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Sample records for allocation model sam

  1. SAM Photovoltaic Model Technical Reference

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, P.

    2015-05-27

    This manual describes the photovoltaic performance model in the System Advisor Model (SAM). The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory maintains and distributes SAM, which is available as a free download from https://sam.nrel.gov. These descriptions are based on SAM 2015.1.30 (SSC 41).

  2. System Advisor Model, SAM 2014.1.14: General Description

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Dobos, A. P.; Freeman, J.; Neises, T.; Wagner, M.; Ferguson, T.; Gilman, P.; Janzou, S.

    2014-02-01

    This document describes the capabilities of the U.S. Department of Energy and National Renewable Energy Laboratory's System Advisor Model (SAM), Version 2013.9.20, released on September 9, 2013. SAM is a computer model that calculates performance and financial metrics of renewable energy systems. Project developers, policy makers, equipment manufacturers, and researchers use graphs and tables of SAM results in the process of evaluating financial, technology, and incentive options for renewable energy projects. SAM simulates the performance of photovoltaic, concentrating solar power, solar water heating, wind, geothermal, biomass, and conventional power systems. The financial model can represent financial structures for projects that either buy and sell electricity at retail rates (residential and commercial) or sell electricity at a price determined in a power purchase agreement (utility). SAM's advanced simulation options facilitate parametric and sensitivity analyses, and statistical analysis capabilities are available for Monte Carlo simulation and weather variability (P50/P90) studies. SAM can also read input variables from Microsoft Excel worksheets. For software developers, the SAM software development kit (SDK) makes it possible to use SAM simulation modules in their applications written in C/C++, C#, Java, Python, and MATLAB. NREL provides both SAM and the SDK as free downloads at http://sam.nrel.gov. Technical support and more information about the software are available on the website.

  3. Technical Manual for the SAM Physical Trough Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M. J.; Gilman, P.

    2011-06-01

    NREL, in conjunction with Sandia National Lab and the U.S Department of Energy, developed the System Advisor Model (SAM) analysis tool for renewable energy system performance and economic analysis. This paper documents the technical background and engineering formulation for one of SAM's two parabolic trough system models in SAM. The Physical Trough model calculates performance relationships based on physical first principles where possible, allowing the modeler to predict electricity production for a wider range of component geometries than is possible in the Empirical Trough model. This document describes the major parabolic trough plant subsystems in detail including the solar field, power block, thermal storage, piping, auxiliary heating, and control systems. This model makes use of both existing subsystem performance modeling approaches, and new approaches developed specifically for SAM.

  4. Wind Technology Modeling Within the System Advisor Model (SAM) (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Dobos, A.; Ferguson, T.; Freeman, J.; Gilman, P.; Whitmore, J.

    2014-05-01

    This poster provides detail for implementation and the underlying methodology for modeling wind power generation performance in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). SAM's wind power model allows users to assess projects involving one or more large or small wind turbines with any of the detailed options for residential, commercial, or utility financing. The model requires information about the wind resource, wind turbine specifications, wind farm layout (if applicable), and costs, and provides analysis to compare the absolute or relative impact of these inputs. SAM is a system performance and economic model designed to facilitate analysis and decision-making for project developers, financers, policymakers, and energy researchers. The user pairs a generation technology with a financing option (residential, commercial, or utility) to calculate the cost of energy over the multi-year project period. Specifically, SAM calculates the value of projects which buy and sell power at retail rates for residential and commercial systems, and also for larger-scale projects which operate through a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a utility. The financial model captures complex financing and rate structures, taxes, and incentives.

  5. System Advisor Model, SAM 2011.12.2: General Description

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, P.; Dobos, A.

    2012-02-01

    This document describes the capabilities of the U.S. Department of Energy and National Renewable Energy Laboratory's System Advisor Model (SAM), Version 2011.12.2, released on December 2, 2011. SAM is software that models the cost and performance of renewable energy systems. Project developers, policy makers, equipment manufacturers, and researchers use graphs and tables of SAM results in the process of evaluating financial, technology, and incentive options for renewable energy projects. SAM simulates the performance of solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, and conventional power systems. The financial model can represent financing structures for projects that either buy and sell electricity at retail rates (residential and commercial) or sell electricity at a price determined in a power purchase agreement (utility). Advanced analysis options facilitate parametric, sensitivity, and statistical analyses, and allow for interfacing SAM with Microsoft Excel or with other computer programs. SAM is available as a free download at http://sam.nrel.gov. Technical support and more information about the software are available on the website.

  6. Rio Hondo Sediment Assessment Analysis Using SAM. Numerical Model Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    MISCELLANEOUS PAPER HL-91-1 M ~ RIO HONDO SEDIMENT ASSESSMENT ANALYSIS USING SAM Numerical Model Investigation AD-A238 572Ii 1 11byIll lil Nolan K...FUNDING NUMBERS Rio Hondo Sediment Assessment Analysis Using SAM; Numerical Model Investigation 6. AUTHOR(S) Nolan K. Raphelt Michael J. Trawle William A... Rio Hondo through Roswell, NM, was conducted. The investigation represented a sediment assessment level study conducted to test for potential

  7. Technoeconomic Modeling of Battery Energy Storage in SAM

    SciTech Connect

    DiOrio, Nicholas; Dobos, Aron; Janzou, Steven; Nelson, Austin; Lundstrom, Blake

    2015-09-01

    Detailed comprehensive lead-acid and lithium-ion battery models have been integrated with photovoltaic models in an effort to allow System Advisor Model (SAM) to offer the ability to predict the performance and economic benefit of behind the meter storage. In a system with storage, excess PV energy can be saved until later in the day when PV production has fallen, or until times of peak demand when it is more valuable. Complex dispatch strategies can be developed to leverage storage to reduce energy consumption or power demand based on the utility rate structure. This document describes the details of the battery performance and economic models in SAM.

  8. The fSAM Model of False Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Daniel R.; Smith, Troy A.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a new theory of false memory building upon existing associative memory models and implemented in fSAM, the first fully specified quantitative model of false recall. Participants frequently intrude unstudied critical words while recalling lists comprising their strongest semantic associates but infrequently produce other…

  9. Technical Manual for the SAM Biomass Power Generation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgenson, J.; Gilman, P.; Dobos, A.

    2011-09-01

    This technical manual provides context for the implementation of the biomass electric power generation performance model in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). Additionally, the report details the engineering and scientific principles behind the underlying calculations in the model. The framework established in this manual is designed to give users a complete understanding of behind-the-scenes calculations and the results generated.

  10. Introducing the aerosol-climate model MAECHAM5-SAM2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommel, R.; Timmreck, C.; Graf, H. F.

    2009-04-01

    We are presenting a new global aerosol model MAECHAM5-SAM2 to study the aerosol dynamics in the UTLS under background and volcanic conditions. The microphysical core modul SAM2 treats the formation, the evolution and the transport of stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. The aerosol size distribution and the weight percentage of the sulphuric acid solution is calculated dependent on the concentrations of H2SO4 and H2O, their vapor pressures, the atmospheric temperature and pressure. The fixed sectional method is used to resolve an aerosol distribution between 1 nm and 2.6 micron in particle radius. Homogeneous nucleation, condensation and evaporation, coagulation, water-vapor growth, sedimentation and sulphur chemistry are included. The module is applied in the middle-atmosphere MAECHAM5 model, resolving the atmosphere up to 0.01 hPa (~80 km) in 39 layers. It is shown here that MAECHAM5-SAM2 well represents in-situ measured size distributions of stratospheric background aerosol in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes. Distinct differences can be seen when derived integrated aerosol parameters (surface area, effective radius) are compared with aerosol climatologies based on the SAGE II satellite instrument (derived by the University of Oxford and the NASA AMES laboratory). The bias between the model and the SAGE II data increases as the moment of the aerosol size distribution decreases. Thus the modeled effective radius show the strongest bias, followed by the aerosol surface area density. Correspondingly less biased are the higher moments volume area density and the mass density of the global stratospheric aerosol coverage. This finding supports the key finding No. 2 of the SPARC Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties (2006), where it was shown that during periods of very low aerosol load in the stratosphere, the consistency between in-situ and satellite measurements, which exist in a volcanically perturbed stratosphere, breaks down and significant

  11. Cardiological aging in SAM model: effect of chronic treatment with growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Forman, K; Vara, E; García, C; Ariznavarreta, C; Escames, G; Tresguerres, J A F

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aging on different parameters related to inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis in hearts from two types of male mice models: senescence-accelerated mice (SAM-P8) and senescence-accelerated-resistant (SAM-R1), and the influence of chronic administration of Growth Hormone (GH) on old SAM-P8 mice. Forty male mice were used. Animals were divided into five experimental groups: two 10 month old untreated groups (SAM-P8/SAM-R1), two 2 month old young groups (SAM-P8/SAM-R1) and one 10 month old group (SAM-P8) treated with GH for 30 days. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 1, interleukin 10, heme oxygenases 1 and 2, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases, NFkB, Bad, Bax and Bcl-2 were determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results were submitted to a two way ANOVA statistical evaluation using the Statgraphics program. Inflammation, as well as, oxidative stress and apoptosis markers were increased in the heart of old SAM-P8 males, as compared to young controls and this situation was not observed in the old SAM-R1 mice. Exogenous GH administration reverted the effect of aging in the described parameters of old SAM-P8 mice. Our results suggest that inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress could play an important role in the observed cardiovascular alterations related to aging of SAM-P8 mice and that GH may play a potential protective effect on the cardiovascular system of these animals.

  12. The fSAM Model of False Recall

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, Daniel R.; Smith, Troy A.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report a new theory of false memory building upon existing associative memory models and implemented in fSAM, the first fully specified quantitative model of false recall. Participants frequently intrude unstudied critical words while recalling lists comprising their strongest semantic associates but infrequently produce other extralist and prior-list intrusions. The authors developed the theory by simulating recall of such lists, using factorial combinations of semantic mechanisms operating at encoding, retrieval, or both stages. During encoding, unstudied words' associations to list context were strengthened in proportion to their strength of semantic association either to each studied word or to all co-rehearsed words. During retrieval, words received preference in proportion to their strength of semantic association to the most recently recalled single word or multiple words. The authors simulated all intrusion types and veridical recall for lists varying in semantic association strength among studied and critical words from the same and different lists. Multiplicative semantic encoding and retrieval mechanisms performed well in combination. Using such combined mechanisms, the authors also simulated several core findings from the Deese–Roediger–McDermott paradigm literature, including developmental patterns, specific list effects, association strength effects, and true–false correlations. These results challenge existing false-memory theories. PMID:17907869

  13. Minority Transportation Expenditure Allocation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Anant D.; Santini, Danilo J.; Marik, Sheri K.

    1993-04-12

    MITRAM (Minority TRansportation expenditure Allocation Model) can project various transportation related attributes of minority (Black and Hispanic) and majority (white) populations. The model projects vehicle ownership, vehicle miles of travel, workers, new car and on-road fleet fuel economy, amount and share of household income spent on gasoline, and household expenditures on public transportation and taxis. MITRAM predicts reactions to sustained fuel price changes for up to 10 years after the change.

  14. Molten Salt Power Tower Cost Model for the System Advisor Model (SAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, C. S.; Heath, G. A.

    2013-02-01

    This report describes a component-based cost model developed for molten-salt power tower solar power plants. The cost model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), using data from several prior studies, including a contracted analysis from WorleyParsons Group, which is included herein as an Appendix. The WorleyParsons' analysis also estimated material composition and mass for the plant to facilitate a life cycle analysis of the molten salt power tower technology. Details of the life cycle assessment have been published elsewhere. The cost model provides a reference plant that interfaces with NREL's System Advisor Model or SAM. The reference plant assumes a nominal 100-MWe (net) power tower running with a nitrate salt heat transfer fluid (HTF). Thermal energy storage is provided by direct storage of the HTF in a two-tank system. The design assumes dry-cooling. The model includes a spreadsheet that interfaces with SAM via the Excel Exchange option in SAM. The spreadsheet allows users to estimate the costs of different-size plants and to take into account changes in commodity prices. This report and the accompanying Excel spreadsheet can be downloaded at https://sam.nrel.gov/cost.

  15. Spill Assessment Model (SAM) Procedure for Manual Field Calculations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    SPECIFICALLY, THE PART OF SAM UTILIZED AS THE BASIS FOR THE FIELD CALCULATIONS ADDRESSES ONLY INSTANTANEOUS POINT SOURCE DISCHARGES INTO A FLOWING RIVER. FOR...instantaneous point source discharges into a flowing river. For field use, the primary requirement is to assess the maximum concentrations which may result...different classes of chemicals, reference sources such as the Chemical Hazard Response Information ,’stem (CHRIS) of the U.S. Coast Guard should be

  16. Fast and slow responses of Southern Ocean sea surface temperature to SAM in coupled climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostov, Yavor; Marshall, John; Hausmann, Ute; Armour, Kyle C.; Ferreira, David; Holland, Marika M.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate how sea surface temperatures (SSTs) around Antarctica respond to the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) on multiple timescales. To that end we examine the relationship between SAM and SST within unperturbed preindustrial control simulations of coupled general circulation models (GCMs) included in the Climate Modeling Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). We develop a technique to extract the response of the Southern Ocean SST (55°S-70°S) to a hypothetical step increase in the SAM index. We demonstrate that in many GCMs, the expected SST step response function is nonmonotonic in time. Following a shift to a positive SAM anomaly, an initial cooling regime can transition into surface warming around Antarctica. However, there are large differences across the CMIP5 ensemble. In some models the step response function never changes sign and cooling persists, while in other GCMs the SST anomaly crosses over from negative to positive values only 3 years after a step increase in the SAM. This intermodel diversity can be related to differences in the models' climatological thermal ocean stratification in the region of seasonal sea ice around Antarctica. Exploiting this relationship, we use observational data for the time-mean meridional and vertical temperature gradients to constrain the real Southern Ocean response to SAM on fast and slow timescales.

  17. Parabolic Trough Reference Plant for Cost Modeling with the Solar Advisor Model (SAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, C.

    2010-07-01

    This report describes a component-based cost model developed for parabolic trough solar power plants. The cost model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), assisted by WorleyParsons Group Inc., for use with NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM). This report includes an overview and explanation of the model, two summary contract reports from WorleyParsons, and an Excel spreadsheet for use with SAM. The cost study uses a reference plant with a 100-MWe capacity and six hours of thermal energy storage. Wet-cooling and dry-cooling configurations are considered. The spreadsheet includes capital and operating cost by component to allow users to estimate the impact of changes in component costs.

  18. Construct Validation of the Louisiana School Analysis Model (SAM) Instructional Staff Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray-Clark, Nikki; Bates, Reid

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the Louisiana SAM Instructional Staff Questionnaire, a key component of the Louisiana School Analysis Model. The model was designed as a comprehensive evaluation tool for schools. Principle axis factoring with oblique rotation was used to uncover the underlying structure of the SISQ. (Contains 1 table.)

  19. Case Studies Comparing System Advisor Model (SAM) Results to Real Performance Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Dobos, A.; Sather, N.

    2012-06-01

    NREL has completed a series of detailed case studies comparing the simulations of the System Advisor Model (SAM) and measured performance data or published performance expectations. These case studies compare PV measured performance data with simulated performance data using appropriate weather data. The measured data sets were primarily taken from NREL onsite PV systems and weather monitoring stations.

  20. Antarctic SAM-temperature relationships in the historical CMIP5 model runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, G.; Bracegirdle, T.

    2013-12-01

    Variability in the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) is associated with a distinct spatial pattern of near-surface temperature anomalies across the Antarctic continent: a more positive SAM is generally linked with warming over the Antarctic Peninsula and cooler temperatures over East Antarctica. However, recent studies have shown that on decadal timescales these SAM-temperature relationships (STRs) can break down and even reverse in sign. Due to the relatively short (~50 years) timescale of available observations it is difficult to determine whether such reversals have occurred in response to anthropogenic forcing or are simply part of natural internal climate variability. Future Antarctic temperature change over the 21st Century is likely to be highly dependent on how the SAM responds to a combination of ozone recovery and greenhouse gas increases, which modelling studies suggest will have opposing effects on the sign of the SAM. Decadal variability in Antarctic STRs will be a major contributing factor to the uncertainty attached to such predictions. Therefore, as a first step in refining such predictions, we examine how well the Coupled Model Intercomparison Phase 5 (CMIP5) models, which provide climate projections for the latest IPCC assessment report, capture STR decadal variability across Antarctica. We analyze the seasonal STR at six Antarctic stations in the historical CMIP5 model runs, which typically encompass the period from 1850-2005. The stations were chosen because they have different seasonal patterns of STR; e.g. consistent across all seasons, one season where the STR is much stronger, or a change in the STR sign across the year. We utilize data from 50 different CMIP5 models comprising 183 separate model runs. First, we examine how well the models determine the long-term seasonal STR correlation and regression coefficients for the 1961-2000 period at each station, as compared to equivalent observations. Second, we investigate whether the models capture

  1. Spatial Allocator for air quality modeling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Spatial Allocator is a set of tools that helps users manipulate and generate data files related to emissions and air quality modeling without requiring the use of a commercial Geographic Information System.

  2. Integration, Validation, and Application of a PV Snow Coverage Model in SAM

    SciTech Connect

    Ryberg, David; Freeman, Janine

    2015-09-01

    Due to the increasing deployment of PV systems in snowy climates, there is significant interest in a method capable of estimating PV losses resulting from snow coverage that has been verified for a wide variety of system designs and locations. A scattering of independent snow coverage models have been developed over the last 15 years; however, there has been very little effort spent on verifying these models beyond the system design and location on which they were based. Moreover, none of the major PV modeling software products have incorporated any of these models into their workflow. In response to this deficiency, we have integrated the methodology of the snow model developed in the paper by Marion et al. [1] into the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) System Advisor Model (SAM). In this work we describe how the snow model is implemented in SAM and discuss our demonstration of the model's effectiveness at reducing error in annual estimations for two PV arrays. Following this, we use this new functionality in conjunction with a long term historical dataset to estimate average snow losses across the United States for a typical PV system design. The open availability of the snow loss estimation capability in SAM to the PV modeling community, coupled with our results of the nation-wide study, will better equip the industry to accurately estimate PV energy production in areas affected by snowfall.

  3. SAM in a Nutshell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Givens, Larry R.

    2000-01-01

    Explains what the Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers' Strategic Assessment Model (SAM) is and how to use it to achieve organizational excellence through continuous improvement. Showing features of both the Malcolm Baldrige programs and the Balanced Scorecard, the SAM components are described along with an explanation of the four…

  4. Parabolic Trough Collector Cost Update for the System Advisor Model (SAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurup, Parthiv; Turchi, Craig S.

    2015-11-01

    This report updates the baseline cost for parabolic trough solar fields in the United States within NREL's System Advisor Model (SAM). SAM, available at no cost at https://sam.nrel.gov/, is a performance and financial model designed to facilitate decision making for people involved in the renewable energy industry. SAM is the primary tool used by NREL and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for estimating the performance and cost of concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies and projects. The study performed a bottom-up build and cost estimate for two state-of-the-art parabolic trough designs -- the SkyTrough and the Ultimate Trough. The SkyTrough analysis estimated the potential installed cost for a solar field of 1500 SCAs as $170/m2 +/- $6/m2. The investigation found that SkyTrough installed costs were sensitive to factors such as raw aluminum alloy cost and production volume. For example, in the case of the SkyTrough, the installed cost would rise to nearly $210/m2 if the aluminum alloy cost was $1.70/lb instead of $1.03/lb. Accordingly, one must be aware of fluctuations in the relevant commodities markets to track system cost over time. The estimated installed cost for the Ultimate Trough was only slightly higher at $178/m2, which includes an assembly facility of $11.6 million amortized over the required production volume. Considering the size and overall cost of a 700 SCA Ultimate Trough solar field, two parallel production lines in a fully covered assembly facility, each with the specific torque box, module and mirror jigs, would be justified for a full CSP plant.

  5. Latent Dirichlet allocation models for image classification.

    PubMed

    Rasiwasia, Nikhil; Vasconcelos, Nuno

    2013-11-01

    Two new extensions of latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA), denoted topic-supervised LDA (ts-LDA) and class-specific-simplex LDA (css-LDA), are proposed for image classification. An analysis of the supervised LDA models currently used for this task shows that the impact of class information on the topics discovered by these models is very weak in general. This implies that the discovered topics are driven by general image regularities, rather than the semantic regularities of interest for classification. To address this, ts-LDA models are introduced which replace the automated topic discovery of LDA with specified topics, identical to the classes of interest for classification. While this results in improvements in classification accuracy over existing LDA models, it compromises the ability of LDA to discover unanticipated structure of interest. This limitation is addressed by the introduction of css-LDA, an LDA model with class supervision at the level of image features. In css-LDA topics are discovered per class, i.e., a single set of topics shared across classes is replaced by multiple class-specific topic sets. The css-LDA model is shown to combine the labeling strength of topic-supervision with the flexibility of topic-discovery. Its effectiveness is demonstrated through an extensive experimental evaluation, involving multiple benchmark datasets, where it is shown to outperform existing LDA-based image classification approaches.

  6. Senescence-accelerated Mice (SAMs) as a Model for Brain Aging and Immunosenescence

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Atsuyoshi; Hasegawa-Ishii, Sanae

    2011-01-01

    The Senescence-Accelerated Mouse (SAM) represents a group of inbred mouse strains developed as a model for the study of human aging and age-related diseases. Senescence-prone (SAMP) strains exhibit an early onset of age-related decline in the peripheral immunity such as thymic involution, loss of CD4+ T cells, impaired helper T cell function, decreased antibody-forming capacity, dysfunction of antigen-presenting cells, decreased natural killer activity, increased auto-antibodies, and susceptibility to virus infection. Senescence-prone SAMP10 mice undergo age-related changes in the brain such as brain atrophy, shrinkage and loss of cortical neurons, retraction of cortical neuronal dendrites, loss of dendritic spines, loss of synapses, impaired learning and memory, depressive behavior, accumulation of neuronal DNA damage, neuronal ubiquitinated inclusions, reduced hippocampal cholinergic receptors, decreased neurotrophic factors, decreased hippocampal zinc and zinc transporters, increased sphyngomyelinase, and elevated oxidative-nitrative stress. Recent data indicating increased pro-inflammatory cytokines in the brain of SAMP10 mice are directing investigators toward an integration of immune and neural abnormalities to enhance understanding of the principles of brain aging. We highlight how mouse brain cells adopt cytokine-mediated responses and how SAMP10 mice are defective in these responses. SAMP10 model would be useful to study how age-related disturbances in peripheral immunity have an impact on dysregulation of brain tissue homeostasis, resulting in age-related neurodegeneration. PMID:22396891

  7. Modeling Sugar Allocations in Plants using Radioisotope Tracer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mingru

    2013-10-01

    The allocations of carbon and nitrogen are major factors in determining growth priorities in plants. The mechanisms that regulate resource allocation in plants are poorly understood. We use radiotracer techniques to identify and quantify dynamical feedback responses of plants to changes in environmental conditions. A major goal of this research is to investigate shifts in sugar allocations as part of the plant's response to changes in environmental conditions. These observations are used to develop mechanistic models that simulate the feedback for adjustments to resource allocations based on the environment-plant interface. By writing a software module in C + + based on the models, we are able to conduct a computer simulation of plant's intake of carbon dioxide and sugar allocation inside plant body. By comparing and matching the simulation results and experimental data through adjusting model parameters, we are able to gain knowledge of the mechanisms that regulate resource allocation in plants.

  8. Review and standardization of cell phone exposure calculations using the SAM phantom and anatomically correct head models

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Brian B; Kainz, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    We reviewed articles using computational RF dosimetry to compare the Specific Anthropomorphic Mannequin (SAM) to anatomically correct models of the human head. Published conclusions based on such comparisons have varied widely. We looked for reasons that might cause apparently similar comparisons to produce dissimilar results. We also looked at the information needed to adequately compare the results of computational RF dosimetry studies. We concluded studies were not comparable because of differences in definitions, models, and methodology. Therefore we propose a protocol, developed by an IEEE standards group, as an initial step in alleviating this problem. The protocol calls for a benchmark validation study comparing the SAM phantom to two anatomically correct models of the human head. It also establishes common definitions and reporting requirements that will increase the comparability of all computational RF dosimetry studies of the human head. PMID:15482601

  9. Environmental control of carbon allocation matters for modelling forest growth.

    PubMed

    Guillemot, Joannès; Francois, Christophe; Hmimina, Gabriel; Dufrêne, Eric; Martin-StPaul, Nicolas K; Soudani, Kamel; Marie, Guillaume; Ourcival, Jean-Marc; Delpierre, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate the importance of modulations of within-tree carbon (C) allocation by water and low-temperature stress for the prediction of annual forest growth with a process-based model. A new C allocation scheme was implemented in the CASTANEA model that accounts for lagged and direct environmental controls of C allocation. Different approaches (static vs dynamic) to modelling C allocation were then compared in a model-data fusion procedure, using satellite-derived leaf production estimates and biometric measurements at c. 10(4) sites. The modelling of the environmental control of C allocation significantly improved the ability of CASTANEA to predict the spatial and year-to-year variability of aboveground forest growth along regional gradients. A significant effect of the previous year's water stress on the C allocation to leaves and wood was reported. Our results also are consistent with a prominent role of the environmental modulation of sink demand in the wood growth of the studied species. Data available at large scales can inform forest models about the processes driving annual and seasonal C allocation. Our results call for a greater consideration of C allocation drivers, especially sink-demand fluctuations, for the simulations of current and future forest productivity with process-based models.

  10. Tracking the MSL-SAM methane detection source location Through Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-García, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    1. Introduction: The putative in situ detection of methane by Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on Curiosi-ty at Gale crater has garnered significant attention because of the potential implications for the presence of geological methane sources or indigenous Martian organisms [1, 2]. SAM reported detection of back-ground levels of atmospheric methane of mean value 0.69±0.25 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) at the 95% confidence interval (CI). Additionally, in four sequential measurements spanning a 60-sol period, SAM observed elevated levels of methane of 7.2±2.1 ppbv (95% CI), implying that Mars is episodically producing methane from an additional unknown source. There are many major unresolved questions regard-ing this detection: 1) What are the potential sources of the methane release? 2) What causes the rapid decrease in concentration? and 3) Where is the re-lease location? 4) How spatially extensive is the re-lease? 5) For how long is CH4 released? Regarding the first question, the source of methane, is so far not identified. It could be related with geo-logical process like methane release from clathrates [3], serpentinisation [4] and volcanism [5]; or due to biological activity from methanogenesis [6]. To answer the second question, the rapid decrease in concentration, it is important to note that the photo-chemical lifetime of methane is of order 100 years, much longer than the atmospheric mixing time scale, and thus the gas should tend to be well mixed except near a source or shortly after an episodic release. The observed spike of 7 ppb from the background of <1 ppb, and then the rapid return to the background lev-el could be due to a sink (destruction) or due to at-mospheric mixing. A wind mediated erosion process of ordinary quartz crystals was proposed to produce activated quartz grains, which sequester methane by forming covalent Si-C bonds. If this process is op-erational on Mars today, which some recent prelimi-nary studies on

  11. Updates to the Demographic and Spatial Allocation Models to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA announced the availability of the draft report, Updates to the Demographic and Spatial Allocation Models to Produce Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios (ICLUS) for a 30-day public comment period. The ICLUS version 2 (v2) modeling tool furthered land change modeling by providing nationwide housing development scenarios up to 2100. ICLUS V2 includes updated population and land use data sets and addressing limitations identified in ICLUS v1 in both the migration and spatial allocation models. The companion user guide describes the development of ICLUS v2 and the updates that were made to the original data sets and the demographic and spatial allocation models. [2017 UPDATE] Get the latest version of ICLUS and stay up-to-date by signing up to the ICLUS mailing list. The GIS tool enables users to run SERGoM with the population projections developed for the ICLUS project and allows users to modify the spatial allocation housing density across the landscape.

  12. Updates to the Demographic and Spatial Allocation Models to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's announced the availability of the final report, Updates to the Demographic and Spatial Allocation Models to Produce Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios (ICLUS) (Version 2). This update furthered land change modeling by providing nationwide housing development scenarios up to 2100. This newest version includes updated population and land use data sets and addresses limitations identified in ICLUS v1 in both the migration and spatial allocation models. The companion user guide (Final Report) describes the development of ICLUS v2 and the updates that were made to the original data sets and the demographic and spatial allocation models. The GIS tool enables users to run SERGoM with the population projections developed for the ICLUS project and allows users to modify the spatial allocation housing density across the landscape.

  13. [A model for resource allocation in primary health care].

    PubMed

    Raña K, Javier; Ferrer O, Juan-Carlos; Bedregal G, Paula

    2007-01-01

    Resource allocation in primary health care is a worldwide issue. In Chile, the state allocates resources to city halls using a mechanism called "per capita". However, each city hall distributes these resources according to the historical expenses of each health center. None of these methods considers the epidemiological and demographic differences in demand. This article proposes a model that allocates resources to health centers in an equitable, efficient and transparent fashion. The model incorporates two types of activities; those that are programmable, whose demand is generated by medical teams and those associated to morbidity, generated by patients. In the first case the health promotion, prevention and control activities are programmed according to the goals proposed by health authorities. In the second case, the utilization rates are calculated for different sociodemographic groups. This model was applied in one of the most populated communities of Metropolitan Santiago and proved to increase efficiency and transparency in resource allocation.

  14. Mathematical Development of the Spill Assessment Model (SAM) for Hydrazine and Similar Acting Materials in Water Bodies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    AFESC/ESL-TR-80-07 NL Aa./ E R HEE//lllnlllllnlhl IIIIIIIIIIIIIIffllfllf IIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIh EIEIIEIIEEEEEE iWii 1 1 . 10 ;s *DI,*lu I,[L...MIR1 RESOLUTIO40 11111H2. II.I25 11f1 1 01 . MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART L fESL-TR-80-07 MATHEMATICAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE SPILL ASSESSMENT MODEL (SAM...FORM 1 , I 12. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. PIENTiS CATALOG NUMBER ESLVTR-8p-T -/ / 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) . - .OVERED & ,)THEMATICAL.EVELOPMENT OF THESPILL

  15. A Model for Resource Allocation Using Operational Knowledge Assets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreou, Andreas N.; Bontis, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper seeks to develop a business model that shows the impact of operational knowledge assets on intellectual capital (IC) components and business performance and use the model to show how knowledge assets can be prioritized in driving resource allocation decisions. Design/methodology/approach: Quantitative data were collected from 84…

  16. ReefSAM - Reef Sedimentary Accretion Model: A new 3D coral reef evolution model/simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Samuel; Webster, Jody

    2013-04-01

    Coral reefs show characteristic morphological patterns (e.g. coral dominated margins with detrital carbonate dominated lagoons/back-reef) and temporal development (e.g. Hopley et al. 2007). While the processes which lead to predictable patterns on a range of scales have been discussed qualitatively, a full quantitative understanding of the range of processes and parameters involved requires modelling. Previous attempts to model complex Holocene reef systems (i.e. One Tree Reef, GBR - Barrett and Webster 2012) using a carbonate stratigraphic forward model (Carbonate3D - Warrlich et al. 2002) identified a number of important but unsimulated processes and potential model improvements. ReefSAM has been written from scratch in Matlab using these findings and experiences from using Carbonate3D. It simulates coralgal accretion and carbonate sand production and transport. Specific improvements include: 1. a more complex hydrodynamic model based on wave refraction and incorporating vertical (depth) and lateral (substrate dependent) variations in transport energy and erosion. 2. a complex reef growth model incorporating depth, wave energy/turbidity and substrate composition. 3. Paleo-water depth, paleo-wave energy and bio-zone (combination of paleo-water depth and wave energy) model outputs allowing coralgal habitat changes through time and space to be simulated and compared to observational data. The model is compared to the well studied One Tree Reef - tests similar to those undertaken in Barrett and Webster 2012 with Carbonate3D are presented. Model development coincides with plans for further intensive drilling at One Tree Reef (mid 2013) providing an opportunity to test the model predictively. The model is still in active development. References: Barrett, S.J., Webster, J.M.,2012. Holocene evolution of the Great Barrier Reef: Insights from 3D numerical modelling. Sedimentary Geology 265-266, 56-71. Warrlich, G.M.D., Waltham, D.A., Bosence D.W.J., 2002. Quantifying the

  17. Predictions of psychophysical measurements for sinusoidal amplitude modulated (SAM) pulse-train stimuli from a stochastic model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yifang; Collins, Leslie M

    2007-08-01

    Two approaches have been proposed to reduce the synchrony of the neural response to electrical stimuli in cochlear implants. One approach involves adding noise to the pulse-train stimulus, and the other is based on using a high-rate pulse-train carrier. Hypotheses regarding the efficacy of the two approaches can be tested using computational models of neural responsiveness prior to time-intensive psychophysical studies. In our previous work, we have used such models to examine the effects of noise on several psychophysical measures important to speech recognition. However, to date there has been no parallel analytic solution investigating the neural response to the high-rate pulse-train stimuli and their effect on psychophysical measures. This work investigates the properties of the neural response to high-rate pulse-train stimuli with amplitude modulated envelopes using a stochastic auditory nerve model. The statistics governing the neural response to each pulse are derived using a recursive method. The agreement between the theoretical predictions and model simulations is demonstrated for sinusoidal amplitude modulated (SAM) high rate pulse-train stimuli. With our approach, predicting the neural response in modern implant devices becomes tractable. Psychophysical measurements are also predicted using the stochastic auditory nerve model for SAM high-rate pulse-train stimuli. Changes in dynamic range (DR) and intensity discrimination are compared with that observed for noise-modulated pulse-train stimuli. Modulation frequency discrimination is also studied as a function of stimulus level and pulse rate. Results suggest that high rate carriers may positively impact such psychophysical measures.

  18. Modelling C allocation in response to nutrient availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Benjamin; Prentice, Colin

    2015-04-01

    Carbon (C) allocation in ecosystems is a key variable of the global terrestrial C cycle. While photosynthesis governs the amount of C that enters ecosystems, its subsequent allocation to compartments with different life times determines its over-all residence time and variations in allocation patterns drive changes in ecosystem C balance and its response to environmental change. A better understanding of the controls on allocation is thus key to improving global vegetation models that commonly rely on using fixed partitioning factors. Observational data suggests variations of ecosystem structure and functioning along large-scale gradients of resource availability. Below-ground C allocation, inferred as gross primary production minus above-ground biomass production increases along gradients of decreasing nutrient availability. This is not only due to more root growth, but also due to enhanced production of exudates and stimulation of root symbionts and has been interpreted to reflect optimal plant allocation decisions under a varying soil fertility status. Here, we propose a model that accounts for trade-offs between (i) growth in above-ground and (ii) below-ground plant compartments, (iii) exudation to the rhizosphere and root symbionts and (iv) temporary storage in non-structural pools. By postulating the maximization of long-term growth under a given (seasonal regime) of soil nitrogen (N) availability, we attempt to reproduce observed large-scale gradients. The model is formulated based on a C cost for different N uptake decisions, where the cost is a function of N availability, root mass, and soil temperature (for biological N fixation). On a daily time scale, ecosystem N uptake may be realized by C exudation to the rhizosphere and/or symbiotic fixation of atmospheric N2. On an annual time scale, allocation to roots versus leaves is adjusted to soil inorganic N availability and modeled to yield maximum total growth. Exudation versus temporary storage of C is

  19. In the interests of time: improving HIV allocative efficiency modelling via optimal time-varying allocations

    PubMed Central

    Shattock, Andrew J; Kerr, Cliff C; Stuart, Robyn M; Masaki, Emiko; Fraser, Nicole; Benedikt, Clemens; Gorgens, Marelize; Wilson, David P; Gray, Richard T

    2016-01-01

    Introduction International investment in the response to HIV and AIDS has plateaued and its future level is uncertain. With many countries committed to ending the epidemic, it is essential to allocate available resources efficiently over different response periods to maximize impact. The objective of this study is to propose a technique to determine the optimal allocation of funds over time across a set of HIV programmes to achieve desirable health outcomes. Methods We developed a technique to determine the optimal time-varying allocation of funds (1) when the future annual HIV budget is pre-defined and (2) when the total budget over a period is pre-defined, but the year-on-year budget is to be optimally determined. We use this methodology with Optima, an HIV transmission model that uses non-linear relationships between programme spending and associated programmatic outcomes to quantify the expected epidemiological impact of spending. We apply these methods to data collected from Zambia to determine the optimal distribution of resources to fund the right programmes, for the right people, at the right time. Results and discussion Considering realistic implementation and ethical constraints, we estimate that the optimal time-varying redistribution of the 2014 Zambian HIV budget between 2015 and 2025 will lead to a 7.6% (7.3% to 7.8%) decrease in cumulative new HIV infections compared with a baseline scenario where programme allocations remain at 2014 levels. This compares to a 5.1% (4.6% to 5.6%) reduction in new infections using an optimal allocation with constant programme spending that recommends unrealistic programmatic changes. Contrasting priorities for programme funding arise when assessing outcomes for a five-year funding period over 5-, 10- and 20-year time horizons. Conclusions Countries increasingly face the need to do more with the resources available. The methodology presented here can aid decision-makers in planning as to when to expand or contract

  20. Modeling in Support of Groundwater-Remediation Cost Allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinder, G. F.

    2003-12-01

    The allocation of costs for remediation among multiple potentially responsible parties (PRPs) can be addressed using a `stand alone' method developed and applied initially to water supply problems. The variant of the stand alone approach used in an allocation case in the San Fernando Valley of California involves 1) the development of groundwater flow and transport models that reflect 1) the contributions of each of the PRPs individually and, 2) the combined effect of all parties. The allocation is then based upon the proportional impact of each PRP. The proportional cost is therefore established by taking the ratio of the plume size of each PRP divided by the overall plume size multiplied by the overall remediation costs.

  1. Resource Allocation Procedure at Queensland University: A Dynamic Modelling Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbraith, Peter L.; Carss, Brian W.

    A structural reorganization of the University of Queensland, Australia, was undertaken to promote efficient resource management, and a resource allocation model was developed to aid in policy evaluation and planning. The operation of the restructured system was based on creating five resource groups to manage the distribution of academic resources…

  2. A Region of Proximal Learning Model of Study Time Allocation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalfe, J.; Kornell, N.

    2005-01-01

    A Region of Proximal Learning model is proposed emphasizing two components to people's study time allocation, controlled by different metacognitive indices. The first component is choice, which is further segmented into two stages: (1) a decision of whether to study or not and (2) the order of priority of items chosen. If the people's Judgments of…

  3. Above-belowground Carbon Allocation in Earth System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.; Hoffman, F. M.; Xu, X.; Iversen, C. M.; Kumar, J.

    2014-12-01

    Above-belowground carbon allocation is a critical mechanism for vegetation growth and its adaptation to the changing environment. The model representation of carbon allocation mechanisms significantly influence the simulated carbon stock and land-atmosphere exchange in Earth System Models (ESMs). Few previous studies, however, have investigated and evaluated the above-belowground carbon allocation in ESMs. In this study, we analyzed carbon density in belowground, total vegetation (above + belowground), and belowground:vegetation ratios of eleven ESMs from the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), which were used for the latest IPCC Assessment Report (AR5). Overall, results of ESMs are not consistent with observational data; both the belowground and total vegetation carbon density are underestimated in tropical/subtropical and temperate regions, while overestimated in arctic/subarctic regions. Moreover, the ratios of belowground:total vegetation carbon are underestimated in all three climate zones. The model-data discrepancies in carbon density vary substantially among biomes, while the ratios of belowground:total vegetation carbon are consistently underestimated across all major biomes expect tropical moist forests. This study indicates that the carbon allocation algorithms in current ESMs need to be improved to better simulate vegetation growth and its responses to global change.

  4. Error rate information in attention allocation pilot models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulkner, W. H.; Onstott, E. D.

    1977-01-01

    The Northrop urgency decision pilot model was used in a command tracking task to compare the optimized performance of multiaxis attention allocation pilot models whose urgency functions were (1) based on tracking error alone, and (2) based on both tracking error and error rate. A matrix of system dynamics and command inputs was employed, to create both symmetric and asymmetric two axis compensatory tracking tasks. All tasks were single loop on each axis. Analysis showed that a model that allocates control attention through nonlinear urgency functions using only error information could not achieve performance of the full model whose attention shifting algorithm included both error and error rate terms. Subsequent to this analysis, tracking performance predictions for the full model were verified by piloted flight simulation. Complete model and simulation data are presented.

  5. Decision Support System for Resource Allocation Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    by Presutti and Trepp in their paper "Much Ado about EOQ." [2) The constraints used in the stock fund model are total stock fund dollars and limits on...Jersey, 1963. 2. Presutti, Victor J., Jr. and Trepp , Richard C., More Ado About Economic Order Ouantities (EOO), Operations Analysis Office

  6. Four Institutional Resource Allocation Models in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecquet, M.; Jadot, J.

    1978-01-01

    The origin and objectives of the HIS, MSAR, TUSS, and Gern models are explained and main characteristics are compared regarding: estimates of student numbers, teaching curricula, size of groups, hourly workload of teaching staff, calculation of space requirements, non-teaching staff, operating and capital budgets. Pooling of efforts is…

  7. SECURITY MODELING FOR MARITIME PORT DEFENSE RESOURCE ALLOCATION

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.; Dunn, D.

    2010-09-07

    Redeployment of existing law enforcement resources and optimal use of geographic terrain are examined for countering the threat of a maritime based small-vessel radiological or nuclear attack. The evaluation was based on modeling conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory that involved the development of options for defensive resource allocation that can reduce the risk of a maritime based radiological or nuclear threat. A diverse range of potential attack scenarios has been assessed. As a result of identifying vulnerable pathways, effective countermeasures can be deployed using current resources. The modeling involved the use of the Automated Vulnerability Evaluation for Risks of Terrorism (AVERT{reg_sign}) software to conduct computer based simulation modeling. The models provided estimates for the probability of encountering an adversary based on allocated resources including response boats, patrol boats and helicopters over various environmental conditions including day, night, rough seas and various traffic flow rates.

  8. Age and equity in liver transplantation: An organ allocation model.

    PubMed

    Cucchetti, Alessandro; Ross, Lainie Friedman; Thistlethwaite, J Richard; Vitale, Alessandro; Ravaioli, Matteo; Cescon, Matteo; Ercolani, Giorgio; Burra, Patrizia; Cillo, Umberto; Pinna, Antonio Daniele

    2015-10-01

    A moral liver allocation policy must be fair. We considered a 2-step, 2-principle allocation system called "age mapping." Its first principle, equal opportunity, ensures that candidates of all ages have an equal chance of getting an organ. Its second principle, prudential lifespan equity, allocates younger donor grafts to younger candidates and older donors to older candidates in order to increase the likelihood that all recipients achieve a "full lifespan." Data from 2476 candidates and 1371 consecutive adult liver transplantations (from 1999 to 2012) were used to determine whether age mapping can reduce the gap in years of life lost (YLL) between younger and older recipients. A parametric Weibull prognostic model was developed to estimate total life expectancy after transplantation using survival of the general population matched by sex and age as a reference. Life expectancy from birth was calculated by adding age at transplant and total life expectancy after transplantation. In multivariate analysis, recipient age, hepatitis C virus status, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score at transplant of >30, and donor age were significantly related to prognosis after surgery (P < 0.05). The mean (and standard deviation) number of years of life from birth, calculated from the current allocation model, for various age groups were: recipients 18-47 years (n = 340) = 65.2 (3.3); 48-55 years (n = 387) = 72.7 (2.1); 56-61 years (n = 372) = 74.7 (1.7) and for recipients >61 years (n = 272) = 77.4 (1.4). The total number of YLL equaled 523 years. Redistributing liver grafts, using an age mapping algorithm, reduces the lifespan gap between younger and older candidates by 33% (from 12.3% to 8.3%) and achieves a 14% overall reduction of YLL (73 years) compared to baseline liver distribution. In conclusion, deliberately incorporating age into an allocation algorithm promotes fairness and increases efficiency.

  9. Comparing Different Model Structures for Carbon Allocation in the Community Land Model (CLM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montane, F.; Fox, A. M.; Arellano, A. F.; Scaven, V. L.; Alexander, M. R.; Moore, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying the intensity of feedback mechanisms between terrestrial ecosystems and climate is a central challenge for understanding the global carbon cycle. Part of this challenge includes understanding how climate affects not only NPP, but also C allocation in different plant tissues (leaves, stem and roots) which determines the C residence time. For instance, C could be sequestered over longer time periods if changes in climate increase allocation to long-lived plant tissue (e.g. woody components) with respect to short-lived tissues (e.g. leaves). Networks of eddy covariance towers like AmeriFlux provide the infrastructure necessary to study relationships between ecosystem processes and climate forcing. We ran the Community Land Model (CLM) for six temperate forests in North America (AmeriFlux sites) using different model structures for the C allocation module: i) standard carbon allocation module in CLM, which allocates C to the stem and leaves as a dynamic function of NPP and with fixed coefficients for the rest of parameters; ii) alternative C allocation module, which allocates C to the root and stem as a dynamic function of NPP and with fixed coefficients for the rest of parameters; and iii) alternative C allocation module with fixed coefficients for all the parameters. We compare C allocation patterns and climate sensitivities betwen the different model structures and available observations for the sites. We suggest some future approaches to reduce model uncertainty in the current scheme for C allocation in CLM and its climate sensitivity.

  10. Modeling the allocation system: principles for robust design before restructuring.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Sanjay; Kilambi, Vikram; Gilroy, Richard; Ladner, Daniela P; Klintmalm, Goran B; Kaplan, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    The United Network for Organ Sharing is poised to resolve geographic disparity in liver transplantation and promote allocation based on medical urgency. At the time of writing, United Network for Organ Sharing is considering redistricting the organ procurement and transplantation network so that patient model for end-stage liver disease scores at transplant is more uniform across regions.We review the proposal with a systems-engineering focus and find that although the proposal is promising, it currently lacks evidence that it would perform effectively under realistic departures from its underlying data and assumptions. Moreover, we caution against prematurely focusing on redistricting as the only method to mitigate disparity. We describe system modeling principles which, if followed, will ensure that the redesigned allocation system is effective and efficient in achieving the intended goals.

  11. SAP Minutes No.2015-03 for FIFRA meeting held 9/15-17/2015. A set of scientific issues being considered by the Environmental Protection Agency regarding development of a spatial aquatic model(SAM)for pesticide risk assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On September 15-17th, 2014, the US Environmental Protection Agency convened a public meeting of the FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel (SAP) to address scientific issues associated with the agency’s “Development of a Spatial Aquatic Model (SAM) for Pesticide Risk Assessment”. The goal of SAM is to impr...

  12. Heterotypic Sam-Sam association between Odin-Sam1 and Arap3-Sam: binding affinity and structural insights.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Flavia A; Marasco, Daniela; Pirone, Luciano; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina L; Pedone, Emilia M; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Leone, Marilisa

    2013-01-02

    Arap3 is a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase effector protein that plays a role as GTPase activator (GAP) for Arf6 and RhoA. Arap3 contains a sterile alpha motif (Sam) domain that has high sequence homology with the Sam domain of the EphA2-receptor (EphA2-Sam). Both Arap3-Sam and EphA2-Sam are able to associate with the Sam domain of the lipid phosphatase Ship2 (Ship2-Sam). Recently, we reported a novel interaction between the first Sam domain of Odin (Odin-Sam1), a protein belonging to the ANKS (ANKyrin repeat and Sam domain containing) family, and EphA2-Sam. In our latest work, we applied NMR spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to characterize the association between Arap3-Sam and Odin-Sam1. We show that these two Sam domains interact with low micromolar affinity. Moreover, by means of molecular docking techniques, supported by NMR data, we demonstrate that Odin-Sam1 and Arap3-Sam might bind with a topology that is common to several Sam-Sam complexes. The revealed structural details form the basis for the design of potential peptide antagonists that could be used as chemical tools to investigate functional aspects related to heterotypic Arap3-Sam associations.

  13. A Scratchpad Memory Allocation Scheme for Dataflow Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-25

    perform via static analysis of C/C++. We use the heterochronous dataflow (HDF) model of computation [16, 39] in Ptolemy II [11] as a means to specify the...buffer data) as the key memory requirements [9]. 4.1 Structure of an HDF Model We use Ptolemy II’s graphical interface and the HDF domain to specify...algorithm. The allocation algorithm was implemented in Ptolemy II [11], a Java-based framework for studying modeling, simulation and design of concurrent

  14. Results and Comparison from the SAM Linear Fresnel Technology Performance Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the new Linear Fresnel technology performance model in NREL's System Advisor Model. The model predicts the financial and technical performance of direct-steam-generation Linear Fresnel power plants, and can be used to analyze a range of system configurations. This paper presents a brief discussion of the model formulation and motivation, and provides extensive discussion of the model performance and financial results. The Linear Fresnel technology is also compared to other concentrating solar power technologies in both qualitative and quantitative measures. The Linear Fresnel model - developed in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute - provides users with the ability to model a variety of solar field layouts, fossil backup configurations, thermal receiver designs, and steam generation conditions. This flexibility aims to encompass current market solutions for the DSG Linear Fresnel technology, which is seeing increasing exposure in fossil plant augmentation and stand-alone power generation applications.

  15. On species sampling sequences induced by residual allocation models

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Abel; Quintana, Fernando A.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss fully Bayesian inference in a class of species sampling models that are induced by residual allocation (sometimes called stick-breaking) priors on almost surely discrete random measures. This class provides a generalization of the well-known Ewens sampling formula that allows for additional flexibility while retaining computational tractability. In particular, the procedure is used to derive the exchangeable predictive probability functions associated with the generalized Dirichlet process of Hjort (2000) and the probit stick-breaking prior of Chung and Dunson (2009) and Rodriguez and Dunson (2011). The procedure is illustrated with applications to genetics and nonparametric mixture modeling. PMID:25477705

  16. Traffic Behavior Recognition Using the Pachinko Allocation Model.

    PubMed

    Huynh-The, Thien; Banos, Oresti; Le, Ba-Vui; Bui, Dinh-Mao; Yoon, Yongik; Lee, Sungyoung

    2015-07-03

    CCTV-based behavior recognition systems have gained considerable attention in recent years in the transportation surveillance domain for identifying unusual patterns, such as traffic jams, accidents, dangerous driving and other abnormal behaviors. In this paper, a novel approach for traffic behavior modeling is presented for video-based road surveillance. The proposed system combines the pachinko allocation model (PAM) and support vector machine (SVM) for a hierarchical representation and identification of traffic behavior. A background subtraction technique using Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) and an object tracking mechanism based on Kalman filters are utilized to firstly construct the object trajectories. Then, the sparse features comprising the locations and directions of the moving objects are modeled by PAMinto traffic topics, namely activities and behaviors. As a key innovation, PAM captures not only the correlation among the activities, but also among the behaviors based on the arbitrary directed acyclic graph (DAG). The SVM classifier is then utilized on top to train and recognize the traffic activity and behavior. The proposed model shows more flexibility and greater expressive power than the commonly-used latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) approach, leading to a higher recognition accuracy in the behavior classification.

  17. Traffic Behavior Recognition Using the Pachinko Allocation Model

    PubMed Central

    Huynh-The, Thien; Banos, Oresti; Le, Ba-Vui; Bui, Dinh-Mao; Yoon, Yongik; Lee, Sungyoung

    2015-01-01

    CCTV-based behavior recognition systems have gained considerable attention in recent years in the transportation surveillance domain for identifying unusual patterns, such as traffic jams, accidents, dangerous driving and other abnormal behaviors. In this paper, a novel approach for traffic behavior modeling is presented for video-based road surveillance. The proposed system combines the pachinko allocation model (PAM) and support vector machine (SVM) for a hierarchical representation and identification of traffic behavior. A background subtraction technique using Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) and an object tracking mechanism based on Kalman filters are utilized to firstly construct the object trajectories. Then, the sparse features comprising the locations and directions of the moving objects are modeled by PAM into traffic topics, namely activities and behaviors. As a key innovation, PAM captures not only the correlation among the activities, but also among the behaviors based on the arbitrary directed acyclic graph (DAG). The SVM classifier is then utilized on top to train and recognize the traffic activity and behavior. The proposed model shows more flexibility and greater expressive power than the commonly-used latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) approach, leading to a higher recognition accuracy in the behavior classification. PMID:26151213

  18. Synthia Tonn, SAM Engineer

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) is a suite of instruments developed for use on the Mars Science Laboratory, designed to help find out whether or not Mars ever supported life. This video profiles ...

  19. The Marshall Engineering Thermosphere model atmosphere Statistical Analysis Mode (MET-SAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert E.; Catlett, Karen; Anderson, B. Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    The minimum, mean, and maximum exospheric temperature on the globe were calculated for every three hour period from 1947 through 1989 using the algorithms in the Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET) model and the appropriate solar activity input parameters. Cumulative percent frequency (CPF) distributions were then calculated for each of these temperatures at five levels of solar activity as defined by the 13-month smoothed values of the 10.7-cm solar radio noise flux. Next, the 50, 95, 97.7, and 100 percentile temperature values in each of these five levels of solar activity were curve fit as a function of the 13-month smoothed 10.7-cm flux. The resulting algorithms are used to compute the exospheric temperature in the MET model instead of the technique developed by Jacchia in his 1970 model. These temperatures are then used to enter tables to determine the total mass density and/or the atomic oxygen number density for application to engineering problems. Users can specify the risk level they are willing to accept in the results of analyses that require neutral atmosphere parameters inputs. The model eliminates the guess work in how to combine the solar activity input parameters to insure that the results provide answers at the proper risk levels.

  20. Cache Allocation in CDN: An Evolutionary Game Generalized Particle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiang; Lau, Francis C. M.; Gao, Daqi

    Content distribution networks (CDNs) increasingly have been used to reduce the response times experienced by Internet users through placing surrogates close to the clients. This paper presents an object replacement approach based on an evolutionary game generalized particle model (G-GPM). We first propose a problem model for CDNs. The CDN model is then fit into a gravitational field. The origin servers and surrogates are regarded as two kinds of particles which are located in two force-fields. The cache allocation problem is thus transformed into the kinematics and dynamics of the particles in the annular and the round force-fields. The G-GPM approach is unique in four aspects: 1) direct viewing of individual and overall optimization; 2) parallel computing (lower time complexity); 3) multi-objective solution; and 4) being able to deal with some social interactions behaviors.

  1. Adapting SAM for CDF

    SciTech Connect

    D. Bonham et al.

    2003-10-13

    The CDF and D0 experiments probe the high-energy frontier and as they do so have accumulated hundreds of Terabytes of data on the way to petabytes of data over the next two years. The experiments have made a commitment to use the developing Grid based on the SAM system to handle these data. The D0 SAM has been extended for use in CDF as common patterns of design emerged to meet the similar requirements of these experiments. The process by which the merger was achieved is explained with particular emphasis on lessons learned concerning the database design patterns plus realization of the use cases.

  2. Modeling healthcare data using multiple-channel latent Dirichlet allocation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hsin-Min; Wei, Chih-Ping; Hsiao, Fei-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Information and communications technologies have enabled healthcare institutions to accumulate large amounts of healthcare data that include diagnoses, medications, and additional contextual information such as patient demographics. To gain a better understanding of big healthcare data and to develop better data-driven clinical decision support systems, we propose a novel multiple-channel latent Dirichlet allocation (MCLDA) approach for modeling diagnoses, medications, and contextual information in healthcare data. The proposed MCLDA model assumes that a latent health status group structure is responsible for the observed co-occurrences among diagnoses, medications, and contextual information. Using a real-world research testbed that includes one million healthcare insurance claim records, we investigate the utility of MCLDA. Our empirical evaluation results suggest that MCLDA is capable of capturing the comorbidity structures and linking them with the distribution of medications. Moreover, MCLDA is able to identify the pairing between diagnoses and medications in a record based on the assigned latent groups. MCLDA can also be employed to predict missing medications or diagnoses given partial records. Our evaluation results also show that, in most cases, MCLDA outperforms alternative methods such as logistic regressions and the k-nearest-neighbor (KNN) model for two prediction tasks, i.e., medication and diagnosis prediction. Thus, MCLDA represents a promising approach to modeling healthcare data for clinical decision support.

  3. Optimal allocation of computational resources in hydrogeological models under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moslehi, Mahsa; Rajagopal, Ram; de Barros, Felipe P. J.

    2015-09-01

    Flow and transport models in heterogeneous geological formations are usually large-scale with excessive computational complexity and uncertain characteristics. Uncertainty quantification for predicting subsurface flow and transport often entails utilizing a numerical Monte Carlo framework, which repeatedly simulates the model according to a random field parameter representing hydrogeological characteristics of the aquifer. The physical resolution (e.g. spatial grid resolution) for the simulation is customarily chosen based on recommendations in the literature, independent of the number of Monte Carlo realizations. This practice may lead to either excessive computational burden or inaccurate solutions. We develop an optimization-based methodology that considers the trade-off between the following conflicting objectives: time associated with computational costs, statistical convergence of the model prediction and physical errors corresponding to numerical grid resolution. Computational resources are allocated by considering the overall error based on a joint statistical-numerical analysis and optimizing the error model subject to a given computational constraint. The derived expression for the overall error explicitly takes into account the joint dependence between the discretization error of the physical space and the statistical error associated with Monte Carlo realizations. The performance of the framework is tested against computationally extensive simulations of flow and transport in spatially heterogeneous aquifers. Results show that modelers can achieve optimum physical and statistical resolutions while keeping a minimum error for a given computational time. The physical and statistical resolutions obtained through our analysis yield lower computational costs when compared to the results obtained with prevalent recommendations in the literature. Lastly, we highlight the significance of the geometrical characteristics of the contaminant source zone on the

  4. Peptide Fragments of Odin-Sam1: Conformational Analysis and Interaction Studies with EphA2-Sam.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Flavia A; Di Natale, Concetta; Pirone, Luciano; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina L; Marasco, Daniela; Pedone, Emilia M; Saviano, Michele; Leone, Marilisa

    2015-07-27

    Odin is a protein belonging to the ANKS family, and has two tandem Sam domains. The first, Odin-Sam1, binds to the Sam domain of the EphA2 receptor (EphA2-Sam); this interaction could be crucial for the regulation of receptor endocytosis and might have an impact on cancer. Odin-Sam1 associates with EphA2-Sam by adopting a "mid-loop/end-helix" model. In this study three peptide sequences, encompassing the mid-loop interacting portion of Odin-Sam1 and its C-terminal α5 helix, were designed. Their conformational properties were analyzed by CD and NMR. In addition, their abilities to interact with EphA2-Sam were investigated by SPR studies. The peptides adopt a predominantly disordered state in aqueous buffer, but a higher helical content is evident in the presence of the cosolvent trifluoroethanol. Dissociation constants towards EphA2-Sam were in the high micromolar range. The structural findings suggest further routes for the design of potential anti-cancer therapeutics as inhibitors of EphA2-Sam heterotypic interactions.

