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Sample records for allied health literature

  1. Factors affecting allied health faculty job satisfaction: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Romig, Barbara; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie; Denmark, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    Evidence in the literature suggests job satisfaction can make a difference in keeping qualified workers on the job, but little research has been conducted focusing specifically on allied health faculty. In order to attract and retain top quality faculty, colleges and universities should understand the variables impacting faculty satisfaction and develop a plan to enhance satisfaction. An integrative literature review (CINHAL, ERIC, Journal of Allied Health, Chronicle of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, and current books on job satisfaction) of faculty job satisfaction and dissatisfaction produced a variety of publications presenting the key determinants of job satisfaction by allied health faculty in the United States. The purpose of the analysis was to examine the various factors that influence job satisfaction, especially by allied health faculty, in institutions of higher education in the U.S. The procedure used for this analysis consisted of reviewing allied health and higher education faculty studies to identify factors influencing job satisfaction, research questions, sample size reported, instruments used for measurement of job satisfaction, and job satisfaction results. While the theoretical models of allied health and higher education faculty job satisfaction exist separately in the literature, their remarkable similarities permit the prospect of a contemporary framework of the essential components of job satisfaction. Potential opportunities for continuing research on the personal and professional variables impacting job satisfaction of allied health faculty and similar disciplines are presented.

  2. Clinical Instructor Characteristics, Behaviors and Skills in Allied Health Care Settings: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Linda S.; Sexton, Patrick; Willeford, K. Sean; Barnum, Mary G.; Guyer, M. Susan; Gardner, Greg; Fincher, A. Louise

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to compare both clinical instructor and student perceptions of helpful and hindering clinical instructor characteristics, behaviors and skills in athletic training and allied health care settings. Clinical education in athletic training is similar to that of other allied health care professions. Clinical…

  3. Allied health disaster volunteering.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Alphonso; Wilson, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Allied health practitioners will play an important role in providing medical care following a disaster. The clinical and laboratory skills possessed by allied health practitioners will be of extreme importance in the processing of disaster victims. The degree that allied health practitioners can help process disaster victims will play a large role in helping stabilize survivors of man-made or natural disasters. Those allied health practitioners skilled in triage, patient assessment, and emergency treatment of those injured can make a large difference in improving the utilization of human resources at an emergency site and thereby potentially improve treatment outcomes. Failure of a health professional to preregister as a health volunteer can affect the quality and responsiveness of a community's surge capacity. The rationale for advance registration ensures that the time-intensive effort of identifying professional credentials and licenses does not consume or divert resources that are necessary for mitigation of the immediate emergency. Of equal importance for allied health practitioners are the liability issues that exist in providing health care services outside of a formal employment agreement.

  4. Allied health: integral to transforming health.

    PubMed

    Lizarondo, Lucylynn; Turnbull, Catherine; Kroon, Tracey; Grimmer, Karen; Bell, Alison; Kumar, Saravana; McEvoy, Maureen; Milanese, Steve; Russell, Mary; Sheppard, Lorraine; Walters, Julie; Wiles, Louise

    2016-04-01

    Objective South Australia is taking an innovative step in transforming the way its healthcare is organised and delivered to better manage current and future demands on the health system. In an environment of transforming health services, there are clear opportunities for allied health to assist in determining solutions to various healthcare challenges. A recent opinion piece proposed 10 clinician-driven strategies to assist in maximising value and sustainability of healthcare in Australia. The present study aimed to seek the perspectives of allied health clinicians, educators, researchers, policy makers and managers on these strategies and their relevance to allied health. Methods A survey of allied health practitioners was undertaken to capture their perspectives on the 10 clinician-driven strategies for maximising value and sustainability of healthcare in Australia. Survey findings were then layered with evidence from the literature. Results Highly relevant across allied health are the strategies of discontinuation of low value practices, targeting clinical interventions to those getting greatest benefit, active involvement of patients in shared decision making and self-management and advocating for integrated systems of care. Conclusions Allied health professionals have been involved in the South Australian healthcare system for a prolonged period, but their services are poorly recognised, often overlooked and not greatly supported in existing traditional practices. The results of the present study highlight ways in which healthcare services can implement strategies not only to improve the quality of patient outcomes, but also to offer innovative solutions for future, sustainable healthcare. The findings call for concerted efforts to increase the utilisation of allied health services to ensure the 'maximum value for spend' of the increasingly scarce health dollar. What is known about the topic? In medicine, clinician-driven strategies have been proposed to

  5. What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ettienne-Gittens, Reynolette; Lisako, E.; McKyer, J.; Goodson, Patricia; Guidry, Jeffrey; Outley, Corliss

    2012-01-01

    Background: Health educators are critical members of the health care team who may be called upon to provide nutrition education. However, are health educators prepared for this task? What have scholars concluded regarding this pertinent topic? Purpose: This study has three purposes: (1) to determine the definition of and criteria for nutrition…

  6. Allied Health Careers Instructional Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Betty

    This instructional workbook contains 24 units to be used by beginning students in allied health care occupations courses. The units are organized in four sections that cover the following topics: introduction to allied health careers, health/wellness, basic sciences, and basic anatomy and physiology. Each unit contains a unit objective, specific…

  7. Emerging Innovation: Allied Health Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Janell B.

    2004-01-01

    This article takes a closer look at emerging fields in the allied health arena. The relatively new field of Health Information Technology is one of the exciting prospects, surging with growth opportunities. These individuals are medical language experts who interpret, process, store and retrieve health information for research and data collection.…

  8. Chemistry for the Allied Health Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Donald H.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the literature concerning the content of chemistry courses for allied health students. Contains the content outline of a two-semester course offered at Hope College (Michigan) and discusses the rationale for organizing the course for this audience. (TW)

  9. Personality Characteristics and Learning Style Preferences of Allied Health Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Rebecca

    Identifying personality types and learning style preferences of students and professionals in the allied health professions can aid college students in academic achievement and in career decision making. A literature review regarding personality types and learning style preferences of students enrolled in various allied health fields is presented.…

  10. Connecting Allied Health Students to Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guion, W. Kent; Mishoe, Shelley C.; Taft, Arthur A.; Campbell, Carol A.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Statewide studies indicate a continuing shortfall of personnel in several allied health disciplines in rural Georgia. National trends indicate lagging enrollment in allied health education programs, suggesting that the workforce shortages will worsen. Purpose: This article describes the efforts of the School of Allied Health Sciences at…

  11. Development of a Scale to Determine Enrollment Barriers into Allied Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barfield, J. P.; Folio, M. Rhonda; Lam, Eddie T. C.; Zhang, James J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop the Scale of Allied Health Education Barriers to identify factors limiting enrollment in college/university allied health education programs. Development of the Scale of Allied Health Education Barriers was conducted through the following four stages: (1) review of literature, (2) focus group studies, (3)…

  12. Horizons in Health (Allied Health Careers)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emphasis Career Education, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The latest conditions affecting job demand, advancement, and compensation potential; educational requirements; and job descriptions are reported for allied health careers in the laboratory and hospital as physician assistants; therapists; nurses and nurses aids; dieticians and nutritionists; and dental assistants, hygienists, and laboratory…

  13. Selected list of books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. health care system of the twenty-first century will be information driven; allied health literature will be a dynamic part of that information. This list of 415 books and 76 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either a health care or academic setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, focus has been directed primarily to the twenty-eight educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation (CAHEA) of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, medical secretarial, nutrition, and speech pathology/audiology programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (177 books and 32 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1994 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $25,300. PMID:7920334

  14. Selected list of books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1994-07-01

    The U.S. health care system of the twenty-first century will be information driven; allied health literature will be a dynamic part of that information. This list of 415 books and 76 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either a health care or academic setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, focus has been directed primarily to the twenty-eight educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation (CAHEA) of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, medical secretarial, nutrition, and speech pathology/audiology programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (177 books and 32 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1994 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $25,300.

  15. Ally

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ally ; CASRN 74223 - 64 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  16. Kentucky Allied Health Project Final Report: A State System for Allied Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Council on Higher Education, Frankfort.

    The accomplishments of the Kentucky Allied Health Project, which implemented a model articulated system of allied health education, are described. The system included plans to promote transition from one education level to another and articulation in educational planning and resource utilization. The project has greatly increased…

  17. Allied Health Technologies. Preceptor/Mentor Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing. Office of Career and Technical Education.

    This handbook is designed to assist preceptors/mentors in a local allied health technology program, a school/industry partnership focused on training students for entry-level employment in the health care field by means of a work internship/externship. It draws heavily on the Secretary of Labor's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS)…

  18. Motivators, enablers, and barriers to building allied health research capacity

    PubMed Central

    Pager, Susan; Holden, Libby; Golenko, Xanthe

    2012-01-01

    Purpose A sound, scientific base of high quality research is needed to inform service planning and decision making and enable improved policy and practice. However, some areas of health practice, particularly many of the allied health areas, are generally considered to have a low evidence base. In order to successfully build research capacity in allied health, a clearer understanding is required of what assists and encourages research as well as the barriers and challenges. Participants and methods This study used written surveys to collect data relating to motivators, enablers, and barriers to research capacity building. Respondents were asked to answer questions relating to them as individuals and other questions relating to their team. Allied health professionals were recruited from multidisciplinary primary health care teams in Queensland Health. Eighty-five participants from ten healthcare teams completed a written version of the research capacity and culture survey. Results The results of this study indicate that individual allied health professionals are more likely to report being motivated to do research by intrinsic factors such as a strong interest in research. Barriers they identified to research are more likely to be extrinsic factors such as workload and lack of time. Allied health professionals identified some additional factors that impact on their research capacity than those reported in the literature, such as a desire to keep at the “cutting edge” and a lack of exposure to research. Some of the factors influencing individuals to do research were different to those influencing teams. These results are discussed with reference to organizational behavior and theories of motivation. Conclusion Supporting already motivated allied health professional individuals and teams to conduct research by increased skills training, infrastructure, and quarantined time is likely to produce better outcomes for research capacity building investment. PMID

  19. Supervising allied health assistants: a concerning skill gap in allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, David

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss the problem of a skill gap in the training of allied health professionals. Allied health assistants are required to work under the supervision of allied health professionals. There is little evidence to suggest supervisory skills are routinely taught as part of the development of professional behavior. With increasing concern about a lack of supervisory skill, there is an opportunity for supervisory skills to be incorporated into the undergraduate curriculum. A combination of classroom and clinical experience is required to ensure this professional skill does not continue to be overlooked.

  20. Mastery Learning: A Model for Allied Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, James A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reports the methods and philosophy used in developing a mastery learning model at the University of Missouri-Columbia to insure that allied health students in the physical therapy and occupational therapy programs learn the concepts of anatomy essential to the rest of the curriculum. (MF)

  1. ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENT GRANTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Arlington, VA.

    THE ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS PERSONNEL ACT OF 1966 AUTHORIZES THE SURGEON GENERAL TO MAKE GRANTS TO EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVING PROGRAMS WHICH QUALIFY STUDENTS (1) FOR THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE OR ITS EQUIVALENT OR THE MASTER'S DEGREE TO THE EXTENT REQUIRED FOR BASIC PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION, REGISTRATION, OR LICENSURE…

  2. Nursing and Allied Health Shortages: TBR Responds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berryman, Treva

    Staff members of the Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) and the Tennessee Higher Education Commission worked jointly to establish a task force to investigate and develop recommendations for addressing the workforce shortages in nursing and allied health in Tennessee. The investigation established that Tennessee already has a workforce shortage of…

  3. Shape of allied health: an environmental scan of 27 allied health professions in Victoria.

    PubMed

    Nancarrow, Susan A; Young, Gretchen; O'Callaghan, Katy; Jenkins, Mathew; Philip, Kathleen; Barlow, Kegan

    2016-08-11

    Objective In 2015, the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services commissioned the Victorian Allied Health Workforce Research Program to provide data on allied health professions in the Victorian public, private and not-for-profit sectors. Herein we present a snapshot of the demographic profiles and distribution of these professions in Victoria and discuss the workforce implications.Methods The program commenced with an environmental scan of 27 allied health professions in Victoria. This substantial scoping exercise identified existing data, resources and contexts for each profession to guide future data collection and research. Each environmental scan reviewed existing data relating to the 27 professions, augmented by an online questionnaire sent to the professional bodies representing each discipline.Results Workforce data were patchy but, based on the evidence available, the allied health professions in Victoria vary greatly in size (ranging from just 17 child life therapists to 6288 psychologists), are predominantly female (83% of professions are more than 50% female) and half the professions report that 30% of their workforce is aged under 30 years. New training programs have increased workforce inflows to many professions, but there is little understanding of attrition rates. Professions reported a lack of senior positions in the public sector and a concomitant lack of senior specialised staff available to support more junior staff. Increasing numbers of allied health graduates are being employed directly in private practice because of a lack of growth in new positions in the public sector and changing funding models. Smaller professions reported that their members are more likely to be professionally isolated within an allied health team or larger organisations. Uneven rural-urban workforce distribution was evident across most professions.Conclusions Workforce planning for allied health is extremely complex because of the lack of data, fragmented

  4. Clinical supervision for allied health staff: necessary but not sufficient.

    PubMed

    Leggat, Sandra G; Phillips, Bev; Pearce, Philippa; Dawson, Margaret; Schulz, Debbie; Smith, Jenni

    2015-09-28

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to explore the perspectives of allied health professionals on appropriate content for effective clinical supervision of staff.Methods A set of statements regarding clinical supervision was identified from the literature and confirmed through a Q-sort process. The final set was administered as an online survey to 437 allied health professionals working in two Australian health services.Results Of the 120 respondents, 82 had experienced six or more clinical supervision sessions and were included in the analysis. Respondents suggested that clinical supervision was beneficial to both staff and patients, and was distinct from line management performance monitoring and development. Curiously, some of the respondents did not agree that observation of the supervisee's clinical practice was an aspect of clinical supervision.Conclusions Although clinical supervision is included as a pillar of clinical governance, current practice may not be effective in addressing clinical risk. Australian health services need clear organisational policies that outline the relationship between supervisor and supervisee, the role and responsibilities of managers, the involvement of patients and the types of situations to be communicated to the line managers.What is known about the topic? Clinical supervision for allied health professionals is an essential component of clinical governance and is aimed at ensuring safe and high-quality care. However, there is varied understanding of the relationship between clinical supervision and performance management.What does this paper add? This paper provides the perspectives of allied health professionals who are experienced as supervisors or who have experienced supervision. The findings suggest a clear role for clinical supervision that needs to be better recognised within organisational policy and procedure.What are the implications for practitioners? Supervisors and supervisees must remember their duty of

  5. Allied Health Core Curriculum: Its Time Has Come

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, M. LaCheeta

    2004-01-01

    There is lack of a clear definition regarding an allied health core curriculum. The Pew Health Professions Commission and the Bureau of Health Professions use the following to define a core curriculum: "A set of interdisciplinary courses, clinical training, and other educational exposures designed to provide allied health students at each level…

  6. Audio-Visual Aids and Computer Assisted and Programmed Instruction in Allied Health Occupation Education. (Updates Literature Search 72-13).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Geraldine D.

    National Library of Medicine (NLM) Literature Searches are selected computer-generated bibliographies produced by the Library's Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (MEDLARS). Selection is made on the basis of a significant current interest of the subject matter to a substantial audience of health professionals. Each Literature Search…

  7. Developing Interdisciplinary Education in Allied Health Programs. Issues and Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, Tom, Jr.; Clark, Dan

    By definition allied health education operates in a dynamic environment influenced by the diciplines it represents, the educational system in which it resides, and the complexities of the health care delivery system which it serves. Well-designed and implemented interdisciplinary programs would assist allied health administrators in answering the…

  8. Allied Health Education Programs in Junior Colleges/1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Allied Health Manpower.

    This directory of allied health programs in junior colleges was compiled to provide a comprehensive source of allied health training programs in two-year colleges and to provide data on which to establish national, regional, State, and local priorities for health manpower education. It may also serve as a supplementary reference for guidance…

  9. Administrative Competencies in Education and the Allied Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Margaret K., Ed.; Canfield, Albert A., Ed.

    A 2-day conference was designed by the staff of the University of Florida Center for Allied Health Instructional Personnel to identify competencies of department chairmen, clinical supervisors, deans of schools of allied health professions, administrators or coordinators of health agencies, and educational leaders in professional or governmental…

  10. Watermelon lycopene and allied health claims

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Ambreen; Butt, Masood Sadiq; Sultan, Muhammad Tauseef; Qayyum, Mir Muhammad Nasir; Niaz, Rai Shahid

    2014-01-01

    Presently, functional foods and nutraceuticals are gaining immense importance in the prevention of various maladies through dietary regimen module. Consumption of fruits and vegetables based diet has pursuit a range of bioactive components, especially phytochemicals targeting life threatening ailments. In this context, lycopene is an extensively studied antioxidant potentially present in watermelon, tomato, pink guava etc. Watermelon is one of the unique sources having readily available cis-isomeric lycopene. The distinctive aroma of watermelon is imparted by medium- and short-chain fatty acids along with geranial, ß-ionone and neral. Its consumption has been escalated owing to rich nutritional profile and allied health benefits. It is effective in reducing the extent of cancer insurgence, cardiovascular disorders, diabetes and macular diseases. The structural characteristics, physiochemical properties and therapeutic effects of lycopene are the limelight of the manuscript. However, further research investigations are still needed to address the health enhancing potential of watermelon lycopene. PMID:26417290

  11. A Study of Tenure among Allied Health Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'pt Holt, Timothy B.

    1991-01-01

    Responses from 47 percent of 310 deans/directors of allied health education programs revealed an average of 35.5 percent of allied health faculty achieving tenure, compared to 58.2 percent for campuses generally. Most noted a trend toward more rigorous tenure criteria. (SK)

  12. Development of Articulation Models for Allied Health Statewide Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Joanne; And Others

    Under the auspices of the Kentucky Council on Higher Education and with the aim of delineating issues in allied health education and making recommendations for alleviating the issues, an in-depth, two-year study was completed in 1975. The primary recommendations pertained to the development of a statewide plan for allied health education that…

  13. Peterson's Guide to Colleges for Careers in Allied Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson's Guides, Inc., Princeton, NJ.

    This guide contains guidelines for evaluating a career in allied health, for selecting a college. The guide profiles undergraduate programs at approximately 750 institutions of higher education in the United States. The directory is divided into five main sections. The first section offers guidelines for evaluating a career in allied health. It…

  14. Collaborative Research in Allied Health. Proceedings of Collaborative Research in Allied Health Symposium, 1986 (Columbus, Ohio, September 18, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, M. Rosita, Ed.; And Others

    The following papers are included: "Collaborative Research: Lessons from the Tower of Babel" (Baldwin); "Establishing a Data Base for Intrainstitutional Research in the Allied Health Professions" (Von Son, Beiley); "Determining Research Needs in a School of Allied Health Professions" (Bottjen et al.); "Surveying Research Interests and Needs of…

  15. Research culture in allied health: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Donna; McKinstry, Carol; Cotchett, Matthew; Williams, Cylie; Haines, Terry

    2016-06-07

    Research evidence is required to guide optimal allied health practice and inform policymakers in primary health care. Factors that influence a positive research culture are not fully understood, and nor is the impact of a positive research culture on allied health professionals. The aim of this systematic review was to identify factors that affect allied health research culture and capacity. An extensive search of 11 databases was conducted in June 2015. Studies were included if they were published in English, had full-text availability and reported research findings relating to allied health professions. Study quality was evaluated using the McMaster Critical Review Forms. Fifteen studies were eligible for inclusion. A meta-analysis was not performed because of heterogeneity between studies. Allied health professionals perceive that their individual research skills are lower in comparison to their teams and organisation. Motivators for conducting research for allied health professionals include developing skills, increasing job satisfaction and career advancement. Barriers include a lack of time, limited research skills and other work roles taking priority. Multilayered strategies, such as collaborations with external partners and developing research leadership positions, aimed at addressing barriers and enablers, are important to enhance allied health research culture and capacity.

  16. Influencers of career choice among allied health students.

    PubMed

    Brown-West, A P

    1991-01-01

    This study focused on the factors that influence students' choice of an allied health profession. A survey of 153 students in three allied health programs at the University of Connecticut revealed that "the need to help others," "prestige," "professional autonomy," "opportunities for advancement," "income potential," and "the effect of the specialty on family and personal life," were the major influencers of career choice among allied health students. Only a few students regarded malpractice suits and AIDS as negative influencers. While medical laboratory science majors regarded these as important factors, dietetics and physical therapy majors did not. The article suggests further use of these findings by program directors and career counselors.

  17. Allied Health Field, Ninth Grade. Introduction to Allied Health and the Health Care Team. Operation TACT [Toward an Allied Health Career Today] Curriculum [and Teachers' Handbook].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Univ., Storrs. School of Allied Health Professions.

    The two-part set consists of a student handbook and a related teachers' handbook in allied health education for use at the ninth grade level. The student handbook contains nine units which focus on the science curriculum: (1) introduction, (2) weights and measures, (3) human body, (4) chemistry, (5) electricity and magnetism, (6) heat and its…

  18. Allied Health Field, Tenth Grade. Introduction to Allied Health and the Health Care Team. Operation TACT [Toward an Allied Health Career Today] Curriculum [and Teachers' Handbook].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Tracy

    The two-part set consists of a student handbook and a related teachers' handbook in allied health education for use at the tenth grade level. The student handbook consists of seven units which focus on the biology curriculum: (1) community water examination, (2) bacteriological examination of water, (3) the microscope, (4) microbes and man, (5)…

  19. Selected list of books and journals in allied health sciences.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1984-01-01

    This list of 450 books and 67 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs and personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Due to the necessity of limiting the scope of coverage because of the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused mainly on the twenty-six educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, in addition to programs in allied dental health and medical secretarial skills. Books are categorized by broad subject followed by an author/editor index; journals are listed alphabetically by title. To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for annual (1984) journal subscriptions would require a total expenditure of approximately $15,000. PMID:6388696

  20. Current status of cardiac surgery allied health professionals in Asia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Ye, W

    2011-01-01

    More and more allied health professions are getting involved in clinical health care. One estimate reported allied health personnel makes up 60 percent of the total health workforce. In Asia, in the field of cardiothoracic surgery, allied health personnel includes perfusionists, physician assistants, physiotherapist, intensivists, rehabilitation therapists, nutritionists and social workers. They work in collaboration with surgeons to provide a range of diagnostic, technical, therapeutic, cardiac care and support services to the patients and their families.Some allied health professions are more specialized. They must adhere to national training and education standards and their professional scope of practice. For example, the training of perfusionists consists of at least five years of academic in medical schools and another three-year-long clinical training in the hospital. The cardiac intensivists usually are medical doctors with a background in cardiology. They spend 3-4 years rotating in Internal Medicine, Anesthesiology, Emergency Rooms and Intensive Care Units. There have specialized medical societies to grant certified credentials and to provide continuing education. Other allied health professions require no special training or credentials and are trained for their work by the hospitals through on-the-job training. Many young health care providers are getting involved in the allied health personnel projects. They consider this as a career ladder because of the opportunities for advancement within specific fields.

  1. Allied Health Chemistry Laboratory: Amino Acids, Insulin, Proteins, and Skin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, David F.

    1975-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment specifically designed for allied health students. The students construct molecular models of amino acids, extract amino acids from their skin with hot water, and chromatographically analyze the skin extract and hydrolyzed insulin. (MLH)

  2. Utilization of virtual learning environments in the allied health professions.

    PubMed

    Butina, Michelle; Brooks, Donna; Dominguez, Paul J; Mahon, Gwendolyn M

    2013-01-01

    Multiple technology based tools have been used to enhance skill development in allied health education, which now includes virtual learning environments. The purpose of this study was to explore whether, and how, this latest instructional technology is being adapted in allied health education. An online survey was circulated to all Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP) member institutions and focused on three broad areas of virtual learning environments: the uses of, the perceived pros and cons of, and the outcomes of utilizing them. Results show 40% (17 of 42) of the respondent use some form of the technology. The use of virtual learning technology in other healthcare professions (e.g., medicine) demonstrates the potential benefits to allied health education.

  3. Index of Graduate Theses and Projects in Allied Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Allied Health, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Contains 1,073 entries from 91 institutions, giving author, institution, year, degree, emphasis, discipline, and title, arranged by topic: allied health, biocommunication arts, child development/care, clinical psychology, dentistry, environmental health, exercise science, food service, health education, health services, medical laboratories, nurse…

  4. A conceptual model for recruitment and retention: allied health workforce enhancement in Western Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Schoo, Adrian M; Stagnitti, Karen E; Mercer, Catherine; Dunbar, James

    2005-01-01

    Attracting and retaining allied health professionals in rural areas is a recognised problem in both Australia and overseas. Predicted increases in health needs will require strategic actions to enhance the rural workforce and its ability to deliver the required services. A range of factors in different domains has been associated with recruitment and retention in the allied health workforce. For example, factors can be related to the nature of the work, the personal needs, or the way an organisation is led. Some factors cannot be changed (eg geographical location of extended family) whereas others can be influenced (eg education, support, management styles). Recruitment and retention of allied health professionals is a challenging problem that deserves attention in all domains and preparedness to actively change established work practices, both individually as well as collectively, in order to cater for current and predicted health needs. Changes to enhance workforce outcomes can be implemented and evaluated using a cyclic model. The Allied Health Workforce Enhancement Project of the Greater Green Triangle University Department of Rural Health (GGT UDRH) is working towards increasing the number of allied health professionals in the south west of Victoria. Based on themes identified in the literature, an interactive model is being developed that addresses recruitment and retention factors in three domains: (1) personal or individual; (2) organisation; and (3) community.

  5. Brandon/Hill selected list of print books and journals in allied health*†

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Dorothy R.; Stickell, Henry N.

    2003-01-01

    This list of 434 books and 79 journals is intended as a selection guide for print literature to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number of and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and recognized by the American Medical Association and other accrediting bodies. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (169 books and 32 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (2002 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $36,744. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $14,465. PMID:12568155

  6. Brandon/Hill selected list of print books and journals in allied health*

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Dorothy R.; Stickell, Henry N.

    2000-01-01

    This list of 424 books and 77 journals is intended as a selection guide for print literature to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and recognized by the American Medical Association and other accrediting bodies. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (167 books and 31 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (2000 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $31,970. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $12,515. PMID:10928707

  7. Brandon/Hill selected list of print books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed

    Hill, D R; Stickell, H N

    2000-07-01

    This list of 424 books and 77 journals is intended as a selection guide for print literature to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and recognized by the American Medical Association and other accrediting bodies. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (167 books and 31 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (2000 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $31,970. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $12,515.

  8. Brandon/Hill selected list of print books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed

    Hill, Dorothy R; Stickell, Henry N

    2003-01-01

    This list of 434 books and 79 journals is intended as a selection guide for print literature to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number of and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and recognized by the American Medical Association and other accrediting bodies. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (169 books and 32 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (2002 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $36,744. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $14,465.

  9. Selected list of books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1992-01-01

    This list of 396 books and 77 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Due to the necessity of limiting the scope of coverage because of the large number and wide range of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the twenty-eight programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, medical secretarial, nutrition, and speech pathology/audiology. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals is followed by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (194 books and 31 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1992 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $22,800. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $10,850. PMID:1525616

  10. Selected list of books and journals in allied health sciences.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1990-01-01

    This list of 453 books and 74 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the twenty-six educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, medical secretarial, and nutrition programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (179 books and 29 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1990 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $21,650. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $9,250. PMID:2393755

  11. Selected list of books and journals in allied health *

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Alfred N.; Hill, Dorothy R.

    1996-01-01

    This list of 410 books and 76 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and described in the AMA's Allied Health and Rehabilitation Professions Education Directory, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, medical secretarial, nutrition, and speech pathology/audiology programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (163 books and 31 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1996 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $26,740. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $11,160. PMID:16018053

  12. The Impact of Word Processing on Office Administration in the Medical and Allied Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Naomi Dornfeld

    The effect of word processing equipment on the future medical secretarial science curriculum was studied. A literature search focused on word processing and the medical and allied health professions, word processing and business education, and futuring of and changes in the secretarial science curriculum. Questionnaires to identify various aspects…

  13. Allied health personnel's attitudes and perceptions of teamwork supporting children with developmental concerns.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Peggy A; Malone, D Michael

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the attitudes and perceptions of allied health personnel toward the efficacy and performance characteristics of school-based teams supporting children with developmental concerns. Sixty-three allied health personnel were asked to complete the Attitudes About Teamwork Survey, the Team Characteristics Survey, and the Team Process Perception Survey. Respondents held a generally positive attitude about teamwork. Respondents' beliefs about the efficacy of the team process were moderately associated with critical performance characteristics. Effect sizes associated with these data suggest that the results were not only statistically significant but also noteworthy. Respondents also provided their perspectives on the benefits, limitations, supports, and recommendations of teamwork. Results were consistent with both the general teamwork literature and that focused on allied health professions. The authors describe practical implications of the results and directions for further investigation on this topic.

  14. Collaborative Research in Allied Health. Proceedings of Collaborative Research in Allied Health Symposium (Columbus, Ohio, September 20, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, M. Rosita, Ed.; And Others

    The following papers are included: "Consortia and Collaborative Research: Getting Started" (Hansen); "Coordination of the Health Care System in the State of Michigan" (Burian, Boyden, Herbert); "Health Promotion and Disease Prevention in Allied Health" (Doiron, Douglas); "Interprofessional Collaboration in the Analysis of Public Policy" (Dunn);…

  15. Rural versus urban: Tennessee health administrators' strategies on recruitment and retention for allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Slagle, Derek R; Byington, Randy L; Verhovsek, Ester L

    2012-01-01

    Due to an increase in the need for allied health professionals, there is a growing interest to assess the allied health workforce and its employment needs. This is especially true in medically underserved rural areas where there is a critical shortage of allied health professionals. A survey was sent to allied health administrators across a variety of allied health disciplines working in Tennessee hospitals in order to gauge opinions on retention and recruitment strategies. Overall successful strategies for recruitment and retention of allied health professionals were reported as well as differences between urban and rural areas, differences of perceptions of strategy effectiveness among allied health disciplines, and key strategies for rural allied health recruitment. Little is known about organizational policies impacting recruitment and retention practices of allied health professionals in Tennessee hospitals. Understanding of this problem is vital to the prevention of a critical shortage of allied health professionals. Therefore, this study sought to compare rural and urban hospital in Tennessee with respect to recruitment and retention needs.

  16. Articulation for Allied Health. Final Report. Omnibus Dissemination Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havens, Cheryl C.

    There exists in health occupations education, two types of educational institutions. One type prepares students for a certificate, and the other for a degree. The objective of the Articulation Project for Allied Health was to establish and document a procedure by which students with technical certificates could receive college credit, recommending…

  17. Nursing Skills for Allied Health Services. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Lucile A., Ed.

    Volume 1 of the two-volume textbook on nursing skills presents instructional materials (units 1-20) based on 184 activities designated by the Allied Health Professions Projects national survey as those which are accomplished by all levels of nursing. Unit titles are: (1) the health worker and the law; (2) introduction to ethics in the healing…

  18. The perceptual domain: a taxonomy for allied health educators.

    PubMed

    Hooker, E Z

    1981-08-01

    A taxonomy of the perceptual domain was proposed over a decade ago. It is hierarchical, as are the taxonomies in the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains. Perception involves extraction of information from presenting stimuli, and there is progression of information extraction as the hierarchy is ascended. Perceptual performance at the higher levels of the taxonomy assumes perceptual abilities at the lower levels. A modified version of the perceptual taxonomy applicable to allied health education is presented. Methods concerning application of the taxonomy are suggested. Use of the taxonomy of the perceptual domain would help allied health educators plan instruction and evaluate teaching.

  19. Tackling racism as a "wicked" public health problem: Enabling allies in anti-racism praxis.

    PubMed

    Came, Heather; Griffith, Derek

    2017-03-16

    Racism is a "wicked" public health problem that fuels systemic health inequities between population groups in New Zealand, the United States and elsewhere. While literature has examined racism and its effects on health, the work describing how to intervene to address racism in public health is less developed. While the notion of raising awareness of racism through socio-political education is not new, given the way racism has morphed into new narratives in health institutional settings, it has become critical to support allies to make informing efforts to address racism as a fundamental cause of health inequities. In this paper, we make the case for anti-racism praxis as a tool to address inequities in public health, and focus on describing an anti-racism praxis framework to inform the training and support of allies. The limited work on anti-racism rarely articulates the unique challenges or needs of allies or targets of racism, but we seek to help fill that gap. Our anti-racism praxis for allies includes five core elements: reflexive relational praxis, structural power analysis, socio-political education, monitoring and evaluation and systems change approaches. We recognize that racism is a modifiable determinant of health and racial inequities can be eliminated with the necessary political will and a planned system change approach. Anti-racism praxis provides the tools to examine the interconnection and interdependence of cultural and institutional factors as a foundation for examining where and how to intervene to address racism.

  20. Selected list of books and journals in allied health sciences.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1988-01-01

    This list of 435 books and 76 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs and/or health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility pf covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the twenty-six educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, nutrition, and medical secretarial programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (176 books and 29 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1988 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $19,000. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $7,900. PMID:3066428

  1. Allied Health Occupations I (Health Assistant). Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a first-year course in allied health occupations education that is intended to prepare students for entry-level employment in such allied health occupations as nurse's aide and health assistant. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: health worker…

  2. 42 CFR 413.85 - Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cost of approved nursing and allied health... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.85 Cost of approved nursing and allied health... methodology for Medicare payment of the costs of approved nursing and allied health education activities....

  3. 42 CFR 413.85 - Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cost of approved nursing and allied health... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.85 Cost of approved nursing and allied health... methodology for Medicare payment of the costs of approved nursing and allied health education activities....

  4. 42 CFR 413.85 - Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cost of approved nursing and allied health... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.85 Cost of approved nursing and allied health... methodology for Medicare payment of the costs of approved nursing and allied health education activities....

  5. 42 CFR 413.85 - Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cost of approved nursing and allied health... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.85 Cost of approved nursing and allied health... methodology for Medicare payment of the costs of approved nursing and allied health education activities....

  6. 42 CFR 136.304 - Publication of a list of allied health professions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Publication of a list of allied health professions... of a list of allied health professions. The Secretary, acting through the Service, shall publish from time to time in the Federal Register a list of the allied health professions for consideration for...

  7. Nursing Skills for Allied Health Services. Volume 2. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Lucile A., Ed.

    Guidelines for teaching nursing skills to allied health personnel at different levels (on-the-job training, associate degree in nursing, adult education, or staff development programs) are the focus of the document. It presents general considerations for planning an effective management system for the utilization of Level 1 (entry-level nursing…

  8. Nursing Skills for Allied Health Services. Volume 1. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Lucile A., Ed.

    Guidelines for teaching nursing skills to allied health personnel at different levels (on-the-job training, associate degree in nursing, adult education, or staff development programs) are the focus of the document. It presents general considerations for planning an effective management system for the utilization of Level 1 (entry-level nursing…

  9. Table Clinics: A Valuable Learning Experience for Allied Health Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Jimmie H.

    Table clinics, or short oral presentations on techniques related to some phase of research, diagnosis, or treatment, can be used to enrich allied health education. To present a table clinic, students must choose a topic which lends itself to a 5- to 7-minute presentation and which imparts knowledge that participants can take back to their…

  10. An Aging Game Simulation Activity for Allied Health Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, Carolinda; Henry, Beverly W.; Kostiwa, Irene M.

    2008-01-01

    The Aging Game, a simulation activity, has been used successfully with medical students in the development of empathetic attitudes toward older adults. To date, the Aging Game has not been used extensively with allied health students. It has been viewed as too costly, time-consuming and labor-intensive. The purpose of this study was to examine the…

  11. Health Planning that Magnifies the Community's Voice: Allies against Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfoss, Frances D.; Kelly, Cynthia; Taylor-Fishwick, Jude

    2005-01-01

    Allies Against Asthma, a working group of the Consortium for Infant and Child Health (CINCH), conducted a comprehensive asthma needs assessment in Hampton Roads, Virginia, in 2001. Results from extant data and parent surveys indicated that asthma prevalence was high (15% to 18%), 45% to 50% of children received primary care for asthma in the…

  12. Nursing Skills for Allied Health Services. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Lucile A., Ed.

    Volume 2 of the two-volume textbook on nursing skills presents instructional materials (units 21-36) on nursing skills based on 184 activities designated by the Allied Health Professions Projects national survey as those which are accomplished by all levels of nursing. Unit titles are: (21) urine elimination; (22) bowel elimination; (23)…

  13. Allied Health Education/Transfer of Credit: Recommendations of the North Carolina Articulation Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boatman, Ralph H., Ed.; Huther, John W., Ed.

    The North Carolina Allied Health Articulation Project was launched to develop procedures which would enable an individual to transfer credit from an allied health education program in one setting to some program in higher education. In 1972-73, study committees were appointed to deal with the allied health professions of physical therapy,…

  14. Allied Health Care Employees' Workplace Skills and Competencies: Are They Prepared?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Clifford R.; McClain, Mildred A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which allied health care providers considered the Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS, 1991) and competencies as those that are necessary for entry level employment in the allied health care industry. The extent that allied health care supervisors and managers…

  15. Student criminal background checks in colleges of allied health.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Diane; Aziz, Hassan; Mahoney, Sherry; Gilman, Frances H

    2008-01-01

    The demand that criminal background checks be performed for students in allied health schools and programs has soared in recent years. The need for criminal background checks on students entering the health care professions has emerged as a critical issue largely due to requirements by clinical affiliate training sites. The Joint Commission published a standard stating, "for staff, students and volunteers who work in the same capacity as staff who provide care, treatment, and services, at Elements of Performance 5 states criminal background checks are verified when required by law and regulation and organization policy." More simply stated, this means that criminal background check records must be verifiable if required by some authoritative entity such as state law. However, whether by misinterpretation of the standard or through conscious decision by organization policy makers, many health care organizations suddenly began to require criminal background checks as part of their affiliation agreements with health related schools or programs. The focus of this study was to identify current practices of allied health institutions regarding their conduct of criminal background checks on students entering the allied health professions.

  16. 42 CFR 413.87 - Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.87 Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... reimbursement for approved nursing and allied health education programs and the methodology for determining...

  17. 42 CFR 413.87 - Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.87 Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... reimbursement for approved nursing and allied health education programs and the methodology for determining...

  18. 42 CFR 413.87 - Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.87 Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... reimbursement for approved nursing and allied health education programs and the methodology for determining...

  19. 42 CFR 413.87 - Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.87 Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... reimbursement for approved nursing and allied health education programs and the methodology for determining...

  20. 42 CFR 413.87 - Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.87 Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied... reimbursement for approved nursing and allied health education programs and the methodology for determining...

  1. Pre-implementation investigation of the readiness of allied health professionals to adopt electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Hailey, David; Yu, Ping; Munyisia, Esther

    2014-01-01

    There has been limited uptake of electronic health records (EHR) by allied health professionals. Yet, not much attention has been given to their information needs. For EHR to work for these health professionals, it is essential to understand their current practice of information management and their perceptions towards EHR. A qualitative interview study was thus conducted with four managers in four allied health practices in Sydney to understand their perceptions for the adoption and use of a new Australian e-health standards compliant EHR system. We found that these allied health professionals were highly confident with the use of electronic information system and were enthusiastically expecting the introduction of the EHR system to support their information management and practice. A number of issues related to the use of EHR in practice for small, independent allied health practices were also discussed. It appears that allied health professionals today are information technology (IT) savvy and ready to adopt EHR. EHR for allied health practices in Australia are long overdue. The health informatics community can no longer ignore the need and want of allied health professionals for EHR that are tailored and built to support their information and practice management.

  2. Role of the Chronic Dental Disease Scheme in Enhanced Primary Care: allied health or allied outlier?

    PubMed

    Lam, Raymond; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to provide a comparative analysis of the Chronic Dental Disease Scheme (CDSS) and the Allied Health Profession (AHP) program as they related to the greater Enhanced Primary Care Scheme introduced by the Australian Government to manage patients with chronic and complex diseases. A retrospective analysis of data pertaining to Medicare items related to dentistry and the allied health professions were extracted from the Medicare Benefits Schedule database online, and formed the basis of this study. The highest proportion of services was provided in the state of New South Wales. There appears to be synergy in the utilisation of services with jurisdictions either overutilising or underutilising services. Costs to the Enhanced Primary Care Scheme under the CDSS model (fee for service) were up to 40 times more expensive compared with the AHP model (fee per visit). Costs and treatment associated with the CDSS experienced an increase of 13350% during the period 2007-08, coincident with an increase in subsidization. Reconstructive dentistry accounted for the majority of the increase. Gender disparities in dentistry were less distinct when compared with AHPs and were postulated to be due to males presenting with conditions that were more progressive requiring more invasive treatment. A comparative analysis indicates significant differences in costs, nature of treatment and the manner of remuneration between dentistry and the AHPs. A fee for service schedule as evidenced by the CDSS is dependent on the degree of financial incentive as indicated by patterns in utilisation over time. The amount of treatment considered necessary may be influenced by the level of subsidy with treatment that may not reflect disease management. The AHP model, which is based around a fee for visit schedule, is not without its deficiencies but has not experienced significant rises in cost compared with the CDSS.

  3. Carotenoids: potential allies of cardiovascular health?

    PubMed Central

    Gammone, Maria Alessandra; Riccioni, Graziano; D'Orazio, Nicolantonio

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are a class of natural, fat-soluble pigments found principally in plants. They have potential antioxidant biological properties because of their chemical structure and interaction with biological membranes. Epidemiologic studies supported the hypothesis that antioxidants could be used as an inexpensive means of both primary and secondary cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention. In fact, the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) in the vessels plays a key role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. The resistance of LDL to oxidation is increased by high dietary antioxidant intake, so that carotenoids, as part of food patterns such as the Mediterranean diet, may have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health too. Further properties of carotenoids leading to a potential reduction of cardiovascular risk are represented by lowering of blood pressure, reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and markers of inflammation (such as C-reactive protein), and improvement of insulin sensitivity in muscle, liver, and adipose tissues. In addition, recent nutrigenomics studies have focused on the exceptional ability of carotenoids in modulating the expression of specific genes involved in cell metabolism. The aim of this review is to focus attention to this effect of some carotenoids to prevent CVD. PMID:25660385

  4. Brandon/Hill selected list of books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, D R; Stickell, H N

    1998-01-01

    This list of 410 books and 78 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and described in the AMA's Health Professions Education Directory, 1997-1998, plus physical therapist and medical secretary. Some programs do not have their own specific literatures. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (160 books and 31 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1998 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $29,180. The cost of only the asterisked items total $11,390. PMID:9803286

  5. Brandon/Hill selected list of books and journals in allied health.

    PubMed

    Hill, D R; Stickell, H N

    1998-10-01

    This list of 410 books and 78 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and described in the AMA's Health Professions Education Directory, 1997-1998, plus physical therapist and medical secretary. Some programs do not have their own specific literatures. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (160 books and 31 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1998 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $29,180. The cost of only the asterisked items total $11,390.

  6. Factors associated with sense of community among allied health students.

    PubMed

    Haar, Mindy; Scanlan, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a substantial increase in online education in the health professions, as well as growing recognition that teamwork and collaboration are essential to success. While the impact of students' sense of community on factors such as course satisfaction and retention has been studied among college enrollees in general, there is little research exploring this concept among allied health students. To address this shortcoming, a convenience sample of students enrolled in a large northeastern school of health-related professions was surveyed to gather information on their demographics, curriculum and selected course attributes, perceived instructor teaching perspectives, and sense of community. Univariate analysis indicated that entry-level students experienced a greater sense of community than post-professional students. Multivariate analysis revealed that instructor-determined factors of encouraging discussion, encouraging expression of opinions, and specifying response times best predicted sense of community. With all other variables controlled, perceptions of community were significantly lower in online courses, among students for whom English was their second language, and in courses where instructors were perceived as focused primarily on content delivery. This study supports promoting selected course and instructor-related attributes associated with sense of community in allied health education, with a particular focus on both non-native English speakers and post-professional students. Enhancement of online courses with strategies that increase instructor presence, better engage students, and facilitate interaction also are warranted.

  7. Clinical care ratios: quantifying clinical versus non-clinical care for allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Cherie; Govier, Adam; Semciw, Adam Ivan

    2016-07-04

    Objective Clinical care ratios (CCRs) are a useful tool that can be used to quantify and benchmark the clinical and non-clinical workloads of allied health professionals. The purpose of this study was to determine if CCRs are influenced by level of seniority, type of role or profession. This will provide meaningful information for allied health service managers to better manage service demand and capacity.Method Data was collected from 2036 allied health professionals from five professions across 11 Australian tertiary hospitals. Mean (95% confidence intervals) CCRs were calculated according to profession, seniority and role type. A two-way ANOVA was performed to assess the association of CCRs (dependent variable) with seniority level and profession (independent variables). Post-hoc pairwise comparisons identified where significant main or interaction effects occurred (α = 0.05).Results Significant main effects for seniority level and profession were identified (P < 0.05), but there was no interaction effect. Post-hoc comparisons revealed significant differences between all tier combinations (P < 0.05) with more senior staff having the lowest CCRs.Conclusion The direct and non-direct clinical components of the allied health professional's workload can be quantified and benchmarked with like roles and according to seniority. The benchmarked CCRs for predominantly clinical roles will enable managers to compare and evaluate like roles and modify non-direct clinical components according to seniority and discipline.What is known about the topic? CCRs are a useful tool to quantify, monitor and compare workloads of allied health professionals. They are thought to change with increased seniority of roles. The CCRs for different allied health professional roles has yet to be defined in the literature.What does this paper add? CCRs decrease as level of seniority increases, indicating higher seniority increases non-clinical time. CCRs differ across professions, suggesting

  8. ADEA/AAL Institute for Allied Health Educators: Program Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Overman, Pamela R; Grzesikowski, Tami; Tucker-Lively, Felicia; Weinstein, George; Haden, N Karl

    2015-05-01

    Revised accreditation standards for dental and dental hygiene education programs have increased emphasis on faculty development that can improve teaching and learning, foster curricular change including use of teaching and learning technologies, and enhance retention and satisfaction of faculty. The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and Academy for Academic Leadership (AAL) established the Institute for Allied Health Educators (IAHE) in 2007 to address faculty development needs for allied dental and allied health educators. In 2009, it was transitioned to an online program, which resulted in increased enrollment and diversity of participants. After seven years, a comprehensive program evaluation was warranted. The authors developed an online questionnaire based on Kirkpatrick's four-level model of training evaluation; for this study, levels one (satisfaction), two (knowledge and skill acquisition), and three (behavior change) were examined. Of the 400 program participants invited to take part in the study, a 38% response rate was achieved, with the majority indicating full-time faculty status. Nearly all (95-97%) of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed the program contributed to their teaching effectiveness, and 88-96% agreed or strongly agreed it enhanced their knowledge of educational concepts and strategies. In addition, 83% agreed or strongly agreed the program helped them develop new skills and confidence with technology, with 69% agreeing or strongly agreeing that it helped them incorporate technology into their own educational setting. Nearly 90% were highly positive or positive in their overall assessment of the program; 95% indicated they would recommend it to a colleague; and 80% agreed or strongly agreed they had discussed what they learned with faculty colleagues at their home institutions who had not attended the program. Positive findings from this evaluation provide evidence that the IAHE has been able to meet its goals.

  9. Allied Health Applications Integrated into Developmental Mathematics Using Problem Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Mark; Shore, JoAnna; Boggs, Stacey

    2004-01-01

    For this FIPSE funded project, mathematics faculty attended allied health classes and allied health faculty attended developmental mathematics courses to incorporate health examples into the developmental mathematics curriculum. Through the course of this grant a 450-page developmental mathematics book was written with many problems from a variety…

  10. Integrating Information Competencies into the Allied Health Curriculum at Gavilan College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausrath, Don; Auyeung, Shuk-Chun; Howell, Jo Anne; Bedell, Kaye

    2003-01-01

    Describes a new program at Gavilan College, California, that introduces Allied Health students and faculty to information technologies. States that the program's goal is to reconfigure Allied Health curriculum to reflect the impact of information technology on the health professions by inserting information competency components into courses.…

  11. Health Promotion Disease Prevention: A Challenge to Allied Health Curriculum Designers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, David

    1986-01-01

    Presents a model curriculum on health promotion and disease prevention for allied health students. Suggested program elements include (1) promoting personal health patterns, (2) fitting health promotion into daily routines, (3) using persuasion, (4) working with support groups and individuals, and (5) serving as a clearinghouse. (CH)

  12. A Reaction to: What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Lori W.; Knol, Linda; Meyer, Mary Kay

    2012-01-01

    "What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals" describes an important issue in health care that is the provision of nutrition education. Obesity and chronic disease rates are rapidly increasing. Due to increase in the prevalence rates of obesity and nutrition-related chronic diseases, there is a growing need for…

  13. Projected Allied Health and Nursing Training Needs for a Seven-County Area in West Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertram, Charles L.; And Others

    This report describes a project that developed and field tested a model for projecting state-wide manpower needs in the allied health and nursing occupations in West Virginia and presents projections made for sixteen allied health and nursing occupations in the Charleston area. The content of the report is presented in three sections. The first…

  14. Strategies for Reorganization in Allied Health and Nursing Programs: The Endless Metamorphosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scigliano, Virginia; Scigliano, John A.

