needing to be targeted in ongoing modifications of the system. The Leximancer findings, while complementing the classical analysis results, gave greater insight into professional groups' attitudes that relate to use of the system, e.g. doctors' relatively limited conceptual vocabulary regarding the system was consistent with their lower incident reporting rates. Such professional differences in reaction to healthcare innovations may constrain inter-disciplinary communication and cooperation.

  1. Oceans apart, yet connected: Findings from a qualitative study on professional supervision in rural and remote allied health services

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Priya; Kumar, Saravana; Burge, Vanessa; Abernathy, LuJuana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective Improving the quality and safety of health care in Australia is imperative to ensure the right treatment is delivered to the right person at the right time. Achieving this requires appropriate clinical governance and support for health professionals, including professional supervision. This study investigates the usefulness and effectiveness of and barriers to supervision in rural and remote Queensland. Design As part of the evaluation of the Allied Health Rural and Remote Training and Support program, a qualitative descriptive study was conducted involving semi‐structured interviews with 42 rural or remote allied health professionals, nine operational managers and four supervisors. The interviews explored perspectives on their supervision arrangements, including the perceived usefulness, effect on practice and barriers. Results Themes of reduced isolation; enhanced professional enthusiasm, growth and commitment to the organisation; enhanced clinical skills, knowledge and confidence; and enhanced patient safety were identified as perceived outcomes of professional supervision. Time, technology and organisational factors were identified as potential facilitators as well as potential barriers to effective supervision. Conclusions This research provides current evidence on the impact of professional supervision in rural and remote Queensland. A multidimensional model of organisational factors associated with effective supervision in rural and remote settings is proposed identifying positive supervision culture and a good supervisor–supervisee fit as key factors associated with effective arrangements. PMID:26052949

  2. Beyond 50. challenges at work for older nurses and allied health workers in rural Australia: a thematic analysis of focus group discussions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The health workforce in Australia is ageing, particularly in rural areas, where this change will have the most immediate implications for health care delivery and workforce needs. In rural areas, the sustainability of health services will be dependent upon nurses and allied health workers being willing to work beyond middle age, yet the particular challenges for older health workers in rural Australia are not well known. The purpose of this research was to identify aspects of work that have become more difficult for rural health workers as they have become older; and the age-related changes and exacerbating factors that contribute to these difficulties. Findings will support efforts to make workplaces more 'user-friendly' for older health workers. Methods Nurses and allied health workers aged 50 years and over were invited to attend one of six local workshops held in the Hunter New England region of NSW, Australia. This qualitative action research project used a focus group methodology and thematic content analysis to identify and interpret issues arising from workshop discussions. Results Eighty older health workers from a range of disciplines attended the workshops. Tasks and aspects of work that have become more difficult for older health workers in hospital settings, include reading labels and administering medications; hearing patients and colleagues; manual handling; particular movements and postures; shift work; delivery of babies; patient exercises and suturing. In community settings, difficulties relate to vehicle use and home visiting. Significant issues across settings include ongoing education, work with computers and general fatigue. Wider personal challenges include coping with change, balancing work-life commitments, dealing with attachments and meeting goals and expectations. Work and age-related factors that exacerbate difficulties include vision and hearing deficits, increasing tiredness, more complex professional roles and a sense of

  3. Annotated Bibliography on Inservice Training for Allied Professionals and Nonprofessionals in Community Mental Health. Public Health Service Publication No. 1901.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    This annotated bibliography presents 169 entries of materials published between 1960 and 1967 classified into the following sections: (1) Physicians--Roles and Continuing Education, (2) Nurses, (3) School Psychologists, (4) Teachers, Special Educators, (5) Clergy, (6) Social Work Technicians, Welfare Workers, (7) Police, (8) Mental Health Workers…

  4. Content in Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Education (Washington D.C.), 1985

    1985-01-01

    Six articles from health journals since 1898 discuss content in health education: (1) "Mental Health and the Schools" (Cromwell); (2) "You Must Relax--But How?" (Nash); (3) "School Hygiene and the Teaching of Hygiene in the Public Schools" (Egbert); (4) "A Sex Education Program" (Leibee); (5) "Sexual Education" (McCurdy); and (6) "Sex Education"…

  5. Health Manpower Source Book. Manpower Supply and Educational Statistics for Selected Health Occupations: 1968. Public Health Service Publication Number 263, Section 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Professions Education and Manpower Training.

    This publication is a compilation of statistics on supply and education of health manpower in medicine and osteopathy, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, podiatry, veterinary medicine, nursing, public health, and eight selected allied health occupations. The material is organized by occupations and the following information is presented for each…

  6. Astronomy Allies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewelling, Heather; Alatalo, Katherine A.

    2017-01-01

    Imagine you are a grad student, at your first conference, and a prominent senior scientist shows interest in your work, and he makes things get way too personal? What would you do? Would you report it? Or would you decide, after a few other instances of harassment, that maybe you shouldn't pursue astronomy? Harassment is under-reported, the policies can be difficult to understand or hard to find, and it can be very intimidating as a young scientist to report it to the proper individuals. The Astronomy Allies Program is designed to help you with these sorts of problems. We are a group of volunteers that will help by doing the following: provide safe walks home during the conference, someone to talk to confidentially, as an intervener, as a resource to report harassment. The Allies are a diverse group of scientists committed to acting as mentors, advocates, and liaisons. The Winter 2015 AAS meeting was the first meeting that had Astronomy Allies, and Astronomy Allies provided a website for information, as well as a twitter, email, and phone number for anyone who needs our help or would like more information. We posted about the Astronomy Allies on the Women In Astronomy blog, and this program resonates with many people: either they want to help, or they have experienced harassment in the past and don't want to see it in the future. Harassment may not happen to most conference participants, but it's wrong, it's against the AAS anti-harassment policy ( http://aas.org/policies/anti-harassment-policy ), it can be very damaging, and if it happens to even one person, that is unacceptable. We intend to improve the culture at conferences to make it so that harassers feel they can't get away with their unprofessional behavior.

  7. Astronomy Allies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewelling, Heather; Alatalo, Katherine

    2015-08-01

    Imagine you are a grad student, at your first conference, and a prominent senior scientist shows interest in your work, and he makes things get way too personal? What would you do? Would you report it? Or would you decide, after a few other instances of harassment, that maybe you shouldn't pursue astronomy? Harassment is under-reported, the policies can be difficult to understand or hard to find, and it can be very intimidating as a young scientist to report it to the proper individuals. The Astronomy Allies Program is designed to help you with these sorts of problems. We are a group of volunteers that will help by doing the following: provide safe walks home during the conference, someone to talk to confidentially, as an intervener, as a resource to report harassment. The Allies are a diverse group of scientists committed to acting as mentors, advocates, and liaisons. The Winter 2015 AAS meeting was the first meeting that had Astronomy Allies, and Astronomy Allies provided a website for information, as well as a twitter, email, and phone number for anyone who needs our help or would like more information. We posted about the Astronomy Allies on the Women In Astronomy blog, and this program resonates with many people: either they want to help, or they have experienced harassment in the past and don't want to see it in the future. Harassment may not happen to most conference participants, but it's wrong, it's against the AAS anti-harassment policy ( http://aas.org/policies/anti-harassment-policy ), it can be very damaging, and if it happens to even one person, that is unacceptable. We intend to improve the culture at conferences to make it so that harassers feel they can't get away with their unprofessional behavior.

  8. Astronomy Allies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewelling, Heather; Alatalo, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Imagine you are a grad student, at your first conference, and a prominent senior scientist shows interest in your work, and he makes things get way too personal? What would you do? Would you report it? Or would you decide, after a few other instances of harassment, that maybe you shouldn't pursue astronomy? Harassment is under-reported, the policies can be difficult to understand or hard to find, and it can be very intimidating as a young scientist to report it to the proper individuals. The Astronomy Allies Program is designed to help you with these sorts of problems. We are a group of volunteers that will help by doing the following: provide safe walks home during the conference, someone to talk to confidentially, as an intervener, as a resource to report harassment. The Allies are a diverse group of scientists committed to acting as mentors, advocates, and liaisons. The Winter 2015 AAS meeting was the first meeting that had Astronomy Allies, and Astronomy Allies provided a website for information, as well as a twitter, email, and phone number for anyone who needs our help or would like more information. We posted about the Astronomy Allies on the Women In Astronomy blog, and this program resonates with many people: either they want to help, or they have experienced harassment in the past and don't want to see it in the future. Harassment may not happen to most conference participants, but it's wrong, it's against the AAS anti-harassment policy ( http://aas.org/policies/anti-harassment-policy ), it can be very damaging, and if it happens to even one person, that is unacceptable. We intend to improve the culture at conferences to make it so that harassers feel they can't get away with their unprofessional behavior.

  9. Deployment-related mental health support: comparative analysis of NATO and allied ISAF partners

    PubMed Central

    Vermetten, Eric; Greenberg, Neil; Boeschoten, Manon A.; Delahaije, Roos; Jetly, Rakesh; Castro, Carl A.; McFarlane, Alexander C.

    2014-01-01

    Background For years there has been a tremendous gap in our understanding of the mental health effects of deployment and the efforts by military forces at trying to minimize or mitigate these. Many military forces have recently systematized the mental support that is provided to support operational deployments. However, the rationale for doing so and the consequential allocation of resources are felt to vary considerably across North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) International Security Assistance (ISAF) partners. This review aims to compare the organization and practice of mental support by five partnering countries in the recent deployment in Afghanistan in order to identify and compare the key methods and structures for delivering mental health support, describe bottlenecks and illustrate new developments. Method Information was collected through document analysis and semi-structured interviews with key military mental healthcare stakeholders. The review resulted from close collaboration between key military mental healthcare professionals within the Australian Defense Forces (ADF), Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), United Kingdom Armed Forces (UK), Netherlands Armed Forces (NLD), and the United States Army (US). Key stakeholders were interviewed about the mental health support provided during a serviceperson's military career. The main items discussed were training, prevention, early identification, intervention, and aftercare in the field of mental health. Results All forces reported that much attention was paid to mental health during the individual's military career, including deployment. In doing so there was much overlap between the rationale and applied methods. The main method of providing support was through training and education. The educative focus was to strengthen the mental resilience of individual soldiers while providing a range of mental healthcare services. All forces had abandoned standard psychological debriefing after critical incidents

  10. The Mental Vitality @ Work study: design of a randomized controlled trial on the effect of a workers' health surveillance mental module for nurses and allied health professionals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Employees in health care service are at high risk for developing mental health complaints. The effects of mental health complaints on work can have serious consequences for the quality of care provided by these workers. To help health service workers remain healthy and productive, preventive actions are necessary. A Workers' Health Surveillance (WHS) mental module may be an effective strategy to monitor and promote good (mental) health and work performance. The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a three arm cluster randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of a WHS mental module for nurses and allied health professionals. Two strategies for this WHS mental module will be compared along with data from a control group. Additionally, the cost effectiveness of the approaches will be evaluated from a societal perspective. Methods The study is designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial consisting of three arms (two intervention groups, 1 control group) with randomization at ward level. The study population consists of 86 departments in one Dutch academic medical center with a total of 1731 nurses and allied health professionals. At baseline, after three months and after six months of follow-up, outcomes will be assessed by online questionnaires. In both intervention arms, participants will complete a screening to detect problems in mental health and work functioning and receive feedback on their screening results. In cases of impairments in mental health or work functioning in the first intervention arm, a consultation with an occupational physician will be offered. The second intervention arm offers a choice of self-help e-mental health interventions, which will be tailored based on each individual's mental health state and work functioning. The primary outcomes will be help-seeking behavior and work functioning. Secondary outcomes will be mental health and wellbeing. Furthermore, cost-effectiveness in both intervention arms

  11. Impact of interdisciplinary learning on critical thinking using case study method in allied health care graduate students.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Scott D; Lester Short, Glenda F; Hendrix, E Michael

    2011-01-01

    It remains unclear which classroom experiences, if any, foster critical think ability. We measured the effectiveness of interdisciplinary, case-based learning on the critical-thinking ability of graduate students enrolled in allied health care programs. We designed a voluntary classroom experience to examine the effectiveness of case studies used in an interdisciplinary setting to increase critical-thinking ability. Two groups of students were measured for their critical thinking ability using an online assessment both before and after their respective classroom experiences. One group of 14 graduate students from 4 different allied health care programs (interdisciplinary, ID) discussed complex interdisciplinary case studies and answered multiple-choice type questions formed around the cases. The second group was composed of graduate students (n = 28) from a single disciple enrolled in a clinical anatomy course (discipline specific, DS). They discussed complex case studies specific to their discipline and answered multiple-choice questions formed around the cases. There was no overall change in critical-thinking scores from the pre- to post-test in either group (delta scores: ID 1.5 ± 5.3, DS -1.7 ± 5.7). However, ID students scoring below the median on the pretest improved significantly (paired t-test, pre 50.7 ± 3.8, post 54.2 ± 1.7, p = 0.02). The interdisciplinary learning experience improved critical-thinking ability in students with the least proficiency. As case studies have long been used to advance deeper learning, these data provide evidence for a broader impact of cases when used in an interdisciplinary setting, especially for those students coming in with the least ability.

  12. A Comparative Study of the Effectiveness of Two Bayesian Models for Predicting the Academic Successes of Selected Allied Health Students Enrolled in the Comprehensive Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, Dennis; Houston, Charles A.

    The purpose of this study was to present and evaluate Bayesian-type models for estimating probabilities of program completion and for predicting first quarter grade point averages of community college students entering certain allied health fields. Two Bayesian models were tested. Bayesian Model 1--Estimating Probabilities of Program…

  13. Predicting Grade Point Average, Withdrawal and Graduation from Four Allied Health Programs at Miami-Dade Community College Medical Center Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bistreich, Alan M.

    The validity of seven criteria utilized in conjunction with personal interviews and School and College Ability Test scores in the selection of applicants for admission to four Allied Health programs was investigated. The independent predictor variables studied were high school grade point average (GPA), the number of high school natural science…

  14. Cultivating Professional Allies for Sexual Minority Youth: A Community-Based Educational Intervention.

    PubMed

    Craig, Shelley L; Doiron, Christopher; Dillon, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Sexual minority youth (SMY) face multiple risks in their daily lives that may influence their need for supportive care. Health and social service providers have unique opportunities to provide culturally competent services to these youth. This article describes a community-based educational intervention created to increase providers' knowledge, skills, and intention to support SMY. Based on the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills model, this pilot study found that for a diverse sample of multidisciplinary professionals (n = 2,850), the odds of behavioral intention (BI) to support SMY were significantly higher when trainings were relevant to the professionals' experience (OR = 1.3), were sensitive (OR = 1.3), developed skills (OR = 1.1), and incorporated policy (OR = 1.2). Implications for the delivery of community-based trainings are provided.

  15. Priorities for Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, David F.

    Twelve priority areas for health education in the 1980s are identified, based on the magnitude and seriousness of the problems addressed; the solidity of the research base; and the likelihood that health education may facilitate improvement in the area. The twelve areas are: (1) cigarette smoking; (2) aging and the aged; (3) mental health; (4)…

  16. Assessing Substance Abuse among Health Care Students and the Efficacy of Educational Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Elizabeth Ann; And Others

    1997-01-01

    At entry, 185 nursing, 152 medical, 140 pharmacy, and 111 allied health students were surveyed; all but the medical students were resurveyed two years later following educational interventions. Nursing students displayed more drug use than did pharmacy students, whose curriculum placed more emphasis on drug and alcohol education. (SK)

  17. Community Health Workers as Allies in Hypertension Self-Management and Medication Adherence in the United States, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Brownstein, J. Nell; Satsangi, Anamika; Escoffery, Cam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rates of hypertension control remain low among underserved populations in the United States; moreover, disparities in hypertension-related cardiovascular disease death are increasing. Community health workers (CHWs) can address barriers to hypertension control among underrepresented and diverse populations. We identify unique roles CHWs play in hypertension self-management and medication adherence. Methods In 2014, we conducted a mixed methods study with an online survey of 265 CHWs and 23 telephone interviews. The survey and interview guide contained questions about CHWs’ roles in hypertension self-management and hypertension medication adherence. We used descriptive statistics to analyze survey data and used inductive thematic analysis for the qualitative data. Results CHWs described working in partnership with patients and various health care providers to assist people in hypertension self-management. Roles were flexible and multifaceted but patient-driven. CHWs used various delivery methods to assist patients in overcoming barriers to medication adherence. CHWs interacted with patients primarily through individual clinical sessions or home visits. On average, they visit about 8 times per month, about 40 minutes per visit, over 7 months. CHWs often addressed barriers related to medicine-taking and refills and support patient–provider communications. Conclusion Results from this study will help health care professionals, policy makers, and academics better understand the work of CHWs. CHWs are important provider allies for improving hypertension prevention and self-management, especially among underserved and diverse populations in the United States. PMID:28033090

  18. Cognitive and Affective Dimensions in Health Related Education. Proceedings of a Conference (Gainesville, Florida, January 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Margaret K., Ed.; And Others

    Ten papers dealing with various aspects of cognitive and affective dimensions of the allied health student are presented. They are: "A Review of Research on Cognitive and Affective Dimensions of Education for the Health Related Professions" by Margaret K. Morgan, "Methodological Problems in the Study of Affective and Cognitive…

  19. A preliminary evaluation of the Visual CARE Measure for use by Allied Health Professionals with children and their parents.