  5. A Model of Resource Allocation in Public School Districts: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jay G.

    This paper formulates a comprehensive model of resource allocation in a local public school district. The theoretical framework specified could be applied equally well to any number of local public social service agencies. Section 1 develops the theoretical model describing the process of resource allocation. This involves the determination of the…

  6. Bringing the Budget Back into Academic Work Allocation Models: A Management Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Michael; Germov, John

    2015-01-01

    Issues surrounding increasingly constrained resources and reducing levels of sector-based funding require consideration of a different Academic Work Allocation Model (AWAM) approach. Evidence from the literature indicates that an effective work allocation model is founded on the principles of equity and transparency in the distribution and…

  7. A model for allocating CDC's HIV prevention resources in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lasry, Arielle; Sansom, Stephanie L; Hicks, Katherine A; Uzunangelov, Vladislav

    2011-03-01

    The Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention (DHAP) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has an annual budget of approximately $325 million for funding HIV prevention programs in the U.S. The purpose of this paper is to thoroughly describe the methods used to develop a national HIV resource allocation model intended to inform DHAP on allocation strategies that might improve the overall effectiveness of HIV prevention efforts. The HIV prevention resource allocation problem consists of choosing how to apportion prevention resources among interventions and populations so that HIV incidence is minimized, given a budget constraint. We developed an epidemic model that projects HIV infections over time given a specific allocation scenario. The epidemic model is then embedded in a nonlinear mathematical optimization program to determine the allocation scenario that minimizes HIV incidence over a 5-year horizon. In our model, we consider the general U.S. population and specific at-risk populations. The at-risk populations include 15 subgroups structured by gender, race/ethnicity and HIV transmission risk group. HIV transmission risk groups include high-risk heterosexuals, men who have sex with men and injection drug users. We consider HIV screening interventions and interventions to reduce HIV-related risk behaviors. The output of the model is the optimal funding scenario indicating the amounts to be allocated to all combinations of populations and interventions. For illustrative purposes only, we provide a sample application of the model. In this example, the optimal allocation scenario is compared to the current baseline funding scenario to highlight how the current allocation of funds could be improved. In the baseline allocation, 29% of the annual budget is aimed at the general population, while the model recommends targeting 100% of the budget to the at-risk populations with no allocation targeted to the general population. Within the allocation to behavioral

  8. Equity Allocation Model for Multi-Campus Districts and/or Large Divisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozitza, George A.

    The equity allocation model for multi-campus districts and/or large divisions is an attempt to rationally allocate expenditure appropriations among campuses or other college units. Typically, the program budget for a school district shows the budget in three dimensions: expenditure object (e.g., salaries, supplies, and contract services); program…

  9. From Theory to Practice: Implementation of a Resource Allocation Model in Health Departments

    PubMed Central

    Yaylali, Emine; Farnham, Paul G.; Schneider, Karen L.; Landers, Stewart J.; Kouzouian, Oskian; Lasry, Arielle; Purcell, David W.; Green, Timothy A.; Sansom, Stephanie L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop a resource allocation model to optimize health departments’ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)–funded HIV prevention budgets to prevent the most new cases of HIV infection and to evaluate the model’s implementation in 4 health departments. Design, Settings, and Participants We developed a linear programming model combined with a Bernoulli process model that allocated a fixed budget among HIV prevention interventions and risk subpopulations to maximize the number of new infections prevented. The model, which required epidemiologic, behavioral, budgetary, and programmatic data, was implemented in health departments in Philadelphia, Chicago, Alabama, and Nebraska. Main Outcome Measures The optimal allocation of funds, the site-specific cost per case of HIV infection prevented rankings by intervention, and the expected number of HIV cases prevented. Results The model suggested allocating funds to HIV testing and continuum-of-care interventions in all 4 health departments. The most cost-effective intervention for all sites was HIV testing in nonclinical settings for men who have sex with men, and the least cost-effective interventions were behavioral interventions for HIV-negative persons. The pilot sites required 3 to 4 months of technical assistance to develop data inputs and generate and interpret the results. Although the sites found the model easy to use in providing quantitative evidence for allocating HIV prevention resources, they criticized the exclusion of structural interventions and the use of the model to allocate only CDC funds. Conclusions Resource allocation models have the potential to improve the allocation of limited HIV prevention resources and can be used as a decision-making guide for state and local health departments. Using such models may require substantial staff time and technical assistance. These model results emphasize the allocation of CDC funds toward testing and continuum-of-care interventions and

  10. Optimization Model for cooperative water allocation and valuation in large river basins regarding environmental constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pournazeri, S.

    2011-12-01

    A comprehensive optimization model named Cooperative Water Allocation Model (CWAM) is developed for equitable and efficient water allocation and valuation of Zab river basin in order to solve the draught problems of Orumieh Lake in North West of Iran. The model's methodology consists of three phases. The first represents an initial water rights allocation among competing users. The second comprises the water reallocation process for complete usage by consumers. The third phase performs an allocation of the net benefit of the stakeholders participating in a coalition by applying cooperative game theory. The environmental constraints are accounted for in the water allocation model by entering probable environmental damage in a target function, and inputting the minimum water requirement of users. The potential of underground water usage is evaluated in order to compensate for the variation in the amount of surface water. This is conducted by applying an integrated economic- hydrologic river basin model. A node-link river basin network is utilized in CWAM which consists of two major blocks. The first indicates the internal water rights allocation and the second is associated to water and net benefit reallocation. System control, loss in links by evaporation or seepage, modification of inflow into the node, loss in nodes and loss in outflow are considered in this model. Water valuation is calculated for environmental, industrial, municipal and agricultural usage by net benefit function. It can be seen that the water rights are allocated efficiently and incomes are distributed appropriately based on quality and quantity limitations.

  11. Other Resources Related to SAM

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn more about websites and information related to EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM), including key EPA collaborators, laboratories, and research centers.

  12. Effects of Parceling on Model Selection: Parcel-Allocation Variability in Model Ranking.

    PubMed

    Sterba, Sonya K; Rights, Jason D

    2016-01-25

    Research interest often lies in comparing structural model specifications implying different relationships among latent factors. In this context parceling is commonly accepted, assuming the item-level measurement structure is well known and, conservatively, assuming items are unidimensional in the population. Under these assumptions, researchers compare competing structural models, each specified using the same parcel-level measurement model. However, little is known about consequences of parceling for model selection in this context-including whether and when model ranking could vary across alternative item-to-parcel allocations within-sample. This article first provides a theoretical framework that predicts the occurrence of parcel-allocation variability (PAV) in model selection index values and its consequences for PAV in ranking of competing structural models. These predictions are then investigated via simulation. We show that conditions known to manifest PAV in absolute fit of a single model may or may not manifest PAV in model ranking. Thus, one cannot assume that low PAV in absolute fit implies a lack of PAV in ranking, and vice versa. PAV in ranking is shown to occur under a variety of conditions, including large samples. To provide an empirically supported strategy for selecting a model when PAV in ranking exists, we draw on relationships between structural model rankings in parcel- versus item-solutions. This strategy employs the across-allocation modal ranking. We developed software tools for implementing this strategy in practice, and illustrate them with an example. Even if a researcher has substantive reason to prefer one particular allocation, investigating PAV in ranking within-sample still provides an informative sensitivity analysis.

  13. Global land-use allocation model linked to an integrated assessment model.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tomoko; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Ito, Akihiko; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Masui, Toshihiko

    2017-02-15

    We developed a global land-use allocation model that can be linked to integrated assessment models (IAMs) with a coarser spatial resolution. Using the model, we performed a downscaling of the IAMs' regional aggregated land-use projections to obtain a spatial land-use distribution, which could subsequently be used by Earth system models for global environmental assessments of ecosystem services, food security, and climate policies. Here we describe the land-use allocation model, discuss the verification of the downscaling technique, and explain the influences of the downscaling on estimates of land-use carbon emissions. A comparison of the emissions estimated with and without downscaling suggested that the land-use downscaling would help capture the spatial distribution of carbon stock density and regional heterogeneity of carbon emissions caused by cropland and pasture land expansion.

  14. A Role for Homemade Financial Models in Faculty Staffing and Resource Allocations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettit, Joseph

    Recent efforts at Georgetown University to formulate financial models to assist in staffing and allocation decisions are described. The analysis considers a departmental model that has been developed, a program model that is being designed, and the potential uses and misuses of the models. Both models use historical data and do not attempt to…

  15. Neural Network Based Modeling and Analysis of LP Control Surface Allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langari, Reza; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Gundy-Burlet, Karen

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to interpretive modeling of LP based control allocation in intelligent flight control. The emphasis is placed on a nonlinear interpretation of the LP allocation process as a static map to support analytical study of the resulting closed loop system, albeit in approximate form. The approach makes use of a bi-layer neural network to capture the essential functioning of the LP allocation process. It is further shown via Lyapunov based analysis that under certain relatively mild conditions the resulting closed loop system is stable. Some preliminary conclusions from a study at Ames are stated and directions for further research are given at the conclusion of the paper.

  16. Modeling the evolution of phenotypic plasticity in resource allocation in wing-dimorphic insects.

    PubMed

    King, Elizabeth G; Roff, Derek A

    2010-06-01

    In nature, resource availability varies spatially and temporally both within and across generations, leading to variation in the amount of energy available to individuals. The optimal allocation strategy can change, depending on the amount of resources available to allocate to life-history functions. If so, selection should favor the evolution of allocation strategies that can respond to variation in environmental resource levels. We address this issue by using two quantitative genetic simulation models in a model system for studying trade-offs, wing-dimorphic insects. Wing dimorphic insects typically exhibit a trade-off in the allocation of resources between migratory ability and reproduction. In our models, we focus on allocation as a genetic trait and model the evolution of phenotypic plasticity in this trait in response to spatiotemporal variation in resource availability. We show that the evolved allocation strategy depends on the predictability of resource levels across time. Specifically, selection favors higher investment in flight under poor conditions in predictable environments and lower investment in unpredictable environments.

  17. SAM Companion Documents and Sample Collection Procedures

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAM Companion Documents and Sample Collection Procedures provide information intended to complement the analytical methods listed in Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  18. Resource Allocation in Healthcare: Implications of Models of Medicine as a Profession

    PubMed Central

    Kluge, Eike-Henner W.

    2007-01-01

    For decades, the problem of how to allocate healthcare resources in a just and equitable fashion has been the subject of concerted discussion and analysis, yet the issue has stubbornly resisted resolution. This article suggests that a major reason for this is that the discussion has focused exclusively on the nature and status of the material resources, and that the nature and role of the medical profession have been entirely ignored. Because physicians are gatekeepers to healthcare resources, their role in allocation is central from a process perspective. This article identifies 3 distinct interpretations of the nature of medicine, shows how each mandates a different method of allocation, and argues that unless an appropriate model of medicine is developed that acknowledges the valid points contained in each of the 3 approaches, the allocation problem will remain unsolvable. PMID:17435657

  19. Faces of Marshall: Sam Ortega

    NASA Video Gallery

    Several Marshall employees were interviewed as part of Marshall's 50th Anniversary activities. Engineer Sam Ortega tells his story of how he came to work as an engineer at Marshall and how sewing a...

  20. Sam's progress with learning mathematics.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Lynne

    2007-07-01

    Sam is 18 years old and has Down syndrome. He achieved a grade in the standard assessment of mathematics (GCSE) at 16 years of age. This paper describes the part played in his success in school by the Kumon method of teaching mathematics, identifies the benefits of the small steps and lots of practice built in to the method and illustrates the way Sam applied his Kumon learning in school.

  1. Sperm competition games: the risk model can generate higher sperm allocation to virgin females.

    PubMed

    Ball, M A; Parker, G A

    2007-03-01

    We examine the risk model in sperm competition games for cases where female fertility increases significantly with sperm numbers (sperm limitation). Without sperm competition, sperm allocation increases with sperm limitation. We define 'average risk' as the probability q that females in the population mate twice, and 'perceived risk' as the information males gain about the sperm competition probability with individual females. If males obtain no information from individual females, sperm numbers increase with q unless sperm limitation is high and one of the two competing ejaculates is strongly disfavoured. If males can distinguish between virgin and mated females, greater sperm allocation to virgins is favoured by high sperm limitation, high q, and by the second male's ejaculate being disfavoured. With high sperm limitation, sperm allocation to virgins increases and to mated females decreases with q at high q levels. With perfect information about female mating pattern, sperm allocation (i) to virgins that will mate again exceeds that to mated females and to virgins that will mate only once, (ii) to virgins that mate only once exceeds that for mated females if q is high and there is high second male disadvantage and (iii) to each type of female can decrease with q if sperm limitation is high, although the average allocation increases at least across low q levels. In general, higher sperm allocation to virgins is favoured by: strong disadvantage to the second ejaculate, high sperm limitation, high average risk and increased information (perceived risk). These conditions may apply in a few species, especially spiders.

  2. What Do We Spend Tto Educate a Child? The Student Resource Allocation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruslow, John T.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the features of a new student resource-allocation model that analyzes resources for individual students, groups, or categories of students and allows the integration of cost analysis into school-district and building-level planning and evaluation. States that use of the model will assist school-district administrators in making more…

  3. Testing new approaches to carbonate system simulation at the reef scale: the ReefSam model first results, application to a question in reef morphology and future challenges.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Samuel; Webster, Jody

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulation of the stratigraphy and sedimentology of carbonate systems (carbonate forward stratigraphic modelling - CFSM) provides significant insight into the understanding of both the physical nature of these systems and the processes which control their development. It also provides the opportunity to quantitatively test conceptual models concerning stratigraphy, sedimentology or geomorphology, and allows us to extend our knowledge either spatially (e.g. between bore holes) or temporally (forwards or backwards in time). The later is especially important in determining the likely future development of carbonate systems, particularly regarding the effects of climate change. This application, by its nature, requires successful simulation of carbonate systems on short time scales and at high spatial resolutions. Previous modelling attempts have typically focused on the scales of kilometers and kilo-years or greater (the scale of entire carbonate platforms), rather than at the scale of centuries or decades, and tens to hundreds of meters (the scale of individual reefs). Previous work has identified limitations in common approaches to simulating important reef processes. We present a new CFSM, Reef Sedimentary Accretion Model (ReefSAM), which is designed to test new approaches to simulating reef-scale processes, with the aim of being able to better simulate the past and future development of coral reefs. Four major features have been tested: 1. A simulation of wave based hydrodynamic energy with multiple simultaneous directions and intensities including wave refraction, interaction, and lateral sheltering. 2. Sediment transport simulated as sediment being moved from cell to cell in an iterative fashion until complete deposition. 3. A coral growth model including consideration of local wave energy and composition of the basement substrate (as well as depth). 4. A highly quantitative model testing approach where dozens of output parameters describing the reef

  4. The Health Resources Allocation Model (HRAM) for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Maire, Nicolas; Hegnauer, Michael; Nguyen, Dana; Godelmann, Lucas; Hoffmann, Axel; de Savigny, Don; Tanner, Marcel

    2012-05-01

    The Health Resources Allocation Model (HRAM) is an eLearning tool for health cadres and scientists introducing basic concepts of sub-national, rational district-based health planning and systems thinking under resources constraint. HRAM allows the evaluation of resource allocation strategies in relation to key outcome measures such as coverage, equity of services achieved and number of deaths and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) prevented. In addition, the model takes into account geographical and demographic characteristics and populations' health seeking behaviour. It can be adapted to different socio-ecological and health system settings.

  5. Allocating HIV prevention funds in the United States: recommendations from an optimization model.

    PubMed

    Lasry, Arielle; Sansom, Stephanie L; Hicks, Katherine A; Uzunangelov, Vladislav

    2012-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had an annual budget of approximately $327 million to fund health departments and community-based organizations for core HIV testing and prevention programs domestically between 2001 and 2006. Annual HIV incidence has been relatively stable since the year 2000 and was estimated at 48,600 cases in 2006 and 48,100 in 2009. Using estimates on HIV incidence, prevalence, prevention program costs and benefits, and current spending, we created an HIV resource allocation model that can generate a mathematically optimal allocation of the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention's extramural budget for HIV testing, and counseling and education programs. The model's data inputs and methods were reviewed by subject matter experts internal and external to the CDC via an extensive validation process. The model projects the HIV epidemic for the United States under different allocation strategies under a fixed budget. Our objective is to support national HIV prevention planning efforts and inform the decision-making process for HIV resource allocation. Model results can be summarized into three main recommendations. First, more funds should be allocated to testing and these should further target men who have sex with men and injecting drug users. Second, counseling and education interventions ought to provide a greater focus on HIV positive persons who are aware of their status. And lastly, interventions should target those at high risk for transmitting or acquiring HIV, rather than lower-risk members of the general population. The main conclusions of the HIV resource allocation model have played a role in the introduction of new programs and provide valuable guidance to target resources and improve the impact of HIV prevention efforts in the United States.

  6. Visual Attention Allocation Between Robotic Arm and Environmental Process Control: Validating the STOM Task Switching Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, Christopher; Vieanne, Alex; Clegg, Benjamin; Sebok, Angelia; Janes, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Fifty six participants time shared a spacecraft environmental control system task with a realistic space robotic arm control task in either a manual or highly automated version. The former could suffer minor failures, whose diagnosis and repair were supported by a decision aid. At the end of the experiment this decision aid unexpectedly failed. We measured visual attention allocation and switching between the two tasks, in each of the eight conditions formed by manual-automated arm X expected-unexpected failure X monitoring- failure management. We also used our multi-attribute task switching model, based on task attributes of priority interest, difficulty and salience that were self-rated by participants, to predict allocation. An un-weighted model based on attributes of difficulty, interest and salience accounted for 96 percent of the task allocation variance across the 8 different conditions. Task difficulty served as an attractor, with more difficult tasks increasing the tendency to stay on task.

  7. Ethical models in bioethics: theory and application in organ allocation policies.

    PubMed

    Petrini, C

    2010-12-01

    Policies for allocating organs to people awaiting a transplant constitute a major ethical challenge. First and foremost, they demand balance between the principles of beneficence and justice, but many other ethically relevant principles are also involved: autonomy, responsibility, equity, efficiency, utility, therapeutic outcome, medical urgency, and so forth. Various organ allocation models can be developed based on the hierarchical importance assigned to a given principle over the others, but none of the principles should be completely disregarded. An ethically acceptable organ allocation policy must therefore be in conformity, to a certain extent, with the requirements of all the principles. Many models for organ allocation can be derived. The utilitarian model aims to maximize benefits, which can be of various types on a social or individual level, such as the number of lives saved, prognosis, and so forth. The prioritarian model favours the neediest or those who suffer most. The egalitarian model privileges equity and justice, suggesting that all people should have an equal opportunity (casual allocation) or priority should be given to those who have been waiting longer. The personalist model focuses on each individual patient, attempting to mesh together all the various aspects affecting the person: therapeutic needs (urgency), fairness, clinical outcomes, respect for persons. In the individualistic model the main element is free choice and the system of opting-in is privileged. Contrary to the individualistic model, the communitarian model identities in the community the fundamental elements for the legitimacy of choices: therefore, the system of opting-out is privileged. This article does not aim at suggesting practical solutions. Rather, it furnishes to decision makers an overview on the possible ethical approach to this matter.

  8. Location-allocation models and new solution methodologies in telecommunication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, S.; Ciucur, V.

    2016-08-01

    When designing a telecommunications network topology, three types of interdependent decisions are combined: location, allocation and routing, which are expressed by the following design considerations: how many interconnection devices - consolidation points/concentrators should be used and where should they be located; how to allocate terminal nodes to concentrators; how should the voice, video or data traffic be routed and what transmission links (capacitated or not) should be built into the network. Including these three components of the decision into a single model generates a problem whose complexity makes it difficult to solve. A first method to address the overall problem is the sequential one, whereby the first step deals with the location-allocation problem and based on this solution the subsequent sub-problem (routing the network traffic) shall be solved. The issue of location and allocation in a telecommunications network, called "The capacitated concentrator location- allocation - CCLA problem" is based on one of the general location models on a network in which clients/demand nodes are the terminals and facilities are the concentrators. Like in a location model, each client node has a demand traffic, which must be served, and the facilities can serve these demands within their capacity limit. In this study, the CCLA problem is modeled as a single-source capacitated location-allocation model whose optimization objective is to determine the minimum network cost consisting of fixed costs for establishing the locations of concentrators, costs for operating concentrators and costs for allocating terminals to concentrators. The problem is known as a difficult combinatorial optimization problem for which powerful algorithms are required. Our approach proposes a Fuzzy Genetic Algorithm combined with a local search procedure to calculate the optimal values of the location and allocation variables. To confirm the efficiency of the proposed algorithm with respect

  9. Substation alarm multiplexing system (SAMS)

    SciTech Connect

    ElBadaly, H.; Gaughan, J.; Ward, G.; Amengual, S.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes an on going R&D project to develop, design, install, and assess the field performance of an advanced substation alarm system. SAMS provides a highly fault-tolerant system for the reporting of equipment alarms. SAMS separates and identifies each of the multiple alarm contacts, transmits an alarm condition over existing substation two-wire system, and displays the alarm source, and its associated technical information, on a touch-screen monitor inside the substation control room, and a remote central location and on a hand held terminal which may be carried anywhere within the substation. SAMS is currently installed at the Sherman Creek substation in the Bronx for the purpose of a three month field evaluation.

  10. Nation-Building Modeling and Resource Allocation Via Dynamic Programming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    1 1.2 Research Contribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ...Page 1 Inverse Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2 RAND Study Models...101 17 Run 2 States for Chapter IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 18 Run 2 Controls for

  11. On LAM's and SAM's for Halley's rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, Stanton J.

    1992-01-01

    Non principal axis rotation for comet Halley is inferred from dual periodicities evident in the observations. The modes where the spin axis precesses around the axis of minimum moment of inertia (long axis mode or LAM) and where it precesses around the axis of maximum moment of inertia (short axis mode or SAM) are described from an inertial point of view. The currently favored LAM model for Halley's rotation state satisfies observational and dynamical constraints that apparently no SAM can satisfy. But it cannot reproduce the observed post perihelion brightening through seasonal illumination of localized sources on the nucleus, whereas a SAM can easily produce post or pre perihelion brightening by this mechanism. However, the likelihood of a LAM rotation for elongated nuclei of periodic comets such as Halley together with Halley's extreme post perihelion behavior far from the Sun suggest that Halley's post perihelion brightening may be due to effects other than seasonal illumination of localized sources, and therefore such brightening may not constrain its rotation state.

  12. A Two-Phase Model of Resource Allocation in Visual Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chaoxiong; Hu, Zhonghua; Li, Hong; Ristaniemi, Tapani; Liu, Qiang; Liu, Taosheng

    2017-03-02

    Two broad theories of visual working memory (VWM) storage have emerged from current research, a discrete slot-based theory and a continuous resource theory. However, neither the discrete slot-based theory or continuous resource theory clearly stipulates how the mental commodity for VWM (discrete slot or continuous resource) is allocated. Allocation may be based on the number of items via stimulus-driven factors, or it may be based on task demands via voluntary control. Previous studies have obtained conflicting results regarding the automaticity versus controllability of such allocation. In the current study, we propose a two-phase allocation model, in which the mental commodity could be allocated only by stimulus-driven factors in the early consolidation phase. However, when there is sufficient time to complete the early phase, allocation can enter the late consolidation phase, where it can be flexibly and voluntarily controlled according to task demands. In an orientation recall task, we instructed participants to store either fewer items at high-precision or more items at low-precision. In 3 experiments, we systematically manipulated memory set size and exposure duration. We did not find an effect of task demands when the set size was high and exposure duration was short. However, when we either decreased the set size or increased the exposure duration, we found a trade-off between the number and precision of VWM representations. These results can be explained by a two-phase model, which can also account for previous conflicting findings in the literature. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Principles of proteome allocation are revealed using proteomic data and genome-scale models

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Laurence; Yurkovich, James T.; Lloyd, Colton J.; Ebrahim, Ali; Saunders, Michael A.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2016-01-01

    Integrating omics data to refine or make context-specific models is an active field of constraint-based modeling. Proteomics now cover over 95% of the Escherichia coli proteome by mass. Genome-scale models of Metabolism and macromolecular Expression (ME) compute proteome allocation linked to metabolism and fitness. Using proteomics data, we formulated allocation constraints for key proteome sectors in the ME model. The resulting calibrated model effectively computed the “generalist” (wild-type) E. coli proteome and phenotype across diverse growth environments. Across 15 growth conditions, prediction errors for growth rate and metabolic fluxes were 69% and 14% lower, respectively. The sector-constrained ME model thus represents a generalist ME model reflecting both growth rate maximization and “hedging” against uncertain environments and stresses, as indicated by significant enrichment of these sectors for the general stress response sigma factor σS. Finally, the sector constraints represent a general formalism for integrating omics data from any experimental condition into constraint-based ME models. The constraints can be fine-grained (individual proteins) or coarse-grained (functionally-related protein groups) as demonstrated here. This flexible formalism provides an accessible approach for narrowing the gap between the complexity captured by omics data and governing principles of proteome allocation described by systems-level models. PMID:27857205

  14. Modeling forest C and N allocation responses to free-air CO2 enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luus, Kristina; De Kauwe, Martin; Walker, Anthony; Werner, Christian; Iversen, Colleen; McCarthy, Heather; Medlyn, Belinda; Norby, Richard; Oren, Ram; Zak, Donald; Zaehle, Sönke

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation allocation patterns and soil-vegetation partitioning of C and N are predicted to change in response to rising atmospheric concentrations of CO2. These allocation responses to rising CO2 have been examined at the ecosystem level through through free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments, and their global implications for the timing of progressive N limitation (PNL) and C sequestration have been predicted for ~100 years using a variety of ecosystem models. However, recent FACE model-data syntheses studies [1,2,3] have indicated that ecosystem models do not capture the 5-10 year site-level ecosystem allocation responses to elevated CO2. This may be due in part to the missing representation of the rhizosphere interactions between plants and soil biota in models. Ecosystem allocation of C and N is altered by interactions between soil and vegetation through the priming effect: as plant N availability diminishes, plants respond physiologically by altering their tissue allocation strategies so as to increase rates of root growth and rhizodeposition. In response, either soil organic material begins to accumulate, which hastens the onset of PNL, or soil microbes start to decompose C more rapidly, resulting in increased N availability for plant uptake, which delays PNL. In this study, a straightforward approach for representing rhizosphere interactions in ecosystem models was developed through which C and N allocation to roots and rhizodeposition responds dynamically to elevated CO2 conditions, modifying soil decomposition rates without pre-specification of the direction in which soil C and N accumulation should shift in response to elevated CO2. This approach was implemented in a variety of ecosystem models ranging from stand (G'DAY), to land surface (CLM 4.5, O-CN), to dynamic global vegetation (LPJ-GUESS) models. Comparisons against data from three forest FACE sites (Duke, Oak Ridge & Rhinelander) indicated that representing rhizosphere interactions allowed

  15. Technical documentation and user's guide for City-County Allocation Model (CCAM). Version 1. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.T. Jr.; Scott, M.J.; Hammer, P.

    1986-05-01

    The City-County Allocation Model (CCAM) was developed as part of the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Program. The CCAM model was designed to allocate population changes forecasted by the MASTER model to specific local communities within commuting distance of the MRS facility. The CCAM model was designed to then forecast the potential changes in demand for key community services such as housing, police protection, and utilities for these communities. The CCAM model uses a flexible on-line data base on demand for community services that is based on a combination of local service levels and state and national service standards. The CCAM model can be used to quickly forecast the potential community service consequence of economic development for local communities anywhere in the country. The remainder of this document is organized as follows. The purpose of this manual is to assist the user in understanding and operating the City-County Allocation Model (CCAM). The annual explains the data sources for the model and code modifications as well as the operational procedures.

  16. Market Model for Resource Allocation in Emerging Sensor Networks with Reinforcement Learning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Song, Bin; Zhang, Ying; Du, Xiaojiang; Guizani, Mohsen

    2016-11-29

    Emerging sensor networks (ESNs) are an inevitable trend with the development of the Internet of Things (IoT), and intend to connect almost every intelligent device. Therefore, it is critical to study resource allocation in such an environment, due to the concern of efficiency, especially when resources are limited. By viewing ESNs as multi-agent environments, we model them with an agent-based modelling (ABM) method and deal with resource allocation problems with market models, after describing users' patterns. Reinforcement learning methods are introduced to estimate users' patterns and verify the outcomes in our market models. Experimental results show the efficiency of our methods, which are also capable of guiding topology management.

  17. Market Model for Resource Allocation in Emerging Sensor Networks with Reinforcement Learning

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Song, Bin; Zhang, Ying; Du, Xiaojiang; Guizani, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Emerging sensor networks (ESNs) are an inevitable trend with the development of the Internet of Things (IoT), and intend to connect almost every intelligent device. Therefore, it is critical to study resource allocation in such an environment, due to the concern of efficiency, especially when resources are limited. By viewing ESNs as multi-agent environments, we model them with an agent-based modelling (ABM) method and deal with resource allocation problems with market models, after describing users’ patterns. Reinforcement learning methods are introduced to estimate users’ patterns and verify the outcomes in our market models. Experimental results show the efficiency of our methods, which are also capable of guiding topology management. PMID:27916841

  18. SAM Overview: The Habitability of Mars

    NASA Video Gallery

    Featuring an interview with Paul Mahaffy, SAM's Principal Investigator, this video gives a general overview of SAM's mission aboard the Mars Science Laboratory, otherwise known as the Curiosity rover.

  19. Solution structure of the first Sam domain of Odin and binding studies with the EphA2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Flavia Anna; Marasco, Daniela; Pirone, Luciano; Pedone, Emilia Maria; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Leone, Marilisa

    2012-03-13

    The EphA2 receptor plays key roles in many physiological and pathological events, including cancer. The process of receptor endocytosis and the consequent degradation have attracted attention as possible means of overcoming the negative outcomes of EphA2 in cancer cells and decreasing tumor malignancy. A recent study indicates that Sam (sterile alpha motif) domains of Odin, a member of the ANKS (ankyrin repeat and sterile alpha motif domain-containing) family of proteins, are important for the regulation of EphA2 endocytosis. Odin contains two tandem Sam domains (Odin-Sam1 and -Sam2). Herein, we report on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) solution structure of Odin-Sam1; through a variety of assays (employing NMR, surface plasmon resonance, and isothermal titration calorimetry techniques), we clearly demonstrate that Odin-Sam1 binds to the Sam domain of EphA2 in the low micromolar range. NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments and molecular modeling studies point out that the two Sam domains interact with a head-to-tail topology characteristic of several Sam-Sam complexes. This binding mode is similar to that we have previously proposed for the association between the Sam domains of the lipid phosphatase Ship2 and EphA2. This work further validates structural elements relevant for the heterotypic Sam-Sam interactions of EphA2 and provides novel insights for the design of potential therapeutic compounds that can modulate receptor endocytosis.

  20. Employing resource allocation modeling to inform HIV prevention planning for the state of Iowa.

    PubMed

    Holtgrave, David R; Young, Patricia A; Mayer, Randall R; Maulsby, Cathy; Kim, J Janet

    2013-10-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reallocated their HIV prevention funding to U.S. states, territories, and some cities so as to be more highly correlated with 2008 HIV prevalence. A jurisdiction's HIV prevention funding could drop as low as $750,000 for FY 2016. Iowa was one state that experienced a substantial funding drop, and it chose to undertake a mathematical modeling exercise to inform the following questions: (a) Given current HIV prevention funding for the state, what is the optimal allocation of resources to maximize infections averted? (b) With this "optimal" resource allocation, how many (and what percentage of) HIV infections in the state can be averted? (c) Is the optimal resource allocation sufficient to achieve the National HIV/AIDS Strategy goal of 25% reduction in HIV incidence? and (d) With the "optimal" resource allocation, is the return on the investment such that it might be considered cost-effective? Here, we describe the results of the policy analysis, and the uses of the results.

  1. Resources allocation in healthcare for cancer: a case study using generalised additive mixed models.

    PubMed

    Musio, Monica; Sauleau, Erik A; Augustin, Nicole H

    2012-11-01

    Our aim is to develop a method for helping resources re-allocation in healthcare linked to cancer, in order to replan the allocation of providers. Ageing of the population has a considerable impact on the use of health resources because aged people require more specialised medical care due notably to cancer. We propose a method useful to monitor changes of cancer incidence in space and time taking into account two age categories, according to healthcar general organisation. We use generalised additive mixed models with a Poisson response, according to the methodology presented in Wood, Generalised additive models: an introduction with R. Chapman and Hall/CRC, 2006. Besides one-dimensional smooth functions accounting for non-linear effects of covariates, the space-time interaction can be modelled using scale invariant smoothers. Incidence data collected by a general cancer registry between 1992 and 2007 in a specific area of France is studied. Our best model exhibits a strong increase of the incidence of cancer along time and an obvious spatial pattern for people more than 70 years with a higher incidence in the central band of the region. This is a strong argument for re-allocating resources for old people cancer care in this sub-region.

  2. Simple, efficient allocation of modelling runs on heterogeneous clusters with MPI

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donato, David I.

    2017-01-01

    In scientific modelling and computation, the choice of an appropriate method for allocating tasks for parallel processing depends on the computational setting and on the nature of the computation. The allocation of independent but similar computational tasks, such as modelling runs or Monte Carlo trials, among the nodes of a heterogeneous computational cluster is a special case that has not been specifically evaluated previously. A simulation study shows that a method of on-demand (that is, worker-initiated) pulling from a bag of tasks in this case leads to reliably short makespans for computational jobs despite heterogeneity both within and between cluster nodes. A simple reference implementation in the C programming language with the Message Passing Interface (MPI) is provided.

  3. Integrated optimal allocation model for complex adaptive system of water resources management (II): Case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanlai; Guo, Shenglian; Xu, Chong-Yu; Liu, Dedi; Chen, Lu; Wang, Dong

    2015-12-01

    Climate change, rapid economic development and increase of the human population are considered as the major triggers of increasing challenges for water resources management. This proposed integrated optimal allocation model (IOAM) for complex adaptive system of water resources management is applied in Dongjiang River basin located in the Guangdong Province of China. The IOAM is calibrated and validated under baseline period 2010 year and future period 2011-2030 year, respectively. The simulation results indicate that the proposed model can make a trade-off between demand and supply for sustainable development of society, economy, ecology and environment and achieve adaptive management of water resources allocation. The optimal scheme derived by multi-objective evaluation is recommended for decision-makers in order to maximize the comprehensive benefits of water resources management.

  4. A model for dynamic allocation of human attention among multiple tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, T. B.; Tulga, M. K.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of multi-task attention allocation with special reference to aircraft piloting is discussed with the experimental paradigm used to characterize this situation and the experimental results obtained in the first phase of the research. A qualitative description of an approach to mathematical modeling, and some results obtained with it are also presented to indicate what aspects of the model are most promising. Two appendices are given which (1) discuss the model in relation to graph theory and optimization and (2) specify the optimization algorithm of the model.

  5. PID feedback controller used as a tactical asset allocation technique: The G.A.M. model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfi, G.; Sabatini, A.; Rossolini, M.

    2007-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to illustrate a tactical asset allocation technique utilizing the PID controller. The proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is widely applied in most industrial processes; it has been successfully used for over 50 years and it is used by more than 95% of the plants processes. It is a robust and easily understood algorithm that can provide excellent control performance in spite of the diverse dynamic characteristics of the process plant. In finance, the process plant, controlled by the PID controller, can be represented by financial market assets forming a portfolio. More specifically, in the present work, the plant is represented by a risk-adjusted return variable. Money and portfolio managers’ main target is to achieve a relevant risk-adjusted return in their managing activities. In literature and in the financial industry business, numerous kinds of return/risk ratios are commonly studied and used. The aim of this work is to perform a tactical asset allocation technique consisting in the optimization of risk adjusted return by means of asset allocation methodologies based on the PID model-free feedback control modeling procedure. The process plant does not need to be mathematically modeled: the PID control action lies in altering the portfolio asset weights, according to the PID algorithm and its parameters, Ziegler-and-Nichols-tuned, in order to approach the desired portfolio risk-adjusted return efficiently.

  6. Game Theoretic Modeling of Water Resources Allocation Under Hydro-Climatic Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C.; Lall, U.; Siegfried, T.

    2005-12-01

    Typical hydrologic and economic modeling approaches rely on assumptions of climate stationarity and economic conditions of ideal markets and rational decision-makers. In this study, we incorporate hydroclimatic variability with a game theoretic approach to simulate and evaluate common water allocation paradigms. Game Theory may be particularly appropriate for modeling water allocation decisions. First, a game theoretic approach allows economic analysis in situations where price theory doesn't apply, which is typically the case in water resources where markets are thin, players are few, and rules of exchange are highly constrained by legal or cultural traditions. Previous studies confirm that game theory is applicable to water resources decision problems, yet applications and modeling based on these principles is only rarely observed in the literature. Second, there are numerous existing theoretical and empirical studies of specific games and human behavior that may be applied in the development of predictive water allocation models. With this framework, one can evaluate alternative orderings and rules regarding the fraction of available water that one is allowed to appropriate. Specific attributes of the players involved in water resources management complicate the determination of solutions to game theory models. While an analytical approach will be useful for providing general insights, the variety of preference structures of individual players in a realistic water scenario will likely require a simulation approach. We propose a simulation approach incorporating the rationality, self-interest and equilibrium concepts of game theory with an agent-based modeling framework that allows the distinct properties of each player to be expressed and allows the performance of the system to manifest the integrative effect of these factors. Underlying this framework, we apply a realistic representation of spatio-temporal hydrologic variability and incorporate the impact of

  7. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on MIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskowitz, Milton E.; Hrovat, Kenneth; Finkelstein, Robert; Reckart, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    During NASA Increment 3 (September 1996 to January 1997), about 5 gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station, Mir. The data were recorded on 11 optical disks and were returned to Earth on STS-81. During this time, SAMS data were collected in the Priroda module to support the following experiments: the Mir Structural Dynamics Experiment (MiSDE) and Binary Colloidal Alloy Tests (BCAT). This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity environment to which these experiments were exposed. Also documented are mission events of interest such as the docked phase of STS-81 operations, a Progress engine burn, attitude control thruster operation, and crew exercise. Also included are a description of the Mir module orientations, and the panel notations within the modules. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. Variations in the acceleration environment caused by unique activities such as crew exercise and life-support fans are presented. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous mission summary reports published by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) group.

  8. Improving representation of nitrogen uptake, allocation, and carbon assimilation in the Community Land Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghimire, B.; Riley, W. J.; Koven, C.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen is the most important nutrient limiting plant carbon assimilation and growth, and is required for production of photosynthetic enzymes, growth and maintenance respiration, and maintaining cell structure. The forecasted rise in plant available nitrogen through atmospheric nitrogen deposition and the release of locked soil nitrogen by permafrost thaw in high latitude ecosystems is likely to result in an increase in plant productivity. However a mechanistic representation of plant nitrogen dynamics is lacking in earth system models. Most earth system models ignore the dynamic nature of plant nutrient uptake and allocation, and further lack tight coupling of below- and above-ground processes. In these models, the increase in nitrogen uptake does not translate to a corresponding increase in photosynthesis parameters, such as maximum Rubisco capacity and electron transfer rate. We present an improved modeling framework implemented in the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) for dynamic plant nutrient uptake, and allocation to different plant parts, including leaf enzymes. This modeling framework relies on imposing a more realistic flexible carbon to nitrogen stoichiometric ratio for different plant parts. The model mechanistically responds to plant nitrogen uptake and leaf allocation though changes in photosynthesis parameters. We produce global simulations, and examine the impacts of the improved nitrogen cycling. The improved model is evaluated against multiple observations including TRY database of global plant traits, nitrogen fertilization observations and 15N tracer studies. Global simulations with this new version of CLM4.5 showed better agreement with the observations than the default CLM4.5-CN model, and captured the underlying mechanisms associated with plant nitrogen cycle.

  9. The p53 status can influence the role of Sam68 in tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Naomi; Ngo, Chau Tuan-Anh; Aleynikova, Olga; Beauchemin, Nicole; Richard, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The expression and activities of RNA binding proteins are frequently dysregulated in human cancer. Their roles, however, appears to be complex, with reports indicating both pro-tumorigenic and tumor suppressive functions. Here we show, using two classical mouse cancer models, that the role of KH-type RNA binding protein, Sam68, in tumor development can be influenced by the status of the p53 tumor suppressor. We demonstrate that in mice expressing wild type p53, Sam68-deficiency resulted in a higher incidence and malignancy of carcinogen-induced tumors, suggesting a tumor suppressive role for Sam68. In marked contrast, Sam68-haploinsufficiency significantly delayed the onset of tumors in mice lacking p53 and prolonged their survival, indicating that Sam68 accelerates the development of p53-deficient tumors. These findings provide considerable insight into a previously unknown relationship between Sam68 and the p53 tumor suppressor in tumorigenesis. PMID:27690217

  10. Basin Economic Allocation Model (BEAM): An economic model of water use developed for the Aral Sea Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegels, Niels; Kromann, Mikkel; Karup Pedersen, Jesper; Lindgaard-Jørgensen, Palle; Sokolov, Vadim; Sorokin, Anatoly

    2013-04-01

    The water resources of the Aral Sea basin are under increasing pressure, particularly from the conflict over whether hydropower or irrigation water use should take priority. The purpose of the BEAM model is to explore the impact of changes to water allocation and investments in water management infrastructure on the overall welfare of the Aral Sea basin. The BEAM model estimates welfare changes associated with changes to how water is allocated between the five countries in the basin (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan; water use in Afghanistan is assumed to be fixed). Water is allocated according to economic optimization criteria; in other words, the BEAM model allocates water across time and space so that the economic welfare associated with water use is maximized. The model is programmed in GAMS. The model addresses the Aral Sea Basin as a whole - that is, the rivers Syr Darya, Amu Darya, Kashkadarya, and Zarafshan, as well as the Aral Sea. The model representation includes water resources, including 14 river sections, 6 terminal lakes, 28 reservoirs and 19 catchment runoff nodes, as well as land resources (i.e., irrigated croplands). The model covers 5 sectors: agriculture (crops: wheat, cotton, alfalfa, rice, fruit, vegetables and others), hydropower, nature, households and industry. The focus of the model is on welfare impacts associated with changes to water use in the agriculture and hydropower sectors. The model aims at addressing the following issues of relevance for economic management of water resources: • Physical efficiency (estimating how investments in irrigation efficiency affect economic welfare). • Economic efficiency (estimating how changes in how water is allocated affect welfare). • Equity (who will gain from changes in allocation of water from one sector to another and who will lose?). Stakeholders in the region have been involved in the development of the model, and about 10 national experts, including

  11. Modeling the spread of bed bug infestation and optimal resource allocation for disinfestation.

    PubMed

    Gharouni, Ali; Wang, Lin

    2016-10-01

    A patch-structured multigroup-like $SIS$ epidemiological model is proposed to study the spread of the common bed bug infestation. It is shown that the model exhibits global threshold dynamics with the basic reproduction number as the threshold parameter. Costs associated with the disinfestation process are incorporated into setting up the optimization problems. Procedures are proposed and simulated for finding optimal resource allocation strategies to achieve the infestation free state. Our analysis and simulations provide useful insights on how to efficiently distribute the available exterminators among the infested patches for optimal disinfestation management.

  12. Sam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James C.

    1988-01-01

    A father writes about his six-year-old son born with hydrocephalus. He describes such day-to-day experiences as going to a baseball game and the grocery store, reactions of friends and strangers to his son's social interactions, and a special day at preschool. The boy's medical treatment, including surgeries, are also described. (VW)

  13. Allocation of resources for ambulatory care -a staffing model for outpatient clinics.

    PubMed Central

    Mansdorf, B D

    1975-01-01

    The enormous commitment of resources to ambulatory health care services requires that flexible and easily implementable management techniques be developed to improve the allocation of health manpower and funds. This article develops a feasible model for staffing outpatient clinics and thereby potentially provides an important analytical tool for allocating and monitoring the utilization of the most critical and expensive of ambulatory care resources-professional and nonprofessional clinic personnel. The model is simplistic, extremely flexible, and can be applied to many modes of delivering ambulatory care-from HMOs to traditional hospital outpatient clinics. To employ the model, certain decision variables must be specified so that the model can produce a least-cost staffing configuration to meet the demand for service in accordance with the desired mode and intensity of care. The key decision varables that require input from administrators and medical personnel include standards for physician-patient contact time, a desired ratio of staff time actually spent treating patients to total paid staff time, and the desired mix of various staff categories to achieve program objectives. Specific benefits of using the model include determining staffing for new, expanded, or existing outpatient clinics, determining budget requirements for such staffing needs, and providing quantitative productivity and utilization objectives and measurements. PMID:809787

  14. Primary health-care network monitoring: a hierarchical resource allocation modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Pur, Aleksander; Bohanec, Marko; Lavrac, Nada; Cestnik, Bojan

    2010-01-01

    Management of a primary health-care network (PHCN) is a difficult task in every country. A suitable monitoring system can provide useful information for PHCN management, especially given a large quantity of health-care data that is produced daily in the network. This paper proposes a methodology for structured development of monitoring systems and a PHCN resource allocation monitoring model based on this methodology. The purpose of the monitoring model is to improve the allocation of health-care resources. The proposed methodology is based on modules that are organized into a hierarchy, where each module monitors a particular aspect of the system. This methodology was used to design a PHCN monitoring model for Slovenia. Specific aspects of the Slovenian PHCN were taken into account such as varying needs of patients from different municipalities, existence of small municipalities having less than 1000 residents, the fact that many patients visit physicians in other municipalities, and that physicians may work at more than one location or organization. The main modules in the model are focused on the overall assessment of the PHCN, monitoring of patients visits to health-care providers (HCPs), physical accessibility of health services, segment of patients in municipalities who have not selected a personal physician, assessment of the availability of HCPs for patients, physicians working on more than one location, and available human resources in the PHCN. Most of the model's components are general and can be adapted for other national health-care systems.

  15. Sam37 is crucial for formation of the mitochondrial TOM–SAM supercomplex, thereby promoting β-barrel biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Ellenrieder, Lars; Qiu, Jian; Bohnert, Maria; Zufall, Nicole; van der Laan, Martin; Becker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Biogenesis of mitochondrial β-barrel proteins requires two preprotein translocases, the general translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). TOM and SAM form a supercomplex that promotes transfer of β-barrel precursors. The SAM core complex contains the channel protein Sam50, which cooperates with Sam35 in precursor recognition, and the peripheral membrane protein Sam37. The molecular function of Sam37 has been unknown. We report that Sam37 is crucial for formation of the TOM–SAM supercomplex. Sam37 interacts with the receptor domain of Tom22 on the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial outer membrane and links TOM and SAM complexes. Sam37 thus promotes efficient transfer of β-barrel precursors to the SAM complex. We conclude that Sam37 functions as a coupling factor of the translocase supercomplex of the mitochondrial outer membrane. PMID:26416958

  16. Deriving effective vaccine allocation strategies for pandemic influenza: Comparison of an agent-based simulation and a compartmental model

    PubMed Central

    Dalgıç, Özden O.; Özaltın, Osman Y.; Ciccotelli, William A.; Erenay, Fatih S.

    2017-01-01

    Individuals are prioritized based on their risk profiles when allocating limited vaccine stocks during an influenza pandemic. Computationally expensive but realistic agent-based simulations and fast but stylized compartmental models are typically used to derive effective vaccine allocation strategies. A detailed comparison of these two approaches, however, is often omitted. We derive age-specific vaccine allocation strategies to mitigate a pandemic influenza outbreak in Seattle by applying derivative-free optimization to an agent-based simulation and also to a compartmental model. We compare the strategies derived by these two approaches under various infection aggressiveness and vaccine coverage scenarios. We observe that both approaches primarily vaccinate school children, however they may allocate the remaining vaccines in different ways. The vaccine allocation strategies derived by using the agent-based simulation are associated with up to 70% decrease in total cost and 34% reduction in the number of infections compared to the strategies derived by using the compartmental model. Nevertheless, the latter approach may still be competitive for very low and/or very high infection aggressiveness. Our results provide insights about potential differences between the vaccine allocation strategies derived by using agent-based simulations and those derived by using compartmental models. PMID:28222123

  17. Efficient bit allocation using new intra and inter-frame modeling for H.264/AVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrarti, Miryem; Saadane, Abdelhakim; Larabi, Mohamed-Chaker; Tamtaoui, Ahmed; Aboutajdine, Driss

    2012-01-01

    Rate control is a critical issue in H.264/AVC video coding standard because it suffers from some shortcomings that make the bit allocation process not optimal. This leads to a video quality that may vary significantly from frame to frame. Our aim is to enhance the rate control efficiency in H.264/AVC baseline profile by handling two of its defects: the initial quantization parameter (QP) estimation for Intra-Frames (I-Frames) and the target number of bits determination for Inter-Frames (P-Frames) encoding. First, we propose a Rate-Quantization (R-Q) model for the I-Frame constructed empirically after extensive experiments. The optimal initial QP calculation is based on both target bit-rate and I-Frame complexity. The I-Frame target bit-rate is derived from the global target bit-rate by using a new non-linear model. Secondly, we propose an enhancement of the bit allocation process by exploiting frame complexity measures. The target number of bits determination for P-Frames is adjusted by combining two temporal measures: the first is a motion ratio based on actual bits used to encode previous frames; the second measure exploits the difference between two consecutive frames and the histogram of this difference. The simulation results, carried out using the JM15.0 reference software and the JVT-O016 rate control algorithm, show that the right choice of initial QP for I-Frame and first P-Frame allows improvement of both the bit-rate and peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR). Finally, the Inter-Frame bit allocation process further improves the bit-rates while keeping the same PSNR improvement (up to +1.33 dB/+2 dB for QCIF/CIF resolutions). Moreover, this process reduces the buffer level variation leading to a more consistent quality of reconstructed videos.

  18. Variability in Parameter Estimates and Model Fit across Repeated Allocations of Items to Parcels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterba, Sonya K.; MacCallum, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Different random or purposive allocations of items to parcels within a single sample are thought not to alter structural parameter estimates as long as items are unidimensional and congeneric. If, additionally, numbers of items per parcel and parcels per factor are held fixed across allocations, different allocations of items to parcels within a…

  19. A New Model for Equitable and Efficient Resource Allocation to Schools: The Israeli Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BenDavid-Hadar, Iris; Ziderman, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    This paper sets out a new budget allocation formula for schools, designed to achieve a more equitable distribution of educational achievement. In addition to needs-based elements, the suggested composite allocation formula includes an improvement component, whereby schools receive budgetary allocations based on a new incentive measure developed in…

  20. Spatial evaluation of crop maps by the spatial production allocation model in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jieyang; Li, Zhengguo; Yang, Peng; Yu, Qiangyi; Zhang, Li; Wu, Wenbin; Tang, Pengqin; Liu, Zhenhuan; You, Liangzhi

    2014-01-01

    The spatial production allocation model (SPAM) is one of the broadest spatial models of crop distribution and applies a cross-entropy method to downscale the global area and yield for multiple crops in the years 2000 and 2005 with a resolution of 5 arc min. To evaluate the allocation accuracy of SPAM for three staple crops (rice, wheat, and maize) in China, we compared these crop maps with remote-sensed cropland data derived from national land cover datasets. This comparison was conducted using a scheme that accounts for spatial differences at the pixel level. Overall, the map of maize has the highest area accuracy, with 64% reasonable pixels (covering 96% of the total maize area); these values were 57% (90% coverage) and 44% (81% coverage) for the wheat and rice maps, respectively. On the provincial scale, the area accuracies of crop maps in the top 10 provinces are better than those of the other provinces. Furthermore, the crop area consistency in rain-fed cropland is better than that in irrigated cropland. These evaluations provide decision makers with information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of SPAM products. This study also recommends priorities for further work to improve the reliability, utility, and periodic repeatability of crop distribution products.

  1. SAM 2 balloon test (stratospheric aerosol measurement)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, T. J.

    1976-01-01

    As a parallel effort to the LACATE balloon experiment a small optical system was constructed to enable a balloon test of a diode filter system similar to the type planned for the Nimbus-G SAM II experiment. The system was called the SAM II Balloon Test. Results of the balloon flight are summarized.

  2. Perceptions and Attitudes of Health Professionals in Kenya on National Health Care Resource Allocation Mechanisms: A Structural Equation Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Owili, Patrick Opiyo; Hsu, Yi-Hsin Elsa; Chern, Jin-Yuan; Chiu, Chiung-Hsuan Megan; Wang, Bill; Huang, Kuo-Cherh; Muga, Miriam Adoyo

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care resource allocation is key towards attaining equity in the health system. However, health professionals’ perceived impact and attitude towards health care resource allocation in Sub-Saharan Africa is unknown; furthermore, they occupy a position which makes them notice the impact of different policies in their health system. This study explored perceptions and attitudes of health professionals in Kenya on health care resource allocation mechanism. Method We conducted a survey of a representative sample of 341 health professionals in Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital from February to April 2012, consisting of over 3000 employees. We assessed health professionals’ perceived impact and attitudes on health care resource allocation mechanism in Kenya. We used structural equation modeling and applied a Confirmatory Factor Analysis using Robust Maximum Likelihood estimation procedure to test the hypothesized model. Results We found that the allocation mechanism was negatively associated with their perceived positive impact (-1.04, p < .001), health professionals’ satisfaction (-0.24, p < .01), and professionals’ attitudes (-1.55, p < .001) while it was positively associated with perceived negative impact (1.14, p < .001). Perceived positive impact of the allocation mechanism was negatively associated with their overall satisfaction (-0.08) and attitude (-0.98) at p < .001, respectively. Furthermore, overall satisfaction was negatively associated with attitude (-1.10, p <.001). On the other hand, perceived negative impact of the allocation was positively associated with overall satisfaction (0.29, p <.001) but was not associated with attitude. Conclusion The result suggests that health care resource allocation mechanism has a negative effect towards perceptions, attitudes and overall satisfaction of health professionals who are at the frontline in health care. These findings can serve as a crucial reference for policymakers as the Kenyan

  3. Concurrent airline fleet allocation and aircraft design with profit modeling for multiple airlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraju, Parithi

    A "System of Systems" (SoS) approach is particularly beneficial in analyzing complex large scale systems comprised of numerous independent systems -- each capable of independent operations in their own right -- that when brought in conjunction offer capabilities and performance beyond the constituents of the individual systems. The variable resource allocation problem is a type of SoS problem, which includes the allocation of "yet-to-be-designed" systems in addition to existing resources and systems. The methodology presented here expands upon earlier work that demonstrated a decomposition approach that sought to simultaneously design a new aircraft and allocate this new aircraft along with existing aircraft in an effort to meet passenger demand at minimum fleet level operating cost for a single airline. The result of this describes important characteristics of the new aircraft. The ticket price model developed and implemented here enables analysis of the system using profit maximization studies instead of cost minimization. A multiobjective problem formulation has been implemented to determine characteristics of a new aircraft that maximizes the profit of multiple airlines to recognize the fact that aircraft manufacturers sell their aircraft to multiple customers and seldom design aircraft customized to a single airline's operations. The route network characteristics of two simple airlines serve as the example problem for the initial studies. The resulting problem formulation is a mixed-integer nonlinear programming problem, which is typically difficult to solve. A sequential decomposition strategy is applied as a solution methodology by segregating the allocation (integer programming) and aircraft design (non-linear programming) subspaces. After solving a simple problem considering two airlines, the decomposition approach is then applied to two larger airline route networks representing actual airline operations in the year 2005. The decomposition strategy serves

  4. SAM-2 ground-truth plan: Correlative measurements for the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement-2 (SAM 2) sensor on the Nimbus G satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Pepin, T. J.; Chu, W. P.; Swissler, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The SAM-2 will fly aboard the Nimbus-G satellite for launch in the fall of 1978 and measure stratospheric vertical profiles of aerosol extinction in high latitude bands. The plan gives details of the location and times for the simultaneous satellite/correlative measurements for the nominal launch time, the rationale and choice of the correlative sensors, their characteristics and expected accuracies, and the conversion of their data to extinction profiles. The SAM-2 expected instrument performance and data inversion results are presented. Various atmospheric models representative of polar stratospheric aerosols are used in the SAM-2 and correlative sensor analyses.

  5. Resource Allocation Modelling in Vocational Rehabilitation: A Prototype Developed with the Michigan and Rhode Island VR Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leff, H. Stephen; Turner, Ralph R.

    This report focuses on the use of linear programming models to address the issues of how vocational rehabilitation (VR) resources should be allocated in order to maximize program efficiency within given resource constraints. A general introduction to linear programming models is first presented that describes the major types of models available,…

  6. School-Site Cost Allocations: Testing a Micro-Financial Model in 23 Districts in Ten States. 2nd Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Bruce S.; And Others

    Findings of a study that developed and applied a microfinancial model to track financial resources through the school systems are presented in this paper. The School Site Allocations Model (SSAM) shifts the current finance structure to the schools. First, the model was designed and tested in 30 school districts across the United States. Next, data…

  7. Statistical mechanics of competitive resource allocation using agent-based models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, Anirban; Challet, Damien; Chatterjee, Arnab; Marsili, Matteo; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2015-01-01

    Demand outstrips available resources in most situations, which gives rise to competition, interaction and learning. In this article, we review a broad spectrum of multi-agent models of competition (El Farol Bar problem, Minority Game, Kolkata Paise Restaurant problem, Stable marriage problem, Parking space problem and others) and the methods used to understand them analytically. We emphasize the power of concepts and tools from statistical mechanics to understand and explain fully collective phenomena such as phase transitions and long memory, and the mapping between agent heterogeneity and physical disorder. As these methods can be applied to any large-scale model of competitive resource allocation made up of heterogeneous adaptive agent with non-linear interaction, they provide a prospective unifying paradigm for many scientific disciplines.

  8. Context dependence of maternal effects: testing assumptions of optimal egg size, differential, and sex allocation models.

    PubMed

    Krist, Miloš; Munclinger, Pavel

    2015-10-01

    If offspring develop in adverse conditions, the maternal component of their phenotypic variation might increase due to the stronger dependence of offspring traits on parental investment. This should result in increased parental investment to individual offspring, as assumed by the model of optimal egg size. The opposite pattern, i.e., stronger dependence of offspring fitness on parental investment and consequently larger parental investment under good conditions is assumed by both the theory of differential allocation if attractive males provide material benefits, and reproductive compensation if they invest less into paternal care. Another influential idea is the Trivers-Willard model, which assumes sex-specific dependence of offspring fitness on parental investment. Here we tested these ideas by examining the effects of egg size on offspring fitness across many postnatal contexts in the Collared Flycatcher Ficedula albicollis. We employed a cross-fostering design that generated variation in egg size within nests and used brood means of fledgling mass as a functional measure of the quality of rearing conditions. Effects of egg size on three offspring traits, including lifetime reproductive success of recruits, were more pronounced in low-quality broods. These results support the assumption of the model of optimal egg size. Based on female preference for males providing material benefits, this pattern could support differential allocation, if attractive males invest less in paternal care, or reproductive compensation, if they invest more. By comparison, we did not find any evidence for sex specificity of fitness returns that might explain sex monomorphism of egg size in this species. The challenge for future studies will be the integration of components of parental investment and offspring fitness into their global measures and testing how the former affects the latter across gradients of postnatal conditions.

  9. A multi-objective optimization model with conditional value-at-risk constraints for water allocation equality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhineng; Wei, Changting; Yao, Liming; Li, Ling; Li, Chaozhi

    2016-11-01

    Water scarcity is a global problem which causes economic and political conflicts as well as degradation of ecosystems. Moreover, the uncertainty caused by extreme weather increases the risk of economic inefficiency, an essential consideration for water users. In this study, a multi-objective model involving water allocation equality and economic efficiency risk control is developed to help water managers mitigate these problems. Gini coefficient is introduced to optimize water allocation equality in water use sectors (agricultural, domestic, and industrial sectors), and CVaR is integrated into the model constraints to control the economic efficiency loss risk corresponding to variations in water availability. The case study demonstrates the practicability and rationality of the developed model, allowing the river basin authority to determine water allocation strategies for a single river basin.

  10. A self-organizing model for task allocation via frequent task quitting and random walks in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brian R

    2009-10-01

    Social insect colonies are able to quickly redistribute their thousands of workers between tasks that vary strongly in space and time. How individuals collectively track spatial variability is particularly puzzling because bees have access only to local information. This work presents and tests a model showing how honeybees solve their fundamental within-nest spatial task-allocation problem. The algorithm, which is self-organizing and derived from empirical studies, couples two processes with opposing effects. Frequent task quitting, followed by patrols, during which bees are insensitive to task stimuli, serves to randomize individual location throughout the nest without reference to variation in task demand, while a foraging-for-work-like mechanism provides the opposing force of localizing individuals to areas of high task demand. This simple model is shown to generate sophisticated patterns of task allocation. It allocates bees to tasks in proportion to their demand, independent of their spatial distribution in the nest, and also reallocates labor in response to temporal changes in task demand. Finally, the model shows that task-allocation patterns at the colony level do not reflect colonies allocating particular individuals to tasks. In contrast, they reflect a dynamic equilibrium of workers switching between tasks and locations in the nest.