    Four alternative organizational structures are discussed with regard to their applicability to the reorganization of community college allied health programs. After introductory material noting the complexities, multiple interfaces, and high costs that make allied health and nursing programs prime targets for reorganization, the four models of…

  15. The College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions. Reflections while Moving across the Grain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacher, Gerald E.; Barr, Judith T.

    1980-01-01

    Academic pharmacy is seen as in transition. The merging of colleges of pharmacy with various allied health programs to form a new governance structure--the college of pharmacy and allied health professions--is described Institutional savings are achieved through shared administration, staff, equipment, space, other resources, and occasionally…

  16. Cystic fibrosis research in allied health and nursing professions.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Judy M; Madge, Susan; Morton, Alison M; Quittner, Alexandra L; Elborn, J Stuart

    2012-09-01

    This report is the result of the "Allied Health and Nursing Professions Working Group" meeting which took place in Verona, Italy, November 2009, which was organised by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society, and involved 32 experts. The meeting was designed to provide a "roadmap" of high priority research questions that can be addressed by Allied Health Professionals (AHP) and nursing. The other goal was to identify research skills that would be beneficial to AHP and nursing researchers and would ultimately improve the research capacity and capability of these professions. The following tasks were accomplished: 1) a Delphi survey was used to identify high priority research areas and themes, 2) common research designs used in AHP and nursing research were evaluated in terms of their strengths and weaknesses, 3) methods for assessing the clinimetric and psychometric properties, as well as feasibility, of relevant outcome measures were reviewed, and 4) a common skill set for AHPs and nurses undertaking clinical research was agreed on and will guide the planning of future research opportunities. This report has identified important areas and themes for future research which include: adherence; physical activity/exercise; nutritional interventions; interventions for the newborn with CF and evaluation of outcome measures for use in AHP and nursing research. It has highlighted the significant challenges AHPs and nurses experience in conducting clinical research, and proposes strategies to overcome these challenges. It is hoped that this report will encourage research initiatives that assess the efficacy/effectiveness of AHP and nursing interventions in order to improve the evidence base. This should increase the quality of research conducted by these professions, justify services they currently provide, and expand their skills in new areas, with the ultimate goal of improving care for patients with CF.

  17. Allied Health, Nursing and Health-Related Manpower Supply and Demand in Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawadski, Alfonso S.

    The status of postsecondary allied health and health-related programs in Pennsylvania was studied. Among the data presented are the following: types of awards offered in 1976-77 by program at four-year institutions; the average number of graduates for 1969-73 and the number projected for 1974-78 by program, and 1973 enrollments by sex; programs…

  18. Mapping the literature of health education.

    PubMed

    Schloman, B F

    1997-07-01

    Health education is a relatively new multidisciplinary field concerned with educational programs that empower individuals and communities to play active roles in achieving, protecting, and sustaining their health. Its practitioners have bachelor's, master's, or doctoral degrees and work in educational, worksite, health facility, or agency settings. This bibliometric study was part of the Medical Library Association (MLA) Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section's Project for Mapping the Literature of Allied Health. It sought to identify the core journals in health education and to determine the extent to which these titles are covered by the standard indexing sources. Cited references appearing from 1991 through 1993 in articles of four journals published by the major professional associations in the field were analyzed. It was found that only thirteen journals supply one-third of all references in the study. Another eighty journals provide the second third. MEDLINE gives the best indexing coverage with nearly 69% of the journals receiving indexing for at least half of their articles, followed by EMBASE (52%) and PsycINFO (43%). Limited coverage is given by the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (16%) and ERIC (14%). The findings name titles that should be added by indexing services and those that should have more complete coverage.

  19. Antecedents and consequences of workplace aggression in the allied health context.

    PubMed

    Demir, Defne; Rodwell, John; Flower, Rebecca L

    2014-01-01

    Workplace aggression research has typically focused on groups in the health care industry considered to be high risk (e.g., nursing); however, aggression also occurs among other health care professional groups, such as those in allied health. This study aimed to investigate the antecedents and consequences of workplace aggression among allied health professionals. Allied health professionals working for an Australian health care organization were surveyed, with 134 (49%) responding. The largest group of allied health professionals surveyed were social workers (49%). Job demands, job control, and social support were linked to different types of aggression. Different sources of aggression were linked to various employee outcomes. The importance of considering stressors surrounding employee work conditions is highlighted.

  20. Survey of Current and Proposed Allied Health Education Programs in New Mexico Post-Secondary Institutions, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, James L.; Burr, Marjorie

    In spring 1991, the Council of Chief Instructional Officers of New Mexico two-year institutions compiled information on current and proposed allied health programs in order to foster cooperation and planning in allied health education among the 17 institutions in the state. In summer 1991, the compilation was updated to include allied health…

  1. Improving health services in developing countries with new types of public and allied health personnel.

    PubMed

    Blayney, K D; Trulove, J W

    1982-10-01

    Allied health manpower in developing countries should be able to serve the specific needs of these countries in solving malnutrition, diarrheal disease, and other health problems. Disease patterns tend to evolve in stages with each stage requiring a special type of health manpower: 1) the 1st stage where infectious diseases are linked to poverty, malnutrition, and poor personal hygiene for which personnel trained to improve health through providing safe water supplies, improving sanitation, and immunizing the population are needed; 2) in the 2nd stages, diseases such as cancer, arthritis, and cardiac diseases exist, requiring extensive technology such as is available in the US; and 3) the 3rd stage relates to an awareness of health hazards (caused by the environment, by the lifestyle dysfunctions of the society, and an emphasis on health promotion) and implies a responsibility for one's own health by the individual; this is a difficult stage to apply to developing countries since the ability to bring about change assumes literacy on the part of the population which is not always the case. Since most developing countries need to cause change in the 1st stage, more public health personnel such as sanitarians and generalist workers are needed. Training of these personnel should include on-the-job education; traditionally trained US allied health professionals are not always equipped to deal with health problems in developing countries. Health educators should look to the lessons learned by the US in the allied health movement: 1) the system of control that national membership organizations have over schooling and the job environment has contributed to an increased cost of health care delivery, unnecessary prolonged curricula, overspecialization, extreme protectionism for membership, and inappropriate fractionalization of health care delivery; 2) the emphasis on prolonged curricula sometimes causes the student to lose sight of the supposed direct relationship between

  2. The Middle School Mentoring Program in Allied Health: A Proposed Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Lori Stewart; Kearns, Ellen Hope; Lafferty, Sharon; Lampignano, John; Pappas, Virginia M.

    2000-01-01

    A model mentoring program to interest middle school students in allied health careers incorporates features of tech prep, career academies, and the Yes I Can program. Activities include speakers, service learning, career day, interdisciplinary presentations, and job shadowing. (SK)

  3. A rural-urban comparison of allied health professionals' average hourly wage.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Indira; Slifkin, Rebecca; Randolph, Randy; Holmes, George M

    2010-01-01

    Nationwide, demand for allied health services is projected to grow significantly in the next several decades, and there is evidence that allied health shortages already exist in many states. Given the longstanding history of health professional shortages in rural areas, the existing and impending shortages in allied health professions may be particularly acute in these areas. To assess whether rural areas are potentially at a recruiting disadvantage because of relative wages, this report uses data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to describe the extent to which rural-urban differentials exist in wages for eight allied health professions, focusing on professions that are both likely to be found in rural communities and have adequate data to support hourly wage estimates. Overall the data show that the national average wage of each of the eight allied health professions is higher in metropolitan than nonmetropolitan areas. On average, the unadjusted rural hourly wage is 10.3% less than the urban wage, although the extent of the difference varies by profession and by geographic area. Adjustment for the cost of living narrows the discrepancy, but does not eliminate it. It is likely that rural providers in areas with the greatest wage discrepancies find it more difficult to recruit allied health professionals, but the extent to which this is the case needs to be assessed through further research with data on workforce vacancy rates.

  4. Caucasion allied health students' attitudes towards African Americans: implications for instruction and research.

    PubMed

    Steed, Robin

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine Caucasian allied health student racial attitudes towards the African American population, students and faculty of a Southern school of allied health professions were surveyed using the Racial Argument Scale (RAS). A one way ANOVA found a significant difference between allied health programs, p = .008, and post hoc testing found the Occupational Therapy Program's scores to be significantly lower (less negative towards Blacks) than the Physical Therapy and Physician Assistant Program's scores (p = .008 and p = .041 respectively). Student scores overall were significantly higher than faculty scores on the RAS (p = .014). The Speech-Language Pathology, Physician Assistant, and Physical Therapy Programs' scores as well the overall allied health student scores were found to be significantly higher than the population mean, thus indicating a higher negativity towards African Americans. The overall results of this study indicate that negative racial bias may be a serious problem in some allied health programs. Future instruction in cultural competency in allied health programs should address racial bias specifically, taking into account cognitive-perceptual errors that may perpetuate negative racial attitudes.

  5. Patchwork of scope-of-practice regulations prevent allied health professionals from fully participating in patient care.

    PubMed

    Elwood, Thomas W

    2013-11-01

    "Allied health" is a label used to describe part of the health workforce generally distinct from physicians, dentists, nurses, or pharmacists. However, the field lacks a single definition, and many disagree on which professions should be included under that rubric. Apart from challenges in developing an informative taxonomy, many allied health professions possess skill sets that may overlap with those of other professions. In addition, states have enacted scope-of-practice laws that may prevent allied health professionals from applying their skills in patient care. This article discusses how certain allied health professions are affected by varying scope-of-practice regulations.

  6. Selected list of books and journals in the allied health sciences.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1986-01-01

    This list of 450 books and 69 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs and/or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused mainly on the twenty-three educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, and medical secretarial programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (157 books and 27 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1986 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $16,700. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $6,700. PMID:3535953

  7. Barriers and Enablers to Clinical Fieldwork Education in Rural Public and Private Allied Health Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Phoebe; Stagnitti, Karen; Schoo, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to maximise rural clinical fieldwork placement to build health workforce capacity. This study investigated allied health professionals' (AHPs) experience of supervising students as part of work-integrated learning in public and private rural health settings. An anonymous postal questionnaire with 30 questions was used to collect…

  8. Allied Health Manpower Training Model. Final Report. June 27, 1973-January 31, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutheran Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY.

    The purpose of the Allied Health Manpower Training Model Project has been to develop a comprehensive manpower development program for health professionals that will serve as a model for other training institutions and health care organizations as they undertake continuing manpower planning and reorganization to meet the changing requirements for…

  9. A Call for Action: Advocating for Increased Funding for the Allied Health Professions: ASAHP Leadership Development Program.

    PubMed

    Demo, David H; Fry, Donna; Devine, Nancy; Butler, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Allied health professionals are a diverse group of health care workers who provide necessary services to patients in addition to, or in place of, services provided by physicians, nurses, and medical paraprofessionals. Two forces generating increased demand for allied health professionals are the aging of the US population and health care reform associated with the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Although the allied health professions comprise nearly 60% of the health care workforce, the funding to support workforce training, faculty development, and research in the allied health fields lags substantially behind funding for the physician and nursing professions. Increased advocacy efforts are needed to increase the awareness of what the allied health professions contribute to health care and to expand funding across all health care professions.

  10. Mapping competencies for the multiskilled health care professional: an allied health curriculum reform project.

    PubMed

    Sherrill, Windsor W; Keels-Williams, Frankie

    2005-01-01

    Health care organizations increasingly face the pressures of meeting the needs of patients while responding to the financial pressures of cost containment and quality optimization. One strategy that health care providers use to adapt to the changing environment is multiskilling. Multi-skilled health care technicians are trained to perform multiple tasks so that they can be deployed more efficiently within health care organizations. Multiskilling can provide numerous benefits to providers, organizations, and patients, but appropriate training for such individuals is critical. The Multiskilled Competencies Development Project was initiated to identify professional standards for entry-level multi-skilled health care technicians. The project was designed to meet the training needs of multiskilled workers through improved allied health curricula. The results of the DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) competency profile for multiskilled health care technicians are presented.

  11. Evidence-based practice curriculum in allied health professions for teaching-research-practice nexus.

    PubMed

    Asokan, G V

    2012-11-01

    Allied healthcare workers are from diverse professions and the key skill required is providing evidence-based care but this concept has not permeated enough for using it skillfully in their professions. A well structured curriculum in allied health professions is needed to strengthen concerted teaching, research, and practice to empower their professionals and make considerable differences in the lives of people by adopting evidence-based practice. Information sources for allied health professionals have relied on advice of their supervisors and colleagues, personal experiences, authoritative theory and texts for practice. Because of "research-practice" gap, often the use of evidence is not reflected in an individual day to day professional practice. Although allied health professionals work in resource and evidence challenged settings, there are certain barriers and facilitators, which need to be addressed. To implement practice-related research findings and uptake of evidence requires two essential components, namely, practical component and knowledge component. Research bench marking and research metrics for quality assurance and standardization through evidence-based practice will promote academic status and credibility of allied health profession.

  12. A Proposed Curriculum on Death and Dying for the Allied Health Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Marie C.

    1980-01-01

    This article summarizes the existing curricular models on death education for health professions students. A proposed course design for allied health professions students modified from Bloch's medical education objectives for a thanatology course is presented. The development of listening skills is given special emphasis. (Author/CT)

  13. Enhancing Discipline-Specific Training across Allied Health Professions through Reflective Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Elaine; Wightman, Barbara; Rosenthal, Harold

    2010-01-01

    The professional preparation of allied health professionals typically focuses on the acquisition of knowledge in a particular area of expertise with less consideration of training on social-emotional development and on how to engage parents in the clinical process, parent-child relationships, or principles of mental health. The authors explore how…

  14. Effectiveness of a Service Learning Model with Allied Health Assistant Students in Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zulch, Debbie; Saunders, Rosemary; Peters, Judith; Quinlivan, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of a student learning activity involving service learning. As part of a vocational course in the Academy of Health Sciences at a Western Australian TAFE (Technical and Further Education) institute, Allied Health Assistant (AHA) students participated in a service learning program focused on work-based learning in…

  15. Allied Health Occupations II. Physical Therapy Aide Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by physical therapists and physical therapy assistants. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: the health team for…

  16. An Annotated Bibliography on Inservice Training for Allied Professionals and Nonprofessionals in Community Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    This annotated bibliography, the second in the series of four, pertains to the inservice training of allied professionals and nonprofessionals for community mental health. The period of emphasis is 1960-1967. Materials citing experiences of formal community health centers are included. Also included are references on inservice mental health…

  17. Arthritis Research and Education in Nursing and Allied Health: A Forum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    A summary of proceedings of the Forum on Arthritis Research and Education in Nursing and Allied Health is presented. The keynote address, "The Burden of Arthritis," by Dorothy P. Rice, provides data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics on the prevalence of arthritis, the burden it imposes, and the volume, type, and cost…

  18. Suicide risk of your client: initial identification and management for the allied health professional.

    PubMed

    Donley, Euan

    2013-01-01

    Allied health professionals treat clients in varying degrees of distress with complex needs in a wide range of services. A client could be experiencing a chronic or life-changing illness, have a trauma from a critical event, have preexisting mental illness, be dealing with significant health or personal loss, be using substances, or experiencing a depression. At some point an allied health professional will treat a client who may have a diagnosed depression, appear depressed, or have thoughts of suicide. Mental health of clients is everyone's responsibility, especially those working in health. This article aims to increase allied health professionals' understanding of some risk factors and clinical features a client at risk may have and will discuss some initial options of management. It is recommended the allied health professional and organisation be aware of risk factors for suicide but not rely too heavily on risk screening. The worker should have basic skills in recognising poor mood and have a list of useful questions to ask in a crisis. Know your local crisis and supportive mental health services, create links with them, have ongoing professional education and protocols for managing clients at-risk, and be acutely aware of your role and limitations.

  19. Student Recruitment in Allied Health Educational Programs: The Importance of Initial Source of Contact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Alphonso; Agho, Augustine O.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of 1,809 students found that information influencing their decision to enroll in allied health programs came from a variety of sources. Practicing health professionals were the most influential. Only physical therapy and dental hygiene students identified high school counselors as an important source. (Contains 20 references.) (JOW)

  20. Impact of Community College of Philadelphia Allied Health Programs on the Philadelphia Region. Report #117.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia Community Coll., PA.

    This report discusses the Allied Health programs at Community College of Philadelphia (CCP): (1) Clinical Laboratory Technician; (2) Dental Assisting Hygiene; (3) Dental Assisting Certificate; (4) Diagnostic Medical Imaging; (5) Dietetic Technician; (6) Health Information Technology; (7) Medical Assisting and Office Management; (8) Nursing; and…

  1. Undergraduate Allied Health Leadership Development: A Program Evaluation and Follow-up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedl, John J., Jr.; Glazer-Waldman, Hilda R.

    1988-01-01

    Reports the 15-year experience of an undergraduate program in preparing allied health professionals for educational leadership positions. Of 73 professionals receiving degrees, 34 percent were department chairs or the equivalent. The diversified settings and job titles reported indicate that curriculum is valid for a variety of health care…

  2. Library tutorials in an allied health evidence-based practice class.

    PubMed

    Hoberecht, Toni; Randall, Ken; Schweikhard, April J

    2015-01-01

    This column describes a collaboration between faculty members in an Allied Health program and academic librarians to provide information literacy instruction to students enrolled in an evidence-based practice course. The process of collaboration is described beginning with the inception of the idea to collaborate, which grew out of an informal conversation between librarians and Allied Health faculty. Implementation of the project is described as well as future plans for the collaboration. The column also discusses initial impressions of student outcomes as well as plans for a more rigorous study of those outcomes.

  3. Analysis of Sex and Gender Content in Allied Health Professions' Curricula.

    PubMed

    Stickley, Lois; Sechrist, Dawndra; Taylor, LesLee

    2016-01-01

    Sex and gender differences in rehabilitation are important because more than half of patients seen by allied health professionals are female. Sex- and gender-specific curricula should be audited to enhance interprofessional education in women's health. The research question was: What is the extent of information about sex and gender differences that is included in selected allied health professions curricula? Student scholars from allied health programs audited courses in real time for references to sex and gender differences. The data were analyzed using content analysis. The emphasis of instruction included primarily statements of facts for the physical and occupational therapy programs and brief discussions in the athletic training program. There was a significant difference among the categories of emphasis for the programs (X2 = 391.23, p<0.05). The individual disciplines identified the majority of content in the same rank order: body systems, health statistics, and health conditions. There were significant differences in the content areas related to sex and gender differences among the three disciplines (X2 = 70.67, p<0.05). This study provided the first content analysis of sex and gender differences in selected allied health professions. No textual inferences were made, but the study reported on the topics discussed and the extent of the sharing of information.

  4. Sharing: The Key of Networking. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the National Society of Allied Health (Houston, Texas, March 30-31, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Harry E., III

    The topic covered at the 1984 annual meeting of the National Society of Allied Health (NSAH) was networking among schools of allied health and health related professionals concerned with increasing the numbers of minorities (Blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans) in the allied health and health related fields. This booklet is a compilation of the…

  5. An evidence-based framework to measure quality of allied health care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is no standard way of describing the complexities of allied health (AH) care, or its quality. AH is an umbrella term which excludes medicine and nursing, and variably includes disciplines which provide therapy, diagnostic, or scientific services. This paper outlines a framework for a standard approach to evaluate the quality of AH therapy services. Methods A realist synthesis framework describing what AH does, how it does it, and what is achieved, was developed. This was populated by the findings of a systematic review of literature published since 1980 reporting concepts of quality relevant to AH. Articles were included on quality measurement concepts, theories, debates, and/or hypothetical frameworks. Results Of 139 included articles, 21 reported on descriptions of quality potentially relevant to AH. From these, 24 measures of quality were identified, with 15 potentially relating to what AH does, 17 to how AH delivers care, 8 relating to short term functional outcomes, and 9 relating to longer term functional and health system outcomes. Conclusions A novel evidence-based quality framework was proposed to address the complexity of AH therapies. This should assist in better evaluation of AH processes and outcomes, costs, and evidence-based engagement of AH providers in healthcare teams. PMID:24571857

  6. Clinical Laboratory Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Education in the clinical laboratory sciences in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and…

  7. A Study of the Clinical Laboratory Occupations. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Div. of Vocational Education.

    The objectives of this study which was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project were: (1) to determine the percent of medical laboratory workers who perform a comprehensive list of tasks and procedures; (2) to evaluate this performance in terms of certification and specialty area; and (3) on the basis of these data, to make…

  8. The Development of an Integrated Science Core Curriculum for Allied Health Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sesney, John; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The article describes the development of BioMedical Sciences Core at Weber State College in Ogden, Utah for introductory level allied health students. The design of the "Core" curriculum is to integrate the disciplines of physics, chemistry, anatomy, physiology, and microbiology as they relate to the human body rather than teaching the traditional…

  9. Improving College Faculty Instruction in the Basic and Allied Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washton, Nathan S.

    A project to improve college instruction in the basic and allied health sciences at New York Chiropractic College and the New York Institute of Technology is described. Attention was directed to: the kinds of resources colleges and professional schools provide to improve instruction; motivation of faculty to explore innovative or strategic…

  10. Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Allied Health Occupations/Practical Nursing. Volume II: Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Gene, Comp.; Simpson, Bruce, Comp.

    These written domain referenced tests (DRTs) for the area of allied health occupations/practical nursing test cognitive abilities or knowledge of theory. Introductory materials describe domain referenced testing and test development. Each multiple choice test includes a domain statement, describing the behavior and content of the domain, and a…

  11. The Use of Individualized Contract Plans as a Method of Performance Evaluation for Allied Health Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitcham, Maralynne D.; Vericella, Biagio J.

    1985-01-01

    Results from a two-year study of the individualized contract plan (ICP) approach to faculty evaluation indicate this is a workable method of performance evaluation for allied health faculty. The ICP was found to be individualized, systematic, flexible, and objective. Five major recommendations were made regarding the continued use of the ICP and…

  12. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Allied Health (Program CIP: 51.1699--Nursing, Other). Secondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which reflects Mississippi's statutory requirement that instructional programs be based on core curricula and performance-based assessment, contains outlines of the instructional units required in local instructional management plans and daily lesson plans for allied health I and II. Presented first are a program description and…

  13. Task Analysis for Curriculum Design and Validation. Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Bruce B.; And Others

    This report contains an outline of the method and the rationale for a project whose purpose is to develop training programs which are relevant to the specific requirements of technical occupations in nine allied health professions. The nine professions are in (a) nursing, (b) inhalation therapy, (c) radiology (technician level), (d) clinical…

  14. Allied Health Occupations II. Medical Laboratory Assistant Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is intended to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by medical laboratory technicians and technologists. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: the value of…

  15. Pathways to Nursing: A Guide to Library and Online Research in Nursing and Allied Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Dennis C.; Craig, Paula

    2004-01-01

    This timely book provides a foundation in library and electronic research in the fields of nursing and allied health. It explains essential sources and techniques that can be used by nursing students, healthcare researchers, and nurse practitioners who need to gather information independently. Pathways to Nursing covers both physical libraries and…

  16. National Assessment of Clinical Education of Allied Health Manpower: Volume IV: Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booz Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The document is the last volume of a four-part report of a study conducted to evaluate and assess the national state of clinical education and training of allied health manpower. It presents a bibliography of all significant clinical education materials, documentary materials and ongoing studies, through August 30, 1973 but after 1965. The…

  17. Strengthening Geriatric Knowledge and Use of Interdisciplinary Teams among Allied Health Students and Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrader, Susan L.; Blue, Rebecca; Miller, Doreen; Jensen, Gwenneth; Zawada, Edward T., Jr.; Hill, Paula; Johannsen, Gail; Elsberry, Dorothy Anne; Nelson, Debralee; Lockwood, Dean

    1999-01-01

    In a three-year collaborative venture between a hospital and a university, an interdisciplinary team trained 684 allied health professionals and students in geriatrics. Outcomes included increased geriatric knowledge, more graduates serving rural underserved areas, and more interdisciplinary clinical initiatives. (SK)

  18. Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Allied Health Occupations/Practical Nursing. Volume 1: Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Bruce; And Others

    These performance tests for the area of allied health occupations/practical nursing consist of a sampling technique (domain referenced tests) which covers all the possible performance situations. When used in total, they may also serve as a comprehensive test. Introductory materials discuss domain referenced testing, determining the domains, and…

  19. The Recruitment and Retention of Minority and Disadvantaged Allied Health Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Jeffrey; Lyons, Barbara Ann

    1989-01-01

    Describes the student recruitment and retention programs in the School of Allied Health Sciences at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. The programs are supported by federal grants and have assisted in enrolling over 575 minority students with a retention rate of above 90 percent. The programs are adaptable and have been used as…

  20. A National Study of Student Selection Practices in the Allied Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Marie C.; Crowley, Judeth A.

    1982-01-01

    Reports the outcomes of a 1978 national survey of candidate selection practices in 4 baccalaureate level and 7 associate degree level allied health disciplines. Found that few programs conducted evaluation of their admissions activities and that physical therapy and dental hygiene programs were the most structured in student selection. (JOW)

  1. The Allied Health Care Professional's Role in Assisting Medical Decision Making at the End of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Heather

    2012-01-01

    As a patient approaches the end of life, he or she faces a number of very difficult medical decisions. Allied health care professionals, including speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and occupational therapists (OTs), can be instrumental in assisting their patients to make advance care plans, although their traditional job descriptions do not…

  2. Making Tactile Charts on a Personal Computer for Blind Students in the Allied Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshida, Tsuguo; Ohtake, Nobuyuki

    2002-01-01

    This article describes how to make tactile charts for students who are blind and in the allied health professions on the basis of medical images and how students who are blind evaluate these charts. Editing rules for creating the charts are discussed. (Contains references.) (CR)

  3. Vocational Instructional Materials for Allied Health Education Available from Federal Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Carol L., Comp.

    This listing of federally produced curriculum and instructional materials for allied health education is one of eight annotated bibliographies that provide information for vocational educators at the secondary, postsecondary, and adult levels. Introductory information given includes a description of how to use the listing and sources and ordering…

  4. Allied Health Occupations II. Radiologic Technologist Aide Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by the radiologic team and to enable them to acquire some basic skills used in the X-ray department. Addressed in the individual units of the course…

  5. Plagiarism: using a collaborative approach in an online allied health professions course.

    PubMed

    Pence, Patricia L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to increase the awareness and understanding of plagiarism among undergraduate students enrolled in an online allied health professions course in a community college in the Midwestern United States. The results suggested that the interventions were effective in educating students about how to avoid plagiarism.

  6. The Effectiveness of Distance Education in Allied Health Science Programs: A Meta-Analysis of Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Stacy L.

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive meta-analysis of the research following Glass, McGraw, and Smith's (1981) technique integrated findings from twenty-five comparative studies from 1990 to 2003 targeting student achievement and distance education in allied health professions. Student achievement was assessed through course grades and resulted in an overall effect…

  7. Plotting Careers in Aged Care: Perspectives of Medical, Nursing, Allied Health Students and New Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Natalie; McCall, Louise

    2007-01-01

    The research reported in this article explored the impact of the undergraduate placement experience on medical, nursing, and allied health students' perceptions of careers in aged care. Data were collected from undergraduate students (48) and graduates (26) via individual (46) and group (7) interviews; data were thematically analyzed.…

  8. Occupational Analysis: Hospital Radiologic Technologist. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Glenn D.; And Others

    In an effort to meet the growing demand for skilled radiologic technologists and other supportive personnel educated through the associate degree level, a national survey was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project to determine the tasks performed by personnel in the field and lay the groundwork for development of…

  9. Allied Health Occupations II. Dental Assistant Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by dentists, dental hygienists, dental laboratory technicians, and dental assistants and also to help students acquire some basic dental assistant…

  10. Future of specialised roles in allied health practice: who is responsible?

    PubMed

    Skinner, Elizabeth H; Kimberley, J Haines; Hayes, Kate; Seller, Daniel; Toohey, Jessica C; Reeve, Julie C; Holdsworth, Clare; Haines, Terry P

    2015-06-01

    Allied health professions have developed specialised advanced and extended scope roles over the past decade, for the benefit of patient outcomes, allied health professionals' satisfaction and to meet labour and workforce demands. There is an essential need for formalised, widely recognised training to support these roles, and significant challenges to the delivery of such training exist. Many of these roles function in the absence of specifically defined standards of clinical practice and it is unclear where the responsibility for training provision lies. In a case example ofphysiotherapy practice in the intensive care unit, clinical placements and independence of practice are not core components of undergraduate physiotherapy degrees. Universities face barriers to the delivery of postgraduate specialised training and, although hospital physiotherapy departments are ideally placed, resources for training are lacking and education is not traditionally considered part of healthcare service providers' core business. Substantial variability in training, and its evaluation, leads to variability in practice and may affect patient outcomes. Allied health professionals working in specialised roles should develop specific clinical standards ofpractice, restructure models ofhealth care delivery to facilitate training, continue to develop the evidence base for their roles and target and evaluate training efficacy to achieve independent practice in a cost-effective manner. Healthcare providers must work with universities, the vocational training sector and government to optimise the ability of allied health to influence decision making and care outcomes for patients.

  11. The effectiveness of allied health care in patients with ataxia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fonteyn, Ella M R; Keus, Samyra H J; Verstappen, Carla C P; Schöls, Ludger; de Groot, Imelda J M; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C

    2014-02-01

    Many patients with cerebellar ataxia have serious disabilities in daily life, while pharmacological treatment options are absent. Therefore, allied health care is considered to be important in the management of these patients. The goal of this review is to evaluate scientific evidence for allied health care in cerebellar ataxia, to identify effective treatment strategies, and to give recommendations for clinical practice and further research. A systematic search for clinical trials concerning allied health care in cerebellar ataxias was conducted using the electronic databases of PubMed, Medline, Embase, Cinahl and Pedro, and references lists of articles, in the time period from 1980 up to and including December 2011 in English and Dutch. We identified 14 trials, of which the four best studies were formally of moderate methodological quality. There was a wide variation in disease entities and interventions. The combined data indicate that physical therapy may lead to an improvement of ataxia symptoms and daily life functions in patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxia (level 2), and in other diseases causing cerebellar ataxia (level 3). When added to physical therapy, occupational therapy might improve global functional status, and occupational therapy alone may diminish symptoms of depression (level 3). There are insufficient data for speech and language therapy. Despite the widespread use of allied health care interventions in cerebellar ataxia, there is a lack of good quality studies that have evaluated such interventions. We found some support for the implementation of physical therapy and occupational therapy, but more research is needed to develop recommendations for clinical practice.

  12. Dental Auxiliary Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Education for the dental auxiliary professions in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and…

  13. Allied Health Students' Learning-Styles Identified with Two Different Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton-Rias, Dawn; Dunn, Rita; Terregrossa, Ralph; Geisert, Gene; Mangione, Robert; Ortiz, Samuel; Honigsfeld, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    This research identified and compared the learning styles of 154 ethnically diverse, upper division undergraduate and graduate students in Allied Health utilizing the "Building Excellence" (BE) (Rundle & Dunn, 2000) and the "Productivity Environmental Preference Survey" (PEPS) (Dunn, Dunn, & Price, 1996). Relationships among age, class standing,…

  14. Radiological Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Radiological sciences education in Kentucky and articulation within this field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and resource…

  15. A Learner-Centered Molecular Modeling Exercise for Allied Health Majors in a Biochemistry Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Terace M.; Ershler, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Learner-centered molecular modeling exercises in college science courses can be especially challenging for nonchemistry majors as students typically have a higher degree of anxiety and may not appreciate the relevance of the work. This article describes a learner-centered project given to allied health majors in a Biochemistry course. The project…

  16. Investing in Academic Science for Allied Health Students: Challenges and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packard, Becky Wai-Ling; Gagnon, Janelle L.; Moring-Parris, Riana

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the experiences of allied health CTE students and teachers in a new academic science class designed to strengthen science preparation and postsecondary pathways. Situated within a partnership between the community hospital and an urban school district, this case study drew upon the perspectives of the students, the hospital…

  17. Promoting Health in American-Occupied Japan Resistance to Allied Public Health Measures, 1945-1952

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    As soon as the authority of the Public Health and Welfare Section (PHW) of the Supreme Commander for Allied Powers waned in May 1951, the Japanese government overturned several measures it had implemented. Although the PHW contributed greatly toward improving public health conditions, not all of its activities were models of cooperative success. Many Japanese perceived some measures—terminated pensions for wounded Japanese veterans, lack of support for segregated orphanages for mixed-race children, and suppression of Japanese atomic bomb medical reports—as promoting US national interest at the expense of Japanese public health needs. Similarly, the PHW's upgrade of nursing education and separation of the professions of medicine and pharmacy were reversed because neither professionals nor the public saw these measures as urgent. Their reinstitution toward the end of the twentieth century suggests that the progressive measures were sound, but broke too sharply with Japanese tradition and were enforced prematurely. PMID:19542032

  18. Integration of Practice Experiences into the Allied Health Curriculum: Curriculum and Pedagogic Considerations Before, during and after Work-Integrated Learning Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagarajan, Srivalli Vilapakkam; McAllister, Lindy

    2015-01-01

    Work-integrated learning (WIL) is an essential component of all allied health university courses. In allied health, learning that occurs during WIL experiences and the relationship between academic and WIL experiences are not well understood. Good integration of WIL experiences into the allied health curriculum is key to realizing the full…

  19. Building interdisciplinary teamwork among allied health students through live clinical case simulations.

    PubMed

    Buelow, Janet R; Rathsack, Christi; Downs, David; Jorgensen, Kathy; Karges, Joy R; Nelson, Debralee

    2008-01-01

    A limited, yet growing, body of research suggests that health care students educated in interdisciplinary teamwork may become more collaborative professionals in the workplace, which, in turn, may foster more productive and satisfied health care professionals. Researchers also have identified lower mortality and morbidity rates, fewer hospitalizations, decreased costs, and improved function by patients among significant health benefits of interdisciplinary teamwork, especially when it is applied to underserved and geriatric populations. Such positive outcomes have prompted medical schools and accreditation boards of many allied health professions to add interdisciplinary education into their training requirements. Meeting these requirements has challenged universities, where there are multiple allied health programs and limited time, faculty, and financial resources to coordinate interdisciplinary education. The challenges have been magnified by insufficient research on the most effective methods to educate university students about interdisciplinary teamwork. This article presents the background, evolution, and key building blocks of one such method: a simulation-based workshop designed at our university over 7 years to educate its allied health students about various health professions through shared learning, interaction, and collaboration.

  20. The South Australian Allied Health Workforce survey: helping to fill the evidence gap in primary health workforce planning.

    PubMed

    Whitford, Deirdre; Smith, Tony; Newbury, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of detailed evidence about the allied health workforce to inform proposed health care reforms. The South Australian Allied Health Workforce (SAAHW) survey collected data about the demographic characteristics, employment, education and recruitment and retention of allied health professionals in South Australia. The SAAHW questionnaire was widely distributed and 1539 responses were received. The average age of the sample was 40 years; males were significantly older than females, the latter making up 82% of respondents. Three-quarters of the sample worked in the city; 60% worked full time and the remainder in part-time, casual or locum positions. 'Work-life balance' was the most common attraction to respondents' current jobs and 'Better career prospects' the most common reason for intending to leave. Practice in a rural location was influenced by rural background and rural experience during training. A greater proportion of Generation Y (1982-2000) respondents intended to leave within 2 years than Generation X (1961-81) or Baby Boomers (1943-60). Most respondents were satisfied with their job, although some reported lack of recognition of their knowledge and skills. Systematic, robust allied health workforce data are required for integrated and sustainable primary health care delivery.

  1. Four Characteristics for Regional Continuing Education in Medical Allied Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koewing, J. Robert; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Program (created under the Comprehensive Health Manpower Act of 1971) is briefly described followed by a discussion of the University of North Carolina's regional planning efforts for continuing education. Major planning problems--aggregate numbers, continuing education suppliers, geographic distribution,…

  2. EDUCATION FOR THE ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS AND SERVICES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Health Council, Washington, DC.

    THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE IN HEALTH OCCUPATIONS WILL PROBABLY INCREASE FROM 2.8 TO 3.8 MILLION PERSONS BY 1975. RECENT SURVEYS OF HOSPITALS AND NURSING HOMES SHOWED THAT OVER 300,000 ADDITIONAL HEALTH WORKERS WERE NEEDED TO PROVIDE OPTIMUM PATIENT CARE. SHORTAGES EXISTED FOR MEDICAL RECORD LIBRARIANS, DENTAL HYGIENISTS, MEDICAL AND RADIOLOGIC…

  3. Evaluation of a post-professional master's program in allied health.

    PubMed

    Murray, C; Judd, D; Snyder, P

    2001-01-01

    Changes in allied health education have precipitated a need to review existing educational programs. As more disciplines require a graduate degree for professional entry, it becomes important to articulate the benefits of advanced, post-professional graduate education for allied health professionals. This article reports results from a study of one interdisciplinary Master of Health Sciences (MHS) program. The intent of the study was to 1) analyze graduates' satisfaction with components of the MHS program; 2) explore the perceived impact of the MHS program on graduates' professional practices; and 3) examine employers' perceptions of the program's effect on graduates' professional behaviors. An investigator-developed written questionnaire was used to gather perspectives from 53 graduates and 27 of their employers. Graduates believed the MHS program had had a positive influence on their employment. Graduates' employers concurred, giving high marks to graduates' skill levels and job performances. Program graduates were active in professional organizations, but few were involved in scholarly activities such as research. Implications for curriculum design of advanced master's programs in allied health are discussed.

  4. Promoting the place of the allied health professions in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Rothan-Tondeur, Monique; Courcier, Soizic; Béhier, Jehan-Michel; Leblanc, Judith; Peoch, Nadia; Lefort, Marie-Claude; Barthélémy, Philippe; Bassompierre, François; Bilbault, Pascal; Déal, Cécile; Diebolt, Vincent; Fraleux, Michèle; François, Bruno; Gambotti, Laetitia; Lévy-Marchal, Claire; Misse, Christophe; Roussel, Christophe; Sibenaler, Claire; Simon, Tabassome; Tavernier, Blanche; Thoby, Frédérique

    2014-01-01

    Clinical research is of major importance to today's society, as scientific evidence is increasingly demanded as a basis for progress, whether this involves developing new healthcare products, improving clinical practice and care protocols or progress in prevention. Clinical research therefore requires professionals who are both experienced and increasingly well trained. Against this background, allied health professionals are becoming involved more and more, both as team members supporting clinical research projects and as managers or coordinators of projects in their own field. Clinical research activities provide an ideal opportunity for continuing professional development. All of this means that the professional skills of the allied health professions and clinical research support professions must be enhanced, their role promoted in the context of lecturer status and in the longer term, their status recognised by the supervisory authorities.

  5. Nutrition economics - food as an ally of public health.

    PubMed

    Lenoir-Wijnkoop, I; Jones, P J; Uauy, R; Segal, L; Milner, J

    2013-03-14

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are a major and increasing contributor to morbidity and mortality in developed and developing countries. Much of the chronic disease burden is preventable through modification of lifestyle behaviours, and increased attention is being focused on identifying and implementing effective preventative health strategies. Nutrition has been identified as a major modifiable determinant of NCD. The recent merging of health economics and nutritional sciences to form the nascent discipline of nutrition economics aims to assess the impact of diet on health and disease prevention, and to evaluate options for changing dietary choices, while incorporating an understanding of the immediate impacts and downstream consequences. In short, nutrition economics allows for generation of policy-relevant evidence, and as such the discipline is a crucial partner in achieving better population nutritional status and improvements in public health and wellness. The objective of the present paper is to summarise presentations made at a satellite symposium held during the 11th European Nutrition Conference, 28 October 2011, where the role of nutrition and its potential to reduce the public health burden through alleviating undernutrition and nutrition deficiencies, promoting better-quality diets and incorporating a role for functional foods were discussed.

  6. Comments on a special issue of the Journal of Allied Health.

    PubMed

    Elwood, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 Annual Conference of the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP) will be conducted in Charlotte, North Carolina, on October 20-22. The theme for this event is "Through an Interdisciplinary Looking Glass: Achieving Quality Outcomes through Research, Education, and Practice." Although the terms interdisciplinary and interprofessional differ from one another, they are close enough to justify an intent to have copies of this special issue of the Journal prepared and distributed in advance of the conference.

  7. Elements of instruction in allied health: do faculty and students value the same things?

    PubMed

    Hoppes, Steve; Chesbro, Steven

    2003-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the importance placed on 15 elements of instruction in allied health by students and faculty and to identify similarities and differences in students' and faculty's views. A total of 145 students and 55 faculty in the College of Allied Health at the University of Oklahoma participated in an on-line survey. Focus groups subsequently were conducted to discuss areas of agreement and disagreement between students and faculty. Four common elements were contained in the top-five list of both groups: (1) the teacher's ability to relate course material to clinical situations, (2) the teacher's communication skills, (3) the teacher's preparation and organization, and (4) the teacher's knowledge of the subject. Five of the 15 items were significantly different: (1) the teachers' friendliness and respect for students, (2) the teacher's ability to motivate students, (3) the teacher's ability to challenge students intellectually, (4) the teacher's encouragement of discussion, and (5) the teacher's ability to use a number of teaching techniques. Results of this study will further understanding between allied health faculty and students concerning similarities and differences in instructional values.

  8. Rural speech-language pathologists' perceptions of working with allied health assistants.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Rachael; Byrne, Nicole; Mitchell, Rebecca; Ferguson, Alison

    2013-12-01

    Workforce shortages are forecast for speech-language pathology in Australia, and will have a more significant impact on rural and remote areas than on metropolitan areas. Allied health (AH) disciplines such as physiotherapy and occupational therapy address the problem of workforce shortages and growing clinical demand by employing allied health assistants (AHAs) to provide clinical and administrative support to AH professionals. Currently, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) don't work with discipline-specific allied health assistants in all states of Australia (e.g., New South Wales). This paper aims to provide insight into the perceptions of SLPs in one Australian state (NSW) regarding working with AHAs. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight rural SLPs. Qualitative analysis indicated that participants perceived they had deficits in skills and knowledge required to work with AHAs and identified further training needs. Participants perceived the SLP role to be misunderstood and were concerned about poor consultation regarding the introduction of AHAs into the profession. Ambivalence was evident in overall perceptions of working with AHAs, and tasks performed. While previous research identified benefits of working with AHAs, results from this study suggest that significant professional, economic, and organizational issues need addressing before such a change should be implemented in speech-language pathology.

  9. The Heart of Rural Health Care: Programs Supply Nurses, Allied Health Workers to Nation's Most Remote Locales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Corey; Fulcher, Roxanne

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that across the United States, rural communities rely on local community colleges to provide a steady pipeline of emergency responders, well-educated qualified nurses, and allied health professionals capable of staffing local medical centers and hospitals and complementing physicians in the delivery of care, from emergency…

  10. A Bookshelf in Public Health, Medical Care, and Allied Fields

    PubMed Central

    La Rocco, August; Jones, Barbara

    1972-01-01

    This bibliography of nonserial publications consists of 610 annotations. It is intended as a guide to the development of a collection for librarians and for health professionals in research and education. References are mostly to publications from 1960. Titles are in English. Both primary and secondary sources are cited. PMID:4554218

  11. Geriatric assessment in daily oncology practice for nurses and allied health care professionals: Opinion paper of the Nursing and Allied Health Interest Group of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG).

    PubMed

    Burhenn, Peggy S; McCarthy, Alexandra L; Begue, Aaron; Nightingale, Ginah; Cheng, Karis; Kenis, Cindy

    2016-09-01

    The management of older persons with cancer has become a major public health concern in developed countries because of the aging of the population and the steady increase in cancer incidence with advancing age. Nurses and allied health care professionals are challenged to address the needs of this growing population. The International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) Nursing and Allied Health (NAH) Interest Group described key issues that nurses and allied health care professionals face when caring for older persons with cancer. The domains of the Geriatric Assessment (GA) are used as a guiding framework. The following geriatric domains are described: demographic data and social support, functional status, cognition, mental health, nutritional status, fatigue, comorbidities, polypharmacy, and other geriatric syndromes (e.g. falls, delirium). In addition to these geriatric domains, quality of life (QoL) is described based on the overall importance in this particular population. Advice for integration of assessment of these geriatric domains into daily oncology practice is made. Research has mainly focused on the role of treating physicians but the involvement of nurses and allied health care professionals is crucial in the care of older persons with cancer through the GA process. The ability of nurses and allied health care professionals to perform this assessment requires specialized training and education beyond standard oncology knowledge.

  12. Report on Health Manpower and Programs in Ohio: Part Two. Allied Health, Area Health Education Centers, Dentistry, Emergency Medical Services, Nursing, Optometry, Pharmacy, Podiatry, and Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus.

    Information on health occupations educational programs in Ohio and current and projected employment needs for health professionals are presented. The following health fields are examined: allied health, dentistry, emergency medical service, nursing, optometry, pharmacy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine. Issues and trends affecting each field are…

  13. [Potentials for research and innovations in allied health professions in Germany].

    PubMed

    Voigt-Radloff, Sebastian; Lang, Britta; Antes, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the increasing complexity and continuously changing needs and demands in the German healthcare system, there is a need to strengthen knowledge translation, evidence-based practice and the conduct of clinical trials in the field of allied health professions. An interdisciplinary working group representing the fields of nursing, midwifery, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy developed a guide and a concept for seminars to provide potential analyses for research and innovations in the allied health professions in Germany. These potential analyses compare the current state of health care delivery for specific health problems and the corpus of evidence for the effectiveness of related interventions. Thus innovations can be identified which might improve client-centred healthcare in Germany. The introductory paper briefly reports the activities and results of the working group, describes the international context of transferring research into practice and outlines possibilities for the future development of coordinated research strategies in Germany. The following papers consist of five potential analyses: (1) Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) in long-term care; (2) giving birth in an upright position; (3) treadmill training for patients with Parkinson's disease; (4) training of everyday activities after stroke; and (5) communication training for patients with aphasia.

  14. Caring for Hispanic patients interactively: simulations and practices for allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Schitai, Amit

    2004-01-01

    Healthcare providers have a new tool for navigating the challenges of cross-cultural communication when treating Hispanic patients: CHISPA e-learning environment. CHISPA, which means "spark" in Spanish, stands for Caring for the Hispanic Patient Interactively: Simulations and Practices for Allied Health Professionals. It is a computer-based training program that provides solutions to both cultural and linguistic barriers to care. The program allows users to interact with Hispanic patients in realistic patient-care scenarios and receive feedback on their choices, along with a wealth of information on cultural variables, advice on overcoming language barriers, and language exercises to facilitate learning medical terms and expressions in Spanish.

  15. Learning style preferences of allied health practitioners in a teacher education program.

    PubMed

    Vittetoe, M C; Hooker, E

    1983-02-01

    This article reports findings of a three-year study of learning style preferences of allied health practitioners in a university teacher education program. The Learning Preference Inventory (LPI) designed by Rezler and French was used as the survey instrument. Ten health fields were represented in the total population of 309 students who participated in the study. Analysis of variance was used to test the significance of the differences of the six LPI mean scores on abstract/concrete, teacher-centered/student-centered, and individual/interpersonal categories across the variables of age, sex, teaching experience, class location, class standing, and health field. Results of this study paralleled the findings of the 1975 Rezler and French study regarding medical technologists and physical therapists in that these two groups indicated they preferred concrete and teacher centered learning styles. Several other significant differences between health fields and other variables are discussed.

  16. [Educational program in the Medical Science Course, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences].

    PubMed

    Kitasato, Hidero; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Ohbu, Makoto; Obata, Fumiya; Ogawa, Zensuke; Sato, Yuichi; Hattori, Manabu; Saito-Taki, Tatsuo; Hara, Kazuya; Okano, Tetsuroh; Kubo, Makoto; Maruyama, Hiroko; Tsuchiya, Benio; Okazaki, Toshio; Ishii, Naohito; Nishimura, Yukari; Takada, Nobukazu; Abe, Michiko; Hachimura, Kazuo; Tanigawa, Kozo; Katagiri, Masato

    2008-07-01

    The aim of education in the Medical Laboratory Science course, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences, is to bring up train students who have Kitasato spirit, for careers in laboratory medicine of hospital or scientific staff of medical companies or as researchers. General and enlightening education concerning "Kitasato spirit" and professional education composed of major subjects was carried out in the first and during the 2nd and two third of 3rd grade, respectively. Medical practice and research training were alternatively carried out for 6 months between November of the 3rd year and November of the 4th year, in order to gain practical experience. Two problem-based learning (PBL) tutorial courses, "Infectious Diseases Course" and "Team Medical Care--Interprofessional Collaborations" were also carried out at the end of the 3rd and beginning of the 4th years, respectively, in order to convert a memory to knowledge. Team medical care course enrolls 1000 students at the School of Allied Health Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy and Kitasato College Applied Clinical Dietetics Course, is now one of special courses available at our university. This attempt is thought to result in a way of thinking that recognizes the importance of co-operation as a team member and personal contributions to actual team medical care.