    PubMed

    Place, Morag A; Murphy, Joan; Duncan, Edward A S; Reid, Jane M; Mercer, Stewart W

    2016-03-01

    The Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) Measure (Mercer et al., 2004) is a patient-rated experience measure of practitioner empathy, developed and validated within adult health services. This study reports the feasibility, acceptability, reliability and validity of three adapted versions of the original CARE measure for the paediatric setting, namely the Visual CARE Measure 5Q, 10Q and 10Q Parent (also known as the Paediatric CARE Measure). Three hundred and sixty-nine participants (N = 149 children (40%) and N = 220 parents (60%)) completed the measure following consultation with an Allied Health Professional (AHP). AHPs felt it was feasible to use the measure in routine practice and the majority of children and parents found the measure easy to understand (98%) and complete (98%). Internal reliability (Cronbach's α) was .746 for the 5Q, .926 for the 10Q and .963 for the 10Q parent. Few participants used the 'not applicable' response (N = 28 (8%)), suggesting high content validity. AHPs found the measures relevant (95%) and useful (90%) and reported that they were likely to use them again (96%). The Visual CARE Measure shows promise as a useful tool to enable children and their parents to give their views. Further research on the tool's reliability and validity is required.

  20. Education in the 80's: Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Robert D., Ed.; And Others

    Current and future status of issues in health education are discussed in thirteen articles by health educators. The topics of the essays are: (1) holistic health; (2) a holistic approach to stress reduction; (3) stress management education; (4) heart disease education; (5) consumer health education; (6) acceptance of traditional, nonscientific…

  1. A Conceptual Framework for Clinical Education in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radtke, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To develop a model for clinical education in athletic training education based on integration of various allied health professional clinical education models. Background: Clinical education is a critical component of allied health education programs. It allows for the transfer of knowledge and skills from classroom to practical…

  2. Soil Health Educational Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoorman, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Soil health and cover crops are topics of interest to farmers, gardeners, and students. Three soil health and cover crop demonstrations provide educational resources. Demonstrations one outlines two educational cover crop seed displays, including the advantages and disadvantages. Demonstration two shows how to construct and grow a cover crop root…

  3. Professional allies: the storying of allies to LGBTQ students on a college campus.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Maura; Broad, K L; Walsh, Clare F; Nutter, Kathryn L

    2013-01-01

    This article details the narratives of faculty and staff involved in a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) ally organization at a large southeastern state university. We illustrate how interview participants diverged from organizational literature on how to be an ally by offering a different narrative, one of professional responsibility to a diverse student body. We expound upon how this notion of professional responsibility differs from most models for understanding ally development and action. We suggest that from an organizational standpoint, these professional ally self-concepts make sense and should be taken into account when building ally organizations in educational settings.

  4. Perceived Benefits of Mobile Learning Devices for Doctoral Students in a School of Allied Health Professions.

    PubMed

    Cotter, J James; Gendron, T; Kupstas, P; Tartaglia, A; Will, L

    2015-01-01

    Graduate students increasingly use personal electronic devices for learning but little is known about how they evaluate their benefits as mobile learning devices (MLDs). This study surveyed students in a hybrid distance education doctoral (PhD) program about their perceptions of the benefits of MLDs. Overall, the study found a range of opinions about the value of MLDs with about one-half of respondents finding benefits. Respondents emphasized that the MLDs improved motivation and productivity and that they were helpful in reviewing course-casts of on-campus sessions. Continued research is needed on doctoral education in general and the increasing use of innovations such as MLDs.

  5. Risky business: Lived experience mental health practice, nurses as potential allies.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Louise; Happell, Brenda; Reid-Searl, Kerry

    2016-09-21

    Mental health policy includes a clear expectation that consumers will participate in all aspects of the design and delivery of mental health services. This edict has led to employment roles for people with lived experience of significant mental health challenges and service use. Despite the proliferation of these roles, research into factors impacting their success or otherwise is limited. This paper presents findings from a grounded theory study investigating the experiences of Lived Experience Practitioners in the context of their employment. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 Lived Experience Practitioners. Risk was identified as a core category, and included sub-categories: vulnerability, 'out and proud', fear to disclose, and self-care. Essentially participants described the unique vulnerabilities of their mental health challenges being known, and while there were many positives about disclosing there was also apprehension about personal information being so publically known. Self-care techniques were important mediators against these identified risks. The success of lived experience roles requires support and nurses can play an important role, given the size of the nursing workforce in mental health, the close relationships nurses enjoy with consumers and the contribution they have made to the development of lived experience roles within academia.

  6. Working with Allies and Partners: A Cost-Based Analysis of U.S. Air Forces in Europe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    public service of the RAND Corporation. CHILDREN AND FAMILIES EDUCATION AND THE ARTS ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT HEALTH AND HEALTH CARE INFRASTRUCTURE AND...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report (SAR) 18. NUMBER OF...United States and key NATO allies maintain a tactical nuclear storage and delivery capability that requires both U.S. presence and exercises with allies

  7. Preparing Teachers as Allies in Indigenous Education: Benefits of an American Indian Content and Pedagogy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInnes, Brian D.

    2017-01-01

    The study explores relationship building and improvements in knowledge, skills, and dispositions of pre-service teachers enrolled in an Indigenous education content and pedagogy methods course. The Teaching American Indian Students in the Elementary Classroom course stands alone from other diversity education offerings at the University of…

  8. Unmet needs for specialty, dental, mental, and allied health care among children with special health care needs: are there racial/ethnic disparities?

    PubMed

    Ngui, Emmanuel M; Flores, Glenn

    2007-11-01

    We examined racial/ethnic disparities in unmet specialty, dental, mental, and allied health care needs among children with special health care needs (CSHCN) using data on 38,866 children in the National Survey of CSHCN. Compared with White CSHCN, Black CSHCN had significantly greater unmet specialty (9.6% vs. 6.7%), dental (16% vs. 8.7%), and mental (27% vs. 17%) health care needs. Hispanic CSHCN had greater unmet dental care needs (15.8% vs. 8.7%). Black females had greater unmet mental health care needs than other groups (41% vs. 13-20%). Most disparities disappeared after multivariate adjustment. Significant risk factors for unmet health care needs included uninsurance, having no personal doctor/nurse, poverty, and condition stability and severity. Eliminating unmet specialty, dental, and mental health care needs for all CSHCN, and especially minority CSHCN, may require greater efforts to reduce poverty and increase insurance coverage among CSHCN, better mental health care assessment of Black female CSHCN, and ensuring all CSHCN have a medical home.

  9. Olly Olly Oxen Free (or Ally Ally in Free): Playing Hide and Seek in Allocating Resources for Child and Youth Health.

    PubMed

    Hiltz, Mary-Ann; Mitton, Craig; Smith, Neale; Dowling, Laura; Campbell, Matthew; Magee, J Fergall; Gibson, Jennifer L; Gujar, Shashi Ashok; Levy, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    There are powerful arguments for increased investment in child and youth health. But the extent to which these benefits can be realized is shaped by health institutions' priority setting processes. We asked, "What are the unique features of a pediatric care setting that should influence choice and implementation of a formal priority setting and resource allocation process?" Based on multiple sources of data, we created a "made-for-child-health" lens containing three foci reflective of the distinct features of pediatric care settings: the diversity of child and youth populations, the challenges in measuring outcomes and the complexity of patient and public engagement.

  10. Feasibility of Retraining Displaced Aerospace Personnel Into the Allied and Public Health Occupations: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindenberg, Klaus W.

    The final report of a study to determine the feasibility of retraining displaced aerospace personnel in the Cape Kennedy, Florida, area is presented. Three broad areas were examined: (1) the development of a profile analysis of aerospace and defense related displaced personnel; (2) compilation of health manpower employment opportunity data; (3)…

  11. Nursing Home Social Workers and Allied Professionals: Enhancing Geriatric Mental Health Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonifas, Robin P.

    2011-01-01

    Research has highlighted the challenges social services professionals face in providing quality psychosocial care to persons living in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs). A primary area of difficulty is addressing the needs of persons with mental health conditions, including problematic behaviors associated with dementia. This study evaluated the…

  12. Enhancement of Anatomical Learning and Developing Clinical Competence of First-Year Medical and Allied Health Profession Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keim Janssen, Sarah A.; VanderMeulen, Stephane P.; Shostrom, Valerie K.; Lomneth, Carol S.

    2014-01-01

    Hands-on educational experiences can stimulate student interest, increase knowledge retention, and enhance development of clinical skills. The Lachman test, used to assess the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), is commonly performed by health care professionals and is relatively easy to teach to first-year health profession…

  13. Health Education in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashem, Anwar

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a historical overview of the evolution of health education in Saudi Arabia. It outlines milestones in the development of the health education profession and traces the roles of various health sectors and their achievements in the health education field. Additionally, this review seeks to describe the status of health education professionals in Saudi Arabia. PMID:27606106

  14. [Nursing research and the Hospital Programme for Nursing and Allied Health Research].

    PubMed

    Chardin, Marc; Benazzouz, Marie; Brocker, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Nursing research is perceived as a way of improving quality of care. As is the case in Britain and Switzerland, this ambitious activity is developing in France, favoured by the raising of nursing studies to university level and boosted by funding from the French ministry of health. A nursing team at Pitié-Salpêtrière hospital, in Paris, share their enthusiasm for this new approach.

  15. A regional training programme for radiotherapists and allied professionals for the west African health community.

    PubMed

    Durosinmi-Etti, F A; Mouelle-Sone, A

    1993-03-01

    With 47% of the population under 15 years of age and the control of infectious and other communicable diseases, cancer will likely constitute a major health problem in West Africa in future. Radiotherapy facilities and trained manpower to run them are very limited within the subregion. This paper quantifies the severity of the situation and discusses a practical approach aimed at coping with the situation through the organisation of a training programme for radiotherapists, medical physicists and radiation technologists as part of the strategies for cancer control in West Africa. A curriculum is proposed for the training of radiotherapists.

  16. Enhancing teamwork among allied health students: evaluation of an interprofessional workshop.

    PubMed

    Rodger, Sylvia; Mickan, Sharon; Marinac, Julie; Woodyatt, Gail

    2005-01-01

    This report outlines the teamwork learning outcomes of an interprofessional workshop conducted with a cohort of 81 graduate-entry students of occupational therapy, physiotherapy, speech pathology, and audiology. This four-hour workshop was based around a case scenario of a child with developmental coordination disorder. This report describes and evaluates the development of knowledge and skills of teamwork that were facilitated through this workshop. Students completed questionnaires before and after the workshop about their knowledge of teamwork, requisites for working together, the utility of the workshop, and learning outcomes. The evaluation indicated that the workshop was successful from the students' perspectives in confirming the importance of teamwork and the processes of communication and collaborative goal setting. Students refined their own professional roles and developed an appreciation of the contribution of other professions and parents. This recognition of the comparative value of different professional contributions in providing holistic patient care is one of the starting points for education about interprofessional teamwork.

  17. The Importance of Consensus in Determining Educational Standards in Health and Human Services Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This report discusses the need for program accreditation and licensure in allied health fields, and in particular, addresses two issues: (1) an attempt by the American Physical Therapy Association to increase the entry-level standards for physical therapy education without achieving consensus; and (2) the attempt to reduce entry-level standards…

  18. Completed Research in Health, Physical Education, Recreation & Dance; Including International Sources. Volume 27. 1985 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedson, Patty S., Ed.

    This compilation lists research completed in the areas of health, physical education, recreation, dance, and allied areas during 1984. The document is arranged in two parts. In the index, references are arranged under the subject headings in alphabetical order. Abstracts of master's and doctor's theses from institutions offering graduate programs…

  19. Completed Research in Health, Physical Education, Recreation & Dance. Volume 31, 1989 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberland, Craig, Ed.; Moffatt, Robert J., Ed.

    This compilation lists research completed during 1988 in the areas of health, physical education, recreation, dance, and allied areas. The compilation includes 513 entries, most with substantive abstracts, of master's theses and doctoral dissertations from institutions offering graduate programs in those areas. A 1,225-item bibliography of…

  20. Health Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Tim

    2012-01-01

    When considering the relevance of contemporary learning theories to health education and promotion work in schools, it is necessary to inspect the kinds of discourses used therein for how they understand and thereby constitute people and their worlds. For instance, contemporary educational practices, teaching and learning included, are dominated…

  1. Change and Continuity in Modern Japanese Educational History: Allied Occupational Reforms Forty Years Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Harry

    1991-01-01

    Describes the efforts of post-World War II U.S. occupiers to change radically the structure, philosophies, content, and teaching methods of Japanese elementary, secondary, and higher education. Compares prewar and current conditions. Discusses cultural and political reasons why these efforts to transplant foreign institutions and values largely…

  2. Continuing Education and Community Services: A Survey of Oregon Courses and Allied Learning Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etter, David C.

    A 20-item questionnaire was mailed to 1,032 prospective Continuing Education and Community Service agencies in Oregon. Two follow-up mailings plus interviews helped to produce a 77.8% return and the identification of 176 public and private and school and nonschool agencies. The purpose of the investigation was to ascertain what course and allied…

  3. Allies in Learning: Critical Insights into the Importance of Staff-Student Interactions in University Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Sarah; Radloff, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Discussions of the quality of learning in university education often focus on curricula. Less attention is paid to the role of student-staff interactions. In a context in which a host of factors place pressure on the opportunities for students and staff to interact, it is important to use empirical insights to inform decisions about how to…

  4. Preparing LGBTQ-Allies and Combating Homophobia in a U. S. Teacher Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Caroline T.

    2010-01-01

    Interns in a US teacher education program were surveyed regarding their attitudes towards diversity, particularly issues of sexuality, their feelings of "cultural competence" around diversity, and the repertoires of practices and resources they feel prepared to draw on in their work with middle and high schools students (11-18 year…

  5. Protective Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Ganime

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: As a result of wars, starvation, traffic accidents, homicide, infectious diseases, insufficient adult protection, migration, and inadequate legal reforms the mortality rate of children has become a serious problem in the world. Protective health education contributes to a child's physical and social health. In this case, the…

  6. Uneasy allies: pro-choice physicians, feminist health activists and the struggle for abortion rights.

    PubMed

    Joffe, C E; Weitz, T A; Stacey, C L

    2004-09-01

    Abortion represents a particularly interesting subject for a social movements analysis of healthcare issues because of the involvement of both feminist pro-choice activists and a segment of the medical profession. Although both groups have long shared the same general goal of legal abortion, the alliance has over time been an uneasy one, and in many ways a contradictory one. This paper traces points of convergence as well as points of contention between the two groups, specifically: highlighting the tensions between the feminist view of abortion as a women-centred service, with a limited, 'technical' role for the physicians, and the abortion-providing physicians' logic of further medicalization/professional upgrading of abortion services as a response to the longstanding marginality and stigmatisation of abortion providers. Only by noting the evolving relationships between these two crucial sets of actors can one fully understand the contemporary abortion rights movement. We conclude by speculating about similar patterns in medical/lay relationships in other health social movements where 'dissident doctors' and lay activists are similarly seeking recognition for medical services that are controversial.

  7. Student perceptions of the use of debate as a teaching strategy in the allied health professions.

    PubMed

    Smith Randolph, Diane

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents results from a survey regarding student perceptions of the use of debate in two occupational therapy courses. The survey was initially used as a classroom evaluation, consisting of open-ended questions asked by the instructor and answered by students in a research and a policy course. Students then were randomly assigned to two groups, which present their arguments and then fielded questions. After the debates, students were asked to answer four questions: 1) What did I learn from the debate?; 2) What did you like best about the debate?; 3) What did you like least about the debate?; and 4) Would you recommend this activity for future classes? Results of the student's comments to the four questions showed that debate was perceived by the majority of students as a useful technique for discussing issues both in a research course and in a health policy-related course. Comments from students showed that debate encouraged active participation in class, out of class research experiences, provided an opportunity to discuss issues and develop conclusions, and promoted the ability to advocate for themselves.

  8. The use of computers to teach human anatomy and physiology to allied health and nursing students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Valerie J.

    Educational institutions are under tremendous pressure to adopt the newest technologies in order to prepare their students to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century. For the last twenty years huge amounts of money have been spent on computers, printers, software, multimedia projection equipment, and so forth. A reasonable question is, "Has it worked?" Has this infusion of resources, financial as well as human, resulted in improved learning? Are the students meeting the intended learning goals? Any attempt to develop answers to these questions should include examining the intended goals and exploring the effects of the changes on students and faculty. This project investigated the impact of a specific application of a computer program in a community college setting on students' attitudes and understanding of human anatomy and physiology. In this investigation two sites of the same community college with seemingly similar students populations, seven miles apart, used different laboratory activities to teach human anatomy and physiology. At one site nursing students were taught using traditional dissections and laboratory activities; at the other site two of the dissections, specifically cat and sheep pluck, were replaced with the A.D.A.M.RTM (Animated Dissection of Anatomy for Medicine) computer program. Analysis of the attitude data indicated that students at both sites were extremely positive about their laboratory experiences. Analysis of the content data indicated a statistically significant difference in performance between the two sites in two of the eight content areas that were studied. For both topics the students using the computer program scored higher. A detailed analysis of the surveys, interviews with faculty and students, examination of laboratory materials, and observations of laboratory facilities in both sites, and cost-benefit analysis led to the development of seven recommendations. The recommendations call for action at the level of the

  9. Education, cognition, health knowledge, and health behavior.

    PubMed

    Mocan, Naci; Altindag, Duha T

    2014-04-01

    Using data from NLSY97, we analyze the impact of education on health behavior. Controlling for health knowledge does not influence the impact of education on health behavior, supporting the productive efficiency hypothesis. Accounting for cognitive ability does not significantly alter the relationship between education and health behavior. Similarly, the impact of education on health behavior is the same between those with and without a learning disability, suggesting that cognition is not likely to be a significant factor in explaining the impact of education on health behavior.