  11. Belowground carbon allocation patterns in a dry Mediterranean ecosystem: a comparison of two models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María, Almagro; Jorge, López; Carolina, Boix-Fayos; Juan, Albadalejo; María, Martínez-Mena

    2010-05-01

    Total belowground C allocation (TBCA) represents a large fraction of gross primary production; it can exceed aboveground net primary production, and provides the primary source of detrital C to mineral soil. Here, we measure soil respiration, water erosion, litterfall and estimated annual changes in C stored in mineral soil, litter and roots, in three representative land uses in a Mediterranean ecosystem (late-successional forest, abandoned agricultural field, rain-fed olive grove), and use two C balance approaches (steady-state and non-steady-state) to estimate TBCA. Both TBCA approaches are compared to assess how different C fluxes (outputs and inputs) affect our estimates of TBCA within each land use. In addition, annual net ecosystem productivity is determined and C allocation patterns are examined for each land use. We hypothesized that changes in C stored in mineral soil, litter and roots will be minor compared to soil respiration, but will still have a significant effect on the estimates of TBCA. Annual net ecosystem productivity was 648, 541 and 324 g C m-2 yr-1 for forest, abandoned field and olive grove, respectively. Across land uses, more than 60 % of the C was allocated belowground. Soil respiration (FS) was the largest component in the TBCA approaches across all land uses. Annual C losses through water erosion were negligible compared to FS (less than 1%) and had little effect on the estimates of TBCA. Annual changes in C stored in the soil, litter layer and roots were low compared to FS (16, 24 and 10 % for forest, abandoned field and olive grove, respectively), but had a significant effect on the estimates of TBCA. In our sites, an assumption that ?[CS + CR + CL]/?t= 0 will give biased estimates of TBCA, particularly in the abandoned agricultural field, where soil C storage may be increasing more rapidly. Therefore, the steady-state model is unsuited to these Mediterranean ecosystems and the full model is recommended. The results from this study

  12. Does Distraction Reduce the Alcohol-Aggression Relation? A Cognitive and Behavioral Test of the Attention-Allocation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Kathryn E.; Parrott, Dominic J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study provided the first direct test of the cognitive underpinnings of the attention-allocation model and attempted to replicate and extend past behavioral findings for this model as an explanation for alcohol-related aggression. Method: A diverse community sample (55% African American) of men (N = 159) between 21 and 35 years of…

  13. Sam68 marks the transcriptionally active stages of spermatogenesis and modulates alternative splicing in male germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Paronetto, Maria Paola; Messina, Valeria; Barchi, Marco; Geremia, Raffaele; Richard, Stéphane; Sette, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Sam68 plays an essential role in mouse spermatogenesis and male fertility. Herein, we report an interaction between Sam68 and the phosphorylated forms of the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) in meiotic spermatocytes. RNase treatment decreased but did not abolish the interaction, consistently with in vitro binding of RNAPII to the Sam68 carboxyl-terminal region. Sam68 retention in the spermatocyte nucleus was dependent on the integrity of cellular RNAs, suggesting that the protein is recruited to transcriptionally active chromatin. Mouse knockout models characterized by stage-specific arrest of spermatogenesis and staining with the phosphorylated form of RNAPII documented that Sam68 expression is confined to the transcriptionally active stages of spermatogenesis. Furthermore, Sam68 associates with splicing regulators in germ cells and we report that alternative splicing of Sgce exon 8 is regulated in a Sam68-dependent manner during spermatogenesis. RNA and chromatin crosslink immunoprecipitation experiments showed that Sam68 binds in vivo to sequences surrounding the intron 7/exon 8 boundary, thereby affecting the recruitment of the phosphorylated RNAPII and of the general splicing factor U2AF65. These results suggest that Sam68 regulates alternative splicing at transcriptionally active sites in differentiating germ cells and provide new insights into the regulation of Sam68 expression during spermatogenesis. PMID:21355037

  14. Optimizing Real-Time Vaccine Allocation in a Stochastic SIR Model

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Chantal; Carlson, Jean M.

    2016-01-01

    Real-time vaccination following an outbreak can effectively mitigate the damage caused by an infectious disease. However, in many cases, available resources are insufficient to vaccinate the entire at-risk population, logistics result in delayed vaccine deployment, and the interaction between members of different cities facilitates a wide spatial spread of infection. Limited vaccine, time delays, and interaction (or coupling) of cities lead to tradeoffs that impact the overall magnitude of the epidemic. These tradeoffs mandate investigation of optimal strategies that minimize the severity of the epidemic by prioritizing allocation of vaccine to specific subpopulations. We use an SIR model to describe the disease dynamics of an epidemic which breaks out in one city and spreads to another. We solve a master equation to determine the resulting probability distribution of the final epidemic size. We then identify tradeoffs between vaccine, time delay, and coupling, and we determine the optimal vaccination protocols resulting from these tradeoffs. PMID:27043931

  15. Water allocation for agriculture in southwestern Iran using a programming model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Abdoulkarim; Shahsavari, Zahra

    2015-09-01

    Water pricing can play a major role in improving water allocation, encouraging users to conserve scarce water resources, and promoting improvements in productivity. In this study, the economic values of water in farms under Dorodzan Dam in southwestern Iran were calculated using linear programming models. The method was applied to three samples of farms that drew irrigation water from a canal, a well, and both a well and a canal. The results of this study revealed that the shadow prices of water in farms varied based on the water sources and time of year. Additionally, the estimated price for water is obviously higher than the price that farmers currently pay for water in the study area. Due to the different economic values of water calculated for different months, it is recommended that the price of irrigation water be adjusted accordingly during various seasons in a fashion similar to that of electrical energy.

  16. Competitive allocation of resources on a network: an agent-based model of air companies competing for the best routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurtner, Gérald; Valori, Luca; Lillo, Fabrizio

    2015-05-01

    We present a stylized model of the allocation of resources on a network. By considering as a concrete example the network of sectors of the airspace, where each node is a sector characterized by a maximal number of simultaneously present aircraft, we consider the problem of air companies competing for the allocation of the airspace. Each company is characterized by a cost function, weighting differently punctuality and length of the flight. We consider the model in the presence of pure and mixed populations of types of airline companies and we study how the equilibria depends on the characteristics of the network.

  17. Patterning NHS-terminated SAMs on germanium.

    PubMed

    Morris, Carleen J; Shestopalov, Alexander A; Gold, Brian H; Clark, Robert L; Toone, Eric J

    2011-05-17

    Here we report a simple, robust approach to patterning functional SAMs on germanium. The protocol relies on catalytic soft-lithographic pattern transfer from an elastomeric stamp bearing pendant immobilized sulfonic acid moieties to an NHS-functionalized bilayer molecular system comprising a primary ordered alkyl monolayer and a reactive ester secondary overlayer. The catalytic polyurethane-acrylate stamp was used to form micrometer-scale features of chemically distinct SAMs on germanium. The methodology represents the first example of patterned SAMs on germanium, a semiconductor material.

  18. Location-allocation and accessibility models for improving the spatial planning of public health services.

    PubMed

    Polo, Gina; Acosta, C Mera; Ferreira, Fernando; Dias, Ricardo Augusto

    2015-01-01

    This study integrated accessibility and location-allocation models in geographic information systems as a proposed strategy to improve the spatial planning of public health services. To estimate the spatial accessibility, we modified the two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) model with a different impedance function, a Gaussian weight for competition among service sites, a friction coefficient, distances along a street network based on the Dijkstra's algorithm and by performing a vectorial analysis. To check the accuracy of the strategy, we used the data from the public sterilization program for the dogs and cats of Bogot´a, Colombia. Since the proposed strategy is independent of the service, it could also be applied to any other public intervention when the capacity of the service is known. The results of the accessibility model were consistent with the sterilization program data, revealing that the western, central and northern zones are the most isolated areas under the sterilization program. Spatial accessibility improvement was sought by relocating the sterilization sites using the maximum coverage with finite demand and the p-median models. The relocation proposed by the maximum coverage model more effectively maximized the spatial accessibility to the sterilization service given the non-uniform distribution of the populations of dogs and cats throughout the city. The implementation of the proposed strategy would provide direct benefits by improving the effectiveness of different public health interventions and the use of financial and human resources.

  19. Simulation of tree-ring widths with a model for primary production, carbon allocation, and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Harrison, S. P.; Prentice, I. C.; Falster, D.

    2014-12-01

    We present a simple, generic model of annual tree growth, called "T". This model accepts input from a first-principles light-use efficiency model (the "P" model). The P model provides values for gross primary production (GPP) per unit of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR is estimated from the current leaf area. GPP is allocated to foliage, transport tissue, and fine-root production and respiration in such a way as to satisfy well-understood dimensional and functional relationships. Our approach thereby integrates two modelling approaches separately developed in the global carbon-cycle and forest-science literature. The T model can represent both ontogenetic effects (the impact of ageing) and the effects of environmental variations and trends (climate and CO2) on growth. Driven by local climate records, the model was applied to simulate ring widths during the period 1958-2006 for multiple trees of Pinus koraiensis from the Changbai Mountains in northeastern China. Each tree was initialised at its actual diameter at the time when local climate records started. The model produces realistic simulations of the interannual variability in ring width for different age cohorts (young, mature, and old). Both the simulations and observations show a significant positive response of tree-ring width to growing-season total photosynthetically active radiation (PAR0) and the ratio of actual to potential evapotranspiration (α), and a significant negative response to mean annual temperature (MAT). The slopes of the simulated and observed relationships with PAR0 and α are similar; the negative response to MAT is underestimated by the model. Comparison of simulations with fixed and changing atmospheric CO2 concentration shows that CO2 fertilisation over the past 50 years is too small to be distinguished in the ring-width data, given ontogenetic trends and interannual variability in climate.

  20. Simulation of tree ring-widths with a model for primary production, carbon allocation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Harrison, S. P.; Prentice, I. C.; Falster, D.

    2014-07-01

    We present a simple, generic model of annual tree growth, called "T". This model accepts input from a first-principles light-use efficiency model (the P model). The P model provides values for Gross Primary Production (GPP) per unit of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR is estimated from the current leaf area. GPP is allocated to foliage, transport-tissue, and fine root production and respiration, in such a way as to satisfy well-understood dimensional and functional relationships. Our approach thereby integrates two modelling approaches separately developed in the global carbon-cycle and forest-science literature. The T model can represent both ontogenetic effects (impact of ageing) and the effects of environmental variations and trends (climate and CO2) on growth. Driven by local climate records, the model was applied to simulate ring widths during 1958-2006 for multiple trees of Pinus koraiensis from the Changbai Mountain, northeastern China. Each tree was initialised at its actual diameter at the time when local climate records started. The model produces realistic simulations of the interannual variability in ring width for different age cohorts (young, mature, old). Both the simulations and observations show a significant positive response of tree-ring width to growing-season total photosynthetically active radiation (PAR0) and the ratio of actual to potential evapotranspiration (α), and a significant negative response to mean annual temperature (MAT). The slopes of the simulated and observed relationships with PAR0 and α are similar; the negative response to MAT is underestimated by the model. Comparison of simulations with fixed and changing atmospheric CO2 concentration shows that CO2 fertilization over the past 50 years is too small to be distinguished in the ring-width data given ontogenetic trends and interannual variability in climate.

  1. Modeling Resources Allocation in Attacker-Defender Games with "Warm Up" CSF.

    PubMed

    Guan, Peiqiu; Zhuang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Like many other engineering investments, the attacker's and defender's investments may have limited impact without initial capital to "warm up" the systems. This article studies such "warm up" effects on both the attack and defense equilibrium strategies in a sequential-move game model by developing a class of novel and more realistic contest success functions. We first solve a single-target attacker-defender game analytically and provide numerical solutions to a multiple-target case. We compare the results of the models with and without consideration of the investment "warm up" effects, and find that the defender would suffer higher expected damage, and either underestimate the attacker effort or waste defense investment if the defender falsely believes that no investment "warm up" effects exist. We illustrate the model results with real data, and compare the results of the models with and without consideration of the correlation between the "warm up" threshold and the investment effectiveness. Interestingly, we find that the defender is suggested to give up defending all the targets when the attack or the defense "warm up" thresholds are sufficiently high. This article provides new insights and suggestions on policy implications for homeland security resource allocation.

  2. SAM-FS: LSC's New Solaris-Based Storage Management Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, Kent

    1996-01-01

    SAM-FS is a full featured hierarchical storage management (HSM) device that operates as a file system on Solaris-based machines. The SAM-FS file system provides the user with all of the standard UNIX system utilities and calls, and adds some new commands, i.e. archive, release, stage, sls, sfind, and a family of maintenance commands. The system also offers enhancements such as high performance virtual disk read and write, control of the disk through an extent array, and the ability to dynamically allocate block size. SAM-FS provides 'archive sets' which are groupings of data to be copied to secondary storage. In practice, as soon as a file is written to disk, SAM-FS will make copies onto secondary media. SAM-FS is a scalable storage management system. The system can manage millions of files per system, though this is limited today by the speed of UNIX and its utilities. In the future, a new search algorithm will be implemented that will remove logical and performance restrictions on the number of files managed.

  3. STS-134 Crew Talks With Sam Ting

    NASA Video Gallery

    The STS-134 crew talks with Sam Ting, principal investigator for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, following the installation of the particle physics detector on the International Space Station duri...

  4. NES Live Video Chat: Engineer Sam Ortega

    NASA Video Gallery

    The NES project invited all K-12 students to participate in a one-hour-long NASA video webchat on April 19, 2011 with NASA engineer Sam Ortega. Ortega answered questions about building and testing ...

  5. Quality Control Guidelines for SAM Radiochemical Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the radiochemistry methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  6. Quality Control Guidelines for SAM Biotoxin Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the pathogen methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  7. Quality Control Guidelines for SAM Pathogen Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the biotoxin methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  8. Quality Control Guidelines for SAM Chemical Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the chemistry methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  9. DESPOT, a process-based tree growth model that allocates carbon to maximize carbon gain.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Thomas N; Roberts, David W

    2006-02-01

    We present a new model of tree growth, DESPOT (Deducing Emergent Structure and Physiology Of Trees), in which carbon (C) allocation is adjusted in each time step to maximize whole-tree net C gain in the next time step. Carbon gain, respiration and the acquisition and transport of substitutable photosynthetic resources (nitrogen, water and light) are modeled on a process basis. The current form of DESPOT simulates a uniform, monospecific, self-thinning stand. This paper describes DESPOT and its general behavior in comparison to published data, and presents an evaluation of the sensitivity of its qualitative predictions by Monte Carlo parameter sensitivity analysis. DESPOT predicts determinate height growth and steady stand-level net primary productivity (NPP), but slow declines in aboveground NPP and leaf area index. Monte Carlo analysis, wherein the model was run repeatedly with randomly different parameter sets, revealed that many parameter sets do not lead to sustainable NPP. Of those that do lead to sustainable growth, the ratios at maturity of net to gross primary productivity and of leaf area to sapwood area are highly conserved.

  10. Modeling virtual organizations with Latent Dirichlet Allocation: a case for natural language processing.

    PubMed

    Gross, Alexander; Murthy, Dhiraj

    2014-10-01

    This paper explores a variety of methods for applying the Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) automated topic modeling algorithm to the modeling of the structure and behavior of virtual organizations found within modern social media and social networking environments. As the field of Big Data reveals, an increase in the scale of social data available presents new challenges which are not tackled by merely scaling up hardware and software. Rather, they necessitate new methods and, indeed, new areas of expertise. Natural language processing provides one such method. This paper applies LDA to the study of scientific virtual organizations whose members employ social technologies. Because of the vast data footprint in these virtual platforms, we found that natural language processing was needed to 'unlock' and render visible latent, previously unseen conversational connections across large textual corpora (spanning profiles, discussion threads, forums, and other social media incarnations). We introduce variants of LDA and ultimately make the argument that natural language processing is a critical interdisciplinary methodology to make better sense of social 'Big Data' and we were able to successfully model nested discussion topics from forums and blog posts using LDA. Importantly, we found that LDA can move us beyond the state-of-the-art in conventional Social Network Analysis techniques.

  11. Modelling optimal allocation of resources in the context of an incurable disease

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Nodding syndrome has affected and led to the deaths of children between the ages of 5 and 15 in Northern Uganda since 2009. There is no reliable explanation of the disease, and currently the only treatment is through a nutritional programme of vitamins, combined with medication to prevent symptoms. In the absence of a proper medical treatment, we develop a dynamic compartmental model to plan the management of the syndrome and to curb its effects. We use incidence data from 2012 and 2013 from Pader, Lamwo and Kitgum regions of Uganda to parameterize the model. The model is then used to look at how to best plan the nutritional programme in terms of first getting children on to the programme through outreach, and then making sure they remain on the programme, through follow-up. For the current outbreak of nodding disease, we estimate that about half of available resources should be put into outreach. We show how to optimize the balance between outreach and follow-up in this particular example, and provide a general methodology for allocating resources in similar situations. Given the uncertainty of parameter estimates in such situations, we perform a robustness analysis to identify the best investment strategy. Our analysis offers a way of using available data to determine the best investment strategy of controlling nodding syndrome. PMID:28288182

  12. Interpretation of tree-ring data with a model for primary production, carbon allocation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Wang, H.; Harrison, S. P.; Prentice, I. C.

    2013-12-01

    We present a simple, generic model of annual tree growth, called ';T'. This model accepts input from a generic light-use efficiency model which is known to provide good simulations of terrestrial carbon exchange. The light-use efficiency model provides values for Gross Primary Production (GPP) per unit of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR is estimated from the current leaf area. GPP is allocated to foliage, transport-tissue, and fine-root production and respiration, in such a way as to satisfy well-understood dimensional relationships. The result is a model that can represent both ontogenetic effects and the effects of environmental variations and trends on growth. The model has been applied to simulate ring-width series from multiple individual trees in temperature- and drought-limited contexts. Each tree is initialized at its actual diameter at the time when local climate records started. These records are used to drive the trees' subsequent growth. Realistic simulations of the pattern of interannual variability of ring-width are generated, and shown to relate statistically to climate. An upward trend in ring-width during 1958-2007 is shown to be present in the primary observations, and in the simulations; but not in the standard, detrended ring-width series. This approach combines two modelling approaches previously developed in the global carbon cycle and forest science literature respectively. Neither has been widely applied in the context of tree-ring based climate reconstruction. This combination of methods offers promise, however, because it could provide a way to sidestep several known problems. These include: reliance on correlations for the interpretation of ring-width variations in terms of climate; the necessity of detrending using empirical functions (which can remove trends caused by variations in the environment as well as those that are ontogenetic); and the difficulty of assessing effects of extrinsic, non

  13. CARBON AND NITROGEN ALLOCATION MODEL FOR THE SUB-TROPICAL SEAGRASS THALASSIA TESTUDINUM AND THE TEMPERATE SEAGRASS ZOSTER MARINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our understanding of seagrass physiology is based on crude estimates of production and biomass. To better understand the complex physiological relationships between the plants and the environment we developed a model of carbon and nitrogen allocation in the sub-tropical seagrass ...

  14. A System Dynamics Model to Improve Water Resources Allocation in the Conchos River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastelum, J. R.; Valdes, J. B.; Stewart, S.

    2005-12-01

    The Conchos river located in Chihuahua state on a semiarid region is the most important Mexican river contributing water deliveries to USA as established by the Water treaty of 1944 signed between Mexico and USA. Historically, Mexico has delivered to UNITED STATES 550 Hm3 (445,549.5 ACF) per year of water since the treaty was established, which is 25% above the yearly water volume Mexico is required to deliver. The Conchos river has contributed with 54% of the historic Mexican water treaty deliveries to the UNITED STATES, which represents the highest percentage of the 6 Mexican rivers considered on the water treaty. However, during drought situations the basin has proven to be vulnerable, for instance, because of the severe drought of the 90's, several cities in 1992 on Chihuahua state where declared disaster areas, and from 1992 to 2001 Mexico had accumulated a water treaty deficit of 2111.6 Hm3 (1,710,586 ACF). This has conduced to economic, social, and political difficulties in both countries. Because of the cited problematic and considering the poor understanding of the relationship between water supply and demand factors on the basin, a decision support system (DSS) has been developed aimed to improve the decision making process related with the water resources allocation process. This DSS has been created using System Dynamics (SD). It is a semi-distributed model and is running on monthly time step basis. For both the short and long term, three important water resources management strategies have been evaluated: several water allocation policies from reservoirs to water users; bulk water rights transfers inside and outside Irrigation Districts; and improvement of water distribution efficiencies. The model results have provided very useful regard to gain more quantitative understanding of the different strategies being implemented. They have also indicated that the different water resources alternatives change its degree of importance according to the

  15. Where does the carbon go? A model-data intercomparison of vegetation carbon allocation and turnover processes at two temperate forest free-air CO2 enrichment sites.

    PubMed

    De Kauwe, Martin G; Medlyn, Belinda E; Zaehle, Sönke; Walker, Anthony P; Dietze, Michael C; Wang, Ying-Ping; Luo, Yiqi; Jain, Atul K; El-Masri, Bassil; Hickler, Thomas; Wårlind, David; Weng, Ensheng; Parton, William J; Thornton, Peter E; Wang, Shusen; Prentice, I Colin; Asao, Shinichi; Smith, Benjamin; McCarthy, Heather R; Iversen, Colleen M; Hanson, Paul J; Warren, Jeffrey M; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2014-08-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (eCO2) has the potential to increase vegetation carbon storage if increased net primary production causes increased long-lived biomass. Model predictions of eCO2 effects on vegetation carbon storage depend on how allocation and turnover processes are represented. We used data from two temperate forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments to evaluate representations of allocation and turnover in 11 ecosystem models. Observed eCO2 effects on allocation were dynamic. Allocation schemes based on functional relationships among biomass fractions that vary with resource availability were best able to capture the general features of the observations. Allocation schemes based on constant fractions or resource limitations performed less well, with some models having unintended outcomes. Few models represent turnover processes mechanistically and there was wide variation in predictions of tissue lifespan. Consequently, models did not perform well at predicting eCO2 effects on vegetation carbon storage. Our recommendations to reduce uncertainty include: use of allocation schemes constrained by biomass fractions; careful testing of allocation schemes; and synthesis of allocation and turnover data in terms of model parameters. Data from intensively studied ecosystem manipulation experiments are invaluable for constraining models and we recommend that such experiments should attempt to fully quantify carbon, water and nutrient budgets.

  16. Comparing administered and market-based water allocation systems through a consistent agent-based modeling framework.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianshi; Cai, Ximing; Wang, Zhongjing

    2013-07-15

    Water allocation can be undertaken through administered systems (AS), market-based systems (MS), or a combination of the two. The debate on the performance of the two systems has lasted for decades but still calls for attention in both research and practice. This paper compares water users' behavior under AS and MS through a consistent agent-based modeling framework for water allocation analysis that incorporates variables particular to both MS (e.g., water trade and trading prices) and AS (water use violations and penalties/subsidies). Analogous to the economic theory of water markets under MS, the theory of rational violation justifies the exchange of entitled water under AS through the use of cross-subsidies. Under water stress conditions, a unique water allocation equilibrium can be achieved by following a simple bargaining rule that does not depend upon initial market prices under MS, or initial economic incentives under AS. The modeling analysis shows that the behavior of water users (agents) depends on transaction, or administrative, costs, as well as their autonomy. Reducing transaction costs under MS or administrative costs under AS will mitigate the effect that equity constraints (originating with primary water allocation) have on the system's total net economic benefits. Moreover, hydrologic uncertainty is shown to increase market prices under MS and penalties/subsidies under AS and, in most cases, also increases transaction, or administrative, costs.

  17. [A simulation model for predicting the dry matter allocation in cut lily plants under effects of substrate water potential].

    PubMed

    Dong, Yong-Yi; Li, Gang; An, Dong-Sheng; Luo, Wei-Hong

    2012-04-01

    Dry matter allocation and translocation is the base of the formation of appearance quality of ornamental plants, and strongly affected by water supply. Taking cut lily cultivar 'Sorbonne' as test material, a culture experiment of different planting dates and water supply levels was conducted in a multi-span greenhouse in Nanjing from March 2009 to January 2010 to quantitatively analyze the seasonal changes of the dry matter allocation and translocation in 'Sorbonne' plants and the effects of substrate water potential on the dry matter allocation indices for different organs (flower, stem, leaf, bulb, and root), aimed to define the critical substrate water potential for the normal growth of the cultivar, and establish a simulation model for predicting the dry matter allocation in cut lily plants under effects of substrate water potential. The model established in this study gave a good prediction on the dry mass of plant organs, with the coefficient of determination and the relative root mean square error between the simulated and measured values of the cultivar' s flower dry mass, stem dry mass, leaf dry mass, bulb dry mass, and root dry mass being 0.96 and 19.2%, 0.95 and 12.4%, 0.86 and 19.4%, 0.95 and 12.2%, and 0.85 and 31.7%, respectively. The critical water potential for the water management of cut lily could be -15 kPa.

  18. A multiprocessor computer simulation model employing a feedback scheduler/allocator for memory space and bandwidth matching and TMR processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, D. B.; Irwin, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A computer simulation model for a multiprocessor computer is developed that is useful for studying the problem of matching multiprocessor's memory space, memory bandwidth and numbers and speeds of processors with aggregate job set characteristics. The model assumes an input work load of a set of recurrent jobs. The model includes a feedback scheduler/allocator which attempts to improve system performance through higher memory bandwidth utilization by matching individual job requirements for space and bandwidth with space availability and estimates of bandwidth availability at the times of memory allocation. The simulation model includes provisions for specifying precedence relations among the jobs in a job set, and provisions for specifying precedence execution of TMR (Triple Modular Redundant and SIMPLEX (non redundant) jobs.

  19. Task Allocation of Wasps Governed by Common Stomach: A Model Based on Electric Circuits

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Simple regulatory mechanisms based on the idea of the saturable ‘common stomach’ can control the regulation of construction behavior and colony-level responses to environmental perturbations in Metapolybia wasp societies. We mapped the different task groups to mutual inductance electrical circuits and used Kirchoff’s basic voltage laws to build a model that uses master equations from physics, yet is able to provide strong predictions for this complex biological phenomenon. Similar to real colonies, independently of the initial conditions, the system shortly sets into an equilibrium, which provides optimal task allocation for a steady construction, depending on the influx of accessible water. The system is very flexible and in the case of perturbations, it reallocates its workforce and adapts to the new situation with different equilibrium levels. Similar to the finding of field studies, decreasing any task groups caused decrease of construction; increasing or decreasing water inflow stimulated or reduced the work of other task groups while triggering compensatory behavior in water foragers. We also showed that only well connected circuits are able to produce adequate construction and this agrees with the finding that this type of task partitioning only exists in larger colonies. Studying the buffer properties of the common stomach and its effect on the foragers revealed that it provides stronger negative feedback to the water foragers, while the connection between the pulp foragers and the common stomach has a strong fixed-point attractor, as evidenced by the dissipative trajectory. PMID:27861633

  20. Task Allocation of Wasps Governed by Common Stomach: A Model Based on Electric Circuits.

    PubMed

    Hilbun, Allison; Karsai, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    Simple regulatory mechanisms based on the idea of the saturable 'common stomach' can control the regulation of construction behavior and colony-level responses to environmental perturbations in Metapolybia wasp societies. We mapped the different task groups to mutual inductance electrical circuits and used Kirchoff's basic voltage laws to build a model that uses master equations from physics, yet is able to provide strong predictions for this complex biological phenomenon. Similar to real colonies, independently of the initial conditions, the system shortly sets into an equilibrium, which provides optimal task allocation for a steady construction, depending on the influx of accessible water. The system is very flexible and in the case of perturbations, it reallocates its workforce and adapts to the new situation with different equilibrium levels. Similar to the finding of field studies, decreasing any task groups caused decrease of construction; increasing or decreasing water inflow stimulated or reduced the work of other task groups while triggering compensatory behavior in water foragers. We also showed that only well connected circuits are able to produce adequate construction and this agrees with the finding that this type of task partitioning only exists in larger colonies. Studying the buffer properties of the common stomach and its effect on the foragers revealed that it provides stronger negative feedback to the water foragers, while the connection between the pulp foragers and the common stomach has a strong fixed-point attractor, as evidenced by the dissipative trajectory.

  1. PSOLA: A Heuristic Land-Use Allocation Model Using Patch-Level Operations and Knowledge-Informed Rules

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaolin; Peng, Jinjin; Jiao, Limin; Liu, Yanfang

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing land-use allocation is important to regional sustainable development, as it promotes the social equality of public services, increases the economic benefits of land-use activities, and reduces the ecological risk of land-use planning. Most land-use optimization models allocate land-use using cell-level operations that fragment land-use patches. These models do not cooperate well with land-use planning knowledge, leading to irrational land-use patterns. This study focuses on building a heuristic land-use allocation model (PSOLA) using particle swarm optimization. The model allocates land-use with patch-level operations to avoid fragmentation. The patch-level operations include a patch-edge operator, a patch-size operator, and a patch-compactness operator that constrain the size and shape of land-use patches. The model is also integrated with knowledge-informed rules to provide auxiliary knowledge of land-use planning during optimization. The knowledge-informed rules consist of suitability, accessibility, land use policy, and stakeholders’ preference. To validate the PSOLA model, a case study was performed in Gaoqiao Town in Zhejiang Province, China. The results demonstrate that the PSOLA model outperforms a basic PSO (Particle Swarm Optimization) in the terms of the social, economic, ecological, and overall benefits by 3.60%, 7.10%, 1.53% and 4.06%, respectively, which confirms the effectiveness of our improvements. Furthermore, the model has an open architecture, enabling its extension as a generic tool to support decision making in land-use planning. PMID:27322619

  2. PSOLA: A Heuristic Land-Use Allocation Model Using Patch-Level Operations and Knowledge-Informed Rules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaolin; Peng, Jinjin; Jiao, Limin; Liu, Yanfang

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing land-use allocation is important to regional sustainable development, as it promotes the social equality of public services, increases the economic benefits of land-use activities, and reduces the ecological risk of land-use planning. Most land-use optimization models allocate land-use using cell-level operations that fragment land-use patches. These models do not cooperate well with land-use planning knowledge, leading to irrational land-use patterns. This study focuses on building a heuristic land-use allocation model (PSOLA) using particle swarm optimization. The model allocates land-use with patch-level operations to avoid fragmentation. The patch-level operations include a patch-edge operator, a patch-size operator, and a patch-compactness operator that constrain the size and shape of land-use patches. The model is also integrated with knowledge-informed rules to provide auxiliary knowledge of land-use planning during optimization. The knowledge-informed rules consist of suitability, accessibility, land use policy, and stakeholders' preference. To validate the PSOLA model, a case study was performed in Gaoqiao Town in Zhejiang Province, China. The results demonstrate that the PSOLA model outperforms a basic PSO (Particle Swarm Optimization) in the terms of the social, economic, ecological, and overall benefits by 3.60%, 7.10%, 1.53% and 4.06%, respectively, which confirms the effectiveness of our improvements. Furthermore, the model has an open architecture, enabling its extension as a generic tool to support decision making in land-use planning.

  3. A Minimal Model of Ribosome Allocation Dynamics Captures Trade-offs in Expression between Endogenous and Synthetic Genes.

    PubMed

    Gorochowski, Thomas E; Avcilar-Kucukgoze, Irem; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Roubos, Johannes A; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-07-15

    Cells contain a finite set of resources that must be distributed across many processes to ensure survival. Among them, the largest proportion of cellular resources is dedicated to protein translation. Synthetic biology often exploits these resources in executing orthogonal genetic circuits, yet the burden this places on the cell is rarely considered. Here, we develop a minimal model of ribosome allocation dynamics capturing the demands on translation when expressing a synthetic construct together with endogenous genes required for the maintenance of cell physiology. Critically, it contains three key variables related to design parameters of the synthetic construct covering transcript abundance, translation initiation rate, and elongation time. We show that model-predicted changes in ribosome allocation closely match experimental shifts in synthetic protein expression rate and cellular growth. Intriguingly, the model is also able to accurately infer transcript levels and translation times after further exposure to additional ambient stress. Our results demonstrate that a simple model of resource allocation faithfully captures the redistribution of protein synthesis resources when faced with the burden of synthetic gene expression and environmental stress. The tractable nature of the model makes it a versatile tool for exploring the guiding principles of efficient heterologous expression and the indirect interactions that can arise between synthetic circuits and their host chassis because of competition for shared translational resources.

  4. Stability of binary SAMs formed by omega-acid and alcohol functionalized thiol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Tielens, Frederik; Humblot, Vincent; Pradier, Claire-Marie; Calatayud, Monica; Illas, Francesc

    2009-09-01

    A simple model is presented to describe the mixing process of acid- and alcohol-terminated thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111). It was found that the low-concentration acid-terminated SAMs are enriched in acid thiol compared with the original solution from which the SAM is made. Due to the relatively strong interaction between acid and alcohol head groups, homogeneously mixed SAMs showing alcohol/acid pairs are preferred when the acid-terminated thiol fraction in solution is below or equal to 50%. This particular behavior affecting the mixing process is explained using atomistic first-principle thermodynamics. The calculated phase diagram has been discussed and interpreted with the help of XPS.

  5. Surface adhesion and confinement variation of Bacillus subtilis on SAM surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiger, Lauren; Pasquale, Rose; Calabrese, Joseph; Senevirathne, Indrajith

    2012-02-01

    Controlled surface adhesion of non - pathogenic gram positive strain, Bacillus subtilis is interesting as a model system due to possible development of respective biosensors for prevention and detection of the pathogenic variants B. anthracis and B. cereus. Further as a study for bio-machine interfacing systems. Self Assembled Monolayers (SAM) with engineered surfaces of linear thiols on Au(111) were used as the substrate. Sub cultured B. subtilis were used for the analysis. The SAM layered surfaces were dipped in 2 -- 5 Log/ml B. subtilis solution. Subsequent surface adhesion at different bacterial dilutions on surfaces will be discussed, and correlated with quantitative and qualitative adhesion properties of bacteria on the engineered SAM surfaces. The bacteria adhered SAM surfaces were investigated using intermittent contact, noncontact, lateral force and contact modes of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM).

  6. Surface adhesion and confinement variation of Staphylococcus aurius on SAM surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amroski, Alicia; Olsen, Morgan; Calabrese, Joseph; Senevirathne, Reshani; Senevirathne, Indrajith

    2012-02-01

    Controlled surface adhesion of non - pathogenic gram positive strain, Staphylococcus aureus is interesting as a model system due to possible development of respective biosensors for prevention and detection of the pathogenic strain methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and further as a study for bio-machine interfacing. Self Assembled Monolayers (SAM) with engineered surfaces of linear thiols on Au(111) were used as the substrate. Sub cultured S. aureus were used for the analysis. The SAM layered surfaces were dipped in 2 -- 4 Log/ml S. aureus solution. Subsequent surface adhesion at different bacterial dilutions on surfaces will be discussed, and correlated with quantitative and qualitative adhesion properties of bacteria on the engineered SAM surfaces. The bacteria adhered SAM surfaces were investigated using intermittent contact, noncontact, lateral force and contact modes of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM).

  7. Sam, Brookhaven, and the Physical Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, Martin

    2010-03-01

    Sam Goudsmit came to Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1948, just after the first year of operation of the new institution, and after a year of his postwar appointment as Professor of Physics at Northwestern University. He was named an associate editor of the Physical Review at that time, under the then Managing Editor John T. Tate of the University of Minnesota. Tate had been Editor since 1926, and had presided over the growth of Physical Review to leadership of publication in the world of physics. Tate died in 1950, and after a search under an interim Editor Sam was, in 1951, named Managing Editor. In 1952 he became Chair of the Brookhaven Physics Department, founded Physical Review Letters, and served as department chair until 1960, when he stepped down but remained an Associate Chair. I will discuss my own interactions with Sam during this later period, when I learned of his many faceted talents and accomplishments.

  8. Validation of SAM 2 and SAGE satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Wang, P.-H.; Farrukh, U. O.; Yue, G. K.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are the results of a validation study of data obtained by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment I (SAGE I) and Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement II (SAM II) satellite experiments. The study includes the entire SAGE I data set (February 1979 - November 1981) and the first four and one-half years of SAM II data (October 1978 - February 1983). These data sets have been validated by their use in the analysis of dynamical, physical and chemical processes in the stratosphere. They have been compared with other existing data sets and the SAGE I and SAM II data sets intercompared where possible. The study has shown the data to be of great value in the study of the climatological behavior of stratospheric aerosols and ozone. Several scientific publications and user-oriented data summaries have appeared as a result of the work carried out under this contract.

  9. Modeling changes in red spruce carbon balance and allocation in response to interacting ozone and nutrient stresses.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, David A.; Beloin, Ronald M.; Yanai, Ruth D.

    1991-01-01

    The simulation model TREGRO was developed to analyze the response of red spruce saplings to multiple stresses, such as drought, nutrient deficiency, and exposure to pollutants. The model provides a method of identifying changes in structural and non-structural carbon resources in the tree that may become measurable only after many years of exposure. The model is based on the assumption that the ability of plants to take up and use carbon, water, and nutrients depends on the interrelationships in availability among the three resources. Consequently, the model simulates the simultaneous cycling of these resources. In the model, the tree is divided into the following compartments: a canopy of leaves grouped by age class, branches, stem, and coarse and fine roots in a number of soil horizons. In each of these compartments we track three carbon pools: living structure, dead structure or wood, and total non-structural carbohydrate. The model calculates the photosynthesis of an entire red spruce tree each hour as a function of ambient environmental conditions and the availability of light, water, and nutrients; the daily redistribution of carbon throughout the plant; and the loss of carbon by respiration and senescence. To accomplish this task, the model tracks the flow of carbon dioxide to the sites of fixation within the leaves, the availability of light in the canopy, water and nutrient resources in each of three soil horizons, and the amounts of these resources taken up by the tree. Soil and plant water potentials, photosynthesis, and leaf respiration are simulated on an hourly timestep; nutrient uptake, allocation and growth are computed on a daily timestep. Through a set of example simulations, we demonstrate how the model can be used to examine the mechanisms by which plants respond to stresses experienced alone and in combination. The model was used to predict the growth decrease and the shifting pattern of carbon allocation expected for an isolated tree exposed

  10. The ALICE Glance Shift Accounting Management System (SAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins Silva, H.; Abreu Da Silva, I.; Ronchetti, F.; Telesca, A.; Maidantchik, C.

    2015-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is an experiment at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider) studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma. The experiment operation requires a 24 hours a day and 7 days a week shift crew at the experimental site, composed by the ALICE collaboration members. Shift duties are calculated for each institute according to their correlated members. In order to ensure the full coverage of the experiment operation as well as its good quality, the ALICE Shift Accounting Management System (SAMS) is used to manage the shift bookings as well as the needed training. ALICE SAMS is the result of a joint effort between the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) and the ALICE Collaboration. The Glance technology, developed by the UFRJ and the ATLAS experiment, sits at the basis of the system as an intermediate layer isolating the particularities of the databases. In this paper, we describe the ALICE SAMS development process and functionalities. The database has been modelled according to the collaboration needs and is fully integrated with the ALICE Collaboration repository to access members information and respectively roles and activities. Run, period and training coordinators can manage their subsystem operation and ensure an efficient personnel management. Members of the ALICE collaboration can book shifts and on-call according to pre-defined rights. ALICE SAMS features a user profile containing all the statistics and user contact information as well as the Institutes profile. Both the user and institute profiles are public (within the scope of the collaboration) and show the credit balance in real time. A shift calendar allows the Run Coordinator to plan data taking periods in terms of which subsystems shifts are enabled or disabled and on-call responsible people and slots. An overview display presents the shift crew present in the control room and allows the Run Coordination team to confirm the presence

  11. Sam68: a new STAR in the male fertility firmament.

    PubMed

    Sette, Claudio; Messina, Valeria; Paronetto, Maria Paola

    2010-01-01

    Male infertility accounts for approximately 50% of the cases of sterile human couples, and in many instances the genetic or molecular defects involved remain unknown. Studies conducted in animal models have elucidated the key role played by RNA-binding proteins and by the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression during spermatogenesis. Ablation of proteins involved in each of the steps required for the processing and the utilization of messenger RNAs impairs the production of fertile spermatozoa. Recent evidence indicates that the RNA-binding protein Sam68 is absolutely required for the correct progression of spermatogenesis and for male fertility in the mouse. Sam68 belongs to the evolutionary conserved signal transduction and activation of RNA (STAR) family of RNA-binding proteins. The members of this family have been demonstrated to play crucial roles in cell differentiation and development, including male and female gametogenesis. In this review we will summarize the observations gathered on the functions of STAR proteins in different organisms, with particular emphasis on the role of Sam68 in male fertility.

  12. Modelling the climatic drivers determining photosynthesis and carbon allocation in evergreen Mediterranean forests using multiproxy long time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gea-Izquierdo, G.; Guibal, F.; Joffre, R.; Ourcival, J. M.; Simioni, G.; Guiot, J.

    2015-02-01

    Climatic drivers limit several important physiological processes involved in ecosystem carbon dynamics including gross primary productivity (GPP) and carbon allocation in vegetation. Climatic variability limits these two processes differently. We developed an existing mechanistic model to analyse photosynthesis and variability in carbon allocation in two evergreen species at two Mediterranean forests. The model was calibrated using a combination of eddy covariance CO2 flux data, dendrochronological time series of secondary growth and forest inventory data. The model was modified to be climate explicit in the key processes addressing acclimation of photosynthesis and allocation. It succeeded to fit both the high- and the low-frequency response of stand GPP and carbon allocation to the stem. This would support its capability to address both carbon source and sink limitations. Simulations suggest a decrease in mean stomatal conductance in response to environmental changes and an increase in mean annual intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE) in both species during the last 50 years. However, this was not translated on a parallel increase in ecosystem water use efficiency (WUE). A long-term decrease in annual GPP matched the local trend in precipitation since the 1970s observed in one site. In contrast, GPP did not show a negative trend and the trees buffered the climatic variability observed at the site where long-term precipitation remained stable. In our simulations these temporal changes would be partly related to increasing [CO2] because the model includes biochemical equations where photosynthesis is directly linked to [CO2]. Long-term trends in GPP did not match those in growth, in agreement with the C-sink hypothesis. There is a great potential to use the model with abundant dendrochronological data and analyse forest performance under climate change. This would help to understand how different interfering environmental factors produce instability in the climatic

  13. Basis for ligand discrimination between ON and OFF state riboswitch conformations: the case of the SAM-I riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Boyapati, Vamsi Krishna; Huang, Wei; Spedale, Jessica; Aboul-Ela, Fareed

    2012-06-01

    Riboswitches are RNA elements that bind to effector ligands and control gene expression. Most consist of two domains. S-Adenosyl Methionine (SAM) binds the aptamer domain of the SAM-I riboswitch and induces conformational changes in the expression domain to form an intrinsic terminator (transcription OFF state). Without SAM the riboswitch forms the transcription ON state, allowing read-through transcription. The mechanistic link between the SAM/aptamer recognition event and subsequent secondary structure rearrangement by the riboswitch is unclear. We probed for those structural features of the Bacillus subtilis yitJ SAM-I riboswitch responsible for discrimination between the ON and OFF states by SAM. We designed SAM-I riboswitch RNA segments forming "hybrid" structures of the ON and OFF states. The choice of segment constrains the formation of a partial P1 helix, characteristic of the OFF state, together with a partial antiterminator (AT) helix, characteristic of the ON state. For most choices of P1 vs. AT helix lengths, SAM binds with micromolar affinity according to equilibrium dialysis. Mutational analysis and in-line probing confirm that the mode of SAM binding by hybrid structures is similar to that of the aptamer. Altogether, binding measurements and in-line probing are consistent with the hypothesis that when SAM is present, stacking interactions with the AT helix stabilize a partially formed P1 helix in the hybrids. Molecular modeling indicates that continuous stacking between the P1 and the AT helices is plausible with SAM bound. Our findings raise the possibility that conformational intermediates may play a role in ligand-induced aptamer folding.

  14. An Optimization Model for the Allocation of University Based Merit Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugrue, Paul K.

    2010-01-01

    The allocation of merit-based financial aid during the college admissions process presents postsecondary institutions with complex and financially expensive decisions. This article describes the application of linear programming as a decision tool in merit based financial aid decisions at a medium size private university. The objective defined for…

  15. CNK and HYP form a discrete dimer by their SAM domains to mediate RAF kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Rajakulendran, Thanashan; Sahmi, Malha; Kurinov, Igor; Tyers, Mike; Therrien, Marc; Sicheri, Frank

    2008-02-26

    RAF kinase functions in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway to transmit growth signals to the downstream kinases MEK and ERK. Activation of RAF catalytic activity is facilitated by a regulatory complex comprising the proteins CNK (Connector enhancer of KSR), HYP (Hyphen), and KSR (Kinase Suppressor of Ras). The sterile alpha-motif (SAM) domain found in both CNK and HYP plays an essential role in complex formation. Here, we have determined the x-ray crystal structure of the SAM domain of CNK in complex with the SAM domain of HYP. The structure reveals a single-junction SAM domain dimer of 1:1 stoichiometry in which the binding mode is a variation of polymeric SAM domain interactions. Through in vitro and in vivo mutational analyses, we show that the specific mode of dimerization revealed by the crystal structure is essential for RAF signaling and facilitates the recruitment of KSR to form the CNK/HYP/KSR regulatory complex. We present two docking-site models to account for how SAM domain dimerization might influence the formation of a higher-order CNK/HYP/KSR complex.

  16. Essay: Physical Review Letters; Sam Goudsmit's Vision.

    PubMed

    Adair, Robert K

    2008-01-18

    Sam Goudsmit implemented his vision of converting the Letters section of Physical Review into a distinct journal fifty years ago. Physical Review Letters was designed to publish "only papers that really deserve rapid communication." The new journal became so successful with physicists throughout the world that Physical Review Letters now publishes 3500 Letters per year.

  17. Sam's Journey to "Reach for the Stars"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Sue

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experiences as a parent of a child with Down syndrome. Although her son Sam's first years were filled with numerous hospitalizations and visits to pediatricians, which she feared would further delay his development, she soon discovered an organization known as the National Association of Child Development…

  18. Light Competition and Carbon Partitioning-Allocation in an improved Forest Ecosystem Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collalti, Alessio; Santini, Monia; Valentini Valentini, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    . Hence, the presence of a cohort in a storey determines the amount of light received for the photosynthetic processes. The population density (numbers of trees per cell) represents a good competition index for determining the tree crown structure and tree crown dimension within a forest population. The tree crown tend to branch out horizontally to intercept as much light as possible. The model assess the structure of the tree crown both vertically and horizontally on the base of the population density and it up-scales the result to the whole stand. The canopy depth and the percentage of horizontal coverage determines moreover a crowding competition index that lead to a specific biomass partitioning-allocation ratio among the different tree components (foliage, roots and stem) and especially for the stem affecting Height-Diameter (at breast height) ratio. In this model, Height-Diameter ratio is used as an alternative competition index in determining the vigour and the strength of competition on free growth status of trees. The forest dominant vegetative cover affects moreover the presence of a dominated layer, it influences its yield and its Carbon stocking capacity and hence it influences the forest ecosystem CO2 carbon balance. From this model it is possible to simulate the impact of Climate Change on forests, the feedback of one or more dominated layers in terms of CO2 uptake in a forest stand and the effects of forest management activities for the next years.

  19. Modelling the climatic drivers determining photosynthesis and carbon allocation in evergreen Mediterranean forests using multiproxy long time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gea-Izquierdo, G.; Guibal, F.; Joffre, R.; Ourcival, J. M.; Simioni, G.; Guiot, J.

    2015-06-01

    Climatic drivers limit several important physiological processes involved in ecosystem carbon dynamics including gross primary productivity (GPP) and carbon allocation in vegetation. Climatic variability limits these two processes differently. We developed an existing mechanistic model to analyse photosynthesis and variability in carbon allocation in two evergreen species at two Mediterranean forests. The model was calibrated using a combination of eddy covariance CO2 flux data, dendrochronological time series of secondary growth and forest inventory data. The model was modified to be climate explicit in the key processes addressing the acclimation of photosynthesis and the pattern of C allocation, particularly to water stress. It succeeded in fitting both the high- and the low-frequency response of stand GPP and carbon allocation to stem growth. This would support its capability to address both C-source and C-sink limitations. Simulations suggest a decrease in mean stomatal conductance in response to a recent enhancement in water stress and an increase in mean annual intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE) in both species during the last 50 years. However, this was not translated into a parallel increase in ecosystem water use efficiency (WUE). The interannual variability in WUE closely followed that in iWUE at both sites. Nevertheless, long-term decadal variability in WUE followed the long-term decrease in annual GPP matching the local trend in annual precipitation observed since the late 1970s at one site. In contrast, at the site where long-term precipitation remained stable, GPP and WUE did not show a negative trend and the trees buffered the climatic variability. In our simulations these temporal changes were related to acclimation processes at the canopy level, including modifications in LAI and stomatal conductance, but also partly related to increasing [CO2] because the model includes biochemical equations where photosynthesis is directly linked to [CO2

  20. Structural Basis for Methyl Transfer by a Radical SAM Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Grove, Tyler L.; McLaughlin, Monica I.; Yennawar, Neela H.; Booker, Squire J.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2014-10-02

    The radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes RlmN and Cfr methylate 23S ribosomal RNA, modifying the C2 or C8 position of adenosine 2503. The methyl groups are installed by a two-step sequence involving initial methylation of a conserved Cys residue (RlmN Cys{sup 355}) by SAM. Methyl transfer to the substrate requires reductive cleavage of a second equivalent of SAM. Crystal structures of RlmN and RlmN with SAM show that a single molecule of SAM coordinates the [4Fe-4S] cluster. Residue Cys{sup 355} is S-methylated and located proximal to the SAM methyl group, suggesting the SAM that is involved in the initial methyl transfer binds at the same site. Thus, RlmN accomplishes its complex reaction with structural economy, harnessing the two most important reactivities of SAM within a single site.

  1. Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM) - Home

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The SAM Home page provides access to all information provided in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM), and includes a query function allowing users to search methods by analyte, sample type and instrumentation.

  2. Optimization model for the allocation of water resources based on the maximization of employment in the agriculture and industry sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi Davijani, M.; Banihabib, M. E.; Nadjafzadeh Anvar, A.; Hashemi, S. R.

    2016-02-01

    In many discussions, work force is mentioned as the most important factor of production. Principally, work force is a factor which can compensate for the physical and material limitations and shortcomings of other factors to a large extent which can help increase the production level. On the other hand, employment is considered as an effective factor in social issues. The goal of the present research is the allocation of water resources so as to maximize the number of jobs created in the industry and agriculture sectors. An objective that has attracted the attention of policy makers involved in water supply and distribution is the maximization of the interests of beneficiaries and consumers in case of certain policies adopted. The present model applies the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm in order to determine the optimum amount of water allocated to each water-demanding sector, area under cultivation, agricultural production, employment in the agriculture sector, industrial production and employment in the industry sector. Based on the results obtained from this research, by optimally allocating water resources in the central desert region of Iran, 1096 jobs can be created in the industry and agriculture sectors, which constitutes an improvement of about 13% relative to the previous situation (non-optimal water utilization). It is also worth mentioning that by optimizing the employment factor as a social parameter, the other areas such as the economic sector are influenced as well. For example, in this investigation, the resulting economic benefits (incomes) have improved from 73 billion Rials at baseline employment figures to 112 billion Rials in the case of optimized employment condition. Therefore, it is necessary to change the inter-sector and intra-sector water allocation models in this region, because this change not only leads to more jobs in this area, but also causes an improvement in the region's economic conditions.

  3. Expanding Radical SAM Chemistry by Using Radical Addition Reactions and SAM Analogues.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xinjian; Li, Yongzhen; Xie, Liqi; Lu, Haojie; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Qi

    2016-09-19

    Radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes utilize a [4Fe-4S] cluster to bind SAM and reductively cleave its carbon-sulfur bond to produce a highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl (dAdo) radical. In almost all cases, the dAdo radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrates or from enzymes, thereby initiating a highly diverse array of reactions. Herein, we report a change of the dAdo radical-based chemistry from hydrogen abstraction to radical addition in the reaction of the radical SAM enzyme NosL. This change was achieved by using a substrate analogue containing an olefin moiety. We also showed that two SAM analogues containing different nucleoside functionalities initiate the radical-based reactions with high efficiencies. The radical adduct with the olefin produced in the reaction was found to undergo two divergent reactions, and the mechanistic insights into this process were investigated in detail. Our study demonstrates a promising strategy in expanding radical SAM chemistry, providing an effective way to access nucleoside-containing compounds by using radical SAM-dependent reactions.

  4. Health systems engineering as an improvement strategy: a case example using location-allocation modeling.

    PubMed

    Watts, Bradley V; Shiner, Brian; Ceyhan, Mehmet E; Musdal, Hande; Sinangil, Seda; Benneyan, James

    2013-01-01

    Finding the optimal geographic location for a medical service is a common challenge for healthcare organizations. However, there is limited use or description of methods to determine the optimal location of a medical service. We describe a case study of how location-allocation techniques used by industrial engineers assisted a regional healthcare network develop a plan for optimal location of sleep medicine services within its network.

  5. Changing model of nursing care from individual patient allocation to team nursing in the acute inpatient environment.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, Greg; Jones, Aaron; Rivas, Ketty

    2010-06-01

    Agreement was reached with 12 acute medical and surgical wards/units at Sydney's Prince of Wales Hospital to participate in a trial of team nursing (TN). Six units employed action research principles to undertake a change to a team nursing model and six remained with the pre-existing individual patient allocation (IPA) model. Task-based teaming was widely discarded by the team nursing units in favour of allocating patients within the team and introducing more supportive and communicative processes aimed at fostering responsibility sharing. Localised team-based models of care arose in the change wards and were outlined, implemented and refined using social action research principles. A 12-month prospective experimental comparison of job satisfaction and staff retention between the TN and IPA groups indicated statistically significant job satisfaction benefits and practically important staff retention benefits associated with moving away from an IPA model of nursing care delivery towards a team-based model of care delivery. Perhaps not surprisingly, job satisfaction gains were most marked among new graduate nurses, who reported real benefits from a teaming inspired shift in model of care in the acute inpatient environment.

  6. Comparison of new conditional value-at-risk-based management models for optimal allocation of uncertain water supplies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamout, Ghina M.; Hatfield, Kirk; Romeijn, H. Edwin

    2007-07-01

    The paper studies the effect of incorporating the conditional value-at-risk (CVaRα) in analyzing a water allocation problem versus using the frequently used expected value, two-stage modeling, scenario analysis, and linear optimization tools. Five models are developed to examine water resource allocation when available supplies are uncertain: (1) a deterministic expected value model, (2) a scenario analysis model, (3) a two-stage stochastic model with recourse, (4) a CVaRα objective function model, and (5) a CVaRα constraint model. The models are applied over a region of east central Florida. Results show the deterministic expected value model underestimates system costs and water shortage. Furthermore, the expected value model produces identical cost estimates for different standard deviations distributions of water supplies with identical mean. From the scenario analysis model it is again demonstrated that the expected value of results taken from many scenarios underestimates costs and water shortages. Using a two-stage stochastic mixed integer formulation with recourse permits an improved representation of uncertainties and real-life decision making which in turn predicts higher costs. The inclusion of CVaRα objective function in the latter provides for the optimization and control of high-risk events. Minimizing CVaRα does not, however, permit control of lower-risk events. Constraining CVaRα while minimizing cost, on the other hand, allows for the control of high-risk events while minimizing the costs of all events. Results show CVaRα exhibits continuous and consistent behavior with respect to the confidence level α, when compared to value-at-risk (VaRα).

  7. Drug delivery from therapeutic self-assembled monolayers (T-SAMs) on 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Mahapatro, Anil; Johnson, Dave M; Patel, Devang N; Feldman, Marc D; Ayon, Arturo A; Agrawal, C Mauli

    2008-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic agents from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on 316L stainless steel (SS) has been demonstrated as a viable method to deliver drugs for localized coronary artery stent application. SAMs are highly-ordered, nano-sized molecular coatings, adding 1-10 nm thickness to a surface. Hydroxyl terminated alkanethiol SAMs of 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (-OH SAM) were formed on 316L SS with 48 hr immersion in ethanolic solutions. Attachment of ibuprofen (a model drug) to the functional SAMs was carried out in toluene for 5 hrs at 60 degrees C using Novozume-435 as a biocatalyst. SAM formation and subsequent attachment of ibuprofen was characterized collectively using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and contact angle (CA) measure-ments. The quantitative in vitro release of ibuprofen into a "physiological" buffer solution was characterized using reverse phase HPLC. Drug release kinetics showed that 14.1 microg of ibuprofen eluted over a period of 35 days with 2.7microg being eluted in the first day and the remaining being eluted over a period of 35 days. The drug release kinetics showed an increase in ibuprofen elution that occurred during first 14 days (2.7microg in 1 day to 9.5 microg in 14 days), following which there was a decrease in the rate of elution. Thus, functional SAMs on 316L SS could be used as tethers for drug attachment and could serve as a drug delivery mechanism from stainless steel implants such as coronary artery stents.

  8. Make or buy analysis model based on tolerance allocation to minimize manufacturing cost and fuzzy quality loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosyidi, C. N.; Puspitoingrum, W.; Jauhari, W. A.; Suhardi, B.; Hamada, K.

    2016-02-01

    The specification of tolerances has a significant impact on the quality of product and final production cost. The company should carefully pay attention to the component or product tolerance so they can produce a good quality product at the lowest cost. Tolerance allocation has been widely used to solve problem in selecting particular process or supplier. But before merely getting into the selection process, the company must first make a plan to analyse whether the component must be made in house (make), to be purchased from a supplier (buy), or used the combination of both. This paper discusses an optimization model of process and supplier selection in order to minimize the manufacturing costs and the fuzzy quality loss. This model can also be used to determine the allocation of components to the selected processes or suppliers. Tolerance, process capability and production capacity are three important constraints that affect the decision. Fuzzy quality loss function is used in this paper to describe the semantic of the quality, in which the product quality level is divided into several grades. The implementation of the proposed model has been demonstrated by solving a numerical example problem that used a simple assembly product which consists of three components. The metaheuristic approach were implemented to OptQuest software from Oracle Crystal Ball in order to obtain the optimal solution of the numerical example.

  9. Mitochondrial Sorting and Assembly Machinery Subunit Sam37 in Candida albicans: Insight into the Roles of Mitochondria in Fitness, Cell Wall Integrity, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yue; Jelicic, Branka; Pettolino, Filomena; Perry, Andrew; Lo, Tricia L.; Hewitt, Victoria L.; Bantun, Farkad; Beilharz, Traude H.; Peleg, Anton Y.; Lithgow, Trevor; Djordjevic, Julianne T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that mitochondrial functions impinge on cell wall integrity, drug tolerance, and virulence of human fungal pathogens. However, the mechanistic aspects of these processes are poorly understood. We focused on the mitochondrial outer membrane SAM (Sorting and Assembly Machinery) complex subunit Sam37 in Candida albicans. Inactivation of SAM37 in C. albicans leads to a large reduction in fitness, a phenotype not conserved with the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our data indicate that slow growth of the sam37ΔΔ mutant results from mitochondrial DNA loss, a new function for Sam37 in C. albicans, and from reduced activity of the essential SAM complex subunit Sam35. The sam37ΔΔ mutant was hypersensitive to drugs that target the cell wall and displayed altered cell wall structure, supporting a role for Sam37 in cell wall integrity in C. albicans. The sensitivity of the mutant to membrane-targeting antifungals was not significantly altered. The sam37ΔΔ mutant was avirulent in the mouse model, and bioinformatics showed that the fungal Sam37 proteins are distant from their animal counterparts and could thus represent potential drug targets. Our study provides the first direct evidence for a link between mitochondrial function and cell wall integrity in C. albicans and is further relevant for understanding mitochondrial function in fitness, antifungal drug tolerance, and virulence of this major pathogen. Beyond the relevance to fungal pathogenesis, this work also provides new insight into the mitochondrial and cellular roles of the SAM complex in fungi. PMID:22286093

  10. Effects of nonlinear model response on allocation of streamflow depletion: exemplified by the case of Beaver Creek, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlfeld, David P.; Schneider, James C.; Spalding, Charles P.