  17. Becoming an Academic: The Reconstruction of Identity by Recently Appointed Lecturers in Nursing, Midwifery and the Allied Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Caroline; Boyd, Pete

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the workplace learning experiences of recently appointed lecturers in UK higher education in nursing, midwifery and the allied health professions. Health care practitioners, appointed to academic posts in Universities, are experts in their respective clinical fields and hold strong practitioner identities developed through…

  18. The Statewide Conference of the Florida Allied Health Articulation Project (Orlando, Florida, June 21, 1989). Proceedings and Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tallahassee Community Coll., FL.

    This document contains the proceedings of a conference on articulation in the allied health care field in Florida. The following presentations are included: "Welcome and Program Overview" (Laurey Stryker); "Health Care Challenges and Choices: Alternate Pathways to the 21st Century" (Robert E. Kinsinger); "Findings and…

  19. Building competency in the novice allied health professional through peer coaching.

    PubMed

    Ladyshewsky, Richard K

    2010-01-01

    The development of competence is an ongoing journey, and one that is particularly punctuated in the early part of a health professional's career. These novice practitioners need to recognize that the challenges inherent in building competency might be resolved more readily by engaging with peers. This paper outlines what it means to be a novice practitioner, and how peer coaching can be used to support professional development in the allied health sciences. An overview of the reasoning process and how peer coaching and experiential learning can be used to build competence is described. A structured and formal approach to peer coaching is outlined in this paper. Novices who embrace this professional development strategy will find the model of coaching practice and underlying strategies described in this paper beneficial to their experience. The importance of formalizing the process and the underlying communication skills needed for coaching are described in detail with accompanying examples to illustrate the model in practice.

  20. Systematic review of knowledge translation strategies in the allied health professions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Knowledge translation (KT) aims to close the research-practice gap in order to realize and maximize the benefits of research within the practice setting. Previous studies have investigated KT strategies in nursing and medicine; however, the present study is the first systematic review of the effectiveness of a variety of KT interventions in five allied health disciplines: dietetics, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physiotherapy, and speech-language pathology. Methods A health research librarian developed and implemented search strategies in eight electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, PASCAL, EMBASE, IPA, Scopus, CENTRAL) using language (English) and date restrictions (1985 to March 2010). Other relevant sources were manually searched. Two reviewers independently screened the titles and abstracts, reviewed full-text articles, performed data extraction, and performed quality assessment. Within each profession, evidence tables were created, grouping and analyzing data by research design, KT strategy, targeted behaviour, and primary outcome. The published descriptions of the KT interventions were compared to the Workgroup for Intervention Development and Evaluation Research (WIDER) Recommendations to Improve the Reporting of the Content of Behaviour Change Interventions. Results A total of 2,638 articles were located and the titles and abstracts were screened. Of those, 1,172 full-text articles were reviewed and subsequently 32 studies were included in the systematic review. A variety of single (n = 15) and multiple (n = 17) KT interventions were identified, with educational meetings being the predominant KT strategy (n = 11). The majority of primary outcomes were identified as professional/process outcomes (n = 25); however, patient outcomes (n = 4), economic outcomes (n = 2), and multiple primary outcomes (n = 1) were also represented. Generally, the studies were of low methodological quality. Outcome reporting bias was

  1. Role, implementation, and effectiveness of advanced allied health assistants: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Stanhope, Jessica; Pearce, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness and implementation of advanced allied health assistant roles. Methods A systematic search of seven databases and Google Scholar was conducted to identify studies published in English peer-reviewed journals from 2003 to 2013 and reporting on the effectiveness and implementation of advanced allied health assistant (A/AHA) roles. Reference lists were also screened to identify additional studies, and the authors’ personal collections of studies were searched. Studies were allocated to the National Health and Medical Research Council hierarchy of evidence, and appraisal of higher-level studies (III-1 and above) conducted using the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine Systematic Review Critical Appraisal Sheet for included systematic reviews or the PEDro scale for level II and III-1 studies. Data regarding country, A/AHA title, disciplines, competencies, tasks, level of autonomy, clients, training, and issues regarding the implementation of these roles were extracted, as were outcomes used and key findings for studies investigating their effectiveness. Results Fifty-three studies were included, and most because they reported background information rather than investigating A/AHA roles, this representing low-level information. A/AHAs work in a range of disciplines, with a variety of client groups, and in a number of different settings. Little was reported regarding the training available for A/AHAs. Four studies investigated the effectiveness of these roles, finding that they were generally well accepted by clients, and provided more therapy time. Issues in integrating these new roles into existing health systems were also reported. Conclusion A/AHA roles are being implemented in a range of settings, and appear to be effective in terms of process measures and stakeholder perceptions. Few studies have investigated these roles, indicating a need for research to be conducted in this area to

  2. Differences between African-American and Caucasian Students on Enrollment Influences and Barriers in Kinesiology-Based Allied Health Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barfield, J. P.; Cobler, D. C.; Lam, Eddie T. C.; Zhang, James; Chitiyo, George

    2012-01-01

    Kinesiology departments have recently started to offer allied health education programs to attract additional students to teacher education units (9). Although allied health professions offer increased work opportunities, insufficient enrollment and training of minority students in these academic fields contribute to underrepresentation in the…

  3. The Predictive Value of Selected Extrinsic and Intrinsic Indicators of Overall Job Satisfaction in Diagnostic Radiological Technology, Radiation Therapy, and Nuclear Medicine Technology Allied Health Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beavers, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare is the largest industry in the United States and 60 percent of its 14 million workers are in allied health jobs. The need to attract and retain allied health faculty is critical to preparing a competent workforce in healthcare. This study reports the results of a survey of 259 faculty members working in diagnostic radiologic technology,…

  4. Review for librarians of evidence-based practice in nursing and the allied health professions in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kronenfeld, Michael; Stephenson, Priscilla L.; Nail-Chiwetalu, Barbara; Tweed, Elizabeth M.; Sauers, Eric L.; McLeod, Tamara C. Valovich; Guo, Ruiling; Trahan, Henry; Alpi, Kristine M.; Hill, Beth; Sherwill-Navarro, Pamela; Allen, Margaret (Peg); Stephenson, Priscilla L.; Hartman, Linda M.; Burnham, Judy; Fell, Dennis; Kronenfeld, Michael; Pavlick, Raymond; MacNaughton, Ellen W.; Nail-Chiwetalu, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This paper provides an overview of the state of evidence-based practice (EBP) in nursing and selected allied health professions and a synopsis of current trends in incorporating EBP into clinical education and practice in these fields. This overview is intended to better equip librarians with a general understanding of the fields and relevant information resources. Included Professions: Professions are athletic training, audiology, health education and promotion, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assisting, respiratory care, and speech-language pathology. Approach: Each section provides a description of a profession, highlighting changes that increase the importance of clinicians' access to and use of the profession's knowledgebase, and a review of each profession's efforts to support EBP. The paper concludes with a discussion of the librarian's role in providing EBP support to the profession. Conclusions: EBP is in varying stages of growth among these fields. The evolution of EBP is evidenced by developments in preservice training, growth of the literature and resources, and increased research funding. Obstacles to EBP include competing job tasks, the need for additional training, and prevalent attitudes and behaviors toward research among practitioners. Librarians' skills in searching, organizing, and evaluating information can contribute to furthering the development of EBP in a given profession. PMID:17971887

  5. Pairing of opposite learning styles among allied health students: effects on collaborative performance.

    PubMed

    Sandmire, David A; Boyce, Pauline F

    2004-01-01

    To understand better determinants of effective collaboration in allied health education, students were paired by similar and opposite learning styles to work on a simulated clinical case exercise. Fifty-six sophomore and junior students enrolled in an anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology course from a variety of allied health programs were assigned randomly in pairs to one of three subsets based on their Kolb Learning Style Inventory scores (concrete versus abstract learners). The students read the history and physical examination findings of an immunocompromised patient with an abscess in an undisclosed spinal cord location, then answered a series of case questions. Analysis of variance revealed that mismatched pairs (concrete/abstract) performed significantly better than matched concrete pairs (F2,21 = 3.83, p < 0.05) and slightly better than matched abstract pairs. This higher performance of the mismatched group was not attributed to differences in either general or specific level of academic preparation among the groups, as measured by cumulative grade point average and prior course examination scores, respectively (F2,21 = 2.15, p > 0.05 and F2,21 = 3.04, p > 0.05). Collapsing of all three subset groups into one cohort revealed that case exercise performance was correlated moderately, however, to cumulative grade point average (r = 0.49, p < 0.01) and correlated strongly to prior course exam scores (r = 0.76, p < 0.001). These findings suggest that clinical collaboration skills are enhanced not only by individual level of academic preparation but also by intentional pairing of concrete with abstract learners.

  6. Attitudes Underlying Corneal Donation in a Group of Trainee Allied Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    McGlade, Donal; McClenahan, Carol; Pierscionek, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Background The focus of this study was to investigate factors that may influence personal willingness to register consent to donate corneal tissue upon death using the theory of planned behaviour in a relatively ethnically homogenous group of trainee allied health professionals. The attainment of this knowledge will be of paramount importance in relation to potential interventions that are designed to change donation-related behaviour. Methods A questionnaire-based study was undertaken with 92 pre-registration nurses (mean age 24.0 years (standard deviation ±5.6 years); female:male  = 89:3) enrolled at a University in Northern Ireland. Intention to register consent to donate corneal tissue upon death was assessed using both direct and belief-based measures found in the theory of planned behaviour. Descriptive statistics were used to assess demographic information, with correlation and regression analyses being used to identify factors influencing intentions. Results The majority of participants were religious (94.6%, n = 87) and mostly Protestant (58.7%, n = 54) or Catholic (35.9%, n = 33). Generally speaking, the theory of planned behaviour accounted for 84% of the variance in intention to register consent. In relation to the constructs found in the theory of planned behaviour, attitude was found to be the strongest predictor of intention to register consent, with subjective norm being the second strongest predictor. Perceived behavioural control did not significantly predict intention to register consent. Conclusions The theory of planned behaviour has allowed an understanding of the factors that influence the personal intentions of a group of future allied health professionals from the same ethnic group to register consent to donate their corneal tissue. PMID:23300937

  7. Interdisciplinary allied health education in treating older adults with low vision.

    PubMed

    Newsham Beckley, Margaret; Teaford, Margaret H; Kegelmeyer, Deborah; Balaswamy, Shantha; Flom, Roanne; Raasch, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    In 2000, the number of elderly citizens in the United States was 35 million, an increase of 3.7 million (11%) since 1990. Of these older adults, approximately 1.3 million (4%) have a low vision impairment. Older adults make up two-thirds of those diagnosed with a visual impairment. Low vision impairment, which is different from the typical vision changes associated with aging, occurs because of a chronic visual disorder that cannot be corrected medically, surgically, or with conventional eyeglasses, most often resulting in disability. The leading causes of low vision impairment are diabetic retinopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration. Combined with the other physical changes associated with aging, the development of a low vision impairment further challenges the functional performance and safety of those 65 and older. Furthermore, the psychological impact from the physical changes accompanying aging is compounded for those with a low vision impairment. In response to the health needs of all age groups, Healthy People 2010 has established overarching goals to increase quality and years of healthy life and eliminate health disparities. An interdisciplinary course for allied health students was developed to support future health care providers in improving quality of life for older adults with low vision and help decrease health disparities in this population. This paper reports on the pilot experience with this course.

  8. Attitudes on Barriers and Benefits of Distance Education among Mississippi Delta Allied Health Community College Faculty, Staff, and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayfield-Johnson, Susan; Mohn, Richard S.; Mitra, Amal K.; Young, Rebekah; McCullers, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Online distance education creates increased opportunities for continuing education and advanced training for allied health professionals living in underserved and geographically isolated areas. The purpose of this article was to explore attitudes on barriers and benefits of distance education technology among underrepresented minority allied…

  9. Student Perceptions and Learning Outcomes of Blended Learning in a Massive First-Year Core Physiology for Allied Health Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Janelle; Meehan-Andrews, Terri; Weerakkody, Nivan; Hughes, Diane L.; Rathner, Joseph A.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence shows that factors contributing to success in physiology education for allied health students at universities include not only their high school achievement and background but also factors such as confidence with their teachers and quality of their learning experience, justifying intensive and continued survey of students' perceptions of…

  10. Articulation Assistance for Columbus State Community College. Add-on Task #2: Pre-Tech for Allied Health. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, S. Judith; And Others

    This guide is intended for use in helping high school and entry-level community college students in acquiring the practical science skills necessary to ensure successful completion of an associate-level allied health program. The guide was originally developed to provide an articulation model for high school students interested in entering the…

  11. Methodological Orientations of Articles Appearing in Allied Health's Top Journals: Who Publishes What and Where

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alderman, Pamela Lea McCloud

    2012-01-01

    This study examined articles published in the major peer-reviewed journals, either hard copy, web, or both formats, in five allied health professions from January 2006 to December 2010. Research journals used in this study include: "Journal of Dental Hygiene," "Journal of the American Dietetic Association," "Journal of…

  12. Developing eLearning Technologies to Implement Competency Based Medical Education: Experiences from Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagunwa, Thomas; Lwoga, Edda

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the practical experience of developing an eLearning technology as a tool to implement Competency-based Medical Education (CBME) in Tanzania medical universities, with a specific focus on Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences. The paper provides a background to eLearning and the early attempt to adopt it in 2006 at…

  13. Applying Innovative Educational Principles when Classes Grow and Resources Are Limited: Biochemistry Experiences at Muhimbili University of Allied Health Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omer, Selma; Hickson, Gilles; Tache, Stephanie; Blind, Raymond; Masters, Susan; Loeser, Helen; Souza, Kevin; Mkony, Charles; Debas, Haile; O'Sullivan, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Teaching to large classes is often challenging particularly when the faculty and teaching resources are limited. Innovative, less staff intensive ways need to be explored to enhance teaching and to engage students. We describe our experience teaching biochemistry to 350 students at Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) under…

  14. A Comparison of the First-Year Experience Programming to Enhance the Retention of Future Allied Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalen, Tina Forsythe

    2012-01-01

    This mixed-methods case study examined the effectiveness of a new first-year experience (FYE) curriculum for selected Choose Ohio First Scholars in the College of Allied Health Sciences (CAHS) and compared it with the effectiveness of the traditional FYE curriculum in CAHS. The quantitative phase of the study involved the collection and analysis…

  15. Does journal club membership improve research evidence uptake in different allied health disciplines: a pre-post study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although allied health is considered to be one 'unit' of healthcare providers, it comprises a range of disciplines which have different training and ways of thinking, and different tasks and methods of patient care. Very few empirical studies on evidence-based practice (EBP) have directly compared allied health professionals. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of a structured model of journal club (JC), known as iCAHE (International Centre for Allied Health Evidence) JC, on the EBP knowledge, skills and behaviour of the different allied health disciplines. Methods A pilot, pre-post study design using maximum variation sampling was undertaken. Recruitment was conducted in groups and practitioners such as physiotherapists, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, social workers, psychologists, nutritionists/dieticians and podiatrists were invited to participate. All participating groups received the iCAHE JC for six months. Quantitative data using the Adapted Fresno Test (McCluskey & Bishop) and Evidence-based Practice Questionnaire (Upton & Upton) were collected prior to the implementation of the JC, with follow-up measurements six months later. Mean percentage change and confidence intervals were calculated to compare baseline and post JC scores for all outcome measures. Results The results of this study demonstrate variability in EBP outcomes across disciplines after receiving the iCAHE JC. Only physiotherapists showed statistically significant improvements in all outcomes; speech pathologists and occupational therapists demonstrated a statistically significant increase in knowledge but not for attitude and evidence uptake; social workers and dieticians/nutritionists showed statistically significant positive changes in their knowledge, and evidence uptake but not for attitude. Conclusions There is evidence to suggest that a JC such as the iCAHE model is an effective method for improving the EBP knowledge and skills of allied

  16. Weight Management Advice for Clients with Overweight or Obesity: Allied Health Professional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Snodgrass, Suzanne J.; Guest, Maya; Kable, Ashley K.; James, Carole; Ashby, Samantha E.; Plotnikoff, Ronald C.; Collins, Clare E.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing. The potential for allied health professionals to intervene through the provision of lifestyle advice is unknown. This study aimed to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of health professionals in the provision of dietary and physical activity advice for clients with overweight or obesity. Dietitians, exercise physiologists, nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists and psychologists (n = 296) working in New South Wales were surveyed using paper-based and online methods. The majority of health professionals (71%) believed that providing weight management advice was within their scope of practice; 81% provided physical activity advice but only 57% provided dietary advice. Other than dietitians, few had received training in client weight management during their professional qualification (14%) or continuing education (16%). Providing dietary advice was associated with: believing it was within their scope of practice (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.9–7.9, p < 0.01), training during their entry-level qualification (OR 7.2, 3.2–16.4, p < 0.01) and having departmental guidelines (OR 4.7, 2.1–10.9, p < 0.01). Most health professionals are willing to provide lifestyle advice to clients with overweight or obesity but few have received required training. Developing guidelines and training for in client weight management may potentially impact on rising obesity levels. PMID:27854252

  17. How Do Allied Health Professionals Construe the Role of the Remote Workforce? New Insight into Their Recruitment and Retention

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Narelle; Eley, Diann S.; McAllister, Lindy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Allied health workforce recruitment and retention in remote areas is a global problem. Using case studies from the Australian allied health workforce, this paper adds new information by combining personality trait information with a detailed understanding of how the cases construe the demands of remote work, which may be useful in addressing this problem. Methods Four cases (two urban, two remote) are presented from a mixed methods study (n = 562), which used (1) the Temperament and Character Inventory to investigate personality traits of allied health professionals; and (2) repertory grid interviews to reveal quantitatively and qualitatively how the cases construed their Ideal work role compared with their Current and a Remote role. Cases also self-assessed their fit (‘suited’ or ‘not suited’) with remote. Findings Differences in the way cases construed their fit with remote work was related to prior experience. However all were satisfied with their work, perceiving their Current role as similar to their Ideal. All saw remote work as requiring generalist expertise and a reliance on relationships. Personality traits, especially Novelty Seeking and Harm Avoidance, fit with how allied health professionals perceived their role. Conclusions The combination of two distinct lines of investigation, illustrates what more can be revealed about allied health professional’s career choices by taking into account the fit or lack of fit between their personality tendencies, their construing of remote work and their life circumstances. Understanding the combined influence of perceptions and traits on an individual toward or away from remote work may enhance recruitment and retention internationally. PMID:27907073

  18. Partnerships in Health Promotion for Black Americans. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the National Society of Allied Health (Virginia Beach, VA, March 29-30, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Harry E., III, Comp.

    This conference report of the National Society of Allied Health focusses on the theme of health promotion for black Americans, with emphasis on creating cooperative partnerships to address the various social and environmental conditions adversely affecting minority group health status. The keynote speaker provided an historical perspective on…

  19. What constitutes an excellent allied health care professional? A multidisciplinary focus group study

    PubMed Central

    Paans, Wolter; Wijkamp, Inge; Wiltens, Egbert; Wolfensberger, Marca V

    2013-01-01

    Background Determining what constitutes an excellent allied health care professional (AHCP) is important, since this is what will guide the development of curricula for training future physical therapists, oral hygienists, speech therapists, diagnostic radiographers, and dietitians. This also determines the quality of care. Aim To describe perspectives of AHCPs on which characteristics are commonly associated with an excellent AHCP. Methods AHCPs’ perspectives were derived from three focus group discussions. Twenty-one health care professionals participated. The final analysis of the focus group discussions produced eight domains, in which content validity was obtained through a Delphi panel survey of 27 contributing experts. Results According to the survey, a combination of the following characteristics defines an excellent AHCP: (1) cognizance, to obtain and to apply knowledge in a broad multidisciplinary health care field; (2) cooperativity, to effectively work with others in a multidisciplinary context; (3) communicative, to communicate effectively at different levels in complex situations; (4) initiative, to initiate new ideas, to act proactively, and to follow them through; (5) innovative, to devise new ideas and to implement alternatives beyond current practices; (6) introspective, to self-examine and to reflect; (7) broad perspective, to capture the big picture; and (8) evidence-driven, to find and to use scientific evidence to guide one’s decisions. Conclusion The AHCPs perspectives can be used as a reference for personal improvement for supervisors and professionals in clinical practice and for educational purposes. These perspectives may serve as a guide against which talented students can evaluate themselves. PMID:24049449

  20. Teaching clinical reasoning by making thinking visible: an action research project with allied health clinical educators

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical reasoning is fundamental to all forms of professional health practice, however it is also difficult to teach and learn because it is complex, tacit, and effectively invisible for students. In this paper we present an approach for teaching clinical reasoning based on making expert thinking visible and accessible to students. Methods Twenty-one experienced allied health clinical educators from three tertiary Australian hospitals attended up to seven action research discussion sessions, where they developed a tentative heuristic of their own clinical reasoning, trialled it with students, evaluated if it helped their students to reason clinically, and then refined it so the heuristic was targeted to developing each student’s reasoning skills. Data included participants’ written descriptions of the thinking routines they developed and trialed with their students and the transcribed action research discussion sessions. Content analysis was used to summarise this data and categorise themes about teaching and learning clinical reasoning. Results Two overriding themes emerged from participants’ reports about using the ‘making thinking visible approach’. The first was a specific focus by participating educators on students’ understanding of the reasoning process and the second was heightened awareness of personal teaching styles and approaches to teaching clinical reasoning. Conclusions We suggest that the making thinking visible approach has potential to assist educators to become more reflective about their clinical reasoning teaching and acts as a scaffold to assist them to articulate their own expert reasoning and for students to access and use. PMID:24479414

  1. Achievements and challenges on policies for allied health professionals who use telehealth in the Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Hailey, D; Foerster, V; Nakagawa, B; Wapshall, T M; Murtagh, J A; Smitten, J; Steblecki, J A; Wong, G

    2005-01-01

    We formulated policies and procedures for allied health professionals (AHPs) who provide services using telehealth in Nunavut, Canada's newest Arctic territory. These are a supplement to the clinical policies and procedures already established for Nunavut physicians and nurses. The services were in the areas of audiology, dietetics/nutrition, midwifery, occupational therapy, ophthalmic services, pharmacy, physiotherapy, psychology, respiratory therapy, social work and speech therapy. Documents specific to each of the services were developed, drawing on information from Government of Nunavut data, Nunavut healthcare providers and links made through the Internet. Topics included the scope and limitations of telehealth services, staff responsibilities, training and reporting, professional standards and cultural considerations. We also considered generic policies covering common issues such as jurisdiction, licensing and liability. The policies and procedures for AHPs will enhance and expand the successes already achieved with telehealth in Nunavut. The challenges are to balance the preferred approaches to service provision with the realities of health care and communications in an Arctic setting.

  2. Characterization of health-related compounds in eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) lines derived from introgression of allied species.

    PubMed

    Mennella, Giuseppe; Rotino, Giuseppe L; Fibiani, Marta; D'Alessandro, Antonietta; Francese, Gianluca; Toppino, Laura; Cavallanti, Federica; Acciarri, Nazzareno; Lo Scalzo, Roberto

    2010-07-14

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the levels of either the nutraceutical and health-promoting compounds or the antioxidant properties of innovative eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) genotypes tolerant and/or resistant to fungi, derived from conventional and non-conventional breeding methodologies (i.e., sexual interspecific hybridization, interspecific protoplast electrofusion, androgenesis, and backcross cycles) in comparison with their allied and cultivated parents. Chemical measures of soluble refractometric residue (SRR), glycoalkaloids (solamargine and solasonine), chlorogenic acid (CA), delphinidin 3-rutinoside (D3R), total phenols (TP), polyphenoloxidase (PPO) activity, antiradical activity on superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical were carried out in raw fruit and peel of 57 eggplant advanced introgression lines (ILs), of three eggplant recurrent genotypes and of three allied species during 2005 and 2006. The majority of the ILs, obtained after several backcross cycles, showed positive characteristics with respect to the allied parents such as good levels of SRR, CA, D3R, TP, PPO activity, the scavenging activity against superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical and, in particular, significantly (p allied parents (i.e., resistance/tolerance to plant pathogen fungi) together with nutraceutical and antioxidant properties typical of the cultivated species.

  3. Leadership in athletic training: implications for practice and education in allied health care.

    PubMed

    Kutz, Matthew R

    2010-01-01

    Leadership behaviors are an important aspect of athletic training and are needed within all allied health care disciples. A two-phase, exploratory, non-experimental research study using a Delphi technique and a randomly selected sample of athletic trainers (n = 161) was conducted to determine leadership competencies perceived to be important for athletic training practice and education. The Delphi technique (phase one) resulted in the Leadership Development in Athletic Training instrument (LDAT). In the national survey (phase two), respondents used the LDAT to rate the importance of leadership competencies for athletic training practice and for athletic training education. Coefficient alphas ranged from α = 0.83 to 0.97 and provided satisfactory estimates of internal consistency. Concurrent, construct, and convergent validity were established. Forty-nine leadership competencies were rated important for practice and 48 for education (M = 1.5, p ≤ 0.001). Exploratory factor analysis revealed that leadership competencies were organized by four constructs (with six emphases): 1) personality characteristics, 2) diagnosing context and people skills, 3) communication and initiative, and 4) strategic thinking. Repeated measures ANOVA with Sidak post-hoc adjustments indicated each leadership construct significantly increased in importance as the level of the ATEP progressed.

  4. Effect of health insurance on the utilisation of allied health services by people with chronic disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Elizabeth H; Foster, Michele; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Haynes, Michele; O'Flaherty, Martin; Haines, Terry P

    2014-01-01

    Allied health services benefit the management of many chronic diseases. The effects of health insurance on the utilisation of allied health services has not yet been established despite health insurance frequently being identified as a factor promoting utilisation of medical and hospital services among people with chronic disease. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to establish the effects of health insurance on the utilisation of allied health services by people with chronic disease. Medline (Ovid Medline 1948 to Present with Daily Update), EMBASE (1980 to 1 April 2011), CINAHL, PsychINFO and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched to 12 April 2011 inclusive. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they were published in English, randomised controlled trials, quasi-experimental trials, quantitative observational studies and included people with one or more chronic diseases using allied health services and health insurance. A full-text review was performed independently by two reviewers. Meta-analyses were conducted. One hundred and fifty-eight citations were retrieved and seven articles were included in the meta-analyses. The pooled odds ratio (95% CI) of having insurance (versus no insurance) on the utilisation of allied health services among people with chronic disease was 1.33 (1.16-1.52; P<0.001). There was a significant effect of insurance on the utilisation of non-physiotherapy services, pooled odds ratio (95% CI) 4.80 (1.46-15.79; P=0.01) but having insurance compared with insurance of a lesser coverage was not significantly associated with an increase in physiotherapy utilisation, pooled odds ratio (95% CI) 1.53 (0.81-2.91; P=0.19). The presence of co-morbidity or functional limitation and higher levels of education increased utilisation whereas gender, race, marital status and income had a limited and variable effect, according to the study population. The review was limited by the considerable

  5. Using self-determination theory to describe the academic motivation of allied health professional-level college students.

    PubMed

    Ballmann, Jodi M; Mueller, Jill J

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the various reasons that allied health students believe they are currently attending college. The Academic Motivation Scale was administered to a convenience sample of 222 upperclassmen and graduate-level students (162 women, 46 men). The Academic Motivation Scale proposes various reasons for continued engagement in academic pursuits that may be characteristic of personal and current reasons for persistence in a subject's particular academic program. The results showed that students portrayed themselves as currently attending college for both intrinsically and extrinsically motivated reasons. The most frequently endorsed motivational styles were identified (autonomous) extrinsic motivation and externally regulated (nonautonomous) extrinsic motivation. This study showed that this sample of professional-level college students was not completely self-determined in their end-stage academic pursuits. One conclusion that may be drawn from this study is that allied health programs that provide students with an educational context that supports self-determination may encourage future allied health professionals to develop the ability to support the self-determination of their future clients.

  6. Preadmission Criteria as Predictors of Academic Success in Entry-Level Athletic Training and Other Allied Health Educational Programs

    PubMed Central

    Turocy, Paula Sammarone; McGlumphy, Barry E.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate preadmission criteria, Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores, and high school grade point average (HSGPA) and to determine the ability of those criteria to predict the college grade point average (CGPA) of graduates from programs in athletic training and 5 other allied health disciplines. Design and Setting: Descriptive data, including age, sex, year of graduation, HSGPA, CGPA, and SAT scores (SAT mathematics [SATM], SAT verbal [SATV], and SAT total) were gathered from the files of graduates (1992 to 1997) of allied health education programs. Subjects: The complete records of 373 graduates (244 women and 129 men) of 6 allied health education programs in athletic training, health management systems, occupational therapy, perfusion technology, physician assistant, and physical therapy were used in this study. Subjects with incomplete files were excluded from this study. Measurements: We collected data from official college transcripts, official high school transcripts, and SAT scores reported to the university. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, Pearson correlation, and stepwise forward regression analyses were used to determine the ability of SATV score, SATM score, and HSGPA to predict CGPA. Results: Both SATV score and HSGPA were found to predict 14% of the variance in student success (CGPA) in all allied health programs; however, only HSGPA was predictive of student success in athletic training (P = .00). Both SATV score and HSGPA were predictive of CGPA in both physical (P = .02 and .03, respectively) and occupational (P = .02 and .00, respectively) therapy graduates; however, they predicted only 12% and 21%, respectively, of the variance in CGPA. The SATM score was predictive of CGPA in both perfusion technology (P = .05) and physician assistant (P = .00) graduates, accounting for 7% and 18% of the variance in outcomes. Conclusions: Overall, HSGPA and SATV score were predictive of student success (CGPA) in the allied health

  7. Implications of Lengthened Health Education: Nursing and the Allied Health Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galambos, Eva C.

    Health care is demanding increasing resources and attention in numbers of health care workers, in levels of skills required, in time spent in training, and in dollars expended. A greater spectrum of skills is required to cope with increasing health care demands, yet trends toward specialization and fracturing of responsibilities assigned to health…

  8. A study of student perceptions of learning transfer from a human anatomy and physiology course in an allied health program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrell, Leigh S.

    The purpose of this study was two-fold. First the study was designed to determine student perceptions regarding the perceived degree of original learning from a human anatomy and physiology course, and the student perception of the use of the knowledge in an allied health program. Second, the intention of the study was to establish student beliefs on the characteristics of the transfer of learning including those factors which enhance learning transfer and those that serve as barriers to learning transfer. The study participants were those students enrolled in any allied health program at a community college in a Midwest state, including: nursing, radiology, surgical technology, health information technology, and paramedic. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed from the responses to the survey. A sub-group of participants were chosen to participate in semi-structured formal interviews. From the interviews, additional qualitative data were gathered. The data collected through the study demonstrated student perception of successful transfer experiences. The students in the study were able to provide specific examples of learning transfer experienced from the human anatomy and physiology course in their allied health program. Findings also suggested students who earned higher grades in the human anatomy and physiology course perceived greater understanding and greater use of the course's learning objectives in their allied health program. The study found the students believed the following learning activities enhances the transfer of learning: (1) Providing application of the information or skills being learned during the instruction of the course content enhances the transfer of learning. (2) Providing resource materials and activities which allow the students to practice the content being taught facilitates the transfer of learning. The students made the following recommendations to remove barriers to the transfer of learning: (1

  9. Integrating public health and allied health education through a core curriculum: an action research approach.

    PubMed

    Fish, Dale R; Tona, Janice; Burton, Harold; Wietig, Paul T; Trevisan, Maurizio; Ohtake, Patricia J

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the use of an action research model to effect curricular change--specifically, to develop a core curriculum that prepares public health and health professions students to meet emerging needs in today's health care environment. The action research process is based on a series of steps wherein the problem is identified, data are collected and interpreted, action is taken, and action is reflected upon. These steps are then repeated. Consensus building proceeds as participants engage in continual analysis and implementation of changes, followed by more analysis. This process led to the emergence of three core content focus areas: Population, Wellness and Disability; Evidence-Based Practice; and Communication and Professionalism. "Focus Area Working Groups" were established to further delineate each content area. These groups initially developed 62 learning objectives across the three focus areas. Those objectives were subsequently distilled and refined, resulting in 25 "Core Essentials" that now define the core curriculum and serve as content guides rather than prescriptive learning objectives. The action research model proved to be beneficial in helping faculty from diverse health disciplines build consensus as they identified common professional and interprofessional learning needs.

  10. Implementation of a patient safety incident management system as viewed by doctors, nurses and allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Travaglia, Joanne F; Westbrook, Mary T; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2009-05-01

    Incident reporting systems have become a central mechanism of most health services patient safety strategies. In this article we compare health professionals' anonymous, free text responses in an evaluation of a newly implemented electronic incident management system. The professions' answers were compared using classic content analysis and Leximancer, a computer assisted text analysis package. The classic analysis identified issues which differentiated the professions. More doctors commented on lack of feedback following incidents and evaluated the system negatively. More allied health staff found that the system lacked fields necessary to report incidents. More nurses complained incident reporting was time consuming. The Leximancer analysis revealed that while the professions all used the more frequently employed concepts (which described basic components of the reporting system), nurses and allied health shared many additional concepts concerned with actual reporting. Doctors applied fewer and more unique (used only by one profession) concepts when writing about the system. Doctors' unique concepts centred on criticism of the incident management system and the broader implications of safety issues, while the other professions' unique concepts focused on more practical issues. The classic analysis identified specific problems needing to be targeted in ongoing modifications of the system. The Leximancer findings, while complementing the classical analysis results, gave greater insight into professional groups' attitudes that relate to use of the system, e.g. doctors' relatively limited conceptual vocabulary regarding the system was consistent with their lower incident reporting rates. Such professional differences in reaction to healthcare innovations may constrain inter-disciplinary communication and cooperation.

  11. Oceans apart, yet connected: Findings from a qualitative study on professional supervision in rural and remote allied health services

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Priya; Kumar, Saravana; Burge, Vanessa; Abernathy, LuJuana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective Improving the quality and safety of health care in Australia is imperative to ensure the right treatment is delivered to the right person at the right time. Achieving this requires appropriate clinical governance and support for health professionals, including professional supervision. This study investigates the usefulness and effectiveness of and barriers to supervision in rural and remote Queensland. Design As part of the evaluation of the Allied Health Rural and Remote Training and Support program, a qualitative descriptive study was conducted involving semi‐structured interviews with 42 rural or remote allied health professionals, nine operational managers and four supervisors. The interviews explored perspectives on their supervision arrangements, including the perceived usefulness, effect on practice and barriers. Results Themes of reduced isolation; enhanced professional enthusiasm, growth and commitment to the organisation; enhanced clinical skills, knowledge and confidence; and enhanced patient safety were identified as perceived outcomes of professional supervision. Time, technology and organisational factors were identified as potential facilitators as well as potential barriers to effective supervision. Conclusions This research provides current evidence on the impact of professional supervision in rural and remote Queensland. A multidimensional model of organisational factors associated with effective supervision in rural and remote settings is proposed identifying positive supervision culture and a good supervisor–supervisee fit as key factors associated with effective arrangements. PMID:26052949

  12. Types of social media (Web 2.0) used by Australian allied health professionals to deliver early twenty-first-century practice promotion and health care.

    PubMed

    Usher, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Types of social media (Web 2.0) usage associated with eight of Australia's major allied health professions (AHPs, n = 935) were examined. Australian AHPs are interacting with Web 2.0 technologies for personal use but are failing to implement such technologies throughout their health professions to deliver health care. Australian AHPs are willing to undertake online educational courses designed to up skill them about how Web 2.0 may be used for practice promotion and health care delivery in the early twenty-first century. Participants in this study indicated that educational courses that were offered online would be the preferred mode of delivery.

  13. Astronomy Allies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewelling, Heather; Alatalo, Katherine A.

    2017-01-01

    Imagine you are a grad student, at your first conference, and a prominent senior scientist shows interest in your work, and he makes things get way too personal? What would you do? Would you report it? Or would you decide, after a few other instances of harassment, that maybe you shouldn't pursue astronomy? Harassment is under-reported, the policies can be difficult to understand or hard to find, and it can be very intimidating as a young scientist to report it to the proper individuals. The Astronomy Allies Program is designed to help you with these sorts of problems. We are a group of volunteers that will help by doing the following: provide safe walks home during the conference, someone to talk to confidentially, as an intervener, as a resource to report harassment. The Allies are a diverse group of scientists committed to acting as mentors, advocates, and liaisons. The Winter 2015 AAS meeting was the first meeting that had Astronomy Allies, and Astronomy Allies provided a website for information, as well as a twitter, email, and phone number for anyone who needs our help or would like more information. We posted about the Astronomy Allies on the Women In Astronomy blog, and this program resonates with many people: either they want to help, or they have experienced harassment in the past and don't want to see it in the future. Harassment may not happen to most conference participants, but it's wrong, it's against the AAS anti-harassment policy ( http://aas.org/policies/anti-harassment-policy ), it can be very damaging, and if it happens to even one person, that is unacceptable. We intend to improve the culture at conferences to make it so that harassers feel they can't get away with their unprofessional behavior.

  14. Astronomy Allies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewelling, Heather; Alatalo, Katherine

    2015-08-01

    Imagine you are a grad student, at your first conference, and a prominent senior scientist shows interest in your work, and he makes things get way too personal? What would you do? Would you report it? Or would you decide, after a few other instances of harassment, that maybe you shouldn't pursue astronomy? Harassment is under-reported, the policies can be difficult to understand or hard to find, and it can be very intimidating as a young scientist to report it to the proper individuals. The Astronomy Allies Program is designed to help you with these sorts of problems. We are a group of volunteers that will help by doing the following: provide safe walks home during the conference, someone to talk to confidentially, as an intervener, as a resource to report harassment. The Allies are a diverse group of scientists committed to acting as mentors, advocates, and liaisons. The Winter 2015 AAS meeting was the first meeting that had Astronomy Allies, and Astronomy Allies provided a website for information, as well as a twitter, email, and phone number for anyone who needs our help or would like more information. We posted about the Astronomy Allies on the Women In Astronomy blog, and this program resonates with many people: either they want to help, or they have experienced harassment in the past and don't want to see it in the future. Harassment may not happen to most conference participants, but it's wrong, it's against the AAS anti-harassment policy ( http://aas.org/policies/anti-harassment-policy ), it can be very damaging, and if it happens to even one person, that is unacceptable. We intend to improve the culture at conferences to make it so that harassers feel they can't get away with their unprofessional behavior.

  15. Astronomy Allies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewelling, Heather; Alatalo, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Imagine you are a grad student, at your first conference, and a prominent senior scientist shows interest in your work, and he makes things get way too personal? What would you do? Would you report it? Or would you decide, after a few other instances of harassment, that maybe you shouldn't pursue astronomy? Harassment is under-reported, the policies can be difficult to understand or hard to find, and it can be very intimidating as a young scientist to report it to the proper individuals. The Astronomy Allies Program is designed to help you with these sorts of problems. We are a group of volunteers that will help by doing the following: provide safe walks home during the conference, someone to talk to confidentially, as an intervener, as a resource to report harassment. The Allies are a diverse group of scientists committed to acting as mentors, advocates, and liaisons. The Winter 2015 AAS meeting was the first meeting that had Astronomy Allies, and Astronomy Allies provided a website for information, as well as a twitter, email, and phone number for anyone who needs our help or would like more information. We posted about the Astronomy Allies on the Women In Astronomy blog, and this program resonates with many people: either they want to help, or they have experienced harassment in the past and don't want to see it in the future. Harassment may not happen to most conference participants, but it's wrong, it's against the AAS anti-harassment policy ( http://aas.org/policies/anti-harassment-policy ), it can be very damaging, and if it happens to even one person, that is unacceptable. We intend to improve the culture at conferences to make it so that harassers feel they can't get away with their unprofessional behavior.

  16. The Mental Vitality @ Work study: design of a randomized controlled trial on the effect of a workers' health surveillance mental module for nurses and allied health professionals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Employees in health care service are at high risk for developing mental health complaints. The effects of mental health complaints on work can have serious consequences for the quality of care provided by these workers. To help health service workers remain healthy and productive, preventive actions are necessary. A Workers' Health Surveillance (WHS) mental module may be an effective strategy to monitor and promote good (mental) health and work performance. The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a three arm cluster randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of a WHS mental module for nurses and allied health professionals. Two strategies for this WHS mental module will be compared along with data from a control group. Additionally, the cost effectiveness of the approaches will be evaluated from a societal perspective. Methods The study is designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial consisting of three arms (two intervention groups, 1 control group) with randomization at ward level. The study population consists of 86 departments in one Dutch academic medical center with a total of 1731 nurses and allied health professionals. At baseline, after three months and after six months of follow-up, outcomes will be assessed by online questionnaires. In both intervention arms, participants will complete a screening to detect problems in mental health and work functioning and receive feedback on their screening results. In cases of impairments in mental health or work functioning in the first intervention arm, a consultation with an occupational physician will be offered. The second intervention arm offers a choice of self-help e-mental health interventions, which will be tailored based on each individual's mental health state and work functioning. The primary outcomes will be help-seeking behavior and work functioning. Secondary outcomes will be mental health and wellbeing. Furthermore, cost-effectiveness in both intervention arms

  17. Curricular transformation of health professions education in Tanzania: the process at Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (2008-2011).

    PubMed

    Ngassapa, Olipa D; Kaaya, Ephata E; Fyfe, Molly V; Lyamuya, Eligius F; Kakoko, Deodatus C; Kayombo, Edmund J; Kisenge, Rodrick R; Loeser, Helen; Mwakigonja, Amos R; Outwater, Anne H; Martin-Holland, Judy; Mwambete, Kennedy D; Kida, Irene; Macfarlane, Sarah B

    2012-01-01

    Tanzania requires more health professionals equipped to tackle its serious health challenges. When it became an independent university in 2007, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) decided to transform its educational offerings to ensure its students practice competently and contribute to improving population health. In 2008, in collaboration with the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), all MUHAS's schools (dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and public health and social sciences) and institutes (traditional medicine and allied health sciences) began a university-wide process to revise curricula. Adopting university-wide committee structures, procedures, and a common schedule, MUHAS faculty set out to: (i) identify specific competencies for students to achieve by graduation (in eight domains, six that are inter-professional, hence consistent across schools); (ii) engage stakeholders to understand adequacies and inadequacies of current curricula; and (iii) restructure and revise curricula introducing competencies. The Tanzania Commission for Universities accredited the curricula in September 2011, and faculty started implementation with first-year students in October 2011. We learned that curricular revision of this magnitude requires: a compelling directive for change, designated leadership, resource mobilization inclusion of all stakeholders, clear guiding principles, an iterative plan linking flexible timetables to phases for curriculum development, engagement in skills training for the cultivation of future leaders, and extensive communication.

  18. Applying innovative educational principles when classes grow and resources are limited: Biochemistry experiences at Muhimbili University of Allied Health Sciences.

    PubMed

    Omer, Selma; Hickson, Gilles; Taché, Stephanie; Blind, Raymond; Masters, Susan; Loeser, Helen; Souza, Kevin; Mkony, Charles; Debas, Haile; O'Sullivan, Patricia

    2008-11-01

    Teaching to large classes is often challenging particularly when the faculty and teaching resources are limited. Innovative, less staff intensive ways need to be explored to enhance teaching and to engage students. We describe our experience teaching biochemistry to 350 students at Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) under severe resource limitations and highlight our efforts to enhance the teaching effectiveness. We focus on peer assisted learning and present three pilot initiatives that we developed to supplement teaching and facilitate student interaction within the classroom. These included; instructor-facilitated small group activities within large group settings, peer-led tutorials to provide supplemental teaching and peer-assisted instruction in IT skills to enable access to online biochemistry learning resources. All our efforts were practical, low cost and well received by our learners. They may be applied in many different settings where faculties face similar challenges.

  19. Impact of interdisciplinary learning on critical thinking using case study method in allied health care graduate students.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Scott D; Lester Short, Glenda F; Hendrix, E Michael

    2011-01-01

    It remains unclear which classroom experiences, if any, foster critical think ability. We measured the effectiveness of interdisciplinary, case-based learning on the critical-thinking ability of graduate students enrolled in allied health care programs. We designed a voluntary classroom experience to examine the effectiveness of case studies used in an interdisciplinary setting to increase critical-thinking ability. Two groups of students were measured for their critical thinking ability using an online assessment both before and after their respective classroom experiences. One group of 14 graduate students from 4 different allied health care programs (interdisciplinary, ID) discussed complex interdisciplinary case studies and answered multiple-choice type questions formed around the cases. The second group was composed of graduate students (n = 28) from a single disciple enrolled in a clinical anatomy course (discipline specific, DS). They discussed complex case studies specific to their discipline and answered multiple-choice questions formed around the cases. There was no overall change in critical-thinking scores from the pre- to post-test in either group (delta scores: ID 1.5 ± 5.3, DS -1.7 ± 5.7). However, ID students scoring below the median on the pretest improved significantly (paired t-test, pre 50.7 ± 3.8, post 54.2 ± 1.7, p = 0.02). The interdisciplinary learning experience improved critical-thinking ability in students with the least proficiency. As case studies have long been used to advance deeper learning, these data provide evidence for a broader impact of cases when used in an interdisciplinary setting, especially for those students coming in with the least ability.

  20. Impact of the Konstanz method of dilemma discussion on moral judgment in allied health students: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Lerkiatbundit, Sanguan; Utaipan, Parichat; Laohawiriyanon, Chonlada; Teo, Adisa

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of the Konstanz method of moral dilemma discussion (KMDD) on moral judgment in allied health students. The study employed the Moral Judgment Test, translated from English into Thai and validated in 247 students, as an moral judgment instrument. The scale satisfied four validity criteria: preference hierarchy, quasi-simplex structure of stage preference, affective-cognitive parallelism, and positive correlation between education and moral competence score (C-index). Test-retest reliability at a 1-month interval was 0.90. To investigate the impact of the KMDD, 83 pharmacy technician and dental nursing students were asked to participate in the study. The subjects were randomly assigned into control (n = 41) or experimental (n = 42) groups. The experimental group participated in a 90-min KMDD once a week for 6 consecutive weeks. Students in the control group also met once a week for 6 weeks to discuss the topics not related to ethics. All subjects completed the Moral Judgment Test before and after the intervention and again 6 months later. Split-plot ANOVA of the C-indexes at the beginning revealed that the experimental and control groups were not different (20.57 +/- 13.45 and 24.98 +/- 16.12). However, the experimental group scored significantly higher than the control group did after the intervention (35.18 +/- 10.96 and 24.20 +/- 14.70) and 6 months later (33.00 +/- 11.02 and 23.67 +/- 14.35). The KMDD appears to be a practical and effective intervention for developing moral judgment in allied health students. The effect on moral judgment remains at least 6 months after the intervention.

  1. Differences between African-American and Caucasian students on enrollment influences and barriers in kinesiology-based allied health education programs.

    PubMed

    Barfield, J P; Cobler, D C; Lam, Eddie T C; Zhang, James; Chitiyo, George

    2012-06-01

    Kinesiology departments have recently started to offer allied health education programs to attract additional students to teacher education units (9). Although allied health professions offer increased work opportunities, insufficient enrollment and training of minority students in these academic fields contribute to underrepresentation in the workforce (3). To improve workforce diversity, kinesiology departments must understand how enrollment influences and barriers differ by race among prospective students. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify differences in allied health education enrollment influences and enrollment barriers between minority and Caucasian students. Participants (n = 601) consisted of students enrolled in kinesiology-based allied health education programs. Multivariate ANOVA was used to compare group differences in enrollment decision making. "Personal influence," "career opportunity," and "physical self-efficacy" were all significantly stronger enrollment influences among African-American students than among Caucasian students, and "social influence," "experiential opportunity," "academic preparation," and "physical self-efficacy" were all perceived as significantly greater barriers compared with Caucasian students. Findings support the need to recruit African-American students through sport and physical education settings and to market program-based experiential opportunities.

  2. A Comparative Study of the Effectiveness of Two Bayesian Models for Predicting the Academic Successes of Selected Allied Health Students Enrolled in the Comprehensive Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, Dennis; Houston, Charles A.

    The purpose of this study was to present and evaluate Bayesian-type models for estimating probabilities of program completion and for predicting first quarter grade point averages of community college students entering certain allied health fields. Two Bayesian models were tested. Bayesian Model 1--Estimating Probabilities of Program…

  3. Predicting Grade Point Average, Withdrawal and Graduation from Four Allied Health Programs at Miami-Dade Community College Medical Center Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bistreich, Alan M.