  10. Continuing Education for the Health Professions. Developing, Managing, and Evaluating Programs for Maximum Impact on Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Joseph S., Ed.; And Others

    Advice on making continuing education (CE) responsive to the practice needs of professionals in medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, allied health, and public health is provided in 16 chapters. Attention is directed to: establishing realistic goals, tailoring programs to specific needs, recruiting subject matter experts, evaluating programs and…

  11. Allied Health Leadership in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Invitational Conference Proceedings (Williamsburg, Virginia, April 17-19, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kra, Eleanor, Ed.

    The following papers are included: "Opening Remarks" (McTernan); "Conference Goals and Plans" (Douglas); "Challenge to Leadership" (Pearson); "Implications of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention for the Practice of Respiratory Care" (Axton); "Health Promotion Strategies in Dietetic Practice"…

  12. Community Colleges of Colorado: Status of Health Care Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Randy

    The rapid increase in Colorado's population has created a huge demand for allied health care providers. This increase, coupled with the aging baby boomer population, has created a near-crisis situation in many Colorado communities. The U.S. Department of Labor predicts severe shortages of allied health care workers for the next several years. The…

  13. THE DETERMINANTS OF NURSING, ALLIED HEALTH AND NON MEDICAL STAFFS’ HEALTH LITERACY IN HOSPITALS OF A DEVELOPING COUNTRY

    PubMed Central

    Kahouei, Mehdi; Roghani, Panoe Seyed; Zadeh, Jamileh Mahdi; Firouzeh, Mehri

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Given the role of personnel working in hospitals in promoting health, there is a clear need for a study to clarify the level of health literacy and affecting factors on it among the non medical and medical staffs working in hospitals. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was performed on 389 employees who were working in hospitals affiliated to Semnan University of Medical Sciences of Iran in 2013. Results: There were significant relationships among the use of TV (P=0.044, CI=95%, Odd’s Ratio= 1.825), the use of books and journals (P<0.0001, CI=95%, Odd’s Ratio= 5.551), the use of internet (P<0.039, CI=95%, Odd’s Ratio= 0.641), the use of physicians (P<0.0001, CI=95%, Odd’s Ratio=0.070) and the nonmedical and medical staffs’ health literacy level. Conclusions: The findings indicate media and print information resources more than physicians and electronic information sources affect on the increase of nonmedical and medical staffs’ health literacy of hospitals of Iran. It also is better to train Iranian physicians more about the skills required for transferring health concepts. Given the important role of medical staffs in the increase of health literacy level in other members of the community, it is better to use other suitable information sources to transfer health information to all individuals in the community. PMID:26889103

  14. Framework for Healthful Living Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    The Healthful Living Education program promotes behaviors that contribute to a healthful lifestyle and improved quality of life for all students. The Framework for Healthy Living Education supports and reinforces the goals and objectives of its three major components: health education, physical education, and alcohol and other drugs. When the…

  15. Exploring the perspectives of allied health practitioners toward the use of journal clubs as a medium for promoting evidence-based practice: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Research evidence suggests that journal clubs (JCs) are one approach which can be used to bridge the gap between research and clinical practice. However, there are issues which potentially threaten their viability such as on-going participation or compliance with attendance, which require further exploration. The objectives of this study are: to explore the views and perspectives of allied health practitioners (AHPs) regarding the use of any type of JC in promoting evidence-based practice (EBP); to identify ways in which an innovative model of JC developed by the International Centre for Allied Health Evidence (iCAHE) might be refined. Methods A qualitative descriptive study utilising focus group interviews with various groups of AHP was undertaken-- those who have been exposed to the iCAHE JC model and those who have no experience of the iCAHE model (although they may have had exposure to other forms of JC). Maximum variation sampling was used to recruit participants for the study. Transcripts of focus groups were coded and distilled into content-related categories. Results Six focus groups with 39 AHPs were facilitated. Allied health practitioners perspectives' on JCs were classified in five broad categories: utility and benefits of a JC, elements of an effective and sustainable JC, barriers to participation, incentives for participation, and opportunities for improvement in the current iCAHE JC model. Overall, JCs were seen as a forum for reflective practice and keeping up-to-date with research evidence, and a venue for learning the processes involved in critical appraisal. Limited knowledge of statistics and heavy clinical workload were reported as barriers to participation in a JC. Strategies such as mentoring, strong support from managers, and providing CPD (continuing professional development) points can potentially address these barriers. Opportunities for refinement of the current iCAHE model were raised. Conclusions This study suggests that a

  16. Psychoneuroimmunology in Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Carl

    1992-01-01

    Studies suggest that stress, emotions, personality, and cognition can affect the immune system's response to disease. This paper argues the need for psychoneuroimmunology to be taught in health education courses and provides a brief overview of research showing the link between the mind and the immune system. (GLR)

  17. Instructional practices for evidence-based practice with pre-registration allied health students: a review of recent research and developments.

    PubMed

    Hitch, Danielle; Nicola-Richmond, Kelli

    2016-07-28

    The aim of this study is to update a previous review published in this journal on the effectiveness of teaching and assessment interventions for evidence based practice in health professions, and to determine the extent to which the five recommendations made from that review have been implemented. The Integrating Theory, Evidence and Action method was used to synthesise all published evidence from 2011 to 2015, which addressed instructional practices used for evidence based practice with pre-registration allied health students. Seventeen articles were found to meet the inclusion criteria, and were analysed for both their individual rigour and relationship to the five recommendations. The evidence reviewed in this study was diverse in both its geographical setting and the allied health disciplines represented. Most of the evidence used less rigorous methods, and the evidence base is generally exploratory in nature. To date, the five recommendations regarding instructional practices in this area have been implemented to varying degrees. Many current practices promote social negotiation, collaborative decision-making and collaborative learning, so the social constructivist approach is being adopted. However, the prior knowledge of students is not being assessed as a basis for scaffolding, communication of evidence based practice to varying audiences is rarely addressed and the role of clinicians in the learning of evidence based practice knowledge, skills, beliefs and attitudes remains limited.

  18. Support for mandatory health care worker influenza vaccination among allied health professionals, technical staff, and medical students.

    PubMed

    Banach, David B; Zhang, Cen; Factor, Stephanie H; Calfee, David P

    2013-04-01

    Although policies mandating annual influenza vaccination among health care workers (HCWs) are recommended, little is known about which HCWs support mandatory vaccination. We surveyed non-physician, non-nursing HCWs to identify beliefs associated with supporting mandatory HCW vaccination. Although similarities were identified, some beliefs and concerns associated with supporting mandatory vaccination differed among HCW groups. Policy makers should understand these differences and address beliefs and concerns of all HCW groups when attempting to implement a mandatory influenza vaccination policy.

  19. Health Education. Common Curriculum Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This guide presents the common curriculm goals for health education developed by the Oregon State Department of Education. Four content strands--safe living, stressor/risk-taking management, physical fitness, and nutrition--are a synthesis of the traditional health education and health promotion objectives. Knowledge and skills objectives are…

  20. Health education telecommunications experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Health/Education Telecommunications Experiment (HET) was conducted jointly by NASA and HEW on NASA's ATS-6 communications satellite. This experiment actually consisted of six experiments testing health and education applications of a communication spacecraft producing a broadcast of color television directly from space to over 120 low-cost receivers located in remote rural areas throughout the U.S. (including Alaska). The experiments were conducted over the period from 2 July 1974 to 20 May 1975 and operated on an almost daily basis. The overall telecommunications system to support these experiments consisted of many elements: The ATS-6 spacecraft; five different types of earth stations consisting of 120 video receive terminals, 51 telephony tranceivers and eight video originating terminals of three different types. Actual performance of the equipment as measured in the field was shown to equal or exceed predicted values.

  1. Collaborative Community: Health Education Web Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Setta

    2004-01-01

    Four community colleges in Western Massachusetts--Berkshire Community College (BCC), Greenfield Community College (GCC), Holyoke Community College (HCC), and Springfield Technical Community College (STCC)--have created a collaborative Web site, at www.healthprograms.org, to present information on allied health associate degrees or certificate…

  2. Completed Research in Health, Physical Education and Recreation Including International Sources. Volume 22. 1980 Edition. Covering Research Completed in 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Anne L., Ed.; Nelson, Jack, Ed.

    This compilation lists research completed in the areas of health, physical education, recreation, and allied areas during 1979. It is arranged in three parts. Part one, the index, gives cross references for all the listings in parts two and three. References are arranged alphabetically under the subject headings. Part two contains a bibliography…

  3. Health Ethics Education for Health Administration Chaplains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Russell; Broussard, Amelia; Duckett, Todd

    2008-01-01

    It is imperative for divinity and health administration programs to improve their level of ethics education for their graduates who work as health administration chaplains. With an initial presentation of the variation of ethical dilemmas presented in health care facilities covering social, organizational, and patient levels, we indicate the need…

  4. Health Educators and Community Health Workers

    MedlinePlus

    ... contact your state’s board of health, nursing, or human services. Important Qualities Analytical skills. Health educators collect and analyze data ... and nutritionists are experts in the use of food and nutrition to promote health and manage disease. ... and causes of disease and injury in humans. They seek to reduce the risk and occurrence ...

  5. Public Health Education in Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    This report documents issues related to the work of the Florida Comprehensive Health Professions Education Plan. Public health education prepares students for initial employment or advancement in a number of positions. While the public health work force is primarily employed in various units in local, state, and federal governments, industry also…

  6. Critical Pedagogy in Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This review investigated how the three-phase model of critical pedagogy, based on the writings of Paulo Freire, can be put into practice in health education. Design: The study considers literature related to the fields of health education, health promotion and critical pedagogy. Setting: The study is a scholarly review completed as part…

  7. Mental health nurses' and allied health professionals' perceptions of the role of the Occupational Health Service in the management of work-related stress: how do they self-care?

    PubMed

    Gibb, J; Cameron, I M; Hamilton, R; Murphy, E; Naji, S

    2010-11-01

    Higher rates of stress-related sickness are found in health care professionals when compared with other sectors. The annual direct cost of absence to the National Health Service is £1.7 billion. Increased clinical demand, long hours, low staffing and a lack of support from colleagues and management are contributing to absenteeism, somatic complaints and mental health problems. Mental health work is inherently stressful and levels of work stress experienced by mental health nurses are especially high. The study investigated mental health nurses' and allied health professionals' (AHPs) awareness and knowledge of the service provided by the Occupational Health Service (OHS) and identified work-related stress and self-care strategies within these two groups. Nurses and AHP staff employed in mental health services in a Scottish healthboard area were invited to complete an anonymous questionnaire. Results demonstrated that staff found their contact with the OHS to be a positive experience. They considered direct patient care to be less stressful than the organizational constraints they work under, and they reported a lack of support from both their peer groups and management. There should be recognition of the increased stress that hospital-based nurses and AHPs experience. These areas should be scrutinized and reviewed further to support staff within these environments in accordance with organizational objectives.

  8. Project 30: An Evaluation and Review. A Project Designed to Strengthen and Support Minority Students Matriculating in Mathematics, Science, Technology, and the Allied Health Fields at Sacramento City College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnebrew, Elbert L.

    Since fall 1972, Sacramento City College has operated a pilot project designed to provide minority students with extra tutorial and laboratory assistance and, thereby, to encourage them to pursue careers in mathematics, science, technology, and the allied health fields. The primary focus of the program was placed on one-to-one tutorials intended…

  9. The Impact of Nursing and Allied Health Professional Organizations and Accrediting Agencies on Community College Curricula. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the National Council of Instructional Administrators (St. Louis, Missouri, April 4-7, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community and Junior Colleges, Washington, DC. National Council of Instructional Administrators.

    The influence of professional accreditation on community college nursing and allied health curricula is discussed in these five papers. First, Robert Evans presents the community college viewpoint, distinguishing between general/institutional and programmatic accreditation, outlining the growth of programmatic accreditation, and citing as concerns…

  10. Health Education and Behavior: Are School Health Educators in Denial?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governali, Joseph F.; Hodges, Bonni C.; Videto, Donna M.

    2005-01-01

    School health education has been and still is guided by a number of different and often competing philosophical orientations. The field seems to be moving toward a skills-based philosophy, but the adoption of this approach is taking place with little discussion or analysis in the professional health education literature. The purpose of this…

  11. Decision Making and Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duryea, Elias J.

    1983-01-01

    A position statement is offered that clarifies the function, role, and emphasis of decision making within the field of health education, and a rationale that proposes that health decision-making efforts be limited to areas where evidence links a health behavior (i.e., smoking) to a health problem (i.e., lung cancer) is presented. (Author/CJ)

  12. Health Education and Behavioral Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prue, Donald M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A review of theoretical and experimental literature on school health education indicates that most programs have focused on health knowledge despite conflicting information on the impact of knowledge based programs on health behaviors. Needed are interventions that include environmental engineering to support health behaviors and use of…

  13. Curriculum Design in Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conceicao, Simone C. O.; Colby, Holly; Juhlmann, Anne; Johaningsmeir, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    While health care providers are knowledgeable of health conditions and of the information patients need to make appropriate health decisions and follow health providers' recommendations, they lack information about adult teaching and learning and appropriate curriculum design. Adult educators can contribute more sophisticated skills in program…

  14. Health Education Telecommunications Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Health/Education Telecommunications Experiment carried out with Applications Technology Satellite-6 is described. The experiment tested the effectiveness of color television broadcasts to over 120 low-cost receivers in rural areas. Five types of earth stations were involved: receive-only terminals (ROT), an intensive terminal consisting of the ROT plus a VHF transmitter and receiver; comprehensive S and C-band terminals having the capability of transmitting the video signal plus four audio channels; and the main originating stations. Additional supporting elements comprise 120 video receive terminals, 51 telephony transceivers, and 8 video originating terminals of 3 different parts. Technical parameters were measured to within 1 dB of the calculated values.

  15. Health Professionals' Knowledge of Women's Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Rebecca M.

    2000-01-01

    Survey responses from 71 health professionals, benchmarking data from 8 hospitals, continuing education program evaluations, and focus groups with nursing, allied health, and primary care providers indicated a need for professional continuing education on women's health issues. Primary topic needs were identified. The data formed the basis for…

  16. Health Education by Open Broadcast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ICIT Report, 1976

    1976-01-01

    This issue focuses on uses and techniques of radio for educational purposes in developing nations. Two health education projects are described which are utilizing open broadcasting to attract a mass audience of listeners not committed to a structured radio education program. Kenya's Swahili language radio serial, "Giving Birth and Caring for your…

  17. Authenticity and Lesbian Health Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiler-Timmins, Rebecca A.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study used narrative inquiry to explore how lesbian health educators navigate authenticity in a heteronormative higher education setting. The study was grounded in a lesbian standpoint pedagogical viewpoint, which provided a lens with which to view the nine participants' experiences. Of particular interest was how the educators in…

  18. HEALTH EDUCATION THROUGH NON – FORMAL EDUCATION

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaj, P. Selva Peter; Kumar, P. Surendra

    1990-01-01

    The non-availability of health care in the rural area leads to the problems like infant mortality, infectious disease deaths and malnutrition. Rural health can be promoted both at preventive and promotive levels through non-formal education. PMID:22556504

  19. A Healthy Investment: Building the Facilities to Train the Next Generation of Nursing and Allied Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Bob

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of community colleges are investing in new facilities and programs to train health care workers in a variety of professions, including nursing, radiology, health information technology, physical therapy, dentistry, and surgical technology. Community colleges have historically offered job training programs in health care, but with…

  20. Parenting Education - Health and Hygiene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Child Abuse and Neglect Resource Center, Tulsa, OK.

    The second in a series on parenting education for American Indians, the booklet offers information on health and hygiene for the mother-to-be and the newborn baby. Chapters include care during pregnancy, mother's weight, mother's health, feeding newborns, washing the baby, baby's early diet, and baby's health care. (ERB)

  1. Health Education Encounters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creighton, Helen

    By considering daily health needs, safety, emotional and social health, sexuality, health services and products, disease prevention, and drug use, students using this book will have the opportunity to examine some ways of providing for their physical needs and will become aware of their health responsibilities to themselves and the outside world.…

  2. Allies in the struggle.

    PubMed

    Draughn, Tricia; Elkins, Becki; Roy, Rakhi

    2002-10-01

    SUMMARY Providing a community that is committed to standards, diversity, and enhancement of the academic environment is often difficult. Offering an Allies or Safe Zone program is among of the first steps an institution can take to achieve a community that embraces diversity and creates a learning environment that is accepting of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered individuals. While there are many opportunities in institutional group settings to address these issues, they often go either unnoticed or untapped. How can being an ally impact the greater institutional environment? This paper will discuss the campus environment for LGBT students, examine existing Allies and Safe Zone programs, and offer a framework to assist program coordinators and participants in establishing comprehensive programs to change the campus climate and develop institutional environments that are gay affirmative.