    2016-11-01

    Anomalies found when apportioning responsibility for streamflow depletion are examined. The anomalies arise when responsibility is assigned to the two states that contribute to depletion of Beaver Creek in the Republican River Basin in the United States. The apportioning procedure for this basin presumes that the sum of streamflow depletions, computed by comparing simulation model runs with and without groundwater pumping from individual states, approximates the streamflow depletion when both states are pumping. In the case study presented here, this presumed superposition fails dramatically. The stream drying and aquifer-storage depletion, as represented in the simulation model used for allocation, are examined in detail to understand the hydrologic and numerical basis for the severe nonlinear response. Users of apportioning procedures that rely on superposition should be aware of the presence and likely magnitude of nonlinear responses in modeling tools.

  11. Optimal control model predictions of system performance and attention allocation and their experimental validation in a display design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johannsen, G.; Govindaraj, T.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of different types of predictor displays in a longitudinal vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) hover task is analyzed in a theoretical study. Several cases with differing amounts of predictive and rate information are compared. The optimal control model of the human operator is used to estimate human and system performance in terms of root-mean-square (rms) values and to compute optimized attention allocation. The only part of the model which is varied to predict these data is the observation matrix. Typical cases are selected for a subsequent experimental validation. The rms values as well as eye-movement data are recorded. The results agree favorably with those of the theoretical study in terms of relative differences. Better matching is achieved by revised model input data.

  12. Approaches to Resource Allocation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dressel, Paul; Simon, Lou Anna Kimsey

    1976-01-01

    Various budgeting patterns and strategies are currently in use, each with its own particular strengths and weaknesses. Neither cost-benefit analysis nor cost-effectiveness analysis offers any better solution to the allocation problem than do the unsupported contentions of departments or the historical unit costs. An operable model that performs…

  13. Modeling of Channel Allocation in Broadband Powerline Communications Access Networks as a Multi-Criteria Optimization Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidine, Abdelfatteh; Lehnert, Ralf

    The planning process of the Broadband Powerline communications access networks contains two main problem parts: theGeneralized Base Station Placement (GBSP) problem and the PLC Channel Allocation Problem (P-CAP). The GBSP is investigated/solved in our previous works. In this paper, we focus on the P-CAP. The task of the P-CAP consists in allocating a sub-set of channels from an available set of PLC channels to each base station in the B-PLC site. Two optimization objectives are considered for the solution of this problem; namely the maximization of the resource reuse and the minimization of the generated interferences in the site. These objectives are conflicting, since the optimization of one of them results in the deterioration of the other. Therefore, this problem is modeled as a Multi-objective (or multi-criteria) Optimization Problem (MOP). Three variants of Pareto-based multi-objective algorithms, using evolutionary search, are used to solve it. Their performances are evaluated on four problem instances.

  14. Research and evaluation of biomass resources/conversion/utilization systems. Biomass allocation model. Volume 1: Test and appendices A & B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringer, R. P.; Ahn, Y. K.; Chen, H. T.; Helm, R. W.; Nelson, E. T.; Shields, K. J.

    1981-08-01

    A biomass allocation model was developed to show the most profitable combination of biomass feedstocks, thermochemical conversion processes, and fuel products to serve the seasonal conditions in a regional market. This optimization model provides a tool for quickly calculating which of a large number of potential biomass missions is the most profitable mission. Other components of the system serve as a convenient storage and retrieval mechanism for biomass marketing and thermochemical conversion processing data. The system can be accessed through the use of a computer terminal, or it could be adapted to a microprocessor. A User's Manual for the system is included. Biomass derived fuels included in the data base are the following: medium Btu gas, low Btu gas, substitute natural gas, ammonia, methanol, electricity, gasoline, and fuel oil.

  15. Applying the Attention-Allocation Model to the Explanation of Alcohol-Related Aggression: Implications for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Giancola, Peter R.; Josephs, Robert A.; DeWall, C. Nathan; Gunn, Rachel L.

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to apply the attention allocation model (AAM; Steele & Josephs, 1990) to the explanation, as well as the prevention, of alcohol-related violence. The AAM contends that alcohol has a “myopic” effect on attentional capacity that presumably facilitates aggression by narrowing attentional focus on the most salient provocative cues, that are naturally present in hostile situations, rather than less salient inhibitory cues. Data are presented to demonstrate support for the AAM with regard to alcohol-related aggression. The model has also been expanded to suggest some intermediary mechanisms that may account for how distracting attention away from provocative cues might be involved in the reduction of aggression. Finally, a number of practical suggestions are put forth regarding how the AAM can be applied to the prevention of intoxicated aggression. PMID:19938917

  16. Applying the attention-allocation model to the explanation of alcohol-related aggression: implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Giancola, Peter R; Josephs, Robert A; DeWall, C Nathan; Gunn, Rachel L

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to apply the attention-allocation model (AAM; Steele and Josephs, 1990 ) to the explanation, as well as the prevention, of alcohol-related violence. The AAM contends that alcohol has a "myopic" effect on attentional capacity that presumably facilitates aggression by narrowing attentional focus on the most salient provocative cues that are naturally present in hostile situations, rather than on less salient inhibitory cues. Data are presented to demonstrate support for the AAM with regard to alcohol-related aggression. The model has also been expanded to suggest some intermediary mechanisms that may account for how distracting attention away from provocative cues might be involved in the reduction of aggression. Finally, a number of practical suggestions are put forth regarding how the AAM can be applied to the prevention of intoxicated aggression.

  17. A variation reduction allocation model for quality improvement to minimize investment and quality costs by considering suppliers’ learning curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosyidi, C. N.; Jauhari, WA; Suhardi, B.; Hamada, K.

    2016-02-01

    Quality improvement must be performed in a company to maintain its product competitiveness in the market. The goal of such improvement is to increase the customer satisfaction and the profitability of the company. In current practice, a company needs several suppliers to provide the components in assembly process of a final product. Hence quality improvement of the final product must involve the suppliers. In this paper, an optimization model to allocate the variance reduction is developed. Variation reduction is an important term in quality improvement for both manufacturer and suppliers. To improve suppliers’ components quality, the manufacturer must invest an amount of their financial resources in learning process of the suppliers. The objective function of the model is to minimize the total cost consists of investment cost, and quality costs for both internal and external quality costs. The Learning curve will determine how the employee of the suppliers will respond to the learning processes in reducing the variance of the component.

  18. Water consumption and allocation strategies along the river oases of Tarim River based on large-scale hydrological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Disse, Markus; Yu, Ruide

    2016-04-01

    With the mainstream of 1,321km and located in an arid area in northwest China, the Tarim River is China's longest inland river. The Tarim basin on the northern edge of the Taklamakan desert is an extremely arid region. In this region, agricultural water consumption and allocation management are crucial to address the conflicts among irrigation water users from upstream to downstream. Since 2011, the German Ministry of Science and Education BMBF established the Sino-German SuMaRiO project, for the sustainable management of river oases along the Tarim River. The project aims to contribute to a sustainable land management which explicitly takes into account ecosystem functions and ecosystem services. SuMaRiO will identify realizable management strategies, considering social, economic and ecological criteria. This will have positive effects for nearly 10 million inhabitants of different ethnic groups. The modelling of water consumption and allocation strategies is a core block in the SuMaRiO cluster. A large-scale hydrological model (MIKE HYDRO Basin) was established for the purpose of sustainable agricultural water management in the main stem Tarim River. MIKE HYDRO Basin is an integrated, multipurpose, map-based decision support tool for river basin analysis, planning and management. It provides detailed simulation results concerning water resources and land use in the catchment areas of the river. Calibration data and future predictions based on large amount of data was acquired. The results of model calibration indicated a close correlation between simulated and observed values. Scenarios with the change on irrigation strategies and land use distributions were investigated. Irrigation scenarios revealed that the available irrigation water has significant and varying effects on the yields of different crops. Irrigation water saving could reach up to 40% in the water-saving irrigation scenario. Land use scenarios illustrated that an increase of farmland area in the

  19. SOAR Adaptive Module (SAM): Seeing Improvement with a UV Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Cantarutti, Rolando; Tighe, Roberto; Schurter, Patricio; Martinez, Manuel; Thomas, Sandrine; van der Bliek, Nicole

    2016-12-01

    The adaptive module of the 4.1 m SOAR telescope, SOAR Adaptive Module (SAM), corrects ground-layer turbulence using an ultraviolet laser guide star. It has been commissioned in 2013 and it is in regular science operation since 2014. SAM works with the CCD imager covering a 3‧ field or with the speckle camera. It operates routinely and stably, delivering resolution in the I band equal to the free-atmosphere seeing. This paper describes the SAM system as a whole, providing essential reference for its users and technical information of interest to instrumentalists. Operation of the instrument, its performance, and science projects done with SAM so far are reviewed.

  20. General Quality Control (QC) Guidelines for SAM Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  1. Updates to the Demographic and Spatial Allocation Models to Produce Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios (ICLUS) (Version 2) (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the availability of the draft report, Updates to the Demographic and Spatial Allocation Models to Produce Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios (ICLUS) for a 30-day public comment period. The ICLUS version 2 (v2) modeling tool furthered land change mod...

  2. Updates to the Demographic and Spatial Allocation Models to Produce Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios (ICLUS) (Final Report, Version 2)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's announced the availability of the final report, Updates to the Demographic and Spatial Allocation Models to Produce Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios (ICLUS) (Version 2). This update furthered land change modeling by providing nationwide housing developmen...

  3. A dynamic model for intertemporal allocation of old-growth forests in the Pacific Northwest.

    PubMed

    Carver, Andrew D; Lee, John G; LeMaster, Dennis C

    2002-12-01

    Across the globe, continued policy debates regarding the management of old-growth forests center around the difficult task of balancing economic and ecological considerations. Though the forests of the Pacific Northwest United States are among the most studied old-growth ecosystems, ecological and economic analyses have yielded public land management directives that remain controversial. Specifically, the recently adopted Northwest Forest Plan lacks explicit goals for maintaining intergenerational equity for the use of forest resources and the diversity of old-growth ecosystems. Unlike previous studies which rely on monetary quantification of costs and benefits, this study develops and applies a conceptual framework for evaluating socially optimal Pacific Northwest old-growth forest utilization strategies. Conditions for the optimal management of old-growth forests are derived using dynamic programming. The objective function synthesizes relevant biological and economic attributes of the old-growth allocation problem. Results in the form of extraction paths are compared given social pressure for consumptive and non-consumptive benefits, as well as different planning horizons, rates of social time preference, and environmental variance. Lengthening the planning horizon results in a vast divergence of optimal policies in the absence of discounting. Extraction rates appear to approach zero as the planning horizon approaches infinity. While higher rates of social time preference increase the rate of extraction, forest stocks remaining at the terminal time period equal levels remaining with a lower discount rate. Increasing environmental variance results in a higher level of stock remaining at the terminal time period. This analysis, while specific to the old-growth controversy of the Pacific Northwest, does provide general guidelines for addressing similar problems of multiple uses of natural areas, particularly where such uses are mutually incompatible, or where one

  4. Multi-objective models of waste load allocation toward a sustainable reuse of drainage water in irrigation.

    PubMed

    Allam, Ayman; Tawfik, Ahmed; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Fleifle, Amr

    2016-06-01

    The present study proposes a waste load allocation (WLA) framework for a sustainable quality management of agricultural drainage water (ADW). Two multi-objective models, namely, abatement-performance and abatement-equity-performance, were developed through the integration of a water quality model (QAUL2Kw) and a genetic algorithm, by considering (1) the total waste load abatement, and (2) the inequity among waste dischargers. For successfully accomplishing modeling tasks, we developed a comprehensive overall performance measure (E wla ) reflecting possible violations of Egyptian standards for ADW reuse in irrigation. This methodology was applied to the Gharbia drain in the Nile Delta, Egypt, during both summer and winter seasons of 2012. Abatement-performance modeling results for a target of E wla = 100 % corresponded to the abatement ratio of the dischargers ranging from 20.7 to 75.6 % and 29.5 to 78.5 % in summer and in winter, respectively, alongside highly shifting inequity values. Abatement-equity-performance modeling results for a target of E wla = 90 % unraveled the necessity of increasing treatment efforts in three out of five dischargers during summer, and four out of five in winter. The trade-off curves obtained from WLA models proved their reliability in selecting appropriate WLA procedures as a function of budget constraints, principles of social equity, and desired overall performance level. Hence, the proposed framework of methodologies is of great importance to decision makers working toward a sustainable reuse of the ADW in irrigation.

  5. Halomethane production in plants: Structure of the biosynthetic SAM-dependent halide methyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana**

    PubMed Central

    Schmidberger, Jason W.; James, Agata B.; Edwards, Robert; Naismith, James H.; O’Hagan, David

    2012-01-01

    A product structure of the halomethane producing enzyme in plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) is reported and a model for presentation of chloride/bromide ion to the methyl group of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) is presented to rationalise nucleophilic halide attack for halomethane production, gaseous natural products that are produced globally. PMID:20376845

  6. The Role of Integrated Modelling and Assessment for Decision-Making: Lessons from Water Allocation Issues in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakeman, A. J.; Guillaume, J. H. A.; El Sawah, S.; Hamilton, S.

    2014-12-01

    Integrated modelling and assessment (IMA) is best regarded as a process that can support environmental decision-making when issues are strongly contested and uncertainties pervasive. To be most useful, the process must be multi-dimensional and phased. Principally, it must be tailored to the problem context to encompass diverse issues of concern, management settings and stakeholders. This in turn requires the integration of multiple processes and components of natural and human systems and their corresponding spatial and temporal scales. Modellers therefore need to be able to integrate multiple disciplines, methods, models, tools and data, and many sources and types of uncertainty. These dimensions are incorporated into iteration between the various phases of the IMA process, including scoping, problem framing and formulation, assessing options and communicating findings. Two case studies in Australia are employed to share the lessons of how integration can be achieved in these IMA phases using a mix of stakeholder participation processes and modelling tools. One case study aims to improve the relevance of modelling by incorporating stakeholder's views of irrigated viticulture and water management decision making. It used a novel methodology with the acronym ICTAM, consisting of Interviews to elicit mental models, Cognitive maps to represent and analyse individual and group mental models, Time-sequence diagrams to chronologically structure the decision making process, an All-encompassing conceptual model, and computational Models of stakeholder decision making. The second case uses a hydro-economic river network model to examine basin-wide impacts of water allocation cuts and adoption of farm innovations. The knowledge exchange approach used in each case was designed to integrate data and knowledge bearing in mind the contextual dimensions of the problem at hand, and the specific contributions that environmental modelling was thought to be able to make.

  7. The Study of Active Monitoring in Sweden (SAMS): A randomized study comparing two different follow-up schedules for active surveillance of low-risk prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Stefan; Holmberg, Erik; Holmberg, Lars; Johansson, Eva; Josefsson, Andreas; Nilsson, Annika; Nyberg, Maria; Robinsson, David; Sandberg, Jonas; Sandblom, Dag; Stattin, Pär

    2013-01-01

    Objective Only a minority of patients with low-risk prostate cancer needs treatment, but the methods for optimal selection of patients for treatment are not established. This article describes the Study of Active Monitoring in Sweden (SAMS), which aims to improve those methods. Material and methods SAMS is a prospective, multicentre study of active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer. It consists of a randomized part comparing standard rebiopsy and follow-up with an extensive initial rebiopsy coupled with less intensive follow-up and no further scheduled biopsies (SAMS-FU), as well as an observational part (SAMS-ObsQoL). Quality of life is assessed with questionnaires and compared with patients receiving primary curative treatment. SAMS-FU is planned to randomize 500 patients and SAMS-ObsQoL to include at least 500 patients during 5 years. The primary endpoint is conversion to active treatment. The secondary endpoints include symptoms, distant metastases and mortality. All patients will be followed for 10–15 years. Results Inclusion started in October 2011. In March 2013, 148 patients were included at 13 Swedish urological centres. Conclusions It is hoped that the results of SAMS will contribute to fewer patients with indolent, low-risk prostate cancer receiving unnecessary treatment and more patients on active surveillance who need treatment receiving it when the disease is still curable. The less intensive investigational follow-up in the SAMS-FU trial would reduce the healthcare resources allocated to this large group of patients if it replaced the present standard schedule. PMID:23883427

  8. Resource allocation using risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, T. F.; Eisenhawer, S. W.

    2003-01-01

    Allocating limited resources among competing priorities is an important problem in management. In this paper we describe an approach to resource allocation using risk as a metric. We call this approach the Logic-Evolved Decision (LED) approach because we use logic-models to generate an exhaustive set of competing options and to describe the often highly complex model used for evaluating the risk reduction achieved by different resource allocations among these options. The risk evaluation then proceeds using probabilistic or linguistic input data.

  9. Competition for light and water increases tree carbon allocation to fine roots and leaves in a next-generation dynamic vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichstein, J. W.; Zhang, T.; Weng, E.; Farrior, C.; Dybzinski, R.; Birdsey, R.; Pacala, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    The response of the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle to climate change is a key uncertainty in land models. An important component of this uncertainty concerns plant functional diversity, which is typically represented in land models by ~10 functional types (PFTs) with fixed traits. However, few land models include the individual-level competitive mechanisms that largely determine how plant functional traits are distributed in time and space in real ecosystems. We have developed a new land model that represents height-structured competition for light with a simple canopy space-filling algorithm, the perfect plasticity approximation (PPA). The new land model, LM3-PPA, allows for an arbitrary number of PFTs (or 'species') whose spatial-temporal distributions are determined by the outcome of competition for light and water. We performed experiments with a modified version of LM3-PPA in 10 eastern U.S. grid cells and across simulated precipitation gradients to determine how competition for light and water affects tree C allocation to leaves, fine roots, and wood across climate gradients and in response to episodic drought. We studied the performance of 16 allocational types ('species') in monoculture and in competition with each other to determine the competitively-optimal, NPP-maximizing, and biomass-maximizing C allocation strategy under different environmental conditions. Under chronically moist conditions, competitively-optimal, NPP-maximizing, and biomass-maximizing trees all had similar C allocation. However, under chronically dry conditions, competitively-optimal trees allocated more C to both fine roots and leaves, and less C to wood, compared to NPP- or biomass-maximizing strategies. When subject to episodic drought, the most drought-tolerant allocational strategies had relatively low allocation to leaves (and thus low leaf area and low water demand). Thus, the "over-investment" in leaves that results from resource competition increases the vulnerability of

  10. Comparison of three methods for the optimal allocation of hydrological model participation in an Ensemble Prediction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochero, D.; Anctil, F.; Gagné, C.

    2012-04-01

    Today, the availability of the Meteorological Ensemble Prediction Systems (MEPS) and its subsequent coupling with multiple hydrological models offer the possibility of building Hydrological Ensemble Prediction Systems (HEPS) consisting of a large number of members. However, this task is complex both in terms of the coupling of information and of the computational time, which may create an operational barrier. The evaluation of the prominence of each hydrological members can be seen as a non-parametric post-processing stage that seeks finding the optimal participation of the hydrological models (in a fashion similar to the Bayesian model averaging technique), maintaining or improving the quality of a probabilistic forecasts based on only x members drawn from a super ensemble of d members, thus allowing the reduction of the task required to issue the probabilistic forecast. The main objective of the current work consists in assessing the degree of simplification (reduction of the number of hydrological members) that can be achieved with a HEPS configured using 16 lumped hydrological models driven by the 50 weather ensemble forecasts from the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), i.e. an 800-member HEPS. In a previous work (Brochero et al., 2011a, b), we demonstrated that the proportion of members allocated to each hydrological model is a sufficient criterion to reduce the number of hydrological members while improving the balance of the scores, taking into account interchangeability of the ECMWF MEPS. Here, we compare the proportion of members allocated to each hydrological model derived from three non-parametric techniques: correlation analysis of hydrological members, Backward Greedy Selection (BGS) and Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA II). The last two techniques allude to techniques developed in machine learning, in a multicriteria framework exploiting the relationship between bias, reliability, and the number of members of the

  11. Theodore Roosevelt Chloroforming Uncle Sam "In the Hopeless Ward".

    PubMed

    Drew, Benjamin A; Bause, George S

    2016-10-01

    In March of 1905 in Judge magazine, Louis Dalrymple published his political cartoon of Theodore Roosevelt chloroforming "Uncle Sam." Having sampled a host of Democratic remedies, the 125-year-old Sam can expect that Roosevelt's chloroform will either cure him with major Republican surgery or kill him with Osler-linked euthanasia.

  12. Statistical analysis of blocking probability and fragmentation based on Markov modeling of elastic spectrum allocation on fiber link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, A. N. F.; Wiatr, P.; Cavdar, C.; Carvalho, S. V.; Costa, J. C. W. A.; Wosinska, L.

    2015-11-01

    In Elastic Optical Network (EON), spectrum fragmentation refers to the existence of non-aligned, small-sized blocks of free subcarrier slots in the optical spectrum. Several metrics have been proposed in order to quantify a level of spectrum fragmentation. Approximation methods might be used for estimating average blocking probability and some fragmentation measures, but are so far unable to accurately evaluate the influence of different sizes of connection requests and do not allow in-depth investigation of blocking events and their relation to fragmentation. The analytical study of the effect of fragmentation on requests' blocking probability is still under-explored. In this work, we introduce new definitions for blocking that differentiate between the reasons for the blocking events. We developed a framework based on Markov modeling to calculate steady-state probabilities for the different blocking events and to analyze fragmentation related problems in elastic optical links under dynamic traffic conditions. This framework can also be used for evaluation of different definitions of fragmentation in terms of their relation to the blocking probability. We investigate how different allocation request sizes contribute to fragmentation and blocking probability. Moreover, we show to which extend blocking events, due to insufficient amount of available resources, become inevitable and, compared to the amount of blocking events due to fragmented spectrum, we draw conclusions on the possible gains one can achieve by system defragmentation. We also show how efficient spectrum allocation policies really are in reducing the part of fragmentation that in particular leads to actual blocking events. Simulation experiments are carried out showing good match with our analytical results for blocking probability in a small scale scenario. Simulated blocking probabilities for the different blocking events are provided for a larger scale elastic optical link.

  13. Student Activities in Meteorology (SAM), June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, B.L.; Passarelli, E.

    1994-06-01

    In an effort to inspire student interest in science and technology, scientists from the Forecast Systems Laboratory, a laboratory within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Environmental Research Laboratories, and classroom teachers from the Boulder Valley School District collaborated to produce a series of classroom science activities on meteorology and atmospheric science. We call this series 'Student Activities in Meteorology,' or SAM. The goal is to provide activities that are interesting to students, and at the same time convenient and easy to use for teachers. The activity topics chosen are to incorporate trend setting scientific research and cutting edge technology. Several of the activities focus on the meteorological concerns of the Denver metropolitan area because many of NOAA's research labs are located in Boulder, where much of the research and testing for the region is performed. We believe that these activities are versatile and can be easily integrated into current science, environmental studies, health, social studies, and math curricula.

  14. Obituary: Sam Roweis (1972-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, David

    2011-12-01

    Computer scientist and statistical astronomer Sam Roweis took his own life in New York City on 2010 January 12. He was a brilliant and accomplished researcher in the field of machine learning, and a strong advocate for the use of computational statistics for automating discovery and scientific data analysis. He made several important contributions to astronomy and was working on adaptive astronomical data analysis at the time of his death. Roweis obtained his PhD in 1999 from the California Institute of Technology, where he worked on a remarkable range of subjects, including DNA computing, modeling of dynamical systems, signal processing, and speech recognition. During this time he unified and clarified some of the most important data analysis techniques, including Principal Component Analysis, Hidden Markov Models, and Expectation Maximization. His work was aimed at making data analysis and modeling faster, but also better justified scientifically. The last years of his PhD were spent in Princeton NJ, where he came in contact with a young generation of cosmologists thinking about microwave background and large-scale structure data. In a postdoc at University College London, Roweis co-created the Locally Linear Embedding (LLE) algorithm; a simple but flexible technique for mapping a large data set onto a low-dimensional manifold. The LLE paper obtained more than 2700 citations in 9 years, launched a new sub-field of machine learning known as "manifold learning," and inspired work in data visualization, search, and applied mathematics. In 2001, Roweis took a faculty job at the University of Toronto Computer Science Department. He continued working on data analysis methods that have probabilistic interpretation and therefore scientific applicability, but at the same time have good performance on large data sets. He was awarded a Sloan Fellowship, a Canada Research Chair, and a fellowship of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, among other honors and awards

  15. Dynamic Channel Allocation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    7 1 . Fixed Channel Allocation (FCA) ........................................................7 2. Dynamic Channel ...19 7. CSMA/CD-Based Multiple Network Lines .....................................20 8. Hybrid Channel Allocation in Wireless Networks...28 1 . Channel Allocation

  16. [Effects of air temperature, solar radiation and soil water on dry matter accumulation and allocation of greenhouse muskmelon seedlings and related simulation models].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Ming; Zou, Zhi-Rong

    2007-12-01

    With different sowing dates and irrigation upper limits, the effects of air temperature, solar radiation and soil water on the dry matter accumulation and allocation of greenhouse muskmelon seedlings were studied, with related simulation models established. The results showed that the dry matter accumulation and allocation of the seedlings had correlations with the changes of effective accumulative temperature, accumulative solar radiation, and irrigation upper limits at different seasons in a year, but the correlation coefficients differed with sowing dates and irrigation upper limits. Comprehensive analysis showed that the dry matter accumulation model was an exponential function, while the dry matter allocation model was a conic function, both of which were driven by effective accumulative temperature. The constant term in the functions was driven by accumulative daily temperature difference and accumulative solar radiation, and the correlation was a linear function. Model test showed that the models were able to objectively simulate and predict the changes of plant dry matter accumulation and allocation, and possessed practical value for the growth analysis and production management of muskmelon seedling.

  17. Economic Analysis Case Studies of Battery Energy Storage with SAM

    SciTech Connect

    DiOrio, Nicholas; Dobos, Aron; Janzou, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Interest in energy storage has continued to increase as states like California have introduced mandates and subsidies to spur adoption. This energy storage includes customer sited behind-the-meter storage coupled with photovoltaics (PV). This paper presents case study results from California and Tennessee, which were performed to assess the economic benefit of customer-installed systems. Different dispatch strategies, including manual scheduling and automated peak-shaving were explored to determine ideal ways to use the storage system to increase the system value and mitigate demand charges. Incentives, complex electric tariffs, and site specific load and PV data were used to perform detailed analysis. The analysis was performed using the free, publically available System Advisor Model (SAM) tool. We find that installation of photovoltaics with a lithium-ion battery system priced at $300/kWh in Los Angeles under a high demand charge utility rate structure and dispatched using perfect day-ahead forecasting yields a positive net-present value, while all other scenarios cost the customer more than the savings accrued. Different dispatch strategies, including manual scheduling and automated peak-shaving were explored to determine ideal ways to use the storage system to increase the system value and mitigate demand charges. Incentives, complex electric tariffs, and site specific load and PV data were used to perform detailed analysis. The analysis was performed using the free, publically available System Advisor Model (SAM) tool. We find that installation of photovoltaics with a lithium-ion battery system priced at $300/kWh in Los Angeles under a high demand charge utility rate structure and dispatched using perfect day-ahead forecasting yields a positive net-present value, while all other scenarios cost the customer more than the savings accrued.

  18. A sub-canopy structure for simulating oil palm in the Community Land Model: phenology, allocation and yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y.; Roupsard, O.; Bernoux, M.; Le Maire, G.; Panferov, O.; Kotowska, M. M.; Knohl, A.

    2015-06-01

    Land surface modelling has been widely used to characterize the two-way interactions between climate and human activities in terrestrial ecosystems such as deforestation, agricultural expansion, and urbanization. Towards an effort to quantify the effects of forests to oil palm conversion occurring in the tropics on land-atmosphere carbon, water and energy fluxes, we introduce a new perennial crop plant functional type (PFT) for oil palm. Due to the modular and sequential nature of oil palm growth (around 40 stacked phytomers) and yield (fruit bunches axillated on each phytomer), we developed a specific sub-canopy structure for simulating palm's growth and yield within the framework of the Community Land Model (CLM4.5). In this structure each phytomer has its own prognostic leaf growth and fruit yield capacity like a PFT but with shared stem and root components among all phytomers. Phenology and carbon and nitrogen allocation operate on the different phytomers in parallel but at unsynchronized steps, so that multiple fruit yields per annum are enabled in terms of carbon and nitrogen outputs. An important phenological phase is identified for the palm PFT - the storage growth period of bud and "spear" leaves which are photosynthetically inactive before expansion. Agricultural practices such as transplanting, fertilization, and leaf pruning are represented. Parameters introduced for the new PFT were calibrated and validated with field measurements of leaf area index (LAI) and yield from Sumatra, Indonesia. In calibration with a mature oil palm plantation, the cumulative yields from 2005 to 2014 matched perfectly between simulation and observation (mean percentage error = 4 %). Simulated inter-annual dynamics of PFT-level and phytomer-level LAI were both within the range of field measurements. Validation from eight independent oil palm sites shows the ability of the model to adequately predict the average leaf growth and fruit yield across sites but also indicates that

  19. Simulation modelling for resource allocation and planning in the health sector.

    PubMed

    Lehaney, B; Hlupic, V

    1995-12-01

    This paper provides a review of the use of simulation for resource planning in the health sector. Case examples of simulation in health are provided, and the modelling problems are explored. The successes and failures of simulation modelling in this context are examined, and an approach for improving the processes, and outcomes, by the use of soft systems methodology, is suggested.

  20. Modeling Drivers' Visual Attention Allocation while Interacting with In-Vehicle Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horrey, William J.; Wickens, Christopher D.; Consalus, Kyle P.

    2006-01-01

    In 2 experiments, the authors examined how characteristics of a simulated traffic environment and in-vehicle tasks impact driver performance and visual scanning and the extent to which a computational model of visual attention (SEEV model) could predict scanning behavior. In Experiment 1, the authors manipulated task-relevant information bandwidth…

  1. District Allocation of Human Resources Utilizing the Evidence Based Model: A Study of One High Achieving School District in Southern California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Amber Marie

    2013-01-01

    This study applies the Gap Analysis Framework to understand the gaps that exist in human resource allocation of one Southern California school district. Once identified, gaps are closed with the reallocation of human resources, according to the Evidenced Based Model, requiring the re-purposing of core classroom teachers, specialists, special…

  2. An Innovative Time-Cost-Quality Tradeoff Modeling of Building Construction Project Based on Resource Allocation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The time, quality, and cost are three important but contradictive objectives in a building construction project. It is a tough challenge for project managers to optimize them since they are different parameters. This paper presents a time-cost-quality optimization model that enables managers to optimize multiobjectives. The model is from the project breakdown structure method where task resources in a construction project are divided into a series of activities and further into construction labors, materials, equipment, and administration. The resources utilized in a construction activity would eventually determine its construction time, cost, and quality, and a complex time-cost-quality trade-off model is finally generated based on correlations between construction activities. A genetic algorithm tool is applied in the model to solve the comprehensive nonlinear time-cost-quality problems. Building of a three-storey house is an example to illustrate the implementation of the model, demonstrate its advantages in optimizing trade-off of construction time, cost, and quality, and help make a winning decision in construction practices. The computational time-cost-quality curves in visual graphics from the case study prove traditional cost-time assumptions reasonable and also prove this time-cost-quality trade-off model sophisticated. PMID:24672351

  3. An innovative time-cost-quality tradeoff modeling of building construction project based on resource allocation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenfa; He, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    The time, quality, and cost are three important but contradictive objectives in a building construction project. It is a tough challenge for project managers to optimize them since they are different parameters. This paper presents a time-cost-quality optimization model that enables managers to optimize multiobjectives. The model is from the project breakdown structure method where task resources in a construction project are divided into a series of activities and further into construction labors, materials, equipment, and administration. The resources utilized in a construction activity would eventually determine its construction time, cost, and quality, and a complex time-cost-quality trade-off model is finally generated based on correlations between construction activities. A genetic algorithm tool is applied in the model to solve the comprehensive nonlinear time-cost-quality problems. Building of a three-storey house is an example to illustrate the implementation of the model, demonstrate its advantages in optimizing trade-off of construction time, cost, and quality, and help make a winning decision in construction practices. The computational time-cost-quality curves in visual graphics from the case study prove traditional cost-time assumptions reasonable and also prove this time-cost-quality trade-off model sophisticated.

  4. A Minimalistic Resource Allocation Model to Explain Ubiquitous Increase in Protein Expression with Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Keren, Leeat; Segal, Eran; Milo, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Most proteins show changes in level across growth conditions. Many of these changes seem to be coordinated with the specific growth rate rather than the growth environment or the protein function. Although cellular growth rates, gene expression levels and gene regulation have been at the center of biological research for decades, there are only a few models giving a base line prediction of the dependence of the proteome fraction occupied by a gene with the specific growth rate. We present a simple model that predicts a widely coordinated increase in the fraction of many proteins out of the proteome, proportionally with the growth rate. The model reveals how passive redistribution of resources, due to active regulation of only a few proteins, can have proteome wide effects that are quantitatively predictable. Our model provides a potential explanation for why and how such a coordinated response of a large fraction of the proteome to the specific growth rate arises under different environmental conditions. The simplicity of our model can also be useful by serving as a baseline null hypothesis in the search for active regulation. We exemplify the usage of the model by analyzing the relationship between growth rate and proteome composition for the model microorganism E.coli as reflected in recent proteomics data sets spanning various growth conditions. We find that the fraction out of the proteome of a large number of proteins, and from different cellular processes, increases proportionally with the growth rate. Notably, ribosomal proteins, which have been previously reported to increase in fraction with growth rate, are only a small part of this group of proteins. We suggest that, although the fractions of many proteins change with the growth rate, such changes may be partially driven by a global effect, not necessarily requiring specific cellular control mechanisms. PMID:27073913

  5. A Minimalistic Resource Allocation Model to Explain Ubiquitous Increase in Protein Expression with Growth Rate.

    PubMed

    Barenholz, Uri; Keren, Leeat; Segal, Eran; Milo, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Most proteins show changes in level across growth conditions. Many of these changes seem to be coordinated with the specific growth rate rather than the growth environment or the protein function. Although cellular growth rates, gene expression levels and gene regulation have been at the center of biological research for decades, there are only a few models giving a base line prediction of the dependence of the proteome fraction occupied by a gene with the specific growth rate. We present a simple model that predicts a widely coordinated increase in the fraction of many proteins out of the proteome, proportionally with the growth rate. The model reveals how passive redistribution of resources, due to active regulation of only a few proteins, can have proteome wide effects that are quantitatively predictable. Our model provides a potential explanation for why and how such a coordinated response of a large fraction of the proteome to the specific growth rate arises under different environmental conditions. The simplicity of our model can also be useful by serving as a baseline null hypothesis in the search for active regulation. We exemplify the usage of the model by analyzing the relationship between growth rate and proteome composition for the model microorganism E.coli as reflected in recent proteomics data sets spanning various growth conditions. We find that the fraction out of the proteome of a large number of proteins, and from different cellular processes, increases proportionally with the growth rate. Notably, ribosomal proteins, which have been previously reported to increase in fraction with growth rate, are only a small part of this group of proteins. We suggest that, although the fractions of many proteins change with the growth rate, such changes may be partially driven by a global effect, not necessarily requiring specific cellular control mechanisms.

  6. Evaluation of a digital model for estuarine water quality simulation in waste allocation studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seaburn, G.E.; Jennings, Marshall E.; Merritt, Michael L.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrologic and water-quality data were collected on 4 estuaries in Pasco, Citrus, and Pinellas Counties, Florida, to evaluate modeling results. Current and predicted waste loading of the four estuaries was simulated by use of a two-dimensional steady-state, intertidal-condition model. Concentrations of DO, carbonaceous and nitrogenous BOD, and chloride were simulated as averages over a tidal cycle. General equations for the model are based on the law of conservation of mass. Assumption of steady-state required that water-quality data for calibration be averaged over an appropriate time cycle with respect to volume and cross-section. Diurnal DO fluctuation was determined in 2 estuaries for evaluating the influence of photosynthesis and respiration. The estuary model is best applied by calibrating it for a particular set of observed conditions, and then using this calibrated model for sensitivity analyses without attempting to verify the chosen parameter values against a second set of conditions. Sensitivity analyses included dispersion coefficient , decay rates, photosynthesis, and respiration. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Characterisation of Desulfovibrio vulgaris haem b synthase, a radical SAM family member.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Susana A L; Lawrence, Andrew D; Romão, Célia V; Warren, Martin J; Teixeira, Miguel; Saraiva, Lígia M

    2014-07-01

    An alternative route for haem b biosynthesis is operative in sulfate-reducing bacteria of the Desulfovibrio genus and in methanogenic Archaea. This pathway diverges from the canonical one at the level of uroporphyrinogen III and progresses via a distinct branch, where sirohaem acts as an intermediate precursor being converted into haem b by a set of novel enzymes, named the alternative haem biosynthetic proteins (Ahb). In this work, we report the biochemical characterisation of the Desulfovibrio vulgaris AhbD enzyme that catalyses the last step of the pathway. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that AhbD promotes the cleavage of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and converts iron-coproporphyrin III via two oxidative decarboxylations to yield haem b, methionine and the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy studies demonstrated that AhbD contains two [4Fe-4S](2+/1+) centres and that binding of the substrates S-adenosylmethionine and iron-coproporphyrin III induces conformational modifications in both centres. Amino acid sequence comparisons indicated that D. vulgaris AhbD belongs to the radical SAM protein superfamily, with a GGE-like motif and two cysteine-rich sequences typical for ligation of SAM molecules and iron-sulfur clusters, respectively. A structural model of D. vulgaris AhbD with putative binding pockets for the iron-sulfur centres and the substrates SAM and iron-coproporphyrin III is discussed.

  8. Local sphere-based co-registration for SAM group analysis in subjects without individual MRI.

    PubMed

    Steinstraeter, O; Teismann, Inga K; Wollbrink, A; Suntrup, S; Stoeckigt, K; Dziewas, R; Pantev, C

    2009-03-01

    Synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM) is a powerful MEG source localization method to analyze evoked as well as induced brain activity. To gain structural information of the underlying sources, especially in group studies, individual magnetic resonance images (MRI) are required for co-registration. During the last few years, the relevance of MEG measurements on understanding the pathophysiology of different diseases has noticeable increased. Unfortunately, especially in patients and small children, structural MRI scans cannot always be performed. Therefore, we developed a new method for group analysis of SAM results without requiring structural MRI data that derives its geometrical information from the individual volume conductor model constructed for the SAM analysis. The normalization procedure is fast, easy to implement and integrates seamlessly into an existing landmark based MEG-MRI co-registration procedure. This new method was evaluated on different simulated points as well as on a pneumatic index finger stimulation paradigm analyzed with SAM. Compared with an established MRI-based normalization procedure (SPM2) the new method shows only minor errors in single subject results as well as in group analysis. The mean difference between the two methods was about 4 mm for the simulated as well as for finger stimulation data. The variation between individual subjects was generally higher than the error induced by the missing MRIs. The method presented here is therefore sufficient for most MEG group studies. It allows accomplishing MEG studies with subject groups where MRI measurements cannot be performed.

  9. Energy and resource allocation: a dynamic model of the Dutch disease. [Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, M.; Sachs, J.

    1982-01-01

    It is well known that a domestic-response discovery gives rise to wealth effects that cause a squeeze of the tradeable-good sector of an open economy. The decline of the manufacturing sector following an energy discovery has been termed the Dutch disease, and has been investigated in many recent studies. The authors' model extends the principally static analyses to date by allowing for: (1) short-run capital specificity and long-run capital mobility; (2) international capital flows; and (3) far-sighted intertemporal optimzing behavior by households and firms. The model is solved by numerical simulation. 9 references, 4 figures, 6 tables.

  10. Scenario-based modeling for multiple allocation hub location problem under disruption risk: multiple cuts Benders decomposition approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahyaei, Mohsen; Bashiri, Mahdi

    2017-03-01

    The hub location problem arises in a variety of domains such as transportation and telecommunication systems. In many real-world situations, hub facilities are subject to disruption. This paper deals with the multiple allocation hub location problem in the presence of facilities failure. To model the problem, a two-stage stochastic formulation is developed. In the proposed model, the number of scenarios grows exponentially with the number of facilities. To alleviate this issue, two approaches are applied simultaneously. The first approach is to apply sample average approximation to approximate the two stochastic problem via sampling. Then, by applying the multiple cuts Benders decomposition approach, computational performance is enhanced. Numerical studies show the effective performance of the SAA in terms of optimality gap for small problem instances with numerous scenarios. Moreover, performance of multi-cut Benders decomposition is assessed through comparison with the classic version and the computational results reveal the superiority of the multi-cut approach regarding the computational time and number of iterations.

  11. Influence of vegetation dynamic modeling on the allocation of green and blue waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Pérez, Guiomar; Francés, Félix

    2015-04-01

    The long history of the Mediterranean region is dominated by the interactions and co-evolution between man and its natural environment. It is important to consider that the Mediterranean region is recurrently or permanently confronted with the scarcity of the water. The issue of climate change is (and will be) aggravating this situation. This raises the question of a loss of services that ecosystems provide to human and also the amount of available water to be used by vegetation. The question of the water cycle, therefore, should be considered in an integrated manner by taking into account both blue water (water in liquid form used for the human needs or which flows into the oceans) and green water (water having the vapor for resulting from evaporation and transpiration processes). In spite of this, traditionally, very few hydrological models have incorporated the vegetation dynamic as a state variable. In fact, most of them are able to represent fairly well the observed discharge, but usually including the vegetation as a static parameter. However, in the last decade, the number of hydrological models which explicitly take into account the vegetation development as a state variable has increased substantially. In this work, we want to analyze if it is really necessary to use a dynamic vegetation model to quantify adequately the distribution of water into blue and green water. The study site is located in the Public Forest Monte de la Hunde y Palomeras (Spain). The vegetation in the study area is dominated by Aleppo pine of high tree density with scant presence of other species. Two different daily models were applied (with static and dynamic vegetation representation respectively) in three different scenarios: dry year (2005), normal year (2008) and wet year (2010). The static vegetation model simulates the evapotranspiration considering the vegetation as a stationary parameter. Contrarily, the dynamic vegetation model connects the hydrological model with a

  12. An Optimization-based Multi-level Asset Allocation Model for Collaborative Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Collaborative Planning” Modeling and Simulation Experimentation, Metrics, and Analysis Collaboration, Shared Awareness, and Decision Making...modules that focused on the Future Operations (FOPS) cell’s planning activities and Current Operations’ (COPS) Risk Analysis . The FOPS Planning Module...planners would indeed be achievable to a specified degree of accuracy. Current Operations (COPS) Risk Analysis module was also implemented to assist COPS

  13. CARBON AND NITROGEN ALLOCATION MODEL FOR THE SEAGRASS THALASSIA TESTUDUNUM IN LOWER LAGUNA MADRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inverse modeling methods are a powerful tool for understanding complex physiological relationships between seagrasses and their environment. The power of the method is a result of using ranges of data in a system of constraints to describe the biological system, in this case, t...

  14. Towards Decentralized and Goal-Oriented Models of Institutional Resource Allocation: The Spanish Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Maria Jose Gonzalez

    2006-01-01

    The search for more flexibility in financial management of public universities demands adjustments in budgeting strategies. International studies on this topic recommend wider financial autonomy for management units, the use of budgeting models based on performance, the implementation of formula systems for the determination of financial needs of…

  15. Generalized Münch coupling between sugar and water fluxes for modelling carbon allocation as affected by water status.

    PubMed

    Daudet, F A; Lacointe, A; Gaudillère, J P; Cruiziat, P

    2002-02-07

    A model of within-plant carbon allocation is proposed which makes a generalized use of the Münch mechanism to integrate carbon and water functions and their involvement in growth limitations. The plant is envisioned as a branched network of resistive pathways (phloem and xylem) with nodal organs acting as sources and sinks for sucrose. Four elementary organs (leaf, stem, fruit, root) are described with their particular sink functions and hydraulic attributes. Given the rates of photosynthesis and transpiration and the hydraulic properties of the network as inputs, the model calculates the internal fluxes of water and sucrose. Xylem water potential (Psi), phloem sucrose concentration (C) and turgor pressure (P) are calculated everywhere in the network accounting for osmotic equilibrium between apoplasm and symplasm and coupled functioning of xylem and phloem. The fluxes of phloem and xylem saps are driven by the gradients of P and Psi, respectively. The fruit growth rate is assumed as turgor pressure dependent. To demonstrate its ability to address within-plant competition, the model is run with a simple-branched structure gathering three leaves, eight stem segments, three competing growing fruits and one root. The model was programmed with P-Spice, a software specifically designed for simulating electrical circuits but easily adaptable to physiology. Simulations of internal water fluxes, sucrose concentrations and fruit growth rates are given for different conditions of soil water availability and hydraulic resistances (sensitivity analysis). The discussion focuses on the potential interest of this approach in functional--structural plant models to address water stress-induced effects.

  16. [A simulation model of ozone stress on photosynthetic production and its allocation of winter wheat].

    PubMed

    Yao, Fang-fang; Wang, Xiao-ke; Ouyang, Zhi-yun; Feng, Zong-wei

    2007-11-01

    Assessing and predicting the impacts of ozone (O3) concentration on crop production have been drawing great attention in the scientific community. The ambient O3 concentration above the winter wheat field was observed with ML9810B O3 Analyzer in Jiaxing, Zhejiang Province. The impact of O3 on the wheat leaf photosynthesis was measured in open-top chamber. Based on the observed parameters, a numerical model for simulating the impact of O3 on the winter wheat development and yield was established, by added the effects of O3 on ear photosynthesis and leaf area. The results showed that the model properly simulated the impacts of O3 on wheat growth in field. The relative error of predicted biomass was 10.3%. The accumulated loss of photosynthate was 11.4% and yield loss was 17.8% at ambient O3 concentration in the wheat growth period under sufficient moisture and fertilizer supplies.

  17. Agent based model of effects of task allocation strategies in flat organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobkowicz, Pawel

    2016-09-01

    A common practice in many organizations is to pile the work on the best performers. It is easy to implement by the management and, despite the apparent injustice, appears to be working in many situations. In our work we present a simple agent based model, constructed to simulate this practice and to analyze conditions under which the overall efficiency of the organization (for example measured by the backlog of unresolved issues) breaks down, due to the cumulative effect of the individual overloads. The model confirms that the strategy mentioned above is, indeed, rational: it leads to better global results than an alternative one, using equal workload distribution among all workers. The presented analyses focus on the behavior of the organizations close to the limit of the maximum total throughput and provide results for the growth of the unprocessed backlog in several situations, as well as suggestions related to avoiding such buildup.

  18. Microeconomics-based resource allocation in overlay networks by using non-strategic behavior modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Analoui, Morteza; Rezvani, Mohammad Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Behavior modeling has recently been investigated for designing self-organizing mechanisms in the context of communication networks in order to exploit the natural selfishness of the users with the goal of maximizing the overall utility. In strategic behavior modeling, the users of the network are assumed to be game players who seek to maximize their utility with taking into account the decisions that the other players might make. The essential difference between the aforementioned researches and this work is that it incorporates the non-strategic decisions in order to design the mechanism for the overlay network. In this solution concept, the decisions that a peer might make does not affect the actions of the other peers at all. The theory of consumer-firm developed in microeconomics is a model of the non-strategic behavior that we have adopted in our research. Based on it, we have presented distributed algorithms for peers' "joining" and "leaving" operations. We have modeled the overlay network as a competitive economy in which the content provided by an origin server can be viewed as commodity and the origin server and the peers who multicast the content to their downside are considered as the firms. On the other hand, due to the dual role of the peers in the overlay network, they can be considered as the consumers as well. On joining to the overlay economy, each peer is provided with an income and tries to get hold of the service regardless to the behavior of the other peers. We have designed the scalable algorithms in such a way that the existence of equilibrium price (known as Walrasian equilibrium price) is guaranteed.

  19. ALAWAT: A spatially allocated watershed model for approximating stream, sediment, and pollutant flows in Hawaii, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, William; Fox, Jefferson

    1995-07-01

    The Ala Wai Canal Watershed Model (ALAWAT) is a planning-level watershed model for approximating direct runoff, streamflow, sediment loads, and loads for up to five pollutants. ALAWAT uses raster GIS data layers including land use, SCS soil hydrologic groups, annual rainfall, and subwatershed delineations as direct model parameter inputs and can use daily total rainfall from up to ten rain gauges and streamflow from up to ten stream gauges. ALAWAT uses a daily time step and can simulate flows for up to ten-year periods and for up to 50 subwatersheds. Pollutant loads are approximated using a user-defined combination of rating curve relationships, mean event concentrations, and loading/washoff parameters for specific subwatersheds, land uses, and times of year. Using ALAWAT, annual average streamflow and baseflow relationships and urban suspended sediment loads were approximated for the Ala Wai Canal watershed (about 10,400 acres) on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Annual average urban suspended sediments were approximated using two methods: mean event concentrations and pollutant loading and washoff. Parameters for the pollutant loading and washoff method were then modified to simulate the effect of various street sweeping intervals on sediment loads.

  20. SAM 2 and SAGE data management and processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, M. T.; Trepte, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    The data management and processing supplied by ST Systems Corporation (STX) for the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement 2 (SAM 2) and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) experiments for the years 1983 to 1986 are described. Included are discussions of data validation, documentation, and scientific analysis, as well as the archival schedule met by the operational reduction of SAM 2 and SAGE data. Work under this contract resulted in the archiving of the first seven years of SAM 2 data and all three years of SAGE data. A list of publications and presentations supported was also included.

  1. Mathematical modelling of diurnal regulation of carbohydrate allocation by osmo-related processes in plants.

    PubMed

    Pokhilko, Alexandra; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2015-03-06

    Plants synthesize sucrose in source tissues (mainly mature leafs) and supply it for growth of sink tissues (young leafs). Sucrose is derived from photosynthesis during daytime and from starch at night. Because the diurnal regulation of sucrose fluxes is not completely understood, we built a mathematical model designed to reproduce all key experimental observations. For this, assumptions were made about the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulations, which are all motivated by experimental facts. The key regulators in our model are two kinases (SnRK1 and osmo-sensitive kinase OsmK) under the control of the circadian clock. SnRK1 is activated in the night to prepare for regularly occurring carbon-limiting conditions, whereas OsmK is activated during the day to prepare for water deficit, which often occurs in the afternoon. Decrease of SnRK1 and increase of OsmK result in partitioning of carbon towards sucrose to supply growing sink tissues. Concomitantly, increasing levels of the growth regulator trehalose-6-phosphate stimulates the development of new sink tissues and thus sink demand, which further activates sucrose supply in a positive feedback loop. We propose that OsmK acts as a timer to measure the length of the photoperiod and suggest experiments how this hypothesis can be validated.

  2. SAM Chlorine Observations at Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, P. G.; Farley, K. A.; Vasconcelos, P. M.; Malespin, C.; Franz, H.; McAdam, A.; Sutter, B.; Stern, J. C.; Clark, B. C.; Atreya, S. K.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars investigation has detected Cl-bearing phases of various oxidation states in its thermally evolved gas measurements of both a wind drift deposit of fines and three different rock samples delivered as sieved drill powders to the instrument suite. In addition to HCl (Leshin et al, 2013; Ming et al, 2013) and chlorinated hydrocarbon detections (Glavin et al, 2013; Freissinet et al, in review), oxygen releases consistent with the decomposition of perchlorate salts are also observed. We have also measured chlorine isotope ratios of the four different solid samples, which yielded variable and more negative δ37Cl than typically observed in SNC meteorite analyses. We summarize our chlorine observations in the context of other gases observed in the SAM solid sample analyses, including water, sulfur- and nitrogen-bearing compounds, and REMS observations of Relative Humidity and Temperature, and compare with knowledge of martian chlorine obtained from the SNC meteorites. Finally, we examine the implications of surface/atmosphere Cl interactions and isotopic ratios for the rise and decline of habitable surface environments on Mars. This research was supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Mars Science Laboratory mission.

  3. In-person and video-based post-traumatic stress disorder treatment for veterans: a location-allocation model.

    PubMed

    Musdal, Hande; Shiner, Brian; Chen, Techieh; Ceyhan, Mehmet E; Watts, Bradley V; Benneyan, James

    2014-02-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with poor health but there is a gap between need and receipt of care. It is useful to understand where to optimally locate in-person care and where video-based PTSD care would be most useful to minimize access to care barriers, care outside the Veterans Affairs system, and total costs. We developed a service location systems engineering model based on 2010 to 2020 projected care needs for veterans across New England to help determine where to best locate and use in-person and video-based care. This analysis determined specific locations and capacities of each type of PTSD care relative to patient home locations to help inform allocation of mental health resources. Not surprisingly Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island are well suited for in-person care, whereas some rural areas of Maine, Vermont, and New Hampshire where in-patient services are infeasible could be better served by video-based care than external care, if the latter is even available. Results in New England alone suggest a potential $3,655,387 reduction in average annual total costs by shifting 9.73% of care to video-based treatment, with an average 12.6 miles travel distance for the remaining in-person care.

  4. Crystal structures of the SAM-III/S[subscript MK] riboswitch reveal the SAM-dependent translation inhibition mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, C.; Smith, A.M.; Fuchs, R.T.; Ding, F.; Rajashankar, K.; Henkin, T.M.; Ke, A.

    2010-01-07

    Three distinct classes of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-responsive riboswitches have been identified that regulate bacterial gene expression at the levels of transcription attenuation or translation inhibition. The SMK box (SAM-III) translational riboswitch has been identified in the SAM synthetase gene in members of the Lactobacillales. Here we report the 2.2-{angstrom} crystal structure of the Enterococcus faecalis SMK box riboswitch. The Y-shaped riboswitch organizes its conserved nucleotides around a three-way junction for SAM recognition. The Shine-Dalgarno sequence, which is sequestered by base-pairing with the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence in response to SAM binding, also directly participates in SAM recognition. The riboswitch makes extensive interactions with the adenosine and sulfonium moieties of SAM but does not appear to recognize the tail of the methionine moiety. We captured a structural snapshot of the SMK box riboswitch sampling the near-cognate ligand S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH) in which SAH was found to adopt an alternative conformation and fails to make several key interactions.

  5. Increased forest carbon storage with increased atmospheric CO2 despite nitrogen limitation: a game-theoretic allocation model for trees in competition for nitrogen and light.

    PubMed

    Dybzinski, Ray; Farrior, Caroline E; Pacala, Stephen W

    2015-03-01

    Changes in resource availability often cause competitively driven changes in tree allocation to foliage, wood, and fine roots, either via plastic changes within individuals or through turnover of individuals with differing strategies. Here, we investigate how optimally competitive tree allocation should change in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 along a gradient of nitrogen and light availability, together with how those changes should affect carbon storage in living biomass. We present a physiologically-based forest model that includes the primary functions of wood and nitrogen. From a tree's perspective, wood is an offensive and defensive weapon used against neighbors in competition for light. From a biogeochemical perspective, wood is the primary living reservoir of stored carbon. Nitrogen constitutes a tree's photosynthetic machinery and the support systems for that machinery, and its limited availability thus reduces a tree's ability to fix carbon. This model has been previously successful in predicting allocation to foliage, wood, and fine roots along natural productivity gradients. Using game theory, we solve the model for competitively optimal foliage, wood, and fine root allocation strategies for trees in competition for nitrogen and light as a function of CO2 and nitrogen mineralization rate. Instead of down-regulating under nitrogen limitation, carbon storage under elevated CO2 relative to carbon storage at ambient CO2 is approximately independent of the nitrogen mineralization rate. This surprising prediction is a consequence of both increased competition for nitrogen driving increased fine root biomass and increased competition for light driving increased allocation to wood under elevated CO2 .

  6. Methodologies for optimal resource allocation to the national space program and new space utilizations. Volume 2: Resource allocation and smoothing model, programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Appendixes are presented that provide model input requirements, a sample case, flow charts, and a program listing. At the beginning of each appendix, descriptive details and technical comments are provided to indicate any special instructions applicable to the use of that appendix. In addition, the program listing includes comment cards that state the purpose of each subroutine in the complete program and describe operations performed within that subroutine. The input requirements includes details on the many options that adapt the program to the specific needs of the analyst for a particular problem.

  7. Simulating smoke transport from wildland fires with a regional-scale air quality model: sensitivity to spatiotemporal allocation of fire emissions.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Menendez, Fernando; Hu, Yongtao; Odman, Mehmet T

    2014-09-15

    Air quality forecasts generated with chemical transport models can provide valuable information about the potential impacts of fires on pollutant levels. However, significant uncertainties are associated with fire-related emission estimates as well as their distribution on gridded modeling domains. In this study, we explore the sensitivity of fine particulate matter concentrations predicted by a regional-scale air quality model to the spatial and temporal allocation of fire emissions. The assessment was completed by simulating a fire-related smoke episode in which air quality throughout the Atlanta metropolitan area was affected on February 28, 2007. Sensitivity analyses were carried out to evaluate the significance of emission distribution among the model's vertical layers, along the horizontal plane, and into hourly inputs. Predicted PM2.5 concentrations were highly sensitive to emission injection altitude relative to planetary boundary layer height. Simulations were also responsive to the horizontal allocation of fire emissions and their distribution into single or multiple grid cells. Additionally, modeled concentrations were greatly sensitive to the temporal distribution of fire-related emissions. The analyses demonstrate that, in addition to adequate estimates of emitted mass, successfully modeling the impacts of fires on air quality depends on an accurate spatiotemporal allocation of emissions.

  8. Curiosity Shakes, Bakes, and Tastes Mars with SAM

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Curiosity rover analyzed its first solid sample of Mars with a variety of instruments, including the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite. Developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight ...

  9. In-Orbit Calibration of a SAMS Triaxial Sensor Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chestney, Louis S.; Sicker, Ronald J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the results of in orbit calibration data collected for a Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) Triaxial Sensor Head (TS H) and the methods used to process the data for bias and gravity levels.

  10. General Safety and Waste Management Related to SAM

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The General Safety and Waste Management page offers section-specific safety and waste management details for chemicals, radiochemicals, pathogens, and biotoxins included in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  11. Safety and Waste Management for SAM Chemistry Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The General Safety and Waste Management page offers section-specific safety and waste management details for the chemical analytes included in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  12. Safety and Waste Management for SAM Radiochemical Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The General Safety and Waste Management page offers section-specific safety and waste management details for the radiochemical analytes included in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  13. Safety and Waste Management for SAM Pathogen Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The General Safety and Waste Management page offers section-specific safety and waste management details for the pathogens included in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  14. The dynamic of annual carbon allocation to wood in European forests is consistent with a combined source-sink limitation of growth: implications for modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemot, J.; Martin-StPaul, N. K.; Dufrêne, E.; François, C.; Soudani, K.; Ourcival, J. M.; Delpierre, N.