    The validity of seven criteria utilized in conjunction with personal interviews and School and College Ability Test scores in the selection of applicants for admission to four Allied Health programs was investigated. The independent predictor variables studied were high school grade point average (GPA), the number of high school natural science…

  4. Identification of Barriers and Proposed Solutions to the Attainment of Equal Representation in Post-Secondary Allied Health Programs for Minorities. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittington, Marna C.; Benson, Stephen D.

    The study identified the barriers which prevent application, matriculation, and/or completion of allied health postsecondary education programs by blacks, Spanish-surnamed Americans, and Native Americans and recommended means of reducing or eliminating the barriers. Only those barriers which could be resolved or reduced through programs of public…

  5. Health Manpower Literature. Volume 2, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Harold M.; And Others

    This publication presents abstracts, statistics, and references drawn from health manpower literature. It is divided into seven sections; the first section provides statistics on (1) estimated employment in selected health occupations that are potentially entry-level, (2) hospital indicators, and (3) percent distribution of personal health care…

  6. Health Information Economy: Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Kamal; Roudbari, Masoud; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Health Information Economy (HIE) is one of the broader, more complex, and challenging and yet important topics in the field of health science that requires the identification of its dimensions for planning and policy making. The aim of this study was to determine HIE concept dimensions. Methods: This paper presents a systematic methodology for analyzing the trends of HIE. For this purpose, the main keywords of this area were identified and searched in the databases and from among 4775 retrieved sources, 12 sources were studied in the field of HIE. Results: Information Economy (IE) in the world has passed behind four paradigms that involve the information evaluation perspective, the information technology perspective, the asymmetric information perspective and information value perspective. In this research, the fourth perspective in the HIE was analyzed. The main findings of this research were categorized in three major groups, including the flow of information process in the field of health (production. collection, processing and dissemination), and information applications in the same field (education, research, health industry, policy, legislation, and decision-making) and the underlying fields. Conclusion: According to the findings, HIE has already developed a theoretical and conceptual gap that due to its importance in the next decade would be one of the research approaches to health science. PMID:26153182

  7. Handbook of Health Professions Education. Responding to New Realities in Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Nursing, Allied Health, and Public Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Christine H.; And Others

    The evolution, present status, future directions, and external forces affecting health professions education are reviewed in this 25 chapter book. Guidelines are set forth for sound practices and policies for innovative and responsive health care. The authors assess how major economic, social, political, demographic, and technological changes are…

  8. Community Health Workers as Allies in Hypertension Self-Management and Medication Adherence in the United States, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Brownstein, J. Nell; Satsangi, Anamika; Escoffery, Cam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rates of hypertension control remain low among underserved populations in the United States; moreover, disparities in hypertension-related cardiovascular disease death are increasing. Community health workers (CHWs) can address barriers to hypertension control among underrepresented and diverse populations. We identify unique roles CHWs play in hypertension self-management and medication adherence. Methods In 2014, we conducted a mixed methods study with an online survey of 265 CHWs and 23 telephone interviews. The survey and interview guide contained questions about CHWs’ roles in hypertension self-management and hypertension medication adherence. We used descriptive statistics to analyze survey data and used inductive thematic analysis for the qualitative data. Results CHWs described working in partnership with patients and various health care providers to assist people in hypertension self-management. Roles were flexible and multifaceted but patient-driven. CHWs used various delivery methods to assist patients in overcoming barriers to medication adherence. CHWs interacted with patients primarily through individual clinical sessions or home visits. On average, they visit about 8 times per month, about 40 minutes per visit, over 7 months. CHWs often addressed barriers related to medicine-taking and refills and support patient–provider communications. Conclusion Results from this study will help health care professionals, policy makers, and academics better understand the work of CHWs. CHWs are important provider allies for improving hypertension prevention and self-management, especially among underserved and diverse populations in the United States. PMID:28033090

  9. [Health advocacy in child care: literature review].

    PubMed

    Andrade, Raquel Dully; Mello, Débora Falleiros; Silva, Marta Angélica Iossi; Ventura, Carla Aparecida Arena

    2011-01-01

    This narrative literature review aimed to identify the publications about health law, in the ambit of child health care. The databases LILACS and MEDLINE were searched, between 2004 and 2009. Thirteen articles were analyzed, and three themes were identified: Emphasis on knowledge, abilities and attitudes for the development of competencies; Partnerships as an imperative; Health and Law: intersectorial relationship. The studies about the practice of health law are relevant to our reality, especially in primary health care, pointing out for the possibilities of its applicability in the role of the nurses acting in the family health strategy, with families and children.

  10. Professional allies: the storying of allies to LGBTQ students on a college campus.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Maura; Broad, K L; Walsh, Clare F; Nutter, Kathryn L

    2013-01-01

    This article details the narratives of faculty and staff involved in a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) ally organization at a large southeastern state university. We illustrate how interview participants diverged from organizational literature on how to be an ally by offering a different narrative, one of professional responsibility to a diverse student body. We expound upon how this notion of professional responsibility differs from most models for understanding ally development and action. We suggest that from an organizational standpoint, these professional ally self-concepts make sense and should be taken into account when building ally organizations in educational settings.

  11. A preliminary evaluation of the Visual CARE Measure for use by Allied Health Professionals with children and their parents.

    PubMed

    Place, Morag A; Murphy, Joan; Duncan, Edward A S; Reid, Jane M; Mercer, Stewart W

    2016-03-01

    The Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) Measure (Mercer et al., 2004) is a patient-rated experience measure of practitioner empathy, developed and validated within adult health services. This study reports the feasibility, acceptability, reliability and validity of three adapted versions of the original CARE measure for the paediatric setting, namely the Visual CARE Measure 5Q, 10Q and 10Q Parent (also known as the Paediatric CARE Measure). Three hundred and sixty-nine participants (N = 149 children (40%) and N = 220 parents (60%)) completed the measure following consultation with an Allied Health Professional (AHP). AHPs felt it was feasible to use the measure in routine practice and the majority of children and parents found the measure easy to understand (98%) and complete (98%). Internal reliability (Cronbach's α) was .746 for the 5Q, .926 for the 10Q and .963 for the 10Q parent. Few participants used the 'not applicable' response (N = 28 (8%)), suggesting high content validity. AHPs found the measures relevant (95%) and useful (90%) and reported that they were likely to use them again (96%). The Visual CARE Measure shows promise as a useful tool to enable children and their parents to give their views. Further research on the tool's reliability and validity is required.

  12. Ethical experiential learning in medical, nursing and allied health education: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Grace, Sandra; Innes, Ev; Patton, Narelle; Stockhausen, Lynette

    2017-01-10

    Students enrolled in medical, nursing and health science programs often participate in experiential learning in their practical classes. Experiential learning includes peer physical examination and peer-assisted learning where students practise clinical skills on each other.

  13. Student perceptions and learning outcomes of blended learning in a massive first-year core physiology for allied health subjects.

    PubMed

    Page, Janelle; Meehan-Andrews, Terri; Weerakkody, Nivan; Hughes, Diane L; Rathner, Joseph A

    2017-03-01

    Evidence shows that factors contributing to success in physiology education for allied health students at universities include not only their high school achievement and background but also factors such as confidence with their teachers and quality of their learning experience, justifying intensive and continued survey of students' perceptions of their learning experience. Here we report data covering a 3-yr period in a physiology subject that has been redesigned for blended and online presentation. Consistent with previous reports, we show that when we undertook a blended mode of delivery, students demonstrated better grades than traditional modes of teaching; however the absence of didactic teaching in this subject resulted in lower grades overall. Students have very strong positive attitudes to weekly quizzes (80% positive approval) but report ambivalent attitudes to online self-directed learning (61% negative perception), even though they had 2-h weekly facilitated workshops. Overwhelmingly, students who undertook the subject in a self-directed online learning mode requested more face-to-face-teaching (70% of comments). From these data, we suggest that there is a quantifiable benefit to didactic teaching in the blended teaching mode that is not reproduced in online self-directed learning, even when face-to-face guided inquiry-based learning is embedded in the subject.

  14. Deployment-related mental health support: comparative analysis of NATO and allied ISAF partners

    PubMed Central

    Vermetten, Eric; Greenberg, Neil; Boeschoten, Manon A.; Delahaije, Roos; Jetly, Rakesh; Castro, Carl A.; McFarlane, Alexander C.

    2014-01-01

    Background For years there has been a tremendous gap in our understanding of the mental health effects of deployment and the efforts by military forces at trying to minimize or mitigate these. Many military forces have recently systematized the mental support that is provided to support operational deployments. However, the rationale for doing so and the consequential allocation of resources are felt to vary considerably across North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) International Security Assistance (ISAF) partners. This review aims to compare the organization and practice of mental support by five partnering countries in the recent deployment in Afghanistan in order to identify and compare the key methods and structures for delivering mental health support, describe bottlenecks and illustrate new developments. Method Information was collected through document analysis and semi-structured interviews with key military mental healthcare stakeholders. The review resulted from close collaboration between key military mental healthcare professionals within the Australian Defense Forces (ADF), Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), United Kingdom Armed Forces (UK), Netherlands Armed Forces (NLD), and the United States Army (US). Key stakeholders were interviewed about the mental health support provided during a serviceperson's military career. The main items discussed were training, prevention, early identification, intervention, and aftercare in the field of mental health. Results All forces reported that much attention was paid to mental health during the individual's military career, including deployment. In doing so there was much overlap between the rationale and applied methods. The main method of providing support was through training and education. The educative focus was to strengthen the mental resilience of individual soldiers while providing a range of mental healthcare services. All forces had abandoned standard psychological debriefing after critical incidents

  15. Risky business: Lived experience mental health practice, nurses as potential allies.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Louise; Happell, Brenda; Reid-Searl, Kerry

    2016-09-21

    Mental health policy includes a clear expectation that consumers will participate in all aspects of the design and delivery of mental health services. This edict has led to employment roles for people with lived experience of significant mental health challenges and service use. Despite the proliferation of these roles, research into factors impacting their success or otherwise is limited. This paper presents findings from a grounded theory study investigating the experiences of Lived Experience Practitioners in the context of their employment. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 Lived Experience Practitioners. Risk was identified as a core category, and included sub-categories: vulnerability, 'out and proud', fear to disclose, and self-care. Essentially participants described the unique vulnerabilities of their mental health challenges being known, and while there were many positives about disclosing there was also apprehension about personal information being so publically known. Self-care techniques were important mediators against these identified risks. The success of lived experience roles requires support and nurses can play an important role, given the size of the nursing workforce in mental health, the close relationships nurses enjoy with consumers and the contribution they have made to the development of lived experience roles within academia.

  16. Unmet needs for specialty, dental, mental, and allied health care among children with special health care needs: are there racial/ethnic disparities?

    PubMed

    Ngui, Emmanuel M; Flores, Glenn

    2007-11-01

    We examined racial/ethnic disparities in unmet specialty, dental, mental, and allied health care needs among children with special health care needs (CSHCN) using data on 38,866 children in the National Survey of CSHCN. Compared with White CSHCN, Black CSHCN had significantly greater unmet specialty (9.6% vs. 6.7%), dental (16% vs. 8.7%), and mental (27% vs. 17%) health care needs. Hispanic CSHCN had greater unmet dental care needs (15.8% vs. 8.7%). Black females had greater unmet mental health care needs than other groups (41% vs. 13-20%). Most disparities disappeared after multivariate adjustment. Significant risk factors for unmet health care needs included uninsurance, having no personal doctor/nurse, poverty, and condition stability and severity. Eliminating unmet specialty, dental, and mental health care needs for all CSHCN, and especially minority CSHCN, may require greater efforts to reduce poverty and increase insurance coverage among CSHCN, better mental health care assessment of Black female CSHCN, and ensuring all CSHCN have a medical home.

  17. Olly Olly Oxen Free (or Ally Ally in Free): Playing Hide and Seek in Allocating Resources for Child and Youth Health.

    PubMed

    Hiltz, Mary-Ann; Mitton, Craig; Smith, Neale; Dowling, Laura; Campbell, Matthew; Magee, J Fergall; Gibson, Jennifer L; Gujar, Shashi Ashok; Levy, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    There are powerful arguments for increased investment in child and youth health. But the extent to which these benefits can be realized is shaped by health institutions' priority setting processes. We asked, "What are the unique features of a pediatric care setting that should influence choice and implementation of a formal priority setting and resource allocation process?" Based on multiple sources of data, we created a "made-for-child-health" lens containing three foci reflective of the distinct features of pediatric care settings: the diversity of child and youth populations, the challenges in measuring outcomes and the complexity of patient and public engagement.

  18. Feasibility of Retraining Displaced Aerospace Personnel Into the Allied and Public Health Occupations: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindenberg, Klaus W.

    The final report of a study to determine the feasibility of retraining displaced aerospace personnel in the Cape Kennedy, Florida, area is presented. Three broad areas were examined: (1) the development of a profile analysis of aerospace and defense related displaced personnel; (2) compilation of health manpower employment opportunity data; (3)…

  19. Nursing Home Social Workers and Allied Professionals: Enhancing Geriatric Mental Health Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonifas, Robin P.

    2011-01-01

    Research has highlighted the challenges social services professionals face in providing quality psychosocial care to persons living in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs). A primary area of difficulty is addressing the needs of persons with mental health conditions, including problematic behaviors associated with dementia. This study evaluated the…

  20. Chemical Waste and Allied Products.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yung-Tse; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Ramli, Siti Fatihah; Yeh, Ruth Yu-Li; Liu, Lian-Huey; Huhnke, Christopher Robert

    2016-10-01

    This review of literature published in 2015 focuses on waste related to chemical and allied products. The topics cover the waste management, physicochemical treatment, aerobic granular, aerobic waste treatment, anaerobic granular, anaerobic waste treatment, chemical waste, chemical wastewater, fertilizer waste, fertilizer wastewater, pesticide wastewater, pharmaceutical wastewater, ozonation. cosmetics waste, groundwater remediation, nutrient removal, nitrification denitrification, membrane biological reactor, and pesticide waste.

  1. Chemical Waste and Allied Products.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yung-Tse; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Yusoff, Mohd Suffian; Kamaruddin, Mohamad Anuar; Yeh, Ruth Yu-Li; Liu, Lian-Huey; Huhnke, Christopher Robert; Fu, Yen-Pei

    2015-10-01

    This review of literature published in 2014 focuses on waste related to chemical and allied products. The topics cover the waste management practices, hospital waste, pesticide waste, chemical wastewater, pesticide wastewater and pharmaceutical wastewater. The other topics include aerobic treatment, anaerobic treatment, sorption and ozonation.

  2. Latino Mental Health: A Review of Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Amado M.; Ruiz, Rene A.

    Reviewed from an interdisciplinary viewpoint is the available literature on the mental health of Spanish speaking, Spanish surnammed (SSSS) individuals and communities in the United States. It is reported that over 9 million U.S. residents are of Spanish origin, that the SSSS are usually on the lowest rung of the socioeconomic ladder, that the…

  3. [Nursing research and the Hospital Programme for Nursing and Allied Health Research].

    PubMed

    Chardin, Marc; Benazzouz, Marie; Brocker, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Nursing research is perceived as a way of improving quality of care. As is the case in Britain and Switzerland, this ambitious activity is developing in France, favoured by the raising of nursing studies to university level and boosted by funding from the French ministry of health. A nursing team at Pitié-Salpêtrière hospital, in Paris, share their enthusiasm for this new approach.

  4. A regional training programme for radiotherapists and allied professionals for the west African health community.

    PubMed

    Durosinmi-Etti, F A; Mouelle-Sone, A

    1993-03-01

    With 47% of the population under 15 years of age and the control of infectious and other communicable diseases, cancer will likely constitute a major health problem in West Africa in future. Radiotherapy facilities and trained manpower to run them are very limited within the subregion. This paper quantifies the severity of the situation and discusses a practical approach aimed at coping with the situation through the organisation of a training programme for radiotherapists, medical physicists and radiation technologists as part of the strategies for cancer control in West Africa. A curriculum is proposed for the training of radiotherapists.

  5. Uneasy allies: pro-choice physicians, feminist health activists and the struggle for abortion rights.

    PubMed

    Joffe, C E; Weitz, T A; Stacey, C L

    2004-09-01

    Abortion represents a particularly interesting subject for a social movements analysis of healthcare issues because of the involvement of both feminist pro-choice activists and a segment of the medical profession. Although both groups have long shared the same general goal of legal abortion, the alliance has over time been an uneasy one, and in many ways a contradictory one. This paper traces points of convergence as well as points of contention between the two groups, specifically: highlighting the tensions between the feminist view of abortion as a women-centred service, with a limited, 'technical' role for the physicians, and the abortion-providing physicians' logic of further medicalization/professional upgrading of abortion services as a response to the longstanding marginality and stigmatisation of abortion providers. Only by noting the evolving relationships between these two crucial sets of actors can one fully understand the contemporary abortion rights movement. We conclude by speculating about similar patterns in medical/lay relationships in other health social movements where 'dissident doctors' and lay activists are similarly seeking recognition for medical services that are controversial.

  6. Student perceptions of the use of debate as a teaching strategy in the allied health professions.

    PubMed

    Smith Randolph, Diane

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents results from a survey regarding student perceptions of the use of debate in two occupational therapy courses. The survey was initially used as a classroom evaluation, consisting of open-ended questions asked by the instructor and answered by students in a research and a policy course. Students then were randomly assigned to two groups, which present their arguments and then fielded questions. After the debates, students were asked to answer four questions: 1) What did I learn from the debate?; 2) What did you like best about the debate?; 3) What did you like least about the debate?; and 4) Would you recommend this activity for future classes? Results of the student's comments to the four questions showed that debate was perceived by the majority of students as a useful technique for discussing issues both in a research course and in a health policy-related course. Comments from students showed that debate encouraged active participation in class, out of class research experiences, provided an opportunity to discuss issues and develop conclusions, and promoted the ability to advocate for themselves.

  7. Personal Health Records: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Information and communication technology (ICT) has transformed the health care field worldwide. One of the main drivers of this change is the electronic health record (EHR). However, there are still open issues and challenges because the EHR usually reflects the partial view of a health care provider without the ability for patients to control or interact with their data. Furthermore, with the growth of mobile and ubiquitous computing, the number of records regarding personal health is increasing exponentially. This movement has been characterized as the Internet of Things (IoT), including the widespread development of wearable computing technology and assorted types of health-related sensors. This leads to the need for an integrated method of storing health-related data, defined as the personal health record (PHR), which could be used by health care providers and patients. This approach could combine EHRs with data gathered from sensors or other wearable computing devices. This unified view of patients’ health could be shared with providers, who may not only use previous health-related records but also expand them with data resulting from their interactions. Another PHR advantage is that patients can interact with their health data, making decisions that may positively affect their health. Objective This work aimed to explore the recent literature related to PHRs by defining the taxonomy and identifying challenges and open questions. In addition, this study specifically sought to identify data types, standards, profiles, goals, methods, functions, and architecture with regard to PHRs. Methods The method to achieve these objectives consists of using the systematic literature review approach, which is guided by research questions using the population, intervention, comparison, outcome, and context (PICOC) criteria. Results As a result, we reviewed more than 5000 scientific studies published in the last 10 years, selected the most significant approaches

  8. Allied Health Leadership in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Invitational Conference Proceedings (Williamsburg, Virginia, April 17-19, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kra, Eleanor, Ed.

    The following papers are included: "Opening Remarks" (McTernan); "Conference Goals and Plans" (Douglas); "Challenge to Leadership" (Pearson); "Implications of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention for the Practice of Respiratory Care" (Axton); "Health Promotion Strategies in Dietetic Practice"…

  9. Support of breastfeeding by health professionals: integrative review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Jordana Moreira; Luz, Sylvana de Araújo Barros; Ued, Fábio da Veiga

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To review the literature in order to evaluate how health professionals promote and support breastfeeding. Data sources: Studies from the following databases were retrieved: Scopus, PubMed, MEDLINE, Lilacs, SciELO, Web of Science and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (Cinahl). The descriptors “breastfeeding”, “professional role” and “patient care team” were used in the research. The review was limited to articles in Portuguese, Spanish, and English published between 1997 and 2013. Data synthesis: The search retrieved 1396 studies, 18 of which were selected for being directly relevant to the main question. The review showed that breastfeeding is a challenge for health professionals, regardless of their specialization, as they have to face a demand that requires skill and sensibility, for which they are not prepared. Health professionals have considered breastfeeding a purely instinctive and biological act. Moreover, it is noticeable that many of them possess theoretical expertise on the subject, but lack the practical skills. Conclusions: Health professionals need to be better trained to work on promoting breastfeeding, whether by health and medical schools or by healthcare administrators, in order to consolidate multiprofessional teams committed to maternal-infant health. PMID:26141902

  10. THE DETERMINANTS OF NURSING, ALLIED HEALTH AND NON MEDICAL STAFFS’ HEALTH LITERACY IN HOSPITALS OF A DEVELOPING COUNTRY

    PubMed Central

    Kahouei, Mehdi; Roghani, Panoe Seyed; Zadeh, Jamileh Mahdi; Firouzeh, Mehri

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Given the role of personnel working in hospitals in promoting health, there is a clear need for a study to clarify the level of health literacy and affecting factors on it among the non medical and medical staffs working in hospitals. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was performed on 389 employees who were working in hospitals affiliated to Semnan University of Medical Sciences of Iran in 2013. Results: There were significant relationships among the use of TV (P=0.044, CI=95%, Odd’s Ratio= 1.825), the use of books and journals (P<0.0001, CI=95%, Odd’s Ratio= 5.551), the use of internet (P<0.039, CI=95%, Odd’s Ratio= 0.641), the use of physicians (P<0.0001, CI=95%, Odd’s Ratio=0.070) and the nonmedical and medical staffs’ health literacy level. Conclusions: The findings indicate media and print information resources more than physicians and electronic information sources affect on the increase of nonmedical and medical staffs’ health literacy of hospitals of Iran. It also is better to train Iranian physicians more about the skills required for transferring health concepts. Given the important role of medical staffs in the increase of health literacy level in other members of the community, it is better to use other suitable information sources to transfer health information to all individuals in the community. PMID:26889103

  11. An online learning module focused on smoking education and prevention for college students: implications for college health instructors and allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    D'Abundo, Michelle Lee; Marinaro, Laura Marie; Fiala, Kelly Ann

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to pilot-test the effectiveness of an online learning module focused on smoking for an undergraduate general education fitness and wellness course. Students enrolled in a required fitness and wellness course were given the opportunity to participate. Participants (n = 510) completed a brief demographic questionnaire and a 10-question pretest about the effects of smoking before viewing a 15-minute presentation about the effects of smoking and completing the same 10 questions as a post-test. Repeated measures ANOVAs were conducted to evaluate knowledge gains. An overall time effect was observed (pretest score 4.9 +/- 1.3, post-test score 7.2 +/- 2.1). Significantly greater knowledge gains were found in nonsmokers (2.1 +/- 2.2) than in smokers (1.1 +/- 2.2). Females (2.3 +/- 2.3) had significantly greater knowledge gains than males (1.5 +/- 2.2). Evidence supporting the effectiveness of the online learning module included significant knowledge gains for both smokers and nonsmokers, and the participants who smoked agreed the online learning module encouraged them to quit. In this research, students were also grouped by major (health-related majors vs non-health-related). There were 118 health-related majors in the sample, with 110 of those students completing the entire learning module. In this research, a learning module for college students was developed, but practical applications are provided not only for college health instructors but also for allied health professionals.

  12. Exploring the perspectives of allied health practitioners toward the use of journal clubs as a medium for promoting evidence-based practice: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Research evidence suggests that journal clubs (JCs) are one approach which can be used to bridge the gap between research and clinical practice. However, there are issues which potentially threaten their viability such as on-going participation or compliance with attendance, which require further exploration. The objectives of this study are: to explore the views and perspectives of allied health practitioners (AHPs) regarding the use of any type of JC in promoting evidence-based practice (EBP); to identify ways in which an innovative model of JC developed by the International Centre for Allied Health Evidence (iCAHE) might be refined. Methods A qualitative descriptive study utilising focus group interviews with various groups of AHP was undertaken-- those who have been exposed to the iCAHE JC model and those who have no experience of the iCAHE model (although they may have had exposure to other forms of JC). Maximum variation sampling was used to recruit participants for the study. Transcripts of focus groups were coded and distilled into content-related categories. Results Six focus groups with 39 AHPs were facilitated. Allied health practitioners perspectives' on JCs were classified in five broad categories: utility and benefits of a JC, elements of an effective and sustainable JC, barriers to participation, incentives for participation, and opportunities for improvement in the current iCAHE JC model. Overall, JCs were seen as a forum for reflective practice and keeping up-to-date with research evidence, and a venue for learning the processes involved in critical appraisal. Limited knowledge of statistics and heavy clinical workload were reported as barriers to participation in a JC. Strategies such as mentoring, strong support from managers, and providing CPD (continuing professional development) points can potentially address these barriers. Opportunities for refinement of the current iCAHE model were raised. Conclusions This study suggests that a

  13. Instructional practices for evidence-based practice with pre-registration allied health students: a review of recent research and developments.

    PubMed

    Hitch, Danielle; Nicola-Richmond, Kelli

    2016-07-28

    The aim of this study is to update a previous review published in this journal on the effectiveness of teaching and assessment interventions for evidence based practice in health professions, and to determine the extent to which the five recommendations made from that review have been implemented. The Integrating Theory, Evidence and Action method was used to synthesise all published evidence from 2011 to 2015, which addressed instructional practices used for evidence based practice with pre-registration allied health students. Seventeen articles were found to meet the inclusion criteria, and were analysed for both their individual rigour and relationship to the five recommendations. The evidence reviewed in this study was diverse in both its geographical setting and the allied health disciplines represented. Most of the evidence used less rigorous methods, and the evidence base is generally exploratory in nature. To date, the five recommendations regarding instructional practices in this area have been implemented to varying degrees. Many current practices promote social negotiation, collaborative decision-making and collaborative learning, so the social constructivist approach is being adopted. However, the prior knowledge of students is not being assessed as a basis for scaffolding, communication of evidence based practice to varying audiences is rarely addressed and the role of clinicians in the learning of evidence based practice knowledge, skills, beliefs and attitudes remains limited.

  14. Annotated Bibliography on Inservice Training for Allied Professionals and Nonprofessionals in Community Mental Health. Public Health Service Publication No. 1901.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    This annotated bibliography presents 169 entries of materials published between 1960 and 1967 classified into the following sections: (1) Physicians--Roles and Continuing Education, (2) Nurses, (3) School Psychologists, (4) Teachers, Special Educators, (5) Clergy, (6) Social Work Technicians, Welfare Workers, (7) Police, (8) Mental Health Workers…

  15. Support for mandatory health care worker influenza vaccination among allied health professionals, technical staff, and medical students.

    PubMed

    Banach, David B; Zhang, Cen; Factor, Stephanie H; Calfee, David P

    2013-04-01

    Although policies mandating annual influenza vaccination among health care workers (HCWs) are recommended, little is known about which HCWs support mandatory vaccination. We surveyed non-physician, non-nursing HCWs to identify beliefs associated with supporting mandatory HCW vaccination. Although similarities were identified, some beliefs and concerns associated with supporting mandatory vaccination differed among HCW groups. Policy makers should understand these differences and address beliefs and concerns of all HCW groups when attempting to implement a mandatory influenza vaccination policy.

  16. Connected health: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The presence of social support, and more recently, connection, has been linked to multiple health benefits and longevity measures and the lack of connection is associated with premature morbidity and mortality. Connected health is a growing industry, and we were interested in determining whether or not scholars in the field have established the ways in which technology could facilitate or promote connection between patients and healthcare providers. This integrative literature review sought to collect and analyze research studies addressing social support or connection in a sample of patients with diabetes to evaluate the social support or connection metrics in use, the type of technology deployed by researchers to achieve connection, and to assess the state of the science in this area. We hypothesized that being connected to someone who cares is good for your health. We believe this holds true even when connection is accomplished with mobile technologies. Thirty five studies were included in this review, 21 utilized technology to enhance patient-provider connection. The articles included in this review were from a total of more than nine countries and took place in hospital, physician office, and community settings. They represented people from childhood through to old age. Technologies evaluated include: telephone interventions, email, text messaging, interactive voice response (IVR), video blogs, apps, websites, and social media. There were multiple operational definitions of social support and self-management used as variables within the studies. Findings from this review suggest that being connected does matter to patients with diabetes, and being connected to family matters the most, even though the associations are complex and not always predictable. Furthermore, patients with diabetes will utilize a variety of technologies to connect with healthcare providers, team members, and even other people with the same disease. The use of technology with diabetes

  17. Beyond 50. challenges at work for older nurses and allied health workers in rural Australia: a thematic analysis of focus group discussions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The health workforce in Australia is ageing, particularly in rural areas, where this change will have the most immediate implications for health care delivery and workforce needs. In rural areas, the sustainability of health services will be dependent upon nurses and allied health workers being willing to work beyond middle age, yet the particular challenges for older health workers in rural Australia are not well known. The purpose of this research was to identify aspects of work that have become more difficult for rural health workers as they have become older; and the age-related changes and exacerbating factors that contribute to these difficulties. Findings will support efforts to make workplaces more 'user-friendly' for older health workers. Methods Nurses and allied health workers aged 50 years and over were invited to attend one of six local workshops held in the Hunter New England region of NSW, Australia. This qualitative action research project used a focus group methodology and thematic content analysis to identify and interpret issues arising from workshop discussions. Results Eighty older health workers from a range of disciplines attended the workshops. Tasks and aspects of work that have become more difficult for older health workers in hospital settings, include reading labels and administering medications; hearing patients and colleagues; manual handling; particular movements and postures; shift work; delivery of babies; patient exercises and suturing. In community settings, difficulties relate to vehicle use and home visiting. Significant issues across settings include ongoing education, work with computers and general fatigue. Wider personal challenges include coping with change, balancing work-life commitments, dealing with attachments and meeting goals and expectations. Work and age-related factors that exacerbate difficulties include vision and hearing deficits, increasing tiredness, more complex professional roles and a sense of

  18. Mental health nurses' and allied health professionals' perceptions of the role of the Occupational Health Service in the management of work-related stress: how do they self-care?

    PubMed

    Gibb, J; Cameron, I M; Hamilton, R; Murphy, E; Naji, S

    2010-11-01

    Higher rates of stress-related sickness are found in health care professionals when compared with other sectors. The annual direct cost of absence to the National Health Service is £1.7 billion. Increased clinical demand, long hours, low staffing and a lack of support from colleagues and management are contributing to absenteeism, somatic complaints and mental health problems. Mental health work is inherently stressful and levels of work stress experienced by mental health nurses are especially high. The study investigated mental health nurses' and allied health professionals' (AHPs) awareness and knowledge of the service provided by the Occupational Health Service (OHS) and identified work-related stress and self-care strategies within these two groups. Nurses and AHP staff employed in mental health services in a Scottish healthboard area were invited to complete an anonymous questionnaire. Results demonstrated that staff found their contact with the OHS to be a positive experience. They considered direct patient care to be less stressful than the organizational constraints they work under, and they reported a lack of support from both their peer groups and management. There should be recognition of the increased stress that hospital-based nurses and AHPs experience. These areas should be scrutinized and reviewed further to support staff within these environments in accordance with organizational objectives.

  19. Project 30: An Evaluation and Review. A Project Designed to Strengthen and Support Minority Students Matriculating in Mathematics, Science, Technology, and the Allied Health Fields at Sacramento City College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnebrew, Elbert L.

    Since fall 1972, Sacramento City College has operated a pilot project designed to provide minority students with extra tutorial and laboratory assistance and, thereby, to encourage them to pursue careers in mathematics, science, technology, and the allied health fields. The primary focus of the program was placed on one-to-one tutorials intended…

  20. The Impact of Nursing and Allied Health Professional Organizations and Accrediting Agencies on Community College Curricula. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the National Council of Instructional Administrators (St. Louis, Missouri, April 4-7, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community and Junior Colleges, Washington, DC. National Council of Instructional Administrators.

    The influence of professional accreditation on community college nursing and allied health curricula is discussed in these five papers. First, Robert Evans presents the community college viewpoint, distinguishing between general/institutional and programmatic accreditation, outlining the growth of programmatic accreditation, and citing as concerns…

  1. Health Manpower Literature, Volume 2, Number 2, December 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA. Center for Medical Manpower Studies.

    This booklet covering health manpower literature is divided into four sections. First, health manpower indicators are presented, such as estimated employment in selected potentially entry-level health occupations. Next follows a paper entitled "Regionalization of Health Insurance in Italy." The third section consists of five book…

  2. Considerations of the Concept of Infant Health: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almqvist-Tangen, Gerd; Axelsson, Asa

    2006-01-01

    This study examined a wide range of literature in order to describe factors associated with the concept of infant health. The design of the study is a literature review examining 21 research studies, written in the English language. The study explored which factors were found to exert an influence on the concept of infant health. The result showed…

  3. A Healthy Investment: Building the Facilities to Train the Next Generation of Nursing and Allied Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Bob

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of community colleges are investing in new facilities and programs to train health care workers in a variety of professions, including nursing, radiology, health information technology, physical therapy, dentistry, and surgical technology. Community colleges have historically offered job training programs in health care, but with…

  4. A systematic scoping review of adherence to reporting guidelines in health care literature

    PubMed Central

    Samaan, Zainab; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Kosa, Daisy; Debono, Victoria Borg; Dillenburg, Rejane; Zhang, Shiyuan; Fruci, Vincent; Dennis, Brittany; Bawor, Monica; Thabane, Lehana

    2013-01-01

    Background Reporting guidelines have been available for the past 17 years since the inception of the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement in 1996. These guidelines were developed to improve the quality of reporting of studies in medical literature. Despite the widespread availability of these guidelines, the quality of reporting of medical literature remained suboptimal. In this study, we assess the current adherence practice to reporting guidelines; determine key factors associated with better adherence to these guidelines; and provide recommendations to enhance adherence to reporting guidelines for future studies. Methods We undertook a systematic scoping review of systematic reviews of adherence to reporting guidelines across different clinical areas and study designs. We searched four electronic databases (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science, Embase, and Medline) from January 1996 to September 2012. Studies were included if they addressed adherence to one of the following guidelines: Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT), Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), Quality of Reporting of Meta-analysis (QUOROM), Transparent Reporting of Evaluations with Nonrandomized Designs (TREND), Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) and Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE). A protocol for this study was devised. A literature search, data extraction, and quality assessment were performed independently by two authors in duplicate. This study reporting follows the PRISMA guidelines. Results Our search retrieved 5159 titles, of which 50 were eligible. Overall, 86.0% of studies reported suboptimal levels of adherence to reporting guidelines. Factors associated with better adherence included journal impact factor and endorsement of guidelines, publication date, funding source, multisite studies, pharmacological

  5. Elderly health and literature therapy: a theoretical review.

    PubMed

    Eum, Yeongcheol; Yim, Jongeun; Choi, Wonjae

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the problems of old age have been discussed in terms of two aspects: preventive and therapeutic approach. The previous studies on the preventive aspect have been mostly concerned with the educational preparation for successful approach to elderly, directing focus toward the transitional period of the old age. Most research into the therapeutic aspect on the elderly diseases has focused on organic mental disorders such as dementia and functional mental diseases such as depression. This study aims to suggest the preventive and new therapeutic possibility in old people through combining the elderly health with literature. First, the research results regarding the social background for the elderly problems indicate that geriatric diseases increase in proportion to the increase of the population. Secondly, for the literature therapy, it is initially required to seek a comprehensive understanding about the health of the elderly through the phased consideration for the elderly problems. Thirdly, for the treatment of geriatric diseases by using literature, it is necessary to develop more active and integrative literature therapy than passive bibliotherapy. Literature therapy is the use of literature in the treatment of people with emotional or mental illness. Fourthly, theoretical approach should be considered for the health of the elderly and the literature therapy. From a literary approach, the literature therapy can help the study on geriatric diseases such as dementia and depression. Thus, the program for the health of geriatric issues and literature therapy should be developed as the next step in the future.

  6. Allies in the struggle.

    PubMed

    Draughn, Tricia; Elkins, Becki; Roy, Rakhi

    2002-10-01

    SUMMARY Providing a community that is committed to standards, diversity, and enhancement of the academic environment is often difficult. Offering an Allies or Safe Zone program is among of the first steps an institution can take to achieve a community that embraces diversity and creates a learning environment that is accepting of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered individuals. While there are many opportunities in institutional group settings to address these issues, they often go either unnoticed or untapped. How can being an ally impact the greater institutional environment? This paper will discuss the campus environment for LGBT students, examine existing Allies and Safe Zone programs, and offer a framework to assist program coordinators and participants in establishing comprehensive programs to change the campus climate and develop institutional environments that are gay affirmative.

  7. Enhancement of Anatomical Learning and Developing Clinical Competence of First-Year Medical and Allied Health Profession Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keim Janssen, Sarah A.; VanderMeulen, Stephane P.; Shostrom, Valerie K.; Lomneth, Carol S.

    2014-01-01

    Hands-on educational experiences can stimulate student interest, increase knowledge retention, and enhance development of clinical skills. The Lachman test, used to assess the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), is commonly performed by health care professionals and is relatively easy to teach to first-year health profession…

  8. Mechanisms to enhance the effectiveness of allied health and social care assistants in community-based rehabilitation services: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Moran, Anna; Nancarrow, Susan A; Enderby, Pamela

    2015-07-01

    This research aims to describe the factors associated with successful employment of allied health and social care assistants in community-based rehabilitation services (CBRS) in England. The research involved the thematic analysis of interviews and focus groups with 153 professionally qualified and assistant staff from 11 older people's interdisciplinary community rehabilitation teams. Data were collected between November 2006 and December 2008. Assistants were perceived as a focal point for care delivery and conduits for enabling a service to achieve goals within interdisciplinary team structures. Nine mechanisms were identified that promoted the successful employment of assistants: (i) Multidisciplinary team input into assistant training and support; (ii) Ensuring the timely assessment of clients by qualified staff; (iii) Establishing clear communication structures between qualified and assistant staff; (iv) Co-location of teams to promote communication and skill sharing; (v) Removing barriers that prevent staff working to their full scope of practice; (vi) Facilitating role flexibility of assistants, while upholding the principles of reablement; (vii) Allowing sufficient time for client-staff interaction; (viii) Ensuring an appropriate ratio of assistant to qualified staff to enable sufficient training and supervision of assistants; and (ix) Appropriately, resourcing the role for training and reimbursement to reflect responsibility. We conclude that upholding these mechanisms may help to optimise the efficiency and productivity of assistant and professionally qualified staff in CBRS.

  9. Health Policy Training: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Heiman, Harry J; Smith, L Lerissa; McKool, Marissa; Mitchell, Denise N; Roth Bayer, Carey

    2015-12-23

    The context within which health care and public health systems operate is framed by health policies. There is growing consensus about the need for increased health policy leadership and a health professional workforce prepared to assume these leadership roles. At the same time, there is strong evidence supporting the need for a broader policy lens and the need to intentionally target health disparities. We reviewed the published literature between 1983 and 2013 regarding health policy training. From 5124 articles identified, 33 met inclusion criteria. Articles varied across common themes including target audience, goal(s), health policy definition, and core curricular content. The majority of articles were directed to medical or nursing audiences. Most articles framed health policy as health care policy and only a small number adopted a broader health in all policies definition. Few articles specifically addressed vulnerable populations or health disparities. The need for more rigorous research and evaluation to inform health policy training is compelling. Providing health professionals with the knowledge and skills to engage and take leadership roles in health policy will require training programs to move beyond their limited health care-oriented health policy framework to adopt a broader health and health equity in all policies approach.

  10. Health Policy Training: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Heiman, Harry J.; Smith, L. Lerissa; McKool, Marissa; Mitchell, Denise N.; Roth Bayer, Carey

    2015-01-01

    The context within which health care and public health systems operate is framed by health policies. There is growing consensus about the need for increased health policy leadership and a health professional workforce prepared to assume these leadership roles. At the same time, there is strong evidence supporting the need for a broader policy lens and the need to intentionally target health disparities. We reviewed the published literature between 1983 and 2013 regarding health policy training. From 5124 articles identified, 33 met inclusion criteria. Articles varied across common themes including target audience, goal(s), health policy definition, and core curricular content. The majority of articles were directed to medical or nursing audiences. Most articles framed health policy as health care policy and only a small number adopted a broader health in all policies definition. Few articles specifically addressed vulnerable populations or health disparities. The need for more rigorous research and evaluation to inform health policy training is compelling. Providing health professionals with the knowledge and skills to engage and take leadership roles in health policy will require training programs to move beyond their limited health care-oriented health policy framework to adopt a broader health and health equity in all policies approach. PMID:26703657

  11. Health Hazards of Xylene: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    T. Rajan, Sharada; Malathi, N.

    2014-01-01

    Xylene, an aromatic hydrocarbon is widely used in industry and medical laboratory as a solvent. It is a flammable liquid that requires utmost care during its usage. On exposure the vapours are rapidly absorbed through the lungs and the slowly through the skin. Prolonged exposure to xylene leads to significant amount of solvent accumulation in the adipose and muscle tissue. This article reviews the various acute and chronic health effects of xylene through various routes of exposure. PMID:24701554

  12. Health hazards of xylene: a literature review.

    PubMed

    T Rajan, Sharada; Malathi, N

    2014-02-01

    Xylene, an aromatic hydrocarbon is widely used in industry and medical laboratory as a solvent. It is a flammable liquid that requires utmost care during its usage. On exposure the vapours are rapidly absorbed through the lungs and the slowly through the skin. Prolonged exposure to xylene leads to significant amount of solvent accumulation in the adipose and muscle tissue. This article reviews the various acute and chronic health effects of xylene through various routes of exposure.

  13. Social Media and Health Education: What the Early Literature Says

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorham, Robyn; Carter, Lorraine; Nowrouzi, Behdin; McLean, Natalie; Guimond, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Social media allows for a wealth of social interactions. More recently, there is a growing use of social media for the purposes of health education. Using an adaptation of the Networked student model by Drexler (2010) as a conceptual model, this article conducts a literature review focusing on the use of social media for health education purposes.…

  14. [Rural endemic diseases, health and development: Emmanuel Dias and the construction of a network of allies against Chagas disease].

    PubMed

    Kropf, Simone Petraglia

    2016-11-01

    The scope of this article is to analyze the trajectory of Emmanuel Dias (1908-1962), a researcher at the Oswaldo Cruz Institute (OCI) and director of the Center for Studies and Prophylaxis of Chagas Disease (OCI outpost established in 1943 in the city of Bambuí, Minas Gerais), as a key actor in the acknowledgement of Chagas disease as a public health problem in Brazil and the Americas. It seeks to show that the conquest of this acknowledgement, the cornerstone of which was the staging of the first campaign to combat the disease in Brazil in 1950, was made possible by the intense political mobilization of Dias together with the various social groups, such as physicians, politicians and residents of rural areas, public health officials, governments and international organizations. This mobilization occurred during the 1940s and 1950s in a historical context marked by intense debate about the relationship between health and development and helped to construct a network of alliances that was critical for the recognition of Chagas disease as a chronic cardiopathy, which threatened the productivity of rural workers and represented a medical and social problem that merited public health actions and programs geared to get it under control.

  15. Proceedings. Leadership Conference for Instructors and Administrators in Allied Health and Nursing (Louisville, Kentucky, February 16-18, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. of Vocational Education.

    The primary purpose of the conference described in this report was to provide a special type of leadership experience in the health professions for graduate assistants, fellowship recipients, and selected workshop participants who had demonstrated a high level of readinesss for opportunities to develop their leadership competencies. Titles of…

  16. Student Assessment System. Student Performance Record. Task Detailing. Allied Health Occupations/Practical Nursing. Georgia Vocational Education Program Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This booklet lists tasks and functions the health occupations student should be able to do upon entering an employment situation or a postsecondary school. (Listings are also available for the areas of cosmetology and transportation/automotive mechanics.) Tasks are coded to correspond to those on the Student Performance Record, which details a…

  17. Intersection of health, immigration, and youth: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Roxana

    2010-10-01

    The goal of this literature review is to provide a critical overview of existing research on the health of immigrant youth within the last decade. Although the review focuses primarily on Canada, the findings have implications for public health planning, policy, and settlement/immigration services in other immigrant-receiving countries. The main objectives are: (i) to locate relevant literature written in the past 10 years (January 1998-January 2008); (ii) to undertake a critical review of retrieved studies; (iii) to highlight gaps in the current state of our knowledge and make recommendations for future research directions. The review focuses on the influence of migration experience on health of youth.

  18. Online Technologies for Health Information and Education: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Gill, Harkiran K; Gill, Navkiranjit; Young, Sean D

    2013-04-01

    There is a growing body of research focused on the use of social media and Internet technologies for health education and information sharing. The authors reviewed literature on this topic, with a specific focus on the benefits and concerns associated with using online social technologies as health education and communication tools. Studies suggest that social media technologies have the potential to safely and effectively deliver health education, if privacy concerns are addressed. Utility of social media-based health education and communication will improve as technology developers and public health officials determine ways to improve information accuracy and address privacy concerns.

  19. Online Technologies for Health Information and Education: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harkiran K.; Gill, Navkiranjit; Young, Sean D.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of research focused on the use of social media and Internet technologies for health education and information sharing. The authors reviewed literature on this topic, with a specific focus on the benefits and concerns associated with using online social technologies as health education and communication tools. Studies suggest that social media technologies have the potential to safely and effectively deliver health education, if privacy concerns are addressed. Utility of social media-based health education and communication will improve as technology developers and public health officials determine ways to improve information accuracy and address privacy concerns. PMID:24465171

  20. Teaching health care professionals about health literacy: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Clifford

    2011-01-01

    Low health literacy is a common and serious issue in U.S. health care. Health care professionals lack adequate training in health literacy principles. Increasing and improving health literacy training for the health care workforce is needed. Health professions educators have responded to this need by developing health literacy curricula, which use a wide variety of didactic and experiential teaching techniques and tools. This article reviews the literature on teaching health literacy principles to health professionals and presents a menu of teaching options for health professions educators.

  1. Characteristics, content, and significance of the popular health periodicals literature.

    PubMed

    Rees, A M

    1987-10-01

    An analysis of the content of sixty popular health periodicals covered in 1986 by the Consumer Health & Nutrition Index was made to identify the characteristics and concerns of popular health magazines and newsletters. The literature mirrors the health values and anxieties of the American public. While some of the literature diverges from mainstream allopathic medicine, most popular publications succeed in presenting coherent, reasoned, and documented viewpoints. Because there is no consensus on many medical problems, it is important that individuals have the freedom to read dissenting and alternative points of view and consider multiple options before making informed and reasoned health decisions. The popular literature is a valuable yet inexpensive source of reliable information on topics of current concern. The publications are not as well known as they deserve to be because they have not been adequately indexed, while they have not been indexed because they are not well known. The Consumer Health & Nutrition Index now provides expanded subject access to sixty health-related periodicals plus all health-related articles in sixteen general interest magazines.

  2. Exercise a Powerful Ally for Breast Cancer Survivors

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163706.html Exercise a Powerful Ally for Breast Cancer Survivors Those ... 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For breast cancer survivors, exercise may help lower their chances of dying from ...

  3. [Health and growth: a brief review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Gitto, L; Navarra, P

    2008-01-01

    Improving health around the world is an important social objective, which provides direct payoffs in terms of longer and better lives. There is also a large consensus that improving health can have equally large indirect payoffs through accelerating economic development. The role that health conditions play in affecting growth is mainly analyzed via two channels: the direct labour productivity effect and the indirect incentive effect. The labour productivity hypothesis asserts that individuals who are healthier have higher returns to labour input. This is well tested in the empirical literature with mixed conclusions. The incentive effect is borne of the theoretical literature, and individuals who are healthier and have a greater life expectancy will have the incentive to invest in education as the time horizon over which returns can be earned is extended. Education is the driver of economic growth, and thus health plays an indirect role. Other minor channels have developed in the literature through which health affect economic development. However, although cross-country empirical works show a strong correlation between measures of health (for example, life expectancy) and economic growth, a causal effect of health and disease on economic development has not been established in the literature. A recent study challenges the view that different health conditions explain cross-country income differences. This study suggests that an improvement in mortality rate due to more effective public health measures and the introduction of new chemicals and drugs starting in the 1940s determines an increase in the population size which in turn reduces income per capita and economic growth.

  4. Taming mental-health-focused popular literature: a crazy idea?

    PubMed

    Zozus, Robert T; Bricker, Audrey; Lunblad, Rob; Elias, Dennis; Nahm, Meredith

    2013-01-01

    Providing tailored and easily accessible health information for mental health clinicians and patients can be enabled through Information Technology and Communications (ITC). The literature is mixed regarding the quality, utility and accessibility of health information in the popular press for this purpose. However, there is consensus that mental health information in the popular press is readily available, easily comprehended by patients, and is continually updated. We report the process by which mental-health-focused articles in the popular press are identified, screened, and disseminated to a large network of doctoral level psychologists (the PsyUSA network). We analyze 4-year article distribution and access data, and conclude that the distribution of mental-health-related popular press articles prompted article access. We leverage this experience to formulate a model for direct access to clinician-vetted mental-health-related popular press through a curated web based archive.