  3. AYURVEDA AND MODERN HEALTH EDUCATION

    PubMed Central

    Ovelil, Bernd Pflug

    1982-01-01

    Ayurveda is prevention in itself. It is not necessary for Ayurveda to develop a comprehensive structure of preventive approaches as it is found in modern health education. On the other hand has Ayurveda not modernized its preventive principles according to the present living and working conditions of the people. It is so far not understood as integral part of the socio-economic development of the country. This has saved Ayurveda to become part of the highly structured and bureaucratic form of health care and health education- at the expense of not being consulted by others when working on a social health oriented development strategy. PMID:22556952

  4. Health professions educators as agents of change in Tanzania: creativity to implement new curricula.

    PubMed

    Mloka, Doreen A; Omer, Selma; Mkony, Charles A; Kisenge, Rodrick R; Macfarlane, Sarah B; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2012-01-01

    Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) strives to instill in its graduates skills and competencies appropriate to serving the Tanzanian population well. MUHAS leadership, working in collaboration with educators from the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), selected and trained an interdisciplinary group of faculty members to promote effective teaching. We describe the development of this group of faculty change agents - now known as the Health Professions Educators Group (HPEG). The HPEG invigorated the education environment at MUHAS by: engaging many colleagues in special training events that introduced new methods for teaching and assessment; encouraging innovation; and developing strong mentoring relationships. HPEG members piloted courses in education to prepare all postgraduate students as peer educators, teaching assistants, and as candidates for faculty future appointments. Creation of a 'teaching commons' reinforces the new focus on innovative teaching as faculty members share experiences and gain recognition for their contributions to quality education.

  5. Simulation in Health Sciences Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Geoffrey R.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Reviews five simulation methods used in medical and health science education: oral examinations, live simulated patients, mannequins, and written and computer-based simulations. Each type of simulation is discussed relative to its fidelity, reliability, validity, learning, and feasibility. (MBR)

  6. Turning Parents from Critics to Allies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagarese, Margaret M.; Giannetti, Charlene C.

    1998-01-01

    Authors of "The Roller Coaster Years" (1997) advise how middle-level educators can turn wary, disinterested parents into allies. Teachers should welcome parents, advertise their own expertise, implement an early-warning system, portray children positively, convey shared values, reassure parents about children's safety, demonstrate insider…

  7. Mechanisms to enhance the effectiveness of allied health and social care assistants in community-based rehabilitation services: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Moran, Anna; Nancarrow, Susan A; Enderby, Pamela

    2015-07-01

    This research aims to describe the factors associated with successful employment of allied health and social care assistants in community-based rehabilitation services (CBRS) in England. The research involved the thematic analysis of interviews and focus groups with 153 professionally qualified and assistant staff from 11 older people's interdisciplinary community rehabilitation teams. Data were collected between November 2006 and December 2008. Assistants were perceived as a focal point for care delivery and conduits for enabling a service to achieve goals within interdisciplinary team structures. Nine mechanisms were identified that promoted the successful employment of assistants: (i) Multidisciplinary team input into assistant training and support; (ii) Ensuring the timely assessment of clients by qualified staff; (iii) Establishing clear communication structures between qualified and assistant staff; (iv) Co-location of teams to promote communication and skill sharing; (v) Removing barriers that prevent staff working to their full scope of practice; (vi) Facilitating role flexibility of assistants, while upholding the principles of reablement; (vii) Allowing sufficient time for client-staff interaction; (viii) Ensuring an appropriate ratio of assistant to qualified staff to enable sufficient training and supervision of assistants; and (ix) Appropriately, resourcing the role for training and reimbursement to reflect responsibility. We conclude that upholding these mechanisms may help to optimise the efficiency and productivity of assistant and professionally qualified staff in CBRS.

  8. Imperative - Redesign for Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyquist, Ewald B.

    Drug addiction, alcoholism, malnutrition, lung cancer, venereal disease, and emphysema represent not medical failures but educational failures, since people suffering from them are either beyond help or already seriously damaged by the time they see a physician. School programs are students must begin early. Moreover, for health education to be…

  9. Identity Development Models: One Size Fits All? Heterosexual Identity Development and the Search for "Allies" in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Cheryl; Kirkley, Evelyn A.

    The "Rainbow Visibility Project" was funded by an Irvine Foundation (California) grant with the primary goal of raising awareness of the gay, lesbian, and bisexual culture at a Roman Catholic university. The "Rainbow Educator Project" was one of five components of the grant the Rainbow Educators (REs), who collaborate as a team…

  10. Health Care Marketing: Role Evolution of the Community Health Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syre, Thomas R.; Wilson, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    This article discusses role delineation in the health education profession, defines and presents principles of health care marketing, describes marketing plan development, and examines major ethical issues associated with health care marketing when utilized by community health educators. A marketing plan format for community health education is…

  11. Rocky Chairland: Educating a Changing Health Care Workforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Charlene

    Recognizing the need to be proactive in redefining the role of nursing and allied health practitioners at the associate degree level and transforming curricula to meet the changing demands of health care, the Division of Health Technologies at Northern Virginia Community College, in partnership with local community agencies, implemented the Mobile…

  12. [Rural endemic diseases, health and development: Emmanuel Dias and the construction of a network of allies against Chagas disease].

    PubMed

    Kropf, Simone Petraglia

    2016-11-01

    The scope of this article is to analyze the trajectory of Emmanuel Dias (1908-1962), a researcher at the Oswaldo Cruz Institute (OCI) and director of the Center for Studies and Prophylaxis of Chagas Disease (OCI outpost established in 1943 in the city of Bambuí, Minas Gerais), as a key actor in the acknowledgement of Chagas disease as a public health problem in Brazil and the Americas. It seeks to show that the conquest of this acknowledgement, the cornerstone of which was the staging of the first campaign to combat the disease in Brazil in 1950, was made possible by the intense political mobilization of Dias together with the various social groups, such as physicians, politicians and residents of rural areas, public health officials, governments and international organizations. This mobilization occurred during the 1940s and 1950s in a historical context marked by intense debate about the relationship between health and development and helped to construct a network of alliances that was critical for the recognition of Chagas disease as a chronic cardiopathy, which threatened the productivity of rural workers and represented a medical and social problem that merited public health actions and programs geared to get it under control.

  13. Proceedings. Leadership Conference for Instructors and Administrators in Allied Health and Nursing (Louisville, Kentucky, February 16-18, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. of Vocational Education.

    The primary purpose of the conference described in this report was to provide a special type of leadership experience in the health professions for graduate assistants, fellowship recipients, and selected workshop participants who had demonstrated a high level of readinesss for opportunities to develop their leadership competencies. Titles of…

  14. 42 CFR 413.85 - Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... cases, critique performance, or discuss specific skills or techniques; it involves no classroom... basic academic courses required for completion of the program, but the provider must provide all of the...-time employees at properly accredited academic or technical institutions (including other...

  15. Community College Nursing and Allied Health Education Programs, and Iowa's Healthcare Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    As the nation's population ages and the Baby Boom generation nears retirement, the need for skilled healthcare workers in Iowa and across the nation grows. Healthcare is one of the fastest growing sectors of the U.S. economy, and one of the top industries for job growth and job creation in Iowa. The increase in the number of healthcare positions…

  16. Application of the DACUM Process in Allied Health Education: The Development of a Dental Assisting Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichowski, Chester P.; Harvan, Robin Ann

    During the development of a dental assisting curriculum, a commitment was made to employ the DACUM (developing a curriculum) process as a foundation to the curriculum. Dental assistants and dentists met at three DACUM workshops to develop a definition of the dental assistant and an outline of clinical competencies in the form of tasks and duties…

  17. Code of Ethics for Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Health Education, 1994

    1994-01-01

    The Association for the Advancement of Health Education's code of ethics for health educators provides a common set of values to guide health educators in resolving ethical dilemmas, focusing on responsibility to the public, to the profession, and to employers in delivering health education and in research and evaluation. (SM)

  18. Biology and Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Sheila; Oberg, Kristina; Unnerstad, Gunilla

    1999-01-01

    Researchers studied English and Swedish biology student teachers' perceptions of teaching health as part of biology. As part of the study, the students investigated secondary students' understanding of health. Surveys and interviews were effective in collecting student teachers' views. They indicated that student teachers' perceptions changed over…

  19. Hospitals as health educators

    MedlinePlus

    ... than your local hospital. From health videos to yoga classes, many hospitals offer information families need to ... care and breastfeeding Parenting Baby sign language Baby yoga or massage Babysitting courses for teens Exercise classes ...

  20. Education Highlights: Plant Health

    SciTech Connect

    Michaels, Michelle; Cook, David

    2016-01-27

    Argonne intern Michelle Michaels from Oakland Community College worked with Argonne mentor David Cook in studying trends in plant health. This research will help farmers determine crop yield during the growing season.

  1. Education Highlights: Plant Health

    ScienceCinema

    Michaels, Michelle; Cook, David

    2016-07-12

    Argonne intern Michelle Michaels from Oakland Community College worked with Argonne mentor David Cook in studying trends in plant health. This research will help farmers determine crop yield during the growing season.

  2. Dental Health Education: Rhetoric or Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Alyson

    1982-01-01

    Suggestions for facilitating dental health education programs in public schools include: (1) determining who will be responsible for dental health education; (2) involving parents; (3) using community health resources; and (4) assessing the results of programs. (JN)

  3. Education Improves Public Health and Promotes Health Equity

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Robert A.; Truman, Benedict I.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a framework and empirical evidence to support the argument that educational programs and policies are crucial public health interventions. Concepts of education and health are developed and linked, and we review a wide range of empirical studies to clarify pathways of linkage and explore implications. Basic educational expertise and skills, including fundamental knowledge, reasoning ability, emotional self-regulation, and interactional abilities, are critical components of health. Moreover, education is a fundamental social determinant of health – an upstream cause of health. Programs that close gaps in educational outcomes between low-income or racial and ethnic minority populations and higher-income or majority populations are needed to promote health equity. Public health policy makers, health practitioners and educators, and departments of health and education can collaborate to implement educational programs and policies for which systematic evidence indicates clear public health benefits. PMID:25995305

  4. Education Improves Public Health and Promotes Health Equity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Robert A; Truman, Benedict I

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a framework and empirical evidence to support the argument that educational programs and policies are crucial public health interventions. Concepts of education and health are developed and linked, and we review a wide range of empirical studies to clarify pathways of linkage and explore implications. Basic educational expertise and skills, including fundamental knowledge, reasoning ability, emotional self-regulation, and interactional abilities, are critical components of health. Moreover, education is a fundamental social determinant of health - an upstream cause of health. Programs that close gaps in educational outcomes between low-income or racial and ethnic minority populations and higher-income or majority populations are needed to promote health equity. Public health policy makers, health practitioners and educators, and departments of health and education can collaborate to implement educational programs and policies for which systematic evidence indicates clear public health benefits.

  5. My Career: Health Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Thuy Vu, Research Coordinator at the University of Washington and Project Director at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington. In this interview, Vu talks about what she does, how she got these jobs, how her education ties in, and her first job out of college. The interview concludes…

  6. Mobile Health (mHealth) Services and Online Health Educators.

    PubMed

    Anshari, Muhammad; Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology enables health-care organizations to extend health-care services by providing a suitable environment to achieve mobile health (mHealth) goals, making some health-care services accessible anywhere and anytime. Introducing mHealth could change the business processes in delivering services to patients. mHealth could empower patients as it becomes necessary for them to become involved in the health-care processes related to them. This includes the ability for patients to manage their personal information and interact with health-care staff as well as among patients themselves. The study proposes a new position to supervise mHealth services: the online health educator (OHE). The OHE should be occupied by special health-care staffs who are trained in managing online services. A survey was conducted in Brunei and Indonesia to discover the roles of OHE in managing mHealth services, followed by a focus group discussion with participants who interacted with OHE in a real online health scenario. Data analysis showed that OHE could improve patients' confidence and satisfaction in health-care services.

  7. Mobile Health (mHealth) Services and Online Health Educators

    PubMed Central

    Anshari, Muhammad; Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology enables health-care organizations to extend health-care services by providing a suitable environment to achieve mobile health (mHealth) goals, making some health-care services accessible anywhere and anytime. Introducing mHealth could change the business processes in delivering services to patients. mHealth could empower patients as it becomes necessary for them to become involved in the health-care processes related to them. This includes the ability for patients to manage their personal information and interact with health-care staff as well as among patients themselves. The study proposes a new position to supervise mHealth services: the online health educator (OHE). The OHE should be occupied by special health-care staffs who are trained in managing online services. A survey was conducted in Brunei and Indonesia to discover the roles of OHE in managing mHealth services, followed by a focus group discussion with participants who interacted with OHE in a real online health scenario. Data analysis showed that OHE could improve patients’ confidence and satisfaction in health-care services. PMID:27257387

  8. Health Education for Health Promotion in Less Developed Nations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambler, Moses

    Designed for policy makers and health education professionals, this paper presents a rationale and strategies for adapting health education to meet the needs of developing nations. Emphasis is placed on the need for health promotion rather than prescriptive health education. Section A, the first of two main sections, discusses perceptions of…

  9. [Health education, patient education and health promotion: educational methods and strategies].

    PubMed

    Sandrin, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help public health actors with an interest in health promotion and health care professionals involved in therapeutic education to develop and implement an educational strategy consistent with their vision of health and health care. First, we show that the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the French Charter for Popular Education share common values. Second, an examination of the career and work of Paulo Freire, of Ira Shor's pedagogical model and of the person-centered approach of Carl Rogers shows how the work of educational practitioners, researchers and theorists can help health professionals to implement a truly "health-promoting" or "therapeutic" educational strategy. The paper identifies a number of problems facing health care professionals who become involved in education without reflecting on the values underlying the pedagogical models they use.

  10. Health Education in Mauritius.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamet, Linda

    1983-01-01

    Presents some extracts from a survey given to new mothers to determine the approach of a multimedia campaign on mother and child health and the importance of breastfeeding in Mauritius. These extracts include information on socioeconomic characteristics, housing conditions, pregnancy and childbirth habits, and breastfeeding. (Author/MBR)

  11. Exercise a Powerful Ally for Breast Cancer Survivors

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163706.html Exercise a Powerful Ally for Breast Cancer Survivors Those ... 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For breast cancer survivors, exercise may help lower their chances of dying from ...

  12. Health management education: current alternatives.

    PubMed

    Weil, Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    The past several decades have witnessed a significant increase in the number of graduate programs in health management, either on campus or online. The alternative for a health professional to attending a graduate program on campus is to receive an MBA or MHA degree online. The current cost ranges from $13,600 to $78,000, with the more expensive online programs tied to graduate programs that are accredited by the Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education and provide the names and qualifications of their faculty. The for-profit online programs have not been forthcoming to this author concerning their health management faculty or their curriculum. For the individual desiring more health management education who is unable to enroll, for family or financial reasons, in an on-campus program, the top-tier online programs seem like a worthwhile but is a relatively expensive option.

  13. Assessing Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuff, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    "Assessing Health Professional Education" is the summary of a workshop hosted by the Institute of Medicine's Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education to explore assessment of health professional education. At the event, Forum members shared personal experiences and learned from patients, students, educators, and…

  14. Health Education Syllabus, Grades K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    This syallbus was designed to provide local educational agencies with a framework for establishing a required health education instructional program in New York's public schools. This booklet explains the rationale for health education and the relationship of health education to the goals of the Board of Regents. Attention is given to program…

  15. Women need health education.

    PubMed

    1980-05-01

    Groups of 15-20 women in Dacca, Bangladesh received a 2-week training program in basic health and nutrition in addition to advice on contraceptive methods and use. Contraceptives were also supplied. There were 18 field teams at work, operating in 24 union councils around Dacca city. The basic health training included 1 week of theoretical classes on sore eyes, scabies and parasites. The 2nd week was devoted to practical application and demonstration. At this time the mothers were given the formula to prepare saline water -- oral rehydration fluid. The mothers then prepared the saline and used it for the children in case of any diarrheal incidence in the community. It was the experience of the fieldworkers of the Concerned Women for Family Planning (CWFP) that the communities under their program live under unsanitary conditions.

  16. Microcomputer Programs for Health Occupations Education. A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This annotated bibliography describes materials available for computer-assisted instruction in secondary and postsecondary health and allied health programs. The materials are suitable for use by regular, disadvantaged, and handicapped students and by students whose facility in English is limited. The bibliography includes software programs…

  17. Healthcare organization-education partnerships and career ladder programs for health care workers.

    PubMed

    Dill, Janette S; Chuang, Emmeline; Morgan, Jennifer C

    2014-12-01

    Increasing concerns about quality of care and workforce shortages have motivated health care organizations and educational institutions to partner to create career ladders for frontline health care workers. Career ladders reward workers for gains in skills and knowledge and may reduce the costs associated with turnover, improve patient care, and/or address projected shortages of certain nursing and allied health professions. This study examines partnerships between health care and educational organizations in the United States during the design and implementation of career ladder training programs for low-skill workers in health care settings, referred to as frontline health care workers. Mixed methods data from 291 frontline health care workers and 347 key informants (e.g., administrators, instructors, managers) collected between 2007 and 2010 were analyzed using both regression and fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (QCA). Results suggest that different combinations of partner characteristics, including having an education leader, employer leader, frontline management support, partnership history, community need, and educational policies, were necessary for high worker career self-efficacy and program satisfaction. Whether a worker received a wage increase, however, was primarily dependent on leadership within the health care organization, including having an employer leader and employer implementation policies. Findings suggest that strong partnerships between health care and educational organizations can contribute to the successful implementation of career ladder programs, but workers' ability to earn monetary rewards for program participation depends on the strength of leadership support within the health care organization.

  18. Childhood Diabesity: International Applications for Health Education and Health Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinzon-Perez, Helda; Kotkin-Jaszi, Suzanne; Perez, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    Health policy has a direct impact on health education initiatives, health care delivery, resource allocation, and quality of life. Increasing rates in the epidemics of obesity and obesity-dependent diabetes mellitus (aka diabesity) suggest that health policy changes should be included in health education and disease prevention strategies. Health…

  19. Health Education of Workers. Publication 1279.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Washington, DC. Div. of Occupational Health.