    2015-02-01

    The extent to which forest growth is limited by carbon (C) supply (source control) or by cambial activity (sink control) will condition the response of trees to global changes. However, the physiological processes responsible for the limitation of forest growth are still under debate. The aim of this study is to evaluate the key drivers of the annual carbon allocation to wood along large soil and climate regional gradients in five tree species representative of the main European forest biomes (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Quercus ilex, Quercus robur and Picea abies). Combining field measurements and process-based simulations at 49 sites (931 site-years), we assessed the stand biomass growth dependences at both inter-site and inter-annual scales. Specifically, the relative influence of forest C balance (source control), direct environmental control (water and temperature controls of sink activity) and allocation adjustments related to age, past climate conditions, competition intensity and soil nutrient availability on growth were quantified. The inter-site variability in stand C allocation to wood was predominantly driven by an age-related decline. The direct control of temperature or water stress on sink activity (i.e. independently from their effects on C supply) exerted a strong influence on the annual stand woody growth in all the species considered, including deciduous temperate species. The lagged effect of the past environment conditions was a significant driver of the annual C allocation to wood. Carbon supply appeared to strongly limit growth only in deciduous temperate species. We provide an evaluation of the spatio-temporal dynamics of annual carbon allocation to wood in European forests. Our study supports the premise that European forest growth is under a complex control including both source and sink limitations. The relative influences of the different growth drivers strongly vary across years and spatial ecological gradients. We suggest a

  15. Scenario-Based Multi-Objective Optimum Allocation Model for Earthquake Emergency Shelters Using a Modified Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm: A Case Study in Chaoyang District, Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiujuan; Xu, Wei; Ma, Yunjia; Hu, Fuyu

    2015-01-01

    The correct location of earthquake emergency shelters and their allocation to residents can effectively reduce the number of casualties by providing safe havens and efficient evacuation routes during the chaotic period of the unfolding disaster. However, diverse and strict constraints and the discrete feasible domain of the required models make the problem of shelter location and allocation more difficult. A number of models have been developed to solve this problem, but there are still large differences between the models and the actual situation because the characteristics of the evacuees and the construction costs of the shelters have been excessively simplified. We report here the development of a multi-objective model for the allocation of residents to earthquake shelters by considering these factors using the Chaoyang district, Beijing, China as a case study. The two objectives of this model were to minimize the total weighted evacuation time from residential areas to a specified shelter and to minimize the total area of all the shelters. The two constraints were the shelter capacity and the service radius. Three scenarios were considered to estimate the number of people who would need to be evacuated. The particle swarm optimization algorithm was first modified by applying the von Neumann structure in former loops and global structure in later loops, and then used to solve this problem. The results show that increasing the shelter area can result in a large decrease in the total weighted evacuation time from scheme 1 to scheme 9 in scenario A, from scheme 1 to scheme 9 in scenario B, from scheme 1 to scheme 19 in scenario C. If the funding were not a limitation, then the final schemes of each scenario are the best solutions, otherwise the earlier schemes are more reasonable. The modified model proved to be useful for the optimization of shelter allocation, and the result can be used as a scientific reference for planning shelters in the Chaoyang district

  16. Scenario-Based Multi-Objective Optimum Allocation Model for Earthquake Emergency Shelters Using a Modified Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm: A Case Study in Chaoyang District, Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiujuan; Xu, Wei; Ma, Yunjia; Hu, Fuyu

    2015-01-01

    The correct location of earthquake emergency shelters and their allocation to residents can effectively reduce the number of casualties by providing safe havens and efficient evacuation routes during the chaotic period of the unfolding disaster. However, diverse and strict constraints and the discrete feasible domain of the required models make the problem of shelter location and allocation more difficult. A number of models have been developed to solve this problem, but there are still large differences between the models and the actual situation because the characteristics of the evacuees and the construction costs of the shelters have been excessively simplified. We report here the development of a multi-objective model for the allocation of residents to earthquake shelters by considering these factors using the Chaoyang district, Beijing, China as a case study. The two objectives of this model were to minimize the total weighted evacuation time from residential areas to a specified shelter and to minimize the total area of all the shelters. The two constraints were the shelter capacity and the service radius. Three scenarios were considered to estimate the number of people who would need to be evacuated. The particle swarm optimization algorithm was first modified by applying the von Neumann structure in former loops and global structure in later loops, and then used to solve this problem. The results show that increasing the shelter area can result in a large decrease in the total weighted evacuation time from scheme 1 to scheme 9 in scenario A, from scheme 1 to scheme 9 in scenario B, from scheme 1 to scheme 19 in scenario C. If the funding were not a limitation, then the final schemes of each scenario are the best solutions, otherwise the earlier schemes are more reasonable. The modified model proved to be useful for the optimization of shelter allocation, and the result can be used as a scientific reference for planning shelters in the Chaoyang district

  17. Current costing models: are they suitable for allocating health resources? The example of fall injury prevention in Australia.

    PubMed

    Moller, Jerry

    2005-01-01

    The example of fall injury among older people is used to define and illustrate how current Australian systems for allocation of health resources perform for funding emerging public health issues. While the examples are Australian, the allocation and priority setting methods are common in the health sector in all developed western nations. With an ageing population the number of falls injuries in Australia and the cost of treatment will rise dramatically over the next 20-50 years. Current methods of allocating funds within the health system are not well suited to meeting this coming epidemic. The information requirements for cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness measures cannot be met. Marginal approaches to health funding are likely to continue to fund already well-funded treatment or politically driven prevention processes and to miss the opportunity for new prevention initiatives in areas that do not have a high political profile. Fall injury is one of many emerging areas that struggle to make claims for funding because the critical mass of intervention and evidence of its impact is not available. The beneficiaries of allocation failure may be those who treat the disease burden that could have been easily prevented. Changes to allocation mechanisms, data systems and new initiative funding practices are required to ensure that preventative strategies are able to compete on an equal footing with treatment approaches for mainstream health funding.

  18. Zinc allocation and re-allocation in rice

    PubMed Central

    Stomph, Tjeerd Jan; Jiang, Wen; Van Der Putten, Peter E. L.; Struik, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Agronomy and breeding actively search for options to enhance cereal grain Zn density. Quantifying internal (re-)allocation of Zn as affected by soil and crop management or genotype is crucial. We present experiments supporting the development of a conceptual model of whole plant Zn allocation and re-allocation in rice. Methods: Two solution culture experiments using 70Zn applications at different times during crop development and an experiment on within-grain distribution of Zn are reported. In addition, results from two earlier published experiments are re-analyzed and re-interpreted. Results: A budget analysis showed that plant zinc accumulation during grain filling was larger than zinc allocation to the grains. Isotope data showed that zinc taken up during grain filling was only partly transported directly to the grains and partly allocated to the leaves. Zinc taken up during grain filling and allocated to the leaves replaced zinc re-allocated from leaves to grains. Within the grains, no major transport barrier was observed between vascular tissue and endosperm. At low tissue Zn concentrations, rice plants maintained concentrations of about 20 mg Zn kg−1 dry matter in leaf blades and reproductive tissues, but let Zn concentrations in stems, sheath, and roots drop below this level. When plant zinc concentrations increased, Zn levels in leaf blades and reproductive tissues only showed a moderate increase while Zn levels in stems, roots, and sheaths increased much more and in that order. Conclusions: In rice, the major barrier to enhanced zinc allocation towards grains is between stem and reproductive tissues. Enhancing root to shoot transfer will not contribute proportionally to grain zinc enhancement. PMID:24478788

  19. Observational constraints on the response function of Southern Ocean SST to SAM forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, U.; Ferreira, D.; Marshall, J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent coupled model studies of the polar Southern Ocean (SO) revealed an initial (fast) cooling, but longer-term (slow) and equilibrium warming, of sea surface temperature (SST) in response to stratospheric ozone depletion and the concurrent shift of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) to its positive phase. Yet there is much spread across models in the amplitude and time scale of the equilibration, so that even the sign of the implied recent-decade SST response to ozone depletion is not robust. Here we use the framework of a simple layered model (representing mixed layer, seasonal thermocline and upper permanent thermocline of the SO south of the polar front) combined with observations of the SO, to derive constraints on the equilibrium response of the real-world SO to annually-repeating seasonal SAM forcing. We obtain simple expressions for the equilibrium response in terms of the SAM-induced air-sea fluxes of heat and momentum and the SO horizontal and vertical temperature stratifications. These are then evaluated using satellite observations and atmospheric reanalysis data, as well as in-situ ocean climatologies. Our estimates suggest that, for observed characteristics (mixed layer depths, stratification, phasing of the SAM-forcing in season and space), the well-documented surface-forced fast SO SST cooling is large in comparison to the dynamically-induced subsurface-forced warming, and thus also largely sets the sign and amplitude of the equilibrium response.Exploration of the parameter space of coupled model versus observed ratios of horizontal to vertical stratifications provides a rationale for the discrepant equilibrium responses.

  20. Modeling seed weight under environmental resource limitations as a function of C, N, and C:N allocation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) contents and C:N ratio in seed of two genotypes each of five crops with different resource allocation patterns were assessed under normal growing degree days (GDD) and normal population density (NN) for each crop; normal GDD and 25%>normal population density (NL); sho...

  1. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir from June to November 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard; Hrovat, Ken; Moskowitz, Milton; McPherson, Kevin

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) sponsors science experiments on a variety of microgravity carriers, including sounding rockets, drop towers, parabolic aircraft, and Orbiter missions. The MSAD sponsors the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) to support microgravity science experiments with acceleration measurements to characterize the microgravity environment to which the experiments were exposed. The Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project at the NASA Lewis Research Center supports principal investigators of microgravity experiments as they evaluate the effects of varying acceleration levels on their experiments. In 1993, a cooperative effort was started between the United States and Russia involving science utilization of the Russian Mir space station by scientists from the United States and Russia. MSAD is currently sponsoring science experiments participating in the Shuttle-Mir Science Program in cooperation with the Russians on the Mir space station. Included in the complement of MSAD experiments and equipment is a SAMS unit In a manner similar to Orbiter mission support, the SAMS unit supports science experiments from the U.S. and Russia by measuring the microgravity environment during experiment operations. The initial SAMS supported experiment was a Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) experiment from June to November 1995. SAMS data were obtained during the PCG operations on Mir in accordance with the PCG Principal Investigator's requirements. This report presents an overview of the SAMS data recorded to support this PCG experiment. The report contains plots of the SAMS 100 Hz sensor head data as an overview of the microgravity environment, including the STS-74 Shuttle-Mir docking.

  2. HPA and SAM axis responses as correlates of self- vs parental ratings of anxiety in boys with an Autistic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Bitsika, Vicki; Sharpley, Christopher F; Sweeney, John A; McFarlane, James R

    2014-03-29

    Anxiety and Autistic Disorder (AD) are both neurological conditions and both disorders share some features that make it difficult to precisely allocate specific symptoms to each disorder. HPA and SAM axis activities have been conclusively associated with anxiety, and may provide a method of validating anxiety rating scale assessments given by parents and their children with AD about those children. Data from HPA axis (salivary cortisol) and SAM axis (salivary alpha amylase) responses were collected from a sample of 32 high-functioning boys (M age=11yr) with an Autistic Disorder (AD) and were compared with the boys' and their mothers' ratings of the boys' anxiety. There was a significant difference between the self-ratings given by the boys and ratings given about them by their mothers. Further, only the boys' self-ratings of their anxiety significantly predicted the HPA axis responses and neither were significantly related to SAM axis responses. Some boys showed cortisol responses which were similar to that previously reported in children who had suffered chronic and severe anxiety arising from stressful social interactions. As well as suggesting that some boys with an AD can provide valid self-assessments of their anxiety, these data also point to the presence of very high levels of chronic HPA-axis arousal and consequent chronic anxiety in these boys.

  3. Bandwidth-allocated algorithm modeled with matrix theory for traffic-orientated multisubsystem-based virtual passive optical network in metro-access optical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Weidong; Gan, Chaoqin; Chen, Bingqin; Xie, Weilun; Zhang, YuChao; Gou, Kaiyu

    2016-09-01

    In a metro-access optical network, a bandwidth-allocated algorithm is proposed for traffic-orientated multisubsystem-based virtual passive optical network (MS-VPON) that can implement the syncretism of multiple systems such as time division multiplexing-PON (TDM-PON), wavelength division multiplexing-PON (WDM-PON), and orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-PON (OFDM-PON). VPONs are constructed based on traffic and different VPONs are separated by different types of traffic. The bandwidth-allocated algorithm is modeled with a matrix theory to determine which VPON can be admitted and then a bandwidth is assigned to these VPONs. With the algorithm, the network value can be maximized. Two cases are investigated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in the bandwidth-utilized ratio and VPONs' admission probability.

  4. Developing a bi-objective optimization model for solving the availability allocation problem in repairable series-parallel systems by NSGA II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Maghsoud; Khajeh, Mostafa

    2016-11-01

    Bi-objective optimization of the availability allocation problem in a series-parallel system with repairable components is aimed in this paper. The two objectives of the problem are the availability of the system and the total cost of the system. Regarding the previous studies in series-parallel systems, the main contribution of this study is to expand the redundancy allocation problems to systems that have repairable components. Therefore, the considered systems in this paper are the systems that have repairable components in their configurations and subsystems. Due to the complexity of the model, a meta-heuristic method called as non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm is applied to find Pareto front. After finding the Pareto front, a procedure is used to select the best solution from the Pareto front.

  5. SAM68: Signal Transduction and RNA Metabolism in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Frisone, Paola; Pradella, Davide; Di Matteo, Anna; Belloni, Elisa; Ghigna, Claudia; Paronetto, Maria Paola

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in expression and/or activity of splicing factors as well as mutations in cis-acting splicing regulatory sequences contribute to cancer phenotypes. Genome-wide studies have revealed more than 15,000 tumor-associated splice variants derived from genes involved in almost every aspect of cancer cell biology, including proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle control, metabolism, apoptosis, motility, invasion, and angiogenesis. In the past decades, several RNA binding proteins (RBPs) have been implicated in tumorigenesis. SAM68 (SRC associated in mitosis of 68 kDa) belongs to the STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA metabolism) family of RBPs. SAM68 is involved in several steps of mRNA metabolism, from transcription to alternative splicing and then to nuclear export. Moreover, SAM68 participates in signaling pathways associated with cell response to stimuli, cell cycle transitions, and viral infections. Recent evidence has linked this RBP to the onset and progression of different tumors, highlighting misregulation of SAM68-regulated splicing events as a key step in neoplastic transformation and tumor progression. Here we review recent studies on the role of SAM68 in splicing regulation and we discuss its contribution to aberrant pre-mRNA processing in cancer. PMID:26273626

  6. SAM, the Starfire Optical Range Atmospheric Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillar, Earl J.; Shoemake, Marjorie A.; Slavin, Ann C.

    2011-10-01

    We describe the Starfire Optical Range (SOR) Atmospheric Monitor (SAM). SAM is a 40 cm telescope feeding a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor with 20 subapertures across the telescope aperture, which in turn feeds a 1 kHz CCD camera. The unique features of SAM include the ability to work through both day and night and the ability to estimate r0 values down to 1.5 cm at 750 nm. Because SAM can measure 200 tilts simultaneously in 1 ms, it is able to detect rapid changes in turbulence parameters. It will be able to estimate the Fried parameter r0, the Greenwood parameter fg, scintillation, and a rough profile simultaneously. After describing the basic design and construction of SAM and our algorithm for estimating r0, we describe the initial capabilities of the system. We show some initial data regarding the diurnal variation of r0 at the SOR, simulations of SAM’s performance, and a validation against another system. We conclude with future plans for the system.

  7. Eco-hydrologic Modeling of Rangelands: Evaluating a New Carbon Allocation Approach and Simulating Ecosystem Response to Changing Climate and Management Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, J. J.; Tague, C.; Choate, J. S.; Adam, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    More than one-third of the United States' land cover is comprised of rangelands, which support both forage production and livestock grazing. For grasses in both semi-arid and humid environments, small changes in precipitation and temperature, as well as grazing, can have disproportionately larger impacts on ecosystem processes. For example, these areas may experience large response pulses under highly variable precipitation and other potential future changes. The ultimate goal of this study is to provide information on the interactions between management activities, climate and ecosystem processes to inform sustainable rangeland management. The specific objectives of this paper are to (1) evaluate a new carbon allocation strategy for grasses and (2) test the sensitivity of this improved strategy to changes in climate and grazing strategies. The Regional Hydro-ecologic Simulation System (RHESSys) is a process-based, watershed-scale model that simulates hydrology and biogeochemical cycling with dynamic soil and vegetation modules. We developed a new carbon allocation algorithm for partitioning net primary productivity (NPP) between roots and leaves for grasses. The 'hybrid' approach represents a balance between preferential partitioning due to environmental conditions and age-related growth. We evaluated this new allocation scheme at the point-scale at a variety of rangeland sites in the U.S. using observed biomass measurements and against existing allocation schemes used in RHESSys. Additionally, changes in the magnitude, frequency, and intensity of precipitation and temperature were used to assess ecosystem responses using our new allocation scheme. We found that changes in biomass and NPP were generally more sensitive to changes in precipitation than changes in temperature. At more arid sites, larger percent reductions in historic baseline precipitation affected biomass and NPP more negatively. We incorporated grazing impacts through biomass removal. We found that

  8. Description of ferrocenylalkylthiol SAMs on gold by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Goujon, F; Bonal, C; Limoges, B; Malfreyt, P

    2009-08-18

    Molecular dynamics simulations of mixed monolayers consisting of Fc(CH2)12S-/C10S-Au SAMs are carried out to calculate structural (density profiles, angular distributions, positions of atoms) and energetic properties. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible inhomogeneity of the neutral ferrocene moieties within the monolayer. Five systems have been studied using different grafting densities for the ferrocenylalkylthiolates. The angular distributions are described in terms of the relative contributions from isolated and clustered ferrocene moieties in the binary SAMs. It is shown that the energetic contributions strongly depend on the state of the ferrocene. The ability of molecular dynamics simulations to enable better understanding the SAM structure is illustrated in this work.

  9. Validation of the Model of End-Stage Liver Disease for Liver Transplant Allocation in Alberta: Implications for Future Directions in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Burak, Kelly W.; Meeberg, Glenda A.; Myers, Robert P.; Fick, Gordon H.; Swain, Mark G.; Bain, Vincent G.; Kneteman, Norman M.; Hilsden, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Since 2002, the Model of End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) has been used for allocation of liver transplants (LT) in the USA. In Canada, livers were allocated by the CanWAIT algorithm. The aim of this study was to compare the abilities of MELD, Child-Pugh (CP), and CanWAIT status to predict 3-month and 1-year mortality before LT in Canadian patients and to describe the use of MELD in Canada. Methods. Validation of MELD was performed in 320 patients listed for LT in Alberta (1998–2002). In October 2014, a survey of MELD use by Canadian LT centers was conducted. Results. Within 1 year of listing, 47 patients were removed from the waiting list (29 deaths, 18 too ill for LT). Using logistic regression, the MELD and CP were better than the CanWAIT at predicting 3-month (AUROC: 0.79, 0.78, and 0.59; p = 0.0002) and 1-year waitlist mortality (AUROC: 0.70, 0.70, and 0.55; p = 0.0023). Beginning in 2004, MELD began to be adopted by Canadian LT programs but its use was not standardized. Conclusions. Compared with the CanWAIT system, the MELD score was significantly better at predicting LT waitlist mortality. MELD-sodium (MELD-Na) has now been adopted for LT allocation in Canada. PMID:27446823

  10. Sarm1-mediated axon degeneration requires both SAM and TIR interactions.

    PubMed

    Gerdts, Josiah; Summers, Daniel W; Sasaki, Yo; DiAntonio, Aaron; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2013-08-14

    Axon degeneration is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that eliminates damaged or unneeded axons. Manipulation of this poorly understood pathway may allow treatment of a wide range of neurological disorders. In an RNAi-based screen performed in cultured mouse DRG neurons, we observed strong suppression of injury-induced axon degeneration upon knockdown of Sarm1 [SARM (sterile α-motif-containing and armadillo-motif containing protein)]. We find that a SARM-dependent degeneration program is engaged by disparate neuronal insults: SARM ablation blocks axon degeneration induced by axotomy or vincristine treatment, while SARM acts in parallel with a soma-derived caspase-dependent pathway following trophic withdrawal. SARM is a multidomain protein that associates with neuronal mitochondria. Deletion of the N-terminal mitochondrial localization sequence disrupts SARM mitochondrial localization in neurons but does not alter its ability to promote axon degeneration. In contrast, mutation of either the SAM (sterile α motif) or TIR (Toll-interleukin-1 receptor) domains abolishes the ability of SARM to promote axonal degeneration, while a SARM mutant containing only these domains elicits axon degeneration and nonapoptotic neuronal death even in the absence of injury. Protein-protein interaction studies demonstrate that the SAM domains are necessary and sufficient to mediate SARM-SARM binding. SARM mutants lacking a TIR domain bind full-length SARM and exhibit strong dominant-negative activity. These results indicate that SARM plays an integral role in the dismantling of injured axons and support a model in which SAM-mediated multimerization is necessary for TIR-dependent engagement of a downstream destruction pathway. These findings suggest that inhibitors of SAM and TIR interactions represent therapeutic candidates for blocking pathological axon loss and neuronal cell death.

  11. Determinants of tRNA Recognition by the Radical SAM Enzyme RlmN

    PubMed Central

    Fitzsimmons, Christina M.; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2016-01-01

    RlmN, a bacterial radical SAM methylating enzyme, has the unusual ability to modify two distinct types of RNA: 23S rRNA and tRNA. In rRNA, RlmN installs a methyl group at the C2 position of A2503 of 23S rRNA, while in tRNA the modification occurs at nucleotide A37, immediately adjacent to the anticodon triplet. Intriguingly, only a subset of tRNAs that contain an adenosine at position 37 are substrates for RlmN, suggesting that the enzyme carefully probes the highly conserved tRNA fold and sequence features to identify its targets. Over the past several years, multiple studies have addressed rRNA modification by RlmN, while relatively few investigations have focused on the ability of this enzyme to modify tRNAs. In this study, we utilized in vitro transcribed tRNAs as model substrates to interrogate RNA recognition by RlmN. Using chimeras and point mutations, we probed how the structure and sequence of RNA influences methylation, identifying position 38 of tRNAs as a critical determinant of substrate recognition. We further demonstrate that, analogous to previous mechanistic studies with fragments of 23S rRNA, tRNA methylation requirements are consistent with radical SAM reactivity. Together, our findings provide detailed insight into tRNA recognition by a radical SAM methylating enzyme. PMID:27902775

  12. SAMSVM: A tool for misalignment filtration of SAM-format sequences with support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianfeng; Ding, Xiaofan; Sun, Xing; Tsang, Shui-Ying; Xue, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Sequence alignment/map (SAM) formatted sequences [Li H, Handsaker B, Wysoker A et al., Bioinformatics 25(16):2078-2079, 2009.] have taken on a main role in bioinformatics since the development of massive parallel sequencing. However, because misalignment of sequences poses a significant problem in analysis of sequencing data that could lead to false positives in variant calling, the exclusion of misaligned reads is a necessity in analysis. In this regard, the multiple features of SAM-formatted sequences can be treated as vectors in a multi-dimension space to allow the application of a support vector machine (SVM). Applying the LIBSVM tools developed by Chang and Lin [Chang C-C, Lin C-J, ACM Trans Intell Syst Technol 2:1-27, 2011.] as a simple interface for support vector classification, the SAMSVM package has been developed in this study to enable misalignment filtration of SAM-formatted sequences. Cross-validation between two simulated datasets processed with SAMSVM yielded accuracies that ranged from 0.89 to 0.97 with F-scores ranging from 0.77 to 0.94 in 14 groups characterized by different mutation rates from 0.001 to 0.1, indicating that the model built using SAMSVM was accurate in misalignment detection. Application of SAMSVM to actual sequencing data resulted in filtration of misaligned reads and correction of variant calling.

  13. Flow of Funds Modeling for Localized Financial Markets: An Application of Spatial Price and Allocation Activity Analysis Models.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    equilibrium theory to include spatially and tempor- ally separated economic activities. Takayama and Judge (156) provide an historical sketch of...nonprice rationing in financial markets (72). The degree to which such activity limits the usefulness of the spatial equilibrium model is mitigated by a...15th ed. S.v. "Operations Research," by Russell L. Ackoff. 55. Enke, Stephen. " Equilibrium Among Spatially Separated Markets: Solution by Electric

  14. Imaging and clinical findings in segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM).

    PubMed

    Alhalabi, Kinan; Menias, Christine; Hines, Robert; Mamoun, Ihsan; Naidu, Sailendra

    2017-02-01

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is an uncommon, non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory arteriopathy that tends to affect the medium-sized splanchnic branches of the aorta along with renal, carotid, cerebral, and coronary arteries. The clinical presentation ranges from asymptomatic to severe, life-threatening intra-abdominal hemorrhage and shock. SAM overlaps clinically and radiologically with other inflammatory vasculitides. This article describes the pathologic-radiologic correlation, imaging findings, and the management of the disease. Radiologists should be familiar with this disease entity as imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis.

  15. The dynamic of the annual carbon allocation to wood in European tree species is consistent with a combined source-sink limitation of growth: implications for modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemot, J.; Martin-StPaul, N. K.; Dufrene, E.; Francois, C.; Soudani, K.; Ourcival, J. M.; Delpierre, N.

    2015-05-01

    appeared to strongly limit growth only in temperate deciduous species. We provide an evaluation of the spatio-temporal dynamics of the annual C allocation to wood in French forests. Our study supports the premise that the growth of European tree species is subject to complex control processes that include both source and sink limitations. The relative influences of the growth drivers strongly vary with time and across spatial ecological gradients. We suggest a straightforward modelling framework with which to implement these combined forest growth limitations into terrestrial biosphere models.

  16. Models of knot and stem development in black spruce trees indicate a shift in allocation priority to branches when growth is limited

    PubMed Central

    Duchateau, Emmanuel; Auty, David; Mothe, Frédéric; Longuetaud, Fleur; Ung, Chhun Huor

    2015-01-01

    The branch autonomy principle, which states that the growth of individual branches can be predicted from their morphology and position in the forest canopy irrespective of the characteristics of the tree, has been used to simplify models of branch growth in trees. However, observed changes in allocation priority within trees towards branches growing in light-favoured conditions, referred to as ‘Milton’s Law of resource availability and allocation,’ have raised questions about the applicability of the branch autonomy principle. We present models linking knot ontogeny to the secondary growth of the main stem in black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.), which were used to assess the patterns of assimilate allocation over time, both within and between trees. Data describing the annual radial growth of 445 stem rings and the three-dimensional shape of 5,377 knots were extracted from optical scans and X-ray computed tomography images taken along the stems of 10 trees. Total knot to stem area increment ratios (KSR) were calculated for each year of growth, and statistical models were developed to describe the annual development of knot diameter and curvature as a function of stem radial increment, total tree height, stem diameter, and the position of knots along an annual growth unit. KSR varied as a function of tree age and of the height to diameter ratio of the stem, a variable indicative of the competitive status of the tree. Simulations of the development of an individual knot showed that an increase in the stem radial growth rate was associated with an increase in the initial growth of the knot, but also with a shorter lifespan. Our results provide support for ‘Milton’s Law,’ since they indicate that allocation priority is given to locations where the potential return is the highest. The developed models provided realistic simulations of knot morphology within trees, which could be integrated into a functional-structural model of tree growth and above

  17. Developing an Agent-based Model for the Depot-based Water Allocation System in the Bakken Field in Western North Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T.; Lin, Z.; Lim, S.; Borders, M.

    2015-12-01

    The oil production at the Bakken Shale increased more than ten times from 2008 to 2013 due to technological advancement in hydraulic fracturing and North Dakota has become the second largest oil producing state in the U.S. behind only Texas since 2012. On average it requires about 2-4 million gallons of freshwater to complete one oil well in the Bakken field and the number of oil well completions (i.e., hydraulic fracturing) in the Bakken field increased from 500 in 2008 to 2085 in 2013. A large quantity of freshwater used for hydraulic fracturing renders a significant impact on water resource management in the semi-arid region. A novel water allocation system - water depots - was spontaneously created to distribute surface and ground water for industrial uses. A GIS-based multi-agent model is developed to simulate the emergent patterns and dynamics of the water depot-based water allocation system and to explore its economic and environmental consequences. Four different types of water depot are defined as agents and water price, climate condition, water source, geology, and other physical and economic constraints are considered in the model. Decentralized optimization algorithm will be used to determine the agents' behaviors. The agent-based model for water depots will be coupled with hydrological models to improve the region's water resources management.

  18. 77 FR 67813 - Sam Rayburn Dam Project Power Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... Southwestern Power Administration Sam Rayburn Dam Project Power Rate AGENCY: Southwestern Power Administration, DOE. ACTION: Notice of Rate Order Approving an Extension of Power Rate on an Interim Basis. SUMMARY..., Assistant Administrator, Southwestern Power Administration, Department of Energy, Williams Center Tower...

  19. SAMS Acceleration Measurement on Mir From March to September 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskowitz, Milton E.; Hrovat, Ken; Truong, Duc; Reckart, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    During NASA Increment 2 (March to September 1996), over 15 gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station, Mir. The data were recorded on 55 optical disks and were returned to Earth on STS-79. During this time, SAMS data were collected in the Kristall and Kvant modules, and in the Priroda module to support the following experiments: the Queen's University Experiments in Liquid Diffusion (QUELD), the Technological Evaluation of the MIM (TEM), the Forced Flow Flame Spreading Test (FFFT), and Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM). This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity environment to which these experiments were exposed. Also documented are mission events of interest such as the docked phase of STS-76 operations, an extravehicular activity (EVA) to install and deploy solar panels on the Kvant module, a Progress engine burn to raise Mir's altitude, and an on-orbit SAMS calibration procedure. Also included are a description of the Mir module orientations, and the panel notations within the modules. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. Variations in the acceleration environment caused by unique activities such as crew exercise and life-support fans are presented. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous mission summary reports published by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) group.

  20. The Discovery of Polar Stratospheric Clouds by SAM II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, L. R.; McCormick, M. P.

    2005-12-01

    Until the advent of spaceborne observations, clouds were thought to occur very rarely in the extremely dry stratosphere. This view changed dramatically following the launch of the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II instrument on the Nimbus 7 spacecraft in October 1978. SAM II was a single channel solar photometer designed to measure stratospheric aerosol extinction profiles at a wavelength of 1.0 micron at latitudes from 64-80 degrees in both hemispheres. An analysis of SAM II data from the Arctic for January 1979 revealed a number of profiles in which the extinction was 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than expected. Careful study showed that these large extinction values were not artifacts, but were indeed due to dramatic reductions in the amount of solar radiance reaching the instrument. Further analyses showed that these so-called polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were observed only when the local stratospheric temperature was very low (185-200 K). The interest in PSCs was primarily academic until the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985, which was quickly followed by studies associating this ozone depletion with the release of active chlorine through heterogeneous chemical reactions catalyzed by PSC particles. A large body of research over the ensuing two decades has firmly established this link. In this paper, we will recount the serendipitous discovery of PSCs in SAM II data more than 25 years ago and highlight other advances in our understanding of PSCs that have stemmed from spaceborne observations.

  1. Social Activity Method (SAM): A Fractal Language for Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Paul

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I shall present and develop my organisational language, "social activity method" (SAM), and illustrate some of its applications. I shall introduce a new scheme for "modes of recontextualisation" that enables the analysis of the ways in which one activity--which might be school mathematics or social research or any…

  2. Laser Induced Temperature Field on Surfaces: Application to SAM Patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadnam, Mohammad Reza; Amirfazli, Alidad

    2004-03-01

    Laser is used to thermally desorb a self assembeled monolayer (SAM) from a gold substrate. This process is a key step in making patterned surfaces. In many applications making curvilinear features is useful. Heating of a surface by a CW laser along a nonlinear trajectory is considered using Green's functions. Temperature profiles are calculated for heating along circular-arc trajectories of different curvatures. The effect of heating trajectory's radius of curvature and heating spot's velocity (Laser scanning rate) on resulting surface temperature is studied. It is shown that within the range of parameters considered, the induced surface temperature profiles are symmetric. It is also shown that change of heating trajectory's radius of curvature by one order of magnitude at heating velocity of 0.1 mm/s changes the induced surface temperatures by 12 K; this temperature increase will be 36 K at 1 mm/s. The effect of such temperature increases are discussed in terms of laser processing of SAM coated surfaces. For a case of heating along straight line, the kinetics of SAM desorption is coupled with heat diffusion equation to predict the percentage of SAM desorped and determine the feature size. The resulting surface chemical composition profiles are compared with experimental measurements and good agreement is reported.

  3. Astronaut Curtis Brown works with SAMS on Shuttle Atlantis middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    On the Space Shuttle Atlantis' mid-deck, astronaut Curtis L. Brown, pilot, works with the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS), which is making its eleventh Shuttle flight. This system supports the Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) experiments onboard by collecting and recording data characterizing the microgravity environment in the Shuttle mid-deck.

  4. Information System through ANIS at CeSAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, C.; Agneray, F.; Gimenez, S.

    2015-09-01

    ANIS (AstroNomical Information System) is a web generic tool developed at CeSAM to facilitate and standardize the implementation of astronomical data of various kinds through private and/or public dedicated Information Systems. The architecture of ANIS is composed of a database server which contains the project data, a web user interface template which provides high level services (search, extract and display imaging and spectroscopic data using a combination of criteria, an object list, a sql query module or a cone search interfaces), a framework composed of several packages, and a metadata database managed by a web administration entity. The process to implement a new ANIS instance at CeSAM is easy and fast : the scientific project has to submit data or a data secure access, the CeSAM team installs the new instance (web interface template and the metadata database), and the project administrator can configure the instance with the web ANIS-administration entity. Currently, the CeSAM offers through ANIS a web access to VO compliant Information Systems for different projects (HeDaM, HST-COSMOS, CFHTLS-ZPhots, ExoDAT,...).

  5. EFFECTS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON OF SAM-COATED ELECTRODES USING FERRYICYANIDE AS THE REDOX INDICATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrochemical responses on self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-coated polycrystalline gold electrodes were investigated using cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry with a three electrode system. Experimental results show potential in the application of pyrene-imprinted SAM...

  6. Competition for water and light in closed-canopy forests: a tractable model of carbon allocation with implications for carbon sinks.

    PubMed

    Farrior, Caroline E; Dybzinski, Ray; Levin, Simon A; Pacala, Stephen W

    2013-03-01

    Abstract The dependence of forest productivity and community composition on rainfall is the result of complex interactions at multiple scales, from the physiology of carbon gain and water loss to competition among individuals and species. In an effort to understand the role of these multiscale interactions in the dependence of forest structure on rainfall, we build a tractable model of individual plant competition for water and light. With game-theoretic analyses, we predict the dominant plant allocation strategy, forest productivity, and carbon storage. We find that the amount and timing of rainfall are critical to forest structure. Comparing two forests that differ only in the total time plants spend in water saturation, the model predicts that the wetter forest has fewer fine roots, more leaves, and more woody biomass than the drier forest. In contrast, if two forests differ only in the amount of water available during water limitation, the model predicts that the wetter forest has more fine roots than the drier forest and equivalent leaves and woody biomass. The difference in these responses to increases in water availability has significant implications for potential carbon sinks with rising atmospheric CO2. We predict that enhanced productivity from increased leaf-level water-use efficiency during water limitation will be allocated to fine roots if plants respond competitively, producing only a small and short-lived carbon sink.

  7. Selective Plasma Deposition of Fluorocarbon Films on SAMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crain, Mark M., III; Walsh, Kevin M.; Cohn, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    A dry plasma process has been demonstrated to be useful for the selective modification of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiolates. These SAMs are used, during the fabrication of semiconductor electronic devices, as etch masks on gold layers that are destined to be patterned and incorporated into the devices. The selective modification involves the formation of fluorocarbon films that render the SAMs more effective in protecting the masked areas of the gold against etching by a potassium iodide (KI) solution. This modification can be utilized, not only in the fabrication of single electronic devices but also in the fabrication of integrated circuits, microelectromechanical systems, and circuit boards. In the steps that precede the dry plasma process, a silicon mold in the desired pattern is fabricated by standard photolithographic techniques. A stamp is then made by casting polydimethylsiloxane (commonly known as silicone rubber) in the mold. The stamp is coated with an alkanethiol solution, then the stamp is pressed on the gold layer of a device to be fabricated in order to deposit the alkanethiol to form an alkanethiolate SAM in the desired pattern (see figure). Next, the workpiece is exposed to a radio-frequency plasma generated from a mixture of CF4 and H2 gases. After this plasma treatment, the SAM is found to be modified, while the exposed areas of gold remain unchanged. This dry plasma process offers the potential for forming masks superior to those formed in a prior wet etching process. Among the advantages over the wet etching process are greater selectivity, fewer pin holes in the masks, and less nonuniformity of the masks. The fluorocarbon films formed in this way may also be useful as intermediate layers for subsequent fabrication steps and as dielectric layers to be incorporated into finished products.

  8. Channel Allocation Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Robert S.

    The Frequency Allocation Subcommittee of the Coordinating Committee for Cable Communication Systems, Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, was formed to produce a background report on the general problems of frequency allocation and assignments in cable television. The present paper, based on the subcommittee's interim report,…

  9. SuMoToRI, an Ecophysiological Model to Predict Growth and Sulfur Allocation and Partitioning in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.) Until the Onset of Pod Formation.

    PubMed

    Brunel-Muguet, Sophie; Mollier, Alain; Kauffmann, François; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Goudier, Damien; Sénécal, Emmanuelle; Etienne, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur (S) nutrition in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is a major concern for this high S-demanding crop, especially in the context of soil S oligotrophy. Therefore, predicting plant growth, S plant allocation (between the plant's compartments) and S pool partitioning (repartition of the mobile-S vs. non-mobile-S fractions) until the onset of reproductive phase could help in the diagnosis of S deficiencies during the early stages. For this purpose, a process-based model, SuMoToRI (Sulfur Model Toward Rapeseed Improvement), was developed up to the onset of pod formation. The key features rely on (i) the determination of the S requirements used for growth (structural and metabolic functions) through critical S dilution curves and (ii) the estimation of a mobile pool of S that is regenerated by daily S uptake and remobilization from senescing leaves. This study describes the functioning of the model and presents the model's calibration and evaluation. SuMoToRI was calibrated and evaluated with independent datasets from greenhouse experiments under contrasting S supply conditions. It is run with a small number of parameters with generic values, except in the case of the radiation use efficiency, which was shown to be modulated by S supply. The model gave satisfying predictions of the dynamics of growth, S allocation between compartments and S partitioning, such as the mobile-S fraction in the leaves, which is an indicator of the remobilization potential toward growing sinks. The mechanistic features of SuMoToRI provide a process-based framework that has enabled the description of the S remobilizing process in a species characterized by senescence during the vegetative phase. We believe that this model structure could be useful for modeling S dynamics in other arable crops that have similar senescence-related characteristics.

  10. DNA adenine methylation of sams1 gene in symbiont-bearing Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Taeck J

    2008-10-01

    The expression of amoeba sams genes is switched from sams1 to sams2 when amoebae are infected with Legionella jeonii. To elucidate the mechanism for the inactivation of host sams1 gene by endosymbiotic bacteria, methylation states of the sams1 gene of D and xD amoebae was compared in this study. The sams1 gene of amoebae was methylated at an internal adenine residue of GATC site in symbiont-bearing xD amoebae but not in symbiont-free D amoebae, suggesting that the modification might have caused the inactivation of sams1 in xD amoebae. The sams1 gene of xD amoebae was inactivated at the transcriptional level. Analysis of DNA showed that adenine residues in L. jeonii sams were also methylated, implying that L. jeonii bacteria belong to a Dam methylase-positive strain. In addition, both SAM and Met appeared to act as negative regulators for the expression of sams1 whereas the expression of sams2 was not affected in amoebae.

  11. Isothiourea-Mediated Organocatalytic Michael Addition-Lactonization on a Surface: Modification of SAMs on Silicon Oxide Substrates.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Ross; Parkin, John D; Smith, Andrew D; Hähner, Georg

    2016-04-05

    Tailoring the functionality of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) can be achieved either by depositing prefunctionalized molecules with the appropriate terminal groups or by chemical modification of an existing SAM in situ. The latter approach is particularly advantageous to allow for diversity of surface functionalization from a single SAM and if the incorporation of bulky groups is desired. In the present study an organocatalytic isothiourea-mediated Michael addition-lactonization process analogous to a previously reported study in solution is presented. An achiral isothiourea, 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrimido[2,1-b]benzothiazole (DHPB), promotes the intermolecular Michael addition-lactonization of a trifluoromethylenone terminated SAM and a variety of arylacetic acids affording C(6)-trifluoromethyldihydropyranones tethered to the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle, and ellipsometry analysis were conducted to confirm the presence of the substituted dihydropyranone. A model study of this approach was also performed in solution to probe the reaction diastereoselectivity as it cannot be measured directly on the surface.

  12. SuMoToRI, an Ecophysiological Model to Predict Growth and Sulfur Allocation and Partitioning in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.) Until the Onset of Pod Formation

    PubMed Central

    Brunel-Muguet, Sophie; Mollier, Alain; Kauffmann, François; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Goudier, Damien; Sénécal, Emmanuelle; Etienne, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur (S) nutrition in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is a major concern for this high S-demanding crop, especially in the context of soil S oligotrophy. Therefore, predicting plant growth, S plant allocation (between the plant’s compartments) and S pool partitioning (repartition of the mobile-S vs. non-mobile-S fractions) until the onset of reproductive phase could help in the diagnosis of S deficiencies during the early stages. For this purpose, a process-based model, SuMoToRI (Sulfur Model Toward Rapeseed Improvement), was developed up to the onset of pod formation. The key features rely on (i) the determination of the S requirements used for growth (structural and metabolic functions) through critical S dilution curves and (ii) the estimation of a mobile pool of S that is regenerated by daily S uptake and remobilization from senescing leaves. This study describes the functioning of the model and presents the model’s calibration and evaluation. SuMoToRI was calibrated and evaluated with independent datasets from greenhouse experiments under contrasting S supply conditions. It is run with a small number of parameters with generic values, except in the case of the radiation use efficiency, which was shown to be modulated by S supply. The model gave satisfying predictions of the dynamics of growth, S allocation between compartments and S partitioning, such as the mobile-S fraction in the leaves, which is an indicator of the remobilization potential toward growing sinks. The mechanistic features of SuMoToRI provide a process-based framework that has enabled the description of the S remobilizing process in a species characterized by senescence during the vegetative phase. We believe that this model structure could be useful for modeling S dynamics in other arable crops that have similar senescence-related characteristics. PMID:26635825

  13. Integrating a distributed hydrological model and SEEA-Water for improving water account and water allocation management under a climate change context.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauch, Eduardo; Almeida, Carina; Simionesei, Lucian; Ramos, Tiago; Neves, Ramiro

    2015-04-01

    The crescent demand and situations of water scarcity and droughts are a difficult problem to solve by water managers, with big repercussions in the entire society. The complexity of this question is increased by trans-boundary river issues and the environmental impacts of the usual adopted solutions to store water, like reservoirs. To be able to answer to the society requirements regarding water allocation in a sustainable way, the managers must have a complete and clear picture of the present situation, as well as being able to understand the changes in the water dynamics both in the short and long time period. One of the available tools for the managers is the System of Environmental-Economic Accounts for Water (SEEA-Water), a subsystem of SEEA with focus on water accounts, developed by the United Nations Statistical Division (UNSD) in collaboration with the London Group on Environmental Accounting, This system provides, between other things, with a set of tables and accounts for water and water related emissions, organizing statistical data making possible the derivation of indicators that can be used to assess the relations between economy and environment. One of the main issues with the SEEA-Water framework seems to be the requirement of large amounts of data, including field measurements of water availability in rivers/lakes/reservoirs, soil and groundwater, as also precipitation, irrigation and other water sources and uses. While this is an incentive to collecting and using data, it diminishes the usefulness of the system on countries where this data is not yet available or is incomplete, as it can lead to a poor understanding of the water availability and uses. Distributed hydrological models can be used to fill missing data required by the SEEA-Water framework. They also make it easier to assess different scenarios (usually soil use, water demand and climate changes) for a better planning of water allocation. In the context of the DURERO project (www

  14. An ADC for the SAM on the SOAR Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tighe, Roberto; Tokovinin, Andrei; Schurter, Patricio; Martínez, Manuel; Cantarutti, Rolando

    2016-08-01

    SAM (Soar Adaptive-optics Module), the SOAR (Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research) GLAO facility is in service since 2011, with a UV, 355nm Laser Guide Star (LGS). The atmospheric wavefront error is therefore measured at 355nm and the star images are corrected in the visible range (BVRI bands). An ADC is required for High Resolution imaging at low telescope elevation, especially at shorter wavelengths of the visible spectrum. The ADC is based on 80mm diameter rotating prisms. This compact unit, fully automated, can be inserted or removed from the tightly constrained SAM collimated beam space-envelope, it adjusts to the parallactic angle and corrects the atmospheric dispersion. Here we present the optical and opto-mechanical design, the control design, the operational strategy and performance results obtained from extensive use in on-sky HR Speckle Imaging.

  15. Integration of sample analysis method (SAM) for polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Monagle, M.; Johnson, R.C.

    1996-05-01

    A completely integrated Sample Analysis Method (SAM) has been tested as part of the Contaminant Analysis Automation program. The SAM system was tested for polychlorinated biphenyl samples using five Standard Laboratory Modules{trademark}: two Soxtec{trademark} modules, a high volume concentrator module, a generic materials handling module, and the gas chromatographic module. With over 300 samples completed within the first phase of the validation, recovery and precision data were comparable to manual methods. Based on experience derived from the first evaluation of the automated system, efforts are underway to improve sample recoveries and integrate a sample cleanup procedure. In addition, initial work in automating the extraction of semivolatile samples using this system will also be discussed.

  16. First use of SAM onboard calibration gas cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malespin, C.; Trainer, M. G.; Manning, H. L.; Franz, H. B.; Conrad, P. G.; Raaen, E.; Webster, C. R.; Flesch, G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Wong, M. H.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument (Mahaffy et al 2012) suite on Curiosity completed its first measurement of the onboard calibration gas cell on MSL Mission Sol 1042. The cell consists of a gas mixture of four primary gases, along with trace fluorinated hydrocarbon high mass calibrants. The mix is comprised of approximately 25% CO2, N2, Xe and Ar, where the 129Xe has been given a three times enrichment relative to terrestrial xenon in order to distinguish it isotopically from Martian atmospheric Xe. Analysis of the calibration cell is intended to identify changes in instrument performance between pre-launch calibrations and operations on Mars, for any of the three main subsystems in SAM: the Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS), and Gas Chromatograph (GC). Here we present the experimental approach, results, and implications for instrument performance after almost three years of measurements on Mars.

  17. Mercury astronauts at the Sam Houston Colosseum, Houston, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    The original seven Mercury astronauts, each wearing new cowboy hats and a badge in the shape of a star, are pictured on stage at the Sam Houston Colosseum. A large crowd was on hand to welcome them to Houston, Texas. Left to right are astronauts M. Scott Carpenter, L. Gordon Cooper Jr., John H. Glenn Jr., Virgil I. Grissom, Walter M. Schirra Jr., Alan B. Shepard Jr., and Donald K. Slayton. Sen. John Tower (R.-Texas) is seen in far right background.

  18. SAM Technical Review Committee Final Report: Summary and Key Recommendations from the Onsite TRC Meeting Held April 22-23, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Dobos, S.; Janzou, S.; Gilman, P.; Freeman, J.; Kaffine, L.

    2013-08-01

    The System Advisor Model (SAM) is a broad and robust set of models and frameworks for analyzing both system performance and system financing. It does this across a range of technologies dominated by solar technologies including photovoltaics (PV) and concentrated solar power (CSP). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technology Program requested the SAM development team to review the photovoltaic performance modeling with the development community and specifically, with the independent engineering community. The report summarizes the major effort for this technical review committee (TRC).

  19. Summary Status of the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS), September 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) was developed to measure the microgravity acceleration environment to which NASA science payloads are exposed during microgravity science missions on the shuttle. Six flight units have been fabricated to date. The inaugural flight of a SAMS unit was on STS-40 in June 1991 as part of the First Spacelab Life Sciences mission. Since that time, SAMS has flown on six additional missions and gathered eighteen gigabytes of data representing sixty-eight days of microgravity environment. The SAMS units have been flown in the shuttle middeck and cargo bay, in the Spacelab module, and in the Spacehab module. This paper summarizes the missions and experiments which SAMS has supported. The quantity of data and the utilization of the SAMS data is described. Future activities are briefly described for the SAMS project and the Microgravity Measurement and Analysis project (MMAP) to support science experiments and scientists with microgravity environment measurement and analysis.

  20. CE-SAM: a conversational interface for ISR mission support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzocaro, Diego; Parizas, Christos; Preece, Alun; Braines, Dave; Mott, David; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.

    2013-05-01

    There is considerable interest in natural language conversational interfaces. These allow for complex user interactions with systems, such as fulfilling information requirements in dynamic environments, without requiring extensive training or a technical background (e.g. in formal query languages or schemas). To leverage the advantages of conversational interactions we propose CE-SAM (Controlled English Sensor Assignment to Missions), a system that guides users through refining and satisfying their information needs in the context of Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) operations. The rapidly-increasing availability of sensing assets and other information sources poses substantial challenges to effective ISR resource management. In a coalition context, the problem is even more complex, because assets may be "owned" by different partners. We show how CE-SAM allows a user to refine and relate their ISR information needs to pre-existing concepts in an ISR knowledge base, via conversational interaction implemented on a tablet device. The knowledge base is represented using Controlled English (CE) - a form of controlled natural language that is both human-readable and machine processable (i.e. can be used to implement automated reasoning). Users interact with the CE-SAM conversational interface using natural language, which the system converts to CE for feeding-back to the user for confirmation (e.g. to reduce misunderstanding). We show that this process not only allows users to access the assets that can support their mission needs, but also assists them in extending the CE knowledge base with new concepts.

  1. Mechanistic Enzymology of the Radical SAM Enzyme DesII.

    PubMed

    Ruszczycky, Mark W; Liu, Hung-Wen

    2015-04-01

    DesII is a member of the radical SAM family of enzymes that catalyzes radical-mediated transformations of TDP-4-amino-4,6-didexoy-D-glucose as well as other sugar nucleotide diphosphates. Like nearly all radical SAM enzymes, the reactions begin with the reductive homolysis of SAM to produce a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical which is followed by regiospecific hydrogen atom abstraction from the substrate. What happens next, however, depends on the nature of the substrate radical so produced. In the case of the biosynthetically relevant substrate, a radical-mediated deamination ensues; however, when this amino group is replaced with a hydroxyl, one instead observes dehydrogenation. The factors that govern the fate of the initially generated substrate radical as well as the mechanistic details underlying these transformations have been a key focus of research into the chemistry of DesII. This review will discuss recent discoveries pertaining to the enzymology of DesII, how it may relate to understanding other radical-mediated lyases and dehydrogenases and the working hypotheses currently being investigated regarding the mechanism of DesII catalysis.

  2. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir (NASA Increment 4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1998-01-01

    During NASA Increment 4 (January to May 1997), about 5 gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurements System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station, Mir. The data were recorded on 28 optical disks which were returned to Earth on STS-84. During this increment, SAMS data were collected in the Priroda module to support the Mir Structural Dynamics Experiment (MiSDE), the Binary Colloidal Alloy Tests (BCAT), Angular Liquid Bridge (ALB), Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM), Diffusion Controlled Apparatus Module (DCAM), Enhanced Dynamic Load Sensors (EDLS), Forced Flow Flame Spreading Test (FFFr), Liquid Metal Diffusion (LMD), Protein Crystal Growth in Dewar (PCG/Dewar), Queen's University Experiments in Liquid Diffusion (QUELD), and Technical Evaluation of MIM (TEM). This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity environment to which these experiments were exposed. Also documented are mission events of interest such as the docked phase of STS-84 operations, a Progress engine bum, Soyuz vehicle docking and undocking, and Progress vehicle docking. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous summary reports prepared by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) group.

  3. Insights into the structure, function and evolution of the radical-SAM 23S rRNA methyltransferase Cfr that confers antibiotic resistance in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska, Katarzyna H.; Purta, Elzbieta; Hansen, Lykke H.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Vester, Birte; Long, Katherine S.

    2010-01-01

    The Cfr methyltransferase confers combined resistance to five classes of antibiotics that bind to the peptidyl tranferase center of bacterial ribosomes by catalyzing methylation of the C-8 position of 23S rRNA nucleotide A2503. The same nucleotide is targeted by the housekeeping methyltransferase RlmN that methylates the C-2 position. Database searches with the Cfr sequence have revealed a large group of closely related sequences from all domains of life that contain the conserved CX3CX2C motif characteristic of radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes. Phylogenetic analysis of the Cfr/RlmN family suggests that the RlmN subfamily is likely the ancestral form, whereas the Cfr subfamily arose via duplication and horizontal gene transfer. A structural model of Cfr has been calculated and used as a guide for alanine mutagenesis studies that corroborate the model-based predictions of a 4Fe–4S cluster, a SAM molecule coordinated to the iron–sulfur cluster (SAM1) and a SAM molecule that is the putative methyl group donor (SAM2). All mutations at predicted functional sites affect Cfr activity significantly as assayed by antibiotic susceptibility testing and primer extension analysis. The investigation has identified essential amino acids and Cfr variants with altered reaction mechanisms and represents a first step towards understanding the structural basis of Cfr activity. PMID:20007606

  4. The SAMS: Smartphone Addiction Management System and verification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heyoung; Ahn, Heejune; Choi, Samwook; Choi, Wanbok

    2014-01-01

    While the popularity of smartphones has given enormous convenience to our lives, their pathological use has created a new mental health concern among the community. Hence, intensive research is being conducted on the etiology and treatment of the condition. However, the traditional clinical approach based surveys and interviews has serious limitations: health professionals cannot perform continual assessment and intervention for the affected group and the subjectivity of assessment is questionable. To cope with these limitations, a comprehensive ICT (Information and Communications Technology) system called SAMS (Smartphone Addiction Management System) is developed for objective assessment and intervention. The SAMS system consists of an Android smartphone application and a web application server. The SAMS client monitors the user's application usage together with GPS location and Internet access location, and transmits the data to the SAMS server. The SAMS server stores the usage data and performs key statistical data analysis and usage intervention according to the clinicians' decision. To verify the reliability and efficacy of the developed system, a comparison study with survey-based screening with the K-SAS (Korean Smartphone Addiction Scale) as well as self-field trials is performed. The comparison study is done using usage data from 14 users who are 19 to 50 year old adults that left at least 1 week usage logs and completed the survey questionnaires. The field trial fully verified the accuracy of the time, location, and Internet access information in the usage measurement and the reliability of the system operation over more than 2 weeks. The comparison study showed that daily use count has a strong correlation with K-SAS scores, whereas daily use times do not strongly correlate for potentially addicted users. The correlation coefficients of count and times with total K-SAS score are CC = 0.62 and CC =0.07, respectively, and the t-test analysis for the

  5. Dynamic Allocation of Sugars in Barley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumberbatch, L. C.; Crowell, A. S.; Fallin, B. A.; Howell, C. R.; Reid, C. D.; Weisenberger, A. G.; Lee, S. J.; McKisson, J. E.

    2014-03-01

    Allocation of carbon and nitrogen is a key factor for plant productivity. Measurements are carried out by tracing 11C-tagged sugars using positron emission tomography and coincidence counting. We study the mechanisms of carbon allocation and transport from carbohydrate sources (leaves) to sinks (stem, shoot, roots) under various environmental conditions such as soil nutrient levels and atmospheric CO2 concentration. The data are analyzed using a transfer function analysis technique to model transport and allocation in barley plants. The experimental technique will be described and preliminary results presented. This work was supported in part by USDOE Grant No. DE-FG02-97-ER41033 and DE-SC0005057.

  6. Synergy between selection for production and longevity and the use of extended lactation: insights from a resource allocation model in a dairy goat herd.

    PubMed

    Douhard, F; Tichit, M; Amer, P R; Friggens, N C

    2014-11-01

    Although most of the genetic progress in production efficiency is achieved through selection at a global scale, locally, farm managers can also influence the selection process to better match genotypes and their varying herd environment. This study focused on the influence of a particular management decision--the use of extended lactation (EL) in dairy goat production systems--as it affects the survival and reproduction rates at the herd level, which may then shape different long-term selection responses. The objective was to understand and quantify the influences of EL and variability in achieved intake level on the responses to selection for production, reproduction, and longevity. An animal model of resource allocation between life functions was applied to the dairy goat. It predicts the trajectory of change in the herd genetic composition as affected by the feeding level and the selection pressure applied by the manager. During 40 yr, goats were selected for milk yield, reproduction, and, with a different selection weight for age (WAGE), for longevity. Under varying achieved intake levels, increasing WAGE improved the survival rate but a nonlinear effect was observed for the average milk yield and BCS. When moderately increasing WAGE from 0, resources were reallocated from lactation towards body reserves and survival, which led to a trade-off at the herd level between improving survival and BCS and increasing milk yield. When further increasing WAGE, old females became systematically preferred regardless of their reproductive status and the proportion of EL in the herd increased. Females undergoing EL had reduced energetic costs of reproduction, which improved their probability of survival. Across generations, an increased herd incidence of EL led to a relaxation of the selection pressure on the resource allocation to body reserves, which is normally imposed by the manager's priority to achieve successful reproduction at each mating. As selection for longevity

  7. In situ analysis of martian regolith with the SAM experiment during the first mars year of the MSL mission: Identification of organic molecules by gas chromatography from laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, M.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; Coll, P.; Glavin, D. P.; Freissinet, C.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; François, P.; Coscia, D.; Bonnet, J. Y.; Teinturier, S.; Cabane, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2016-09-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument onboard the Curiosity rover, is specifically designed for in situ molecular and isotopic analyses of martian surface materials and atmosphere. It contributes to the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) missions primary scientific goal to characterize the potential past, present or future habitability of Mars. In all of the analyses of solid samples delivered to SAM so far, chlorinated organic compounds have been detected above instrument background levels and identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) (Freissinet et al., 2015; Glavin et al., 2013). While some of these may originate from reactions between oxychlorines and terrestrial organic carbon present in the instrument background (Glavin et al., 2013), others have been demonstrated to originate from indigenous organic carbon present in samples (Freissinet et al., 2015). We present here laboratory calibrations that focused on the analyses performed with the MXT-CLP GC column (SAM GC-5 channel) used for nearly all of the GC-MS analyses of the martian soil samples carried out with SAM to date. Complementary to the mass spectrometric data, gas chromatography allows us to separate and identify the species analyzable in a nominal SAM-GC run time of about 21 min. To characterize the analytical capabilities of this channel within the SAM Flight Model (FM) operating conditions on Mars, and their implications on the detection of organic matter, it is required to perform laboratory experimental tests and calibrations on spare model components. This work assesses the SAM flight GC-5 column efficiency, confirms the identification of the molecules based on their retention time, and enables a better understanding of the behavior of the SAM injection trap (IT) and its release of organic molecules. This work will enable further optimization of the SAM-GC runs for additional samples to be analyzed during the MSL mission.

  8. Unliganded EphA3 dimerization promoted by the SAM domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristova, Kalina; Singh, Deo; King, Christopher; Ahmed, Fozia; Pasquale, Elena

    The EphA3 receptor tyrosine kinase regulates morphogenesis during development, and is overexpressed and mutated in a variety of cancers. EphA3 activation is believed to follow a ``seeding mechanism'' model, in which ligand binding to the monomeric receptor acts as a trigger for signal-productive receptor clustering. We use a novel approach to study EphA3 lateral interactions on the surface of live cells, and we demonstrate that EphA3 forms dimers in the absence of ligand binding. We further show that these dimers are stabilized by interactions involving the EphA3 SAM domain. The discovery of unliganded EphA3 dimers challenges the current understanding of the chain of EphA3 activation events, and suggests that EphA3 may follow the ``pre-formed dimer'' model of activation known to be relevant for other receptor tyrosine kinases. This work also establishes a new role for the SAM domain in promoting Eph receptor lateral interactions and signaling on the cell surface.