  5. What Contributes to the Activeness of Ethnic Minority Patients with Chronic Illnesses Seeking Allied Health Services? A Cross-Sectional Study in Rural Western China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shangfeng; Dong, Dong; Ji, Lu; Fu, Hang; Feng, Zhanchun; Bishwajit, Ghose; He, Zhifei; Ming, Hui; Fu, Qian; Xian, Yue

    2015-09-15

    Actively seeking health services lies at the core of effective models of chronic disease self-management and contributes to promoting the utilization of allied health services (AHS). However, the use of AHS by ethnic minority Chinese, especially the elderly living in rural areas, has not received much attention. This study, therefore, aims to explore the association between personal characteristics and the activeness of ethnic minority patients with chronic diseases in rural areas of western China seeking AHS. A cross-sectional study was conducted to collect data on the socio-demographic and economic characteristics, health knowledge level and health communication channels of the sampled patients. A logistic regression model was used to examine the association of these predictors with the activeness of the surveyed patients in seeking AHS. A total of 1078 ethnic minorities over 45 years old who had chronic conditions were randomly selected from three western provinces in China and were interviewed in 2014. It is found that the New Cooperative Medical Scheme (NCMS) is the most salient predictor affecting the activeness of Chinese ethnic minorities in seeking AHS. The probability is 8.51 times greater for those insured with NCMS to actively seek AHS than those without (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 4.76-15.21; p < 0.001). Moreover, participants between 60 and 70 years old and those who have five to six household members are more likely to seek AHS compared with other social groups (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.64, 95% CI 1.28-2.97, p = 0.007; OR = 1.95, 95% CI 1.15-2.36, p = 0.002). However, the activeness of patients seeking AHS is lower for those who have better household economic conditions. Besides socio-demographic predictors, the Chinese ethnic minorities' activeness in seeking AHS is clearly associated with the communication channels used for receiving health information, which include direct communication with doctors (OR = 5.18, 95% CI 3.58-7.50, p < 0.001) and

  6. Barriers to health care for undocumented immigrants: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Karen; Anies, Maria; Folb, Barbara L; Zallman, Leah

    2015-01-01

    With the unprecedented international migration seen in recent years, policies that limit health care access have become prevalent. Barriers to health care for undocumented immigrants go beyond policy and range from financial limitations, to discrimination and fear of deportation. This paper is aimed at reviewing the literature on barriers to health care for undocumented immigrants and identifying strategies that have or could be used to address these barriers. To address study questions, we conducted a literature review of published articles from the last 10 years in PubMed using three main concepts: immigrants, undocumented, and access to health care. The search yielded 341 articles of which 66 met study criteria. With regard to barriers, we identified barriers in the policy arena focused on issues related to law and policy including limitations to access and type of health care. These varied widely across countries but ultimately impacted the type and amount of health care any undocumented immigrant could receive. Within the health system, barriers included bureaucratic obstacles including paperwork and registration systems. The alternative care available (safety net) was generally limited and overwhelmed. Finally, there was evidence of widespread discriminatory practices within the health care system itself. The individual level focused on the immigrant’s fear of deportation, stigma, and lack of capital (both social and financial) to obtain services. Recommendations identified in the papers reviewed included advocating for policy change to increase access to health care for undocumented immigrants, providing novel insurance options, expanding safety net services, training providers to better care for immigrant populations, and educating undocumented immigrants on navigating the system. There are numerous barriers to health care for undocumented immigrants. These vary by country and frequently change. Despite concerns that access to health care attracts

  7. Barriers to health care for undocumented immigrants: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Karen; Anies, Maria; Folb, Barbara L; Zallman, Leah

    2015-01-01

    With the unprecedented international migration seen in recent years, policies that limit health care access have become prevalent. Barriers to health care for undocumented immigrants go beyond policy and range from financial limitations, to discrimination and fear of deportation. This paper is aimed at reviewing the literature on barriers to health care for undocumented immigrants and identifying strategies that have or could be used to address these barriers. To address study questions, we conducted a literature review of published articles from the last 10 years in PubMed using three main concepts: immigrants, undocumented, and access to health care. The search yielded 341 articles of which 66 met study criteria. With regard to barriers, we identified barriers in the policy arena focused on issues related to law and policy including limitations to access and type of health care. These varied widely across countries but ultimately impacted the type and amount of health care any undocumented immigrant could receive. Within the health system, barriers included bureaucratic obstacles including paperwork and registration systems. The alternative care available (safety net) was generally limited and overwhelmed. Finally, there was evidence of widespread discriminatory practices within the health care system itself. The individual level focused on the immigrant's fear of deportation, stigma, and lack of capital (both social and financial) to obtain services. Recommendations identified in the papers reviewed included advocating for policy change to increase access to health care for undocumented immigrants, providing novel insurance options, expanding safety net services, training providers to better care for immigrant populations, and educating undocumented immigrants on navigating the system. There are numerous barriers to health care for undocumented immigrants. These vary by country and frequently change. Despite concerns that access to health care attracts

  8. Knowledge and Attitudes of Allied Health Professional Students regarding the Stroke Rehabilitation Team and the Role of the Speech and Language Therapist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Aine; Pettigrew, Catharine M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: One of the major barriers to effective team working among healthcare professionals is a lack of knowledge of each other's roles. The importance of understanding Irish healthcare students' attitudes towards team working and each other's roles led to the development of this study. Aims: The aims were to investigate allied health…

  9. Health status of migrant farmworkers: a literature review and commentary.

    PubMed Central

    Rust, G S

    1990-01-01

    I made a computerized search of MEDLINE files from 1966 through October 1989 followed by a review of this literature. Four hundred eighty-five articles were scanned; 152 were found specifically related to migrant families, while another 51 articles addressed the health of agricultural workers or farmers in general. Solid data exist on dental health, nutrition and, to a lesser extent, childhood health. Data also were prominent in several disease categories including certain infectious diseases, pesticide exposures, occupational dermatoses, and lead levels in children. Estimates of the size of the migrant and seasonal farmworker population vary widely. Basic health status indicators such as age-related death rates are unknown. Prevalence rates of the most common cause of death in the United States have yet to be studied. More research is needed into the health problems and health status of migrant and seasonal farmworker families. PMID:2205116

  10. Child Health Assessment; Part I: A Literature Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Kathryn E., Ed.; Douglas, Helen Bee, Ed.

    Presented are 13 papers describing the Seattle Project and reviewing the literature relevant to the project's purpose of developing and testing an assessment format to enable nurses to better identify health and developmental problems in children. Six papers pertaining to predictor variables cover the areas of prenatal and perinatal factors,…

  11. Countries: General, Electricity, Geography, Health, Literature: Children's, Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated list of Web site educational resources kindergarten through eighth grade. The Web sites this month cover the following subjects: countries (general); electricity; geography; health; children's literature; and plants. Includes a list of "Calendar Connections" to Web site sources of information on Earth Day in April…

  12. Mapping the literature of cytotechnology.

    PubMed

    Stevens, S R

    2000-04-01

    The major purpose of this study was to identify and assess indexing coverage of core journals in cytotechnology. It was part of a larger project sponsored by the Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section of the Medical Library Association to map the literature of allied health. Three representative journals in cytotechnology were selected and subjected to citation analysis to determine what journals, other publication types, and years were cited and how often. Bradford's Law of Scattering was applied to the resulting list of cited journals to identify core titles in the discipline, and five indexes were searched to assess coverage of these core titles. Results indicated that the cytotechnology journal literature had a small core but wide dispersion: one third of the 21,021 journal citations appeared in only 3 titles; another third appeared in an additional 26 titles; the remaining third were scattered in 1,069 different titles. Science Citation Index Expanded rated highest in indexing coverage of the core titles, followed by MEDLINE, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, HealthSTAR, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). The study's results also showed that journals were the predominantly cited format and that citing authors relied strongly on more recent literature.

  13. Mapping the literature of cytotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Sheryl R.

    2000-01-01

    The major purpose of this study was to identify and assess indexing coverage of core journals in cytotechnology. It was part of a larger project sponsored by the Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section of the Medical Library Association to map the literature of allied health. Three representative journals in cytotechnology were selected and subjected to citation analysis to determine what journals, other publication types, and years were cited and how often. Bradford's Law of Scattering was applied to the resulting list of cited journals to identify core titles in the discipline, and five indexes were searched to assess coverage of these core titles. Results indicated that the cytotechnology journal literature had a small core but wide dispersion: one third of the 21,021 journal citations appeared in only 3 titles; another third appeared in an additional 26 titles; the remaining third were scattered in 1,069 different titles. Science Citation Index Expanded rated highest in indexing coverage of the core titles, followed by MEDLINE, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, HealthSTAR, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). The study's results also showed that journals were the predominantly cited format and that citing authors relied strongly on more recent literature. PMID:10783973

  14. Educators' Guide to Ally Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), 2010

    2010-01-01

    An ally is an individual who speaks out and stands up for a person or group that is targeted and/or discriminated against. An ally works to end oppression by supporting and advocating for people who are stigmatized, or treated unfairly because of who they are. In this context, Allies are referred to as people who do not identify as LGBT (lesbian,…

  15. Food, cooking skills, and health: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Engler-Stringer, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Over the past century, a major shift in North American food practices has been taking place. However, the literature on this topic is lacking in several areas. Some available research on food and cooking practices in the current context is presented, with a focus on how these are affecting health and how they might be contributing to health inequalities within the population. First, cooking and cooking skills are examined, along with the ambiguities related to terms associated with cooking in the research literature. Food choice, cooking, and health are described, particularly in relation to economic factors that may lead to health inequalities within the population. The importance of developing an understanding of factors within the wider food system as part of food choice and cooking skills is presented, and gaps in the research literature are examined and areas for future research are presented. Cooking practices are not well studied but are important to an understanding of human nutritional health as it relates to cultural, environmental, and economic factors.

  16. Global health diplomacy: A critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ruckert, Arne; Labonté, Ronald; Lencucha, Raphael; Runnels, Vivien; Gagnon, Michelle

    2016-04-01

    Global health diplomacy (GHD) describes the practices by which governments and non-state actors attempt to coordinate and orchestrate global policy solutions to improve global health. As an emerging field of practice, there is little academic work that has comprehensively examined and synthesized the theorization of Global Health Diplomacy (GHD), nor looked at why specific health concerns enter into foreign policy discussion and agendas. With the objective of uncovering the driving forces behind and theoretical explanations of GHD, we conducted a critical literature review. We searched three English-language scholarly databases using standardized search terms which yielded 606 articles. After screening of abstracts based on our inclusion/exclusion criteria, we retained 135 articles for importing into NVivo10 and coding. We found a lack of rigorous theorizing about GHD and fragmentation of the GHD literature which is not clearly structured around key issues and their theoretical explanations. To address this lack of theoretical grounding, we link the findings from the GHD literature to how theoretical concepts used in International Relations (IR) have been, and could be invoked in explaining GHD more effectively. To do this, we develop a theoretical taxonomy to explain GHD outcomes based on a popular categorization in IR, identifying three levels of analysis (individual, domestic/national, and global/international) and the driving forces for the integration of health into foreign policy at each level.

  17. Physician leadership in e-health? A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Keijser, Wouter; Smits, Jacco; Penterman, Lisanne; Wilderom, Celeste

    2016-07-04

    Purpose This paper aims to systematically review the literature on roles of physicians in virtual teams (VTs) delivering healthcare for effective "physician e-leadership" (PeL) and implementation of e-health. Design/methodology/approach The analyzed studies were retrieved with explicit keywords and criteria, including snowball sampling. They were synthesized with existing theoretical models on VT research, healthcare team competencies and medical leadership. Findings Six domains for further PeL inquiry are delineated: resources, task processes, socio-emotional processes, leadership in VTs, virtual physician-patient relationship and change management. We show that, to date, PeL studies on socio-technical dynamics and their consequences on e-health are found underrepresented in the health literature; i.e. no single empirical, theoretic or conceptual study with a focus on PeL in virtual healthcare work was identified. Research limitations/implications E-health practices could benefit from organization-behavioral type of research for discerning effective physicians' roles and inter-professional relations and their (so far) seemingly modest but potent impact on e-health developments. Practical implications Although best practices in e-health care have already been identified, this paper shows that physicians' roles in e-health initiatives have not yet received any in-depth study. This raises questions such as are physicians not yet sufficiently involved in e-health? If so, what (dis)advantages may this have for current e-health investments and how can they best become involved in (leading) e-health applications' design and implementation in the field? Originality/value If effective medical leadership is being deployed, e-health effectiveness may be enhanced; this new proposition needs urgent empirical scrutiny.

  18. Needlestick injuries among health care workers. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Porta, C; Handelman, E; McGovern, P

    1999-06-01

    Needlestick injuries among health care workers are a recognized health hazard, with 400,000 needlesticks occurring annually among the 4 million health care workers in the United States. Existing needlestick injury literature primarily focuses on hospital sites and may not be generalizable to other health care settings such as nursing homes, home health care sites, clinics, and emergency response units. Nurses were at high risk of needlestick injury from syringes and i.v. equipment relative to the other health care workers. Recapping, prohibited by the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, continues to be an identified cause of injury. The literature supports comprehensive injury prevention and control strategies in conjunction with the use of safer needle devices. Health care organizations should assess their worksites to identify hazards and select products and strategies to correct the problem. Future research should clarify accurate needlestick injury rates (e.g., establish consistent denominators), address non-hospital setting risks, validate self reported data, and evaluate comprehensive interventions that employ engineering strategies to minimize the risk.

  19. Physics for Allied Health Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldick, Howard

    2000-04-01

    In this paper I will describe two courses that I have been teaching for the past 6 years to physical therapy and occupational therapy students Emphasis will be paced on those points that distinguish these courses from others with which I am familiar. I will discuss the syllabus: homework, exams, labs and the final grade. I will also present a topic outline of the courses showing how examples are drawn from the human body to illustrate the physics concept under discussion and to stimulate the students's interest in the material. The following basic concepts of physics will be covered (each with human body examples): vectors, components, statics, conservation of energy, efficiency, change of state, heat transfer, electric charge, electric field, voltage and capacitance.

  20. Health care partnerships: a literature review of interdisciplinary education.

    PubMed

    Dufrene, Claudine

    2012-04-01

    Interdisciplinary education is an excellent teaching model for nursing and other health care professions students. When one considers that nurses, physicians, and other health care professionals must work together in the same environment, it seems feasible that learning together through allocated learning activities as an interdisciplinary group might enhance educational outcomes. According to the literature, interdisciplinary education fosters collaboration and teamwork among the health care team. In addition, anecdotal comments from nursing students indicate that they feel unprepared to communicate with other health care disciplines. Although there is an abundance of articles related to interdisciplinary education, few studies of student outcomes have been conducted. This article provides an overview of interdisciplinary education studies with nursing and other health professions students.

  1. Mapping the literature of occupational therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, K L

    1999-01-01

    Occupational therapy, formally organized in the United States in 1917, is considered an allied health field. Mapping occupational therapy literature is part of a bibliometric project of the Medical Library Association's Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section's project for mapping the literature of allied health. Three core journals were selected from the years 1995 and 1996 and a determination was made of the extent to which the cited journal references were covered by standard indexing sources. Using Bradford's Law of Scattering three zones were created, each containing approximately one-third of the cited journal references. The results showed that three journals made up the first zone, 117 journals the second, and 657 the third. The most cited journal was the American Journal of Occupational Therapy. In the second zone, journals from twelve disciplines were identified. While MEDLINE provided the best overall indexing, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) was the only database that indexed the three most cited journals plus nine of the currently active titles in occupational therapy. MEDLINE could improve its coverage of occupational therapy by indexing the journals of the British, Canadian, and Australian national associations. PMID:10427431

  2. Social capital and health: Does egalitarianism matter? A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Islam, M Kamrul; Merlo, Juan; Kawachi, Ichiro; Lindström, Martin; Gerdtham, Ulf-G

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to critically review the notion of social capital and review empirical literature on the association between social capital and health across countries. The methodology used for the review includes a systematic search on electronic databases for peer-reviewed published literature. We categorize studies according to level of analysis (single and multilevel) and examine whether studies reveal a significant health impact of individual and area level social capital. We compare the study conclusions according to the country's degrees of economic egalitarianism. Regardless of study design, our findings indicate that a positive association (fixed effect) exists between social capital and better health irrespective of countries degree of egalitarianism. However, we find that the between-area variance (random effect) in health tends to be lower in more egalitarian countries than in less egalitarian countries. Our tentative conclusion is that an association between social capital and health at the individual level is robust with respect to the degree of egalitarianism within a country. Area level or contextual social capital may be less salient in egalitarian countries in explaining health differences across places. PMID:16597324

  3. Bisphenol A and human health: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rochester, Johanna R

    2013-12-01

    There is growing evidence that bisphenol A (BPA) may adversely affect humans. BPA is an endocrine disruptor that has been shown to be harmful in laboratory animal studies. Until recently, there were relatively few epidemiological studies examining the relationship between BPA and health effects in humans. However, in the last year, the number of these studies has more than doubled. A comprehensive literature search found 91 studies linking BPA to human health; 53 published within the last year. This review outlines this body of literature, showing associations between BPA exposure and adverse perinatal, childhood, and adult health outcomes, including reproductive and developmental effects, metabolic disease, and other health effects. These studies encompass both prenatal and postnatal exposures, and include several study designs and population types. While it is difficult to make causal links with epidemiological studies, the growing human literature correlating environmental BPA exposure to adverse effects in humans, along with laboratory studies in many species including primates, provides increasing support that environmental BPA exposure can be harmful to humans, especially in regards to behavioral and other effects in children.

  4. AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database is a resource from the Health Care Information Service of the British Library. AMED offers access to complementary and alternative medicine topics, such as acupuncture, chiropractic, herbalism, homeopathy, hospice care, hypnosis, palliative care, physiotherapy, podiatry, and rehabilitation. This column features a sample search to demonstrate the type of information available within AMED. AMED is available through the EBSCOhost and OVID platforms.

  5. Meditation, Health and Scientific Investigations: Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Cynthia Vieira Sanches; Lima, Manuela Garcia; Ladeia, Ana Marice

    2017-04-01

    A growing number of people are seeking health recovery treatments with a holistic approach to the human being. Meditation is a mental training capable of producing connection between the mind, body and spirit. Its practice helps people to achieve balance, relaxation and self-control, in addition to the development of consciousness. At present, meditation is classified as a complementary and integrative technique in the area of health. The purpose of this review of the literature was to describe what meditation is, its practices and effects on health, demonstrated by consistent scientific investigations. Recently, the advances in researches with meditation, the discovery of its potential as an instrument of self-regulation of the human body and its benefits to health have shown that it is a consistent alternative therapy when associated with conventional medical treatments.

  6. Financial impact of population health management programs: reevaluating the literature.

    PubMed

    Grossmeier, Jessica; Terry, Paul E; Anderson, David R; Wright, Steven

    2012-06-01

    Although many employers offer some components of worksite-based population health management (PHM), most do not yet invest in comprehensive programs. This hesitation to invest in comprehensive programs may be attributed to numerous factors, such as other more pressing business priorities, reluctance to intervene in the personal health choices of employees, or insufficient funds for employee health. Many decision makers also remain skeptical about whether investment in comprehensive programs will produce a financial return on investment (ROI). Most peer-reviewed studies assessing the financial impact of PHM were published before 2000 and include a broad array of program and study designs. Many of these studies have also included indirect productivity savings in their assessment of financial outcomes. In contrast, this review includes only peer-reviewed studies of the direct health care cost impact of comprehensive PHM programs that meet rigorous methodological criteria. A systematic search of health sciences databases identified only 5 studies with program designs and study methods meeting these selection criteria published after 2007. This focused review found that comprehensive PHM programs can yield a positive ROI based on their impact on direct health care costs, but the level of ROI achieved was lower than that reported by literature reviews with less focused and restrictive qualifying criteria. To yield substantial short-term health care cost savings, the longer term financial return that can credibly be associated with a comprehensive, prevention-oriented population health program must be augmented by other financial impact strategies.

  7. Literature review: Afghanistan women's health crisis, health service delivery, and ethical issues for international aid.

    PubMed

    Turner, Helen

    2006-09-01

    The literature indicates that the health of women in Afghanistan is poor. In 1997 maternal mortality in Afghanistan was one of the worst in the world. Difficulties in establishing health services revolve around fundamentalist Islamic ideas and ongoing violence within Afghanistan. The literature holds advice on key behaviours for health professionals who may chose to work in Afghanistan. The literature also identifies the local level action that is occurring as the issue of women's health is recognised. Humanitarian assistance has been provided, with international aid agencies having to weigh the ethical responsibilities they hold and one agency tragically facing the violent loss of its own staff. Easy answers are not in the literature, merely an opportunity to understand, consider, and take action about what is facing women in Afghanistan and those who try to help.

  8. Moving health promotion communities online: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Naomi; Beekhuyzen, Jenine; Kendall, Elizabeth; Wolski, Malcom

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to enhance the effectiveness and reach of complex health promotion initiatives by providing opportunities for diverse health promotion practitioners and others to interact in online settings. This paper reviews the existing literature on how to take health promotion communities and networks into online settings. A scoping review of relevant bodies of literature and empirical evidence was undertaken to provide an interpretive synthesis of existing knowledge on the topic. Sixteen studies were identified between 1986 and 2007. Relatively little research has been conducted on the process of taking existing offline communities and networks into online settings. However, more research has focused on offline (i.e. not mediated via computer networks); 'virtual' (purely online with no offline interpersonal contact); and 'multiplex' communities (i.e. those that interact across both online and offline settings). Results are summarised under three themes: characteristics of communities in online and offline settings; issues in moving offline communities online, and designing online communities to match community needs. Existing health promotion initiatives can benefit from online platforms that promote community building and knowledge sharing. Online e-health promotion settings and communities can successfully integrate with existing offline settings and communities to form 'multiplex' communities (i.e. communities that operate fluently across both online and offline settings).

  9. Religion and health: making sense of a disheveled literature.

    PubMed

    Krause, Neal

    2011-03-01

    A growing body of research suggests that religion may exert a beneficial effect on both physical and mental health. Unfortunately, the rapid growth of this literature has made it difficult to get a clear picture of what has been accomplished. This issue is addressed by presenting a conceptual model that focuses on the needs that are satisfied by religion. In the process, an effort is made to show how this conceptual scheme can be used to add greater coherence to the field.

  10. Health effects and wind turbines: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Wind power has been harnessed as a source of power around the world. Debate is ongoing with respect to the relationship between reported health effects and wind turbines, specifically in terms of audible and inaudible noise. As a result, minimum setback distances have been established world-wide to reduce or avoid potential complaints from, or potential effects to, people living in proximity to wind turbines. People interested in this debate turn to two sources of information to make informed decisions: scientific peer-reviewed studies published in scientific journals and the popular literature and internet. Methods The purpose of this paper is to review the peer-reviewed scientific literature, government agency reports, and the most prominent information found in the popular literature. Combinations of key words were entered into the Thomson Reuters Web of KnowledgeSM and the internet search engine Google. The review was conducted in the spirit of the evaluation process outlined in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Results Conclusions of the peer reviewed literature differ in some ways from those in the popular literature. In peer reviewed studies, wind turbine annoyance has been statistically associated with wind turbine noise, but found to be more strongly related to visual impact, attitude to wind turbines and sensitivity to noise. To date, no peer reviewed articles demonstrate a direct causal link between people living in proximity to modern wind turbines, the noise they emit and resulting physiological health effects. If anything, reported health effects are likely attributed to a number of environmental stressors that result in an annoyed/stressed state in a segment of the population. In the popular literature, self-reported health outcomes are related to distance from turbines and the claim is made that infrasound is the causative factor for the reported effects, even though sound pressure levels are not measured

  11. Women's oral health issues: an exploration of the literature.

    PubMed

    Covington, P

    1996-01-01

    the recognition that women may have different oral health needs and issues than men. The common view may be that teeth are gender free, but how can this be when teeth exist in a body, and that body is male or female? For many years, the primary acknowledged difference between men and women's oral health was pregnancy gingivitis. Like medicine, dentistry must re-examine the viewpoint that women's oral health differs from men's only as it is influenced by reproductive processes. There are many areas where women's oral health may differ from that of men. This paper will explore the literature for potential women's oral health issues in the areas of oral hygiene behaviours, esthetics, eating disorders, temporomandibular disorders, and hormonal influences on periodontal health.

  12. The Health Effect of Psychostimulants: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Favrod-Coune, Thierry; Broers, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Prevalence of psychostimulant use is high, and raising in several countries. Nicotine is the legal stimulant causing the most important public health impact. Cocaine ranks among the most used illicit substances after cannabis. Stimulant medications are frequently misused. Psychostimulants can lead to addiction, have physical, psychological and social health consequences and can induce a great disease burden. The aim of the present article is to provide a literature review on the health effects of stimulants as potential drugs of abuse. It will cover essentially cocaine, amphetamines and its derivatives (including methamphetamines and 3-4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, ecstasy), nicotine, caffeine and khat, and touch upon the issues of prescribed substances (anti-depressants, weight control medications, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder medications, hypersomniac disorder). Their pharmacology, addictive potential, health consequences and treatment will be discussed. We used Medline for the literature review from 1990 to the date of this review, and mention the findings of human and animal studies (the latter only if they are of clinical relevance). PMID:27713356

  13. Towards pervasive computing in health care – A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Orwat, Carsten; Graefe, Andreas; Faulwasser, Timm

    2008-01-01

    Background The evolving concepts of pervasive computing, ubiquitous computing and ambient intelligence are increasingly influencing health care and medicine. Summarizing published research, this literature review provides an overview of recent developments and implementations of pervasive computing systems in health care. It also highlights some of the experiences reported in deployment processes. Methods There is no clear definition of pervasive computing in the current literature. Thus specific inclusion criteria for selecting articles about relevant systems were developed. Searches were conducted in four scientific databases alongside manual journal searches for the period of 2002 to 2006. Articles included present prototypes, case studies and pilot studies, clinical trials and systems that are already in routine use. Results The searches identified 69 articles describing 67 different systems. In a quantitative analysis, these systems were categorized into project status, health care settings, user groups, improvement aims, and systems features (i.e., component types, data gathering, data transmission, systems functions). The focus is on the types of systems implemented, their frequency of occurrence and their characteristics. Qualitative analyses were performed of deployment issues, such as organizational and personnel issues, privacy and security issues, and financial issues. This paper provides a comprehensive access to the literature of the emerging field by addressing specific topics of application settings, systems features, and deployment experiences. Conclusion Both an overview and an analysis of the literature on a broad and heterogeneous range of systems are provided. Most systems are described in their prototype stages. Deployment issues, such as implications on organization or personnel, privacy concerns, or financial issues are mentioned rarely, though their solution is regarded as decisive in transferring promising systems to a stage of regular

  14. Health Care Provider Adoption of eHealth: Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Talaei-Khoei, Amir; Seale, Holly; Ray, Pradeep; MacIntyre, C Raina

    2013-01-01

    Background eHealth is an application of information and communication technologies across the whole range of functions that affect health. The benefits of eHealth (eg, improvement of health care operational efficiency and quality of patient care) have previously been documented in the literature. Health care providers (eg, medical doctors) are the key driving force in pushing eHealth initiatives. Without their acceptance and actual use, those eHealth benefits would be unlikely to be reaped. Objective To identify and synthesize influential factors to health care providers’ acceptance of various eHealth systems. Methods This systematic literature review was conducted in four steps. The first two steps facilitated the location and identification of relevant articles. The third step extracted key information from those articles including the studies’ characteristics and results. In the last step, identified factors were analyzed and grouped in accordance with the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT). Results This study included 93 papers that have studied health care providers’ acceptance of eHealth. From these papers, 40 factors were identified and grouped into 7 clusters: (1) health care provider characteristics, (2) medical practice characteristics, (3) voluntariness of use, (4) performance expectancy, (5) effort expectancy, (6) social influence, and (7) facilitating or inhibiting conditions. Conclusions The grouping results demonstrated that the UTAUT model is useful for organizing the literature but has its limitations. Due to the complex contextual dynamics of health care settings, our work suggested that there would be potential to extend theories on information technology adoption, which is of great benefit to readers interested in learning more on the topic. Practically, these findings may help health care decision makers proactively introduce interventions to encourage acceptance of eHealth and may also assist health policy makers

  15. The Use of Errorless Learning Strategies for Patients with Alzheimer's Disease: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ruijie; Liu, Karen P. Y.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the evidence of errorless learning on learning outcomes in patients with early-stage Alzheimer's disease. A computer-aided literature search from 1999 to 2011 was carried out using MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO and PsycArticles. Keywords included…

  16. Zoonoses and One Health: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bidaisee, Satesh; Macpherson, Calum N. L.

    2014-01-01

    Background. One health is a concept that was officially adopted by international organizations and scholarly bodies in 1984. It is the notion of combining human, animal, and environmental components to address global health challenges that have an ecological interconnectedness. Methods. A cross-sectional study of the available literature cited was conducted from January 1984 when the one health concept was adopted till December 2012 to examine the role of the one health approach towards zoonoses. Inclusion criteria included publications, professional presentations, funding allocations, official documentation books, and book chapters, and exclusion criteria included those citations written outside the period of review. Results. A total of 737 resources met the inclusion criteria and were considered in this review. Resources showed a continuous upward trend for the years from 2006 to 2012. The predominant resources were journal publications with environmental health as the significant scope focus for one health. There was also an emphasis on the distribution of the work from developed countries. All categories of years, resources, scopes, and country locale differed from the means (P = 0.000). Year of initiative, scope, and country locale showed a dependent relationship (P = 0.022, P = 0.003, and P = 0.021, resp.). Conclusion. Our findings demonstrate the rapid growth in embracing the concept of one health, particularly in developed countries over the past six years. The advantages and benefits of this approach in tackling zoonoses are manifold, yet they are still not seemingly being embraced in developing countries where zoonoses have the greatest impact. PMID:24634782

  17. Rural Allied Medical Business Occupations (RAMBO). Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gloria

    A partnership was formed to address the crisis that rural health care facilities in rural Nebraska face in attracting and hiring trained health care workers. The Rural Allied Medical Business Occupations (RAMBO) project trained economically disadvantaged individuals in high technology medical fields. Five objectives were outlined in the project:…

  18. Turning gadflies into allies.

    PubMed

    Yaziji, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Multinational companies are the driving force behind globalization, but they are also the source of many of its most painful consequences, including currency crises, cross-border pollution, and overfishing. These problems remain unsolved because they are beyond the scope of individual governments; transnational organizations have also proved unequal to the task. Nonprofit, nongovernmental organizations have leaped into the breach. To force policy changes, they have seized on all forms of modern persuasion to influence public sentiment toward global traders, manufacturers, and investors. By partnering with NGOs instead of opposing them, companies can avoid costly conflict and can use NGOs' assets to gain competitive advantage. So far, however, most companies have proved ill equipped to deal with NGOs. Large companies know how to compete on the basis of product attributes and price. But NGO attacks focus on production methods and their spillover effects, which are often noneconomic. Similarly, NGOs are able to convert companies' standard competitive strengths--such as size and wide market awareness of their brands--into liabilities. That's because the wealthier and better known a company is, the juicier the target it makes. Emboldened by their successes, NGOs continue to take on new causes. By partnering with NGOs instead of reflexively opposing them, companies could draw on NGOs' key strengths--legitimacy, awareness of social forces, distinct networks, and specialized technical expertise--which most companies could use more of. And with NGOs as allies and guides, companies should also be able to accelerate innovation, foresee shifts in demand, shape legislation affecting them, and, in effect, set technical and regulatory standards for their industries.

  19. Health information technology in primary health care in developing countries: a literature review.

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, Elaine; Facchini, Luiz Augusto; Maia, Maria de Fatima Santos

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the debate and initiatives concerning the use of information technology (IT) in primary health care in developing countries. The literature from 1992-2002 was identified from searches of the MEDLINE, Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Literature Database (LILACS), Cochrane Library and Web of Science databases. The search identified 884 references, 350 of which were classified according to the scheme described by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). For the analysis of advantages, problems and perspectives of IT applications and systems, 52 articles were selected according to their potential contribution to the primary health-care processes in non-developed countries. These included: 10 on electronic patient registries (EPR), 22 on process and programmatic action evaluation and management systems (PPAEM) and 20 on clinical decision-support systems (CDS). The main advantages, limitations and perspectives are discussed. PMID:15640923

  20. Integrative Literature Review: A Review of Literature Related to Geographical Information Systems, Healthcare Access, and Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Barbara Ann

    2008-01-01

    Differences in access to healthcare services and the resulting adverse health outcomes are major public health priorities. The Institute of Medicine and the Department of Health and Human Services have identified the need for strategies to improve access to healthcare services and to support the improvement of health outcomes. The literature documents health disparities associated with healthcare access and health outcomes from a geographic perspective. Place of residence, location of healthcare services, and geography in general are important factors in the analysis of health. Geographical information systems (GISs) are an emerging technology in the analysis of health from a geographical or location context. As a type of information technology, GISs are potentially powerful assessment tools for the investigation of healthcare access, health outcomes, and the possible resulting health disparities. Their ability to integrate health data with mapping functions allows for visualization, exploration, and modeling of health patterns. Application of GIS technology using health data can help in describing and explaining disparities in healthcare access and health outcomes. The studies reviewed demonstrated the use of GISs to investigate various aspects of healthcare access and health outcomes, including environmental variables of Lyme disease, sociodemographic variables and teen pregnancy, geographical disparities in breast cancer mortality by racial groups, PCP and AIDS prevalence, and factors of a leptospirosis disease outbreak. The literature reviewed shows effective integration and analysis of health data using GIS technology. PMID:18698429

  1. Health economic analyses of psoriasis management: a systematic literature search.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, Mandy; Krensel, Magdalene; Augustin, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    In the course of the chronic skin disease psoriasis, where a variety of treatment interventions is available, a strong growth of health economic studies comparing treatment costs and benefits can be noticed. The objective was to identify health economic evaluations of psoriasis treatments that have been published to date. Of particular interest were the mostly used analysis and outcome parameters, the compared treatments, and the question, if available health economic studies may be used to perform a meta-analysis of qualitative findings. A systematic literature search using PubMed Medline, Ovid Medline, and Cochrane Library was performed for articles, published and available until mid of January 2016. Among the key words were the terms "psoriasis" and "cost-effectiveness". The search resulted in 318 articles without duplicates. Thereof 60 health economic analyses in psoriasis management were identified. Most of these are cost-effectiveness evaluations (45). The clinical parameter PASI (Psoriasis Area Severity Index) is the most often used cost-effectiveness outcome (33) followed by the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) (6). In case of cost-utility analyses, QALYs (quality-adjusted life-years) were mostly generated with the help of EuroQol five dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D) (12), which was partly based on PASI and DLQI values. The majority of health economic studies is focusing on the direct medical and non-medical costs without consideration of productivity losses. Almost 70 % of 60 publications were conducted in Europe. Overall, most considered systemic treatments were the biological agents etanercept (36), adalimumab (27), and infliximab (26) followed by ustekinumab (17) and phototherapy (incl. UV-B, PUVA/psoralen combined with UV-A) (14). Comparisons including only topical treatments mostly focused on vitamin D treatment (14), corticosteroids (13), and coal tar products (6) followed by dithranol (5) and tazarotene (4). Given the setting, compared

  2. [Popular education in health and nutrition: literature review].

    PubMed

    Mueses De Molina, C

    1993-01-01

    This literature review of popular education in health and nutrition is intended to provide the necessary theoretical framework for proposals and programs for human resource development in food and nutrition. The work contains a summary of the objectives, purposes, and methodology of popular education in general, a discussion of applications of popular education techniques to health and nutrition education, and a description of some projects based on popular education. Popular education was developed in Latin America by Paulo Freire and others as a response to political domination. Its basic objective was to make the oppressed masses aware of their condition and able to struggle for the transformation of society. Popular education views community participation, development of consciousness, and integration with social and economic activity as fundamental attributes. Participation should be developed through community organizations and should continue for the duration of the educational intervention. The right of all persons to participate in a plane of equality should be recognized. Community or popular education should be conceived as a process of permanent education that will continue throughout the lifetime of individuals and groups. Popular education is directed toward population sectors excluded from participation in employment, family, community, mass communications, education, and leisure activities. Such population sectors are concentrated in the urban periphery and in rural areas. Abandonment of traditional educational techniques and assumption of an active role by community members are elements in development of the methodology of popular education. Steps in the methodology include investigation of possible themes, selection of themes to serve as points of departure, definition of the problem, and action programs. Popular education in nutrition and health begins by asking what problems need to be remedied. The entire process of training and education in

  3. Kin of coauthorship in five decades of health science literature

    PubMed Central

    Prosperi, Mattia; Buchan, Iain; Fanti, Iuri; Meloni, Sandro; Palladino, Pietro; Torvik, Vetle I.

    2016-01-01

    Family background—kinship—can propagate careers. The evidence for academic nepotism is littered with complex associations and disputed causal inferences. Surname clustering, albeit with very careful consideration of surnames’ flows across regions and time periods, can be used to reflect family ties. We examined surname patterns in the health science literature, by country, across five decades. Over 21 million papers indexed in the MEDLINE/PubMed database were analyzed. We identified relevant country-specific kinship trends over time and found that authors who are part of a kin tend to occupy central positions in their collaborative networks. Just as kin build potent academic networks with their own resources, societies may do well to provide equivalent support for talented individuals with fewer resources, on the periphery of networks. PMID:27457939

  4. Information overload within the health care system: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Hall, Amanda; Walton, Graham

    2004-06-01

    There is a widespread view held by health clinicians that their work effectiveness is impaired by 'information overload.' Building upon a previous work by Wilson, a review of the literature was undertaken to look for the evidence of this. It was found that the literature, particularly in the context of the clinical environment, was limited. This review explores the diverse overarching theories of information overload, effects of the phenomenon that are perceived to occur and proposed solutions to this problem. Many of the papers noted an information explosion but only three authors explicitly attempted to measure both the quantity and the complexity of this information. It was also found that the typology of the information studied was severely limited with most studies exploring information such as guidelines, access to journals, research findings and other knowledge intensive areas. Solutions proposed seem to concentrate on technological means rather than exploring the use of humans either in management of information or as a step in the filtering process.

  5. Chemicals and Allied Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, R. F.; Hovious, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from chemical industry, covering publications of 1976-77. This review covers: (1) wastewater treatment by-product type; (2) biological, and physical/chemical treatments; and (3) source treatment. A list of 80 references is also presented. (HM)

  6. Heterosexual Allies: A Descriptive Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Susan B.; Davis, Denise S.

    2010-01-01

    Forty-six heterosexual members of a college-based gay/straight alliance organization were surveyed to investigate characteristics of students who commit to acting as allies in reducing sexual prejudice. Assessment focused on the students' history of intergroup contact and exposure to sexual prejudice prior to joining the gay/straight alliance,…

  7. Review of the epidemiologic literature on EMF and Health.

    PubMed Central

    Ahlbom, I C; Cardis, E; Green, A; Linet, M; Savitz, D; Swerdlow, A

    2001-01-01

    Exposures to extremely low-frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMF) emanating from the generation, transmission, and use of electricity are a ubiquitous part of modern life. Concern about potential adverse health effects was initially brought to prominence by an epidemiologic report two decades ago from Denver on childhood cancer. We reviewed the now voluminous epidemiologic literature on EMF and risks of chronic disease and conclude the following: a) The quality of epidemiologic studies on this topic has improved over time and several of the recent studies on childhood leukemia and on cancer associated with occupational exposure are close to the limit of what can realistically be achieved in terms of size of study and methodological rigor. b) Exposure assessment is a particular difficulty of EMF epidemiology, in several respects: i) The exposure is imperceptible, ubiquitous, has multiple sources, and can vary greatly over time and short distances. ii) The exposure period of relevance is before the date at which measurements can realistically be obtained and of unknown duration and induction period. iii) The appropriate exposure metric is not known and there are no biological data from which to impute it. c) In the absence of experimental evidence and given the methodological uncertainties in the epidemiologic literature, there is no chronic disease for which an etiological relation to EMF can be regarded as established. d) There has been a large body of high quality data for childhood cancer, and also for adult leukemia and brain tumor in relation to occupational exposure. Among all the outcomes evaluated in epidemiologic studies of EMF, childhood leukemia in relation to postnatal exposures above 0.4 microT is the one for which there is most evidence of an association. The relative risk has been estimated at 2.0 (95% confidence limit: 1.27-3.13) in a large pooled analysis. This is unlikely to be due to chance but, may be, in part, due to bias. This is

  8. School Nurse Workload: A Scoping Review of Acute Care, Community Health, and Mental Health Nursing Workload Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endsley, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this scoping review was to survey the most recent (5 years) acute care, community health, and mental health nursing workload literature to understand themes and research avenues that may be applicable to school nursing workload research. The search for empirical and nonempirical literature was conducted using search engines such as…

  9. The World Health Organization Library (Geneva) and Health Literature Services Programme.

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, B

    1988-01-01

    The origins and functions of the World Health Organization (WHO) Library and the global, regional, and national objectives of the WHO Health Literature Services Program (HLSP) are reviewed. WHO is an aggregate of nations and not a supra-national body. With limited resources and unlimited needs, HLSP is involved in surveys, training, regional medical libraries, national and regional networks, bibliographic services and document delivery, promotion, coordination, and communication. The basic concept of HLSP eschews internationally-conceived, self-contained technical projects in favor of broad programs based on national planning. Small rural centers receive more attention than large urban hospitals, and preventive medicine together with health education and community involvement are of more immediate concern than curative medicine. National self-reliance implies national initiative but not necessarily national self-sufficiency. Recent planning and implementation of HLSP activities are described. PMID:3370376

  10. Review of Literature on the Control of Nurse Burnout. Societal Factors Affecting Education Seminar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carraway, Cassandra Todd

    As reflected in the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, no articles with the term burnout in their titles were published prior to 1978. However, by 1980 the number of articles about burnout had increased dramatically in an explosion of awareness of the problem. Various writers and researchers have identified the stressors…

  11. "Great" Literature as a Teaching Tool in the Education of Mental Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorelick, Kenneth

    According to Dr. Gorelick, "fictional literature has unique assets that live clinical experience lacks," thus setting the tone for his paper. Literature serves many purposes; a form of communication; a tool for making the reader understand her/his subjectivity; and most importantly for the mental health situations, "it (literature) represents the…

  12. The Current Scope of Health Disparities in the U.S.: A Review of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettit, Michele L.; Nienhaus, Alyson R.

    2010-01-01

    This review of literature examines leading contributors and mediators of health disparities in the United States. Specifically, poverty, education, and health are addressed. Special emphasis is placed on implications of health risk behaviors and health education for select populations and settings. Existing and suggested strategies for addressing…

  13. Health literacy in kidney disease: Review of the literature and implications for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepika; Green, Jamie Alton

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy is the capacity of an individual to understand information related to a disease in order to make an informed decision. In patients with kidney diseases, studies have reported increasing impact of limited health literacy on health outcomes. Our paper discusses current literature on health literacy in kidney diseases. PMID:26981438

  14. Community-Based Inquiry in Allied Health Biochemistry Promotes Equity by Improving Critical Thinking for Women and Showing Promise for Increasing Content Gains for Ethnic Minority Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goeden, Terrah J.; Kurtz, Martha J.; Quitadamo, Ian J.; Thomas, Carin

    2015-01-01

    In the Community-Based Inquiry (CBI) instructional method, cooperative student groups complete case study activities based on scientific literature and conduct their own laboratory investigations that address authentic community needs. This study compared critical thinking and content knowledge outcomes between traditional Introduction to…

  15. [The national health system and health policies in the Brazilian dentistry literature, 1986-1993].

    PubMed

    Narvai, P C; Almeida, E S

    1998-01-01

    The Brazilian scientific literature on social and preventive dentistry from 1986 to 1993 was identified and analyzed to verify whether themes of papers referred to health policy and the national health system. Published scientific articles were used as the unit of analysis for the study. An analytical survey was conducted considering the following variables, amongst others: author's institutional affiliation; author's title; author's areas of interest; type of research; type of article; and research funding sources. Articles reviewed were published between the First and Second National Oral Health Conferences. There were 386 articles published in 19 journals, by at least 866 authors. More than 75% of the studies came from public universities. RGO was the largest publisher in this field, followed by Revista da APCD. Original articles accounted for 56.7% of the studies, while 30.3% were reviews and essays. The majority of the authors were from the State of São Paulo. Male writers predominated. A 'quantitative deficiency' was identified, since scientific production remained below 50% of its potential. Health policy was considered a specific issue in only 3 articles (0.8%) while 7 (1.8%) discussed the national health system.

  16. Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verner, Zenobia, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    This issue provides a selection of articles about literature and the teaching of literature. Titles include "Sin, Salvation, and Grace in 'The Scarlet Letter,'""'The Road Not Taken': A Study in Ambiguity,""In Search of Shakespeare: The Essential Years,""Right Deeds for Wrong Reasons: Teaching the Bible as…

  17. [Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Katherine; And Others

    GRADES OR AGES: K-12. SUBJECT MATTER: Literature. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide starts with an overview of literature topics for grades 4-12, followed by suggested activities, a list of supplementary books for elementary grades, and a table listing specific skills. The remainder of the guide deals with ten cardinal concerns and…

  18. Health Literacy Programs for Older Adults: A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manafo, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Older adults make up the fastest growing age group in North America. This has demanded increased attention in supporting the health and well-being of this population and, in particular, the role of health information in promoting the health and well-being of older adults. Increased availability and accessibility of information as well as a greater…

  19. Built Environment and Elderly Population Health: A Comprehensive Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Garin, Noe; Olaya, Beatriz; Miret, Marta; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis; Power, Michael; Bucciarelli, Paola; Haro, Josep Maria

    2014-01-01

    Global population aging over recent years has been linked to poorer health outcomes and higher healthcare expenditure. Policies focusing on healthy aging are currently being developed but a complete understanding of health determinants is needed to guide these efforts. The built environment and other external factors have been added to the International Classification of Functioning as important determinants of health and disability. Although the relationship between the built environment and health has been widely examined in working age adults, research focusing on elderly people is relatively recent. In this review, we provide a comprehensive synthesis of the evidence on the built environment and health in the elderly. PMID:25356084

  20. Access to care and the allied oral health care workforce in Kansas: perceptions of Kansas dental hygienists and scaling dental assistants.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando; Peters, Ralph; Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Overman, Pamela R; Stover, Lauren

    2006-03-01

    Access to oral health care continues to be a problem in the United States. Research has called for innovative approaches to improve access to oral health care and reduce oral health care disparities. Successful alternate approaches have been reported. In 1998 the Kansas Legislature passed a proposal to enhance access to care and manpower needs by allowing dental assistants to provide supragingival scaling, a service traditionally assigned to dental hygienists. In 2000, Mitchell et al. investigated the perceptions of Kansas dental hygienists and scaling dental assistants in relation to House Bill 2724 (HB 2724), which allows dental assistants to perform coronal scaling. The intent of the study was to collect baseline data in relation to HB 2724. The purpose of the present study was to follow up on the impact of HB 2724 six years after legislation. Both groups report satisfaction with their professions: scaling dental assistants believe the delivery of care in Kansas has changed, and areas of Kansas previously noted as dental health professional shortage areas are now served by either a registered dental hygienist or scaling dental assistant.

  1. Parents' Role in Teenage Health Problems: Allies or Adversaries?. Meeting Highlights and Background Briefing Report. Report of a Family Impact Seminar (Washington, D.C., September 21, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ooms, Theodora; Owen, Todd

    This report contains highlights from a seminar on the role of parents in helping adolescents with their health problems. Comments by these panelists is summarized: Judy Areen, dean, Georgetown University Law Center; Barbara Popper, founder and board member of Children in Hospitals, Inc. and resource specialist at the Federation for Children with…

  2. Examining the Importance of Incorporating Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Training Core Competencies into Allied Health Curricula as Perceived by College Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Tammy

    2013-01-01

    Preparation for responding to emergency events that does not warrant outside help beyond the local community resources or responding to disaster events that is beyond the capabilities of the local community both require first responders and health care professionals to have interdisciplinary skills needed to function as a team for saving lives. To…

  3. Systematic literature review of Internet interventions across health behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Su-I; Charlery, Su-Anne Robyn; Roberson, Kiersten

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This review examines Internet interventions aiming to change health behaviors in the general population. Methods: Internet health interventions in the USA published between January 2005 and December 2013 were identified through Medline and CINAHL. Keywords used were (Internet or e-health or social media or web) paired with (intervention or program*). A total of 38 articles met all criteria and were reviewed. Results: Studies were analyzed by targeted health behavior interventions: tobacco (5), alcohol (4), weight loss (7), physical activity (PA) (7), nutrition (2), PA and nutrition combined (5), HIV or sexual health (4), and chronic diseases (4). Interventions ranged from one session to 24  weeks (average 6–12 weeks). Common strategies used, including web-based information, tailored feedback, weekly e-mails, goal setting, and self-assessment. Social cognitive theory and the transtheoretical models were the most commonly used frameworks. Recruitment strategies were typically media based varied by settings and populations. Except for the tobacco interventions, the majority studies yielded significant outcomes. Conclusion: This review provides updates and synthesized knowledge on the design and consistent effectiveness of Internet interventions across health behaviors. Results have implications for public health and healthcare professionals, as they play a key role in developing and delivering health promotion interventions as well as in assisting the communities and clients serviced obtaining evidence-based health information. PMID:25750795

  4. Strategic groups in health care: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Perryman, Martha M; Rivers, Patrick A

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the literature that discusses the relationship between strategic group membership and performance in the nursing home industry. This literature review examines the relationship between organizational structure and performance in the nursing home industry. Results from these studies suggest industry stability of segmentation; limitation of strategic choice due to high mobility barriers (as represented by facility, staffing and location variables); quality is controlled by the existing combinations of industry regulation and market competition; and the existence of performance differences among strategic groups.