    As a ready reference for information on health education programs for employees, this monograph brings together four comprehensive review articles which have appeared in the literature and seven abstracts of studies and demonstrations. The articles are: "Health Education in the Occupational Setting,""Health Education in Industry,""Health Education…

  20. Approaches to Advocacy for Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Beverly Saxton, Ed.; Brown, Kelli McCormack, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This monograph provides a collection of articles on health educators' approaches to advocacy: "The Role of Health Education Advocacy in Removing Disparities in Health Care" (John P. Allegrante, Donald E. Morisky, and Behjat A. Sharif); "The Role of Health Education Associations in Advocacy" (M. Elaine Auld and Eleanor…

  1. Innovative Approaches to Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurney, Elizabeth, Comp.; Kintgen, Jean, Comp.

    To improve communications between health occupations educators and health professionals about developments in health occupations education, a compilation of 21 approaches used in health occupations education is presented. Outlines of the 21 different courses are presented, grouped in eight areas: (1) career mobility--modified LPN program for…

  2. Physical Education's Role in Public Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallis, James F.; McKenzie, Thomas L.

    1991-01-01

    Analyzes contributions physical education makes to child and adult health. Topics discussed are current levels of U.S. children's physical activity; status of elementary physical education programs; health-related physical activity interventions; public health analysis of elementary physical education; and public health role and goal for physical…

  3. What Contributes to the Activeness of Ethnic Minority Patients with Chronic Illnesses Seeking Allied Health Services? A Cross-Sectional Study in Rural Western China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shangfeng; Dong, Dong; Ji, Lu; Fu, Hang; Feng, Zhanchun; Bishwajit, Ghose; He, Zhifei; Ming, Hui; Fu, Qian; Xian, Yue

    2015-09-15

    Actively seeking health services lies at the core of effective models of chronic disease self-management and contributes to promoting the utilization of allied health services (AHS). However, the use of AHS by ethnic minority Chinese, especially the elderly living in rural areas, has not received much attention. This study, therefore, aims to explore the association between personal characteristics and the activeness of ethnic minority patients with chronic diseases in rural areas of western China seeking AHS. A cross-sectional study was conducted to collect data on the socio-demographic and economic characteristics, health knowledge level and health communication channels of the sampled patients. A logistic regression model was used to examine the association of these predictors with the activeness of the surveyed patients in seeking AHS. A total of 1078 ethnic minorities over 45 years old who had chronic conditions were randomly selected from three western provinces in China and were interviewed in 2014. It is found that the New Cooperative Medical Scheme (NCMS) is the most salient predictor affecting the activeness of Chinese ethnic minorities in seeking AHS. The probability is 8.51 times greater for those insured with NCMS to actively seek AHS than those without (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 4.76-15.21; p < 0.001). Moreover, participants between 60 and 70 years old and those who have five to six household members are more likely to seek AHS compared with other social groups (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.64, 95% CI 1.28-2.97, p = 0.007; OR = 1.95, 95% CI 1.15-2.36, p = 0.002). However, the activeness of patients seeking AHS is lower for those who have better household economic conditions. Besides socio-demographic predictors, the Chinese ethnic minorities' activeness in seeking AHS is clearly associated with the communication channels used for receiving health information, which include direct communication with doctors (OR = 5.18, 95% CI 3.58-7.50, p < 0.001) and

  4. Microenterprise in health care and health education.

    PubMed

    Edler, A A

    1998-01-01

    Over the last decade, development aid has increasingly used a more collaborative model, with donors and recipients both contributing ideas, methods and goals. Though many examples of collateral aid projects exist in agriculture, business administration and banking, few have found their way into health care and health education, a typically donor-dominated model. The following case report describes a collateral project in health care education. This case report analyzes data-inducing project proposals, personal interviews and project reports obtained through standard archival research methods. The setting for this joint project was the collaboration between international nongovernmental (NGO) aid foundations and the faculty of a major sub-Saharan African Medical School's Department of Anesthesia. The initial goal of this project was to improve record keeping for all anesthetic records, both in the operating theatres and outside. Analysis of the data was performed using ethnographic methods of constant comparative analysis. The purpose of the analysis was to critically evaluate both the goals and their results in the Department of Anesthesiology. The findings of this analysis suggested that results included not only quality assurance and improvement programs in the department but also advances in the use of critical incidents as teaching tools, hospital-wide drug and equipment utilization information and the initiation of an outreach program to district hospitals throughout the country for similar projects.

  5. Venereal Disease. Consumer Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, Cooperative Extension Service.

    Designed to be used by health educators when teaching youths and their parents about the control of veneral disease (syphilis and gonorrhea), this booklet includes the following: (1) a two-page teaching plan consisting of objectives for both youths and adults along with notes on subject matter, methods (including titles of films and printed…

  6. Consumer Health Education. Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, Cooperative Extension Service.

    This short booklet is designed to be used by health educators when teaching women about breast cancer and its early detection and the procedure for breast self-examination. It includes the following: (1) A one-page teaching plan consisting of objectives, subject matter, methods (including titles of films and printed materials), target audience,…

  7. Moving from Health Education to Health Promotion: Developing the Health Education Curriculum in Cyprus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ioannou, Soula; Kouta, Christiana; Charalambous, Neofytos

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to discuss the rationale of the newly reformed health education curriculum in Cyprus, which aspires to enable not only teachers, but also all the school personnel, to work from the perspective of health promotion. It is a curriculum which moves from the traditional approach of health education focusing on individual…

  8. New Developments in Undergraduate Education in Public Health: Implications for Health Education and Health Promotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Michael D.; Wykoff, Randy; King, Laura Rasar; Petersen, Donna J.

    2012-01-01

    The article provides an overview of efforts to improve public health and health education training and on the potential use of Critical Component Elements (CCEs) for undergraduate health education programs toward more consistent quality assurance across programs. Considered in the context of the Galway Consensus Conference, the authors discuss the…

  9. Knowledge and Attitudes of Allied Health Professional Students regarding the Stroke Rehabilitation Team and the Role of the Speech and Language Therapist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Aine; Pettigrew, Catharine M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: One of the major barriers to effective team working among healthcare professionals is a lack of knowledge of each other's roles. The importance of understanding Irish healthcare students' attitudes towards team working and each other's roles led to the development of this study. Aims: The aims were to investigate allied health…

  10. Finding Queer Allies: The Impact of Ally Training and Safe Zone Stickers on Campus Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Stephanie L.; Bartle, Eli; Masequesmay, Gina

    2008-01-01

    To counter heterosexism, homophobia, and gender binarism in higher education, "safe zone" or "ally" programs are efforts by American universities to create a welcoming environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning (LGBTQ) members of the campus community. This study describes perceptions of campus…

  11. Satisfaction with a distance continuing education program for health professionals.

    PubMed

    Bynum, Ann B; Irwin, Cathy A; Cohen, Betty

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed differences in program satisfaction among health professionals participating in a distance continuing education program by gender, ethnicity, discipline, and community size. A one-group posttest design was used with a sample of 45,996 participants in the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Rural Hospital, Distance Continuing Medical Education Program during 1995-2007. This program provided 2,219 continuing education programs for physicians (n = 7,047), nurses (n = 21,264), allied health (n = 3,230) and dental (n = 305) professionals, pharmacists (n = 4,088), administrators (n = 1,211), and marketing/finance/human resources professionals (n = 343). These programs were provided in Arkansas hospitals, clinics, and area health education centers. Interactive video technology and the Internet were used to deliver these programs. The program satisfaction instrument demonstrated adequate internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.91) and construct validity. Participants had high levels of satisfaction regarding knowledge and skills, use of information to enhance patient care, program quality, and convenience of the technology (mean total satisfaction score = 4.44, range: 1-5). Results from the t-test for independent samples and one-way analysis of variance indicated that men (p = 0.01), African-Americans and Hispanics (p < 0.01), dental professionals (p < 0.01), and participants in larger urban communities (population of 75,001-185,000) (p < 0.01) had significantly greater satisfaction. Nurses and physicians had significantly greater satisfaction regarding the use of information in practice to enhance patient care (p < 0.01). Results suggest that socioeconomic and demographic factors can affect satisfaction with distance continuing education programs.

  12. Education, Technology and Health Literacy.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Kurt; Koldkjær Sølling, Ina; Carøe, Per; Siggaard Mathiesen, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an interdisciplinary learning environment between education in technology, business, and nursing. This collaboration creates natural interest and motivation for welfare technology. The aim of establishing an interaction between these three areas of expertise is to create an understanding of skills and cultural differences in each area. Futhermore, the aim is to enable future talents to gain knowledge and skills to improve health literacy among senior citizens. Based on a holistic view of welfare technology, a Student Academy was created as a theoretically- and practically-oriented learning center. The mission of the Student Academy is to support and facilitate education in order to maintain and upgrade knowledge and skills in information technology and information management related to e-health and health literacy. The Student Academy inspires students, stakeholders, politicians, DanAge Association members, companies, and professionals to participate in training, projects, workshops, and company visits.

  13. [Health education: prevention of smoking].

    PubMed

    Ducommun, S; Mounoud, R L

    1979-03-01

    With the aim of primary prevention, the Health Education Service of Geneva organizes in all schools since 1970, an information campaign against the dangers of smoking! The objectives of this preventive action are to render the pupils conscient of the dangers of smoking, to draw their attention on the lures of advertisement and to permit them to make a personal opinion on the subject. This information is given in primary and secondary schools by the teachers who receive the necessary audio-visual equipment from the Health Education Service. In the higher degrees, this information is integrated in a regular health teaching program. All future teachers also receive an "anti-smoking" information given by doctors of our Department. We hope that this form of objective and scientific instruction in schools will minimise the effects of publicity, making the young people aware of the risks they encounter.

  14. Education and Health. Policy Brief #9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, David M.; Lleras-Muney, Adriana

    2007-01-01

    A large and persistent association between education and health has been well-documented in many countries and time periods and for a wide variety of health measures. In their paper, "Education and Health: Evaluating Theories and Evidence," presented at the National Poverty Center conference "The Health Effects of Non-Health Policy," David M.…

  15. Health Education Resource Guide, Junior High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Way School District 210, WA.

    As part of a health education program for K-12, this curriculum guide for grade eight provides: (1) a short overview of health education; (2) a scope and sequence chart which lists specific topics to teach on mental health, physical health, community health, and safety that are appropriate at different grade levels; (3) a list of objectives; and…

  16. Issues and Trends in Higher Education Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tietjen-Smith, Tara

    2016-01-01

    Public speculation about bioterrorism and the increasing obesity epidemic are examples of current public health issues that continue to be illuminated in the spotlight. Major public health threats continue to drive the health job market and impact higher education health curricula (e.g., public health, health promotion, community health). Also,…

  17. Physics for Allied Health Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldick, Howard

    2000-04-01

    In this paper I will describe two courses that I have been teaching for the past 6 years to physical therapy and occupational therapy students Emphasis will be paced on those points that distinguish these courses from others with which I am familiar. I will discuss the syllabus: homework, exams, labs and the final grade. I will also present a topic outline of the courses showing how examples are drawn from the human body to illustrate the physics concept under discussion and to stimulate the students's interest in the material. The following basic concepts of physics will be covered (each with human body examples): vectors, components, statics, conservation of energy, efficiency, change of state, heat transfer, electric charge, electric field, voltage and capacitance.

  18. Education for Job Safety and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vojtecky, Michael A.

    1988-01-01

    Until individuals with special training in health education enter the field of occupational safety and health, it is unlikely that education will achieve its potential as a method for combatting occupational illness and injury. (JOW)

  19. Health Education Research in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollander, Roberta B.; Feldman, Robert H. L.

    1986-01-01

    The work setting offers the health educator a unique opportunity for research. This article discusses advantages and disadvantages associated with health education research in the workplace and suggests ways the research efforts in this setting can be optimized. (DF)

  20. NHLBI: A Partner in School Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Jane A.

    1982-01-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, a federal biomedical research agency, contributes to school health education by means of information dissemination and cooperation with schools and other agencies to apply research findings to health education programs. (CJ)

  1. Financial planning of continuing education for health professions.

    PubMed

    Bennett, N L; Schimmel, R J

    1981-02-01

    With the increase in continuing education programs being developed for more health professionals, more information for decision making is essential. A study was conducted to define costs of continuing education programming and to examine the productivity of the professional staff. Sixty-one programs were developed and offered in a semi-rural setting over a four-year period. Of the programs analyzed, 39.4% were interdisciplinary programs, 26.2% were allied health programs, 21.3% were nursing programs, and 13.1% were miscellaneous programs. During the four-year period, there were 4,528 participants. A total of 27,835 instructional units were generated. The direct program expenses totalled $47,411, with a cost per instructional unit of $1.70. To determine the total cost of programming, the supporting staff salaries were allocated to the programs and added to the direct program expenses. Staff salaries were allocated in three ways: by program, by participant, or by instructional unit. Based on the allocations, the average total cost per program was $3,488; the average total cost per participant was $47; and the average total cost per instructional unit was $7.65. Staff productivity figures were derived by comparing the numbers of programs offered to the full-time equivalency staff for a given period. Professional staff productivity was found to be equivalent to approximately seven programs per year with about 500 participants.

  2. Community health educators band together in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, R

    1979-01-01

    Begun last year with only six participants, the Massachusetts Consumer Health Educators Association, now 100 members strong, is in the business of sharing experiences to help alleviate its members' feelings of being alone. Meetings are held once a month, and authorities in the health education field are invited to speak. The Consumer Health Educators' first major project is the compilation of an index of hospital-based health education programs in the state.

  3. Social action for health: emerging perspectives for health education.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, H S

    1992-01-01

    Most of the world's major health problems and premature deaths are preventable. Health technology and scientific knowledge exists to combat health problems at an affordable cost. And, health education is recognized as a viable public health intervention and a vitally important means of addressing health challenges.

  4. Heart Health Education in the Young

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunseri, Albert J.; Kruc, Joan E.

    1978-01-01

    The focus of this article is to examine selected approaches to heart health education, to describe a program the Heart Attack Prevention Program of the Chicago Heart Association is designing and implementing in heart health education, and to make recommendations concerning future development of health education programs by other agencies. (Author)

  5. Papers on Theoretical Issues in Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Berkeley. School of Public Health.

    This document is a collection of 17 papers on theoretical issues in health education presented at the Dorothy Nyswander International Symposium. The introduction, entitled "Theory and Practice in Health Education: A Synthesis," attempts to highlight some of the features of these papers and their relevance for health education practice. The papers…

  6. Health and Nutrition: Preconditions for Educational Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Negussie, Birgit

    This paper discusses the importance of maternal and infant health for children's educational achievement. Education, health, and nutrition are so closely related that changes in one causes changes in the others. Improvement of maternal and preschooler health and nutrition is a precondition for improved educational achievement. Although parental…

  7. Health Education in Higher Education: What Is the Future?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack-Brown, Kelli R.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the reflections of Kelli R. McCormack-Brown, recognized as the 2011 American Association for Health Education (AAHE) Scholar at the American Association for Health Education conference in 2013. Recognition of peers is the highest honor a health educator can receive and is the culmination of many years of challenges and…

  8. Family Life Education. Grade 7. An Optional Health Education Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education and Training, Winnipeg.

    The Family Life Education optional unit of the Manitoba (Canada) Health Education curriculum reflects the current emphasis in health education on preventive medicine, total well-being, and the assumption of individual responsibility for health. The unit as a whole consists of four components: an overview and three grade level guides designed for…

  9. Family Life Education. Grade 9. An Optional Health Education Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education and Training, Winnipeg.

    The Family Life Education optional unit of the Manitoba (Canada) Health Education curriculum reflects the current emphasis in health education on preventive medicine, total well-being, and the assumption of individual responsibility for health. The unit as a whole consists of four components: an overview and three grade level guides designed for…

  10. Empowerment Education: Freire's Ideas Adapted to Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallerstein, Nina; Bernstein, Edward

    1988-01-01

    This article contains three sections: (1) a literature review demonstrating that powerlessness is linked to disease and empowerment to health; (2) an exposition of Brazilian educator Paulo Freire's empowering education theory with a comparison to traditional health education; and (3) a case study of an empowering education substance abuse…

  11. AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database is a resource from the Health Care Information Service of the British Library. AMED offers access to complementary and alternative medicine topics, such as acupuncture, chiropractic, herbalism, homeopathy, hospice care, hypnosis, palliative care, physiotherapy, podiatry, and rehabilitation. This column features a sample search to demonstrate the type of information available within AMED. AMED is available through the EBSCOhost and OVID platforms.

  12. Putting Health Education on the Public Health Map in Canada--The Role of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vamos, Sandra; Hayos, Julia

    2010-01-01

    The health education profession has developed over recent years garnering national and international attention. Canada's evolving health education perspective emphasizing the concept of health literacy within the broader public health system reflects the need for trained, competent and skilled health educators designing, implementing and…

  13. Federal Data Bases for Health Education Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Ronald; Iverson, Donald

    1982-01-01

    Described are some of the national health related databases which are useful in conducting health education research. Among areas covered by the projects are hypertension, myocardial infarction, neighborhood health centers, alcoholism, and over the counter drugs. (CJ)

  14. Education and Training for Health Professionals

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Classroom Series is a collection of webinars that highlights topics that provide the educational content, tools, and resources necessary for health professionals, especially those working in public health, to address cancer as a public health problem.