  9. Systematic biochemical characterization of the SAM domains in Eph receptor family from Mus Musculus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Li, Qingxia; Zheng, Yunhua; Li, Gang; Liu, Wei

    2016-05-13

    The Eph receptor family is the largest subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases and well-known for their pivotal roles in axon guidance, synaptogenesis, artery/venous differentiation and tumorigenesis, etc. Activation of the Eph receptor needs multimerization of the receptors. The intracellular C-terminal SAM domain of Eph receptor was reported to mediate self-association of Eph receptors via the homo SAM-SAM interaction. In this study, we systematically expressed and purified the SAM domain proteins of all fourteen Eph receptors of Mus musculus in Escherichia coli. The FPLC (fast protein liquid chromatography) results showed the recombinant SAM domains were highly homogeneous. Using CD (circular dichroism) spectrometry, we found that the secondary structure of all the SAM domains was typically alpha helical folded and remarkably similar. The thermo-stability tests showed that they were quite stable in solution. SEC-MALS (size exclusion chromatography coupled with multiple angle light scattering) results illustrated 200 μM Eph SAM domains behaved as good monomers in the size-exclusion chromatography. More importantly, DLS (dynamic light scattering) results revealed the overwhelming majority of SAM domains was not multimerized in solution either at 200 μM or 2000 μM protein concentration, which indicating the SAM domain alone was not sufficient to mediate the polymerization of Eph receptor. In summary, our studies provided the systematic biochemical characterizations of the Eph receptor SAM domains and implied their roles in Eph receptor mediated signaling pathways.

  10. GABAergic inhibition shapes SAM responses in rat auditory thalamus.

    PubMed

    Cai, R; Caspary, D M

    2015-07-23

    Auditory thalamus (medial geniculate body [MGB]) receives ascending inhibitory GABAergic inputs from inferior colliculus (IC) and descending GABAergic projections from the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) with both inputs postulated to play a role in shaping temporal responses. Previous studies suggested that enhanced processing of temporally rich stimuli occurs at the level of MGB, with our recent study demonstrating enhanced GABA sensitivity in MGB compared to IC. The present study used sinusoidal amplitude-modulated (SAM) stimuli to generate modulation transfer functions (MTFs), to examine the role of GABAergic inhibition in shaping the response properties of MGB single units in anesthetized rats. Rate MTFs (rMTFs) were parsed into "bandpass (BP)", "mixed (Mixed)", "highpass (HP)" or "atypical" response types, with most units showing the Mixed response type. GABAA receptor blockade with iontophoretic application of the GABAA receptor (GABAAR) antagonist gabazine (GBZ) selectively altered the response properties of most MGB neurons examined. Mixed and HP units showed significant GABAAR-mediated SAM-evoked rate response changes at higher modulation frequencies (fms), which were also altered by N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor blockade (2R)-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (AP5). BP units, and the lower arm of Mixed units responded to GABAAR blockade with increased responses to SAM stimuli at or near the rate best modulation frequency (rBMF). The ability of GABA circuits to shape responses at higher modulation frequencies is an emergent property of MGB units, not observed at lower levels of the auditory pathway and may reflect activation of MGB NMDA receptors (Rabang and Bartlett, 2011; Rabang et al., 2012). Together, GABAARs exert selective rate control over selected fms, generally without changing the units' response type. These results showed that coding of modulated stimuli at the level of auditory thalamus is at least, in part, strongly controlled by GABA

  11. Structure of the chromosomal insertion site for pSAM2: functional analysis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Raynal, A; Tuphile, K; Gerbaud, C; Luther, T; Guérineau, M; Pernodet, J L

    1998-04-01

    The element pSAM2 from Streptomyces ambofaciens integrates into the chromosome through site-specific recombination between the element (attP) and the chromosomal (attB) sites. These regions share an identity segment of 58bp extending from the anti-codon loop through the 3' end of a tRNA(Pro) gene. To facilitate the study of the attB site, the int and xis genes, expressed from an inducible promoter, and attP from pSAM2 were cloned on plasmids in Escherichia coil. Compatible plasmids carrying the different attB regions to be tested were introduced in these E. coli strains. Under these conditions, Int alone could promote site-specific integration; Int and Xis were both required for site-specific excision. This experimental system was used to study the sequences required in attB for efficient site-specific recombination. A 26 bp sequence, centred on the anti-codon loop region and not completely included in the identity segment, retained all the functionality of attB; shorter sequences allowed integration with lower efficiencies. By comparing the 26-bp-long attB with attP, according to the Lambda model, we propose that B and B', C and C' core-type Int binding sites consist of 9 bp imperfect inverted repeats separated by a 5 bp overlap region.

  12. Paramagnetic Intermediates Generated by Radical S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus A [4Fe–4S]+ cluster reduces a bound S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) molecule, cleaving it into methionine and a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical (5′-dA•). This step initiates the varied chemistry catalyzed by each of the so-called radical SAM enzymes. The strongly oxidizing 5′-dA• is quenched by abstracting a H-atom from a target species. In some cases, this species is an exogenous molecule of substrate, for example, l-tyrosine in the [FeFe] hydrogenase maturase, HydG. In other cases, the target is a proteinaceous residue as in all the glycyl radical forming enzymes. The generation of this initial radical species and the subsequent chemistry involving downstream radical intermediates is meticulously controlled by the enzyme so as to prevent unwanted reactions. But the manner in which this control is exerted is unknown. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has proven to be a valuable tool used to gain insight into these mechanisms. In this Account, we summarize efforts to trap such radical intermediates in radical SAM enzymes and highlight four examples in which EPR spectroscopic results have shed significant light on the corresponding mechanism. For lysine 2,3-aminomutase, nearly each possible intermediate, from an analogue of the initial 5′-dA• to the product radical l-β-lysine, has been explored. A paramagnetic intermediate observed in biotin synthase is shown to involve an auxiliary [FeS] cluster whose bridging sulfide is a co-substrate for the final step in the biosynthesis of vitamin B7. In HydG, the l-tyrosine substrate is converted in unprecedented fashion to a 4-oxidobenzyl radical on the way to generating CO and CN– ligands for the [FeFe] cluster of hydrogenase. And finally, EPR has confirmed a mechanistic proposal for the antibiotic resistance protein Cfr, which methylates the unactivated sp2-hybridized C8-carbon of an adenosine base of 23S ribosomal RNA. These four systems provide just a brief survey of the ever-growing set

  13. Carbon extension in peptidylnucleoside biosynthesis by radical-SAM enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Lilla, Edward A.; Yokoyama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Nikkomycins and polyoxins are antifungal peptidylnucleoside (PN) antibiotics active against human and plant pathogens. Here, we report that during PN biosynthesis in Streptomyces cacaoi and Streptomyces tendae, the C5′-extension of the nucleoside essential for downstream structural diversification is catalyzed by a conserved radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzyme, PolH or NikJ. This is distinct from the nucleophilic mechanism reported for antibacterial nucleosides and represents a novel mechanism of nucleoside natural product biosynthesis. PMID:27642865

  14. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  15. Benchmark Simulations of the Thermal-Hydraulic Responses during EBR-II Inherent Safety Tests using SAM

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Rui; Sumner, Tyler S.

    2016-01-01

    An advanced system analysis tool SAM is being developed for fast-running, improved-fidelity, and wholeplant transient analyses at Argonne National Laboratory under DOE-NE’s Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program. As an important part of code development, companion validation activities are being conducted to ensure the performance and validity of the SAM code. This paper presents the benchmark simulations of two EBR-II tests, SHRT-45R and BOP- 302R, whose data are available through the support of DOE-NE’s Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) program. The code predictions of major primary coolant system parameter are compared with the test results. Additionally, the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code simulation results are also included for a code-to-code comparison.

  16. Detection of Nitric Oxide by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Implications for the Presence of Nitrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Stern, J.; Freissinet, C.; Franz, H. B.; Eigenbrode, J. L..; McKay, C. P.; Coll, P.; Sutter, B.; Archer, D.; McAdam, A.; Cabane, M.; Ming, D. W.; Glavin, D.; Leshin, L.; Wong, M.; Atreya, S.; Wray, J. J.; Steele, A.; Buch, A.; Prats, B. D.; Szopa, C.; Coscia, D.; Teinturier, S.; Conrad, P.; Owen, T. C.; Mahaffy, P.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main goals of the Mars Science Laboratory is to determine whether the planet ever had environmental conditions able to support microbial life. Nitrogen is a fundamental element for life, and is present in structural (e.g., proteins), catalytic (e.g., enzymes and ribozymes), energy transfer (e.g., ATP) and information storage (RNA and DNA) biomolecules. Planetary models suggest that molecular nitrogen was abundant in the early Martian atmosphere, but was rapidly lost to space by photochemistry, sputtering impact erosion, and oxidized and deposited to the surface as nitrate. Nitrates are a fundamental source for nitrogen to terrestrial microorganisms. Therefore, the detection of nitrates in soils and rocks is important to assess the habitability of a Martian environment. SAM is capable of detecting nitrates by their thermal decomposition into nitric oxide, NO. Here we analyze the release of NO from soils and rocks examined by the SAM instrument at Gale crater, and discuss its origin.

  17. A sub-canopy structure for simulating oil palm in the Community Land Model (CLM-Palm): phenology, allocation and yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y.; Roupsard, O.; Bernoux, M.; Le Maire, G.; Panferov, O.; Kotowska, M. M.; Knohl, A.

    2015-11-01

    In order to quantify the effects of forests to oil palm conversion occurring in the tropics on land-atmosphere carbon, water and energy fluxes, we develop a new perennial crop sub-model CLM-Palm for simulating a palm plant functional type (PFT) within the framework of the Community Land Model (CLM4.5). CLM-Palm is tested here on oil palm only but is meant of generic interest for other palm crops (e.g., coconut). The oil palm has monopodial morphology and sequential phenology of around 40 stacked phytomers, each carrying a large leaf and a fruit bunch, forming a multilayer canopy. A sub-canopy phenological and physiological parameterization is thus introduced so that each phytomer has its own prognostic leaf growth and fruit yield capacity but with shared stem and root components. Phenology and carbon and nitrogen allocation operate on the different phytomers in parallel but at unsynchronized steps, separated by a thermal period. An important phenological phase is identified for the oil palm - the storage growth period of bud and "spear" leaves which are photosynthetically inactive before expansion. Agricultural practices such as transplanting, fertilization and leaf pruning are represented. Parameters introduced for the oil palm were calibrated and validated with field measurements of leaf area index (LAI), yield and net primary production (NPP) from Sumatra, Indonesia. In calibration with a mature oil palm plantation, the cumulative yields from 2005 to 2014 matched notably well between simulation and observation (mean percentage error = 3 %). Simulated inter-annual dynamics of PFT-level and phytomer-level LAI were both within the range of field measurements. Validation from eight independent oil palm sites shows the ability of the model to adequately predict the average leaf growth and fruit yield across sites and sufficiently represent the significant nitrogen- and age-related site-to-site variability in NPP and yield. Results also indicate that seasonal dynamics

  18. Updates to the Demographic and Spatial Allocation Models to Produce Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios (Iclus) (Version 2)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios (ICLUS) version 2 (v2) modeling tool furthered land change modeling by providing nationwide housing development scenarios up to 2100. This newest version includes updated population and land use data sets and addresses limitations ...

  19. Comparative studies of aerosol extinction measurements made by the SAM II and SAGE II satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, Glenn K.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Wang, P.; Osborn, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    Results from the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II are compared for measurement locations which are coincident in time and space. At 1.0 micron, the SAM II and SAGE II aerosol extinction profiles are similar within their measurement errors. In addition, sunrise and sunset aerosol extinction data at four different wavelengths are compared for occasions when the SAGE II and SAM II measurements are nearly coincident in space and about 12 hours apart.

  20. The nuclear protein Sam68 is cleaved by the FMDV 3C protease redistributing Sam68 to the cytoplasm during FMDV infection of host cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Paul; Schafer, Elizabeth A.; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2012-03-30

    Picornavirus infection can lead to disruption of nuclear pore traffic, shut-off of cell translation machinery, and cleavage of proteins involved in cellular signal transduction and the innate response to infection. Here, we demonstrated that the FMDV 3C{sup pro} induced the cleavage of nuclear RNA-binding protein Sam68 C-terminus containing the nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Consequently, it stimulated the redistribution of Sam68 to the cytoplasm. The siRNA knockdown of Sam68 resulted in a 1000-fold reduction in viral titers, which prompted us to study the effect of Sam68 on FMDV post-entry events. Interestingly, Sam68 interacts with the internal ribosomal entry site within the 5 Prime non-translated region of the FMDV genome, and Sam68 knockdown decreased FMDV IRES-driven activity in vitro suggesting that it could modulate translation of the viral genome. The results uncover a novel role for Sam68 in the context of picornaviruses and the proteolysis of a new cellular target of the FMDV 3C{sup pro}.

  1. Conjugal immunity of Streptomyces strains carrying the integrative element pSAM2 is due to the pif gene (pSAM2 immunity factor).

    PubMed

    Possoz, Christophe; Gagnat, Josette; Sezonov, Guennadi; Guérineau, Michel; Pernodet, Jean-Luc

    2003-03-01

    Mechanisms of conjugal immunity preventing redundant exchange between two cells harbouring the same conjugative element have been reported in diverse bacteria. Such a system does exist for pSAM2, a conjugative and integrative element of Streptomyces. The apparition of the conjugative free form of pSAM2 in the donor strain during mating can be considered as the initial step of transfer. We analysed the genes involved in transfer inhibition by mating donors harbouring pSAM2 with recipient strains containing different regions of pSAM2. The conjugal immunity was previously thought to be mediated by the transcriptional repressor KorSA. Although the transfer efficiency is reduced by its presence in the recipient, the initiation of the transfer process is not affected. In contrast, the presence in the recipient strain of a single pSAM2 gene, pif (pSAM2 immunity factor), was sufficient to abolish both transfer and initiation of transfer. Thus, the clustered genes korSA and pif act complementarily to maintain pSAM2 in a 'prophage' state under non-conjugal conditions. KorSA is involved in intracellular signalling, whereas Pif participates in intercellular signalling. The Pif nudix motif is essential for its activity. This is the first protein of the nudix family shown to be involved in bacterial conjugation.

  2. Updates to Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    View information on the latest updates to methods included in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM), including the newest recommended methods and publications.

  3. The first year: Development of a LANDSAT capability at Sam Houston State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bounds, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Problems encountered in initiating a LANDSAT data processing capability at Sam Houston State University are discussed. Computer requirements, financing, and academic and administrative support are addressed.

  4. Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses

    SciTech Connect

    Newes, E.; Bush, B.; Inman, D.; Lin, Y.; Mai, T.; Martinez, A.; Mulcahy, D.; Short, W.; Simpkins, T.; Uriarte, C.; Peck, C.

    2012-05-01

    The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a system dynamics model developed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a tool to better understand the interaction of complex policies and their potential effects on the biofuels industry in the United States. However, it does not currently have the capability to account for allocation of biomass resources among the various end uses, which limits its utilization in analysis of policies that target biomass uses outside the biofuels industry. This report provides a more holistic understanding of the dynamics surrounding the allocation of biomass among uses that include traditional use, wood pellet exports, bio-based products and bioproducts, biopower, and biofuels by (1) highlighting the methods used in existing models' treatments of competition for biomass resources; (2) identifying coverage and gaps in industry data regarding the competing end uses; and (3) exploring options for developing models of biomass allocation that could be integrated with the BSM to actively exchange and incorporate relevant information.

  5. Tree Biomass Allocation and Its Model Additivity for Casuarina equisetifolia in a Tropical Forest of Hainan Island, China

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yang; Yang, Zhongyang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Lin, Zhipan; Li, Dunxi; Su, Shaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Casuarina equisetifolia is commonly planted and used in the construction of coastal shelterbelt protection in Hainan Island. Thus, it is critical to accurately estimate the tree biomass of Casuarina equisetifolia L. for forest managers to evaluate the biomass stock in Hainan. The data for this work consisted of 72 trees, which were divided into three age groups: young forest, middle-aged forest, and mature forest. The proportion of biomass from the trunk significantly increased with age (P<0.05). However, the biomass of the branch and leaf decreased, and the biomass of the root did not change. To test whether the crown radius (CR) can improve biomass estimates of C. equisetifolia, we introduced CR into the biomass models. Here, six models were used to estimate the biomass of each component, including the trunk, the branch, the leaf, and the root. In each group, we selected one model among these six models for each component. The results showed that including the CR greatly improved the model performance and reduced the error, especially for the young and mature forests. In addition, to ensure biomass additivity, the selected equation for each component was fitted as a system of equations using seemingly unrelated regression (SUR). The SUR method not only gave efficient and accurate estimates but also achieved the logical additivity. The results in this study provide a robust estimation of tree biomass components and total biomass over three groups of C. equisetifolia. PMID:27002822

  6. Tree Biomass Allocation and Its Model Additivity for Casuarina equisetifolia in a Tropical Forest of Hainan Island, China.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yang; Yang, Zhongyang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Lin, Zhipan; Li, Dunxi; Su, Shaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Casuarina equisetifolia is commonly planted and used in the construction of coastal shelterbelt protection in Hainan Island. Thus, it is critical to accurately estimate the tree biomass of Casuarina equisetifolia L. for forest managers to evaluate the biomass stock in Hainan. The data for this work consisted of 72 trees, which were divided into three age groups: young forest, middle-aged forest, and mature forest. The proportion of biomass from the trunk significantly increased with age (P<0.05). However, the biomass of the branch and leaf decreased, and the biomass of the root did not change. To test whether the crown radius (CR) can improve biomass estimates of C. equisetifolia, we introduced CR into the biomass models. Here, six models were used to estimate the biomass of each component, including the trunk, the branch, the leaf, and the root. In each group, we selected one model among these six models for each component. The results showed that including the CR greatly improved the model performance and reduced the error, especially for the young and mature forests. In addition, to ensure biomass additivity, the selected equation for each component was fitted as a system of equations using seemingly unrelated regression (SUR). The SUR method not only gave efficient and accurate estimates but also achieved the logical additivity. The results in this study provide a robust estimation of tree biomass components and total biomass over three groups of C. equisetifolia.

  7. Advances in liver transplantation allocation systems.

    PubMed

    Schilsky, Michael L; Moini, Maryam

    2016-03-14

    With the growing number of patients in need of liver transplantation, there is a need for adopting new and modifying existing allocation policies that prioritize patients for liver transplantation. Policy should ensure fair allocation that is reproducible and strongly predictive of best pre and post transplant outcomes while taking into account the natural history of the potential recipients liver disease and its complications. There is wide acceptance for allocation policies based on urgency in which the sickest patients on the waiting list with the highest risk of mortality receive priority. Model for end-stage liver disease and Child-Turcotte-Pugh scoring system, the two most universally applicable systems are used in urgency-based prioritization. However, other factors must be considered to achieve optimal allocation. Factors affecting pre-transplant patient survival and the quality of the donor organ also affect outcome. The optimal system should have allocation prioritization that accounts for both urgency and transplant outcome. We reviewed past and current liver allocation systems with the aim of generating further discussion about improvement of current policies.

  8. Advances in liver transplantation allocation systems

    PubMed Central

    Schilsky, Michael L; Moini, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    With the growing number of patients in need of liver transplantation, there is a need for adopting new and modifying existing allocation policies that prioritize patients for liver transplantation. Policy should ensure fair allocation that is reproducible and strongly predictive of best pre and post transplant outcomes while taking into account the natural history of the potential recipients liver disease and its complications. There is wide acceptance for allocation policies based on urgency in which the sickest patients on the waiting list with the highest risk of mortality receive priority. Model for end-stage liver disease and Child-Turcotte-Pugh scoring system, the two most universally applicable systems are used in urgency-based prioritization. However, other factors must be considered to achieve optimal allocation. Factors affecting pre-transplant patient survival and the quality of the donor organ also affect outcome. The optimal system should have allocation prioritization that accounts for both urgency and transplant outcome. We reviewed past and current liver allocation systems with the aim of generating further discussion about improvement of current policies. PMID:26973389

  9. Investigation and incorporation of water inflow uncertainties through stochastic modelling in a combined optimisation methodology for water allocation in Alfeios River (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekri, Eleni; Yannopoulos, Panayotis; Disse, Markus

    2014-05-01

    The Alfeios River plays a vital role for Western Peloponnisos in Greece from natural, ecological, social and economic aspect. The main river and its six tributaries, forming the longest watercourse and the highest streamflow rate of Peloponnisose, represent a significant source of water supply for the region, aiming at delivering and satisfying the expected demands from a variety of water users, including irrigation, drinking water supply, hydropower production and recreation. In the previous EGU General Assembly, a fuzzy-boundary-interval linear programming methodology, based on Li et al. (2010) and Bekri et al. (2012), has been presented for optimal water allocation under uncertain and vague system conditions in the Alfeios River Basin. Uncertainties associated with the benefit and cost coefficient in the objective function of the main water uses (hydropower production and irrigation) were expressed as probability distributions and fuzzy boundary intervals derived by associated α-cut levels. The uncertainty of the monthly water inflows was not incorporated in the previous initial application and the analysis of all other sources of uncertainty has been applied to two extreme hydrologic years represented by a selected wet and dry year. To manage and operate the river system, decision makers should be able to analyze and evaluate the impact of various hydrologic scenarios. In the present work, the critical uncertain parameter of water inflows is analyzed and its incorporation as an additional type of uncertainty in the suggested methodology is investigated, in order to enable the assessment of optimal water allocation for hydrologic and socio-economic scenarios based both on historical data and projected climate change conditions. For this purpose, stochastic simulation analysis for a part of the Alfeios river system is undertaken, testing various stochastic models from simple stationary ones (AR and ARMA), Thomas-Fiering, ARIMA as well as more sophisticated and

  10. In situ analysis of Mars soil sample with the sam gcms instrumentation onboard Curiosity : interpretation and comparison of measurements done at Rocknest and Yelloknife bay sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, Cyril; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Buch, Arnaud; Francois, Pascaline; Millan, Maeva; Teinturier, Sammy; Navarro-Gonzales, Rafael; Glavin, Daniel; Freissinet, Caro; Steele, Andrew; Eigenbrode, Jen; Mahaffy, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The characterisation of the chemical and mineralogical composition of regolith samples collected with the Curiosity rover is a primary objective of the SAM experiment. These data should provide essential clues on the past habitability of Gale crater. Amongst the SAM suite of instruments [1], SAM-GC (Gas Chromatograph) is devoted to identify and quantify volatiles evolved from the thermal (heating up to about 900°C)/chemical (derivatization procedure) treatment of any soil sample collected by the Curiosity rover. With the aim to search for potential organic molecules outgassed from the samples, a SAM-GC analytical channel composed of thermal-desorption injector and a MXT-CLP chromatographic column was chosen to achieve all the measurements done up today, as it was designed for the separation of a wide range of volatile organic molecules. Three solid samples have been analyzed with GCMS, one sand sample collected at the Rocknest site, and two rock samples (John Klein and Cumberland respectively) collected at the Yellowknife Bay site using the Curiosity driller. All the measurements were successful and they produced complex chromatograms with both detectors used for SAM GC, i.e. a thermal conductivity detector and the SAM quandrupole mass spectrometer. Their interpretation already revealed the presence of an oxychlorine phase present in the sample which is at the origin of chlorohydrocarbons clearly identified [2] but this represents only a fraction of the GCMS signal recorded [3,4]. This work presents a systematic comparison of the GCMS measurements done for the different samples collected, supported by reference data obtained in laboratory with different spare models of the gas chromatograph, with the aim to bring new elements of interpretation of the SAM measurements. References: [1] Mahaffy, P. et al. (2012) Space Sci Rev, 170, 401-478. [2] Glavin, D. et al. (2013), JGR. [3] Leshin L. et al. (2013), Science, [4] Ming D. et al. (2013), Science, 32, 64

  11. A fuzzy multi-objective model for capacity allocation and pricing policy of provider in data communication service with different QoS levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wei; Wang, Xianjia; Zhong, Yong-guang; Yu, Lean; Jie, Cao; Ran, Lun; Qiao, Han; Wang, Shouyang; Xu, Xianhao

    2012-06-01

    Data communication service has an important influence on e-commerce. The key challenge for the users is, ultimately, to select a suitable provider. However, in this article, we do not focus on this aspect but the viewpoint and decision-making of providers for order allocation and pricing policy when orders exceed service capacity. It is a multiple criteria decision-making problem such as profit and cancellation ratio. Meanwhile, we know realistic situations in which much of the input information is uncertain. Thus, it becomes very complex in a real-life environment. In this situation, fuzzy sets theory is the best tool for solving this problem. Our fuzzy model is formulated in such a way as to simultaneously consider the imprecision of information, price sensitive demand, stochastic variables, cancellation fee and the general membership function. For solving the problem, a new fuzzy programming is developed. Finally, a numerical example is presented to illustrate the proposed method. The results show that it is effective for determining the suitable order set and pricing policy of provider in data communication service with different quality of service (QoS) levels.

  12. Constrained control allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Wayne C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the allocation of several flight controls to the generation of specified body-axis moments. The number of controls is greater than the number of moments being controlled, and the ranges of the controls are constrained to certain limits. The controls are assumed to be individually linear in their effect throughout their ranges of motion, and independent of one another in their effects. The geometries of the subset of the constrained controls and of its image in moment space are examined. A direct method of allocating these several controls is presented, that guarantees the maximum possible moment is generated within the constraints of the controls. The results are illustrated by an example problem involving three controls and two moments.

  13. GENERATING SOPHISTICATED SPATIAL SURROGATES USING THE MIMS SPATIAL ALLOCATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Multimedia Integrated Modeling System (MIMS) Spatial Allocator is open-source software for generating spatial surrogates for emissions modeling, changing the map projection of Shapefiles, and performing other types of spatial allocation that does not require the use of a comm...

  14. Myrmics Memory Allocator

    SciTech Connect

    Lymperis, S.

    2011-09-23

    MMA is a stand-alone memory management system for MPI clusters. It implements a shared Partitioned Global Address Space, where multiple MPI processes request objects from the allocator and the latter provides them with system-wide unique memory addresses for each object. It provides applications with an intuitive way of managing the memory system in a unified way, thus enabling easier writing of irregular application code.

  15. Regioselective patterning of multiple SAMs and applications in surface-guided smart microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanzhao; Xu, Pengcheng; Li, Xinxin

    2014-12-24

    A top-down nanofabrication technology is developed to integrate multiple SAMs (self-assembled monolayers) into regioselective patterns. With ultraviolet light exposure through regioselectively hollowed hard mask, an existing SAM at designated microregions can be removed and a dissimilar kind of SAM can be regrown there. By repeating the photolithography-like process cycle, diverse kinds of SAM building blocks can be laid out as a desired pattern in one microfluidic channel. In order to ensure high quality of the surface modifications, the SAMs are vapor-phase deposited before the channel is closed by a bonding process. For the first time the technique makes it possible to integrate three or more kinds of SAMs in one microchannel. The technique is very useful for multiplex surface functionalization of microfluidic chips where different segments of a microfluidic channel need to be individually modified with different SAMs or into arrayed pattern for surface-guided fluidic properties like hydrophobicity/philicity and/or oleophobicity/philicity, etc. The technique has been well validated by experimental demonstration of various surface-directed flow-guiding functions. By modifying a microchannel surface into an arrayed pattern of multi-SAM "two-tone" stripe array, surface-guiding-induced 3D swirling flow is generated in a microfluidic channel that experimentally exhibits quick oil/water mixing and high-efficiency oil-to-water chemical extraction.

  16. Sam2bam: High-Performance Framework for NGS Data Preprocessing Tools

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yinhe; Tzeng, Tzy-Hwa Kathy

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a high-throughput software tool framework called sam2bam that enables users to significantly speed up pre-processing for next-generation sequencing data. The sam2bam is especially efficient on single-node multi-core large-memory systems. It can reduce the runtime of data pre-processing in marking duplicate reads on a single node system by 156–186x compared with de facto standard tools. The sam2bam consists of parallel software components that can fully utilize multiple processors, available memory, high-bandwidth storage, and hardware compression accelerators, if available. The sam2bam provides file format conversion between well-known genome file formats, from SAM to BAM, as a basic feature. Additional features such as analyzing, filtering, and converting input data are provided by using plug-in tools, e.g., duplicate marking, which can be attached to sam2bam at runtime. We demonstrated that sam2bam could significantly reduce the runtime of next generation sequencing (NGS) data pre-processing from about two hours to about one minute for a whole-exome data set on a 16-core single-node system using up to 130 GB of memory. The sam2bam could reduce the runtime of NGS data pre-processing from about 20 hours to about nine minutes for a whole-genome sequencing data set on the same system using up to 711 GB of memory. PMID:27861637

  17. Overview of SAM results obtained at Gale Crater during the 180 first sols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Cabane, M.; Webster, C. R.; Archer, D.; Atreya, S. K.; Benna, M.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Brunner, A.; Buch, A.; Conrad, P.; Coscia, D.; Dobson, N.; Dworkin, J.; Eigenbrode, J.; Farley, K.; Flesch, G.; Franz, H.; Freissinet, C.; Galvin, D.; Gorevan, S.; Harpold, D.; Hengemihle, J.; Jaeger, F.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, M.; Jones, J.; Lefavor, M.; Leshin, L.; Lyness, E.; Malespin, C.; Manning, H.; Martin, D.; McAdam, A.; McKay, C.; Miller, K.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Navarro-González, R.; Niles, P.; Nolan, T.; Owen, T.; Pavolv, A.; Prats, B.; Pepin, R.; Raaen, E.; Raulin, F.; Steele, A.; Stern, J.; Squyres, S.; Sutter, B.; Summons, R. E.; Szopa, C.; Tan, F.; Teinturier, S.; Trainer, M.; Wong, M.; Wray, J.

    2013-09-01

    During the first 180 sols of Curiosity's landed mission on Mars (8/6/2012 to 2/7/2013) SAM sampled the atmosphere more than a dozen times, the dusty sandpile named Rocknest and a basin site named John Klein on the floor of Gale crater. The atmospheric experiments utilized SAM's quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and its tunable laser spectrometer (TLS) while the solid sample experiments also utilized the gas chromatograph (GC). Although a number of core experiments were pre-programmed and stored in SAM EEProm, the high level SAM scripting language enabled the team to often optimize experiments based on prior runs. SAM and its Experiment Sequences exercised during the First 120 Sols: The SAM instruments, its gas processing system (GPS) and its sample manipulation system (SMS) have been already described [1]. During the first few weeks of the landed mission SAM carried out a variety of instrument health checks and then began a series of atmospheric experiments to measure atmospheric composition and isotope ratios. From sol 56 to 102 Curiosity lingered at Rocknest to clean out the surfaces of the sample processing system by scooping several times into this fine grained material, vibrating to abrade possible contamination from surfaces, and then discarding before delivery of sample to SAM from the 5th scoop.

  18. Winning Attitude & Dedication to Physical Therapy Keep Sam Schmidt on Track

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosley, Nikki Prevenslik

    2006-01-01

    This article relates how Sam Schmidt returned to living a productive life after an accident left him with spinal cord injury. Schmidt was a former Indy Racing League driver who founded Sam Schmidt Motorsports after his accident in 2000. Schmidt's car hit the wall as he exited turn two during a practice session at Walt Disney World Speedway in…

  19. High expression level and nuclear localization of Sam68 are associated with progression and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Src-associated in mitosis (Sam68; 68 kDa) has been implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of several human cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinicopathologic significance of Sam68 expression and its subcellular localization in colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods Sam68 expression was examined in CRC cell lines, nine matched CRC tissues and adjacent noncancerous tissues using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Sam68 protein expression and localization were determined in 224 paraffin-embedded archived CRC samples using immunohistochemistry. Statistical analyses were applied to evaluate the clinicopathologic significance. Results Sam68 was upregulated in CRC cell lines and CRC, as compared with normal tissues; high Sam68 expression was detected in 120/224 (53.6%) of the CRC tissues. High Sam68 expression correlated significantly with poor differentiation (P = 0.033), advanced T stage (P < 0.001), N stage (P = 0.023) and distant metastasis (P = 0.033). Sam68 nuclear localization correlated significantly with poor differentiation (P = 0.002) and T stage (P =0.021). Patients with high Sam68 expression or Sam68 nuclear localization had poorer overall survival than patients with low Sam68 expression or Sam68 cytoplasmic localization. Patients with high Sam68 expression had a higher risk of recurrence than those with low Sam68 expression. Conclusions Overexpression of Sam68 correlated highly with cancer progression and poor differentiation in CRC. High Sam68 expression and Sam68 nuclear localization were associated with poorer overall survival. PMID:23937454

  20. S.A.M., the Italian Martian simulation chamber.

    PubMed

    Galletta, G; Ferri, F; Fanti, G; D'Alessandro, M; Bertoloni, G; Pavarin, D; Bettanini, C; Cozza, P; Pretto, P; Bianchini, G; Debei, S

    2006-12-01

    The Martian Environment Simulator (SAM "Simulatore di Ambiente Marziano") is a interdisciplinary project of Astrobiology done at University of Padua. The research is aimed to the study of the survival of the microorganisms exposed to the "extreme" planetary environment. The facility has been designed in order to simulate Mars' environmental conditions in terms of atmospheric pressure, temperature cycles and UV radiation dose. The bacterial cells, contained into dedicated capsules, will be exposed to thermal cycles simulating diurnal and seasonal Martian cycles. The metabolism of the different biological samples will be analysed at different phases of the experiment, to study their survival and eventual activity of protein synthesis (mortality, mutations and capability of DNA repairing). We describe the experimental facility and provide the perspectives of the biological experiments we will perform in order to provide hints on the possibility of life on Mars either autochthonous or imported from Earth.

  1. Radical SAM-Mediated Methylation of Ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovic, Vanja; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional modifications of RNA play an important role in a wide range of biological processes. In ribosomal RNA (rRNA), methylation of nucleotide bases is the predominant modification. In recent years, methylation of adenosine 2503 (A2503) in bacterial 23S rRNA has attracted significant attention due to both the unusual regioselectivity of the methyl group incorporation, as well as the pathophysiological roles of the resultant methylations. Specifically, A2503 is methylated at the C2 and C8 positions of the adenine ring, and the introduced modifications have a profound impact on translational fidelity and antibiotic resistance, respectively. These modifications are performed by RlmN and Cfr, two members, of the recently discovered class of radical S-adenosylmethionine (radical SAM) methylsynthases. Here, we present several methods that can be used to evaluate the activity of these enzymes, under both in vivo and in vitro conditions. PMID:26253978

  2. Social activity method (SAM): A fractal language for mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Paul

    2013-09-01

    In this paper I shall present and develop my organisational language, social activity method (SAM), and illustrate some of its applications. I shall introduce a new scheme for modes of recontextualisation that enables the analysis of the ways in which one activity - which might be school mathematics or social research or any empirically observed regularity of practice - recontextualises the practice of another and I shall also present, deploy, and develop an existing scheme - domains of action - in an analysis of school mathematics examination papers and in the structuring of what I refer to as the esoteric domain. This domain is here conceived as a hybrid domain of, first, linguistic and extralinguistic resources that are unambiguously mathematical in terms of both expression and content and, second, pedagogic theory - often tacit - that enables the mathematical gaze onto other practices and so recontextualises them. A second and more general theme that runs through the paper is the claim that there is nothing that is beyond semiosis, that there is nothing to which we have direct access, unmediated by interpretation. This state of affairs has implications for mathematics education. Specifically, insofar as an individual's mathematical semiotic system is under continuous development - the curriculum never being graspable all at once - understanding - as a stable semiotic moment - of any aspect or object of mathematics is always localised to the individual and is at best transient, and the sequencing of such moments may well also be more individualised than consistent in some correspondence with the sequencing of the curriculum. This being the case, a concentration on understanding as a goal may well serve to inhibit the pragmatic acquisition and deployment of mathematical technologies, which should be the principal aim of mathematics teaching and learning. The paper is primarily concerned with mathematics education. SAM, however, is a language that is available for

  3. Radical SAM catalysis via an organometallic intermediate with an Fe-[5'-C]-deoxyadenosyl bond.

    PubMed

    Horitani, Masaki; Shisler, Krista; Broderick, William E; Hutcheson, Rachel U; Duschene, Kaitlin S; Marts, Amy R; Hoffman, Brian M; Broderick, Joan B

    2016-05-13

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to cleave SAM to initiate diverse radical reactions. These reactions are thought to involve the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate, which has not yet been detected. We used rapid freeze-quenching to trap a catalytically competent intermediate in the reaction catalyzed by the radical SAM enzyme pyruvate formate-lyase activating enzyme. Characterization of the intermediate by electron paramagnetic resonance and (13)C, (57)Fe electron nuclear double-resonance spectroscopies reveals that it contains an organometallic center in which the 5' carbon of a SAM-derived deoxyadenosyl moiety forms a bond with the unique iron site of the [4Fe-4S] cluster. Discovery of this intermediate extends the list of enzymatic bioorganometallic centers to the radical SAM enzymes, the largest enzyme superfamily known, and reveals intriguing parallels to B12 radical enzymes.

  4. Sam68 is Overexpressed in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer and Promotes Tumor Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lijuan; Che, Hailuo; Li, Mingmei; Li, Xuepeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the deadliest gynecological malignancy, and evidence is accumulating on how molecular markers may be associated with the origin and process of EOC. Sam68 (Src-associated in mitosis, of 68 kD), is a K homology domain RNA-binding protein that has been investigated as a risk factor in multiple types of tumors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the contribution of the Sam68 gene in the pathogenesis of EOC. Material/Methods Western blot assay and real-time quantitative PCR methods were performed to examine Sam68 expression in EOC tissue specimens. The association of Sam68 expression with clinic-pathologic variables of EOC was evaluated. Then gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies were adopted to examine the regulation of Sam68 on the proliferation of EOC OVCAR-3 cells using CCK-8 and colony forming assays. Results Sam68 was overexpressed in both mRNA and protein levels in EOC tumor tissue (n=152) in an association with malignant factors of EOC such as International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, residual tumor size (cm), histological grade, and lymph node metastasis. In vitro results demonstrated that Sam68 overexpression was upregulated while Sam68 knockdown downregulated the proliferation of EOC OVCAR-3 cells via regulation of cell growth and colony formation. Conclusions Sam68 was overexpressed in EOC tissue in association with such cancer malignant factors of FIGO stage, histological grade, and lymph node metastasis, and also positively regulated the proliferation of EOC cells. Our research suggests that Sam68 might accelerate cell cycle progression, and present as a prognostic marker for EOC. PMID:27623016

  5. Metacognitive and control strategies in study-time allocation.

    PubMed

    Son, L K; Metcalfe, J

    2000-01-01

    This article investigates how people's metacognitive judgments influence subsequent study-time-allocation strategies. The authors present a comprehensive literature review indicating that people allocate more study time to judged-difficult than to judged-easy items--consistent with extant models of study-time allocation. However, typically, the materials were short, and participants had ample time for study. In contrast, in Experiment 1, when participants had insufficient time to study, they allocated more time to the judged-easy items than to the judged-difficult items, especially when expecting a test. In Experiment 2, when the materials were shorter, people allocated more study time to the judged-difficult materials. In Experiment 3, under high time pressure, people preferred studying judged-easy sonnets; under moderate time pressure, they showed no preference. These results provide new evidence against extant theories of study-time allocation.

  6. Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Matteo; Hwa, Terence; Martin, Olivier C.

    2016-01-01

    New experimental results on bacterial growth inspire a novel top-down approach to study cell metabolism, combining mass balance and proteomic constraints to extend and complement Flux Balance Analysis. We introduce here Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis, CAFBA, in which the biosynthetic costs associated to growth are accounted for in an effective way through a single additional genome-wide constraint. Its roots lie in the experimentally observed pattern of proteome allocation for metabolic functions, allowing to bridge regulation and metabolism in a transparent way under the principle of growth-rate maximization. We provide a simple method to solve CAFBA efficiently and propose an “ensemble averaging” procedure to account for unknown protein costs. Applying this approach to modeling E. coli metabolism, we find that, as the growth rate increases, CAFBA solutions cross over from respiratory, growth-yield maximizing states (preferred at slow growth) to fermentative states with carbon overflow (preferred at fast growth). In addition, CAFBA allows for quantitatively accurate predictions on the rate of acetate excretion and growth yield based on only 3 parameters determined by empirical growth laws. PMID:27355325

  7. Development of target allocation methods for LAMOST focal plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hailong; Zhang, Haotong; Zhang, Yanxia; Lei, Yajuan; Dong, Yiqiao

    2014-01-01

    We first introduce the primary target allocation requirements and restrictions for the parallel control multiple fiber system, which is used in the LAMOST spectroscopic survey. The fiber positioner anti-collision model is imported. Then several target allocation methods and features are discussed in detail, including a network flow algorithm, high priority for fiber unit holding less target number, target allocation algorithm for groups, target allocation method for add-ons and target reallocation. Their virtues and weaknesses are analyzed for various kinds of scientific research situations. Furthermore an optimization concept using the Simulate Anneal Arithmetic (SAA) is developed to improve the fiber utilizing efficiency.

  8. MSL/SAM Measurements of Non Condensable Volatiles, Comparison with Viking Lander, and Implications for Seasonal Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atreya, Sushil; Squyres, Steve; Mahaffy, Paul; Leshin, Laurie; Franz, Heather; Trainer, Melissa; Wong, Michael; McKay, Christopher; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; ScienceTeam, MarsScienceLab

    2013-04-01

    increase of a factor of 2-3 over south polar region in the winter. No data exist on the seasonal behavior of N2. For the first time, SAM will monitor the seasonal behavior of N2 over the two-year prime mission of Curiosity, together with other NCV's, Ar and CO, which will reveal whether they track one another, as expected, and whether the present SAM ratio of N2/Ar =1 holds up over the seasons at roughly one-half the value obtained by Viking. These data will in turn provide crucial constraints to climate evolution and general circulation models of Mars. (www.umich.edu/~atreya). References: [1] Mahaffy P.R. et al., EGU 2013. [2] Owen T. et al., JGR 82, 4635-4639, 1977. [3] Aoudjehane, H.C. et al., Science 338, 785-788, 2012. [4] Sprague A.L. et al., JGR 117, E04005, 2012. [5] Economou T.E. and Pierrehumbert R.T., Abstract 2179.pdf, LPI Conference, 2010. [6] Wong A.S., Atreya S.K., Encrenaz T., JGR.108 (E4), 5026, doi:10.1029/2002JE002003. [7] Encrenaz T. et al., A&A 459, 265-270, 2006. [8] Smith M.D. et al., JGR.114, E00D03, doi:10.1029/2008JE003288, 2009.

  9. Task mapping for non-contiguous allocations.

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Vitus Joseph; Bunde, David P.; Ebbers, Johnathan; Price, Nicholas W.; Swank, Matthew.; Feer, Stefan P.; Rhodes, Zachary D.

    2013-02-01

    This paper examines task mapping algorithms for non-contiguously allocated parallel jobs. Several studies have shown that task placement affects job running time for both contiguously and non-contiguously allocated jobs. Traditionally, work on task mapping either uses a very general model where the job has an arbitrary communication pattern or assumes that jobs are allocated contiguously, making them completely isolated from each other. A middle ground between these two cases is the mapping problem for non-contiguous jobs having a specific communication pattern. We propose several task mapping algorithms for jobs with a stencil communication pattern and evaluate them using experiments and simulations. Our strategies improve the running time of a MiniApp by as much as 30% over a baseline strategy. Furthermore, this improvement increases markedly with the job size, demonstrating the importance of task mapping as systems grow toward exascale.

  10. The Allocation of Resources in a University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, James V.

    1974-01-01

    The paper describes a linear programming model which generates explicit quantitative information about (1) the optimal allocation of resources inside the public university (2) the "shadow price" attached to each input used in the academic process; and (3) the optimal mixture of academic outputs produced by the university. (KM)

  11. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir from November 1995 to March 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) sponsors science experiments on a variety of microgravity carriers, including Orbiter missions and Russia's Mir space station. The MSAD sponsors the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LERC) to support these science experiments by providing acceleration measurements to characterize the microgravity environment to which the experiments were exposed. The LeRC Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) project supports principal investigations of microgravity science experiments as they evaluate the effects of varying acceleration levels on their experiments. In 1994, a SAMS unit was installed on the Mir space station. In a manner similar to Orbiter mission support, the SAMS unit supports science experiments from the U.S. and Russia by measuring the microgravity environment during experiment operations. Previous reports have summarized the SAMS data acquired during the period from September 1994 to November 1995. During the time period from November 1995 to March 1996, the primary SAMS-supported experiment was a Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) experiment. SAMS data were obtained during the PCG operations on Mir in accordance with the requirements specified by the PCG Principal Investigator. Also included in this data are mission events of interest, such as the undocking of STS-74 from Mir (November 1995) and the docking of Atlantis (STS-76) to Mir in March 1996. This report presents an overview of the SAMS data recorded in the interval from November 1995 to March 1996.

  12. The integrated conjugative plasmid pSAM2 of Streptomyces ambofaciens is related to temperate bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Boccard, F; Smokvina, T; Pernodet, J L; Friedmann, A; Guérineau, M

    1989-03-01

    Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877 and derivatives contain the 11-kb element pSAM2 present in an integrated state or as a free and integrated plasmid. This element, able to integrate site-specifically in the genome of different Streptomyces species, is conjugative and mobilizes chromosomal markers. Besides these plasmid functions, we have shown that the site-specific recombination system of pSAM2 presents strong similarities with that of several temperate phages. The integration event is promoted by a site-specific recombinase of the integrase family. The int gene encoding this integrase is closely linked to the plasmid attachment site (attP). A small open reading frame (ORF) overlaps the int gene and the predicted protein exhibits similarities with Xis proteins involved in phages excision. The integrated copy of pSAM2 in strain ATCC23877 is flanked by att sequences (attL and attR). Another att sequence (attX) is present in this strain and attX and attL are the boundaries of a 42-kb fragment (xSAM1) absent, as well as pSAM2, from S.ambofaciens DSM40697. Sequences partially similar to pSAM2 int gene are found near the chromosomal integration zone in both S.ambofaciens strains. The possible origin of pSAM2, an element carrying plasmid as well as phage features, is discussed.

  13. The integrative element pSAM2 from Streptomyces: kinetics and mode of conjugal transfer.

    PubMed

    Possoz, C; Ribard, C; Gagnat, J; Pernodet, J L; Guérineau, M

    2001-10-01

    pSAM2 is an 11 kb integrative element from Streptomyces ambofaciens that is capable of conjugal transfer. A system based on differential DNA modification by SalI methyltransferase was used to localize pSAM2 in the donor or recipient strain, and thus to determine the various steps associated with transfer. Initiation (i.e. excision and replication of pSAM2 in the donor) occurs a few hours after mating with a recipient strain. pSAM2 replicates in the recipient strain, spreads within the mycelium and then integrates into the chromosome. Transfer generally involves single-stranded DNA. In Streptomyces, only a few genes, such as traSA for pSAM2, are required for conjugal transfer. Using the differential sensitivity to the SalI restriction-modification system of transfers involving single- and double-stranded DNA, we found that pSAM2 was probably transferred to the recipient as double-stranded DNA. This provides the first experimental evidence for the transfer of double-stranded DNA during bacterial conjugation. Thus, TraSA, involved in pSAM2 transfer, and SpoIIIE, which is involved in chromosome partitioning in Bacillus subtilis, display similarities in both sequence and function: both seem to transport double-stranded DNA actively, either from donor to recipient or from mother cell to prespore.

  14. Computationally efficient control allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Wayne (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A computationally efficient method for calculating near-optimal solutions to the three-objective, linear control allocation problem is disclosed. The control allocation problem is that of distributing the effort of redundant control effectors to achieve some desired set of objectives. The problem is deemed linear if control effectiveness is affine with respect to the individual control effectors. The optimal solution is that which exploits the collective maximum capability of the effectors within their individual physical limits. Computational efficiency is measured by the number of floating-point operations required for solution. The method presented returned optimal solutions in more than 90% of the cases examined; non-optimal solutions returned by the method were typically much less than 1% different from optimal and the errors tended to become smaller than 0.01% as the number of controls was increased. The magnitude of the errors returned by the present method was much smaller than those that resulted from either pseudo inverse or cascaded generalized inverse solutions. The computational complexity of the method presented varied linearly with increasing numbers of controls; the number of required floating point operations increased from 5.5 i, to seven times faster than did the minimum-norm solution (the pseudoinverse), and at about the same rate as did the cascaded generalized inverse solution. The computational requirements of the method presented were much better than that of previously described facet-searching methods which increase in proportion to the square of the number of controls.

  15. On the Allocation of Resources for Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haelermans, Carla; De Witte, Kristof; Blank, Jos L. T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the optimal allocation of resources--in terms of school management, teachers, supporting employees and materials--in secondary schools. We use a flexible budget constrained output distance function model to estimate both technical and allocative efficiency scores for 448 Dutch secondary schools between 2002 and 2007. The results…

  16. The association of Sam68 with Vav1 contributes to tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Lazer, Galit; Pe'er, Liron; Schapira, Vered; Richard, Stéphane; Katzav, Shulamit

    2007-12-01

    Vav1 functions in the hematopoietic system as a specific GDP/GTP nucleotide exchange factor regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation. An intact C-terminal SH3 domain of Vav1 (Vav1SH3C) was shown to be necessary for Vav1-induced transformation, yet the associating protein(s) necessary for this activity have not yet been identified. Using a proteomics approach, we identified Sam68 as a Vav1SH3C-associating protein. Sam68 (Src-associated in mitosis of 68 kD) belongs to the heteronuclear ribonucleoprotein particle K (hnRNP-K) homology (KH) domain family of RNA-binding proteins. The Vav1/Sam68 interaction was observed in vitro and in vivo. Mutants of Vav1SH3C previously shown to lose their transforming potential did not associate with Sam68. Co-expression of Vav1 and Sam68 in Jurkat T cells led to increased localization of Vav1 in the nucleus and changes in cell morphology. We then tested the contribution of Sam68 to known functions of Vav1, such as focus-forming in NIH3T3 fibroblasts and NFAT stimulation in T cells. Co-expression of oncogenic Vav1 with Sam68 in NIH3T3 fibroblasts resulted in a dose-dependent increase in foci, yet no further enhancement of NFAT activity was observed in Jurkat T cells, as compared to cells overexpressing only Vav1 or Sam68. Our results strongly suggest that Sam68 contributes to transformation by oncogenic Vav1.

  17. Sam68 Mediates the Activation of Insulin and Leptin Signalling in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Pérez, Antonio; Sánchez-Jiménez, Flora; Vilariño-García, Teresa; de la Cruz, Luis; Virizuela, Juan A.; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a well-known risk factor for breast cancer development in postmenopausal women. High insulin and leptin levels seem to have a role modulating the growth of these tumours. Sam68 is an RNA-binding protein with signalling functions that has been found to be overexpressed in breast cancer. Moreover, Sam68 may be recruited to insulin and leptin signalling pathways, mediating its effects on survival, growth and proliferation in different cellular types. We aimed to study the expression of Sam68 and its phosphorylation level upon insulin and leptin stimulation, and the role of Sam68 in the proliferative effect and signalling pathways that are activated by insulin or leptin in human breast adenocarcinoma cells. In the human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and BT-474, Sam68 protein quantity and gene expression were increased upon leptin or insulin stimulation, as it was checked by qPCR and immunoblot. Moreover, both insulin and leptin stimulation promoted an increase in Sam68 tyrosine phosphorylation and negatively regulated its RNA binding capacity. siRNA was used to downregulate Sam68 expression, which resulted in lower proliferative effects of both insulin and leptin, as well as a lower activation of MAPK and PI3K pathways promoted by both hormones. These effects may be partly explained by the decrease in IRS-1 expression by down-regulation of Sam68. These results suggest the participation of Sam68 in both leptin and insulin receptor signaling in human breast cancer cells, mediating the trophic effects of these hormones in proliferation and cellular growth. PMID:27415018

  18. A comparative study of aerosol extinction measurements made by the SAM II and SAGE satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    SAM II and SAGE are two satellite experiments designed to measure stratospheric aerosol extinction using the technique of solar occultation or limb extinction. Although each sensor is mounted aboard a different satellite, there are occasions when their measurement locations are nearly coincident, thereby providing opportunities for a measurement comparison. In this paper, the aerosol extinction profiles and daily contour plots for some of these events in 1979 are reported. The comparisons shown in this paper demonstrate that SAM II and SAGE are producing similar aerosol extinction profiles within their measurement errors and that since SAM II has been previously validated, these results show the validity of the SAGE aerosol measurements.

  19. Function Allocation in Complex Socio-Technical Systems: Procedure usage in nuclear power and the Context Analysis Method for Identifying Design Solutions (CAMIDS) Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Kara Anne

    This research aims to prove that strict adherence to procedures and rigid compliance to process in the US Nuclear Industry may not prevent incidents or increase safety. According to the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, the nuclear power industry has seen a recent rise in events, and this research claims that a contributing factor to this rise is organizational, cultural, and based on peoples overreliance on procedures and policy. Understanding the proper balance of function allocation, automation and human decision-making is imperative to creating a nuclear power plant that is safe, efficient, and reliable. This research claims that new generations of operators are less engaged and thinking because they have been instructed to follow procedures to a fault. According to operators, they were once to know the plant and its interrelations, but organizationally more importance is now put on following procedure and policy. Literature reviews were performed, experts were questioned, and a model for context analysis was developed. The Context Analysis Method for Identifying Design Solutions (CAMIDS) Model was created, verified and validated through both peer review and application in real world scenarios in active nuclear power plant simulators. These experiments supported the claim that strict adherence and rigid compliance to procedures may not increase safety by studying the industry's propensity for following incorrect procedures, and when it directly affects the outcome of safety or security of the plant. The findings of this research indicate that the younger generations of operators rely highly on procedures, and the organizational pressures of required compliance to procedures may lead to incidents within the plant because operators feel pressured into following the rules and policy above performing the correct actions in a timely manner. The findings support computer based procedures, efficient alarm systems, and skill of the craft matrices. The solution to

  20. OARE and SAMS on STS-94/MSL-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskowitz, Milton; Hrovat, Kenneth; McPherson, Kevin; Tschen, Peter; DeLombard, Richard; Nati, Maurizio

    1998-01-01

    Four microgravity acceleration measurement instruments were included on MSL-1 to measure the accelerations and vibrations to which science experiments were exposed during their operation on the mission. The data were processed and presented to the principal investigators in a variety of formats to aid their assessment of the microgravity environment during their experiment operations. Two accelerometer systems managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) supported the MSL-1 mission: the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), and the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS). In addition, the Microgravity Measurement Assembly (MMA) and the Quasi- Steady Acceleration Measurement (QSAM) system, both sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division, collected acceleration data as a part of the MSL-1 mission. The NIMA was funded and designed by the European Space Agency in the Netherlands (ESA/ESTEC), and the QSAM system was funded and designed by the German Space Agency (DLR). The Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) project at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) supports Principal Investigators (PIs) of the Microgravity science community as they evaluate the effects of acceleration on their experiments. PIMS primary responsibility is to support NASA-sponsored investigators in the area of acceleration data analysis and interpretation. A mission summary report was prepared and published by PIMS in order to furnish interested experiment investigators with a guide for evaluating the acceleration environment during the MSL-1 mission.

  1. Sam Goudsmit--His Physics and His Statesmanship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bederson, Benjamin

    2010-03-01

    Sam Goudsmit was already a famous theoretical physicist in his thirties, mainly because of his co-discovery of electron spin with George Uhlenbeck while both were students of Paul Ehrenfest in Holland in 1925. He and Uhlenbeck continued their thriving careers at the University of Michigan. Goudsmit's style as a physicist was always to make as close a connection between theory and experiment as possible. Thus, for example, his development with his student Robert Bacher of the technique called ``fractional parentage'' used fruitfully in both atomic and nuclear physics to compute energy levels of unknown states in terms of know ones. He also delved deeply into problems related to determinations of nuclear spins and moments. Partly because of his service as scientific leader of the Alsos project at the end of WWII he became a leading statesman of science. I will describe some of his achievements both as a physicist and as a statesman, prior to his becoming Editor in Chief of the American Physical Society.

  2. Large scale study on the variation of RF energy absorption in the head & brain regions of adults and children and evaluation of the SAM phantom conservativeness.

    PubMed

    Keshvari, J; Kivento, M; Christ, A; Bit-Babik, G

    2016-04-21

    This paper presents the results of two computational large scale studies using highly realistic exposure scenarios, MRI based human head and hand models, and two mobile phone models. The objectives are (i) to study the relevance of age when people are exposed to RF by comparing adult and child heads and (ii) to analyze and discuss the conservativeness of the SAM phantom for all age groups. Representative use conditions were simulated using detailed CAD models of two mobile phones operating between 900 MHz and 1950 MHz including configurations with the hand holding the phone, which were not considered in most previous studies. The peak spatial-average specific absorption rate (psSAR) in the head and the pinna tissues is assessed using anatomically accurate head and hand models. The first of the two mentioned studies involved nine head-, four hand- and two phone-models, the second study included six head-, four hand- and three simplified phone-models (over 400 configurations in total). In addition, both studies also evaluated the exposure using the SAM phantom. Results show no systematic differences between psSAR induced in the adult and child heads. The exposure level and its variation for different age groups may be different for particular phones, but no correlation between psSAR and model age was found. The psSAR from all exposure conditions was compared to the corresponding configurations using SAM, which was found to be conservative in the large majority of cases.

  3. Large scale study on the variation of RF energy absorption in the head & brain regions of adults and children and evaluation of the SAM phantom conservativeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshvari, J.; Kivento, M.; Christ, A.; Bit-Babik, G.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the results of two computational large scale studies using highly realistic exposure scenarios, MRI based human head and hand models, and two mobile phone models. The objectives are (i) to study the relevance of age when people are exposed to RF by comparing adult and child heads and (ii) to analyze and discuss the conservativeness of the SAM phantom for all age groups. Representative use conditions were simulated using detailed CAD models of two mobile phones operating between 900 MHz and 1950 MHz including configurations with the hand holding the phone, which were not considered in most previous studies. The peak spatial-average specific absorption rate (psSAR) in the head and the pinna tissues is assessed using anatomically accurate head and hand models. The first of the two mentioned studies involved nine head-, four hand- and two phone-models, the second study included six head-, four hand- and three simplified phone-models (over 400 configurations in total). In addition, both studies also evaluated the exposure using the SAM phantom. Results show no systematic differences between psSAR induced in the adult and child heads. The exposure level and its variation for different age groups may be different for particular phones, but no correlation between psSAR and model age was found. The psSAR from all exposure conditions was compared to the corresponding configurations using SAM, which was found to be conservative in the large majority of cases.

  4. Research on allocation efficiency of the daisy chain allocation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jingping; Zhang, Weiguo

    2013-03-01

    With the improvement of the aircraft performance in reliability, maneuverability and survivability, the number of the control effectors increases a lot. How to distribute the three-axis moments into the control surfaces reasonably becomes an important problem. Daisy chain method is simple and easy to be carried out in the design of the allocation system. But it can not solve the allocation problem for entire attainable moment subset. For the lateral-directional allocation problem, the allocation efficiency of the daisy chain can be directly measured by the area of its subset of attainable moments. Because of the non-linear allocation characteristic, the subset of attainable moments of daisy-chain method is a complex non-convex polygon, and it is difficult to solve directly. By analyzing the two-dimensional allocation problems with a "micro-element" idea, a numerical calculation algorithm is proposed to compute the area of the non-convex polygon. In order to improve the allocation efficiency of the algorithm, a genetic algorithm with the allocation efficiency chosen as the fitness function is proposed to find the best pseudo-inverse matrix.