  5. Are We Promoting the Health of People with Physical Mobility Impairments? A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Donna Marie; Adams, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine whether the health education and health promotion literature is inclusive of people with physical mobility impairments. The English government Department of Health statistics indicate that the number of people living with physical mobility impairments is increasing and this is largely a result of chronic illness…

  6. Mental Health and Students with Disabilities: A Review of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Julie M.; Jarvis, Jane M.

    2013-01-01

    Students with disabilities are at increased risk of experiencing mental health difficulties, but may not be recognised as an at-risk population in the design of school-based prevention and intervention efforts. Understanding the link between disability and mental health is important for school psychologists and guidance counsellors, teachers, and…

  7. Review of the Literature on Asian American Mental Health Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Trang Ngoc

    Within the mental health treatment field there is an underutilization of services by Asian Americans. Researchers have questioned how to lessen the gap between the number of Asian Americans who need mental health services and the significantly lower number who successfully use these services. A review of current research points out that matching…

  8. The transposability of the Mediterranean-type diet in non-Mediterranean regions: application to the physician/allied health team.

    PubMed

    Speed, C

    2004-12-01

    Studies are consistently declaring that the Mediterranean-type diet is transposable to non-Mediterranean regions. The nutritional end points of Med-type eating appear to be achievable through foods from a variety of traditions and appear to support predetermined expectations surrounding food preparation, choice, taste and sensory appeal. The broad emphasis on minimally processed plants and their products (vegetables, fruit, legumes, wholegrains, nuts, seeds and oils); low fat dairy, fish, less emphasis on animal products and removal of partially hydrogenated fats has piqued the attention of health professionals who are interested in arresting the incidence of chronic disease. The theoretical underpinnings of Med-type eating have driven new understandings in dietary guidelines, which is especially timely as well-marketed fad diets loom large on the current health horizon.

  9. Health Education Research and Practice Literature on Hispanic Health Issues: Have We Lost Sight of the Largest Minority Population?

    PubMed

    Price, James H; Khubchandani, Jagdish

    2016-03-01

    Hispanics constitute the largest racial/ethnic minority population in the United States and are the fastest growing segment of the population. Knowledge about health needs and practices, effective health promotion programs, and health policy making for Hispanics has the potential to improve population health outcomes for this group. Continued research and practice literature will aid in accomplishing these objectives. However, little is known about the extent of health education-related literature available on Hispanic health issues. In this review, we analyzed research and practice publications in all health education-related journals to assess the volume of articles published on Hispanic health issues. We found that the portion of journal articles devoted to Hispanic health issues varied widely among the journals and that there was a very limited emphasis on Hispanic health-related issues. Journal editors and editorial board members may need to be more proactive in soliciting manuscripts on Hispanic health, and our practitioners may have to improve their professional skills and cultural competence in order to work with Hispanic populations to produce research and practice literature that is of adequate quantity and quality to help improve Hispanics' health.

  10. Rural hospitals: a literature synthesis and health services research agenda.

    PubMed Central

    Moscovice, I S

    1989-01-01

    The economic decline of rural America and an inability to respond to pressures created by the evolving American health care system are making it increasingly hard for rural hospitals to survive. PMID:2645251

  11. Health sector responses to intimate partner violence: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zweigenthal, Virginia; Joyner, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a common and serious public health concern, particularly in South Africa, but it is not well managed in primary care. Aim This review aims to summarise the current state of knowledge regarding health sector-based interventions for IPV, their integration into health systems and services and the perspectives of service users and healthcare workers on IPV care, focusing on the South African context. Method PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Google Scholar were searched between January 2012 and May 2014. All types of study design were included, critically appraised and summarised. Results Exposure to IPV leads to wide-ranging and serious health effects. There is sufficient evidence that intervening in IPV in primary care can improve outcomes. Women who have experienced IPV have described an appropriate response by healthcare providers to be non-judgmental, understanding and empathetic. IPV interventions that are complex, comprehensive and utilise systems-wide approaches have been most effective, but system- and society-level barriers hamper implementation. Gender inequities should not be overlooked when responding to IPV. Conclusion Further evaluations of health sector responses to IPV are needed, in order to assist health services to determine the most appropriate models of care, how these can be integrated into current systems and how they can be supported in managing IPV. The need for this research should not prevent health services and healthcare providers from implementing IPV care, but rather should guide the development of rigorous contextually-appropriate evaluations. PMID:26245388

  12. The Role of Physician Assistants in Rural Health Care: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Lisa R.; Hooker, Roderick S.; Yates, Kathryn L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A literature review was performed to assess the role of physician assistants (PAs) in rural health care. Four categories were examined: scope of practice, physician perceptions, community perceptions, and retention/recruitment. Methods: A search of the literature from 1974 to 2008 was undertaken by probing the electronic bibliographic…

  13. Changing Multiple Adolescent Health Behaviors through School-Based Interventions: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Vincent; de Leeuw, Johannes Rob Josephus; de Harder, Alinda; Schrijvers, Augustinus Jacobus Petrus

    2013-01-01

    Background: In approaches to health promotion in adolescents, unhealthy behaviors are no longer regarded as independent processes, but as interrelated. This article presents a systematic literature review of school-based interventions targeting multiple adolescent behaviors simultaneously. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed…

  14. How Allies Collaborate; The NATO Training Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandevanter, E., Jr.

    A survey was made of North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) coordination of training programs for allied military forces and its implications about collaboration among allies in peacetime. Three types of training were analyzed: (1) higher training, or the coordination of large military formations; (2) unit training of smaller teams; (3)…

  15. Allied Dental Education: Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVore, Linda Rubinstein

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the status of the three allied dental disciplines (dental assisting, dental technology, and dental hygiene) gives a historical overview on allied dental programs, assesses their current status and enrollment trends, identifies critical issues affecting educational programs, and outlines a framework for innovation in recruitment and…

  16. [Use of social marketing in population health programs (literature review)].

    PubMed

    Kholmogorova, G T; Gladysheva, N V

    1991-01-01

    At present health education programmes abroad make wide use of social marketing strategy. Unlike commercial marketing whose purpose is competition and struggle for the expansion of commodity markets, social marketing is aimed at disseminating certain ideas or introducing certain practices, using largely the technological base and strategy of commercial marketing. The authors give 8 fundamental principles of social marketing (consumer orientation, the theory of barter, the analysis of audience and segmentation, special surveys to detect the orientation of population, the choice of channels for information transmission application of "marketing mixture", control of ongoing programme and marketing management). Application fields of social marketing in public health are discussed.

  17. Access of primary and secondary literature by health personnel in an academic health center: implications for open access*

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Ryan M.; Moorhead, Laura; O'Brien, Bridget; Willinsky, John

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The research sought to ascertain the types and quantity of research evidence accessed by health personnel through PubMed and UpToDate in a university medical center over the course of a year in order to better estimate the impact that increasing levels of open access to biomedical research can be expected to have on clinical practice in the years ahead. Methods: Web log data were gathered from the 5,042 health personnel working in the Stanford University Hospitals (SUH) during 2011. Data were analyzed for access to the primary literature (abstracts and full-text) through PubMed and UpToDate and to the secondary literature, represented by UpToDate (research summaries), to establish the frequency and nature of literature consulted. Results: In 2011, SUH health personnel accessed 81,851 primary literature articles and visited UpToDate 110,336 times. Almost a third of the articles (24,529) accessed were reviews. Twenty percent (16,187) of the articles viewed were published in 2011. Conclusion: When it is available, health personnel in a clinical care setting frequently access the primary literature. While further studies are needed, this preliminary finding speaks to the value of the National Institutes of Health public access policy and the need for medical librarians and educators to prepare health personnel for increasing public access to medical research. PMID:23930091

  18. Quality of Mental Health Care for Nursing Home Residents: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, David C.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Rome, Vincent F.; Bartels, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Because of the high proportion of nursing home residents with a mental illness other than dementia, the quality of mental health care in nursing homes is a major clinical and policy issue. The authors apply Donabedian's framework for assessing quality of care based on the triad of structure, process, and outcome-based measures in reviewing the literature on the quality of mental health care in nursing homes. Quality measures used within the literature include mental health consultations and hospitalizations, inappropriate use of medications, and mental health survey deficiencies. Factors related to the resident's welfare (nurse staffing), provider norms (locality), and financial factors (payer mix) were associated with the quality of mental health care. Although future research is necessary, the extant literature suggests that persons with mental illness are frequently admitted to nursing homes and their care is often of poor quality and related to a series of resident and facility factors. PMID:20223943

  19. Literature Reviews on Wind Turbines and Health: Are They Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Brett; Jeffery, Roy D.; Krogh, Carmen M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Industrial wind turbines (IWTs) are a new source of community noise to which relatively few people have yet been exposed. IWTs are being erected at a rapid pace in proximity to human habitation. Some people report experiencing adverse health effects as a result of living in the environs of IWTs. In order to address public concerns and assess the…

  20. Health Effects of Electromagnetic Fields: A Review of Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, George L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) disturb cell homeostasis at very low intensities by influencing discrete intracellular magnetic fields. The article reviews current research about the health effects of EMF, examining historical implications, childhood studies, adult studies, and popular press reports, and…

  1. Cultural Dance and Health: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olvera, Anna E.

    2008-01-01

    Physical activity has many physical and mental health outcomes. However, physical inactivity continues to be common. Dance, specifically cultural dance, is a type of physical activity that may appeal to some who are not otherwise active and may be a form of activity that is more acceptable than others in certain cultures. The purpose of this paper…

  2. Effectiveness of Health Promotion Programmes for Truck Drivers: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Mandy K.; Yousuf, Bilal; Bigelow, Philip Lloyd; Van Eerd, Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To review the characteristics of effective health promotion interventions for reducing chronic diseases and their risk factors in truck drivers. Methods: MEDLINE (PubMed), SCOPUS, Web of Science Conference Proceedings, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), and the National Transportation Library were…

  3. Psychosocial Determinants of Health among Incarcerated Black Women: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Mahaffey, Carlos; Stevens-Watkins, Danelle; Knighton, Joi-Sheree'

    2016-01-01

    Black women are disproportionately incarcerated and experience greater health outcomes compared to White and Hispanic women. This systematic literature review aims to identify the major psychosocial determinants of health and service utilization among incarcerated Black women. The ecological model for health behavior was used to frame the literature presented and explain how individual, interpersonal, and societal level factors impact health. Nineteen articles met inclusion criteria for this review. Psychosocial factors were identified at each level such as: mental health problems (individual); sexual behavior (interpersonal); and dysfunctional/negative relationships (community). The factors form a dynamic relationship that influences the health and service utilization of Black women and do not exist independently. Future research should examine within-group differences to highlight the unique needs and culture within the Black community in the context of psychosocial determinants. This synthesis of relevant studies can serve to inform change in correctional policies, practices, and reduce health disparities. PMID:27133512

  4. Popular education for health promotion and community empowerment: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Noelle

    2012-09-01

    While there is now general agreement that the most effective way to promote health and decrease health inequities is by creating more just economic, social and political conditions, there is much less agreement about concrete ways in which public health practitioners can work with communities to address inequities such as poverty, racism and powerlessness. Practical strategies are desperately needed. Popular education, also known as Freirian and empowerment education, has been used successfully to create more equitable conditions around the world for >50 years. Its use to improve health has been documented in the public health literature since the early 1980s. Nonetheless, it remains largely unknown and its potential unrealized in mainstream public health circles in the industrialized world. In order to explore the potential of popular education as a tool to address inequities and improve health, a systematic review of the peer-reviewed international literature was conducted. Findings revealed that popular education is an effective method for enhancing empowerment and improving health. However, the existing literature does not provide empirical evidence that popular education is more effective than traditional education at increasing health knowledge and empowerment and changing health behavior. In order to fully understand the potential of popular education as a tool to eliminate health inequities and to advocate effectively for its use, further studies are needed that utilize mixed methods, participatory approaches and experimental or quasi-experimental designs.

  5. Using Interpreters in Mental Health Counseling: A Literature Review and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paone, Tina R.; Malott, Krista M.

    2008-01-01

    Limited understanding of the challenges inherent in counselor-interpreter collaboration may potentially result in inadequate or ineffective mental health services. To provide guidelines for effective mental health assistance of clients who are English language learners, the authors review the literature regarding the partnership between counselors…

  6. Early Intervention in the Mental Health of Young People: A Literature Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Cathy; Martin, Graham; Kosky, Robert; O'Hanlon, Anne

    This literature review was undertaken as part of the National Mental Health Strategy on the development and maintenance of a national early intervention network for mental health in young people. Its purpose is to facilitate the development of innovative early intervention services across Australia by developing and maintaining a national network…

  7. The Technology of Evidence-Based Practice: Tools for Navigating the Health Sciences Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Whitney

    2011-01-01

    Medical and health sciences libraries have incorporated the elements of evidence-based practice (EBP) into their reference services, instruction, and online resource development for years. While EBP focuses on the use of medical and health sciences literature in the clinical environment (i.e., making decisions about how to treat a particular…

  8. A Critical Interpretive Synthesis of the Literature Linking Music and Adolescent Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFerran, Katrina Skewes; Garrido, Sandra; Saarikallio, Suvi

    2016-01-01

    There is a diverse literature that explores the relationship between youth, music, and mental health, with few attempts at systematic synthesis. This critical interpretive review included 33 studies published between 2000 and 2012 investigating the relationship between music and the mental health of young people, particularly targeting depression.…

  9. Mapping the literature of dental assisting.

    PubMed Central

    Hook, S A; Wagner, C F

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify core journals and the databases that provide access to these journals for the field of dental assisting. This study was completed as a part of the Medical Library Association (MLA) Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section's project to map the literature of allied health. There were three original journals selected for analysis using the prescribed methodology, Dental Assistant, the journal of the American Dental Assistants Association; Journal of the CDAA, the journal of the Canadian Dental Assistants' Association; and Dental Teamwork, published by the American Dental Association. Dental Teamwork ceased publication in December 1996; however, it was considered a necessary part of the analysis due to its extensive coverage of dental assisting as well as its numerous scientific articles with references. In Dental Assistant, there were 16 source articles, containing 206 citations. In Dental Teamwork, there were 31 source articles with 308 citations. In Journal of the CDAA, there were only 3 source articles with 14 citations. Bradford's Law of Scattering was applied to the journal citations. Four databases, MEDLINE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, and HEALTH were analyzed for their coverage of these cited journals. This study may encourage the dental assisting profession to take a close look at its existing journals and to consider enhancing the content of these journals or the publication of additional journals in the field. Dental assistants of today need substantive literature that deals with all aspects of their chosen profession in order to meet the challenges of providing dental health care in the future. PMID:10427427

  10. Mother nature's disasters and their health effects: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Jones, Joan

    2006-01-01

    Each year global warming and climate changes are affecting Mother Nature, causing extreme weather events to occur (Patz & Khaliq, 2002). The impact of these disasters uproots populations, causes massive infrastructure destruction, and sets the stage for an increase of population mortality and morbidity. Before, during, and after the disaster, nurses provide health care to those in need. Nurses should be aware of the anticipated diseases, traumas, and short- and long-term illnesses that occur following the different types of natural disasters. The purpose of this article is to review existing data and alert nurses to the potential threats they may face following a natural disaster.

  11. Spirituality in nursing and health-related literature: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Sessanna, Loralee; Finnell, Deborah; Jezewski, Mary Ann

    2007-12-01

    Spirituality has become an increasingly popular concept among the nursing and health-related literature. The purpose for conducting this concept analysis, guided by Walker and Avant's methodology, was to (a) examine how spirituality has been used within the current body of nursing and health-related literature, (b) clarify the meaning of spirituality by discovering what this concept's current critical attributes/characteristics are, and (c) propose a definition of spirituality based on the concept analysis findings. A total of 90 references were reviewed, including 73 nursing and health-related references. Concept analysis findings revealed that spirituality was defined within four main themes in the nursing and health-related literature: (a) spirituality as religious systems of beliefs and values (spirituality = religion); (b) spirituality as life meaning, purpose, and connection with others; (c) spirituality as nonreligious systems of beliefs and values; and (d) spirituality as metaphysical or transcendental phenomena.

  12. A Framework and Methodology for Navigating Disaster and Global Health in Crisis Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jennifer L.; Burkle, Frederick M.

    2013-01-01

    Both ‘disasters’ and ‘global health in crisis’ research has dramatically grown due to the ever-increasing frequency and magnitude of crises around the world. Large volumes of peer-reviewed literature are not only a testament to the field’s value and evolution, but also present an unprecedented outpouring of seemingly unmanageable information across a wide array of crises and disciplines. Disaster medicine, health and humanitarian assistance, global health and public health disaster literature all lie within the disaster and global health in crisis literature spectrum and are increasingly accepted as multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary disciplines. Researchers, policy makers, and practitioners now face a new challenge; that of accessing this expansive literature for decision-making and exploring new areas of research. Individuals are also reaching beyond the peer-reviewed environment to grey literature using search engines like Google Scholar to access policy documents, consensus reports and conference proceedings. What is needed is a method and mechanism with which to search and retrieve relevant articles from this expansive body of literature. This manuscript presents both a framework and workable process for a diverse group of users to navigate the growing peer-reviewed and grey disaster and global health in crises literature. Methods: Disaster terms from textbooks, peer-reviewed and grey literature were used to design a framework of thematic clusters and subject matter ‘nodes’. A set of 84 terms, selected from 143 curated terms was organized within each node reflecting topics within the disaster and global health in crisis literature. Terms were crossed with one another and the term ‘disaster’. The results were formatted into tables and matrices. This process created a roadmap of search terms that could be applied to the PubMed database. Each search in the matrix or table results in a listed number of articles. This process was applied to

  13. Health Information Technology in Oncology Practice: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Fasola, G; Macerelli, M; Follador, A; Rihawi, K; Aprile, G; Mea, V Della

    2014-01-01

    The adoption and implementation of information technology are dramatically remodeling healthcare services all over the world, resulting in an unstoppable and sometimes overwhelming process. After the introduction of the main elements of electronic health records and a description of what every cancer-care professional should be familiar with, we present a narrative review focusing on the current use of computerized clinical information and decision systems in oncology practice. Following a detailed analysis of the many coveted goals that oncologists have reached while embracing informatics progress, the authors suggest how to overcome the main obstacles for a complete physicians’ engagement and for a full information technology adoption, and try to forecast what the future holds. PMID:25506195

  14. Lifting teams in health care facilities: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Haiduven, Donna

    2003-05-01

    1. Manual lifting and transfer activities are job tasks frequently associated with back injuries in nursing personnel. One approach with potential to decrease these injuries is the lifting team. 2. In program evaluations completed to date, there have been numerous benefits and several limitations attributed to use of lifting teams in health care facilities. 3. Benefits of lifting teams include reductions in lost time workdays, restricted workdays, workers' compensation claims, and injuries to lifting team members; satisfaction of patients, staff, and lifting team members; and capacity of the lifting team to absorb the majority of high risk lifts and transfers on shifts in which they operate. 4. Lifting teams may not be appropriate for all settings, require infrastructure and lifting team equipment to support their use, and require careful consideration related to staffing. However, when their use is appropriate, efforts to overcome their limitations can be accomplished with careful evaluation of outcome measures and indicators.

  15. Health information technology in oncology practice: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Fasola, G; Macerelli, M; Follador, A; Rihawi, K; Aprile, G; Della Mea, V

    2014-01-01

    The adoption and implementation of information technology are dramatically remodeling healthcare services all over the world, resulting in an unstoppable and sometimes overwhelming process. After the introduction of the main elements of electronic health records and a description of what every cancer-care professional should be familiar with, we present a narrative review focusing on the current use of computerized clinical information and decision systems in oncology practice. Following a detailed analysis of the many coveted goals that oncologists have reached while embracing informatics progress, the authors suggest how to overcome the main obstacles for a complete physicians' engagement and for a full information technology adoption, and try to forecast what the future holds.

  16. Allied dental personnel: will there be enough?

    PubMed

    Waldman, H Barry; Perlman, Steven P

    2008-11-01

    The escalating number and size of dental practices mean greater dependency on a ready supply of allied dental personnel. However, despite the increasing number of entry places in allied dental training programs, many places remain unfilled and large numbers of individuals do not complete the course of studies. A review of the changes in dental practice sizes and dental assistant, dental hygienist and dental laboratory technician programs raises concerns as to whether there will be enough allied dental personnel to meet the future needs of the profession. The need for increasing attention to this potential eventuality is stressed.

  17. The impact of socially-accountable health professional education: A systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Carole; Woolley, Torres; Ross, Simone J; Mohammadi, Leila; Halili, Servando Ben; Cristobal, Fortunato; Siega-Sur, Jusie Lydia J; Neusy, A-J

    2017-01-01

    This literature review describes the impact of health professional schools with a social accountability mandate by identifying characteristics of medical education found to impact positively on medical students, health workforce, and health outcomes of disadvantaged communities. A critical appraisal tool was used to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the published articles. Data are presented as a narrative synthesis due to the variety of methodologies in the studies, and characterized using a logic model. Health professional schools aiming to improve health outcomes for their disadvantaged local communities described collaborative partnerships with communities, equitable selection criteria, and community-engaged placements in underserved areas as positively impacting the learning and attitudes of students. Students of socially accountable schools were more likely to stay in rural areas and serve disadvantaged communities, and were often more skilled than students from more traditional schools to meet the needs of underserved communities. However, published literature on the impact of socially accountable health professional education on communities and health outcomes is limited, with only one study investigating health outcomes. The findings of this literature review guide schools on the inputs likely to maximize their socially accountability outputs and increase their impact on students, local health workforce and local communities.

  18. Undergraduate Nursing Students' Understandings of Mental Health: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Barry, Sinead; Ward, Louise

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this literature review was to identify research and current literature surrounding nursing students' understandings of mental health. The aim is to share findings from an extensive international and national literature review exploring undergraduate nurse education specific to mental health content. Data were collected utilising a comprehensive search of electronic databases including CINAHL (EBSCO), MEDLINE, and PsycINFO 1987-(Ovid) from 2008 to 2016. The initial search terms were altered to include undergraduate, mental health, nursing, education, experience, and knowledge. Three content themes emerged which included: 1. Undergraduate nursing students' knowledge has been considered compromised due to concerns relating to the variation and inconsistencies within the comprehensive nursing curriculums representation of mental health, 2. Undergraduate nursing students knowledge of mental health is thought to be compromised due to the quality of mental health theoretical and experiential learning opportunities, and 3. Research indicates that nursing students' knowledge of mental health was influenced by their experience of undertaking mental health content. Based on these findings greater consideration of students' understandings of mental health is required.

  19. Building an Education Infrastructure for Allied Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lankes, R. David; Bonner, Hugh W.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a five-part framework for an information infrastructure: (1) aggregating (digital storage); (2) organizing (imposing higher-level structure); (3) using (retrieval processes); (4) tool building (designing and developing technologies for steps 1-3); and (5) policy making (metadata, selection criteria, use policies). Applies the framework to…

  20. Mental health and gender dysphoria: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dhejne, Cecilia; Van Vlerken, Roy; Heylens, Gunter; Arcelus, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Studies investigating the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among trans individuals have identified elevated rates of psychopathology. Research has also provided conflicting psychiatric outcomes following gender-confirming medical interventions. This review identifies 38 cross-sectional and longitudinal studies describing prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders and psychiatric outcomes, pre- and post-gender-confirming medical interventions, for people with gender dysphoria. It indicates that, although the levels of psychopathology and psychiatric disorders in trans people attending services at the time of assessment are higher than in the cis population, they do improve following gender-confirming medical intervention, in many cases reaching normative values. The main Axis I psychiatric disorders were found to be depression and anxiety disorder. Other major psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, were rare and were no more prevalent than in the general population. There was conflicting evidence regarding gender differences: some studies found higher psychopathology in trans women, while others found no differences between gender groups. Although many studies were methodologically weak, and included people at different stages of transition within the same cohort of patients, overall this review indicates that trans people attending transgender health-care services appear to have a higher risk of psychiatric morbidity (that improves following treatment), and thus confirms the vulnerability of this population.

  1. We cannot ignore nurses' health anymore: a synthesis of the literature on evidence-based strategies to improve nurse health.

    PubMed

    Letvak, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Nurses are known to suffer from health problems because of the physical and stressful nature of nurses' work. With the advent of health care reform and the increasing importance of nurses to quality and cost-effective health care, the health of nurses can no longer be ignored. The purpose of this synthesis of the literature is to determine what interventions and evidence-based practices have been found that support and improve the health of nurses. Whittemore and Knafl's integrative review methodology was chosen to guide the synthesis. Eighteen studies, all conducted in clinical settings, were identified. Interventions included on-site wellness, ergonomic and exercise programs; holistic practices, including Tai Chi and massage; the use of clinical supervision; mental health programs; and the use of minimal, no lift and lift-team programs. There is a critical need for more research specifically designed to improve the health and safety of the nursing workforce.

  2. Global health diplomacy: an integrative review of the literature and implications for nursing.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Anita; Wilson, Lynda; Stanhope, Marcia; Hatcher, Barbara; Hattar, Marianne; Hilfinger Messias, Deanne K; Powell, Dorothy

    2013-01-01

    The increasing interconnectedness of the world and the factors that affect health lay the foundation for the evolving practice of global health diplomacy. There has been limited discussion in the nursing literature about the concept of global health diplomacy or the role of nurses in such initiatives. A discussion of this concept is presented here by the members of a Task Force on Global Health Diplomacy of the American Academy of Nursing Expert Panel on Global Nursing and Health (AAN EPGNH). The purpose of this article is to present an integrative review of literature on the concept of global health diplomacy and to identify implications of this emerging field for nursing education, practice, and research. The steps proposed by Whittemore and Knafl (2005) were adapted and applied to the integrative review of theoretical and descriptive articles about the concept of global health diplomacy. This review included an analysis of the historical background, definition, and challenges of global health diplomacy and suggestions about the preparation of global health diplomats. The article concludes with a discussion of implications for nursing practice, education, and research. The Task Force endorses the definition of global health diplomacy proposed by Adams, Novotny, and Leslie (2008) but recommends that further dialogue and research is necessary to identify opportunities and educational requirements for nurses to contribute to the emerging field of global health diplomacy.

  3. Whiteness in Social Work Education Authentic White Allies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornung, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is guided by the following questions: How do People of Color define and experience White people as "authentic" allies? What does a White ally look like to People of Color? How do White allies view themselves as "authentic" White allies? What experiences lead White people to anti-racism and anti-racist praxis?…

  4. Women's autonomy in health care decision-making in developing countries: a synthesis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Osamor, Pauline E; Grady, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Autonomy is considered essential for decision-making in a range of health care situations, from health care seeking and utilization to choosing among treatment options. Evidence suggests that women in developing or low-income countries often have limited autonomy and control over their health decisions. A review of the published empirical literature to identify definitions and methods used to measure women's autonomy in developing countries describe the relationship between women's autonomy and their health care decision-making, and identify sociodemographic factors that influence women's autonomy and decision-making regarding health care was carried out. An integrated literature review using two databases (PubMed and Scopus) was performed. Inclusion criteria were 1) publication in English; 2) original articles; 3) investigations on women's decision-making autonomy for health and health care utilization; and 4) developing country context. Seventeen articles met inclusion criteria, including eleven from South Asia, five from Africa, and one from Central Asia. Most studies used a definition of autonomy that included independence for women to make their own choices and decisions. Study methods differed in that many used study-specific measures, while others used a set of standardized questions from their countries' national health surveys. Most studies examined women's autonomy in the context of reproductive health, while neglecting other types of health care utilized by women. Several studies found that factors, including age, education, and income, affect women's health care decision-making autonomy. Gaps in existing literature regarding women's autonomy and health care utilization include gaps in the areas of health care that have been measured, the influence of sex roles and social support, and the use of qualitative studies to provide context and nuance.

  5. Educational services in health sciences libraries: an analysis of the periodical literature, 1975-1986.

    PubMed Central

    Zachert, M J

    1987-01-01

    The periodical literature on group instructional services in health sciences libraries was analyzed to determine the nature of these services, their target audiences, and their institutional settings. Three kinds of reports were identified: descriptions of services (70%), reviews of the literature (10.5%), and future-oriented articles that advocate various group instructional services (19.5%). Five target audiences were identified: library users, staff, librarian peers, library science students, and patients. Instructional services were offered primarily in medical school/center libraries, hospital libraries, and the National Library of Medicine and its Regional Medical Libraries (RMLs). To a lesser extent, health sciences educational services are offered through other professional school libraries, library associations and consortia, and schools of library science. There are gaps in the literature in the areas of library experience with marketing, evaluation, administration of the offered educational services, and continuing education for health sciences librarians. PMID:3676534

  6. Addressing indigenous health workforce inequities: A literature review exploring 'best' practice for recruitment into tertiary health programmes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Addressing the underrepresentation of indigenous health professionals is recognised internationally as being integral to overcoming indigenous health inequities. This literature review aims to identify 'best practice' for recruitment of indigenous secondary school students into tertiary health programmes with particular relevance to recruitment of Māori within a New Zealand context. Methodology/methods A Kaupapa Māori Research (KMR) methodological approach was utilised to review literature and categorise content via: country; population group; health profession ffocus; research methods; evidence of effectiveness; and discussion of barriers. Recruitment activities are described within five broad contexts associated with the recruitment pipeline: Early Exposure, Transitioning, Retention/Completion, Professional Workforce Development, and Across the total pipeline. Results A total of 70 articles were included. There is a lack of published literature specific to Māori recruitment and a limited, but growing, body of literature focused on other indigenous and underrepresented minority populations. The literature is primarily descriptive in nature with few articles providing evidence of effectiveness. However, the literature clearly frames recruitment activity as occurring across a pipeline that extends from secondary through to tertiary education contexts and in some instances vocational (post-graduate) training. Early exposure activities encourage students to achieve success in appropriate school subjects, address deficiencies in careers advice and offer tertiary enrichment opportunities. Support for students to transition into and within health professional programmes is required including bridging/foundation programmes, admission policies/quotas and institutional mission statements demonstrating a commitment to achieving equity. Retention/completion support includes academic and pastoral interventions and institutional changes to ensure safer

  7. Health, work and working conditions: a review of the European economic literature.

    PubMed

    Barnay, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Economists have traditionally been very cautious when studying the interaction between employment and health because of the two-way causal relationship between these two variables: health status influences the probability of being employed and, at the same time, working affects the health status. Because these two variables are determined simultaneously, researchers control endogeneity skews (e.g., reverse causality, omitted variables) when conducting empirical analysis. With these caveats in mind, the literature finds that a favourable work environment and high job security lead to better health conditions. Being employed with appropriate working conditions plays a protective role on physical health and psychiatric disorders. By contrast, non-employment and retirement are generally worse for mental health than employment, and overemployment has a negative effect on health. These findings stress the importance of employment and of adequate working conditions for the health of workers. In this context, it is a concern that a significant proportion of European workers (29 %) would like to work fewer hours because unwanted long hours are likely to signal a poor level of job satisfaction and inadequate working conditions, with detrimental effects on health. Thus, in Europe, labour-market policy has increasingly paid attention to job sustainability and job satisfaction. The literature clearly invites employers to take better account of the worker preferences when setting the number of hours worked. Overall, a specific "flexicurity" (combination of high employment protection, job satisfaction and active labour-market policies) is likely to have a positive effect on health.

  8. Scope of Policy Issues in eHealth: Results From a Structured Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Durrani, Hammad; Nayani, Parvez; Fahim, Ammad

    2012-01-01

    Background eHealth is widely used as a tool for improving health care delivery and information. However, distinct policies and strategies are required for its proper implementation and integration at national and international levels. Objective To determine the scope of policy issues faced by individuals, institutions, or governments in implementing eHealth programs. Methods We conducted a structured review of both peer-reviewed and gray literature from 1998–2008. A Medline search for peer-reviewed articles found 40 papers focusing on different aspects of eHealth policy. In addition, a Google search found 20 national- and international-level policy papers and documents. We reviewed these articles to extract policy issues and solutions described at different levels of care. Results The literature search found 99 policy issues related to eHealth. We grouped these issues under the following themes: (1) networked care, (2) interjurisdictional practice, (3) diffusion of eHealth/digital divide, (4) eHealth integration with existing systems, (5) response to new initiatives, (6) goal-setting for eHealth policy, (7) evaluation and research, (8) investment, and (9) ethics in eHealth. Conclusions We provide a list of policy issues that should be understood and addressed by policy makers at global, jurisdictional, and institutional levels, to facilitate smooth and reliable planning of eHealth programs. PMID:22343270

  9. Barriers to health care for people with hearing loss: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Scheier, Donna B

    2009-01-01

    Deaf individuals face many barriers when trying to access health care. The reasons why barriers are encountered, difficulties met as a result of the barriers, and ways that health professionals and others working with deaf people can overcome obstacles are included in this review of the literature. A brief summary of Deaf culture and history gives background information to better understand the problems. Misunderstandings by d/Deaf patients and hearing health professionals are addressed, as well as issues related to medical interpreters. This paper aims to make health professionals more aware of the needs and cultural differences that must be considered when providing care to the d/Deaf population.

  10. The benefits of health information technology: a review of the recent literature shows predominantly positive results.

    PubMed

    Buntin, Melinda Beeuwkes; Burke, Matthew F; Hoaglin, Michael C; Blumenthal, David

    2011-03-01

    An unprecedented federal effort is under way to boost the adoption of electronic health records and spur innovation in health care delivery. We reviewed the recent literature on health information technology to determine its effect on outcomes, including quality, efficiency, and provider satisfaction. We found that 92 percent of the recent articles on health information technology reached conclusions that were positive overall. We also found that the benefits of the technology are beginning to emerge in smaller practices and organizations, as well as in large organizations that were early adopters. However, dissatisfaction with electronic health records among some providers remains a problem and a barrier to achieving the potential of health information technology. These realities highlight the need for studies that document the challenging aspects of implementing health information technology more specifically and how these challenges might be addressed.

  11. Distance Learning and the Health Professions: A Synthesis Report of the Literature Investigating Continuing Professional Health Education at a Distance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Vernon; Noseworthy, Tanya

    This synthesis report provides an extensive overview of literature evaluating use and effectiveness of distance learning technologies in delivering continuing education (CE) for health professionals. Chapter 2 discusses advantages and disadvantages of correspondence materials, explores suggestions for improving print-based learning materials, and…

  12. Working with Allies and Partners: A Cost-Based Analysis of U.S. Air Forces in Europe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    public service of the RAND Corporation. CHILDREN AND FAMILIES EDUCATION AND THE ARTS ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT HEALTH AND HEALTH CARE INFRASTRUCTURE AND...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report (SAR) 18. NUMBER OF...United States and key NATO allies maintain a tactical nuclear storage and delivery capability that requires both U.S. presence and exercises with allies

  13. Community Health Workers and Mobile Technology: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Rebecca; Catalani, Caricia; Wimbush, Julian; Israelski, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In low-resource settings, community health workers are frontline providers who shoulder the health service delivery burden. Increasingly, mobile technologies are developed, tested, and deployed with community health workers to facilitate tasks and improve outcomes. We reviewed the evidence for the use of mobile technology by community health workers to identify opportunities and challenges for strengthening health systems in resource-constrained settings. Methods We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature from health, medical, social science, and engineering databases, using PRISMA guidelines. We identified a total of 25 unique full-text research articles on community health workers and their use of mobile technology for the delivery of health services. Results Community health workers have used mobile tools to advance a broad range of health aims throughout the globe, particularly maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, and sexual and reproductive health. Most commonly, community health workers use mobile technology to collect field-based health data, receive alerts and reminders, facilitate health education sessions, and conduct person-to-person communication. Programmatic efforts to strengthen health service delivery focus on improving adherence to standards and guidelines, community education and training, and programmatic leadership and management practices. Those studies that evaluated program outcomes provided some evidence that mobile tools help community health workers to improve the quality of care provided, efficiency of services, and capacity for program monitoring. Discussion Evidence suggests mobile technology presents promising opportunities to improve the range and quality of services provided by community health workers. Small-scale efforts, pilot projects, and preliminary descriptive studies are increasing, and there is a trend toward using feasible and acceptable interventions that lead to positive program outcomes

  14. Ethnic Density Effects on Physical Morbidity, Mortality, and Health Behaviors: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Richard; Nazroo, James; Stafford, Mai; Albor, Christo; Atkin, Karl; Kiernan, Kathleen; Wilkinson, Richard; Pickett, Kate

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that people in racial/ethnic minority groups are healthier when they live in areas with a higher concentration of people from their own ethnic group, a so-called ethnic density effect. Ethnic density effects are still contested, and the pathways by which ethnic density operates are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature examining the ethnic density effect on physical health, mortality, and health behaviors. Most studies report a null association between ethnic density and health. Protective ethnic density effects are more common than adverse associations, particularly for health behaviors and among Hispanic people. Limitations of the literature include inadequate adjustment for area deprivation and limited statistical power across ethnic density measures and study samples. PMID:23078507

  15. Reproductive Health in the United States: A Review of the Recent Social Work Literature.

    PubMed

    Wright, Rachel L; Bird, Melissa; Frost, Caren J

    2015-10-01

    Reproductive health is an important area affecting a woman's overall health and well-being. The examination of reproductive health and barriers to care is pertinent to the social work profession and should be a focus of social work practice, education, research, and advocacy. The authors conducted a literature search of articles published in the social work literature from 2010 to 2014. The findings reveal important published articles that increase our knowledge of the reproductive health of women in the United States. Most published articles focused on pregnancy and birth outcomes. Articles also addressed sexually transmitted infections; abortion; intimate partner violence; prostitution; access to care; cancer screening; views toward contraception; hysterectomies; breastfeeding; menopause; and the intersection of reproductive rights, religion, and social justice. This review also identified unexamined areas that require further social work attention and consideration.

  16. A Systematic Review of the Literature on the Sustainability of Community Health Collaboratives.

    PubMed

    Hearld, Larry R; Bleser, William K; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Wolf, Laura J

    2016-04-01

    Recent interest in community health collaboratives has been driven by the potential of these types of organizations to solve complex health problems at the local level by bringing together stakeholders that have traditionally operated independently, and often at cross-purposes. Much of the work that is central to the mission of collaboratives can take years to reach fruition, however, and there are a number of challenges to sustaining their activities. In this article, we systematically reviewed the theoretical and empirical literature on health care collaborative sustainability, focusing on definitions and antecedents of sustainability. Given the diversity and fragmentation of this literature, we used this review as a foundation to develop a synthesized definition, conceptual groups of antecedents, and potential research propositions to help guide future research, planning, and practice of sustainable community health collaboratives.

  17. Review of literature on herbicides, including phenoxy herbicides and associated dioxins. Volume 13: Analysis of recent literature on health effects and Volume 14: Annotated bibliography of recent literature on health effects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-15

    The report consists of a bibliography and critical review of scientific literature that became available during 1988 on the health effects of the herbicides (including impurities) used as defoliants in the Vietnam conflict. An attempt has been made to identify all scientific literature (including unpublished reports) relevant to the potential human health effects of the herbicidal preparation commonly referred to as Agent Orange, the herbicidal active ingredients 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4,5-trichloroacetic acid and their esters, as well as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin, henceforth referred to as TCDD, known to be contaminating impurities of some phenoxy herbicide preparations, an the herbicides, picloram and cacodylic acid. The scope of the review does not include literature dealing exclusively with the chemistry, analysis, or environmental fate and effects of these compounds.

  18. Oral health-related cultural beliefs for four racial/ethnic groups: Assessment of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Butani, Yogita; Weintraub, Jane A; Barker, Judith C

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess information available in the dental literature on oral health-related cultural beliefs. In the US, as elsewhere, many racial/ethnic minority groups shoulder a disproportionate burden of oral disease. Cultural beliefs, values and practices are often implicated as causes of oral health disparities, yet little is known about the breadth or adequacy of literature about cultural issues that could support these assertions. Hence, this rigorous assessment was conducted of work published in English on cultural beliefs and values in relation to oral health status and dental practice. Four racial/ethnic groups in the US (African-American, Chinese, Filipino and Hispanic/Latino) were chosen as exemplar populations. Methods The dental literature published in English for the period 1980–2006 noted in the electronic database PUBMED was searched, using keywords and MeSH headings in different combinations for each racial/ethnic group to identify eligible articles. To be eligible the title and abstract when available had to describe the oral health-related cultural knowledge or orientation of the populations studied. Results Overall, the majority of the literature on racial/ethnic groups was epidemiologic in nature, mainly demonstrating disparities in oral health rather than the oral beliefs or practices of these groups. A total of 60 relevant articles were found: 16 for African-American, 30 for Chinese, 2 for Filipino and 12 for Hispanic/Latino populations. Data on beliefs and practices from these studies has been abstracted, compiled and assessed. Few research-based studies were located. Articles lacked adequate identification of groups studied, used limited methods and had poor conceptual base. Conclusion The scant information available from the published dental and medical literature provides at best a rudimentary framework of oral health related ideas and beliefs for specific populations. PMID:18793438

  19. Archetype-based electronic health records: a literature review and evaluation of their applicability to health data interoperability and access.

    PubMed

    Wollersheim, Dennis; Sari, Anny; Rahayu, Wenny

    2009-01-01

    Health Information Managers (HIMs) are responsible for overseeing health information. The change management necessary during the transition to electronic health records (EHR) is substantial, and ongoing. Archetype-based EHRs are a core health information system component which solve many of the problems that arise during this period of change. Archetypes are models of clinical content, and they have many beneficial properties. They are interoperable, both between settings and through time. They are more amenable to change than conventional paradigms, and their design is congruent with clinical practice. This paper is an overview of the current archetype literature relevant to Health Information Managers. The literature was sourced in the English language sections of ScienceDirect, IEEE Explore, Pubmed, Google Scholar, ACM Digital library and other databases on the usage of archetypes for electronic health record storage, looking at the current areas of archetype research, appropriate usage, and future research. We also used reference lists from the cited papers, papers referenced by the openEHR website, and the recommendations from experts in the area. Criteria for inclusion were (a) if studies covered archetype research and (b) were either studies of archetype use, archetype system design, or archetype effectiveness. The 47 papers included show a wide and increasing worldwide archetype usage, in a variety of medical domains. Most of the papers noted that archetypes are an appropriate solution for future-proof and interoperable medical data storage. We conclude that archetypes are a suitable solution for the complex problem of electronic health record storage and interoperability.

  20. Meaning in Life and Meaning of Life in Mental Health Care: An Integrative Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Glaw, Xanthe; Kable, Ashley; Hazelton, Michael; Inder, Kerry

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this integrative literature review was to identify high quality empirical research and theoretical literature on the sources of meaning in life and people's beliefs regarding the meaning of life. This will inform current mental health clinical practice and research by providing a synthesis of empirical and theoretical literature. Failure to address meaninglessness or the existential crisis can lead to psychopathologies such as depression, anxiety, addiction, aggression, hopelessness, apathy, lower levels of well-being, physical illness, and suicide. Integrative literature reviews incorporate empirical research and theoretical literature. The inclusion criteria were primary research and theoretical papers and books by prominent theorists. Thirty-nine items underwent the critical appraisal process. Thirty-two papers or books were included. Overwhelmingly the results revealed that relationships, particularly relationships with family, are cited as the most important source of meaning in people's lives in all cultures and age groups. There was no consensus identified to answer the meaning of life question. These results and future research will allow mental health clinicians to help patients deepen their understanding of themselves, identify where they find meaning and understand their beliefs about meaning of life, contributing to a reduction in symptomatology and meaninglessness, and an increase in happiness, life satisfaction, positive affect, better coping, psychosocial health and well-being, and more meaningfulness in life.

  1. The Astronomy of Africa's Health Systems Literature During the MDG Era: Where Are the Systems Clusters?

    PubMed

    Phillips, James F; Sheff, Mallory; Boyer, Christopher B

    2015-09-01

    Growing international concern about the need for improved health systems in Africa has catalyzed an expansion of the health systems literature. This review applies a bibliometric procedure to analyze the acceleration of scientific writing on this theme. We focus on research published during the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) era between 1990 and 2014, reporting findings from a systematic review of a database comprised of 17,655 articles about health systems themes from sub-Saharan African countries or subregions. Using bibliometric tools for co-word textual analysis, we analyzed the incidence and associations of keywords and phrases to generate and visualize topical foci on health systems as clusters of themes, much in the manner that astronomers represent groupings of stars as galaxies of celestial entities. The association of keywords defines their relative position, with the size of images weighted by the relative frequency of terms. Sets of associated keywords are arrayed as stars that cluster as "galaxies" of concepts in the knowledge universe represented by health systems research from sub-Saharan Africa. Results show that health systems research is dominated by literature on diseases and categorical systems research topics, rather than on systems science that cuts across diseases or specific systemic themes. Systems research is highly developed in South Africa but relatively uncommon elsewhere in the region. "Black holes" are identified by searching for terms in our keyword library related to terms in widely cited reviews of health systems. Results identify several themes that are unexpectedly uncommon in the country-specific health systems literature. This includes research on the processes of achieving systems change, the health impact of systems strengthening, processes that explain the systems determinants of health outcomes, or systematic study of organizational dysfunction and ways to improve system performance. Research quantifying the relationship

  2. Continuing Education in the Health Professions. A Review of the Literature: 1960-1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamoto, June; Verner, Coolie

    A review is made of the literature on continuing education in the health professions. After an overview of the study, six chapters cover continuing education in medicine -- physical composition and distribution, participation in continuing education, organization and administration, instructional processes, evaluation, and summary and conclusions.…

  3. Nursing Workload and the Changing Health Care Environment: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neill, Denise

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the health care environment have impacted nursing workload, quality of care, and patient safety. Traditional nursing workload measures do not guarantee efficiency, nor do they adequately capture the complexity of nursing workload. Review of the literature indicates nurses perceive the quality of their work has diminished. Research has…

  4. Story immersion of videogames for youth health promotion: A review of literature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article reviews research in the fields of psychology, literature, communication, human–computer interaction, public health, and consumer behavior on narrative and its potential relationships with videogames and story immersion. It also reviews a narrative's role in complementing behavioral chan...

  5. Health effects of protein intake in healthy adults: A systematic literature review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this systematic review is to assess the evidence behind the dietary requirement of protein and to assess the health effects of varying protein intake in healthy adults. The literature search covered the years 2000-2011. Prospective cohort, case-control, and intervention studies were i...

  6. Exploring the Potential of Computer and Video Games for Health and Physical Education: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papastergiou, Marina

    2009-01-01

    This study aims at critically reviewing recently published scientific literature on the use of computer and video games in Health Education (HE) and Physical Education (PE) with a view: (a) to identifying the potential contribution of the incorporation of electronic games as educational tools into HE and PE programs, (b) to present a synthesis of…

  7. Educational services in health sciences libraries: a content analysis of the literature, 1987-1994.

    PubMed Central

    Dimitroff, A

    1995-01-01

    The recent literature (1987-1994) describing educational services of health sciences librarians was analyzed for content. Variables examined included publication journal, country, type of article (description, review, or advocacy), target audience of education services, and subject of article. Articles that reported research results also were identified. Of 123 articles studied, 82.1% were descriptive, 14.6% advocacy, and 3.3% reviews. Library users were the primary target audience (85.1%), an increase over the percentage reported in an earlier study of the 1975-1986 literature. Librarians were the target audience in 12.8% of the articles, a decrease from the previous study's findings. There was an increase in educational offerings by academic libraries, which sponsored 83.2% of programs, while hospital libraries' sponsorship decreased to 5% of programs reported in the literature. The analysis identified a major need for research related to educational activities in health sciences libraries. PMID:8547899

  8. Prevention and health promotion and evidence-based fields of nursing - a literature review.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsson, Susan; Lindberg, Malou

    2007-08-01

    This paper summarizes the evidence constituting the foundation for preventive and health promotive work performed by nurses in primary care. This is a systematic literature review in six scientific databases. Forty original articles and 16 literature reviews met the inclusion criteria. After both authors independently read the articles, 25 were excluded and 15 included. One article was judged to be of high quality, five of medium quality and 10 of low quality. The articles of high and medium quality focused on alcohol counselling, coronary heart disease and diabetes. Of the 16 literature reviews from the Cochrane Library, 10 were found to be relevant and presented evidence. The subjects included smoking cessation, breast-feeding, prevention of falls among the elderly, asthma in children, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Few studies in the area of prevention and health promotion are of adequate scientific quality, resulting in limited evidence for the effects of interventions.