  15. Health Occupations Education. Health Services Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Twenty-four units on health service careers are presented in this teacher's guide. The units are organized into four sections as follow: Section A--Orientation (health careers, career success, Health Occupations Students of America); Section B--Health and First Aid (personal health, community health, and first aid); Section C--Body Structure and…

  16. Allie Abrahamson: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    The APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology is awarded on an annual basis by the APA Board of Professional Affairs (BPA) and the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS) to a graduate student who has demonstrated outstanding practice and application of psychology. A qualified candidate must demonstrate exemplary performance in working with an underserved population in an applied setting or have developed an innovative method for delivering health services to an underserved population. This year there are joint recipients of the award, Allie Abrahamson and Rebeccah A. Bernard. Their vision, creativity, courage, and dedication led them to create the Human Rights Forum at Chestnut Hill College to promote human rights education, awareness, and community service opportunities for doctoral students. Allie Abrahamson's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  17. Health Coaching: A Developing Field within Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    The health promotion and health education literature has references to health counselling. Yet, beyond the field of health, coaching has become a popular method to enhance and facilitate individual and group performance in business, sports, and personal areas of life. This paper focuses on the recent development of health coaching by practitioners…

  18. The Safe Space Kit: Guide to Being an Ally to LGBT Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), 2009

    2009-01-01

    "The Safe Space Kit" is designed to help educators create a safe space for LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) students. One of the most effective ways for an educator to create a safe space is to be a supportive ally to LGBT students. The hard copy of "The Safe Space Kit" includes the "Guide to Being an Ally," ten "Safe Space" stickers…

  19. Health Education and Cigarette Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Morison, James B.; Medovy, Herry; MacDonell, Gordon T.

    1964-01-01

    The smoking habits of Winnipeg school students were surveyed before and after a three-year program of health education on the hazards of smoking, directed to 8300 out of 48,000 students. The program consisted of informal approaches to students in elementary schools and a formal program of talks, lectures, films, and student participation for older students. There were fewer students at all ages who had never smoked a cigarette at the time of the second survey. There was a slight decrease in the number of regular smokers in high school, most marked in the school where the program was enthusiastically received and student participation was most active. A direct relationship between parental smoking and that of the student, and an inverse relationship between academic achievement and student smoking, were shown on both surveys. The majority of students believed that smoking caused lung cancer and other hazards to health, although this was less marked among smokers. The results indicated that an intensive program of health education directed to the teenagers in school was a potentially useful approach to the problem of cigarette smoking. PMID:14154295

  20. Nice White Men or Social Justice Allies?: Using Critical Race Theory to Examine How White Male Faculty and Administrators Engage in Ally Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Lori D.; Bondi, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Numerous scholars have offered definitions and perspectives for White people to be or become social justice allies. The purpose of this study was to examine the complicated realities that social justice allies in higher education face when working on campus. Using a critical interpretivist approach grounded in critical race theory, the authors…

  1. Death Education for the Health Professional.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Contains seven articles reviewing various death education programs for health professionals. Discusses death education in undergraduate and advanced nursing practice programs; a graduate course focusing on social, psychological, and cultural conditions influencing death; two death education programs in medical schools; and humanistic health care…

  2. Health Education Curriculum Content--Abstinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota Department of Public Instruction, 2011

    2011-01-01

    As a result of House Bill 1229, introduced and passed during the 2011 North Dakota legislative session, every school district, both public and nonpublic, must expand health education to include abstinence education, if teaching sexuality education as part of the general health curriculum. This fact sheet provides guidance for districts in meeting…

  3. Interactive Influences on Health and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Lilian H.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines multiple convergent forces affecting health, relates these to social determinants of health and critical adult health learning, and closes with discussion of opportunities for adult educators to contribute to human health at the individual, community, health provider, policy/regulatory agency, and international levels.

  4. Arkansas Health Education Curriculum Framework, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This K-12 health education curriculum presents five areas in which Arkansas students should show competence. The five strands are: health promotion and disease prevention (students will comprehend health promotion and disease prevention concepts); health information products and services (students will evaluate health information, products, and…

  5. Education, mental health, and education-labor market misfit.

    PubMed

    Bracke, Piet; van de Straat, Vera; Missinne, Sarah

    2014-12-01

    Higher-educated people experience enhanced mental health. We ponder whether the mental health benefits of educational attainment are limitless. At the individual level, we look at the impact of job-education mismatch. At the societal level, we hypothesize that diminishing economic returns on education limit its mental health benefits. Using a subsample of individuals aged 20 to 65 years (N = 28,288) from 21 countries in the European Social Survey (ESS 2006), we estimate the impact on depressive symptoms of characteristics at both the employee level (years of education and job-education mismatch) and the labor market/country level (the gap between the nontertiary and tertiary educated in terms of unemployment risks and earnings). The results show that educational attainment produces mental health benefits in most European countries. However, in some of the countries, these benefits are limited or even completely eliminated by education-labor market misfit.

  6. Preparing Social Work Students for Interprofessional Practice in Geriatric Health Care: Insights from Two Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonifas, Robin P.; Gray, Amanda K.

    2013-01-01

    Although several interprofessional education projects have addressed training allied health students for effective teamwork in geriatrics, few curriculum evaluation studies have examined differences in learning outcomes between interprofessional and traditional uniprofessional approaches, especially for social work students. This paper compares…

  7. Quality and Health-Optimizing Physical Education: Using Assessment at the Health and Education Nexus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Dean; Goodyear, Victoria; Baxter, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: The United Nations Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organization (UNESCO) recognizes quality physical education (QPE) must, along with physical, social and affective educative goals, seek to improve the health status of youth (UNESCO, 2015). Health-Optimizing Physical Education (HOPE) is a model of physical education (PE) that…

  8. Health Education circa 2035--A Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses what life will be like in 2035, and what its implications will be for the way in which health education is practiced. He states that in the next 25 years health educators will have to leave their comfort zones and take a calculated risk with some radical and more creative approaches to health behavior change.…

  9. The West Virginia Health Education Assessment Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, Nancy O'Hara; Kamal, Khalid M.; Chapman, Don

    2005-01-01

    Well-designed school health education should provide students with the knowledge and skills to prevent the health risk behaviors most responsible for the major causes of morbidity and mortality. This paper reports the methodology and findings of a West Virginia statewide health education assessment initiative and describes how the findings are…

  10. Health Education Curriculum Standards K-12, Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware State Dept. of Public Instruction, Dover.

    The health education program focuses on wellness and health promotion, with emphasis on the need to influence children and youth to make early decisions about positive lifestyles that will continue into adulthood. These comprehensive health education curriculum standards focus on positive self-image, decision-making, nutrition, stress management,…

  11. The Multicultural Challenge in Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matiella, Ana Consuelo, Ed.

    This collection offers strategies for making health education culturally relevant. The volume is organized into five sections. The first section, "Foundations for Multicultural Health Education," includes chapters: (1) "Who Are the Children and How Is Their Health?" (Iris M. Tropp, Marie J. Montrose); (2) "The…

  12. Health Education Content Standards and Benchmarks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing.

    The Michigan Department of Education's vision for health education is a continuum of learning experiences which enables people to make informed decisions, modify behaviors, and change social conditions in ways that are health enhancing, with students learning to obtain, interpret, and apply health information and services in ways that protect and…

  13. Improving a Sexual Health Education Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowden, Kevin; And Others

    This report summarizes an evaluation of a 4-week sexual health education program in a disadvantaged, urban target school in Scotland, and the investigation of the longer term impact of a previous 10-week program involving sexual health education provided by health workers. In-depth interviews with 5 boys and 5 girls revealed that the 10-week…

  14. Comparing need between health occupation and health education schools: which students benefit most from the school health education program.

    PubMed

    Lam, Lisa; Lee, Rachel; Nip, Ivy

    2004-09-01

    Comparing need between Health Occupation and Health Education Schools: Which students benefit most from the School Health Education Program? First-year medical students taught general health topics at public high schools. Pre-test and post-tests were given for each presentation. Health Education students had lower pre-test scores but showed greater improvement. With greater need and fewer resources, Health Education students benefit most.

  15. The West Virginia Health Education Assessment Project.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Nancy O'Hara; Kamal, Khalid M; Chapman, Don

    2005-08-01

    Well-designed school health education should provide students with the knowledge and skills to prevent the health risk behaviors most responsible for the major causes of morbidity and mortality. This paper reports the methodology and findings of a West Virginia statewide health education assessment initiative and describes how the findings are used to design professional development training for school health educators. Selected response items from the State Collaborative on Assessment and Student Standards, Health Education Assessment Project were used to develop a 40-item assessment instrument for 6 health education content areas. In West Virginia, 51 counties and 242 schools were recruited (county response rate = 93%; school response rate = 53%); 17,549 students were tested in grades 6, 8, and high school health education classes. Mean total scores by grade were 30.61 (grade 6), 26.55 (grade 8), and 26.53 (high school), indicating a slight decline in scores as grade level increased. Females in each grade level scored higher on total Health Education Assessment Project (HEAP) scores and subtest scores than males. The results suggest notable differences across grade levels. High school students failed to meet the standard on any health education content areas, indicating the need for enhanced knowledge and skill development. During professional development training, HEAP scores were examined in the context of results from the West Virginia Youth Risk Behavior Survey to underscore the importance of providing quality skills-based health education in West Virginia schools.

  16. Reviewing health promotion in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Dean

    2007-04-01

    The [World Health Organisation, 2000. Nurse and Midwives for Health: A WHO European Strategy for Nursing and Midwifery Education. WHO Regional Office for Europe, Copenhagen] European Strategy for Nursing and Midwifery Education calls for the explicit inclusion and application of health promotion in all nursing curricula. Prior to this strategy, and subsequently, studies have explored the nature and extent of health promotion in nursing education. This article extensively reviews this body of literature. Overall, the literature, both included in this review and its supporting discussion, presents a picture suggesting that the call for effective inclusion of health promotion has in many cases gone unheeded. The literature also identifies that the educational delivery of broader elements of health promotion is muted in comparison to the 'traditional' constructs of health education. Considerations for wider reform, born out of the literature, are presented.

  17. Multilingual health education tapes project.

    PubMed

    Vryheid, R

    1992-01-01

    The success of Thailand's 1985 malaria education cassette tapes project motivated the Highland Development Program to produce tapes in 6 tribal languages on family planning, maternal and child health, nutrition, and disease prevention. Staff produced tapes using a drama or radio magazine format as a series of short features with music and sound effects. Scriptwriters consulted villagers, broadcasting professionals, research workers, and health officials to tailor messages to the various hill tribes. They tried to avoid conflict between traditional and modern concepts and to minimize distrust of government services. The scriptwriters used basically short, grammatically simple sentences, and colloquial Thai to simplify translation. The staff tried to recruit literate, adult, native speakers of the target languages with some experience in health education in their own languages. Obstacles encountered with translation included some languages used an uncommon alphabet or translators did not know their own alphabet. The program backtranslated the scripts to assure the accuracy of the messages and the appropriateness of the words used. Backtranslation revealed deficiencies in the translated messages. Altering the meaning of technical terms tended to be simple mistakes, words with multiple meanings, and exaggeration of problems and/or solutions. Translators also sometimes failed to adapt cultural ideas to those of their tribes. For example, some persons translated all possible misconceptions about a disease yet the tribes did not have all the misconceptions. As of early 1992, recording, pretesting, distribution, and follow up had not yet taken place. The staff should meet with a recording studio to coordinate production including technicians and translators identifying means to communicate. Staff should be aware of signs of poor translation which they may have missed earlier and surfaces during recording. Pretesting should occur among literate and illiterate members of

  18. Interdisciplinary Delivery of Oral Health Care Student-Training Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roe, Sandy; Branson, Bonnie G.; Lackey, Nancy R.

    2001-01-01

    Responses from 23 of 37 area health education center project directors revealed that dental and dental hygiene students participated in interdisciplinary allied health studies. Oral health care education was delivered across disciplines; methods included problem-based learning and reflection. (SK)

  19. Permanent education in health: a review

    PubMed Central

    Miccas, Fernanda Luppino; Batista, Sylvia Helena Souza da Silva

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To undertake a meta-synthesis of the literature on the main concepts and practices related to permanent education in health. METHODS A bibliographical search was conducted for original articles in the PubMed, Web of Science, LILACS, IBECS and SciELO databases, using the following search terms: “public health professional education”, “permanent education”, “continuing education”, “permanent education health”. Of the 590 articles identified, after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 48 were selected for further analysis, grouped according to the criteria of key elements, and then underwent meta-synthesis. RESULTS The 48 original publications were classified according to four thematic units of key elements: 1) concepts, 2) strategies and difficulties, 3) public policies and 4) educational institutions. Three main conceptions of permanent education in health were found: problem-focused and team work, directly related to continuing education and education that takes place throughout life. The main strategies for executing permanent education in health are discussion, maintaining an open space for permanent education, and permanent education clusters. The most limiting factor is mainly related to directly or indirect management. Another highlight is the requirement for implementation and maintenance of public policies, and the availability of financial and human resources. The educational institutions need to combine education and service aiming to form critical-reflexive graduates. CONCLUSIONS The coordination between health and education is based as much on the actions of health services as on management and educational institutions. Thus, it becomes a challenge to implement the teaching-learning processes that are supported by critical-reflexive actions. It is necessary to carry out proposals for permanent education in health involving the participation of health professionals, teachers and educational institutions. PMID:24789649

  20. Promoting Health Literacy through the Health Education Assessment Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Eva; Hudson, Nancy; Deal, Tami B.; Pateman, Beth; Middleton, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    Background: The Council of Chief State School Officers' State Collaborative on Assessment and Student Standards Health Education Assessment Project (SCASS-HEAP) allows states to pool financial and human resources to develop effective ready-to-use health education assessment resources through a collaborative process. The purpose of this article is…

  1. Health Literacy and Adult Basic Education Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golbeck, Amanda L.; Ahlers-Schmidt, Carolyn R.; Paschal, Angelia M.

    2005-01-01

    Adult basic education (ABE) is an ideal venue for developing health literacy skills. Literacy and numeracy assessments used in ABE were identified and the most common were examined for health components. Only the Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System (CASAS) included health. The two most common health literacy assessments used in general…

  2. Design of the School Health Education Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Walter J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The nation's public schools can systematically promote the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary for good health. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services contracted to evaluate the School Health Curriculum Project and three other approaches. The design, implementation, and benefits of the School Health Education Evaluation (SHEE) are…

  3. Rural Allied Medical Business Occupations (RAMBO). Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gloria

    A partnership was formed to address the crisis that rural health care facilities in rural Nebraska face in attracting and hiring trained health care workers. The Rural Allied Medical Business Occupations (RAMBO) project trained economically disadvantaged individuals in high technology medical fields. Five objectives were outlined in the project:…

  4. Historical Perspective of Athletic Training Clinical Education

    PubMed Central

    Weidner, Thomas G.; Henning, Jolene M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To present a historical perspective of the development and evolution of clinical education in the medical and allied health professions, with a special interest in athletic training; to gain a better understanding and appreciation of the depth and breadth of the structured and formal clinical education needed in athletic training, for both the present and the future. Data Sources: Information was drawn from the Educational Resources Information Center (1966–2001), MEDLINE (1966–2001), SPORT Discus (1830–2002), and CINAHL (1982–2002) searches of historical literature relating to the development of medical, allied health, and athletic training clinical education. Key words searched were clinical education, clinical instruction, medical education, allied health education, history of medical education, athletic training education, and history of clerkships. We also used reference materials cited in historical textbooks on medical education. Data Synthesis: Clinical education in American medical schools evolved from a primarily didactic process to the clinical-clerkship model. In contrast, athletic training professional preparation was initially more steeped in clinical experiences and less in didactic instruction. Conclusions/Recommendations: Reviewing medical education over the past century and allied health clinical education over the past 30 years provides interesting insights about the past, present, and future of athletic training professional preparation. Athletic training clinical education is undergoing reform and development, which will subsequently enhance the profession. Athletic training has entered an exciting era in its history. PMID:12937549

  5. Turning gadflies into allies.

    PubMed

    Yaziji, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Multinational companies are the driving force behind globalization, but they are also the source of many of its most painful consequences, including currency crises, cross-border pollution, and overfishing. These problems remain unsolved because they are beyond the scope of individual governments; transnational organizations have also proved unequal to the task. Nonprofit, nongovernmental organizations have leaped into the breach. To force policy changes, they have seized on all forms of modern persuasion to influence public sentiment toward global traders, manufacturers, and investors. By partnering with NGOs instead of opposing them, companies can avoid costly conflict and can use NGOs' assets to gain competitive advantage. So far, however, most companies have proved ill equipped to deal with NGOs. Large companies know how to compete on the basis of product attributes and price. But NGO attacks focus on production methods and their spillover effects, which are often noneconomic. Similarly, NGOs are able to convert companies' standard competitive strengths--such as size and wide market awareness of their brands--into liabilities. That's because the wealthier and better known a company is, the juicier the target it makes. Emboldened by their successes, NGOs continue to take on new causes. By partnering with NGOs instead of reflexively opposing them, companies could draw on NGOs' key strengths--legitimacy, awareness of social forces, distinct networks, and specialized technical expertise--which most companies could use more of. And with NGOs as allies and guides, companies should also be able to accelerate innovation, foresee shifts in demand, shape legislation affecting them, and, in effect, set technical and regulatory standards for their industries.