  5. Tandem SAM Domain Structure of Human Caskin1: A Presynaptic, Self-Assembling Scaffold for CASK

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, Ryan L.; Hinde, Elizabeth; Knight, Mary Jane; Pennella, Mario A.; Ear, Jason; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Bowie, James U.

    2012-02-07

    The synaptic scaffolding proteins CASK and Caskin1 are part of the fibrous mesh of proteins that organize the active zones of neural synapses. CASK binds to a region of Caskin1 called the CASK interaction domain (CID). Adjacent to the CID, Caskin1 contains two tandem sterile a motif (SAM) domains. Many SAM domains form polymers so they are good candidates for forming the fibrous structures seen in the active zone. We show here that the SAM domains of Caskin1 form a new type of SAM helical polymer. The Caskin1 polymer interface exhibits a remarkable segregation of charged residues, resulting in a high sensitivity to ionic strength in vitro. The Caskin1 polymers can be decorated with CASK proteins, illustrating how these proteins may work together to organize the cytomatrix in active zones.

  6. Intercomparison of nitrogen-containing species in Nimbus 7 LIMS and SAMS Data

    SciTech Connect

    Jackman, C.H.; Guthrie, P.D.; Kaye, J.A.

    1987-01-20

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) and nitric acid (HNO/sub 3/) distributions were derived with a two-dimensional time-dependent model using N/sub 2/O, CH/sub 4/, and temperature measurements from the stratospheric and mesospheric sounder (SAMS) along with H/sub 2/O measurements from the limb infrared monitor of the stratosphere (LIMS) and O/sub 3/ measurements from the solar backscatter ultraviolet (SBUV) instrument. All three instruments (SAMS, LIMS, and SBUV) were aboard the Nimbus 7 satellite. The computed NO/sub 2/ and HNO/sub 3/ were compared with LIMS NO/sub 2/ and HNO/sub 3/ measurements. Calculated NO/sub 2/ is lower than the LIMS NO/sub 2/ in much of the lower stratosphere by about a factor of 4 or more. Differences in the upper stratosphere between derived NO/sub 2/ and LIMS NO/sub 2/ are within the photochemical uncertainties of the computation. Derived NO/sub 2/ is much larger than LIMS NO/sub 2/ at high latitudes in the upper stratosphere in December, indicating that dynamics and/or photochemistry in the atmosphere are different from those used in the model. Derived HNO/sub 3/ is in fairly good agreement with LIMS HNO/sub 3/ in the upper stratosphere. Derived and LIMS HNO/sub 3/ gradually become more different through the middle stratosphere and reach a fairly substantial disagreement in the lower stratosphere. The high-latitude maxima observed in LIMS HNO/sub 3/ are present at lower altitudes and at higher concentrations than those derived in the model computations. More significantly, the derived HNO/sub 3/ at polar latitudes is highest in the summer while LIMS HNO/sub 3/ is highest in the winter. Disagreements in the lower stratosphere between the computed and LIMS NO/sub 2/ and HNO/sub 3/ can only be reduced if two changes are made in the model computations: (1) additional lower stratospheric sources of odd nitrogen (other than N/sub 2/O+O(/sup 1/D)) are included and (2) a modified chemistry to allow the formation of HNO/sub 3/ at the expense of N/sub 2

  7. CD and NMR conformational studies of a peptide encompassing the Mid Loop interface of Ship2-Sam.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Flavia A; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina L; Di Natale, Concetta; Marasco, Daniela; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Leone, Marilisa

    2014-11-01

    The lipid phosphatase Ship2 is a protein that intervenes in several diseases such as diabetes, cancer, neurodegeneration, and atherosclerosis. It is made up of a catalytic domain and several protein docking modules such as a C-terminal Sam (Sterile alpha motif) domain. The Sam domain of Ship2 (Ship2-Sam) binds to the Sam domains of the EphA2 receptor (EphA2-Sam) and the PI3K effector protein Arap3 (Arap3-Sam). These heterotypic Sam-Sam interactions occur through formation of dimers presenting the canonical "Mid Loop/End Helix" binding mode. The central region of Ship2-Sam, spanning the C-terminal end of α2, the α3 and α4 helices together with the α2α3 and α3α4 interhelical loops, forms the Mid Loop surface that is needed to bind partners Sam domains. A peptide encompassing most of the Ship2-Sam Mid Loop interface (Shiptide) capable of binding to both EphA2-Sam and Arap3-Sam, was previously identified. Here we investigated the conformational features of this peptide, through solution CD and NMR studies in different conditions. These studies reveal that the peptide is highly flexible in aqueous buffer, while it adopts a helical conformation in presence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol. The discovered structural insights and in particular the identification of a helical motif, may lead to the design of more constrained and possibly cell permeable Shiptide analogs that could work as efficient antagonists of Ship2-Sam heterotypic interactions and embrace therapeutic applications.

  8. Bringing a Chemical Laboratory Named Sam to Mars on the 2011 Curiosity Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Bleacher, L.; Jones, A.; Atreya, S. K.; Manning, H. L.; Cabane, M.; Webster, C. R.; Sam Team

    2010-12-01

    Introduction: An important goal of upcoming missions to Mars is to understand if life could have developed there. The task of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite of instruments [1] and the other Curiosity investigations [2] is to move us steadily toward that goal with an assessment of the habitability of our neighboring planet through a series of chemical and geological measurements. SAM is designed to search for organic compounds and inorganic volatiles and measure isotope ratios. Other instruments on Curiosity will provide elemental analysis and identify minerals. SAM will analyze both atmospheric samples and gases evolved from powdered rocks that may have formed billions of years ago with Curiosity providing access to interesting sites scouted by orbiting cameras and spectrometers. SAM Instrument Suite: SAM’s instruments are a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), a 6-column Gas Chromatograph (GC), and a 2-channel Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS). SAM can identify organic compounds in Mars rocks to sub-ppb sensitivity and secure precise isotope ratios for C, H, and O in carbon dioxide and water and measure trace levels of methane and its carbon 13 isotope. The SAM gas processing system consists of valves, heaters, pressure sensors, gas scrubbers and getters, traps, and gas tanks used for calibration or combustion experiments [2]. A variety of calibrant compounds interior and exterior to SAM will allow the science and engineering teams to assess SAM’s performance. SAM has been calibrated and tested in a Mars-like environment. Keeping Educators and the Public Informed: The Education and Public Outreach (EPO) goals of the SAM team are to make this complex chemical laboratory and its data widely available to educators, students, and the public. Formal education activities include developing templates for professional development workshops for educators to teach them about SAM and Curiosity, incorporating data into Mars Student Data Teams, and writing articles

  9. A role of the SAM domain in EphA2 receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaojun; Hapiak, Vera; Zheng, Ji; Muller-Greven, Jeannine; Bowman, Deanna; Lingerak, Ryan; Buck, Matthias; Wang, Bing-Cheng; Smith, Adam W.

    2017-01-01

    Among the 20 subfamilies of protein receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), Eph receptors are unique in possessing a sterile alpha motif (SAM domain) at their C-terminal ends. However, the functions of SAM domains in Eph receptors remain elusive. Here we report on a combined cell biology and quantitative fluorescence study to investigate the role of the SAM domain in EphA2 function. We observed elevated tyrosine autophosphorylation levels upon deletion of the EphA2 SAM domain (EphA2ΔS) in DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells and a skin tumor cell line derived from EphA1/A2 knockout mice. These results suggest that SAM domain deletion induced constitutive activation of EphA2 kinase activity. In order to explain these effects, we applied fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to investigate the lateral molecular organization of EphA2. Our results indicate that SAM domain deletion (EphA2ΔS-GFP) increases oligomerization compared to the full length receptor (EphA2FL-GFP). Stimulation with ephrinA1, a ligand for EphA2, induced further oligomerization and activation of EphA2FL-GFP. The SAM domain deletion mutant, EphA2ΔS-GFP, also underwent further oligomerization upon ephrinA1 stimulation, but the oligomers were larger than those observed for EphA2FL-GFP. Based on these results, we conclude that the EphA2 SAM domain inhibits kinase activity by reducing receptor oligomerization. PMID:28338017

  10. The Combustion Experiment on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suite on the Curiosity Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, J. C.; Malespin, C. A.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Graham, H. V.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Brunner, A. E.; Freissinet, C.; Franz, H. B.; Fuentes, J.; Glavin, D. P.; Leshin, L. A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D. W.; Navvaro-Gonzales, R.; Niles, P. B.; Steele, A.

    2014-01-01

    The combustion experiment on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite on Curiosity will heat a sample of Mars regolith in the presence of oxygen and measure composition of the evolved gases using quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) and tunable laser spectrometry (TLS). QMS will enable detection of combustion products such as CO, CO2, NO, and other oxidized species, while TLS will enable precise measurements of the abundance and carbon isotopic composition (delta(sup 13)C) of the evolved CO2 and hydrogen isotopic composition (deltaD) of H2O. SAM will perform a two-step combustion to isolate combustible materials below approx.550 C and above approx.550 C. The combustion experiment on SAM, if properly designed and executed, has the potential to answer multiple questions regarding the origins of volatiles seen thus far in SAM evolved gas analysis (EGA) on Mars. Constraints imposed by SAM and MSL time and power resources, as well as SAM consumables (oxygen gas), will limit the number of SAM combustion experiments, so it is imperative to design an experiment targeting the most pressing science questions. Low temperature combustion experiments will primarily target the quantification of carbon (and nitrogen) contributed by SAM wet chemistry reagants MTBSTFA (N-Methyl-N-tert-butyldimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide) and DMF (Dimethylformamide), which have been identified in the background of blank and sample runs and may adsorb to the sample while the cup is in the Sample Manipulation System (SMS). In addition, differences between the sample and "blank" may yield information regarding abundance and delta(sup 13)C of bulk (both organic and inorganic) martian carbon. High temperature combustion experiments primarily aim to detect refractory organic matter, if present in Cumberland fines, as well as address the question of quantification and deltaD value of water evolution associated with hydroxyl hydrogen in clay minerals.

  11. Identification of trans-acting factors regulating SamDC expression in Oryza sativa

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Supratim; Roychoudhury, Aryadeep; Sengupta, Dibyendu N.

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • Identification of cis elements responsible for SamDC expression by in silico analysis. • qPCR analysis of SamDC expression to abiotic and biotic stress treatments. • Detection of SamDC regulators using identified cis-elements as probe by EMSA. • Southwestern Blot analysis to predict the size of the trans-acting factors. - Abstract: Abiotic stress affects the growth and productivity of crop plants; to cope with the adverse environmental conditions, plants have developed efficient defense machinery comprising of antioxidants like phenolics and flavonoids, and osmolytes like polyamines. SamDC is a key enzyme in the polyamine biosynthesis pathway in plants. In our present communication we have done in silico analysis of the promoter region of SamDC to look for the presence of different cis-regulatory elements contributing to its expression. Based on the presence of different cis-regulatory elements we completed comparative analysis of SamDC gene expression in rice lamina of IR-29 and Nonabokra by qPCR in response to the abiotic stress treatments of salinity, drought, cold and the biotic stress treatments of ABA and light. Additionally, to explore the role of the cis-regulatory elements in regulating the expression of SamDC gene in plants we comparatively analyzed the binding of rice nuclear proteins prepared from IR-29 and Nonabokra undergoing various stress treatments. The intensity of the complex formed was low and inducible in IR-29 in contrast to Nonabokra. Southwestern blot analysis helped in predicting the size of the trans-acting factors binding to these cis-elements. To our knowledge this is the first report on the comprehensive analysis of SamDC gene expression in rice and identification of the trans-acting factors regulating its expression.

  12. Individual optimization efforts and population dynamics: a mathematical model for the evolution of resource allocation strategies, with applications to reproductive and mating systems.

    PubMed

    Jost, Jürgen; Pepper, John

    2008-03-01

    We develop a formal framework for the optimal allocation of limited resources that includes and clarifies the interplay between individual optimization and the resulting effects at the population level. As an example, in regard to the evolution of sexual recombination, the paradox of the twofold cost of sex is avoided by distinguishing between the evolution of recombination and the subsequent emergence and stability of different mating types as a result of individual optimization within a population that benefits from recombination.

  13. Contribution of sams-1 and pmt-1 to lipid homoeostasis in adult Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingxiu; Na, Keun; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Lee, Eun-Young; Paik, Young-Ki

    2011-05-01

    Accumulation of lipids inside the cell is primarily caused by disorders of lipid metabolism. S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAMS) produces SAM, an important methyl donor in various phospholipid methyltransferase reactions catalysed by phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PMT-1). A gel-based, quantitative proteomic analysis of the RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated inactivation of the pod-2 gene, which encodes acetyl-CoA carboxylase, showed a substantial down-regulation of SAMS-1. Consequently, RNAi of either sams-1 or pmt-1 caused a significant increase in lipid droplet size in the intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans. Lipid droplets exhibited increased triacylglycerol (TG) and decreased phosphatidylcholine (PC) levels, suggesting a reciprocal relationship between TG and PC regulation. These lipid-associated phenotypes were rescued by choline feeding. Among the five fat metabolism-related genes examined, two genes were highly induced by inactivation of sams-1 or pmt-1: pod-2 and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (fat-7). Thus, both SAMS-1 and PMT-1 were shown to contribute to the homoeostasis of TG and PC levels in C. elegans, which would provide an important survival strategy under harsh environmental conditions.

  14. Sam68 Is Required for DNA Damage Responses via Regulating Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Andrea; Wier, Eric M.; Wen, Matthew G.; Kamenyeva, Olena; Xia, Xue; Koo, Lily Y.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid and robust synthesis of polymers of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose (PAR) chains, primarily catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), is crucial for cellular responses to DNA damage. However, the precise mechanisms through which PARP1 is activated and PAR is robustly synthesized are not fully understood. Here, we identified Src-associated substrate during mitosis of 68 kDa (Sam68) as a novel signaling molecule in DNA damage responses (DDRs). In the absence of Sam68, DNA damage-triggered PAR production and PAR-dependent DNA repair signaling were dramatically diminished. With serial cellular and biochemical assays, we demonstrated that Sam68 is recruited to and significantly overlaps with PARP1 at DNA lesions and that the interaction between Sam68 and PARP1 is crucial for DNA damage-initiated and PARP1-conferred PAR production. Utilizing cell lines and knockout mice, we illustrated that Sam68-deleted cells and animals are hypersensitive to genotoxicity caused by DNA-damaging agents. Together, our findings suggest that Sam68 plays a crucial role in DDR via regulating DNA damage-initiated PAR production. PMID:27635653

  15. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2015-03-01

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5‧-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  16. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    DOE PAGES

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; ...

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active sitemore » metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.« less

  17. Adaptive Control Allocation in the Presence of Actuator Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yu; Crespo, Luis G.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a novel adaptive control allocation framework is proposed. In the adaptive control allocation structure, cooperative actuators are grouped and treated as an equivalent control effector. A state feedback adaptive control signal is designed for the equivalent effector and allocated to the member actuators adaptively. Two adaptive control allocation algorithms are proposed, which guarantee closed-loop stability and asymptotic state tracking in the presence of uncertain loss of effectiveness and constant-magnitude actuator failures. The proposed algorithms can be shown to reduce the controller complexity with proper grouping of the actuators. The proposed adaptive control allocation schemes are applied to two linearized aircraft models, and the simulation results demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithms.

  18. Active Region Soft X-Ray Spectra and Temperature Analyses based on Sounding Rocket Measurements from the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), - a Modified SDO/EVE Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didkovsky, Leonid V.; Wieman, Seth; Woods, Thomas N.; Jones, Andrew; Moore, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Some initial results of soft x-ray spectral (0.5 to 3.0 nm) observations of active regions (AR11877 and AR11875) from a sounding rocket flight NASA 36.290 on 21 October 2013 at about 18:30 UT are reported. These observations were made by a Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), a rocket version of the EUV Variability Experiment’s (EVE) channel, a pinhole camera modified for EVE rocket suite of instruments to include a free-standing transmission grating (200 nm period), which provided spectrally-resolved images of the solar disk. Intensity ratios for strong emission lines extracted from temporally averaged SAM spectral profiles of the ARs were compared to appropriately convolved modeled CHIANTI spectra. These ratios represent the AR’s temperature structures, which are compared to the structures derived from some other observations and temperature models.

  19. The Dynamic of Annual Carbon Allocation to Wood in European Forests Is Consistent with a Combined Source-Sink Limitation of Growth: Implications on Growth Simulations in a Terrestrial Biosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemot, J.; Martin-StPaul, N. K.; Dufrêne, E.; François, C.; Soudani, K.; Ourcival, J. M.; Leadley, P.; Delpierre, N.

    2014-12-01

    The extent to which forest growth is limited by carbon (C) supply (source control) or by cambial activity (sink control) will strongly determines the responses of trees to global changes. However, the physiological processes responsible for the limitation of forest growth are still under debate. The aim of this study was i) to evaluate the key drivers of the annual carbon allocation to wood along large soil and climate regional gradients in four tree species representative of the main European forest biomes (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Quercus ilex and Picea abies) ii) to implement the identified key drivers in a new C allocation scheme within the CASTANEA terrestrial biosphere model (TBM). Combining field measurements and process-based simulations at 49 sites (931 site-years), our analyses revealed that the inter-site variability in C allocation to wood was predominantly driven by an age-related decline. The direct control of temperature or water stress on sink activity (i.e. independently from their effects on C supply) exerted a strong influence on the annual woody growth in all the species considered, including deciduous temperate species. The lagged effect of the past environment conditions was a significant driver of the annual C allocation to wood. Carbon supply appeared to strongly limit growth only in deciduous temperate species. Our study supports the premise that European forest growth is under a complex panel of source- and sink- limitations, contradicting the simple source control implemented in most TBMs. The implementation of these combined forest growth limitations in the CASTANEA model significantly improved its performance when evaluated against independent stand growth data at the regional scale (mainland France, >103 plots). We finally discuss how the sink imitation affects the CASTANEA simulated projections of forest productivity along the 21th century, especially with respect to the expected fertilizing effect of increasing atmospheric

  20. Resource Balancing Control Allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Bodson, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Next generation aircraft with a large number of actuators will require advanced control allocation methods to compute the actuator commands needed to follow desired trajectories while respecting system constraints. Previously, algorithms were proposed to minimize the l1 or l2 norms of the tracking error and of the control effort. The paper discusses the alternative choice of using the l1 norm for minimization of the tracking error and a normalized l(infinity) norm, or sup norm, for minimization of the control effort. The algorithm computes the norm of the actuator deflections scaled by the actuator limits. Minimization of the control effort then translates into the minimization of the maximum actuator deflection as a percentage of its range of motion. The paper shows how the problem can be solved effectively by converting it into a linear program and solving it using a simplex algorithm. Properties of the algorithm are investigated through examples. In particular, the min-max criterion results in a type of resource balancing, where the resources are the control surfaces and the algorithm balances these resources to achieve the desired command. A study of the sensitivity of the algorithms to the data is presented, which shows that the normalized l(infinity) algorithm has the lowest sensitivity, although high sensitivities are observed whenever the limits of performance are reached.

  1. Community-aware task allocation for social networked multiagent systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanyuan; Jiang, Yichuan

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel community-aware task allocation model for social networked multiagent systems (SN-MASs), where the agent' cooperation domain is constrained in community and each agent can negotiate only with its intracommunity member agents. Under such community-aware scenarios, we prove that it remains NP-hard to maximize system overall profit. To solve this problem effectively, we present a heuristic algorithm that is composed of three phases: 1) task selection: select the desirable task to be allocated preferentially; 2) allocation to community: allocate the selected task to communities based on a significant task-first heuristics; and 3) allocation to agent: negotiate resources for the selected task based on a nonoverlap agent-first and breadth-first resource negotiation mechanism. Through the theoretical analyses and experiments, the advantages of our presented heuristic algorithm and community-aware task allocation model are validated. 1) Our presented heuristic algorithm performs very closely to the benchmark exponential brute-force optimal algorithm and the network flow-based greedy algorithm in terms of system overall profit in small-scale applications. Moreover, in the large-scale applications, the presented heuristic algorithm achieves approximately the same overall system profit, but significantly reduces the computational load compared with the greedy algorithm. 2) Our presented community-aware task allocation model reduces the system communication cost compared with the previous global-aware task allocation model and improves the system overall profit greatly compared with the previous local neighbor-aware task allocation model.

  2. SAM-Like Evolved Gas Analyses of Phyllosilicate Minerals and Applications to SAM Analyses of the Sheepbed Mudstone, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Franz, H. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Stern, J. C.; Brunner, B.; Sutter, B.; Archer, P. D.; Ming , D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Bish, D. L.; Atreya, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    While in Yellowknife Bay, the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover collected two drilled samples, John Klein (hereafter "JK") and Cumberland ("CB"), from the Sheepbed mudstone, as well as a scooped sample from the Rocknest aeolian bedform ("RN"). These samples were sieved by Curiosity's sample processing system and then several subsamples of these materials were delivered to the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite and the CheMin X-ray diffraction/X-ray fluorescence instrument. CheMin provided the first in situ X-ray diffraction-based evidence of clay minerals on Mars, which are likely trioctahedral smectites (e.g., Fe-saponite) and comprise 20 wt% of the mudstone samples [1]. SAM's evolved gas analysis (EGA) mass spectrometry analyses of JK and CB subsamples, as well as RN subsamples, detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, OCS, CS2 and other trace gases evolved during pyrolysis. The identity of evolved gases and temperature( s) of evolution can augment mineral detection by CheMin and place constraints on trace volatile-bearing phases present below the CheMin detection limit or those phases difficult to characterize with XRD (e.g., X-ray amorphous phases). Here we will focus on the SAM H2O data, in the context of CheMin analyses, and comparisons to laboratory SAM-like analyses of several phyllosilicate minerals including smectites.

  3. Structural analysis of loci involved in pSAM2 site-specific integration in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Boccard, F; Smokvina, T; Pernodet, J L; Friedmann, A; Guérineau, M

    1989-01-01

    pSAM2 is an 11-kb plasmid integrated in the Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877 and ATCC15154 genomes and found additionally as a free replicon in an uv derivative. After transfer into S. ambofaciens DSM40697 (devoid of pSAM2) or into Streptomyces lividans, specific integration of pSAM2 occurred very efficiently. A 58-bp sequence (att) present in both pSAM2 (attP) and S. ambofaciens strain DSM40697 (attB) attachment regions is found at the boundaries (attL and attR) of integrated pSAM2 in S. ambofaciens strain ATCC23877. The S. lividans chromosomal integration zone contained an imperfectly conserved att sequence (attB), and the integration event of pSAM2 was located within a 49-bp sequence of attB. Only one primary functional attB sequence was present in the S. lividans or S. ambofaciens DSM40697 total DNA. The integration zone of S. lividans hybridized with the integration zone of S. ambofaciens DSM40697. The two integration zones were homologous only to the right side of the att sequence. The conserved region contained an open reading frame (ORF A) with a stop codon located 99 bp from the attB sequence in both strains. S. ambofaciens DSM40697 contained DNA sequences related to pSAM2 on the left side of the att site. The att sequence was included in a region conserved in Streptomyces antibioticus, Streptomyces actuosus, Streptomyces bikiniensis, Streptomyces coelicolor, Streptomyces glaucescens, and Streptomyces parvulus. Site-specific integration of a pSAM2 derivative was characterized in another unrelated strain, Streptomyces griseofuscus. This strain contained an imperfectly conserved 58-bp attB sequence, and the integration event took place within a 45-bp sequence of attB. Site-specific integration of pSAM2 in three nonrelated Streptomyces strains suggests the wide host range of pSAM2 integration in Streptomyces.

  4. Collaborative Resource Allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yeou-Fang; Wax, Allan; Lam, Raymond; Baldwin, John; Borden, Chester

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative Resource Allocation Networking Environment (CRANE) Version 0.5 is a prototype created to prove the newest concept of using a distributed environment to schedule Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna times in a collaborative fashion. This program is for all space-flight and terrestrial science project users and DSN schedulers to perform scheduling activities and conflict resolution, both synchronously and asynchronously. Project schedulers can, for the first time, participate directly in scheduling their tracking times into the official DSN schedule, and negotiate directly with other projects in an integrated scheduling system. A master schedule covers long-range, mid-range, near-real-time, and real-time scheduling time frames all in one, rather than the current method of separate functions that are supported by different processes and tools. CRANE also provides private workspaces (both dynamic and static), data sharing, scenario management, user control, rapid messaging (based on Java Message Service), data/time synchronization, workflow management, notification (including emails), conflict checking, and a linkage to a schedule generation engine. The data structure with corresponding database design combines object trees with multiple associated mortal instances and relational database to provide unprecedented traceability and simplify the existing DSN XML schedule representation. These technologies are used to provide traceability, schedule negotiation, conflict resolution, and load forecasting from real-time operations to long-range loading analysis up to 20 years in the future. CRANE includes a database, a stored procedure layer, an agent-based middle tier, a Web service wrapper, a Windows Integrated Analysis Environment (IAE), a Java application, and a Web page interface.

  5. The Search for Nitrates on Mars by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Stern, Jennifer C.; Freissinet, Caroline; McKay, Chirstopher P.; Sutter, Brad; Archer, P. Douglas, Jr.; McAdam, Amy; Franz, Heather; Coll, Partice J.; Glavin, Daniel Patrick; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Wong, Mike; Atreya, Sushiil K.; Wray, James J.; Steele, Andrew; Prats, Benito D.; Szopa, Cyril; Coscia, David; Teinturier, Samuel; Buch, Arnaud; Leshin, Laurie A.; Ming, Douglas W.; Conrad, Pamela Gales; Cabane, Michel; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Grotzinger, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Planetary models suggest that nitrogen was abundant in the early Martian atmosphere as N2 but it was lost by sputtering and photochemical loss to space, impact erosion, and chemical oxidation to nitrates. A nitrogen cycle may exist on Mars where nitrates, produced early in Mars' history, may have been later decomposed back into N2 by the current impact flux. Nitrates are a fundamental source of nitrogen for terrestrial microorganisms, and they have evolved metabolic pathways to perform both oxidation and reduction to drive a complete biological nitrogen cycle. Therefore, the characterization of nitrogen in Martian soils is important to assess habitability of the Martian environment, particularly with respect to the presence of nitrates. The only previous mission that was designed to search for soil nitrates was the Phoenix mission but N-containing species were not detected by TEGA or the MECA WCL. Nitrates have been tentatively identified in Nakhla meteorites, and if nitrogen was oxidized on Mars, this has important implications for the habitability potential of Mars. Here we report the results from the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite aboard the Curiosity rover during the first year of surface operations in Gale Crater. Samples from the Rocknest aeolian deposit and sedimentary rocks (John Klein) were heated to approx 835degC under helium flow and the evolved gases were analyzed by MS and GC-MS. Two and possibly three peaks may be associated with the release of m/z 30 at temperatures ranging from 180degC to 500degC. M/z 30 has been tentatively identified as NO; other plausible contributions include CH2O and an isotopologue of CO, 12C18O. NO, CH2O, and CO may be reaction products of reagents (MTBSTFA/DMF) carried from Earth for the wet chemical derivatization experiments with SAM and/or derived from indigenous soil nitrogenated organics. Laboratory analyses indicate that it is also possible that <550degC evolved NO is produced via reaction of HCl with

  6. Dynamic Resource Allocation in Conservation Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Dynamic Resource Allocation in Conservation Planning Daniel Golovin Caltech Pasadena, CA, USA Andreas Krause ETH Zürich Zurich, Switzerland Beth...to adaptive policies ( Golovin and Krause 2010). We omit details due to space limita- tions. 1335 using the independent cascade model of Goldenberg... Golovin and Krause [2010]. However, their approach is not known to provide competitiveness guarantees such as those of Theo- rem 2, where the set of

  7. Fluorocarbon Contamination from the Drill on the Mars Science Laboratory: Potential Science Impact on Detecting Martian Organics by Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eigenbrode, J. L.; McAdam, A.; Franz, H.; Freissinet, C.; Bower, H.; Floyd, M.; Conrad, P.; Mahaffy, P.; Feldman, J.; Hurowitz, J.; Evans, J.; Anderson, M.; Jandura, L.; Brown, K.; Logan, C.; Kuhn, S.; Anderson, R.; Beegle, L.; Limonadi, D.; Rainen, R.; Umland, J.

    2013-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or trade name: Teflon by Dupont Co.) has been detected in rocks drilled during terrestrial testing of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) drilling hardware. The PTFE in sediments is a wear product of the seals used in the Drill Bit Assemblies (DBAs). It is expected that the drill assembly on the MSL flight model will also shed Teflon particles into drilled samples. One of the primary goals of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on MSL is to test for the presence of martian organics in samples. Complications introduced by the potential presence of PTFE in drilled samples to the SAM evolved gas analysis (EGA or pyrolysisquadrupole mass spectrometry, pyr-QMS) and pyrolysis- gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Pyr- GCMS) experiments was investigated.

  8. SAM Sample preparation and its impact on the detection of organic compounds on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Arnaud; Szopa, Cyril; Coll, Patrice; Freissinet, Caroline; Glavin, Daniel; Belmahdi, Imene; François, Pascaline; Millan, Maeva; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; navarro, Rafael; Stern, Jennifer; Pinnick, Veronica; Coscia, David; Teinturier, Samuel; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Mahaffy, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The wet chemistry experiments on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) [1] experiment in the Curiosity rover of the Mars Science Laboratory mission supports extraction of polar organic compounds from solid samples that improves their detection either by increasing the release of chemical species from solid sample matrices, or by changing their chemical structure to make compounds more amenable to gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). The wet chemistry approach provides an alternative to the nominal inert-thermal desorption/pyrolysis analytical protocol used by SAM [1] that is more aptly suited for polar components. SAM, includes two different wet chemistry experiments: MTBSTFA derivatization [2-3] and TMAH thermochemolysis [4]. Here we report on the nature of the MTBSTFA derivatization experiment on SAM, the detection of MTBSTFA products in the SAM evolved gas analysis and GCMS experiments, and the implications of this detection. Solid sample were heated up to approximately 840°C at a rate of 35°C/min under He flow. For GC analyses, the majority of the gas released was trapped on a hydrocarbon trap (Tenax®) over a specific temperature range. Adsorbed volatiles on the GC injection trap (IT) were then released into the GC column (CLP-MXT 30m x 0.25mm x 0.25µm) by rapidly heating the IT to 300°C. Then, in order better understand the part of compounds detected coming from internal reaction we have performed several lab experiments to mimic the SAM device. We have investigated the thermal degradation of Tenax®, and possible interaction with MTBSTFA and perchlorate in the SAM trap (Tenax®) to better constrain interpretations of SAM results on Mars. References: [1] Mahaffy, P. et al. (2012) Space Sci Rev, 170, 401-478. [2] Buch, A. et al. (2009) J chrom. A, 43, 143-151. [3] Stalport, F. et al. (2012) Planet. Space Sci. 67: 1-13 [4] Geffroy-Rodier, C. et al. (2009) JAAP, 85, 454-459. Acknowledgements: SAM-GC team acknowledges support from the French Space Agency

  9. New insights into the electrochemical desorption of alkanethiol SAMs on gold

    PubMed Central

    Pensa, Evangelina; Vericat, Carolina; Grumelli, Doris; Salvarezza, Roberto C.; Park, Sung Hyun; Longo, Gabriel S.; Szleifer, Igal

    2012-01-01

    A combination of Polarization Modulation Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (PMIRRAS) under electrochemical control, Electrochemical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (ECSTM) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations has been used to shed light on the reductive desorption process of dodecanethiol (C12) and octadecanethiol (C18) SAMs on gold in aqueous electrolytes. Experimental PMIRRAS, ECSTM and MD simulations data for C12 desorption are consistent with formation of randomly distributed micellar aggregates stabilized by Na+ ions, coexisting with a lying-down phase of molecules. The analysis of pit and Au island coverage before and after desorption is consistent with the thiolate-Au adatoms models. On the other hand, PMIRRAS and MD data for C18 indicate that the desorbed alkanethiolates adopt a Na+ ion-stabilized bilayer of interdigitated alkanethiolates, with no evidence of lying down molecules. MD simulations also show that both the degree of order and tilt angle of the desorbed alkanethiolates change with the surface charge on the metal, going from bilayers to micelles. These results demonstrate the complexity of the alkanethiol desorption in the presence of water and the fact that chain length and counterions play a key role in a complex structure. PMID:22870508

  10. Possible Detection of Nitrates on Mars by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Stern, J.; Sutter, B.; Archer, D.; McAdam, A.; Franz, H. B.; McKay, C. P.; Coll, P.; Cabane, M.; Ming, D. W.; Brunner, A. E.; Glavin, D.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Jones, J. H.; Freissinet, C.; Leshin, L.; Wong, M.; Atreya, S.; Wray, J. J.; Steele, A.; Buch, A.; Prats, B. D.; Szopa, C.; Conrad, P.; Mahaffy, P.

    2013-01-01

    Planetary models suggest that nitrogen was abundant in the early Martian atmosphere as dinitrogen (N2). However, it has been lost by sputtering and photochemical loss to space [1, 2], impact erosion [3], and chemical oxidation to nitrates [4]. Nitrates, produced early in Mars history, are later decomposed back into N2 by the current impact flux [5], making possible a nitrogen cycle on Mars. It is estimated that a layer of about 3 m of pure NaNO3 should be distributed globally on Mars [5]. Nitrates are a fundamental source for nitrogen to terrestrial microorganisms. Therefore, the detection of soil nitrates is important to assess habitability in the Martian environment. The only previous mission that was designed to search for soil nitrates was the Phoenix mission but was unable to detect evolved N-containing species by TEGA and the MECA WCL [6]. Nitrates have been tentatively identified in the Nakhla meteorite [7]. The purpose of this work is to determine if nitrates were detected in first solid sample (Rocknest) in Gale Crater examined by the SAM instrument.

  11. Valuing certainty in a consensus-based water allocation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Saket; McKee, Mac

    2007-02-01

    We present an interdisciplinary approach to attach economic value to model certainty. The central theme of this paper concerns valuing certainty in water resource management, specifically resource allocation. A conceptual framework is developed to study (1) a hypothetical scenario of three water users attempting to mutually agree on allocation of some fixed amount of water amongst themselves and (2) California water policy negotiations along the lines of Adams et al. (1996). We attempt to answer how uncertainty in a policy variable affects the "allocation solution" in such consensus-based decision-making processes. This study finally evolves into economic valuation of uncertainty reduction and willingness to pay for the same.

  12. Carbon-sulfur bond-forming reaction catalysed by the radical SAM enzyme HydE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohac, Roman; Amara, Patricia; Benjdia, Alhosna; Martin, Lydie; Ruffié, Pauline; Favier, Adrien; Berteau, Olivier; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C.; Nicolet, Yvain

    2016-05-01

    Carbon-sulfur bond formation at aliphatic positions is a challenging reaction that is performed efficiently by radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzymes. Here we report that 1,3-thiazolidines can act as ligands and substrates for the radical SAM enzyme HydE, which is involved in the assembly of the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenase. Using X-ray crystallography, in vitro assays and NMR spectroscopy we identified a radical-based reaction mechanism that is best described as the formation of a C-centred radical that concomitantly attacks the sulfur atom of a thioether. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a radical SAM enzyme that reacts directly on a sulfur atom instead of abstracting a hydrogen atom. Using theoretical calculations based on our high-resolution structures we followed the evolution of the electronic structure from SAM through to the formation of S-adenosyl-L-cysteine. Our results suggest that, at least in this case, the widely proposed and highly reactive 5‧-deoxyadenosyl radical species that triggers the reaction in radical SAM enzymes is not an isolable intermediate.

  13. The relative influence of ENSO and SAM on Antarctic Peninsula climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clem, Kyle R.; Renwick, James A.; McGregor, James; Fogt, Ryan L.

    2016-08-01

    Recent warming of the Antarctic Peninsula during austral autumn, winter, and spring has been linked to sea surface temperature (SST) trends in the tropical Pacific and tropical Atlantic, while warming of the northeast Peninsula during summer has been linked to a strengthening of westerly winds traversing the Peninsula associated with a positive trend in the Southern Annular Mode (SAM). Here we demonstrate that circulation changes associated with the SAM dominate interannual temperature variability across the entire Antarctic Peninsula during both summer and autumn, while relationships with tropical Pacific SST variability associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are strongest and statistically significant primarily during winter and spring only. We find the ENSO-Peninsula temperature relationship during autumn to be weak on interannual time scales and regional circulation anomalies associated with the SAM more important for interannual temperature variability across the Peninsula during autumn. Consistent with previous studies, western Peninsula temperatures during autumn, winter, and spring are closely tied to changes in the Amundsen Sea Low (ASL) and associated meridional wind anomalies. The interannual variability of ASL depth is most strongly correlated with the SAM index during autumn, while the ENSO relationship is strongest during winter and spring. Investigation of western and northeast Peninsula temperatures separately reveals that interannual variability of northeast Peninsula temperatures is primarily sensitive to zonal wind anomalies crossing the Peninsula and resultant leeside adiabatic warming rather than to meridional wind anomalies, which is closely tied to variability in the zonal portion of the SAM pattern.

  14. Oxygen Attachment on Alkanethiolate SAMs Induced by Low-Energy Electron Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Sylvain; Bass, Andrew D.; Steffenhagen, Marie; Sanche, Léon

    2013-01-01

    Reactions of 18O2 with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films of 1-dodecanethiol, 1-octadecanethiol, 1-butanethiol, and benzyl mercaptan chemisorbed on gold, were studied by the electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of anionic fragments over the incident electron energy range 2–20 eV. Dosing the SAMs with 18O2 at 50 K, results in the ESD of 18O− and 18OH−. Electron irradiation of samples prior to 18O2 deposition demonstrates that intensity of subsequent 18O− and 18OH− desorption signals increase with electron fluence and that absent electron pre-irradiation, no 18O− and 18OH− ESD signals are observed, since oxygen is unable to bind to the SAMs. A minimum incident electron energy of 6–7 eV is required to initiate the binding of 18O2 to the SAMs. O2 binding is proposed to proceed by the formation of CHx−1• radicals via resonant dissociative electron attachment and non-resonant C–H dissociation processes. The weaker signals of 18O− and 18OH− from short-chain SAMs are related to the latter’s resistance to electron induced damage, due to the charge-image dipole quenching and electron delocalization. Comparison between the present results and those for DNA oligonucleotides self-assembled on Au [Mirsaleh-Kohan, N. et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2012, 136, 235104] indicates that the oxygen binding mechanism is common to both systems. PMID:23537075

  15. ER residency of the ceramide phosphoethanolamine synthase SMSr relies on homotypic oligomerization mediated by its SAM domain

    PubMed Central

    Cabukusta, Birol; Kol, Matthijs; Kneller, Laura; Hilderink, Angelika; Bickert, Andreas; Mina, John G. M.; Korneev, Sergei; Holthuis, Joost C. M.

    2017-01-01

    SMSr/SAMD8 is an ER-resident ceramide phosphoethanolamine synthase with a critical role in controlling ER ceramides and suppressing ceramide-induced apoptosis in cultured cells. SMSr-mediated ceramide homeostasis relies on the enzyme’s catalytic activity as well as on its N-terminal sterile α-motif or SAM domain. Here we report that SMSr-SAM is structurally and functionally related to the SAM domain of diacylglycerol kinase DGKδ, a central regulator of lipid signaling at the plasma membrane. Native gel electrophoresis indicates that both SAM domains form homotypic oligomers. Chemical crosslinking studies show that SMSr self-associates into ER-resident trimers and hexamers that resemble the helical oligomers formed by DGKδ-SAM. Residues critical for DGKδ-SAM oligomerization are conserved in SMSr-SAM and their substitution causes a dissociation of SMSr oligomers as well as a partial redistribution of the enzyme to the Golgi. Conversely, treatment of cells with curcumin, a drug disrupting ceramide and Ca2+ homeostasis in the ER, stabilizes SMSr oligomers and promotes retention of the enzyme in the ER. Our data provide first demonstration of a multi-pass membrane protein that undergoes homotypic oligomerization via its SAM domain and indicate that SAM-mediated self-assembly of SMSr is required for efficient retention of the enzyme in the ER. PMID:28120887

  16. Characterization of pra, a gene for replication control in pSAM2, the integrating element of Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    PubMed

    Sezonov, G; Hagège, J; Pernodet, J L; Friedmann, A; Guérineau, M

    1995-08-01

    pSAM2 is a genetic element found integrated in Streptomyces ambofaciens (B2) and additionally in a replicating form in two mutants B3 and B4. The presence of the pSAM2 replicating form in these mutants was the result of mutations located on pSAM2 in the pra locus, named pra3 and pra4, respectively. The pra gene is not directly involved in replication, but its inactivation led to the disappearance of the pSAM2 free form; therefore, it was considered as a replication regulator. The pra3 and pra4 mutations were located in the pra promoter and were shown to be point substitutions that increase the promoter strength. The replication regulator role of pra was demonstrated by the fact that its constitutive expression in cells harbouring pSAM2B2, which is normally only integrated, led to the appearance of the pSAM2 replicating form. Northern analysis showed that the pra gene transcript can be detected only for the replicating mutants B3 and B4 and that the three adjacent genes korSA, pra and traSA were transcribed separately. As replication of pSAM2 is not needed for its maintenance but is an indispensable stage of its transfer, the pra gene, described formally as an activator of pSAM2 replication, is patently involved in pSAM2 transfer.

  17. A Distributed Cooperative Power Allocation Method for Campus Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, He; Sun, Yannan; Carroll, Thomas E.; Somani, Abhishek

    2015-09-01

    We propose a coordination algorithm for cooperative power allocation among a collection of commercial buildings within a campus. We introduced thermal and power models of a typical commercial building Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system, and utilize model predictive control to characterize their power flexibility. The power allocation problem is formulated as a cooperative game using the Nash Bargaining Solution (NBS) concept, in which buildings collectively maximize the product of their utilities subject to their local flexibility constraints and a total power limit set by the campus coordinator. To solve the optimal allocation problem, a distributed protocol is designed using dual decomposition of the Nash bargaining problem. Numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of our proposed allocation method

  18. How do people learn to allocate resources? Comparing two learning theories.

    PubMed

    Rieskamp, Jörg; Busemeyer, Jerome R; Laine, Tei

    2003-11-01

    How do people learn to allocate resources? To answer this question, 2 major learning models are compared, each incorporating different learning principles. One is a global search model, which assumes that allocations are made probabilistically on the basis of expectations formed through the entire history of past decisions. The 2nd is a local adaptation model, which assumes that allocations are made by comparing the present decision with the most successful decision up to that point, ignoring all other past decisions. In 2 studies, participants repeatedly allocated a capital resource to 3 financial assets. Substantial learning effects occurred, although the optimal allocation was often not found. From the calibrated models of Study 1, a priori predictions were derived and tested in Study 2. This generalization test shows that the local adaptation model provides a better account of learning in resource allocations than the global search model.

  19. The crystal structure of a novel SAM-dependent methyltransferase PH1915 from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W.; Xu, X.; Pavlova, M.; Edwards, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Savchenko, A.; Christendat, D.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Toronto; Univ. Health Network

    2005-01-01

    The S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferases represent a diverse and biologically important class of enzymes. These enzymes utilize the ubiquitous methyl donor SAM as a cofactor to methylate proteins, small molecules, lipids, and nucleic acids. Here we present the crystal structure of PH1915 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, a predicted SAM-dependent methyltransferase. This protein belongs to the Cluster of Orthologous Group 1092, and the presented crystal structure is the first representative structure of this protein family. Based on sequence and 3D structure analysis, we have made valuable functional insights that will facilitate further studies for characterizing this group of proteins. Specifically, we propose that PH1915 and its orthologs are rRNA- or tRNA-specific methyltransferases.

  20. SPASM and Twitch Domains in S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) Radical Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Grell, Tsehai A. J.; Goldman, Peter J.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM, also known as AdoMet) radical enzymes use SAM and a [4Fe-4S] cluster to catalyze a diverse array of reactions. They adopt a partial triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel fold with N- and C-terminal extensions that tailor the structure of the enzyme to its specific function. One extension, termed a SPASM domain, binds two auxiliary [4Fe-4S] clusters and is present within peptide-modifying enzymes. The first structure of a SPASM-containing enzyme, anaerobic sulfatase-maturating enzyme (anSME), revealed unexpected similarities to two non-SPASM proteins, butirosin biosynthetic enzyme 2-deoxy-scyllo-inosamine dehydrogenase (BtrN) and molybdenum cofactor biosynthetic enzyme (MoaA). The latter two enzymes bind one auxiliary cluster and exhibit a partial SPASM motif, coined a Twitch domain. Here we review the structure and function of auxiliary cluster domains within the SAM radical enzyme superfamily. PMID:25477505

  1. Distributed processing and analysis of physics data in the D0 SAM system at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Igor V. Terekhov

    2001-08-30

    SAM (Sequential Access through Meta-data) is the data access system for the D0 high energy physics (HEP) experiment at Fermilab. The system is being developed and used to handle the Petabyte-scale experiment data. The D0 applications, like virtually all HEP applications, are data-intensive, which poses special problems for the data management and job control facilities in the distributed environment. The fundamental problem is to bring the user applications and the data together, and SAM attacks the problems from both sides. First, we describe how the system moves the data through the distributed disk cache. Second, we describe how SAM interacts with the batch system to synchronize parallel user jobs with the data availability. All the design solutions herein have been implemented in a real system that handles the mission-critical data of the D0 experiment; thus, we present our work from the standpoint of real experience.

  2. Bringing a Chemical Laboratory Named Sam to Mars on the 2011 Curiosity Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Bleacher, L.; Jones, A.; Conrad, P. G.; Cabane, M.; Webster, C. R.; Atreya, S. A.; Manning, H.

    2010-01-01

    An important goal of upcoming missions to Mars is to understand if life could have developed there. The task of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite of instruments [1] and the other Curiosity investigations [2] is to move us steadily toward that goal with an assessment of the habitability of our neighboring planet through a series of chemical and geological measurements. SAM is designed to search for organic compounds and inorganic volatiles and measure isotope ratios. Other instruments on Curiosity will provide elemental analysis and identify minerals. SAM will analyze both atmospheric samples and gases evolved from powdered rocks that may have formed billions of years ago with Curiosity providing access to interesting sites scouted by orbiting cameras and spectrometers.

  3. Detection of Organics at Mars: How Wet Chemistry Onboard SAM Helps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buch, A.; Freissinet, Caroline; Szopa, C.; Glavin, D.; Coll, P.; Cabane, M.; Eigenbrode, J.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Coscia, D.; Teinturier, S.; Mahaffy, P.

    2013-01-01

    For the first time in the history of space exploration, a mission of interest to astrobiology could be able to analyze refractory organic compounds in the soil of Mars. Wet chemistry experiment allow organic components to be altered in such a way that improves there detection either by releasing the compounds from sample matricies or by changing the chemical structure to be amenable to analytical conditions. The latter is particular important when polar compounds are present. Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM), on the Curiosity rover of the Mars Science Laboratory mission, has onboard two wet chemistry experiments: derivatization and thermochemolysis. Here we report on the nature of the MTBSTFA derivatization experiment on SAM, the detection of MTBSTFA in initial SAM results, and the implications of this detection.

  4. Allocation of control rights and cooperation efficiency in public-private partnerships: theory and evidence from the Chinese pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Jia, Ming; Wan, Difang

    2009-06-01

    This article uses incomplete contract theory to study the allocation of control rights in public-private partnerships (PPPs) between pharmaceutical enterprises and nonprofit organizations; it also investigates how this allocation influences cooperation efficiency. We first develop a mathematic model for the allocation of control rights and its influence on cooperation efficiency, and then derive some basic hypotheses from the model. The results of an empirical test show that the allocation of control rights influences how enterprises invest in PPPs. A proper allocation provides incentives for firms to make fewer self-interested and more public-interested investments. Such an allocation also improves the cooperation efficiency of PPPs.

  5. Optimal allocation of file servers in a local network environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodside, C. M.; Tripathi, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Files associated with workstations in a local area network are to be allocated among two or more file servers. Assuming statistically identical workstations and file servers and a performance model which is a closed multiclass separable queueing network, an optimal allocation is found. It is shown that all the files of each workstation should be placed on one file server, with the workstations divided as equally as possible among the file servers.

  6. Data handling with SAM and art at the NOνA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurisano, A.; Backhouse, C.; Davies, G. S.; Illingworth, R.; Mayer, N.; Mengel, M.; Norman, A.; Rocco, D.; Zirnstein, J.

    2015-12-01

    During operations, NOvA produces between 5,000 and 7,000 raw files per day with peaks in excess of 12,000. These files must be processed in several stages to produce fully calibrated and reconstructed analysis files. In addition, many simulated neutrino interactions must be produced and processed through the same stages as data. To accommodate the large volume of data and Monte Carlo, production must be possible both on the Fermilab grid and on off-site farms, such as the ones accessible through the Open Science Grid. To handle the challenge of cataloging these files and to facilitate their off-line processing, we have adopted the SAM system developed at Fermilab. SAM indexes files according to metadata, keeps track of each file's physical locations, provides dataset management facilities, and facilitates data transfer to off-site grids. To integrate SAM with Fermilab's art software framework and the NOvA production workflow, we have developed methods to embed metadata into our configuration files, art files, and standalone ROOT files. A module in the art framework propagates the embedded information from configuration files into art files, and from input art files to output art files, allowing us to maintain a complete processing history within our files. Embedding metadata in configuration files also allows configuration files indexed in SAM to be used as inputs to Monte Carlo production jobs. Further, SAM keeps track of the input files used to create each output file. Parentage information enables the construction of self-draining datasets which have become the primary production paradigm used at NOvA. In this paper we will present an overview of SAM at NOvA and how it has transformed the file production framework used by the experiment.

  7. The survey of autobiographical memory (SAM): a novel measure of trait mnemonics in everyday life.

    PubMed

    Palombo, Daniela J; Williams, Lynne J; Abdi, Hervé; Levine, Brian

    2013-06-01

    Compared to the abundance of laboratory-based memory tasks, few measures exist to assess self-reported memory function. This need is particularly important for naturalistic mnemonic capacities, such as autobiographical memory (recall of events and facts from one's past), because it is difficult to reliably assess in the laboratory. Furthermore, naturalistic mnemonic capacities may show stable individual differences that evade the constraints of laboratory testing. The Survey of Autobiographical Memory (SAM) was designed to assess such trait mnemonics, or the dimensional characterization of self-reported mnemonic characteristics. The SAM comprises items assessing self-reported episodic autobiographical, semantic, and spatial memory, as well as future prospection. In a large sample of healthy young adults, the latent dimensional structure of the SAM was characterized with multiple correspondence analysis (MCA). This analysis revealed dimensions corresponding to general mnemonic abilities (i.e., good vs poor memory across subtypes), spatial memory, and future prospection. While episodic and semantic items did not separate in this data-driven analysis, these categories did show expected dissociations in relation to depression history and to laboratory-based measures of recollection. Remote spatial memory as assessed by the SAM showed the expected advantage for males over females. Spatial memory was also related to autobiographical memory performance. Brief versions of the SAM are provided for efficient research applications. Individual differences in memory function are likely related to other health-related factors, including personality, psychopathology, dementia risk, brain structure and function, and genotype. In conjunction with laboratory or performance based assessments, the SAM can provide a useful measure of naturalistic self-report trait mnemonics for probing these relationships.

  8. Searching for Reduced Carbon on the Surface of Mars: The SAM Combustion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, J. C.; Malespin, C. A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Webster, C. R.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Brunner, A. E.; Freissinet, C.; Franz, H. B.; Glavin, D. P.; Graham, H. V.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D. W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Niles, P. B.; Steele, A.; Sutter, B.; Trainer, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    The search for reduced carbon has been a major focus of past and present missions to Mars. Thermal evolved gas analysis was used by the Viking and Phoenix landers and is currently in use by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) to characterize volatiles evolved from solid samples, including those associated with reduced organic species. SAM has the additional capability to perform a combustion experiment, in which a sample of Mars regolith is heated in the presence of oxygen and the composition of the evolved gases is measured using quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) and tunable laser spectrometry (TLS) [1]. Organics detection on the Martian surface has been complicated by oxidation and destruction during heating by soil oxidants [2], including oxychlorine compounds, and terrestrial organics in the SAM background contributed by one of the SAM wet chemistry reagents MTBSTFA (N-Methyl-N-tertbutyldimethylsilyl- trifluoroacetamide) [3,4]. Thermal Evolved Gas Analysis (TEGA) results from Phoenix show a mid temperature CO2 release between 400 C - 680 C speculated to be carbonate, CO2 adsorbed to grains, or combustion of organics by soil oxidants [5]. Low temperature CO2 evolutions (approx. 200 C - 400 C) were also present at all three sites in Gale Crater where SAM Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA) was performed, and potential sources include combustion of terrestrial organics from SAM, as well as combustion and/or decarboxylation either indigenous martian or exogenous organic carbon [4,6]. By performing an experiment to intentionally combust all reduced materials in the sample, we hope to compare the bulk abundance of CO2 and other oxidized species evolved by combustion to that evolved during an EGA experiment to estimate how much CO2 could be contributed by reduced carbon sources. In addition, C, O, and H isotopic compositions of CO2 and H2O measured by TLS can contribute information regarding the potential sources of these

  9. Results from the Curiosity Rover's SAM Investigation at Gale Crater and links to Habitability of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, P. J.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Webster, C. R.; Cabane, M.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Navarro-gonzalez, R.; SAM; MSL Science Teams

    2013-05-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Mission (MSL) has as its goal an exploration of the potential of the ancient Gale Crater to support life. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite (3) contributes to this exploration of habitability with (1) a search for organic compounds in rocks and soils, (2) a determination of the composition of inorganic volatiles compounds in the atmosphere or extracted from solid materials, and (3) measurements of the isotopic composition of several of these volatiles. The initial exploration of the region near the landing point has revealed a diverse geology and SAM has made measurements of both atmospheric and solid samples. Additional prime exploration targets are the clay and sulfate layers in the central mound (Mt. Sharp) of Gale crater. SAM is located in the interior of the Curiosity rover. Nine other instruments complete the payload including an XRD/XRF instrument and a variety of imaging, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, and elemental analysis instrumentation. Several of these instruments serve to locate sampling sites and interrogate candidate materials before solid sample is collected either with a drill or a scoop for delivery to SAM and the XRD/XRF instruments. SAM's instruments are a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS), and a 6-column gas chromatograph (GC) coupled through a solid sample transport system and a gas processing and enrichment system. SAM atmospheric runs include a determination of: new volume mixing ratios for the 5 major isotopic constituents; an upper limit for the volume mixing ratio of methane; C and O isotope ratios in CO2; D/H in water; and the 40Ar/36Ar ratio. Major evolved gases from fines scooped from an eolian drift were H2O, CO2, O2, SO2, and a number of minor species. Chlorine containing compounds in this material were tentatively identified as perchlorates.

  10. Data handling with SAM and art at the NOvA experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Aurisano, A.; Backhouse, C.; Davies, G. S.; ...

    2015-12-23

    During operations, NOvA produces between 5,000 and 7,000 raw files per day with peaks in excess of 12,000. These files must be processed in several stages to produce fully calibrated and reconstructed analysis files. In addition, many simulated neutrino interactions must be produced and processed through the same stages as data. To accommodate the large volume of data and Monte Carlo, production must be possible both on the Fermilab grid and on off-site farms, such as the ones accessible through the Open Science Grid. To handle the challenge of cataloging these files and to facilitate their off-line processing, we havemore » adopted the SAM system developed at Fermilab. SAM indexes files according to metadata, keeps track of each file's physical locations, provides dataset management facilities, and facilitates data transfer to off-site grids. To integrate SAM with Fermilab's art software framework and the NOvA production workflow, we have developed methods to embed metadata into our configuration files, art files, and standalone ROOT files. A module in the art framework propagates the embedded information from configuration files into art files, and from input art files to output art files, allowing us to maintain a complete processing history within our files. Embedding metadata in configuration files also allows configuration files indexed in SAM to be used as inputs to Monte Carlo production jobs. Further, SAM keeps track of the input files used to create each output file. Parentage information enables the construction of self-draining datasets which have become the primary production paradigm used at NOvA. In this study we will present an overview of SAM at NOvA and how it has transformed the file production framework used by the experiment.« less

  11. Applicability and Limitations of Reliability Allocation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Reliability allocation process may be described as the process of assigning reliability requirements to individual components within a system to attain the specified system reliability. For large systems, the allocation process is often performed at different stages of system design. The allocation process often begins at the conceptual stage. As the system design develops, more information about components and the operating environment becomes available, different allocation methods can be considered. Reliability allocation methods are usually divided into two categories: weighting factors and optimal reliability allocation. When properly applied, these methods can produce reasonable approximations. Reliability allocation techniques have limitations and implied assumptions that need to be understood by system engineers. Applying reliability allocation techniques without understanding their limitations and assumptions can produce unrealistic results. This report addresses weighting factors, optimal reliability allocation techniques, and identifies the applicability and limitations of each reliability allocation technique.

  12. SAGE II aerosol data validation - Comparative studies of SAGE II and SAM II data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Wang, P. H.; Osborn, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    Data from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II) satellite are compared with data from the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM II) satellite. Both experiments produce aerosol extinction profiles by measuring the attenuation of solar radiation during each sunrise and sunset observed by the satelltie. The SAGE II obtains profiles at 1.02 microns and three smaller wavelengths, whereas the SAM II measures at only one radiometric channel at 1.0 microns. It is found that the differences between the two sets of data are generally within the error bars associated with each measurement. In addition, the sunrise and sunset data from SAGE II are analyzed.

  13. Mechanistic studies of the radical SAM enzyme spore photoproduct lyase (SPL).

    PubMed

    Li, Lei

    2012-11-01

    Spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) repairs a special thymine dimer 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, which is commonly called spore photoproduct or SP at the bacterial early germination phase. SP is the exclusive DNA photo-damage product in bacterial endospores; its generation and swift repair by SPL are responsible for the spores' extremely high UV resistance. The early in vivo studies suggested that SPL utilizes a direct reversal strategy to repair the SP in the absence of light. The research in the past decade further established SPL as a radical SAM enzyme, which utilizes a tri-cysteine CXXXCXXC motif to harbor a [4Fe-4S] cluster. At the 1+ oxidation state, the cluster provides an electron to the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which binds to the cluster in a bidentate manner as the fourth and fifth ligands, to reductively cleave the CS bond associated with the sulfonium ion in SAM, generating a reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl (5'-dA) radical. This 5'-dA radical abstracts the proR hydrogen atom from the C6 carbon of SP to initiate the repair process; the resulting SP radical subsequently fragments to generate a putative thymine methyl radical, which accepts a back-donated H atom to yield the repaired TpT. SAM is suggested to be regenerated at the end of each catalytic cycle; and only a catalytic amount of SAM is needed in the SPL reaction. The H atom source for the back donation step is suggested to be a cysteine residue (C141 in Bacillus subtilis SPL), and the H-atom transfer reaction leaves a thiyl radical behind on the protein. This thiyl radical thus must participate in the SAM regeneration process; however how the thiyl radical abstracts an H atom from the 5'-dA to regenerate SAM is unknown. This paper reviews and discusses the history and the latest progress in the mechanistic elucidation of SPL. Despite some recent breakthroughs, more questions are raised in the mechanistic understanding of this intriguing DNA repair enzyme. This article is part of a Special Issue

  14. The Combustion Experiment on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suite on the Curiosity Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, J. C.; Malespin, C. A.; Eigenbrode, J.; Graham, H. V.; Archer, P. D.; Brunner, A.; Freissinet, C.; Franz, H. B.; Fuentes, J.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D. W.; Niles, P. B.; Steele, A.