  9. Sexual Minority Health: A Bibliography and Preliminary Study of the Book Literature.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Sharon A

    2017-01-01

    The literature on health in people who identify as sexual minorities is scattered in many types of resources and disciplines. To help address the need for relevant, well-organized information for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people and health care providers, this study first identified books published in a ten-year period and then examined the topics, the number of books published per year, most prolific authors, and primary publishers. A wide range of publishers published a relatively small number of books (521). Most were about mental health or relationships and 24% were personal accounts. There were many subject deficiencies in the published book corpus.

  10. Health hazards of obesity and weight control in children: a review of the literature.

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, M J

    1983-01-01

    A review of the literature on the health hazards of obesity and weight control in children indicates: 1) methodological flaws tend to invalidate the assumption that obesity is a risk factor for this age group; 2) weight control by children and adolescents may cause a variety of health problems including retardation of growth, development, mental functioning, and reproductive capacity; and 3) preoccupation with weight control in this society makes it likely that weight control-related-health problems are common phenomena. Further research into the short and long-term consequences of obesity and weight control is necessary before enlightened clinical practice in this area is possible. PMID:6336638

  11. Trichloroethylene--a review of the literature from a health effects perspective.

    PubMed

    Gist, G L; Burg, J R

    1995-01-01

    This report reviews the literature on the impact of exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) on human health. Special emphasis is given to the health effects reported in excess of national norms by participants in the TCE Subregistry of the Volatile Organic Compounds Registry of the National Exposure Registries--persons with documented exposure to TCE through drinking and use of contaminated water. The health effects reported in excess by some or all of the sex and age groups studied were speech and hearing impairments, effects of stroke, liver problems, anemia and other blood disorders, diabetes, kidney disease, urinary tract disorders, and skin rashes.

  12. Disease patterns addressed by mobile health-enabling technologies--a literature review.

    PubMed

    Von Bargen, Tobias; Schwartze, Jonas; Haux, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    Health-enabling technologies can contribute to a better living with diverse disease patterns, especially at home. Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) provides security and convenience at the main place of residence, but usually cannot be taken on the road. Mobile health-enabling technologies could overcome this barrier of immobility and enable its' users to take advantages of assistive technology with them. The presented literature review examines disease patterns, which can be addressed by mobile health-enabling technologies. Especially chronic diseases, like diabetes, are very responsive for continuous support by portable support technology.

  13. Heat pump associations, alliances, and allies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Associations, Alliances, and Allies, a seminar and workshop sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute, was held in Memphis, Tennessee, April 10--11, 1991. The focus of the meeting was relationships forged between electric utilities and trade allies that sell residential heat pumps. one hundred and seven representatives of electric utilities, dealer/contractors, manufacturers, and consultants attended. Electric utility trade ally programs run the gamut from coop advertising to heat pump association to elaborate technician training programs. All utility participants recognize the important programs, since it is the trade ally who sells, installs, and services heat pumps, while it is the electric utility who gets blamed if the heat pumps fail to operate properly or are inefficient. Heat pumps are efficient and effective, but their efficiency and effectiveness depends critically upon the quality of installation and maintenance. A utility can thus help to ensure satisfied customers and can also help to achieve its own load shape objectives by working closely with its trade allies, the dealers, contractors, manufacturers, and distributors. Attendees spent the morning sessions of the two day meeting in plenary sessions, hearing about utility and dealer heat pump programs and issues. Afternoon roundtable discussions provided structured forums to discuss: Advertising; Heat pump association startup and operation; Rebates and incentives; Technician training school and centers; Installation inspection and dealer qualification; and Heat pump association training. These proceedings report on the papers presented in the morning plenary sessions and summarize the main points discussed in the afternoon workshops.

  14. How scholarly nursing literature addresses health disparities for racial/ethnic minority men.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Constance

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review conceptual/theoretical and review/agenda setting nursing literature on the health care of racial/ethnic minority men [specifically African American/Black, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian/Alaskan Native and Asian/Pacific Islander men] in one of the four targeted areas of health disparities. CINAHL and MEDLINE computer databases were searched from 1983 to the present using a combination of manual and computer-based methods to identify the nursing literature that included any racial/ethnic men in the sample and addressed at least one of the four areas of health disparities targeted by Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) that affect adults: heart disease, malignant neoplasms (cancer), diabetes mellitus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/AIDS. This review provides an overview of health disparities experienced by racial/ethnic minority men in the targeted areas and of the types of conceptual and agenda-setting articles published in scholarly nursing literature in those targeted areas.

  15. Health Economics of Dengue: A Systematic Literature Review and Expert Panel's Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Mark E.; Beutels, Philippe; Meltzer, Martin I.; Shepard, Donald S.; Hombach, Joachim; Hutubessy, Raymond; Dessis, Damien; Coudeville, Laurent; Dervaux, Benoit; Wichmann, Ole; Margolis, Harold S.; Kuritsky, Joel N.

    2011-01-01

    Dengue vaccines are currently in development and policymakers need appropriate economic studies to determine their potential financial and public health impact. We searched five databases (PubMed, EMBASE, LILAC, EconLit, and WHOLIS) to identify health economics studies of dengue. Forty-three manuscripts were identified that provided primary data: 32 report economic burden of dengue and nine are comparative economic analyses assessing various interventions. The remaining two were a willingness-to-pay study and a policymaker survey. An expert panel reviewed the existing dengue economic literature and recommended future research to fill information gaps. Although dengue is an important vector-borne disease, the economic literature is relatively sparse and results have often been conflicting because of use of inconsistent assumptions. Health economic research specific to dengue is urgently needed to ensure informed decision making on the various options for controlling and preventing this disease. PMID:21363989

  16. The organisational context for teamwork: comparing health care and business literature.

    PubMed

    Mickan, S; Rodger, S

    2000-01-01

    Teams are a significant tool for promoting and managing change. There are shared definitions of teamwork in the literature, and agreement on general benefits and limitations of working in teams. However, the historical development of teamwork differs between health care and the business environments of manufacturing and service industries. The impact of the organisational context on teamwork appears to differ most, when literature from the two environments is compared. As a result, there are specific issues that are unique to the development and implementation of health care teams. This article summarises the unique team structures and the issue of professionalization in health care teams, while recommending that team members acknowledge their professional differences and focus foremost on meeting patient needs.

  17. [Male bodies in the field of health: links in the literature].

    PubMed

    Gomes, Romeu; Granja, Edna Mirtes dos Santos; Honorato, Eduardo Jorge Sant'Ana; Riscado, Jorge Luís de Souza

    2014-01-01

    The article seeks to analyze the specific literature about the male body and its relationship to the field of health. Based on this analysis, it is hoped that hypotheses or presuppositions can be established as a starting point for future interventions and research on the subject. Methodologically, the study is a literature review of a qualitative nature focusing on articles available in the Virtual Health Library (VHL). In terms of results, three themes were established that summarize the analysis of the sources: gendered bodies, male bodies in the midst of transgression and marginalization, and the reductions of the male body and self care. The concluded reached is that the standpoint of health on male bodies can promote enhanced self care in which masculinity can be constructed and reconstructed, superseding exclusionary, monolithic and reductive models that govern the male being and the female being.

  18. Health effects of relocation following disaster: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Uscher-Pines, Lori

    2009-03-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the effects of post-disaster relocation on physical and mental heath, and develops a conceptual framework to guide future research. Forty articles were selected for full-text review and incorporation into the conceptual framework. Twenty-four articles were reviewed for results and methodology. These overwhelmingly tracked mental health outcomes. Only four (16 per cent) focused on physical health. Eight of ten showed an association between relocation and psychological morbidity. Certain outcomes (such as mortality, injury and cardiovascular disease risk factors) revealed inconsistent results, but these were rarely studied. Despite the frequency of post-disaster relocation and evidence of its effect on psychological morbidity, there is a relative paucity of studies; the few examples in the literature reveal weak study designs, inconsistent results, and inattention to physical health impacts and the challenges facing vulnerable populations. Further research guided by theory is needed to inform emergency preparedness and recovery policy.

  19. Peer-based health interventions for people with serious mental illness: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J; Camacho, David; Vélez-Grau, Carolina M; Stefancic, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Health interventions delivered by peer specialists or co-facilitated by peer specialists and health professionals can help improve the physical health of people with serious mental illness (SMI). Yet, the quality of the studies examining these health interventions and their impact on health outcomes remains unclear. To address this gap, we conducted a systematic literature review of peer-based health interventions for people with SMI. We rated the methodological quality of studies, summarized intervention strategies and health outcomes, and evaluated the inclusion of racial and ethnic minorities in these studies. We used the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis guidelines to conduct our systematic literature review. Electronic bibliographic databases and manual searches were used to locate articles that were published in English in peer-reviewed journals between 1990 and 2015, described peer-based health interventions for people with SMI, and evaluated the impact of the interventions on physical health outcomes. Two independent reviewers used a standardized instrument to rate studies' methodological quality, abstracted study characteristics, and evaluated the effects of the interventions on different health outcomes. Eighteen articles were reviewed. Findings indicated that the strength of the evidence generated from these studies is limited due to several methodological limitations. Mixed and limited intervention effects were reported for most health outcomes. The most promising interventions were self-management and peer-navigator interventions. Efforts to strengthen the evidence of peer-based interventions require a research agenda that focuses on establishing the efficacy and effectiveness of these interventions across different populations and settings.

  20. Disaster Preparedness among Health Professionals and Support Staff: What is Effective? An Integrative Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Gowing, Jeremy R; Walker, Kim N; Elmer, Shandell L; Cummings, Elizabeth A

    2017-03-16

    Introduction It is important that health professionals and support staff are prepared for disasters to safeguard themselves and the community during disasters. There has been a significantly heightened focus on disasters since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 in New York (USA); however, despite this, it is evident that health professionals and support staff may not be adequately prepared for disasters. Report An integrative literature review was performed based on a keyword search of the major health databases for primary research evaluating preparedness of health professionals and support staff. The literature was quality appraised using a mixed-methods appraisal tool (MMAT), and a thematic analysis was completed to identify current knowledge and gaps. Discussion The main themes identified were: health professionals and support staff may not be fully prepared for disasters; the most effective content and methods for disaster preparedness is unknown; and the willingness of health professionals and support staff to attend work and perform during disasters needs further evaluation. Gaps were identified to guide further research and the creation of new knowledge to best prepare for disasters. These included the need for: high-quality research to evaluate the best content and methods of disaster preparedness; inclusion of the multi-disciplinary health care team as participants; preparation for internal disasters; the development of validated competencies for preparedness; validated tools for measurement; and the importance of performance in actual disasters to evaluate preparation.

  1. Measurement error in performance studies of health information technology: lessons from the management literature.

    PubMed

    Litwin, A S; Avgar, A C; Pronovost, P J

    2012-01-01

    Just as researchers and clinicians struggle to pin down the benefits attendant to health information technology (IT), management scholars have long labored to identify the performance effects arising from new technologies and from other organizational innovations, namely the reorganization of work and the devolution of decision-making authority. This paper applies lessons from that literature to theorize the likely sources of measurement error that yield the weak statistical relationship between measures of health IT and various performance outcomes. In so doing, it complements the evaluation literature's more conceptual examination of health IT's limited performance impact. The paper focuses on seven issues, in particular, that likely bias downward the estimated performance effects of health IT. They are 1.) negative self-selection, 2.) omitted or unobserved variables, 3.) mis-measured contextual variables, 4.) mismeasured health IT variables, 5.) lack of attention to the specific stage of the adoption-to-use continuum being examined, 6.) too short of a time horizon, and 7.) inappropriate units-of-analysis. The authors offer ways to counter these challenges. Looking forward more broadly, they suggest that researchers take an organizationally-grounded approach that privileges internal validity over generalizability. This focus on statistical and empirical issues in health IT-performance studies should be complemented by a focus on theoretical issues, in particular, the ways that health IT creates value and apportions it to various stakeholders.

  2. Mapping the literature of radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Delwiche, Frances A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study characterizes the literature of the radiation therapy profession, identifies the journals most frequently cited by authors writing in this discipline, and determines the level of coverage of these journals by major bibliographic indexes. Method: Cited references from three discipline-specific source journals were analyzed according to the Mapping the Literature of Allied Health Project Protocol of the Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section of the Medical Library Association. Bradford's Law of Scattering was applied to all journal references to identify the most frequently cited journal titles. Results: Journal references constituted 77.8% of the total, with books, government documents, Internet sites, and miscellaneous sources making up the remainder. Although a total of 908 journal titles were cited overall, approximately one-third of the journal citations came from just 11 journals. MEDLINE and Scopus provided the most comprehensive indexing of the journal titles in Zones 1 and 2. The source journals were indexed only by CINAHL and Scopus. Conclusion: The knowledgebase of radiation therapy draws heavily from the fields of oncology, radiology, medical physics, and nursing. Discipline-specific publications are not currently well covered by major indexing services, and those wishing to conduct comprehensive literature searches should search multiple resources. PMID:23646027

  3. Mapping the literature of clinical laboratory science.

    PubMed

    Delwiche, Frances A

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes a citation analysis of the literature of clinical laboratory science (medical technology), conducted as part of a project of the Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section of the Medical Library Association. Three source journals widely read by those in the field were identified, from which cited references were collected for a three-year period. Analysis of the references showed that journals were the predominant format of literature cited and the majority of the references were from the last eleven years. Applying Bradford's Law of Scattering to the list of journals cited, three zones were created, each producing approximately one third of the cited references. Thirteen journals were in the first zone, eighty-one in the second, and 849 in the third. A similar list of journals cited was created for four specialty areas in the field: chemistry, hematology, immunohematology, and microbiology. In comparing the indexing coverage of the Zone 1 and 2 journals by four major databases, MEDLINE provided the most comprehensive coverage, while the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature was the only database that provided complete coverage of the three source journals. However, to obtain complete coverage of the field, it is essential to search multiple databases.

  4. Gaps in studies of global health education: an empirical literature review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Zhaolan; Wang, JianLi

    2015-01-01

    Background Global health has stimulated a lot of students and has attracted the interest of many faculties, thereby initiating the establishment of many academic programs on global health research and education. global health education reflects the increasing attention toward social accountability in medical education. Objective This study aims to identify gaps in the studies on global health education. Design A critical literature review of empirical studies was conducted using Boolean search techniques. Results A total of 238 articles, including 16 reviews, were identified. There had been a boom in the numbers of studies on global health education since 2010. Four gaps were summarized. First, 94.6% of all studies on global health education were conducted in North American and European countries, of which 65.6% were carried out in the United States, followed by Canada (14.3%) and the United Kingdom (9.2%). Only seven studies (2.9%) were conducted in Asian countries, five (2.1%) in Oceania, and two (0.8%) in South American/Caribbean countries. A total of 154 studies (64.4%) were qualitative studies and 64 studies (26.8%) were quantitative studies. Second, elective courses and training or programs were the most frequently used approach for global health education. Third, there was a gap in the standardization of global health education. Finally, it was mainly targeted at medical students, residents, and doctors. It had not granted the demands for global health education of all students majoring in medicine-related studies. Conclusions Global health education would be a potentially influential tool for achieving health equity, reducing health disparities, and also for future professional careers. It is the time to build and expand education in global health, especially among developing countries. Global health education should be integrated into primary medical education. Interdisciplinary approaches and interprofessional collaboration were recommended. Collaboration

  5. Migrants' Health in Iran from the Perspective of Social Justice: a Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Shamsi Gooshki, Ehsan; Rezaei, Raheleh; Wild, Verina

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a systematic literature review of studies that shed light on the health of migrants in Iran from the perspective of social justice. A systematic search was conducted in PubMed and Iranian databases, including IranMedex, Magiran, and SID, in June 2012. All studies that were published until June 2012 describing the health status of migrants - including refugees - in Iran were included. The search results were categorisoyed according to an adapted version of the six dimensions of well-being in Madison Powers' and Ruth Faden's theory of social justice in health. They consisted of access to health care, health, respect, self-determination and attachment, personal security, and social determinants of health. The majority of papers mentioned issues related to infectious diseases (100 papers, 60.2%). Only a few papers mentioned socioeconomic status and access to health services, education, and work. Infectious diseases and high population growth among migrants and the problematic image of migrants as "threat" to the Iranian population's health appear to be the most prominent results in our search. It is imperative to combat the high numbers of infectious diseases among migrants in Iran while simultaneously making efforts to change the public image of migrants as a health and social service threat to Iran. Data concerning social and ethical issues of migrants' health in Iran is scarce, and thus, future research is necessary using other methods and sources.

  6. Virtual community consultation? Using the literature and weblogs to link community perspectives and health technology assessment

    PubMed Central

    Street, Jackie M.; Braunack‐Mayer, Annette J.; Facey, Karen; Ashcroft, Richard E.; Hiller, Janet E.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background  Community views, expressed in social impact assessments and collected through community consultation, should play an important role in health technology assessment (HTA). Yet HTA methodologists have been slow to include outcomes of these forms of inquiry in analyses, in part because collecting community views is time‐consuming and resource intensive. Objective  To explore how community views sourced from published studies, grey literature and informal internet web pages can inform HTA. Methods  A technology reviewed by Adelaide HTA in 2004 was selected: retinal photography for detection of diabetic retinopathy. Published literature, ‘grey’ literature and informal web pages were searched to examine the availability of evidence about service community and user community views with respect to this technology. Particular efforts were made to source evidence relating to rural, remote and Aboriginal populations. Results  We found that journal articles, reports from the grey literature and informal internet web pages (including blogs and discussion forums) can provide valuable insight into community views. Although there was little empirical evidence relating to the experience of diabetes and diabetes management in rural, remote and Aboriginal communities, there were indications that some evidence may be transferable from other populations. Conclusions  Community perspectives on selected health technologies can be gauged from available resources in published and grey literature and perspectives collected in this way can provide insight into whether the introduction of the technology would be acceptable to the community. The limitations of this approach are discussed. PMID:18430153

  7. Determinants of health insurance coverage rates for young adults: an analytical literature review.

    PubMed

    Cantiello, John; Fottler, Myron D; Oetjen, Dawn; Zhang, Ning Jackie

    2011-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the major determinants of health insurance coverage rates among young adults. Socioeconomic status, demographics, actual and perceived health status, perceived value, and perceived need are all examined in order to determine what the literature reveals regarding each variable and how each variable impacts a young adult's decision to purchase health insurance. Results indicate that socioeconomic status, demographics, perceived value, and perceived need were the most significant determinates of health insurance status of young adults. A conceptual framework is also examined and used to illustrate theoretical implications. Managerial implications for marketing health plans to young adults are also addressed. Finally, policy implications concerning the new Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act are addressed.

  8. Lean thinking in health and nursing: an integrative literature review 1

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Aline Lima Pestana; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; da Silva, Elza Lima; dos Santos, José Luís Guedes

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: to demonstrate the scientific knowledge developed on lean thinking in health, highlighting the impact and contributions in health care and nursing. Method: an integrative literature review in the PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Science, Emerald, LILACS and SciELO electronic library databases, from 2006 to 2014, with syntax keywords for each data base, in which 47 articles were selected for analysis. Results: the categories were developed from the quality triad proposed by Donabedian: structure, process and outcome. Lean thinking is on the rise in health surveys, particularly internationally, especially in the USA and UK, improving the structure, process and outcome of care and management actions. However, it is an emerging theme in nursing. Conclusion: this study showed that the use of lean thinking in the context of health has a transforming effect on care and organizational aspects, promoting advantages in terms of quality, safety and efficiency of health care and nursing focused on the patient. PMID:27508906

  9. Mindfulness, self-compassion, and empathy among health care professionals: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Raab, Kelley

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between mindfulness and self-compassion is explored in the health care literature, with a corollary emphasis on reducing stress in health care workers and providing compassionate patient care. Health care professionals are particularly vulnerable to stress overload and compassion fatigue due to an emotionally exhausting environment. Compassion fatigue among caregivers in turn has been associated with less effective delivery of care. Having compassion for others entails self-compassion. In Kristin Neff's research, self-compassion includes self-kindness, a sense of common humanity, and mindfulness. Both mindfulness and self-compassion involve promoting an attitude of curiosity and nonjudgment towards one's experiences. Research suggests that mindfulness interventions, particularly those with an added lovingkindness component, have the potential to increase self-compassion among health care workers. Enhancing focus on developing self-compassion using MBSR and other mindfulness interventions for health care workers holds promise for reducing perceived stress and increasing effectiveness of clinical care.

  10. Health problems associated with international business travel. A critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rogers, H L; Reilly, S M

    2000-08-01

    1. Few studies examine the travel related health problems of international business travelers (IBTs). Research exists for other travelers, such as tourists, which begins to help clinicians understand the potential health problems faced by IBTs. 2. A review of the literature reveals 36% to 54% of travelers experience physical health problems such as traveler's diarrhea, insomnia, respiratory problems, and skin problems; 6% to 18% report accidents and injuries while abroad. 3. Psychosocial data are equally limited, but support the idea that IBTs may experience stress, anxiety, culture shock, and adjustment problems while overseas. 4. Multiple factors likely contribute to the physical and psychosocial health experiences of IBTs. The historical lack of data for this population of workers combined with the trend towards globalization confirm the need for further study from an occupational health perspective.

  11. "Screw health": representations of sex as a health-promoting activity in medical and popular literature.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kristina

    2011-06-01

    Recently, scientific and popular press articles have begun to represent sex as a health-promoting activity. A number of scientific studies have identified possible health benefits of sexual activity, including increased lifespan and decreased risk of certain types of cancers. These scientific findings have been widely reported on in the popular press. This "sex for health" discourse claims that sexual activity leads to quantifiable physical and mental health benefits in areas not directly related to sexuality. Analyzing this discourse provides an opportunity to better understand both broader health promotion discourses and current norms and anxieties about sexuality. In this article, I place this "sex for health" discourse within the context of broader health promotion discourses and within the context of a number of historical and contemporary discourses connecting health and sexuality. I argue that although the "sex for health" discourse may serve to de-stigmatize sexual activity for some, it may also increase pressure on others to be sexually active and may further pathologize sexual "dysfunction." In addition, these representations often serve to further privilege a normative form of sexual behavior - coitus in the context of a monogamous heterosexual partnership - at the expense of non-normative sexual desires, identities, and practices.

  12. Knowledge mobilisation in healthcare: a critical review of health sector and generic management literature.

    PubMed

    Ferlie, Ewan; Crilly, Tessa; Jashapara, Ashok; Peckham, Anna

    2012-04-01

    The health policy domain has displayed increasing interest in questions of knowledge management and knowledge mobilisation within healthcare organisations. We analyse here the findings of a critical review of generic management and health-related literatures, covering the period 2000-2008. Using 29 pre-selected journals, supplemented by a search of selected electronic databases, we map twelve substantive domains classified into four broad groups: taxonomic and philosophical (e.g. different types of knowledge); theoretical discourse (e.g. critical organisational studies); disciplinary fields (e.g. organisational learning and Information Systems/Information Technology); and organisational processes and structures (e.g. organisational form). We explore cross-overs and gaps between these traditionally separate literature streams. We found that health sector literature has absorbed some generic concepts, notably Communities of Practice, but has not yet deployed the performance-oriented perspective of the Resource Based View (RBV) of the Firm. The generic literature uses healthcare sites to develop critical analyses of power and control in knowledge management, rooted in neo-Marxist/labour process and Foucauldian approaches. The review generates three theoretically grounded statements to inform future enquiry, by: (a) importing the RBV stream; (b) developing the critical organisational studies perspective further; and (c) exploring the theoretical argument that networks and other alternative organisational forms facilitate knowledge sharing.

  13. Cr laser research at AlliedSignal

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    The Applied Physics Laboratory of AlliedSignal, Inc. has been developing Cr lasers and applications for a number of years. This operation has resulted in new laser designs and in improved engineering and packaging which are critical to acceptable performance in the field. Although most of the work has been part of military programs, AlliedSignal, with partners, has recently been offering its lasers to commercial programs as a supplier to the OEM market. This paper will present several laser systems which have recently been developed at AlliedSignal. These systems will include those based on alexandrite and Cr:LiSAF. The examples chosen will show the versatility of these laser materials.

  14. District decision-making for health in low-income settings: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Wickremasinghe, Deepthi; Hashmi, Iram Ejaz; Schellenberg, Joanna; Avan, Bilal Iqbal

    2016-09-01

    Health management information systems (HMIS) produce large amounts of data about health service provision and population health, and provide opportunities for data-based decision-making in decentralized health systems. Yet the data are little-used locally. A well-defined approach to district-level decision-making using health data would help better meet the needs of the local population. In this second of four papers on district decision-making for health in low-income settings, our aim was to explore ways in which district administrators and health managers in low- and lower-middle-income countries use health data to make decisions, to describe the decision-making tools they used and identify challenges encountered when using these tools. A systematic literature review, following PRISMA guidelines, was undertaken. Experts were consulted about key sources of information. A search strategy was developed for 14 online databases of peer reviewed and grey literature. The resources were screened independently by two reviewers using pre-defined inclusion criteria. The 14 papers included were assessed for the quality of reported evidence and a descriptive evidence synthesis of the review findings was undertaken. We found 12 examples of tools to assist district-level decision-making, all of which included two key stages-identification of priorities, and development of an action plan to address them. Of those tools with more steps, four included steps to review or monitor the action plan agreed, suggesting the use of HMIS data. In eight papers HMIS data were used for prioritization. Challenges to decision-making processes fell into three main categories: the availability and quality of health and health facility data; human dynamics and financial constraints. Our findings suggest that evidence is available about a limited range of processes that include the use of data for decision-making at district level. Standardization and pre-testing in diverse settings would increase

  15. The Health Profile of Street Children in Africa: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Cumber, Samuel Nambile; Tsoka-Gwegweni, Joyce Mahlako

    2015-08-17

    The United Nations Children's Fund has labeled street children as children in difficult circumstances, which represent a minority population that has been under-represented for too long in health research. This is a concern because street children are at risk of carrying a greater disease burden. Their homeless lifestyle makes them more vulnerable to health risks and problems than children who live at home; as they roam the streets begging for food and money to obtain basic needs and are found sleeping in half-destroyed houses, abandoned basements, under bridges and in the open air. This paper presents health results from a systematic review of literature from 17 databases and including 16 countries in Africa. The review revealed that there are more boys than girls living on the street in their adolescence and who mainly have left home due to poverty and abuse. These children in these countries are vulnerable to poor health due to factors such as homelessness, risky sexual behavior, substance abuse and violence. Among the health problems identified are growth and nutritional disorders, physical injuries, violence, sexual abuse, communicable diseases including diarrheal diseases, malaria, respiratory diseases, neglected tropical diseases, mental health issues, substance abuse, reproductive health disorders, mortality, sexually transmitted diseases and HIV/AIDS. Primary interventions that could prevent poor health and improve the health status of street children include provision of safe shelter, proper nutrition, access to health care, health education, and sexual reproductive health, protection from any form of abuse, violence and substance abuse. Enforcing state policies and laws in all African countries is required to protect street children from neglect, abuse and to increase their access to education. More research on the health risks and health status of street children is still required, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa, which carries the greatest disease

  16. The Health Profile of Street Children in Africa: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cumber, Samuel Nambile; Tsoka-Gwegweni, Joyce Mahlako

    2015-01-01

    The United Nations Children’s Fund has labeled street children as children in difficult circumstances, which represent a minority population that has been under-represented for too long in health research. This is a concern because street children are at risk of carrying a greater disease burden. Their homeless lifestyle makes them more vulnerable to health risks and problems than children who live at home; as they roam the streets begging for food and money to obtain basic needs and are found sleeping in half-destroyed houses, abandoned basements, under bridges and in the open air. This paper presents health results from a systematic review of literature from 17 databases and including 16 countries in Africa. The review revealed that there are more boys than girls living on the street in their adolescence and who mainly have left home due to poverty and abuse. These children in these countries are vulnerable to poor health due to factors such as homelessness, risky sexual behavior, substance abuse and violence. Among the health problems identified are growth and nutritional disorders, physical injuries, violence, sexual abuse, communicable diseases including diarrheal diseases, malaria, respiratory diseases, neglected tropical diseases, mental health issues, substance abuse, reproductive health disorders, mortality, sexually transmitted diseases and HIV/AIDS. Primary interventions that could prevent poor health and improve the health status of street children include provision of safe shelter, proper nutrition, access to health care, health education, and sexual reproductive health, protection from any form of abuse, violence and substance abuse. Enforcing state policies and laws in all African countries is required to protect street children from neglect, abuse and to increase their access to education. More research on the health risks and health status of street children is still required, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa, which carries the greatest disease

  17. Health needs of detainees in police custody in England and Wales. Literature review.

    PubMed

    Rekrut-Lapa, Tatyana; Lapa, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this systematic is to review and analyse the literature concerned with the health needs of detainees in police custody in England and Wales. The healthcare of detainees in police custody is regulated by the England and Wales Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984. The Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine of the Royal College of Physicians also sets quality standards for the provision of custodial healthcare. The provision of healthcare in custody presents a number of challenges including the patient group, the setting and the overlap between the legal and medical concerns that are addressed by the medical team. Currently, care to the detainees in custody is delivered by a mixture of private organisations, police-led forensic medical services and the NHS. A search of the PUBMED, EMBASE and PsycINFO databases undertaken using the search terms: (police custody) OR (detainees) OR (police detainees) yielded 830 publications. All of the titles were screened to identify potentially relevant publications concerned with the health needs of detainees in police custodies in England and Wales. There were no design specific criteria set for inclusion of the studies in this literature review. 77 articles were initially identified as relevant and obtained in full. After further analysis 28 publications were included in this literature review. A total sample of over 12,000 detainees was examined in this literature review. Approximately 20% of detainees seen by health care teams suffer from psychiatric conditions. On average, 50% of patients claim that they have problems with drugs and alcohol. Physical health conditions are also highly prevalent with up to 74% of detainees requiring regular medication. Forensic medical issues included the management of detainees who were restrained using handcuffs, irritant sprays and TASER. Detainees who are suspected of internal drug concealment also require intensive medical input. Injury documentation in custody is often requested

  18. Framework for Selecting Best Practices in Public Health: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    de Colombani, Pierpaolo

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based public health has commonly relied on findings from empirical studies, or research-based evidence. However, this paper advocates that practice-based evidence derived from programmes implemented in real-life settings is likely to be a more suitable source of evidence for inspiring and guiding public health programmes. Selection of best practices from the array of implemented programmes is one way of generating such practice-based evidence. Yet the lack of consensus on the definition and criteria for practice-based evidence and best practices has limited their application in public health so far. To address the gap in literature on practice-based evidence, this paper hence proposes measures of success for public health interventions by developing an evaluation framework for selection of best practices. The proposed framework was synthesised from a systematic literature review of peer-reviewed and grey literature on existing evaluation frameworks for public health programmes as well as processes employed by health-related organisations when selecting best practices. A best practice is firstly defined as an intervention that has shown evidence of effectiveness in a particular setting and is likely to be replicable to other situations. Regardless of the area of public health, interventions should be evaluated by their context, process and outcomes. A best practice should hence meet most, if not all, of eight identified evaluation criteria: relevance, community participation, stakeholder collaboration, ethical soundness, replicability, effectiveness, efficiency and sustainability. Ultimately, a standardised framework for selection of best practices will improve the usefulness and credibility of practice-based evidence in informing evidence-based public health interventions. Significance for public health Best practices are a valuable source of practice-based evidence on effective public health interventions implemented in real-life settings. Yet, despite

  19. Framework for Selecting Best Practices in Public Health: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ng, Eileen; de Colombani, Pierpaolo

    2015-11-17

    Evidence-based public health has commonly relied on findings from empirical studies, or research-based evidence. However, this paper advocates that practice-based evidence derived from programmes implemented in real-life settings is likely to be a more suitable source of evidence for inspiring and guiding public health programmes. Selection of best practices from the array of implemented programmes is one way of generating such practice-based evidence. Yet the lack of consensus on the definition and criteria for practice-based evidence and best practices has limited their application in public health so far. To address the gap in literature on practice-based evidence, this paper hence proposes measures of success for public health interventions by developing an evaluation framework for selection of best practices. The proposed framework was synthesised from a systematic literature review of peer-reviewed and grey literature on existing evaluation frameworks for public health programmes as well as processes employed by health-related organisations when selecting best practices. A best practice is firstly defined as an intervention that has shown evidence of effectiveness in a particular setting and is likely to be replicable to other situations. Regardless of the area of public health, interventions should be evaluated by their context, process and outcomes. A best practice should hence meet most, if not all, of eight identified evaluation criteria: relevance, community participation, stakeholder collaboration, ethical soundness, replicability, effectiveness, efficiency and sustainability. Ultimately, a standardised framework for selection of best practices will improve the usefulness and credibility of practice-based evidence in informing evidence-based public health interventions. Significance for public healthBest practices are a valuable source of practice-based evidence on effective public health interventions implemented in real-life settings. Yet, despite the

  20. eHealth Literacy Interventions for Older Adults: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Background eHealth resources offer new opportunities for older adults to access health information online, connect with others with shared health interests, and manage their health. However, older adults often lack sufficient eHealth literacy to maximize their benefit from these resources. Objective This review evaluates the research design, methods, and findings of eHealth literacy interventions for older adults. Methods A systematic review of peer-reviewed research articles from 28 databases in 9 fields was carried out in January 2013. Four rounds of screening of articles in these databases resulted in a final sample of 23 articles. Results Findings indicated a significant gap in the literature for eHealth literacy interventions evaluating health outcomes as the outcome of interest, a lack of theory-based interventions, and few studies applied high-quality research design. Conclusions Our findings emphasize the need for researchers to develop and assess theory-based interventions applying high-quality research design in eHealth literacy interventions targeting the older population. PMID:25386719

  1. Trauma-related mental health problems among national humanitarian staff: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Strohmeier, Hannah; Scholte, Willem F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Working in humanitarian crisis situations is dangerous. National humanitarian staff in particular face the risk of primary and secondary trauma exposure which can lead to mental health problems. Despite this, research on the mental health of national staff is scarce, and a systematic analysis of up-to-date findings has not been undertaken yet. Objective This article reviews the available literature on trauma-related mental health problems among national humanitarian staff. It focuses on the prevalence of selected mental health problems in relation to reference groups; sex and/or gender as predictive factors of mental health problems; and the influence of organization types on mental health problems. Method Three databases were systematically searched for relevant studies published in the English language in peer-reviewed journals. Results Fourteen articles matched the inclusion criteria. Findings suggest that national staff experience mental health problems and the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety among this occupation group is mostly similar to or higher than among reference groups. Research on both substance use disorder and suicidal behavior among national staff is particularly scarce. The relation between sex and/or gender and mental health problems among national staff appears to be complex, and organizational staff support seems to be an important determinant for mental health. Conclusion All findings call for increased attention from the humanitarian community and further research on the topic. PMID:26589256

  2. Lessons of Allied Interoperability: A Portent for the Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-08-10

    Allied operations, coalition warfare, allied interoperobility, standardizatlon. rationliaaton, laisou, logistica , comand and control. doctrine, training...Staff College .1................... I Industrial College of the Armed Forces ....... ............... 2 Inter-American Defense College

  3. Electronic cigarettes and vaping: a new challenge in clinical medicine and public health. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Palazzolo, Dominic L

    2013-11-18

    Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use, or vaping, in the United States and worldwide is increasing. Their use is highly controversial from scientific, political, financial, psychological, and sociological ideologies. Given the controversial nature of e-cigarettes and vaping, how should medical care providers advise their patients? To effectively face this new challenge, health care professionals need to become more familiar with the existing literature concerning e-cigarettes and vaping, especially the scientific literature. Thus, the aim of this article is to present a review of the scientific evidence-based primary literature concerning electronic cigarettes and vaping. A search of the most current literature using the pubmed database dating back to 2008, and using electronic cigarette(s) or e-cigarette(s) as key words, yielded a total of 66 highly relevant articles. These articles primarily deal with (1) consumer-based surveys regarding personal views on vaping, (2) chemical analysis of e-cigarette cartridges, solutions, and mist, (3) nicotine content, delivery, and pharmacokinetics, and (4) clinical and physiological studies investigating the effects of acute vaping. When compared to the effects of smoking, the scant available literature suggests that vaping could be a "harm reduction" alternative to smoking and a possible means for smoking cessation, at least to the same degree as other Food and Drug Administration-approved nicotine replacement therapies. However, it is unclear if vaping e-cigarettes will reduce or increase nicotine addiction. It is obvious that more rigorous investigations of the acute and long-term health effects of vaping are required to establish the safety and efficacy of these devices; especially parallel experiments comparing the cardiopulmonary effects of vaping to smoking. Only then will the medical community be able to adequately meet the new challenge e-cigarettes and vaping present to clinical medicine and public health.

  4. Electronic Cigarettes and Vaping: A New Challenge in Clinical Medicine and Public Health. A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Palazzolo, Dominic L.

    2013-01-01

    Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use, or vaping, in the United States and worldwide is increasing. Their use is highly controversial from scientific, political, financial, psychological, and sociological ideologies. Given the controversial nature of e-cigarettes and vaping, how should medical care providers advise their patients? To effectively face this new challenge, health care professionals need to become more familiar with the existing literature concerning e-cigarettes and vaping, especially the scientific literature. Thus, the aim of this article is to present a review of the scientific evidence-based primary literature concerning electronic cigarettes and vaping. A search of the most current literature using the pubmed database dating back to 2008, and using electronic cigarette(s) or e-cigarette(s) as key words, yielded a total of 66 highly relevant articles. These articles primarily deal with (1) consumer-based surveys regarding personal views on vaping, (2) chemical analysis of e-cigarette cartridges, solutions, and mist, (3) nicotine content, delivery, and pharmacokinetics, and (4) clinical and physiological studies investigating the effects of acute vaping. When compared to the effects of smoking, the scant available literature suggests that vaping could be a “harm reduction” alternative to smoking and a possible means for smoking cessation, at least to the same degree as other Food and Drug Administration-approved nicotine replacement therapies. However, it is unclear if vaping e-cigarettes will reduce or increase nicotine addiction. It is obvious that more rigorous investigations of the acute and long-term health effects of vaping are required to establish the safety and efficacy of these devices; especially parallel experiments comparing the cardiopulmonary effects of vaping to smoking. Only then will the medical community be able to adequately meet the new challenge e-cigarettes and vaping present to clinical medicine and public health. PMID

  5. [Literature revision about the attendance of deaf patient by health professionals].

    PubMed

    Chaveiro, Neuma; Barbosa, Maria Alves; Porto, Celmo Celeno

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this systematic literature review is to analyze and identify the communication between deaf patients and health professionals, as well as to investigate the care offered. The computerized databases were used for data collection, using the keywords paciente (patient), surdo (deaf person), and comunicação (communication). The results were grouped in three categories: communication, health professional education, and legal aspects. The communication category deals with communicative barriers, written language and the presence of the interpreter. In the second category, the focus is on the education of the professionals in relation to the deaf community. The third category reports the legal aspects involved in caring for deaf patients. The review showed that there are communication barriers between deaf patients and health professionals, and that health care is a challenge for both. It also emphasized that there is a need for education regarding the deaf patients.

  6. Determining business models for financial sustainability in regional health information organizations: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Roxana; Dunn, Kim

    2008-11-06

    While the promise and enthusiasm for regional health information organizations (RHIOs) are immense, a significant issue regarding this type of health information exchange, (HIE) remains unclear: financial sustainability. As of today, there is a clear lack of concrete business models implemented in RHIOs' projects. The purpose of this study is to conduct a literature review of the current state of RHIOs adaptation and implementation of business models for successful financial sustainability, as well as evaluate existing RHIOs financial situation to determine and recommend best models for economic uphold. This literature review will be the starting point for thorough analysis and understanding of the economic factors required for RHIOs to generate a return on investment (ROI) and become self-sustainable.

  7. A systematic review of microfinance and women's health literature: Directions for future research.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, T L; Burke, J G

    2016-04-15

    While growing evidence suggests that microfinance is an effective approach for improved women's health, a significant gap remains in our understanding. The objective of this review is to synthesise the findings from published literature focused on microfinance and health issues particularly affecting women, including HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, mental health, and violence. Forty-one articles that examine the impact of microfinance participation on women's health were identified through a systematic search of electronic databases, coded using a structured abstraction form, and synthesised. Review results indicate that the impact of microfinance on women's health is an area in great need of research and publication attention. Varied quality and reporting in the identified articles restricted the ability to draw concrete conclusions regarding the relationship between microfinance participation and women's health, but led to the identification of current gaps in existing published research. Future research should work to address the recommendations provided in order to offer additional evidence to better understand the use of microfinance programming as a structural intervention to improve women's health.

  8. Linking databases on perinatal health: a review of the literature and current practices in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Szamotulska, K.; Hindori-Mohangoo, A.D.; Blondel, B.; Macfarlane, A.J.; Dattani, N.; Barona, C.; Berrut, S.; Zile, I.; Wood, R.; Sakkeus, L.; Gissler, M.; Zeitlin, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: International comparisons of perinatal health indicators are complicated by the heterogeneity of data sources on pregnancy, maternal and neonatal outcomes. Record linkage can extend the range of data items available and thus can improve the validity and quality of routine data. We sought to assess the extent to which data are linked routinely for perinatal health research and reporting. Methods: We conducted a systematic review of the literature by searching PubMed for perinatal health studies from 2001 to 2011 based on linkage of routine data (data collected continuously at various time intervals). We also surveyed European health monitoring professionals about use of linkage for national perinatal health surveillance. Results: 516 studies fit our inclusion criteria. Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, the US and the UK contributed 76% of the publications; a further 29 countries contributed at least one publication. Most studies linked vital statistics, hospital records, medical birth registries and cohort data. Other sources were specific registers for: cancer (70), congenital anomalies (56), ART (19), census (19), health professionals (37), insurance (22) prescription (31), and level of education (18). Eighteen of 29 countries (62%) reported linking data for routine perinatal health monitoring. Conclusion: Research using linkage is concentrated in a few countries and is not widely practiced in Europe. Broader adoption of data linkage could yield substantial gains for perinatal health research and surveillance. PMID:26891058

  9. The Role of Health Kiosks in 2009: Literature and Informant Review

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ray

    2009-01-01

    Kiosks can provide patients with access to health systems in public locations, but with increasing home Internet access their usefulness is questioned. A literature and informant review identified kiosks used for taking medical histories, health promotion, self assessment, consumer feedback, patient registration, patient access to records, and remote consultations. Sited correctly with good interfaces, kiosks can be used by all demographics but many ‘projects’ have failed to become routine practice. A role remains for: (a) integrated kiosks as part of patient ‘flow’, (b) opportunistic kiosks to catch people’s attention. Both require clear ‘ownership’ to succeed. PMID:19578463

  10. Turning Parents from Critics to Allies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagarese, Margaret M.; Giannetti, Charlene C.

    1998-01-01

    Authors of "The Roller Coaster Years" (1997) advise how middle-level educators can turn wary, disinterested parents into allies. Teachers should welcome parents, advertise their own expertise, implement an early-warning system, portray children positively, convey shared values, reassure parents about children's safety, demonstrate insider…

  11. Ugruayaaglu Avilaitqatiglu (Alli and His Friends).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Mary L.; And Others

    This third grade elementary language text, designed for children in bilingual Inupiat-English programs in the Alaskan village of Barrow and several small villages near Barrow, contains one story about the adventures of an animal named Alli and his friends. The material is presented with many illustrations depicting the events in the story. The…

  12. 27 CFR 24.322 - Allied products record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allied products record. 24..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Records and Reports § 24.322 Allied products record. A proprietor who uses fruit, fruit juice or concentrated fruit juice in the production of allied products shall...

  13. Global health training among U.S. residency specialties: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hau, Duncan K.; Smart, Luke R.; DiPace, Jennifer I.; Peck, Robert N.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Interest in global health training during residency is increasing. Global health knowledge is also becoming essential for health-care delivery today. Many U.S. residency programs have been incorporating global health training opportunities for their residents. We performed a systematic literature review to evaluate global health training opportunities and challenges among U.S. residency specialties. Methods: We searched PubMed from its earliest dates until October 2015. Articles included were survey results of U.S. program directors on global health training opportunities, and web-based searches of U.S. residency program websites on global health training opportunities. Data extracted included percentage of residency programs offering global health training within a specialty and challenges encountered. Results: Studies were found for twelve U.S. residency specialties. Of the survey based studies, the specialties with the highest percentage of their residency programs offering global health training were preventive medicine (83%), emergency medicine (74%), and surgery (71%); and the lowest were orthopaedic surgery (26%), obstetrics and gynecology (28%), and plastic surgery (41%). Of the web-based studies, the specialties with the highest percentage of their residency programs offering global health training were emergency medicine (41%), pediatrics (33%), and family medicine (22%); and the lowest were psychiatry (9%), obstetrics and gynecology (17%), and surgery (18%). The most common challenges were lack of funding, lack of international partnerships, lack of supervision, and scheduling. Conclusion: Among U.S. residency specialties, there are wide disparities for global health training. In general, there are few opportunities in psychiatry and surgical residency specialties, and greater opportunities among medical residency specialties. Further emphasis should be made to scale-up opportunities for psychiatry and surgical residency specialties

  14. Health outcomes during the 2008 financial crisis in Europe: systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Divya; Ioannidis, John P A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To systematically identify, critically appraise, and synthesise empirical studies about the impact of the 2008 financial crisis in Europe on health outcomes. Design Systematic literature review. Data sources Structural searches of key databases, healthcare journals, and organisation based websites. Review methods Empirical studies reporting on the impact of the financial crisis on health outcomes in Europe, published from January 2008 to December 2015, were included. All selected studies were assessed for risk of bias. Owing to the heterogeneity of studies in terms of study design and analysis and the use of overlapping datasets across studies, studies were analysed thematically per outcome, and the evidence was synthesised on different health outcomes without formal meta-analysis. Results 41 studies met the inclusion criteria, and focused on suicide, mental health, self rated health, mortality, and other health outcomes. Of those studies, 30 (73%) were deemed to be at high risk of bias, nine (22%) at moderate risk of bias, and only two (5%) at low risk of bias, limiting the conclusions that can be drawn. Although there were differences across countries and groups, there was some indication that suicides increased and mental health deteriorated during the crisis. The crisis did not seem to reverse the trend of decreasing overall mortality. Evidence on self rated health and other indicators was mixed. Conclusions Most published studies on the impact of financial crisis on health in Europe had a substantial risk of bias; therefore, results need to be cautiously interpreted. Overall, the financial crisis in Europe seemed to have had heterogeneous effects on health outcomes, with the evidence being most consistent for suicides and mental health. There is a need for better empirical studies, especially those focused on identifying mechanisms that can mitigate the adverse effects of the crisis. PMID:27601477

  15. Qualitative Environmental Health Research: An Analysis of the Literature, 1991–2008

    PubMed Central

    Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent articles have advocated for the use of qualitative methods in environmental health research. Qualitative research uses nonnumeric data to understand people’s opinions, motives, understanding, and beliefs about events or phenomena. Objective In this analysis of the literature, I report the use of qualitative methods and data in the study of the relationship between environmental exposures and human health. Data sources A primary search on ISI Web of Knowledge/Web of Science for peer-reviewed journal articles dated from 1991 through 2008 included the following three terms: qualitative, environ*, and health. Inclusion and exclusion criteria are described. Data extraction Searches resulted in 3,155 records. Data were extracted and findings of articles analyzed to determine where and by whom qualitative environmental health research is conducted and published, the types of methods and analyses used in qualitative studies of environmental health, and the types of information qualitative data contribute to environmental health. Data synthesis Ninety-one articles met inclusion criteria. These articles were published in 58 different journals, with a maximum of eight for a single journal. The results highlight a diversity of disciplines and techniques among researchers who used qualitative methods to study environmental health, with most studies relying on one-on-one interviews. Details of the analyses were absent from a large number of studies. Nearly all of the studies identified increased scientific understanding of lay perceptions of environmental health exposures. Discussion and conclusions Qualitative data are published in traditionally quantitative environmental health studies to a limited extent. However, this analysis demonstrates the potential of qualitative data to improve understanding of complex exposure pathways, including the influence of social factors on environmental health, and health outcomes. PMID:20421191

  16. Conceptual Models in Health Informatics Research: A Literature Review and Suggestions for Development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Contributing to health informatics research means using conceptual models that are integrative and explain the research in terms of the two broad domains of health science and information science. However, it can be hard for novice health informatics researchers to find exemplars and guidelines in working with integrative conceptual models. Objectives The aim of this paper is to support the use of integrative conceptual models in research on information and communication technologies in the health sector, and to encourage discussion of these conceptual models in scholarly forums. Methods A two-part method was used to summarize and structure ideas about how to work effectively with conceptual models in health informatics research that included (1) a selective review and summary of the literature of conceptual models; and (2) the construction of a step-by-step approach to developing a conceptual model. Results The seven-step methodology for developing conceptual models in health informatics research explained in this paper involves (1) acknowledging the limitations of health science and information science conceptual models; (2) giving a rationale for one’s choice of integrative conceptual model; (3) explicating a conceptual model verbally and graphically; (4) seeking feedback about the conceptual model from stakeholders in both the health science and information science domains; (5) aligning a conceptual model with an appropriate research plan; (6) adapting a conceptual model in response to new knowledge over time; and (7) disseminating conceptual models in scholarly and scientific forums. Conclusions Making explicit the conceptual model that underpins a health informatics research project can contribute to increasing the number of well-formed and strongly grounded health informatics research projects. This explication has distinct benefits for researchers in training, research teams, and researchers and practitioners in information, health, and other

  17. Health Inequity and "Restoring Fairness" Through the Canadian Refugee Health Policy Reforms: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Antonipillai, Valentina; Baumann, Andrea; Hunter, Andrea; Wahoush, Olive; O'Shea, Timothy

    2016-09-02

    Refugees and refugee claimants experience increased health needs upon arrival in Canada. The Federal Government funded the Interim Federal Health Program (IFHP) since 1957, ensuring comprehensive healthcare insurance for all refugees and refugee claimants seeking protection in Canada. Over the past 4 years, the Canadian government implemented restrictions to essential healthcare services through retrenchments to the IFHP. This paper will review the IFHP, in conjunction with other immigration policies, to explore the issues associated with providing inequitable access to healthcare for refugee populations. It will examine changes made to the IFHP in 2012 and in response to the federal court decision in 2014. Findings of the review indicate that the retrenchments to the 2012 IFHP instigated health outcome disparities, social exclusion and increased costs for vulnerable refugee populations. The 2014 reforms reinstated some services; however the policy continued to produce inequitable healthcare access for some refugees and refugee claimants.