  6. Mental Health: The next Frontier of Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutcher, Stan; Venn, David; Szumilas, Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    Promoting student health and well-being in school has long been a component of education. Traditionally, sports and physical education programs have stressed the importance of staying physically healthy through exercise. More recently, school-based sexual education and nutrition programs have informed young people about the importance of sexual…

  7. From the School Health Education Study to the National Health Education Standards: Concepts Endure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nobiling, Brandye D.; Lyde, Adrian R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The landmark School Health Education Study (SHES) project influenced by the conceptual approach to teaching and learning provides perspective on modern school health instruction. Conceptual education, the cornerstone of the SHES curriculum framework (CF), "Health Education: A Conceptual Approach to Curriculum Design," fosters…

  8. The Increasing Value of Education to Health

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Dana; Smith, James P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper assesses how the relationship between health and educational attainment has changed over the last three decades. We examine trends in disease prevalence and self-reporte health using the US National Health Interview Survey for five chronic conditions—arthritis, diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, and lung diseases. The sample is limited to non-Hispanic Whites ages 40–64 to focus on the value of education and not changing representation of minority populations. We find that health benefits associated with additional schooling rose over time by more than ten percentage points as measured by self-reported health status. This can be attributed to both a growing disparity by education in the probability of having major chronic diseases during middle age, and better health outcomes for those with each disease. The value of education in achieving better health has increased over the last 25 years; both in protecting against onset of disease and promoting better health outcomes amongst those with a disease. Besides better access to health insurance, the more educated increasingly adapted better health behaviors, particularly not smoking and engaging in vigorous excercise, and reaped the benefits of improving medical technology. Rising health disparities by education are an important social concern which may require targeted interventions. PMID:21555176

  9. A Gateway to Health Careers for Urban High School Students: Collaborative Front-Line and Allied Workforce Development Program among High Schools, Public Hospitals and Public Colleges. Program Results Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jablow, Paul

    2012-01-01

    From 2005 to 2011, the Gateway Institute for Pre-College Education partnered with three public entities in New York City--the Department of Education, the City University of New York and the Health and Hospitals Corporation--to introduce, educate, and prepare urban high school students for careers in the health professions. Gateway was launched in…

  10. The Allied Medical Development Project, Forest Park Community College. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Louis Community Coll., MO.

    The Allied Medical Development Project was conceived to determine the role of the St. Louis-St. Louis County Junior College District in the education of personnel for allied medical careers in the St. Louis area. The underlying assumption was that the development of needed programs on a sound basis in the St. Louis area would result in general…

  11. Montana Health Education Curriculum Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Dept. of Public Instruction, Helena.

    This guide is intended to serve administrators, curriculum directors, and teachers as a resource to develop or enhance the existing health education curriculum. After two introductory chapters that provide an overview of the Montana health education curriculum and its 10 content areas, the document provides guidelines for high school, junior high,…

  12. Readying the Health Education Specialist for Emergencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geiger, Brian F.; Firsing, Stephen L., III; Beric, Bojana; Rodgers, Joel B.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a resourceful guide for the health education specialist to improve emergency management knowledge and skills specific to their setting, including training and preparing for emergencies and providing adequate support to students, clients, and colleagues. Five steps guide competent health education practice before, during, and…

  13. Health Professions Education for Year 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    Economic, demographic, technological, and practice factors outside the health professions that will influence education and practice in the future are outlined, and critical educational components (sciences, epidemiology, public health, quantitative skills, literacy, information retrieval and use) and elements in the academic and clinical…

  14. Compensation of Certified Health Education Specialists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonaguro, John; White, John; Duncan, David F.; Nicholson, Thomas; Smith, Becky J.

    2009-01-01

    Health education moved toward professionalization with the establishment, in 1988, of the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. Today, there are approximately 8,000 active holders of the CHES credential. This article examines the compensation levels of CHES recipients in relation to their current position, employment setting…

  15. Practice Notes: Strategies in Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Education & Behavior, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The "Practice Notes" section is intended to keep readers informed about health education practice around the country. It is an attempt to spread the word about exemplary strategies, initiatives, and programs and share successes in overcoming obstacles or challenges. This article features two new programs on health education: (1) Project FIESTA;…

  16. Wisconsin School Health Education Profile Report, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    This report provides statewide data on Wisconsin middle and high school health education curriculum and policy. All regular public secondary schools were included in the school sampling frame. Data were collected via surveys of principals and lead health teachers regarding tobacco, physical education and activity, nutrition, HIV/AIDS, violence,…

  17. Educator Preparedness to Teach Health Education in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vamos, Sandra; Zhou, Mingming

    2007-01-01

    Background: To date, few studies have been conducted to investigate the preparedness of health educators in Canadian school systems. Purpose: This study assessed practicing and pre-service teachers' self-perceptions of preparedness to teach health education in British Columbia K-12 classrooms. It also investigated factors related to their…

  18. Health Education and the Political System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    David Easton's model describing how political systems operate can help health educators initiate improvements and resist harmful changes. The Memphis (Tennessee) Board of Education's experience with the adoption of family life education is cited as an example of a constructive political strategy. (PP)

  19. The Reunification of Health and Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Seymour

    1982-01-01

    The movement toward a separation of physical education and health education is gradually receding with the realization that a holistic education is more suitable to the physical and psychological growth of the individual personality. The reunification of the two disciplines is important for the unification of mind and body. (JN)

  20. Community Health: FCS Extension Educators Deliver Diabetes Education in PA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Jill N.; Corbin, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    For decades, family and consumer sciences (FCS) Extension educators have provided health related education to consumers through Cooperative Extension programming at land grant universities. However, offering diabetes education can be extra challenging due to the complicated nature of the disease and the multi-faceted treatment required. Faced with…

  1. Deaf community analysis for health education priorities.

    PubMed

    Jones, Elaine G; Renger, Ralph; Firestone, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Deaf persons' access to health-related information is limited by barriers to spoken or written language: they cannot overhear information; they have limited access to television, radio, and other channels for public information; and the average reading level of Deaf adults is at a 3rd to 4th grade level. However, literature searches revealed no published reports of community analysis focusing specifically on health education priorities for Deaf communities. A seven-step community analysis was conducted to learn the health education priorities in Arizona Deaf communities and to inform development of culturally relevant health education interventions in Deaf communities. The word "Deaf" is capitalized to reflect the cultural perspective of the Deaf community. A 14-member Deaf Health Committee collected data using multimethods that included review of state census data, review of national health priorities, key informant interviews, discussions with key community groups, a mail survey (n = 20), and semistructured interviews conducted in sign language with 111 Deaf adults. The community diagnosis with highest priority for health education was vulnerability to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Following completion of the community analysis, a heart-health education intervention (The Deaf Heart Health Intervention) was developed using a train-the-trainer, community health worker model. If this model proves to be effective in addressing vulnerability to CVD, then a similar protocol could be employed to address other health concerns identified in the Deaf community analysis.

  2. [Migrant related health education: Concept and measures of the Federal Centre for Health Education, Germany].

    PubMed

    Blümel, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    The Federal Centre for Health Education (BZgA) regards migrants as an important target group in nationwide health education programmes because they make up a large part of the population in Germany. The elements of the health education strategy are described and illustrated by examples of sex education and family planning. This includes concept development, migrant related mass communication, addressing target groups with special needs by personal communication, and cooperation with partners from migration work.

  3. Enhancing capabilities in health professions education

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Susan J.; Siddiqui, Zarrin S.; Jonas-Dwyer, Diana R.D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This article documents the results of ongoing summative program evaluation of a suite of postgraduate courses at The University of Western Australia designed to enhance the educational capabilities, academic leadership and scholarly output of health professionals. Methods Commencing students were invited to participate in this descriptive, longitudinal study that surveyed students at commencement and subsequently over a seven year period. Data was collected at baseline and follow-up in relation to the respondents’ educational leadership responsibilities, promotions, involvement in new educational programs, and recognition for contributions towards student learning, educational scholarly outputs and involvement in training programs. Results The respondents came from a wide range of health professions and worked in various roles, with a quarter already holding leadership positions. During the follow-up period, half reported receiving a new promotion or moving to new positions requiring educational leadership. Those identifying as being involved with the development of new educational programs doubled and 34% received a new teaching award. Scholarly productivity doubled with 45% giving an oral presentation related to education, 21% publishing and 29% being successful in obtaining funding related to an education project.  Conclusions These postgraduate courses in health professions education appear to be positively influencing graduates’ capabilities, especially in the areas of educational leadership skills and scholarly productivity. For those looking to develop a community of leaders in health professions education, the authors offer some suggestions. PMID:26590857

  4. Marketing impact of health education programs.

    PubMed

    Gombeski, W R; Briller, S; Fishleder, A; Bat-Cirjak, E; Rothner, A D; Secic, M

    1997-01-01

    A study evaluating whether a lay public education program caused initiation of health-related behaviors was conducted at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Attendees of three individual "Health Talks" were surveyed: endometriosis (n = 78), men's health (n = 62) and cancer (n = 57). Participants were surveyed at three points: (a) before the talk, (b) immediately following the talk and (c) six weeks after the talk concerning their knowledge and health behaviors. The results indicated that community health education produces a substantial improvement in health-related knowledge and after attending the seminars, 81.3% of respondents initiated a positive health behavior. Of interest to health care marketers are the 30.8% of attendees who initiated health behaviors which have marketing implications.

  5. Resource Manual for Health Occupations Education Instructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feilner, Veronica, Ed.; Robling, Jeannine, Ed.

    This resource manual is designed to assist secondary health occupations instructors in implementing their health occupations programs. It contains two types of materials: informational topics and sample forms, letters, memos, and other materials. The manual begins with an overview of the health occupations education program, followed by these…

  6. How Healthy Is Your Child's Health Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twiest, Meghan Mahoney

    1991-01-01

    Offers questions for parents to ask when determining whether their child's school health program is sufficient. Issues to examine include time allotted for health education, types of school services provided to help teachers with the subject, instructional methods, outside health services, and additional staff (e.g., nurses and counselors). (SM)

  7. Migrant Education Health Program, 1985. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Health, Denver.

    During 1985 the Colorado Migrant Education Program and the Colorado Migrant Health Program provided a comprehensive health program for students enrolled in migrant summer schools. A total of 1,889 migrant children through age 21 (60% between 5 and 10 years of age) received health screening and physical assessment, referral for diagnosis and…

  8. A Health Education Program That Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albino, Joseph; Davis, Roy

    1975-01-01

    Recounts a successful implementation of the School Health Curriculum Project in an elementary school. Development of the program has been supported by the federal Bureau of Health Education, Center for Disease Control, and the National Clearinghouse for Smoking and Health. (Author/IRT)

  9. [Health education methodology: an attempt at classification].

    PubMed

    Baudier, F

    1986-09-01

    Health education is a major tool in the implementation of any dynamic health promotion policy. In the author's view, its conventional role, the improvement of health by bringing about behavioural changes is today subject to controversy. He identifies five key approaches in health education: the traditional approach, characterized by three features: the didactic provision of information, the use of fear as an educational technique, and the appeal to the individual's sense of responsibility for his own health. the media approach, which uses marketing methods to promote health, with a tendency to resort to positive humorous messages. the socio-political approach, which questions the very purpose of health education. According to those who hold this view, wide-scale educational campaigns would only increase social and health inequalities and would be quite ineffective in fighting the powerful economic interests that control most of our habits. The health educator's real role would be to raise the people's political awareness. the epidemiological approach, which aims at great soundness through precise planning by objectives. It is based on the so-called exact sciences such as epidemiology and its aim is to study needs and assess actions. It incorporates the classical concept according to which a change in knowledge leads to a change in behaviour and habits and thus induces health improvement. Its very elaborate character accounts for both its strength and its weakness. In fact, it takes little account of the complexity of the educational process. the community approach fills some of these gaps by stressing the participation of individuals and institutions at all programming levels. For this purpose, it uses techniques designed to ensure consensus. In conclusion, the author recommends that active research in health education be undertaken in order to clarify more adequately these approaches with a view to improving the effectiveness of preventive work.

  10. [The senses of health education for community health agents].

    PubMed

    Brito, Suerde Miranda de Oliveira; Domingos Sobrinho, Moisés

    2009-12-01

    The study aimed at identifying the social representation of health education built by communitarian health workers. It was developed with 119 communitarian health workers in the city of João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil. Data were collected by the test of free association of words, questionnaires and interviews and analyzed by different methods and techniques. The results show: guidance, prevention and care as the centerpiece of representations. The peripheral: important, be prepared to guide, conduct, guidelines, professional, among others. The social representation of health education is structured in two levels: one aimed at informing the general public, another for professional training.

  11. Maternal Education and Investments in Children's Health.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Kate C; Augustine, Jennifer M

    2016-02-01

    Maternal education differences in children's academic skills have been strongly linked to parental investment behaviors. This study extended this line of research to investigate whether these same maternal education patterns in parenting are observed among a set of parenting behaviors that are linked to young children's health. Drawing on data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (n = 5,000) and longitudinal models incorporating random effects, the authors found that higher levels of maternal education were associated with more advantageous health investment behaviors at each phase of early development (9 months, 2 years, 4 years, 5 years). Moreover, these disparities were typically largest at the developmental stage when it was potentially most sensitive for children's long-term health and development. These findings provide further evidence of a developmental gradient associated with mothers' education and new insight into the salience of mothers' education for the short- and long-term health and well-being of their children.

  12. The National Tay Sachs and Allied Diseases Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeitlin, Paula

    1986-01-01

    The National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association is involved in education, research, and prevention of Tay-Sachs, an inherited metabolic disorder which destroys the central nervous system, and over 30 related disorders. The group features a parent peer group network and a support group for carrier couples. (CL)

  13. Health Instruction Packages: Health Education for Consumers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgerly, Gisele; And Others

    Text, illustrations and exercises are utilized in this set of six learning modules dealing with health topics of interest to the general public. The first module, "Do You Know Your Rights as a Patient?" by Gisele Edgerly, details the personal and financial rights of hospital patients. The second module, "The Consumer's Guide to…

  14. Nuclear education in public health and nursing

    SciTech Connect

    Winder, A.E.; Stanitis, M.A.

    1988-08-01

    Twenty-three public health schools and 492 university schools of nursing were surveyed to gather specific information on educational programs related to nuclear war. Twenty public health schools and 240 nursing schools responded. Nuclear war-related content was most likely to appear in disaster nursing and in environmental health courses. Three schools of public health report that they currently offer elective courses on nuclear war. Innovative curricula included political action projects for nuclear war prevention.

  15. Heterosexual Allies: A Descriptive Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Susan B.; Davis, Denise S.

    2010-01-01

    Forty-six heterosexual members of a college-based gay/straight alliance organization were surveyed to investigate characteristics of students who commit to acting as allies in reducing sexual prejudice. Assessment focused on the students' history of intergroup contact and exposure to sexual prejudice prior to joining the gay/straight alliance,…

  16. Chemical Waste and Allied Products.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yung-Tse; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Ramli, Siti Fatihah; Yeh, Ruth Yu-Li; Liu, Lian-Huey; Huhnke, Christopher Robert

    2016-10-01

    This review of literature published in 2015 focuses on waste related to chemical and allied products. The topics cover the waste management, physicochemical treatment, aerobic granular, aerobic waste treatment, anaerobic granular, anaerobic waste treatment, chemical waste, chemical wastewater, fertilizer waste, fertilizer wastewater, pesticide wastewater, pharmaceutical wastewater, ozonation. cosmetics waste, groundwater remediation, nutrient removal, nitrification denitrification, membrane biological reactor, and pesticide waste.

  17. Chemical Waste and Allied Products.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yung-Tse; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Yusoff, Mohd Suffian; Kamaruddin, Mohamad Anuar; Yeh, Ruth Yu-Li; Liu, Lian-Huey; Huhnke, Christopher Robert; Fu, Yen-Pei

    2015-10-01

    This review of literature published in 2014 focuses on waste related to chemical and allied products. The topics cover the waste management practices, hospital waste, pesticide waste, chemical wastewater, pesticide wastewater and pharmaceutical wastewater. The other topics include aerobic treatment, anaerobic treatment, sorption and ozonation.

  18. Health and educational performance among young migrants.

    PubMed

    Kirkcaldy, Bruce David; Furnham, Adrian; Siefen, Rainer Georg

    2013-01-01

    This study is a part replication of an earlier study by on health efficacy, educational attainment and well-being among 30 nations. It includes, however, data from these nations, as well as the latest Pisa results and update socioeconomic data and sociological variables which include divorce rate, number of persons/household, employment rates, and measures of physical and mental health (including new scales of well-being, e.g., mental health index, life satisfaction, suicide rates). More importantly, it includes measures of migrant rates among children and adults in each country, the focus of attention of this article. New material on health and educational expenditure are provided.

  19. Health-related services provided by public health educators.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Hans H; Becker, Craig M

    2011-09-01

    This study identifies the health-related services provided by public health educators. The investigators, with the help of practicing public health educators, created the list of health-related services. Respondents received questionnaires in 2001 and 2007. Thus, this study determined the changes in health-related services provided over a 6-year period. Respondents ranked up to five health-related services by the amount of time spent delivering each health-related service. The list of health-related services presented in a 2001 survey and a 2007 survey were identical. As in 2001, this list in the 2007 survey captured the breadth of health-related services provided, with one exception. In 2007, several participants wrote-in "emergency preparedness/bioterrorism." The types of health-related services provided did not change over the 6-year period; however, the ranking of these services did change. Most notably, nutrition education and involvement with physical activity moved up in the ranking in 2007.

  20. Advancing Public Health through Continuing Education of Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Addleton, Robert L.; Vitale, Frank M.; Christiansen, Bruce A.; Mejicano, George C.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how the CS2day (Cease Smoking Today) initiative positioned continuing education (CE) in the intersection between medicine and public health. The authors suggest that most CE activities address the medical challenges that clinicians confront, often to the neglect of the public health issues that are key risk factors for the…

  1. Emphasizing Sustainable Health and Wellness in a Health Education Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bajracharya, Srijana M.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental sustainability is the most visible recent global movement addressing the effect of human activities on the environment. Because of its effect on human health and well-being, it is imperative that the health education discipline begin to consider this topic as one of the important content areas. This paper provides a model for the…

  2. [Health education: knowledge, social representation, and illness].

    PubMed

    Gazzinelli, Maria Flávia; Gazzinelli, Andréa; Reis, Dener Carlos dos; Penna, Cláudia Maria de Mattos

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the theory and practice of health and education, beginning with the notion of the hegemony (in health education practice) of strategies linked to the notion that to grasp established knowledge always leads to the acquisition of new behaviors and practices. Five different axioms have oriented education and health practices, either juxtaposed or at different moments: (1) the notion of overcoming the determination of knowledge over practices; (2) the determination of representations over practices; (3) the analysis of representations within the traditional framework of right and wrong; (4) reciprocity between representations and practices; and (5) the importance of considering practices amenable to re-elaboration through representations, thus situating experience in understanding subjects' illness processes, as well as the way subjects culturally construct illness. The article highlights the need for a link between social representations and illness-as-experience in health education practices.

  3. Strategic Teleconference Planning in Rural Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Liza; Boswell, Judy

    1997-01-01

    An introduction to planning interactive health education teleconferences via satellite discusses participant recruitment, satellite transmission coordination, scheduling considerations, format design, and use of site facilitators. Teleconference training of community service providers and community leaders should combine passive delivery of…

  4. School role in health education in Italy.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Sergio

    2011-10-01

    Intellectual and knowledge values on one side, and vital and physical values on the other, need to be balanced. A harmonious coexistence of these values requires synergy among the bodies that contribute to children education to avoid that the heath education activities cause overlapping, misunderstanding and conflicts between the two models that define children lifestyles: schools and families. Educational bodies understand that health education is key to enable people manage their bio-psychic, emotional, moral and mental resources. Lack of this ability means damage to the child and consequently a failure of the school and the society itself. In the latest decades, schools have been working in this direction, and they have redefined the national curricula integrating health education with specific references to food education and physical activity.

  5. Common Questions about Sexual Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    Provides research-based answers to questions commonly posed by educators, parents, and others about the philosophy, methods, and impact of school sexual health education, discussing such issues as: whether these school programs are needed, what values they teach, whether the programs should teach about sexual orientation and abstinence, and…

  6. Death Education for the Health Professional.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint, Ed.

    The perspectives of a number of health professionals based on their experiences in providing death education courses are presented in essays. In "Interdisciplinary Death Education in a Nursing School" (Helen L. Swain and Kathleen V. Cowles), the development of an undergraduate elective course in death, dying, and bereavement at the…

  7. Health Education Program. Kanawha County Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanawha County Schools, Charleston, WV.

    A task force, after a 2-year study, recommended a curriculum on health education which would meet the specific needs of both teachers and students. This teacher developed curriculum guide is comprised of five units on: human growth and development, diseases, nutrition, personal hygiene, drug education, safety and first aid. Each unit contains a…

  8. Health/Cosmetology. Career Education Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dependents Schools (DOD), Washington, DC. European Area.

    The curriculum guide is designed to provide students with realistic training in theory and practice within the secondary educational framework and prepare them for entry into an occupation or continuing postsecondary education. The learning modules are grouped into branches pertaining to the broad categories of health services and cosmetology.…

  9. Health Occupations Education. Vocational Education Program Courses Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This document contains vocational education program courses standards (curriculum frameworks and student performance standards) for exploratory courses, practical arts courses, and job preparatory programs in health occupations (HO) education offered at the secondary or postsecondary level as a part of Florida's comprehensive vocational education…

  10. [Secondary Career Education Activities: Health and Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford City Schools, VA.

    The guide is one of a series developed in a pilot project to integrate career education concepts with subject matter in secondary grades. The units are designed to reveal career orientation aspects of traditional topics within five major subject areas: English, social studies, mathematics, science, and health and physical education. The lesson…

  11. Health Science Education. Vocational Education Program Courses Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Applied Tech., Adult, and Community Education.

    This document contains vocational education program course standards (curriculum frameworks and student performance standards) for exploratory courses, practical arts courses, and job preparatory programs offered at the secondary and postsecondary level as part of the health science education component of Florida's comprehensive vocational…

  12. An education gradient in health, a health gradient in education, or a confounded gradient in both?

    PubMed

    Lynch, Jamie L; von Hippel, Paul T

    2016-04-01

    There is a positive gradient associating educational attainment with health, yet the explanation for this gradient is not clear. Does higher education improve health (causation)? Do the healthy become highly educated (selection)? Or do good health and high educational attainment both result from advantages established early in the life course (confounding)? This study evaluates these competing explanations by tracking changes in educational attainment and Self-rated Health (SRH) from age 15 to age 31 in the National Longitudinal Study of Youth, 1997 cohort. Ordinal logistic regression confirms that high-SRH adolescents are more likely to become highly educated. This is partly because adolescent SRH is associated with early advantages including adolescents' academic performance, college plans, and family background (confounding); however, net of these confounders adolescent SRH still predicts adult educational attainment (selection). Fixed-effects longitudinal regression shows that educational attainment has little causal effect on SRH at age 31. Completion of a high school diploma or associate's degree has no effect on SRH, while completion of a bachelor's or graduate degree have effects that, though significant, are quite small (less than 0.1 points on a 5-point scale). While it is possible that educational attainment would have greater effect on health at older ages, at age 31 what we see is a health gradient in education, shaped primarily by selection and confounding rather than by a causal effect of education on health.

  13. Appraising quantitative research in health education: guidelines for public health educators.

    PubMed

    Jack, Leonard; Hayes, Sandra C; Scharalda, Jeanfreau G; Stetson, Barbara; Jones-Jack, Nkenge H; Valliere, Matthew; Kirchain, William R; LeBlanc, Cris

    2010-03-01

    Many practicing health educators do not feel they possess the skills necessary to critically appraise quantitative research. This publication is designed to help provide practicing health educators with basic tools helpful to facilitate a better understanding of quantitative research. This article describes the major components- title, introduction, methods, analyses, results, and discussion sections-of quantitative research. Readers will be introduced to information on the various types of study designs and seven key questions health educators can use to facilitate the appraisal process. On reading, health educators will be in a better position to determine whether research studies are well designed and executed.

  14. Recommendations for Undergraduate Public Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riegelman, Richard K.; Albertine, Susan

    2008-01-01

    This curriculum guide serves to assist faculty who are developing undergraduate courses in public health as well as educational administrators and faculty curriculum committees who are designing undergraduate public health curricula. The approach outlined in these recommendations focuses on the development of three core courses, each of which is…

  15. Challenges for Tailored Messaging in Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stellefson, Michael L.; Hanik, Bruce W.; Chaney, Beth H.; Chaney, J. Don

    2008-01-01

    It is a health education truism that instructional material will be more effective when audience characteristics are taken into account at the outset of program development. One strategy for disseminating relevant health information to individuals is known as "tailored messaging," which accounts for intra-individual information processing needs.…

  16. Practice Notes: Strategies in Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Education & Behavior, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article features two exemplary programs in health education practice: (1) Project L.E.A.P (Learning Effective and Applicable Parenting); and (2) A program that uses a pedestrian count tool to measure environmental and health promotion efforts. Project L.E.A.P. was developed by the Atlanta Alliance on Developmental Disabilities to promote…

  17. Answers to Health Questions in Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Robert, Ed.

    Culled from the answers of physical education teachers and coaches, this booklet attempts to indicate the scope of health problems and suggests some directions which the solutions may take. It is divided into three parts. Part 1, Health and Safety in Activity Programs, answers questions on first aid, excused absences, and desirability of…

  18. Virginia Adult Education Health Literacy Toolkit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Kate, Comp.

    This toolkit is a resource to help adult education instructors and administrators better understand the problem of health literacy as it affects their learners. It is designed to support creative approaches to helping learners increase their health literacy as they engage in sound, productive adult literacy instruction. Information resources are…

  19. Educational Statistics for Selected Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Donald W.; Holz, Frank M.

    Detailed statistics on education are provided for a number of health occupations. Data are given as far back as 1950-1951 for medical and dental schools, while for schools of public health, the data begin in 1975-1976. Complete 1980 data are provided only for dentistry, pharmacy, and veterinary medicine. Statistical tables are included on the…

  20. Clark County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Clark County area of Nevada, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  1. Treasure Valley Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Treasure Valley area of Idaho, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  2. Missoula County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Missoula County area of Montana, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  3. Sheridan County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Sheridan County area of Wyoming, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  4. Yellowstone County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Yellowstone County area of Montana, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  5. Migrant Education Health Program, 1984. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver. Compensatory Education Services Unit.

    During 1984 the Colorado Migrant Health Program, together with the Colorado Migrant Education Program, provided students enrolled in migrant summer schools with a continuum of care which included screening and physical assessment for detection of existing and potential health problems, referral for diagnosis and treatment of identified…

  6. Migrant Education Health Program, 1982. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Charles L.; Swanson, Terri M.

    During 1982 the Colorado Migrant Health Program, together with the Colorado Migrant Education Program, provided students enrolled in migrant summer schools with a continuum of care which included screening and physical assessment for detection of existing and potential health problems, referral for diagnosis and treatment of identified…

  7. Migrant Education Health Program, 1983. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Health, Denver.

    During 1983 the Colorado Migrant Health Program, together with the Colorado Migrant Education Program, provided students enrolled in migrant summer schools with a continuum of care which included screening and physical assessment for detection of existing and potential health problems, referral for diagnosis and treatment of identified…

  8. Health Educators as Environmental Policy Advocates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Kimberly J.; Baker, Judith A.

    1993-01-01

    Health educators must complement individual-level change with communitywide policy and legislative initiatives, focusing on environmental issues such as air pollution, ozone layer depletion, and toxic waste disposal. Recent increases in discomfort and disease related to the physical environment call for immediate action from health professionals…

  9. First steps towards interprofessional health practice in Tanzania: an educational experiment in rural Bagamoyo district.

    PubMed

    Leshabari, Sebalda; Lubbock, Lindsey A; Kaijage, Herbert; Kalala, Willbrord; Koehler, Gary; Massawe, Siriel; Muganyizi, Projestine; Macfarlane, Sarah B; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2012-01-01

    Health workers in Tanzania struggle to provide adequate health care for populations with high maternal, neonatal, and child mortality and high prevalence of communicable and non-communicable diseases. There are longstanding shortages of staff and resources. Universities are training more health professionals and revising curricula to be sure that staff have the specific skills needed to work in rural districts. This includes training people from different disciplines to work more effectively together. While teamwork is important in all settings, it is particularly critical in rural areas where there are few trained professionals. The health professional schools at Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) developed curricula that share common competencies to promote interprofessional cooperation. In this article, we describe a pilot program developed by MUHAS to train its professional students (dentists, doctors, environmental health officers, nurses, and pharmacists) to work collaboratively with each other and with other health staff at the district level. We describe the reactions of participants, and identify some considerations for taking such an exercise to scale for education.

  10. Health Education in the Field of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, J. MacDonald

    1974-01-01

    The real demand for health education lies in learning about stress and tension, facing up to anxiety, and understanding one's own behavior, according to the author, who has taught psychological aspects of health successfully to adults for several years, with neuromuscular relaxation techniques the matirx unifying and integrating his course. (AJ)

  11. Entrepreneurship in health education and health promotion: five cardinal rules.

    PubMed

    Eddy, James M; Stellefson, Michael L

    2009-07-01

    The nature of health education and health promotion (HE/HP) offers a fertile ground for entrepreneurial activity. As primary prevention of chronic diseases becomes a more central component of the health and/ or medical care continuum, entrepreneurial opportunities for health educators will continue to expand. The process used to design, implement, and evaluate health promotion and disease prevention has clear articulation with entrepreneurial, marketing management, and other business processes. Thus, entrepreneurs in HE/HP must be able to utilize business process to facilitate creative, new HE/HP business ideas. The purpose of this article is to weave theory and practical application into a primer on entrepreneurial applications in HE/HP. More specifically, the authors meld their prospective experiences and expertise to provide background thoughts on entrepreneurship in HE/HP and develop a framework for establishing an entrepreneurial venture in HE/HP. Five Cardinal Rules for Entrepreneurs in HE/HP are proposed.

  12. [Health education based on culture circles].

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Estela Maria Leite Meirelles; Vieira, Neiva Francenely Cunha

    2010-01-01

    This study aims at systematizing with the participants of Culture Circles a proposal of reconstruction of actions of health education that show the necessary competences to the nurses of Family Health Program for a practice in education on critical and reflexive health. It is constituted of a research action, where the researcher based in "Paulo Freire Method" is encouraging debates in eight Culture Circles having the participation of ten nurses. The Circles give them the training of a political conscience , essential to the process of " empowerment " of the health professional in practicing his socio-politics competence. The proposal of achieving the Culture Circles establish a link of complicity between health professionals and communitarian groups with the actions of health promotion.

  13. Understanding Differences in Health Behaviors by Education

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, David M.; Lleras-Muney, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    Using a variety of data sets from two countries, we examine possible explanations for the relationship between education and health behaviors, known as the education gradient. We show that income, health insurance, and family background can account for about 30 percent of the gradient. Knowledge and measures of cognitive ability explain an additional 30 percent. Social networks account for another 10 percent. Our proxies for discounting, risk aversion, or the value of future do not account for any of the education gradient, and neither do personality factors such as a sense of control of oneself or over one’s life. PMID:19963292

  14. Dieting and Nutrition Patterns of College Females: Implications for College Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snelling, Anastasia M.; Schaeffer, Marc; Lehrhoff, Sara

    2002-01-01

    Assessed the dieting frequency and nutritional patterns of college females in allied health and health science at a large urban university. Data from the Black Health and Habits History Questionnaire and measures of body mass index indicated that 73 percent of the respondents had dieted at least one time, though 61 percent were at normal weight.…

  15. [Health education programs: elements of critiquing].

    PubMed

    Loiselle, C G; Delvigne-Jean, Y

    1998-03-01

    Health education programs don't always meet expectations. This article analyzes the factors that contribute to their failure, including complexity or underutilization of theoretical models, and poor articulation of research. Another factor is the disparity in approaches to understanding and intervening in the health experiences of the public. The author briefly describes three main approaches to health education--the individual, the ecological and the interactional--to suggest new avenues for work, deliberation and assessment. Also discussed is the need to clarify limits, foundations and objectives of health education. Finally, the role of the nurse in practical and research activities is examined. These activities are challenging and demanding and require informed, determined commitment.

  16. Alabama Commission on Higher Education. Annual Report, 1993-94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

    This annual report of the Alabama Commission on Higher Education describes new academic programs approved, allied health programs, off-campus instruction, computer-based articulation, rising junior exam, the Academic Common Market, educational technologies, Governor's Conference on Higher Education, Eminent Scholars Program, Meharry Medical…

  17. Understanding of the Application of Advanced-Practice Health Educator Subcompetencies by Certified Health Education Specialists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambescia, Stephen; Paravattil, Blossom; Perko, Mike; Edmonds, Ellen; Lysoby, Linda; McClellan, C. Suzette

    2013-01-01

    In May 2009, the Board of Commissioners of the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. (NCHEC) established policies to award the Master Certified Health Education Specialist certification. As with any new licensure, registration, or certification in a profession, policy makers need to consider how to provide quality assurance…

  18. Health educators' role in promoting health literacy and advocacy for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Tappe, M K; Galer-Unti, R A

    2001-12-01

    This article discusses the relationship between health literacy and advocacy for health and health education, cites achievement of advocacy as a critical outcome of health education, and identifies health advocacy competencies for both students and health educators. The paper also delineates a role for health education in developing health-literate citizens and in training health educators to advocate for health and health education. The article draws on recent initiatives in comprehensive school health education and coordinated school health programs to identify content and strategies for developing health advocacy skills among elementary, middle, and senior high school students. The article provides a variety of approaches and strategies for developing advocacy skills among preservice and inservice health educators.

  19. CPR in Basic Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foulk, David; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The American Heart Association's Heartsaver Program, including instruction in cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills, has been integrated into the basic Personal Health and Safety course at the University of Arkansas. An outline of the course content is provided. (JMF)

  20. Using Technology, Bioinformatics and Health Informatics Approaches to Improve Learning Experiences in Optometry Education, Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vivek K.; Gupta, Veer B.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid advances in ocular diagnostic approaches and emerging links of pathological changes in the eye with systemic disorders have widened the scope of optometry as the front line of eye health care. Expanding professional requirements stipulate that optometry students get a meticulous training in relevant information and communication technologies (ICT) and various bioinformatics and health informatics software to meet current and future challenges. Greater incorporation of ICT approaches in optometry education can facilitate increased student engagement in shared learning experiences and improve collaborative learning. This, in turn, will enable students to participate in and prepare for the complex real-world situations. A judicious use of ICTs by teachers in learning endeavors can help students develop innovative patterns of thinking to be a successful optometry professional. ICT-facilitated learning enables students and professionals to carry out their own research and take initiatives and thus shifts the equilibrium towards self-education. It is important that optometry and allied vision science schools adapt to the changing professional requirements with pedagogical evolution and react appropriately to provide the best educational experience for the students and teachers. This review aims to highlight the scope of ICT applications in optometry education and professional development drawing from similar experiences in other disciplines. Further, while enhanced use of ICT in optometry has the potential to create opportunities for transformative learning experiences, many schools use it merely to reinforce conventional teaching practices. Tremendous developments in ICT should allow educators to consider using ICT tools to enhance communication as well as providing a novel, richer, and more meaningful medium for the comprehensive knowledge construction in optometry and allied health disciplines. PMID:27854266