  18. Undergraduate Full Text Databases: "Bell and Howell Medical Complete" and "InfoTrac Health Reference Center - Academic."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Lutishoor; Davidson, Bryan; Bailey, Alberta

    2000-01-01

    Compares/contrasts InfoTrac and ProQuest primarily as full-text resources to supplement retrieval of references contained in the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) database. These databases are analyzed by examining their scope in terms of the number and types of serials covered within specific areas using…

  19. Policy and System Change and Community Coalitions: Outcomes from Allies against Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Noreen M.; Lachance, Laurie; Doctor, Linda Jo; Gilmore, Lisa; Kelly, Cindy; Krieger, James; Lara, Marielena; Meurer, John; Friedman Milanovich, Amy; Nicholas, Elisa; Rosenthal, Michael; Stoll, Shelley C.; Wilkin, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We assessed policy and system changes and health outcomes produced by the Allies Against Asthma program, a 5-year collaborative effort by 7 community coalitions to address childhood asthma. We also explored associations between community engagement and outcomes. Methods: We interviewed a sample of 1,477 parents of children with asthma…

  20. Health-Related Internet Use by Informal Caregivers of Children and Adolescents: An Integrative Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Steinhoff, Andreanna

    2016-01-01

    Background Internet-based health resources can support informal caregivers who are caring for children or adolescents with health care needs. However, few studies discriminate informal caregivers’ needs from those of their care recipients or those of people caring for adults. Objective This study reviews the literature of health-related Internet use among informal caregivers of children and adolescents. Methods A total of 17 studies were selected from literature searches conducted in 6 electronic databases: PubMed, Cochrane, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ERIC, and EMBASE. All databases searches were limited to articles published in the years 2004 to 2014 in peer-reviewed publications. Search terms consisted of “health-related Internet use,” “eHealth,” “Internet use for health-related purpose(s),” “Web-based resource(s),” and “online resources,” combined with informal caregiver (or “parents”) of “child,” “adolescent,” “student,” “youth,” and “teen.” The age range of the children receiving care was limited to younger than 22 years. Their informal caregivers were defined as persons (parents) who provided unpaid care or assistance to a child or an adolescent with health problems. Results Among 17 empirical studies, the majority of informal caregivers of children with medical issues were the parents. Quantitative studies (14/17, 77%) reported prevalence and predictors of health-related Internet use, while mixed-methods and qualitative studies (3/17, 24%) investigated informal caregiver perceptions of helpful health-related Internet use and barriers of use. The prevalence of health-related Internet use varied (11%-90%) dependent upon how health-related Internet use was operationalized and measured. Disease-specific information was used for decision making about treatment, while social support via virtual communities and email were used for informal caregiver emotional needs. A digital divide of Internet access was identified in lower

  1. Active involvement of people with intellectual disabilities in health research - A structured literature review.

    PubMed

    Frankena, Tessa Kim; Naaldenberg, Jenneken; Cardol, Mieke; Linehan, Christine; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny

    2015-01-01

    Actively involving people with intellectual disabilities (ID) in health research, also known as inclusive health research, is increasingly popular. Currently, insight into experiences of this type of research is scarce. To gain insight into this topic, a structured literature review was conducted focussing on (1) existing theories, (2) inclusive methods, (3) added value and (4) barriers and facilitators. Literature published between January 2000 and January 2014 was included covering keywords related to ID and inclusive health research. Searches were performed in Pubmed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE and MEDLINE databases, resulting in 26 included papers. Papers were quality assessed and analysed using qualitative data analysis software. Four theories were often simultaneously addressed: participatory research, emancipatory research, inclusive research and Arnstein's ladder. Barriers and facilitators could be divided into preparing, undertaking and finalising phases of research. Authors indicated that their motivation to conduct inclusive health research was based on demands by policy and funding bodies or was based on ethical considerations (i.e., ethical notions and giving people with ID a voice). Upon completion, authors perceived increased quality and validity of their research and several benefits for stakeholders (i.e., people with ID, researchers and healthcare professionals). Overall, there was consistency in their perception of the most important aspects of inclusive health research. Based on the analysis of included papers, four recommendations of inclusive health research with people with ID were found. Inclusive health research should be: (1) tailoring to the specific study; (2) anticipating all stakeholders; (3) considering its added value; and (4) providing insight into its process.

  2. A Literature Synthesis of Health Promotion Research in Salons and Barbershops

    PubMed Central

    Linnan, Laura A.; D’Angelo, Heather; Harrington, Cherise B.

    2015-01-01

    Context Barbershops and beauty salons are located in all communities and frequented by diverse groups of people, making them key settings for addressing health disparities. No studies have reviewed the growing body of literature describing studies promoting health in these settings. This review summarized the literature related to promoting health within barbershops and beauty salons to inform future approaches that target diverse populations in similar settings. Evidence Acquisition We identified and reviewed published research articles describing formative research, recruitment, and health-related interventions set in beauty salons and barbershops. PubMed and other secondary search engines were searched in 2010 and again in 2013 for English-language papers indexed from 1990 through August 2013. The search yielded 110 articles, 68 of which were formerly reviewed, and 54 were eligible for inclusion. Evidence Synthesis Included articles were categorized as formative research (n=27), recruitment (n=7), or intervention (n=20). Formative research studies showed that owners, barbers/stylists, and their customers were willing participants, clarifying the feasibility of promoting health in these settings. Recruitment studies demonstrated that salon/shop owners will join research studies and can enroll customers. Among intervention studies, level of stylist/barber involvement was categorized. More than 73.3% of intervention studies demonstrated statistically significant results, targeting mostly racial/ethnic minority groups and focusing on a variety of health topics. Conclusions Barbershops and beauty salons are promising settings for reaching populations most at risk for health disparities. Although these results are encouraging, more rigorous research and evaluation of future salon- and barbershop-based interventions are needed. PMID:24768037

  3. Research on workplace health promotion in the Nordic countries: a literature review, 1986-2008.

    PubMed

    Torp, Steffen; Eklund, Leena; Thorpenberg, Stefan

    2011-09-01

    Workplace health promotion may include approaches focusing on behavioral change among employees and approaches with a holistic system-oriented thinking aiming at changing the physical, social and organizational factors of a setting. This literature review aimed to identify studies on workplace health promotion in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden), to describe when, where and how the studies were performed and to further analyze the use of settings approaches and empowerment processes. Using scientific literature databases, we found 1809 hits when searching for Nordic studies published from 1986 to 2008 with the search term health promotion. Of these, 116 studies were related to workplace health promotion and 33 included interventions. We used content analysis to analyze the abstracts of all articles and the full articles of the intervention studies. Most studies were performed in Sweden and Finland. The focus was mainly on behavioral change rather than on holistic health promotion as defined by the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. This was especially obvious for the intervention studies. In addition to the intervention studies using non-settings approaches with top-down driven behavioral change, we identified studies with participatory settings approaches aimed at changing the setting. We categorized relatively few studies as having a non-participatory settings approach. The studies aiming specifically at improving employees' empowerment were evenly distributed between the categories market-oriented persuasion of empowerment, therapeutic empowerment and empowerment as a liberal management strategy. More studies on workplace health promotion using empowering and participatory settings approaches are needed in the Nordic countries, and a more theory-based approach towards this research field is needed.

  4. Measurement Error in Performance Studies of Health Information Technology: Lessons from the Management Literature

    PubMed Central

    Litwin, A.S.; Avgar, A.C.; Pronovost, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Just as researchers and clinicians struggle to pin down the benefits attendant to health information technology (IT), management scholars have long labored to identify the performance effects arising from new technologies and from other organizational innovations, namely the reorganization of work and the devolution of decision-making authority. This paper applies lessons from that literature to theorize the likely sources of measurement error that yield the weak statistical relationship between measures of health IT and various performance outcomes. In so doing, it complements the evaluation literature’s more conceptual examination of health IT’s limited performance impact. The paper focuses on seven issues, in particular, that likely bias downward the estimated performance effects of health IT. They are 1.) negative self-selection, 2.) omitted or unobserved variables, 3.) mis-measured contextual variables, 4.) mismeasured health IT variables, 5.) lack of attention to the specific stage of the adoption-to-use continuum being examined, 6.) too short of a time horizon, and 7.) inappropriate units-of-analysis. The authors offer ways to counter these challenges. Looking forward more broadly, they suggest that researchers take an organizationally-grounded approach that privileges internal validity over generalizability. This focus on statistical and empirical issues in health IT-performance studies should be complemented by a focus on theoretical issues, in particular, the ways that health IT creates value and apportions it to various stakeholders. PMID:23620719

  5. Empirical studies on usability of mHealth apps: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Belén Cruz; Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Idri, Ali; Toval, Ambrosio

    2015-02-01

    The release of smartphones and tablets, which offer more advanced communication and computing capabilities, has led to the strong emergence of mHealth on the market. mHealth systems are being used to improve patients' lives and their health, in addition to facilitating communication between doctors and patients. Researchers are now proposing mHealth applications for many health conditions such as dementia, autism, dysarthria, Parkinson's disease, and so on. Usability becomes a key factor in the adoption of these applications, which are often used by people who have problems when using mobile devices and who have a limited experience of technology. The aim of this paper is to investigate the empirical usability evaluation processes described in a total of 22 selected studies related to mHealth applications by means of a Systematic Literature Review. Our results show that the empirical evaluation methods employed as regards usability could be improved by the adoption of automated mechanisms. The evaluation processes should also be revised to combine more than one method. This paper will help researchers and developers to create more usable applications. Our study demonstrates the importance of adapting health applications to users' need.

  6. Millennium Development Goal Four and Child Health Inequities in Indonesia: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Schröders, Julia; Wall, Stig; Kusnanto, Hari; Ng, Nawi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 4 calls for reducing mortality of children under-five years by two-thirds by 2015. Indonesia is on track to officially meet the MDG 4 targets by 2015 but progress has been far from universal. It has been argued that national level statistics, on which MDG 4 relies, obscure persistent health inequities within the country. Particularly inequities in child health are a major global public health challenge both for achieving MDG 4 in 2015 and beyond. This review aims to map out the situation of MDG 4 with respect to disadvantaged populations in Indonesia applying the Social Determinants of Health (SDH) framework. The specific objectives are to answer: Who are the disadvantaged populations? Where do they live? And why and how is the inequitable distribution of health explained in terms of the SDH framework? Methods and Findings We retrieved studies through a systematic review of peer-reviewed and gray literature published in 1995-2014. The PRISMA-Equity 2012 statement was adapted to guide the methods of this review. The dependent variables were MDG 4-related indicators; the independent variable “disadvantaged populations” was defined by different categories of social differentiation using PROGRESS. Included texts were analyzed following the guidelines for deductive content analysis operationalized on the basis of the SDH framework. We identified 83 studies establishing evidence on more than 40 different determinants hindering an equitable distribution of child health in Indonesia. The most prominent determinants arise from the shortcomings within the rural health care system, the repercussions of food poverty coupled with low health literacy among parents, the impact of low household decision-making power of mothers, and the consequences of high persistent use of traditional birth attendants among ethnic minorities. Conclusion This review calls for enhanced understanding of the determinants and pathways that create

  7. Mental and Physical Health and Intimate Partner Violence against Women: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Gina; Hussain, Rafat; Loxton, Deborah; Rahman, Saifur

    2013-01-01

    Associations between intimate partner violence (IPV) and poor physical and mental health of women have been demonstrated in the international and national literature across numerous studies. This paper presents a review of the literature on this topic. The 75 papers included in this review cover both original research studies and those which undertook secondary analyses of primary data sources. The reviewed research papers published from 2006 to 2012 include quantitative and qualitative studies from Western and developing countries. The results show that while there is variation in prevalence of IPV across various cultural settings, IPV was associated with a range of mental health issues including depression, PTSD, anxiety, self-harm, and sleep disorders. In most studies, these effects were observed using validated measurement tools. IPV was also found to be associated with poor physical health including poor functional health, somatic disorders, chronic disorders and chronic pain, gynaecological problems, and increased risk of STIs. An increased risk of HIV was reported to be associated with a history of sexual abuse and violence. The implications of the study findings in relation to methodological issues, clinical significance, and future research direction are discussed. PMID:23431441

  8. Ageism and age discrimination in health care: Fact or fiction? A narrative review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kydd, Angela; Fleming, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Ageism and age discrimination are terms used in best practice statements and in the literature to define negative attitudes towards older people and towards people because of their age (whether old or young). However, 'old age' is a nebulous concept with definitions ranging from the over 50s to the over 85s. In seeking to explore ageism and age discrimination within health care, this paper discusses the concept of 'old' and discusses the findings of a narrative review of the literature on these two concepts. Results show that negative attitudes have been perceived by users of health care services, but the reasons are not clear. Such attitudes are usually reported in acute health care settings, where targets and quick turnover are encouraged. Thus people, usually those with complex needs, who require longer periods of recuperation and rehabilitation following an episode of ill health, are troublesome to staff working in a system geared up for early discharges. This type of service user is usually over the age of 85. Recommendations from this paper include the need for acute frailty units, with well trained staff, where frail older people can be comprehensively assessed, receive timely and targeted care, followed by a supported discharge.

  9. Designing for Risk Assessment Systems for Patient Triage in Primary Health Care: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Paulo Victor Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Background This literature review covers original journal papers published between 2011 and 2015. These papers review the current status of research on the application of human factors and ergonomics in risk assessment systems’ design to cope with the complexity, singularity, and danger in patient triage in primary health care. Objective This paper presents a systematic literature review that aims to identify, analyze, and interpret the application of available evidence from human factors and ergonomics to the design of tools, devices, and work processes to support risk assessment in the context of health care. Methods Electronic search was performed on 7 bibliographic databases of health sciences, engineering, and computer sciences disciplines. The quality and suitability of primary studies were evaluated, and selected papers were classified according to 4 classes of outcomes. Results A total of 1845 papers were retrieved by the initial search, culminating in 16 selected for data extraction after the application of inclusion and exclusion criteria and quality and suitability evaluation. Conclusions Results point out that the study of the implications of the lack of understanding about real work performance in designing for risk assessment in health care is very specific, little explored, and mostly focused on the development of tools. PMID:27528543

  10. Nutritional and health benefits of semi-elemental diets: A comprehensive summary of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Dominik D; Bylsma, Lauren C; Elkayam, Laura; Nguyen, Douglas L

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To critically review and summarize the literature on nutritional and health outcomes of semi-elemental formulations on various nutritionally vulnerable patient populations who are unable to achieve adequate nutrition from standard oral diets. METHODS: We conducted a comprehensive literature search of Pubmed and Embase databases. We manually screened articles that examined nutritional and health outcomes (e.g., growth, disease activity, gastrointestinal impairment, mortality, and economic impact) among various patient groups receiving semi-elemental diets. This review focused on full-text articles of randomized controlled clinical trials and other intervention studies, but pertinent abstracts and case studies were also included. Results pertaining primarily to tolerance, digestion, and absorption were summarized for each patient population in this systematic review. RESULTS: Results pertaining primarily to tolerance, digestion, and absorption were summarized for each patient population. The efficacy of semi-elemental whey hydrolyzed protein (WHP) diet have been reported in various nutritionally high risk patient populations including - Crohn’s disease, short bowel syndrome, acute and chronic pancreatitis, cerebral palsy, cystic fibrosis, cerebrovascular accidents, human immunodeficiency virus, critically ill, and geriatrics. Collectively, the evidence from the medical literature indicates that feeding with a semi-elemental diet performs as well or better than parenteral or amino acid based diets in terms of tolerance, digestion, and nutrient assimilation measures across various disease conditions. CONCLUSION: Based on this comprehensive review of the literature, patient populations who have difficulty digesting or absorbing standard diets may be able to achieve improved health and nutritional outcomes through the use of semi-elemental WHP diets. PMID:27158547

  11. Gaps in studies of global health education: an empirical literature review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Zhaolan; Wang, JianLi

    2015-01-01

    Background Global health has stimulated a lot of students and has attracted the interest of many faculties, thereby initiating the establishment of many academic programs on global health research and education. global health education reflects the increasing attention toward social accountability in medical education. Objective This study aims to identify gaps in the studies on global health education. Design A critical literature review of empirical studies was conducted using Boolean search techniques. Results A total of 238 articles, including 16 reviews, were identified. There had been a boom in the numbers of studies on global health education since 2010. Four gaps were summarized. First, 94.6% of all studies on global health education were conducted in North American and European countries, of which 65.6% were carried out in the United States, followed by Canada (14.3%) and the United Kingdom (9.2%). Only seven studies (2.9%) were conducted in Asian countries, five (2.1%) in Oceania, and two (0.8%) in South American/Caribbean countries. A total of 154 studies (64.4%) were qualitative studies and 64 studies (26.8%) were quantitative studies. Second, elective courses and training or programs were the most frequently used approach for global health education. Third, there was a gap in the standardization of global health education. Finally, it was mainly targeted at medical students, residents, and doctors. It had not granted the demands for global health education of all students majoring in medicine-related studies. Conclusions Global health education would be a potentially influential tool for achieving health equity, reducing health disparities, and also for future professional careers. It is the time to build and expand education in global health, especially among developing countries. Global health education should be integrated into primary medical education. Interdisciplinary approaches and interprofessional collaboration were recommended. Collaboration

  12. What’s Past is Prologue: A Scoping Review of Recent Public Health and Global Health Informatics Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Brian E.; Pina, Jamie; Kharrazi, Hadi; Gharghabi, Fardad; Richards, Janise

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To categorize and describe the public health informatics (PHI) and global health informatics (GHI) literature between 2012 and 2014. Methods: We conducted a semi-systematic review of articles published between January 2012 and September 2014 where information and communications technologies (ICT) was a primary subject of the study or a main component of the study methodology. Additional inclusion and exclusion criteria were used to filter PHI and GHI articles from the larger biomedical informatics domain. Articles were identified using MEDLINE as well as personal bibliographies from members of the American Medical Informatics Association PHI and GHI working groups. Results: A total of 85 PHI articles and 282 GHI articles were identified. While systems in PHI continue to support surveillance activities, we identified a shift towards support for prevention, environmental health, and public health care services. Furthermore, articles from the U.S. reveal a shift towards PHI applications at state and local levels. GHI articles focused on telemedicine, mHealth and eHealth applications. The development of adequate infrastructure to support ICT remains a challenge, although we identified a small but growing set of articles that measure the impact of ICT on clinical outcomes. Discussion: There is evidence of growth with respect to both implementation of information systems within the public health enterprise as well as a widening of scope within each informatics discipline. Yet the articles also illuminate the need for more primary research studies on what works and what does not as both searches yielded small numbers of primary, empirical articles. Conclusion: While the body of knowledge around PHI and GHI continues to mature, additional studies of higher quality are needed to generate the robust evidence base needed to support continued investment in ICT by governmental health agencies. PMID:26392846

  13. Collaborative partnerships for nursing faculties and health service providers: what can nursing learn from business literature?

    PubMed

    Brown, Diane; White, Jill; Leibbrandt, Lara

    2006-04-01

    Collaborative partnerships between nursing faculties and health service providers are the cornerstone of successful clinical experience for nursing students. The challenge of providing an optimal learning environment can be enormous given the turbulent and rapidly changing environment in health. The present study uses the business literature to examine what nursing can learn from business about the development of successful collaborative partnerships. The characteristics of sound partnerships are described and a set of best practice guidelines is developed. The guidelines summarize the factors considered to be essential for the effective development of collaborative partnerships. In these times of nursing shortages and high turnover high quality, collaborative partnerships between nursing faculties and the health care sector are seen as a possible solution to optimize clinical learning and therefore graduate preparedness.

  14. District decision-making for health in low-income settings: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Avan, Bilal Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Health management information systems (HMIS) produce large amounts of data about health service provision and population health, and provide opportunities for data-based decision-making in decentralized health systems. Yet the data are little-used locally. A well-defined approach to district-level decision-making using health data would help better meet the needs of the local population. In this second of four papers on district decision-making for health in low-income settings, our aim was to explore ways in which district administrators and health managers in low- and lower-middle-income countries use health data to make decisions, to describe the decision-making tools they used and identify challenges encountered when using these tools. A systematic literature review, following PRISMA guidelines, was undertaken. Experts were consulted about key sources of information. A search strategy was developed for 14 online databases of peer reviewed and grey literature. The resources were screened independently by two reviewers using pre-defined inclusion criteria. The 14 papers included were assessed for the quality of reported evidence and a descriptive evidence synthesis of the review findings was undertaken. We found 12 examples of tools to assist district-level decision-making, all of which included two key stages—identification of priorities, and development of an action plan to address them. Of those tools with more steps, four included steps to review or monitor the action plan agreed, suggesting the use of HMIS data. In eight papers HMIS data were used for prioritization. Challenges to decision-making processes fell into three main categories: the availability and quality of health and health facility data; human dynamics and financial constraints. Our findings suggest that evidence is available about a limited range of processes that include the use of data for decision-making at district level. Standardization and pre-testing in diverse settings would

  15. Trauma-informed care in inpatient mental health settings: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Muskett, Coral

    2014-02-01

    Trauma-informed care is an emerging value that is seen as fundamental to effective and contemporary mental health nursing practice. Trauma-informed care, like recovery, leaves mental health nurses struggling to translate these values into day-to-day nursing practice. Many are confused about what individual actions they can take to support these values. To date, the most clearly articulated policy to emerge from the trauma-informed care movement in Australia has been the agreement to reduce, and wherever possible, eliminate the use of seclusion and restraint. Confronted with the constant churn of admissions and readmissions of clients with challenging behaviours, and seemingly intractable mental illness, the elimination of seclusion and restraint is seen to be utopian by many mental health nurses in inpatient settings. Is trauma-informed care solely about eliminating seclusion and restraint, or are there other tangible practices nurses could utilize to effect better health outcomes for mental health clients, especially those with significant abuse histories? This article summarizes the findings from the literature from 2000-2011 in identifying those practices and clinical activities that have been implemented to effect trauma-informed care in inpatient mental health settings.

  16. Political violence, collective functioning and health: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Cindy A.

    2013-01-01

    Political violence is implicated in a range of mental health outcomes, including PTSD, depression, and anxiety. The social and political contexts of people’s lives, however, offer considerable protection from the mental health effects of political violence. In spite of the importance of people’s social and political environments for health, there is limited scholarship on how political violence compromises necessary social and political systems and inhibits individuals from participating in social and political life. Drawing on literature from multiple disciplines, including public health, anthropology, and psychology, this narrative review uses a multi-level, social ecological framework to enhance current knowledge about the ways that political violence affects health. Findings from over 50 studies were analyzed and used to build a conceptual model demonstrating how political violence threatens three inter-related domains of functioning: individual functioning in relationship to their environment; community functioning and social fabric; and governmental functioning and delivery of services to populations. Results illustrate the need for multilevel frameworks that move beyond individual pathology towards more nuanced conceptualizations about how political violence affects health; findings contribute to the development of prevention programs addressing political violence. PMID:24133929

  17. Political violence, collective functioning and health: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cindy A

    2013-01-01

    Political violence is implicated in a range of mental health outcomes, including PTSD, depression, and anxiety. The social and political contexts of people's lives, however, offer considerable protection from the mental health effects of political violence. In spite of the importance of people's social and political environments for health, there is limited scholarship on how political violence compromises necessary social and political systems and inhibits individuals from participating in social and political life. Drawing on literature from multiple disciplines, including public health, anthropology, and psychology, this narrative review uses a multi-level, social ecological framework to enhance current knowledge about the ways that political violence affects health. Findings from over 50 studies were analysed and used to build a conceptual model demonstrating how political violence threatens three inter-related domains of functioning: individual functioning in relationship to their environment; community functioning and social fabric; and governmental functioning and delivery of services to populations. Results illustrate the need for multilevel frameworks that move beyond individual pathology towards more nuanced conceptualizations about how political violence affects health; findings contribute to the development of prevention programmes addressing political violence.

  18. Health effects of residence near hazardous waste landfill sites: a review of epidemiologic literature.

    PubMed Central

    Vrijheid, M

    2000-01-01

    This review evaluates current epidemiologic literature on health effects in relation to residence near landfill sites. Increases in risk of adverse health effects (low birth weight, birth defects, certain types of cancers) have been reported near individual landfill sites and in some multisite studies, and although biases and confounding factors cannot be excluded as explanations for these findings, they may indicate real risks associated with residence near certain landfill sites. A general weakness in the reviewed studies is the lack of direct exposure measurement. An increased prevalence of self-reported health symptoms such as fatigue, sleepiness, and headaches among residents near waste sites has consistently been reported in more than 10 of the reviewed papers. It is difficult to conclude whether these symptoms are an effect of direct toxicologic action of chemicals present in waste sites, an effect of stress and fears related to the waste site, or an effect of reporting bias. Although a substantial number of studies have been conducted, risks to health from landfill sites are hard to quantify. There is insufficient exposure information and effects of low-level environmental exposure in the general population are by their nature difficult to establish. More interdisciplinary research can improve levels of knowledge on risks to human health of waste disposal in landfill sites. Research needs include epidemiologic and toxicologic studies on individual chemicals and chemical mixtures, well-designed single- and multisite landfill studies, development of biomarkers, and research on risk perception and sociologic determinants of ill health. PMID:10698726

  19. Foreign direct investment and trade in health services: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard D

    2004-12-01

    Globalization is a key challenge facing health policy-makers. A significant aspect of this is direct trade in health services, a result of the rise of transnational corporations, challenges in health care financing, porous borders and improved technology creating the scope for increased 'foreign direct investment' (FDI) in health care. This has gathered momentum with the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), which aims to further liberalize trade in services, and within which FDI has been noted as perhaps the most critical area for trade negotiation. Given the rapid development of this area, there are little empirical data. This paper therefore seeks to provide the first comprehensive and systematic review of evidence concerning FDI and health services. This process included electronic bibliographic database searches, website searches and correspondence with experts in the area of trade in health services, from which 76 papers, books and reports were reviewed. Perhaps due to the rapid developments in this area, most of the literature is speculative, polarized between those arguing for the benefits of liberalization and those arguing against. However, there seem to be three issues which emerge as of most importance: (i) the extent to which a national health system is commercialized per se is of more significance than whether investment in it is foreign or domestic; (ii) the national regulatory environment and its 'strength' will significantly determine the economic and health impact of FDI, the effectiveness of safeguard measures, and the stability of GATS commitments; and (iii) any negotiations will depend upon parties having a common understanding of what is being negotiated, and the interpretation of key definitions is thus critical. Each of these issues is explored in some depth, with the overall conclusion that countries should take a step back and first think through the risks and benefits of commercialization of their health sector, rather than being

  20. Three Things to Do With Stories: Using Literature in Medical, Health Professions, and Interprofessional Education.

    PubMed

    Blackie, Michael; Wear, Delese

    2015-10-01

    It would be unusual to find a current medical school administrator or faculty member who has not heard the phrase "literature and medicine" or who does not know that literature is taught in various forms-short stories, novels, poems, essays-at many points in the curriculum at U.S. medical schools. Yet the phrase is used in slippery if not elusive ways, with no clear referent common to all who use it. This article focuses on three theoretical and pedagogical uses for literature in medical, health professions, and interprofessional education: close reading, ethical or moral inquiry, and drawing illustrations. Summaries of these approaches are provided, followed by demonstrations of how they might work in the classroom by using the story "Blankets," by Native American writer Sherman Alexie.Close reading requires reading slowly and carefully to enrich an initial encounter with a text. Ethical or moral inquiry turns to literary representations to challenge readers' assumptions and prejudices. Literature offers rich, provoking, and unusual depictions of common phenomena, so it can be used to draw illustrations. Although each approach can be used on its own, the authors argue that reading closely makes the other two approaches possible and meaningful because it shares with the diagnostic process many practices critical to skilled interprofessional caregiving: paying attention to details, gathering and reevaluating evidence, weighing competing interpretations. By modeling a close reading of a text, faculty can demonstrate how this skill, which courts rather than resists ambiguity, can assist students in making ethical and compassionate judgments.

  1. What do we know about health care team effectiveness? A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lemieux-Charles, Louise; McGuire, Wendy L

    2006-06-01

    This review of health care team effectiveness literature from 1985 to 2004 distinguishes among intervention studies that compare team with usual (nonteam) care; intervention studies that examine the impact of team redesign on team effectiveness; and field studies that explore relationships between team context, structure, processes, and outcomes. The authors use an Integrated Team Effectiveness Model (ITEM) to summarize research findings and to identify gaps in the literature. Their analysis suggests that the type and diversity of clinical expertise involved in team decision making largely accounts for improvements in patient care and organizational effectiveness. Collaboration, conflict resolution, participation, and cohesion are most likely to influence staff satisfaction and perceived team effectiveness. The studies examined here underscore the importance of considering the contexts in which teams are embedded. The ITEM provides a useful framework for conceptualizing relationships between multiple dimensions of team context, structure, processes, and outcomes.

  2. A literature review of neck pain associated with computer use: public health implications

    PubMed Central

    Green, Bart N

    2008-01-01

    Prolonged use of computers during daily work activities and recreation is often cited as a cause of neck pain. This review of the literature identifies public health aspects of neck pain as associated with computer use. While some retrospective studies support the hypothesis that frequent computer operation is associated with neck pain, few prospective studies reveal causal relationships. Many risk factors are identified in the literature. Primary prevention strategies have largely been confined to addressing environmental exposure to ergonomic risk factors, since to date, no clear cause for this work-related neck pain has been acknowledged. Future research should include identifying causes of work related neck pain so that appropriate primary prevention strategies may be developed and to make policy recommendations pertaining to prevention. PMID:18769599

  3. A narrative review of Men's Sheds literature: reducing social isolation and promoting men's health and well-being.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Nathan J; Cordier, Reinie

    2013-09-01

    Men's Sheds are community-based organisations that typically provide a space for older men to participate in meaningful occupation such as woodwork. Men's Sheds are considered an exemplar for the promotion of men's health and well-being by health and social policy-makers. The objective of this literature review was to determine the state of the science about the potential for Men's Sheds to promote male health and well-being. Between October 2011 and February 2012, we conducted searches of databases, the grey literature and manual searches of websites and reference lists. In total, we found 5 reports and 19 articles about Men's Sheds. The majority of the literature has emanated from Australian academics and is about older men's learning in community contexts. There is a limited body of research literature about Men's Sheds; the literature consists of either descriptive surveys or small qualitative studies. The range of variables that might contribute towards best practice in Men's Sheds has not yet been adequately conceptualised, measured, tested or understood. Future research should be focussed on the health and well-being benefits of Men's Sheds; it needs to incorporate social determinants of health and well-being within the study designs to enable comparison against other health promotion research. Without this research focus, there is a danger that the potential health and well-being benefits of Men's Sheds as supportive and socially inclusive environments for health will not be incorporated into future male health policy and practice.

  4. Occupational health and safety issues affecting young workers: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Laberge, Marie; Ledoux, Elise

    2011-01-01

    Many overview articles, reports, book chapters and literature reviews have examined the health and safety of young workers. These sources discuss the relationships between the work conditions of young workers and the various indicators of accidents and occupational diseases. Breslin et al. [12,13] conducted two literature reviews of quantitative studies to determine which factors best predicted work accidents and occupational disorders in young people. The present article proposes a review of young people's occupational health and safety (OHS) factors (e.g., demographic, individual, professional, organizational, temporal and operational factors) in both qualitative and quantitative studies. Five types of problems were analyzed in greater depth, namely MSD symptoms, respiratory, allergy and toxicological problems, mental health and well-being, alcohol and drug consumption, and fatigue. This review likewise examines related dimensions that allow us to adopt a more global perspective on this subject by considering such elements as young people's values, their knowledge and attitudes, safety practices in companies, the safe integration of young people, and rehabilitation. A total of 189 scientific articles were selected on the basis of certain criteria. These articles came from refereed OHS journals published between 1994 and 2005.

  5. Ethics of health policy and systems research: a scoping review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Bridget; Paul, Amy; Hyder, Adnan A; Ali, Joseph

    2017-03-15

    Health policy and systems research (HPSR) is increasingly funded and undertaken as part of health system strengthening efforts worldwide. HPSR ethics is also a relatively new and emerging field, with numerous normative and descriptive questions that have largely not been considered. Normative questions include what ethical principles and values should guide HPSR. Descriptive questions include what ethical concerns arise when conducting HPSR. A small but growing body of scholarly work characterizes the various ethics issues inherent in HPSR. Towards informing the future development of ethics guidance for HPSR, a scoping review was undertaken to: (1) identify the range of ethics issues relevant to the conduct of HPSR-with a deliberate (though not exclusive) focus on low- and middle-income country settings and (2) describe existing guidance on key ethics issues relevant to HPSR. Using the Cochrane methods as a basis, the review identified formal and informal literature on HPSR ethics by searching the following databases: PubMed's Medline, Embase, Global Health, Scopus, WHO Global Health Regional Libraries, LILACs, OpenDOAR and Bielefeld Academic Search Engine. In total, 11 062 documents were identified from the formal (10 519) and informal (543) literature. One hundred and seven of these documents (formal 99 and informal 8) met at least one inclusion criterion and underwent thematic analysis. Ethical issues in four main categories were identified: upholding autonomy, identifying and balancing risks and benefits, justice and determination of ethical review requirements. The review indicated that the ethical values behind HPSR place an emphasis on its contributing to the reduction of health disparities. Unsurprisingly then, numerous ethical concerns relating to justice arise in HPSR. However, the majority of existing guidance focuses on obtaining or waiving informed consent and, thus, appears to be insufficient for HPSR. A list of priority ethics issues in HPSR in

  6. Immigration, Work, and Health: A Literature Review of Immigration Between Mexico and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Michael A.; Carreón, Tania; Eggerth, Donald E.; Johnson, Antoinette I.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the influence someone’s job or career has on their health goes beyond the physical, emotional and social hazards, risks and conditions that they face at work. One’s job or career also exerts a significant influence over other aspects of life that contribute or detract from their health and that of their family. Work is the major incentive for Latin American migration to the United States. Latino immigrants experience increasingly poorer outcomes for physical health and chronic diseases the longer they remain in the U.S. The strong link between work and immigration suggests that, for many Latin Americans, immigration can be understood as a career path which puts them, and their family members, in situations that can change their physical, emotional, and social health as a condition of their employment. Given the large number of Latin Americans who emigrate for work, it is essential that the unique physical, mental and social impacts of emigration are accounted for when working with clients impacted by emigration at the individual, family and community level as well as those social workers practicing at the system level. This paper is a literature review that explores the impact that emigrating for work has on the health of those that emigrate and their family members that stay behind. PMID:28260831

  7. Barriers within the health care system to dealing with sexualized violence: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Rönnberg, A K; Hammarström, A

    2000-09-01

    The aim of this study was to review the literature about possible barriers to recognition and intervention regarding women exposed to sexualized violence, in their interactions with the health care system. The barriers, as reported by the health care staff, were: lack of education; the stereotype of a "typical battered woman"; too close identification with the victim/abuser; time constraints; fear of offending the victim/abuser; and feelings of hopelessness and non-responsibility. The barriers, as reported by the victims, were: negative experiences of and structural limitations within the health care system; fear of retaliation from the abusive partner; and psychological effects of the normalization process. We conclude that the barriers within the health care sector have to be dealt with on three different levels: the structural level in order to diminish male power in society; the organizational level in order to initiate screening and to allow the staff time for dealing with the victims; and on the individual level, health care staff need to acquire the knowledge and skills to enable them to address sexualized violence.

  8. Homeless youth’s overwhelming health burden: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kulik, Dina M; Gaetz, Stephen; Crowe, Cathy; Ford-Jones, Elizabeth (Lee)

    2011-01-01

    Homelessness has reached epidemic proportions in Canada. Canadian children and adolescents are the most vulnerable because youth comprise the fastest growing segment of the homeless population. A systematic literature review was undertaken using MEDLINE, Web of Science and the Homeless Hub (www.homelesshub.ca) to encompass the time frame from January 1990 to June 2009. The following terms were used as key words: ‘homelessness’, ‘homeless youth’, ‘poverty’, ‘street youth’ and ‘runaway’. The present review identified an intersection among education deficits, social service insufficiencies, and poor mental and physical health in homeless youth. Health care delivery to homeless youth was often nonanticipatory, inconsistent and perceived as discriminatory. However, street youth were identified as requiring health care for pregnancy, mental health concerns, sexually transmitted illnesses, respiratory conditions, substance abuse and a myriad of other illnesses. Plenty of work is still required to reduce health inequalities and improve the daily living conditions of Canadian youth living in poverty. PMID:22654549

  9. The Revolution in Military Affairs: Allied Perspectives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-01

    seek to understand the American debate and to identify opportunities for and the risks to themselves in variant patterns of development of the...key industrial allies. In effect , the United States is, de facto, trying to set in place a new regional networking strategy. Broad global military...to deal with regional goals and networking requirements. 2 erolo~ue For the United States to develop an effective interallied RMA strategy, it

  10. When public action undermines public health: a critical examination of antifluoridationist literature

    PubMed Central

    Armfield, Jason M

    2007-01-01

    Background The addition of the chemical fluorine to the water supply, called water fluoridation, reduces dental caries by making teeth more resistant to demineralisation and more likely to remineralise when initially decayed. This process has been implemented in more than 30 countries around the world, is cost-effective and has been shown to be efficacious in preventing decay across a person's lifespan. However, attempts to expand this major public health achievement in line with Australia's National Oral Health Plan 2004–2013 are almost universally met with considerable resistance from opponents of water fluoridation, who engage in coordinated campaigns to portray water fluoridation as ineffective and highly dangerous. Discussion Water fluoridation opponents employ multiple techniques to try and undermine the scientifically established effectiveness of water fluoridation. The materials they use are often based on Internet resources or published books that present a highly misleading picture of water fluoridation. These materials are used to sway public and political opinion to the detriment of public health. Despite an extensive body of literature, both studies and results within studies are often selectively reported, giving a biased portrayal of water fluoridation effectiveness. Positive findings are downplayed or trivialised and the population implications of these findings misinterpreted. Ecological comparisons are sometimes used to support spurious conclusions. Opponents of water fluoridation frequently repeat that water fluoridation is associated with adverse health effects and studies are selectively picked from the extensive literature to convey only claimed adverse findings related to water fluoridation. Techniques such as "the big lie" and innuendo are used to associate water fluoridation with health and environmental disasters, without factual support. Half-truths are presented, fallacious statements reiterated, and attempts are made to bamboozle the

  11. Linking Engaged Learning, Student Mental Health and Well-Being, and Civic Development: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaner, Lynn E.

    2007-01-01

    Conducted for the Bringing Theory to Practice project, this literature review examines the theoretical and research bases for linking engaged learning, student mental health and well-being, and civic development. The findings of this review are discussed briefly in this article. Current prevention literature recommends a shift from targeted…

  12. A Literature Review Analysing Current Research into Undergraduate Interprofessional Learning in the Health and Social Care Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yearsley, Shirley

    2007-01-01

    This literature review analyses current health and social care literature regarding interprofessional learning in undergraduate curricula. It is based on search of academic data bases for published research written in English over the last ten years. It also includes review of government policy documents regarding interprofessional learning in…

  13. Sexual Health Behavior Interventions for U.S. Latino Adolescents: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cardoza, Vicky J.; Documét, Patricia I.; Fryer, Craig S.; Gold, Melanie A.; Butler, James

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective To identify sexual health behavior interventions targeting U.S. Latino adolescents. Design A systematic literature review. Setting Peer-reviewed articles published between 1993 and 2011, conducted in any type of setting. Participants Male and female Latino adolescents ages 11–21 years. Interventions Interventions promoting sexual abstinence, pregnancy prevention, sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention, and/or HIV/AIDS prevention. Main Outcome Measures Changes in knowledge, attitudes, engagement in risky sexual behaviors, rates of STIs, and/or pregnancy. Results Sixty-eight articles were identified. Fifteen were included in this review that specifically addressed Latino adolescent sexual health behavior. Among the reviewed interventions, most aimed to prevent or reduce STI and HIV/AIDS incidence by focusing on behavior change at two levels of the social ecological model: individual and interpersonal. Major strengths of the articles included addressing the most critical issues of sexual health; using social ecological approaches; employing different strategies to deliver sexual health messages; and employing different intervention designs in diverse geographical locations with the largest population of Latino communities. Most of the interventions targeted female adolescents, stressing the need for additional interventions that target Latino adolescent males. Conclusions Latino adolescent sexual health is a new research field with gaps that need to be addressed in reducing negative sexual health outcomes among this population. More research is needed to produce new or validate existing, age-specific, and culturally-sensitive sexual health interventions for Latino male and female adolescents. Further, this research should also be conducted in areas of the U.S. with the newest Latino migration (e.g., North Carolina). PMID:22206687

  14. [Ethical problems experienced by nurses in primary health care: integrative literature review].

    PubMed

    Nora, Carlise Rigon Dalla; Zoboli, Elma Lourdes Campos Pavone; Vieira, Margarida

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to identify ethical problems experienced by nurses in primary health care and resources for coping based on publications on the subject. An integrative literature review was performed between the months of October and November 2013, using the databases: BDTD, CINAHL, LILACS, MEDLINE, Biblioteca Cochrane, PubMed, RCAAP and SciELO. Articles, dissertations and theses published in Portuguese, English and Spanish were included, totalling 31 studies published from 1992 to 2013. This analysis resulted in four categories: ethical problems in the relationship between team members, ethical problems in the relationship with the user, ethical problems in health services management and resources for coping with ethical problems. Results showed that nurses need to be prepared to face ethical problems, emphasizing the importance of ethics education during the education process before and during professional practice to enhance the development of ethical sensitivity and competence for problem resolution.

  15. Trust in health information websites: A systematic literature review on the antecedents of trust.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeolib

    2016-06-01

    Health websites are important sources of information for consumers. In choosing websites, trust in websites largely determines which website to access and how to best utilize the information. Thus, it is critical to understand why consumers trust certain websites and distrust others. A systematic literature review was conducted with the goal of identifying the antecedents of trust in health information websites. After four rounds of screening process, 20 articles between 2000 and 2013 were harvested. Factors that determine trust are classified into individual difference antecedents, website-related antecedents, and consumer-to-website interaction-related antecedents. The most frequently studied antecedents were socio-demographics, information quality, appearance, and perceived reputation of the website. Each antecedent of trust are discussed in detail and future research directions are proposed.

  16. Software Quality Evaluation Models Applicable in Health Information and Communications Technologies. A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Villamor Ordozgoiti, Alberto; Delgado Hito, Pilar; Guix Comellas, Eva María; Fernandez Sanchez, Carlos Manuel; Garcia Hernandez, Milagros; Lluch Canut, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Information and Communications Technologies in healthcare has increased the need to consider quality criteria through standardised processes. The aim of this study was to analyse the software quality evaluation models applicable to healthcare from the perspective of ICT-purchasers. Through a systematic literature review with the keywords software, product, quality, evaluation and health, we selected and analysed 20 original research papers published from 2005-2016 in health science and technology databases. The results showed four main topics: non-ISO models, software quality evaluation models based on ISO/IEC standards, studies analysing software quality evaluation models, and studies analysing ISO standards for software quality evaluation. The models provide cost-efficiency criteria for specific software, and improve use outcomes. The ISO/IEC25000 standard is shown as the most suitable for evaluating the quality of ICTs for healthcare use from the perspective of institutional acquisition.

  17. Developing a common language for using social marketing: an analysis of Public Health literature.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Ellery, Jane; Thomas, Kamilah B; Marshall, Robert

    2010-10-01

    The term social marketing has been used to describe a multitude of interventions that incorporate the use of traditional marketing techniques to promote a behavior that will improve the health or well-being of a target audience or of society as a whole. However, there is wide variation in the way social marketing is defined and used. This systematic review article examines how social marketing has been defined and applied to social problems within the public health literature from 2001-2006, by adapting a grading-system borrowed from evidence-based medicine and utilizing Kotler and Zaltman's definition of social marketing. Additionally, definitions of social marketing were identified in the reviewed articles. Identifying a common language in the description and design of social marketing interventions will benefit researchers and practitioners interested in social marketing as a behavior change approach.

  18. Undocumented migrants in Canada: a scope literature review on health, access to services, and working conditions.

    PubMed

    Magalhaes, Lilian; Carrasco, Christine; Gastaldo, Denise

    2010-02-01

    It is estimated that there are 30-40 million undocumented workers worldwide. Although undocumented migration has become an issue of high international relevance, it has been strikingly understudied in Canada, especially with respect to its impact on health. The purpose of this study is to explore the concept of undocumentedness in Canada through a scoping review of peer-reviewed and grey literature written in English, French, Portuguese and Spanish between 2002 and 2008. The specific aims are to: (i) summarize and disseminate current academic and community-based findings on the health, service access and working conditions of undocumented migrants in Canada; (ii) examine the sources and use of evidence; (iii) identify significant gaps in existing knowledge; (iv) set recommendations for policy and research, including considerations on transnationalism, ethics, interdisciplinary approaches, gender differences, resilience, and impact on the children of non-status parents.

  19. Undocumented Migrants in Canada: A scope literature review on health, access to services, and working conditions

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Christine; Gastaldo, Denise

    2011-01-01

    It is estimated that there are 30 to 40 million undocumented workers worldwide. Although undocumented migration has become an issue of high international relevance, it has been strikingly understudied in Canada, especially with respect to its impact on health. The purpose of this study is to explore the concept of undocumentedness in Canada through a scoping review of peer-reviewed and grey literature written in English, French, Portuguese and Spanish between 2002 and 2008. The specific aims are to: i) summarize and disseminate current academic and community-based findings on the health, service access and working conditions of undocumented migrants in Canada; ii) examine the sources and use of evidence; iii) identify significant gaps in existing knowledge; iv) set recommendations for policy and research, including considerations on transnationalism, ethics, interdisciplinary approaches, gender differences, resilience, and impact on the children of non-status parents. PMID:19657739

  20. Impact of targeted financial incentives on personal health behavior: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Kim; Christianson, Jon B; Leatherman, Sheila

    2008-12-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a substantial increase in the use of financial incentives by private employers and public programs to encourage healthy behaviors, wellness activities, and use of preventive services. The research evidence regarding the effectiveness of this approach is reviewed, summarizing relevant findings from literature reviews and from recent evaluations. The article concludes that financial incentives, even relatively small incentives, can influence individuals' health-related behaviors. However, the findings regarding health promotion and wellness are based primarily on analyses of a limited number of private sector initiatives, whereas the evidence regarding preventive services is based on evaluations of initiatives sponsored predominantly by public programs and directed at low-income populations. In either case, there are several important limitations in the ability of the published findings to provide clear guidance for public program administrators or private purchasers seeking to design and implement effective incentive programs.