    2014-01-01

    The combustion experiment on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite on Curiosity will heat a sample of Mars regolith in the presence of oxygen and measure composition of the evolved gases using quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) and tunable laser spectrometry (TLS). QMS will enable detection of combustion products such as CO, CO2, NO, and other oxidized species, while TLS will enable precision measurements of the abundance and carbon isotopic composition (delta C-13) of the evolved CO2 and hydrogen isotopic composition (delta D) of H2O. SAM will perform a two-step combustion to isolate combustible materials below approx. 550 C and above approx. 550 C.

  15. The nucleation and growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate on self- assembled monolayers (SAMs)

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.A.; Tarasevich, B.J.; Graff, G.L.; Fryxell, G.E.; Rieke, P.C.

    1992-05-01

    A physical chemical approach was used to study calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) nucleation and growth on various organic interfaces. Self-assembling monolayers (SAMs), containing derivatized organic functional groups, were designed to mimic various amino acid residues present in both urine and stone matrix macromolecules. Derivatized surfaces include SAMs with terminal methyl, bromo, imidazole, and thiazolidine-carboxylic acid functional groups. Pronounced differences in COM deposition were observed for the various interfaces with the imidazole and thiazolidine surfaces having the greatest effect and the methyl and bromo groups having little or no nucleating potential.

  16. Mineral classification map using MF and SAM techniques: A case study in the Nohwa Island, Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Young-Sun; Yoon, Wang-Jung

    2015-03-10

    The purpose of this study is to map pyprophyllite distribution at surface of the Nohwa deposit, Korea by using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflectance Radiometer (ASTER) data. For this, combined Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM), and Matched Filtering (MF) technique based on mathematical algorithm was applied. The regional distribution of high-grade and low-grade pyrophyllite in the Nohwa deposit area could be differentiated by this method. The results of this study show that ASTER data analysis using combination of SAM and MF techniques will assist in exploration of pyrophyllite at the exposed surface.

  17. Collective credit allocation in science.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hua-Wei; Barabási, Albert-László

    2014-08-26

    Collaboration among researchers is an essential component of the modern scientific enterprise, playing a particularly important role in multidisciplinary research. However, we continue to wrestle with allocating credit to the coauthors of publications with multiple authors, because the relative contribution of each author is difficult to determine. At the same time, the scientific community runs an informal field-dependent credit allocation process that assigns credit in a collective fashion to each work. Here we develop a credit allocation algorithm that captures the coauthors' contribution to a publication as perceived by the scientific community, reproducing the informal collective credit allocation of science. We validate the method by identifying the authors of Nobel-winning papers that are credited for the discovery, independent of their positions in the author list. The method can also compare the relative impact of researchers working in the same field, even if they did not publish together. The ability to accurately measure the relative credit of researchers could affect many aspects of credit allocation in science, potentially impacting hiring, funding, and promotion decisions.

  18. Collective credit allocation in science

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua-Wei; Barabási, Albert-László

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration among researchers is an essential component of the modern scientific enterprise, playing a particularly important role in multidisciplinary research. However, we continue to wrestle with allocating credit to the coauthors of publications with multiple authors, because the relative contribution of each author is difficult to determine. At the same time, the scientific community runs an informal field-dependent credit allocation process that assigns credit in a collective fashion to each work. Here we develop a credit allocation algorithm that captures the coauthors’ contribution to a publication as perceived by the scientific community, reproducing the informal collective credit allocation of science. We validate the method by identifying the authors of Nobel-winning papers that are credited for the discovery, independent of their positions in the author list. The method can also compare the relative impact of researchers working in the same field, even if they did not publish together. The ability to accurately measure the relative credit of researchers could affect many aspects of credit allocation in science, potentially impacting hiring, funding, and promotion decisions. PMID:25114238

  19. Task allocation in a distributed computing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Walter D.

    1987-01-01

    A conceptual framework is examined for task allocation in distributed systems. Application and computing system parameters critical to task allocation decision processes are discussed. Task allocation techniques are addressed which focus on achieving a balance in the load distribution among the system's processors. Equalization of computing load among the processing elements is the goal. Examples of system performance are presented for specific applications. Both static and dynamic allocation of tasks are considered and system performance is evaluated using different task allocation methodologies.

  20. Optimal allocation of trend following strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.; Serror, Jeremy

    2015-09-01

    We consider a portfolio allocation problem for trend following (TF) strategies on multiple correlated assets. Under simplifying assumptions of a Gaussian market and linear TF strategies, we derive analytical formulas for the mean and variance of the portfolio return. We construct then the optimal portfolio that maximizes risk-adjusted return by accounting for inter-asset correlations. The dynamic allocation problem for n assets is shown to be equivalent to the classical static allocation problem for n2 virtual assets that include lead-lag corrections in positions of TF strategies. The respective roles of asset auto-correlations and inter-asset correlations are investigated in depth for the two-asset case and a sector model. In contrast to the principle of diversification suggesting to treat uncorrelated assets, we show that inter-asset correlations allow one to estimate apparent trends more reliably and to adjust the TF positions more efficiently. If properly accounted for, inter-asset correlations are not deteriorative but beneficial for portfolio management that can open new profit opportunities for trend followers. These concepts are illustrated using daily returns of three highly correlated futures markets: the E-mini S&P 500, Euro Stoxx 50 index, and the US 10-year T-note futures.

  1. In Situ Analysis of Mars Soil and Rocks Sample with the Sam Gcms Instrumentation Onboard Curiosity : Interpretation and Comparison of Measurements Done during the First Martian Year of Curiosity on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, C.; Coll, P. J.; Cabane, M.; Buch, A.; Coscia, D.; Millan, M.; Francois, P.; Belmahadi, I.; Teinturier, S.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Glavin, D. P.; Freissinet, C.; Steele, A.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    The characterisation of the chemical and mineralogical composition of solid surface samples collected with the Curiosity rover is a primary objective of the SAM experiment. These data should provide essential clues on the past habitability of Gale crater. Amongst the SAM suite of instruments [1], SAM-GC (Gas Chromatograph) is devoted to identify and quantify volatiles evolved from the thermal (heating up to about 900°C)/chemical (derivatization procedure) treatment of any soil sample collected by the Curiosity rover. With the aim to search for potential organic molecules outgassed from the samples, SAM-GC analytical channels composed of thermal-desorption injector, and a MXT-CLP or a MXT-Q chromatographic column was chosen to achieve all the measurements done up today, with the aim to separate of a wide range of volatile inorganic and organic molecules. Four solid samples have been analyzed with GCMS, one sand sample collected at the Rocknest site, two rock samples (John Klein and Cumberland respectively) collected at the Yellowknife Bay site using the Curiosity driller, and one rock sample collected at the Kimberly site. All the measurements were successful and they produced complex chromatograms with both detectors used for SAM GC, i.e. a thermal conductivity detector and the SAM quandrupole mass spectrometer. Their interpretation already revealed the presence of an oxychlorine phase present in the sample which is at the origin of chlorohydrocarbons clearly identified [2] but this represents only a fraction of the GCMS signal recorded [3,4]. This work presents a systematic comparison of the GCMS measurements done for the different samples collected, supported by reference data obtained in laboratory with different spare models of the gas chromatograph, with the aim to bring new elements of interpretation of the SAM measurements. References: [1] Mahaffy, P. et al. (2012) Space Sci Rev, 170, 401-478. [2] Glavin, D. et al. (2013), JGR. [3] Leshin L. et al. (2013

  2. Analysis of the interactions between host factor Sam68 and viral elements during foot-and-mouth disease virus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nuclear protein Src-associated protein of 68 kDa in mitosis (Sam68) is known to bind RNA and be involved in cellular processes triggered in response to environmental stresses, including virus infection. Interestingly, Sam68, is a multi-functional protein implicated in the life cycle of retroviru...

  3. Targeting EphA2-Sam and Its Interactome: Design and Evaluation of Helical Peptides Enriched in Charged Residues.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Flavia A; Marasco, Daniela; Di Natale, Concetta; Pirone, Luciano; Costantini, Susan; Pedone, Emilia M; Leone, Marilisa

    2016-11-17

    The EphA2 receptor controls diverse physiological and pathological conditions and its levels are often upregulated in cancer. Targeting receptor overexpression, through modulation of endocytosis and consequent degradation, appears to be an appealing strategy for attacking tumor malignancy. In this scenario, the Sam domain of EphA2 plays a pivotal role because it is the site where protein regulators of endocytosis and stability are recruited by means of heterotypic Sam-Sam interactions. Because EphA2-Sam heterotypic complexes are largely based on electrostatic contacts, we have investigated the possibility of attacking these interactions with helical peptides enriched in charged residues. Several peptide sequences with high predicted helical propensities were designed, and detailed conformational analyses were conducted by diverse techniques including NMR, CD, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Interaction studies were also performed by NMR, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and microscale thermophoresis (MST) and led to the identification of two peptides capable of binding to the first Sam domain of Odin. These molecules represent early candidates for the generation of efficient Sam domain binders and antagonists of Sam-Sam interactions involving EphA2.

  4. Rate Distortion Analysis and Bit Allocation Scheme for Wavelet Lifting-Based Multiview Image Coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasang, Pongsak; Kumwilaisak, Wuttipong

    2009-12-01

    This paper studies the distortion and the model-based bit allocation scheme of wavelet lifting-based multiview image coding. Redundancies among image views are removed by disparity-compensated wavelet lifting (DCWL). The distortion prediction of the low-pass and high-pass subbands of each image view from the DCWL process is analyzed. The derived distortion is used with different rate distortion models in the bit allocation of multiview images. Rate distortion models including power model, exponential model, and the proposed combining the power and exponential models are studied. The proposed rate distortion model exploits the accuracy of both power and exponential models in a wide range of target bit rates. Then, low-pass and high-pass subbands are compressed by SPIHT (Set Partitioning in Hierarchical Trees) with a bit allocation solution. We verify the derived distortion and the bit allocation with several sets of multiview images. The results show that the bit allocation solution based on the derived distortion and our bit allocation scheme provide closer results to those of the exhaustive search method in both allocated bits and peak-signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR). It also outperforms the uniform bit allocation and uniform bit allocation with normalized energy in the order of 1.7-2 and 0.3-1.4 dB, respectively.

  5. Mesospheric effects of solar ultraviolet variations - Further analysis of SME IR ozone and Nimbus 7 SAMS temperature data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Huang, Z.; Bougher, S. W.

    1991-01-01

    In order to improve the constraints on models of the mesospheric response to solar UV variations, an analysis is conducted of the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) IR ozone data and Nimbus 7 stratosphere and mesosphere sounder (SAMS) temperature data. Maximum low-altitude ozone and temperature-response amplitudes occur at about the same altitude, where a strong coupling between photochemical and thermal components of the mesospheric response is suggested by the simultaneous positive temperature and negative ozone response maxima. Increased Lyman-alpha dissociation of water vapor and temperature feedback are theorized to account for the negative ozone response. HO(x) chemical heating can increase as ozone destruction increases, and can therefore account for the positive temperature response.

  6. Congestion Pricing for Aircraft Pushback Slot Allocation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lihua; Zhang, Yaping; Liu, Lan; Xing, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    In order to optimize aircraft pushback management during rush hour, aircraft pushback slot allocation based on congestion pricing is explored while considering monetary compensation based on the quality of the surface operations. First, the concept of the "external cost of surface congestion" is proposed, and a quantitative study on the external cost is performed. Then, an aircraft pushback slot allocation model for minimizing the total surface cost is established. An improved discrete differential evolution algorithm is also designed. Finally, a simulation is performed on Xinzheng International Airport using the proposed model. By comparing the pushback slot control strategy based on congestion pricing with other strategies, the advantages of the proposed model and algorithm are highlighted. In addition to reducing delays and optimizing the delay distribution, the model and algorithm are better suited for use for actual aircraft pushback management during rush hour. Further, it is also observed they do not result in significant increases in the surface cost. These results confirm the effectiveness and suitability of the proposed model and algorithm.

  7. Congestion Pricing for Aircraft Pushback Slot Allocation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaping

    2017-01-01

    In order to optimize aircraft pushback management during rush hour, aircraft pushback slot allocation based on congestion pricing is explored while considering monetary compensation based on the quality of the surface operations. First, the concept of the “external cost of surface congestion” is proposed, and a quantitative study on the external cost is performed. Then, an aircraft pushback slot allocation model for minimizing the total surface cost is established. An improved discrete differential evolution algorithm is also designed. Finally, a simulation is performed on Xinzheng International Airport using the proposed model. By comparing the pushback slot control strategy based on congestion pricing with other strategies, the advantages of the proposed model and algorithm are highlighted. In addition to reducing delays and optimizing the delay distribution, the model and algorithm are better suited for use for actual aircraft pushback management during rush hour. Further, it is also observed they do not result in significant increases in the surface cost. These results confirm the effectiveness and suitability of the proposed model and algorithm. PMID:28114429

  8. Task allocation among multiple intelligent robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, L.; Bekey, G.

    1987-01-01

    Researchers describe the design of a decentralized mechanism for allocating assembly tasks in a multiple robot assembly workstation. Currently, the approach focuses on distributed allocation to explore its feasibility and its potential for adaptability to changing circumstances, rather than for optimizing throughput. Individual greedy robots make their own local allocation decisions using both dynamic allocation policies which propagate through a network of allocation goals, and local static and dynamic constraints describing which robots are elibible for which assembly tasks. Global coherence is achieved by proper weighting of allocation pressures propagating through the assembly plan. Deadlock avoidance and synchronization is achieved using periodic reassessments of local allocation decisions, ageing of allocation goals, and short-term allocation locks on goals.

  9. The transcription factor FBI-1 inhibits SAM68-mediated BCL-X alternative splicing and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Pamela; Busà, Roberta; Di Stasi, Savino M; Munoz, Manuel J; Botti, Flavia; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Sette, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is tightly coupled to transcription for the majority of human genes. However, how these two processes are linked is not well understood. Here, we unveil a direct role for the transcription factor FBI-1 in the regulation of AS. FBI-1 interacts with the splicing factor SAM68 and reduces its binding to BCL-X mRNA. This, in turn, results in the selection of the proximal 5' splice site in BCL-X exon 2, thereby favoring the anti-apoptotic BCL-XL variant and counteracting SAM68-mediated apoptosis. Conversely, depletion of FBI-1, or expression of a SAM68 mutant lacking the FBI-1 binding region, restores the ability of SAM68 to induce BCL-XS splicing and apoptosis. FBI-1's role in splicing requires the activity of histone deacetylases, whose pharmacological inhibition recapitulates the effects of FBI-1 knockdown. Our study reveals an unexpected function for FBI-1 in splicing modulation with a direct impact on cell survival.

  10. 16. (4'X5' image enlarged from 2 1/4' negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. (4'X5' image enlarged from 2 1/4' negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE). DETAIL OF TURN-SPAN MECHANISM. - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  11. 15. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) PIVOT PIER - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  12. 13. (4'X5' image enlarged from 2 1/4' negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. (4'X5' image enlarged from 2 1/4' negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) NORTH SIDE ELEVATION. - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  13. 17. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) APPROACH SPAN FENDER - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  14. 12. (4'X5' image enlarged from 2 1/4' negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. (4'X5' image enlarged from 2 1/4' negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) SOUTH SIDE ELEVATION. - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  15. 14. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) TURN-SPAN AND LOCKING MECHANISM - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  16. The formation of ACC and competition between polyamines and ethylene for SAM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethylene biosynthesis involves the conversion of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) by ACC synthase (ACS). ACC is then converted to ethylene. The genes that encode enzymes in this pathway all belong to a family of genes. Differential transcriptional regulation ...

  17. Initial SAM calibration gas experiments on Mars: Quadrupole mass spectrometer results and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Heather B.; Trainer, Melissa G.; Malespin, Charles A.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Becker, Richard H.; Benna, Mehdi; Conrad, Pamela G.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Freissinet, Caroline; Manning, Heidi L. K.; Prats, Benito D.; Raaen, Eric; Wong, Michael H.

    2017-04-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover is equipped to analyze both martian atmospheric gases and volatiles released by pyrolysis of solid surface materials, with target measurements including chemical and isotopic composition (Mahaffy et al., 2012). To facilitate assessment of instrument performance and validation of results obtained on Mars, SAM houses a calibration cell containing CO2, Ar, N2, Xe, and several fluorinated hydrocarbon compounds (Franz et al., 2014; Mahaffy et al., 2012). This report describes the first two experiments utilizing this calibration cell on Mars and gives results from analysis of data acquired with the SAM Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS). These data support the accuracy of isotope ratios obtained with the QMS (Conrad et al., 2016; Mahaffy et al., 2013) and provide ground-truth for reassessment of analytical constants required for atmospheric measurements, which were reported in previous contributions (Franz et al., 2015, 2014). The most significant implication of the QMS data involves reinterpretation of pre-launch contamination previously believed to affect only CO abundance measurements (Franz et al., 2015) to affect N2 abundances, as well. The corresponding adjustment to the N2 calibration constant presented here brings the atmospheric volume mixing ratios for Ar and N2 retrieved by SAM into closer agreement with those reported by the Viking mission (Owen et al., 1977; Oyama and Berdahl, 1977).

  18. Statement of Facts for 1977 City-Wide Mock Trial Competitions. Walker Thomas v. Sam Nomad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Citizen Education in the Law, Washington, DC.

    Prepared by the District of Columbia Street Law Project for its annual city-wide mock trial competition, this instructional handout provides material for a civil case over an automobile accident. Walker Thomas is suing Sam Nomad for damages that resulted from a collision, for which both parties blame the other. The handout clarifies the laws and…

  19. 77 FR 187 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Transition to the System for Award Management (SAM)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ...: Deletes the definition at 2.101 for ``business partner network,'' which is no longer necessary in the SAM architecture. Deletes reference to ``business partner network'' at 4.1100, Scope, which is no longer necessary....101, in paragraph (b)(2) by removing the definition ``Business Partner Network (BPN)'' and...

  20. What can we learn from Wet Chemistry onboard the Mars Science Laboratory SAM Suite?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.; Szopa, C.; Coll, P.; Eigenbrode, J.; Coscia, D.; Navarro Gonzalez, R.; Cabane, M.; MSL Science Team

    2013-09-01

    Direct pyrolysis of Mars soil samples has been used up today today to analyse their content in volatile molecules. However, this technique has been shown to have limitation for the analysis of a few chemical families, or macromolecules. The SAM experiment is the first space instrument onboarding a device based on wet chemistry to overcome this limitation.

  1. Treating Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Schizophrenia: The Case of Sam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peasley-Miklus, Catherine; Massie, Elise; Baslett, Gaston; Carmin, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the case of Sam, a 22-year-old male with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and schizophrenia. The patient's background, the development and characteristics of his OCD and schizophrenia, and the history of what became a rather complicated treatment are described. In addition, four problem areas of therapy are identified.

  2. 19. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE). NAVIGATIONAL LIGHT LOCATED ON TOP OF FENDER - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  3. Constraints on the Mineralogy of Gale Crater Mudstones from MSL SAM Evolved Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Sutter, B.; Franz, H. B.; Hogancamp, J. V. (Clark); Knudson, C. A.; Andrejkovicova, S.; Archer, P. D.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Ming, D. W.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2017-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) have analysed more than 150 micron fines from 14 sites at Gale Crater. Here we focus on the mudstone samples. Two were drilled from sites John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB) in the Sheepbed mudstone. Six were drilled from Murray Formation mudstone: Confidence Hills (CH), Mojave (MJ), Telegraph Peak (TP), Buckskin (BK), Oudam (OU), Marimba (MB). SAM's evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS) detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, and other trace gases, including organic fragments. The identity and evolution temperature of evolved gases can support CheMin mineral detection and place constraints on trace volatile-bearing phases or phases difficult to characterize with X-ray diffraction (e.g., amorphous phases). Here we will focus on SAM H2O data and comparisons to SAM-like analyses of key reference materials.

  4. Mercury astronaut John Glenn at the Sam Houston Colosseum, Houston, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Mercury astronaut John H. Glenn Jr., wearing a new cowboy hat and a badge in the shape of a star, leafs through his program as he is served his food at the Sam Houston Colosseum. A large crowd was on hand to welcome them to Houston, Texas.

  5. Mechanism elucidation of the radical SAM enzyme spore photoproduct lyase (SPL)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) repairs a special thymine dimer 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, which is commonly called spore photoproduct or SP at the bacterial early germination phase. SP is the exclusive DNA photo-damage product in bacterial endospores; its generation and swift repair by SPL are responsible for the spores’ extremely high UV resistance. The early in vivo studies suggested that SPL utilizes a direct reversal strategy to repair the SP in the absence of light. The research in the past decade further established SPL as a radical SAM enzyme, which utilizes a tri-cysteine CXXXCXXC motif to harbor a [4Fe-4S] cluster. At the 1+ oxidation state, the cluster provides an electron to the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which binds to the cluster in a bidentate manner as the fourth and fifth ligands, to reductively cleave the C-S bond associated with the sulfonium ion in SAM, generating a reactive 5′-deoxyadenosyl (5′-dA) radical. This 5′-dA radical abstracts the proR hydrogen atom from the C6 carbon of SP to initiate the repair process; the resulting SP radical subsequently fragments to generate a putative thymine methyl radical, which accepts a back-donated H atom to yield the repaired TpT. SAM is suggested to be regenerated at the end of each catalytic cycle; and only a catalytic amount of SAM is needed in the SPL reaction. The H atom source for the back donation step is suggested to be a cysteine residue (C141 in B. subtilis SPL), and the H-atom transfer reaction leaves a thiyl radical behind on the protein. This thiyl radical thus must participate in the SAM regeneration process; however how the thiyl radical abstracts an H atom from the 5′-dA to regenerate SAM is unknown. This paper reviews and discusses the history and the latest progress in the mechanistic elucidation of SPL. Despite some recent breakthroughs, more questions are raised in the mechanistic understanding of this intriguing DNA repair enzyme. PMID:22197590

  6. The Discipline of Asset Allocation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petzel, Todd E.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of asset allocation for college/university endowment funds focuses on three levels of risk: (1) the absolute risk of the portfolio (usually leading to asset diversification); (2) the benchmark risk (usually comparison with peer institutions; and (3) personal career risk (which may incline managers toward maximizing short-term returns,…

  7. Administrators' Decisions about Resource Allocation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, William E.; Folkins, John W.; Hakel, Milton D.; Kennell, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    Do academic administrators make decisions about resource allocation differently depending on the discipline receiving the funding? Does an administrator's academic identity influence these decisions? This study explored those questions with a sample of 1,690 academic administrators at doctoral-research universities. Participants used fictional…

  8. Regulating nutrient allocation in plants

    DOEpatents

    Udvardi, Michael; Yang, Jiading; Worley, Eric

    2014-12-09

    The invention provides coding and promoter sequences for a VS-1 and AP-2 gene, which affects the developmental process of senescence in plants. Vectors, transgenic plants, seeds, and host cells comprising heterologous VS-1 and AP-2 genes are also provided. Additionally provided are methods of altering nutrient allocation and composition in a plant using the VS-1 and AP-2 genes.

  9. Resource Allocation: A Participatory Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Alban E.

    Whether a participatory process for resource allocation in a public community college setting occurs depends upon several key factors: (1) the leadership style of the institutional chief executive officer; (2) the administrative organizational structure of the institution; (3) the relationship which exists between and among members of the various…

  10. Determination of the Possible Source of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons Detected By SAM during MSL Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.; Belmahdi, I.; Szopa, C.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Francois, P.; Coll, P. J.; Miller, K.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Stern, J. C.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; McAdam, A.; Teinturier, S.; Bonnet, J. Y.; Summons, R. E.; Millan, M.; Dequaire, T.; Cabane, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    The SAM GC-MS instrument on the Curiosity rover allows to analyze volatile compounds from the atmosphere or volatile compounds from the Martian regolith and refractory compounds in the regolith after sample treatment using wet chemistry. One portion of the wet chemistry experiment is composed of MTBSTFA (N-methyl-N-tert-butyldimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide) / DMF (dimethylformamide). Abundant chlorinated hydrocarbons have been detected with SAM when analyzing samples collected in several sites explored by Curiosity rover. Some of these chlorohydrocarbons are produced during pyrolysis by the reaction of Martian oxychlorine compounds in the samples with terrestrial carbon from a derivatization agent (MTBSTFA) used in SAM (1, 2). Chlorobenzene cannot be formed by the direct reaction of MTBSTFA and DMF when heated in the presence of fused silica and perchlorates under SAM-like conditions (1)) therefore two other reaction pathways for chlorobenzene were proposed : (1) reactions between the volatile thermal degradation products of perchlorates (e.g. O2, Cl2 and HCl) and Tenax® and (2) the interaction of perchlorates with organic material from the martian regolith such as benzenecarboxylates (3, 4). This study investigates several propositions for chlorinated hydrocarbon formation by looking for: (1) all products coming from the interaction of Tenax® (which is part of the SAM hydrocarbon trap) and perchlorates, (2) also between some soil sample and perchlorates in the presence or absence of MTBSTFA and (c) sources of chlorinated hydrocarbon precursors. References: 1. D. P. Glavin et al.(2013) JGR 118, 1955-1973. 2. L. a Leshin et al. (2013) Science 341, 1238937. 3. C. Freissinet et al. (2014) LPSC XXXXV Abstract 2796. 4. D. Glavin et al. (2014) LPSC XXXV Abstract #1157.

  11. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of the SAMS gene during adventitious root development in IBA-induced tetraploid black locust.

    PubMed

    Quan, Jine; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Chunxia; Meng, Sen; Zhao, Zhong; Xu, Xuexuan

    2014-01-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAMS) catalyzes the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a precursor for ethylene and polyamine biosynthesis. Here, we report the isolation of the 1498 bp full-length cDNA sequence encoding tetraploid black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) SAMS (TrbSAMS), which contains an open reading frame of 1179 bp encoding 392 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of TrbSAMS has more than 94% sequence identity to SAMSs from other plants, with a closer phylogenetic relationship to SAMSs from legumes than to SAMS from other plants. The TrbSAMS monomer consists of N-terminal, central, and C-terminal domains. Subcellular localization analysis revealed that the TrbSAMS protein localizes mainly to in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of onion epidermal cells and Arabidopsis mesophyll cell protoplasts. Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA)-treated cuttings showed higher levels of TrbSAMS transcript than untreated control cuttings during root primordium and adventitious root formation. TrbSAMS and its downstream genes showed differential expression in shoots, leaves, bark, and roots, with the highest expression observed in bark. IBA-treated cuttings also showed higher SAMS activity than control cuttings during root primordium and adventitious root formation. These results indicate that TrbSAMS might play an important role in the regulation of IBA-induced adventitious root development in tetraploid black locust cuttings.

  12. Partitioning of resources: the evolutionary genetics of sexual conflict over resource acquisition and allocation.

    PubMed

    Zajitschek, F; Connallon, T

    2017-04-01

    Fitness depends on both the resources that individuals acquire and the allocation of those resources to traits that influence survival and reproduction. Optimal resource allocation differs between females and males as a consequence of their fundamentally different reproductive strategies. However, because most traits have a common genetic basis between the sexes, conflicting selection between the sexes over resource allocation can constrain the evolution of optimal allocation within each sex, and generate trade-offs for fitness between them (i.e. 'sexual antagonism' or 'intralocus sexual conflict'). The theory of resource acquisition and allocation provides an influential framework for linking genetic variation in acquisition and allocation to empirical evidence of trade-offs between distinct life-history traits. However, these models have not considered the emergence of trade-offs within the context of sexual dimorphism, where they are expected to be particularly common. Here, we extend acquisition-allocation theory and develop a quantitative genetic framework for predicting genetically based trade-offs between life-history traits within sexes and between female and male fitness. Our models demonstrate that empirically measurable evidence of sexually antagonistic fitness variation should depend upon three interacting factors that may vary between populations: (1) the genetic variances and between-sex covariances for resource acquisition and allocation traits, (2) condition-dependent expression of resource allocation traits and (3) sex differences in selection on the allocation of resource to different fitness components.

  13. Analogue Experiments Identify Possible Precursor Compounds for Chlorohydrocarbons Detected in SAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K.; Summons, R. E.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Martin, M. G.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    Since landing at Gale Crater on August 6, 2012, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite, aboard the Curiosity Rover, has conducted multiple analyses of scooped and drilled samples and has identified a suite of chlorohydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene (Glavin et al., 2013; Leshin et al., 2013). These compounds were identified after samples were pyrolysed at temperatures up to ~835°C through a combination of Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA) and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GCMS). Since these chlorinated species were well above the background levels determined by empty cup blanks analyzed prior to solid sample analyses, thermal degradation of oxychlorine phases, such as perchlorate, present in the Martian soil, are the most likely source of chlorine needed to generate these chlorohydrocarbons. Laboratory analogue experiments show that terrestrial organics internal to SAM, such as N-methyl-N(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a derivatization agent, can react with perchlorates to produce all of the chlorohydrocarbons detected by SAM. However, in pyrolysis-trap-GCMS laboratory experiments with MTBSTFA, C4 compounds are the predominant chlorohydrocarbon observed, whereas on SAM the C1 chlorohydrocarbons dominate (Glavin et al., 2013). This, in addition to the previous identification of chloromethane and dichloromethane by the 1976 Viking missions (Biemann et al., 1977), suggest that there could be another, possibly Martian, source of organic carbon contributing to the formation of the C1 chlorohydrocarbons, or other components of the solid samples analyzed by SAM are having a catalytic effect on chlorohydrocarbon generation. Laboratory analogue experiments investigated a suite of organic compounds that have the potential to accumulate on Mars (Benner et al., 2000) and thus serve as sources of carbon for the formation of chlorohydrocarbons detected by the SAM and

  14. The egg-sharing model for human therapeutic cloning research: managing donor selection criteria, the proportion of shared oocytes allocated to research, and amount of financial subsidy given to the donor.

    PubMed

    Heng, Boon Chin; Tong, Guo Qing; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in human therapeutic cloning made by Hwang and colleagues have opened up new avenues of therapy for various human diseases. However, the major bottleneck of this new technology is the severe shortage of human donor oocytes. Egg-sharing in return for subsidized fertility treatment has been suggested as an ethically justifiable and practical solution to overcome the shortage of donor oocytes for therapeutic cloning. Because the utilization of shared oocytes in therapeutic cloning research does not result in any therapeutic benefit to a second party, this would necessitate a different management strategy compared to their use for the assisted conception of infertile women who are unable to produce any oocytes of their own. It is proposed that the pool of prospective egg-sharers in therapeutic cloning research be limited only to younger women (below 30 years of age) with indications for either male partner sub-fertility or tubal blockage. With regards to the proportion of the shared gametes being allocated to research, a threshold number of retrieved oocytes should be set that if not exceeded, would result in the patient being automatically removed from the egg-sharing scheme. Any excess supernumerary oocyte above this threshold number can be contributed to science, and allocation should be done in a randomized manner. Perhaps, a total of 10 retrieved oocytes from the patient may be considered a suitable threshold, since the chances of conception are unlikely to be impaired. With regards to the amount of subsidy being given to the patient, it is suggested that the proportion of financial subsidy should be equal to the proportion of the patient's oocytes being allocated to research. No doubt, the promise of future therapeutic benefit may be offered to the patient instead of financial subsidy. However, this is ethically controversial because therapeutic cloning has not yet been demonstrated to be a viable model of clinical therapy and any promises made to

  15. Sam68/KHDRBS1 is critical for colon tumorigenesis by regulating genotoxic stress-induced NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Kai; Sun, Xin; Wier, Eric M; Hodgson, Andrea; Liu, Yue; Sears, Cynthia L; Wan, Fengyi

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-mediated transcription is an important mediator for cellular responses to DNA damage. Genotoxic agents trigger a 'nuclear-to-cytoplasmic' NF-κB activation signaling pathway; however, the early nuclear signaling cascade linking DNA damage and NF-κB activation is poorly understood. Here we report that Src-associated-substrate-during-mitosis-of-68kDa/KH domain containing, RNA binding, signal transduction associated 1 (Sam68/KHDRBS1) is a key NF-κB regulator in genotoxic stress-initiated signaling pathway. Sam68 deficiency abolishes DNA damage-stimulated polymers of ADP-ribose (PAR) production and the PAR-dependent NF-κB transactivation of anti-apoptotic genes. Sam68 deleted cells are hypersensitive to genotoxicity caused by DNA damaging agents. Upregulated Sam68 coincides with elevated PAR production and NF-κB-mediated anti-apoptotic transcription in human and mouse colon cancer. Knockdown of Sam68 sensitizes human colon cancer cells to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis and genetic deletion of Sam68 dampens colon tumor burden in mice. Together our data reveal a novel function of Sam68 in the genotoxic stress-initiated nuclear signaling, which is crucial for colon tumorigenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15018.001 PMID:27458801

  16. Optimal Allocation of Cognitive Resources to Spatial Location

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Marilyn L.; Shaw, Peter

    1977-01-01

    From experiments showing that subjects differentially attend to parts of the visual field, psychologists have inferred a limitation on human visual information processing capacity. The model presented describes an optimal way to allocate a limited quantity of "cognitive resources", "attention" or "mental effort". An experiment tests this model.…

  17. Measuring health indicators and allocating health resources: a DEA-based approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Ching

    2016-02-03

    This paper suggests new empirical DEA models for the measurement of health indicators and the allocation of health resources. The proposed models were developed by first suggesting a population-based health indicator. By introducing the suggested indicator into DEA models, a new approach that solves the problem of health resource allocation has been developed. The proposed models are applied to an empirical study of Taiwan's health system. Empirical findings show that the suggested indicator can successfully accommodate the differences in health resource demands between populations, providing more reliable performance information than traditional indicators such as physician density. Using our models and a commonly used allocation mechanism, capitation, to allocate medical expenditures, it is found that the proposed model always obtains higher performance than those derived from capitation, and the superiority increases as allocated expenditures rise.

  18. 10 CFR 455.31 - Allocation formulas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS AND BUILDINGS OWNED BY... conservation measures, including renewable resource measures, for schools and hospitals, shall be allocated... percent of all amounts allocated in any grant program cycle. No State will be allocated more than...

  19. 42 CFR 457.228 - Cost allocation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cost allocation. 457.228 Section 457.228 Public...; Reduction of Federal Medical Payments § 457.228 Cost allocation. A State plan must provide that the single or appropriate CHIP Agency will have an approved cost allocation plan on file with the Department...

  20. 42 CFR 433.34 - Cost allocation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cost allocation. 433.34 Section 433.34 Public... Provisions § 433.34 Cost allocation. A State plan under Title XIX of the Social Security Act must provide that the single or appropriate Agency will have an approved cost allocation plan on file with...

  1. 50 CFR 600.517 - Allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allocations. 600.517 Section 600.517 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... allocation. The burden of ascertaining and accurately transmitting current allocations and status of...

  2. 50 CFR 600.517 - Allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allocations. 600.517 Section 600.517 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... allocation. The burden of ascertaining and accurately transmitting current allocations and status of...

  3. 50 CFR 600.517 - Allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allocations. 600.517 Section 600.517 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... allocation. The burden of ascertaining and accurately transmitting current allocations and status of...

  4. 24 CFR 945.203 - Allocation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Allocation plan. 945.203 Section... FAMILIES Application and Approval Procedures § 945.203 Allocation plan. (a) Applicable terminology. (1) As used in this section, the terms “initial allocation plan” refers to the PHA's first submission of...

  5. Early Results from the Curiosity Rover's SAM Investigation at Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Webster, Chris; Cabane, Michael; Coll, Patrice

    2013-04-01

    The goals of the Mars Science Laboratory Mission (1, 2) are to explore the potential of the Gale Crater landing site to support life either in the distant past or the present. The contribution of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite (3) in this exploration of habitability is (A) to search for organic compounds in rocks and soils, (B) to determine the composition of inorganic volatiles compounds in the atmosphere or extracted from solid materials, and (C) to measure the isotopic composition of several of these volatiles. While prime exploration targets of MSL's Curiosity Rover are the layers in the central mound (Mt. Sharp) of Gale crater the initial exploration of region near the landing point has revealed a diverse geology and the early part of the mission has been spent both commissioning the 10 Curiosity instruments and the Rover subsystems and making first time measurements of both atmospheric and solid samples. SAM is located in the interior of MSL's Curiosity rover next to the XRD/XRF CheMin instrument. A variety of imaging, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, and elemental analysis instrumentation serves to locate sampling sites and interogate candidate materials before solid sample is collected either with a drill or a scoop for delivery to SAM and CheMin. SAM's instruments are a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS), and a 6-column gas chromatograph (GC). These are coupled through a solid sample transport system and a gas processing and enrichment system. The SAM suite is able to measure a suite of light isotopes and to analyze volatiles directly from the atmosphere or thermally released from solid samples. Early results from SAM atmospheric runs include a determination of: new volume mixing ratios for the 5 major isotopic constituents showing Ar approximately equal to N2; an upper limit of 3.5 ppb for the volume mixing ratio of methane; C and O isotope ratios showing both heavier than terrestrial averages

  6. Early Evolved Gas Results from the Curiosity Rover’s SAM Investigation at Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Franz, H.; McAdam, A.; Brunner, A.; Eigenbrode, J.; Stern, J.; SAM Science Team; MSL Science Team

    2013-10-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Mission is designed to explore the habitability of the selected landing site at Gale crater. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite contributes to this study with a search for organic compounds, an analysis of the composition of inorganic volatiles, and measurements of the isotopic composition light elements. Both atmospheric and solid samples are analyzed. The layers in the central mound (Mt. Sharp) of Gale crater are important targets for the MSL mission. However, in situ measurements made during the past year of interesting regions close to the Bradbury landing site have revealed a diverse geology and several primary mission objectives have already been realized. SAM is located in the interior of the Curiosity rover. The MSL cameras, a laser induced breakdown spectrometer, and elemental analysis instrumentation serves to locate sampling sites and interogate candidate materials before solid sample is collected either with a drill or a scoop for delivery to SAM and the XRD instrument CheMin. SAM integrates a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS), and a 6-column gas chromatograph (GC) with a solid sample transport system and a gas processing and enrichment system. Results of SAM atmospheric composition analyses have already been reported (1,2). To date, multiple SAM evolved gas experiments have examined samples from fines scooped from an aeolian drift and from two drilled samples of a mudstone. Major evolved gases are H2O, CO2, O2, SO2, H2S, H2, and a number of minor species. These data help confirm the likely presence of perchlorates, the presence of phylosillicates, and both reduced and oxidized compounds evolved from the same sample. 1) P.R. Mahaffy et al., Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Gases in the Martian Atmosphere from the Curiosity Rover, Science 343, (2013). 2) C.R. Webster et al., Isotope Ratios of H, C and O in Martian Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Water Measured by the

  7. Using Regression Analysis in Departmental Budget Allocations. IR Applications, Volume 24, November 1, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luna, Andrew L.; Brennan, Kelly A.

    2009-01-01

    This study uses a regression model to determine if a significant difference exists between the actual budget allocation that an academic department received and the model's predicted budget allocation for that same department. Budget data from a Southeastern Master's/Comprehensive state university were used as the dependent variable, and the…

  8. Communication patterns and allocation strategies.

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Vitus Joseph; Mache, Jens Wolfgang; Bunde, David P.

    2004-01-01

    Motivated by observations about job runtimes on the CPlant system, we use a trace-driven microsimulator to begin characterizing the performance of different classes of allocation algorithms on jobs with different communication patterns in space-shared parallel systems with mesh topology. We show that relative performance varies considerably with communication pattern. The Paging strategy using the Hilbert space-filling curve and the Best Fit heuristic performed best across several communication patterns.

  9. Algorithms for optimal redundancy allocation

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenkieboom, J.; Youngblood, R.

    1993-01-01

    Heuristic and exact methods for solving the redundancy allocation problem are compared to an approach based on genetic algorithms. The various methods are applied to the bridge problem, which has been used as a benchmark in earlier work on optimization methods. Comparisons are presented in terms of the best configuration found by each method, and the computation effort which was necessary in order to find it.

  10. Solving the optimal attention allocation problem in manual control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinman, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    Within the context of the optimal control model of human response, analytic expressions for the gradients of closed-loop performance metrics with respect to human operator attention allocation are derived. These derivatives serve as the basis for a gradient algorithm that determines the optimal attention that a human should allocate among several display indicators in a steady-state manual control task. Application of the human modeling techniques are made to study the hover control task for a CH-46 VTOL flight tested by NASA.

  11. Successful treatment tailored to each splanchnic arterial lesion due to segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM): report of a case.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Deguchi, Juno; Endo, Hisako; Miyata, Tetsuro

    2008-11-01

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is a rare condition characterized by splanchnic arterial catastrophe caused by mediolysis. We report a 59-year-old man with a ruptured splenic arterial aneurysm who was successfully treated by coil embolization. He underwent additional resection of large gastroepiploic and residual splenic aneurysms. Pathological examination showed mediolysis and tearing, compatible with SAM. Furthermore, he developed acute dissection of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) one and a half years later, demonstrated by computed tomography. This report demonstrates that SAM is characterized by multiple lesions of the splanchnic arteries at different times, and requires treatment suited to the lesions, including careful long-term observation.

  12. Curiosity's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Investigation: Overview of Results from the First 120 Sols on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Cabane, M.; Webster, C. R.; Archer, P. D.; Atreya, S. K.; Benna, M.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Brunner, A. E.; Buch, A.; Coll, P.; Conrad, P. G.; Coscia, D.; Dobson, N.; Dworkin, J. P.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Farley, K. A.; Flesch, G.; Franz, H. B.; Freissinet, C.; Gorevan, S.; Glavin, D. P.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Harpold, D. N.; Hengemihle, J.; Jaeger, F.

    2013-01-01

    During the first 120 sols of Curiosity s landed mission on Mars (8/6/2012 to 12/7/2012) SAM sampled the atmosphere 9 times and an eolian bedform named Rocknest 4 times. The atmospheric experiments utilized SAM s quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and tunable laser spectrometer (TLS) while the solid sample experiments also utilized the gas chromatograph (GC). Although a number of core experiments were pre-programmed and stored in EEProm, a high level SAM scripting language enabled the team to optimize experiments based on prior runs.

  13. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous Metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Control

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J

    2007-01-12

    This report describes the analysis and modeling approaches used in the evaluation for criticality-control applications of the neutron-absorbing structural-amorphous metal (SAM) coatings. The applications of boron-containing high-performance corrosion-resistant material (HPCRM)--amorphous metal as the neutron-absorbing coatings to the metallic support structure can enhance criticality safety controls for spent nuclear fuel in baskets inside storage containers, transportation casks, and disposal containers. The use of these advanced iron-based, corrosion-resistant materials to prevent nuclear criticality in transportation, aging, and disposal containers would be extremely beneficial to the nuclear waste management programs.

  14. Prey risk allocation in a grazing ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Gude, Justin A; Garrott, Robert A; Borkowski, John J; King, Fred

    2006-02-01

    Understanding the behaviorally mediated indirect effects of predators in ecosystems requires knowledge of predator-prey behavioral interactions. In predator-ungulate-plant systems, empirical research quantifying how predators affect ungulate group sizes and distribution, in the context of other influential variables, is particularly needed. The risk allocation hypothesis proposes that prey behavioral responses to predation risk depend on background frequencies of exposure to risk, and it can be used to make predictions about predator-ungulate-plant interactions. We determined non-predation variables that affect elk (Cervus elaphus) group sizes and distribution on a winter range in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) using logistic and log-linear regression on surveys of 513 1-km2 areas conducted over two years. Employing model selection techniques, we evaluated risk allocation and other a priori hypotheses of elk group size and distributional responses to wolf (Canis lupus) predation risk while accounting for influential non-wolf-predation variables. We found little evidence that wolves affect elk group sizes, which were strongly influenced by habitat type and hunting by humans. Following predictions from the risk allocation hypothesis, wolves likely created a more dynamic elk distribution in areas that they frequently hunted, as elk tended to move following wolf encounters in those areas. This response should dilute elk foraging pressure on plant communities in areas where they are frequently hunted by wolves. We predict that this should decrease the spatial heterogeneity of elk impacts on grasslands in areas that wolves frequently hunt. We also predict that this should decrease browsing pressure on heavily browsed woody plant stands in certain areas, which is supported by recent research in the GYE.

  15. Effects of adaptive task allocation on monitoring of automated systems.

    PubMed

    Parasuraman, R; Mouloua, M; Molloy, R

    1996-12-01

    The effects of adaptive task allocation on monitoring for automation failure during multitask flight simulation were examined. Participants monitored an automated engine status task while simultaneously performing tracking and fuel management tasks over three 30-min sessions. Two methods of adaptive task allocation, both involving temporary return of the automated engine status task to the human operator ("human control"), were examined as a possible countermeasure to monitoring inefficiency. For the model-based adaptive group, the engine status task was allocated to all participants in the middle of the second session for 10 min, following which it was again returned to automation control. The same occurred for the performance-based adaptive group, but only if an individual participant's monitoring performance up to that point did not meet a specified criterion. For the nonadaptive control groups, the engine status task remained automated throughout the experiment. All groups had low probabilities of detection of automation failures for the first 40 min spent with automation. However, following the 10-min intervening period of human control, both adaptive groups detected significantly more automation failures during the subsequent blocks under automation control. The results show that adaptive task allocation can enhance monitoring of automated systems. Both model-based and performance-based allocation improved monitoring of automation. Implications for the design of automated systems are discussed.

  16. Supply chain carbon footprinting and responsibility allocation under emission regulations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Xiao; Chen, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions has become an enormous challenge for any single enterprise and its supply chain because of the increasing concern on global warming. This paper investigates carbon footprinting and responsibility allocation for supply chains involved in joint production. Our study is conducted from the perspective of a social planner who aims to achieve social value optimization. The carbon footprinting model is based on operational activities rather than on firms because joint production blurs the organizational boundaries of footprints. A general model is proposed for responsibility allocation among firms who seek to maximize individual profits. This study looks into ways for the decentralized supply chain to achieve centralized optimality of social value under two emission regulations. Given a balanced allocation for the entire supply chain, we examine the necessity of over-allocation to certain firms under specific situations and find opportunities for the firms to avoid over-allocation. The comparison of the two regulations reveals that setting an emission standard per unit of product will motivate firms to follow the standard and improve their emission efficiencies. Hence, a more efficient and promising policy is needed in contrast to existing regulations on total production.

  17. Innovative Approach for Developing Spacecraft Interior Acoustic Requirement Allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, S. Reynold; Dandaroy, Indranil; Allen, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is an American spacecraft for carrying four astronauts during deep space missions. This paper describes an innovative application of Power Injection Method (PIM) for allocating Orion cabin continuous noise Sound Pressure Level (SPL) limits to the sound power level (PWL) limits of major noise sources in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) during all mission phases. PIM is simulated using both Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) and Hybrid Statistical Energy Analysis-Finite Element (SEA-FE) models of the Orion MPCV to obtain the transfer matrix from the PWL of the noise sources to the acoustic energies of the receivers, i.e., the cavities associated with the cabin habitable volume. The goal of the allocation strategy is to control the total energy of cabin habitable volume for maintaining the required SPL limits. Simulations are used to demonstrate that applying the allocated PWLs to the noise sources in the models indeed reproduces the SPL limits in the habitable volume. The effects of Noise Control Treatment (NCT) on allocated noise source PWLs are investigated. The measurement of source PWLs of involved fan and pump development units are also discussed as it is related to some case-specific details of the allocation strategy discussed here.

  18. Resource-dependent sex-allocation in a simultaneous hermaphrodite.

    PubMed

    Vizoso, D B; Schärer, L

    2007-05-01

    Most sex allocation theory is based on the relationship between the resource investment into male and female reproduction and the consequent fitness returns (often called fitness-gain curves). Here we investigate the effects of resource availability on the sex allocation of a simultaneously hermaphroditic animal, the free-living flatworm Macrostomum lignano. We kept the worms under different resource levels and determined the size of their testes and ovaries over a period of time. At higher resource levels, worms allocated relatively more into the female function, suggesting a saturating male fitness-gain curve for this species. A large part of the observed effect was due to a correlated increase in body size, showing size-dependent sex allocation in M. lignano. However, a significant part of the overall effect was independent of body size, and therefore likely due to the differences in resource availability. Moreover, in accordance with a saturating male fitness-gain curve, the worms developed the male gonads first. As the group size was kept constant, our results contrast with expectations from sex allocation models that deal with local mate competition alone, and with previous experiments that test these models.

  19. Evolved Gas Analyses of Sedimentary Materials in Gale Crater, Mars: Results of the Curiosity Rover's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument from Yellowknife Bay to the Stimson Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; McAdam, A. C.; Rampe, E. B.; Ming, D. W.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Stern, J. C.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Archer, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument aboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover has analyzed 10 samples from Gale Crater. All SAM evolved gas analyses have yielded a multitude of volatiles (e.g, H2O, SO2, H2S, CO2, CO, NO, O2, HC1). The objectives of this work are to 1) Characterize the evolved H2O, SO2, CO2, and O2 gas traces of sediments analyzed by SAM through sol 1178, 2) Constrain sediment mineralogy/composition based on SAM evolved gas analysis (SAM-EGA), and 3) Discuss the implications of these results releative to understanding the geochemical history of Gale Crater.

  20. Allocating funds for HIV/AIDS: a descriptive study of KwaDukuza, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Lasry, Arielle; Carter, Michael W; Zaric, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    Objective Through a descriptive study, we determined the factors that influence the decision-making process for allocating funds to HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment programmes, and the extent to which formal decision tools are used in the municipality of KwaDukuza, South Africa. Methods We conducted 35 key informant interviews in KwaDukuza. The interview questions addressed specific resource allocation issues while allowing respondents to speak openly about the complexities of the HIV/AIDS resource allocation process. Results Donors have a large influence on the decision-making process for HIV/AIDS resource allocation. However, advocacy groups, governmental bodies and local communities also play an important role. Political power, culture and ethics are among a set of intangible factors that have a strong influence on HIV/AIDS resource allocation. Formal methods, including needs assessment, best practice approaches, epidemiologic modelling and cost-effectiveness analysis are sometimes used to support the HIV/AIDS resource allocation process. Historical spending patterns are an important consideration in future HIV/AIDS allocation strategies. Conclusions Several factors and groups influence resource allocation in KwaDukuza. Although formal economic and epidemiologic information is sometimes used, in most cases other factors are more important for resource allocation decision-making. These other factors should be considered in any attempts to improve the resource allocation processes. PMID:20551138

  1. Allocating Variability and Reserve Requirements (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, B.; King, J.; Milligan, M.

    2011-10-01

    This presentation describes how you could conceivably allocate variability and reserve requirements, including how to allocate aggregation benefits. Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Aggregation provides benefits because individual requirements are not 100% correlated; (2) Method needed to allocate reduced requirement among participants; (3) Differences between allocation results are subtle - (a) Not immediately obvious which method is 'better'; (b) Many are numerically 'correct', they sum to the physical requirement; (c) Many are not 'fair', Results depend on sub-aggregation and/or the order individuals are included; and (4) Vector allocation method is simple and fair.

  2. Updates to the Demographic and Spatial Allocation Models to Produce Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios (Iclus) (Version 2) (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA's Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios (ICLUS) version 2 (v2) modeling tool furthered land change modeling by providing nationwide housing development scenarios up to 2100. ICLUS V2 includes updated population and land use data sets and addressing limitations i...

  3. Polar stratospheric cloud sightings by SAM II. [Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement onboard Nimbus 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Steele, H. M.; Hamill, P.; Swissler, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    The functions and data gained regarding stratospheric cloud sightings by the stratospheric aerosol measurement (SAM) II experiment on board the Numbus 7 spacecraft are reported. SAM II comprises a single channel sun photometer centered at 1.0 micron wavelength for measuring the solar intensity when the sun descends below an apparent 300 km altitude until the sun is occulted by clouds or the horizon. Readings are also made during sunrise in an opposite fashion. Transmission profiles are developed from the data and used to construct profiles of aerosol extinction with a 1 km resolution. Polar stratospheric clouds have been observed in more than 90% of the cases when the minimum temperature is 185 K or less, and 45% of the time when the temperature is 193 K or less. The clouds were more prevalent in the Antarctic winter than during the Arctic winter, and cloud height was lower than indicated by previous data.

  4. Catch-and-Release of Target Cells Using Aptamer-Conjugated Electroactive Zwitterionic Oligopeptide SAM

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Junko; Kageyama, Tatsuto; Osaki, Tatsuya; Bonalumi, Flavia; Marchese, Francesca; Gautieri, Alfonso; Bianchi, Elena; Dubini, Gabriele; Arrigoni, Chiara; Moretti, Matteo; Fukuda, Junji

    2017-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamers possess attractive features such as specific molecular recognition, high-affinity binding, and rapid acquisition and replication, which could be feasible components for separating specific cells from other cell types. This study demonstrates that aptamers conjugated to an oligopeptide self-assembled monolayer (SAM) can be used to selectively trap human hepatic cancer cells from cell mixtures containing normal human hepatocytes or human fibroblasts. Molecular dynamics calculations have been performed to understand how the configurations of the aptamers are related to the experimental results of selective cell capture. We further demonstrate that the captured hepatic cancer cells can be detached and collected along with electrochemical desorption of the oligopeptide SAM, and by repeating these catch-and-release processes, target cells can be enriched. This combination of capture with aptamers and detachment with electrochemical reactions is a promising tool in various research fields ranging from basic cancer research to tissue engineering applications. PMID:28266533

  5. Sam the Monkey After His Ride in the Little Joe 2 Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Sam, the Rhesus monkey, after his ride in the Little Joe-2 (LJ-2) spacecraft. A U.S. Navy destroyer safely recovered Sam after he experienced three minutes of weightlessness during the flight. Animals were often used during test flights for Project Mercury to help determine the effects of spaceflight and weightlessness on humans. LJ-2 was one in a series of flights that led up to the human orbital flights of NASA's Project Mercury program. The Little Joe rocket booster was developed as a cheaper, smaller, and more functional alternative to the Redstone rockets. Little Joe could be produced at one-fifth the cost of Redstone rockets and still have enough power to carry a capsule payload. Seven unmanned Little Joe rockets were launched from Wallops Island, Virginia from August 1959 to April 1961.

  6. Catch-and-Release of Target Cells Using Aptamer-Conjugated Electroactive Zwitterionic Oligopeptide SAM.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Junko; Kageyama, Tatsuto; Osaki, Tatsuya; Bonalumi, Flavia; Marchese, Francesca; Gautieri, Alfonso; Bianchi, Elena; Dubini, Gabriele; Arrigoni, Chiara; Moretti, Matteo; Fukuda, Junji

    2017-03-07

    Nucleic acid aptamers possess attractive features such as specific molecular recognition, high-affinity binding, and rapid acquisition and replication, which could be feasible components for separating specific cells from other cell types. This study demonstrates that aptamers conjugated to an oligopeptide self-assembled monolayer (SAM) can be used to selectively trap human hepatic cancer cells from cell mixtures containing normal human hepatocytes or human fibroblasts. Molecular dynamics calculations have been performed to understand how the configurations of the aptamers are related to the experimental results of selective cell capture. We further demonstrate that the captured hepatic cancer cells can be detached and collected along with electrochemical desorption of the oligopeptide SAM, and by repeating these catch-and-release processes, target cells can be enriched. This combination of capture with aptamers and detachment with electrochemical reactions is a promising tool in various research fields ranging from basic cancer research to tissue engineering applications.

  7. Wide Range Vacuum Pumps for the SAM Instrument on the MSL Curiosity Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Paul; Kline-Schoder, Robert; Farley, Rodger

    2014-01-01

    Creare Incorporated and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center developed and space qualified two wide range pumps (WRPs) that were included in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument. This instrument was subsequently integrated into the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) "Curiosity Rover," launched aboard an Atlas V rocket in 2011, and landed on August 6, 2012, in the Gale Crater on Mars. The pumps have now operated for more than 18 months in the Gale Crater and have been evacuating the key components of the SAM instrument: a quadrupole mass spectrometer, a tunable laser spectrometer, and six gas chromatograph columns. In this paper, we describe the main design challenges and the ways in which they were solved. This includes the custom design of a miniaturized, high-speed motor to drive the turbo drag pump rotor, analysis of rotor dynamics for super critical operation, and bearing/lubricant design/selection.

  8. Equatorial semiannual oscillation in zonally averaged temperature observed by the Nimbus 7 SAMS and LIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delisi, Donald P.; Dunkerton, Timothy J.

    1988-04-01

    Zonally averaged equatorial temperatures obtained aboard Nimbus 7 by the stratospheric and mesospheric sounder (SAMS) are compared to comparable data obtained from the limb IR monitor of the stratosphere. The SAMS data are shown to confirm the seasonal asymmetry in semiannual wind regimes previously noted in rocketsonde observations near the equator. Two explanations for the asymmetry are considered: (1) an improved Kelvin and gravity wave transmissivity in stronger equatorial easterlies (resulting from planetary Rossby wave momentum transport), implying stronger westerly mean flow acceleration in the first cycle than in the second; and (2) evidence of strong polar-tropical coupling in the northern winter indicating that mean meridional circulations are present on a global scale.

  9. Characterization of heterojunctions via x-ray and uv photoemission spectroscopy: energy level implications for single and mixed monolayer SAMs, cadmium selenide nanoparticle films, and organic semiconductor depositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Amy L.

    This work has centered on the interface dipoles arising at heterojunctions between metals, semiconductor nanoparticles, self-assembled monolayers, and organic semiconductor materials. Alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers, CdSe nanocrystals, and the organic semiconductors zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and Buckminster fullerene (C60) were the basis of these investigations. UV photoemission spectroscopy has proven to be an invaluable tool to observe the vacuum level shifts for these analyses while using XPS to corroborate surface structure. With a full evaluation of these surfaces, the shifts in the vacuum level, valence ionizations, and core ionizations, the impact of these interfaces, as well as their influence on the subsequent deposition of organic semiconductor layers is established. Alkanethiols possessing varying dipole moments were examined on gold and silver substrates. The viability of these alkanethiols was demonstrated to predictively adjust the work function of these metals as a function of their intrinsic dipole moments projected to surface normal, and established differences between Ag---S and Au---S bonds. The capability of the SAMs to modify the work function of gold provided an opportunity for mixed monolayers of the alkanethiols to produce a precise range of work functions by minimal adjustments of solution concentration, which were examined with a simple point dipole model. Photoemission spectroscopy offers a thorough analysis of CdSe nanoparticle films. Despite a plethora of research on these nanocrystals, there still is controversy on the magnitude of the shift in the valence band with diameter. In our research we found the majority of the valence band shift could be attributed to the interface dipole, ignored previously. Meanwhile, the valence band tethered films was obscured by the sulfur of the thiol tether. Finally, organic semiconductor layers deposited on SAMs on gold exhibited various interface dipole effects at these heterojunctions. Charge

  10. 20. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE). DETAIL OF FENDER SYSTEM FOR TURN-SPAN PIVOT PIER. OPERATOR'S HOUSE LOCATED ON UPPER SECTION OF TRUSS - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  11. SAM II aerosol profile measurements, Poker Flat, Alaska; July 16-19, 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Grams, G. W.; Herman, B. M.; Pepin, T. J.; Russell, P. B.; Swissler, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    SAM II satellite measurements during the July 1979 Poker Flat mission, yielded an aerosol extinction coefficient of 0.0004/km at 1.0 micron wavelength, in the region of the stratospheric aerosol mixing ratio peak (12-16 km). The stratospheric aerosol optical depth for these data, calculated from the tropopause through 30 km, is approximately 0.001. These results are consistent with the average 1979 summertime values found throughout the Arctic.

  12. 18. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) APPROACH SPAN FENDER. DOLPHIN LOCATED AT RIGHT. NAVIGATIONAL LIGHT LOCATED ON TOP OF FENDER - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  13. 45 CFR 402.31 - Determination of allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ASSISTANCE GRANTS State Allocations § 402.31 Determination of allocations. (a) Allocation formula. Allocations will be computed according to a formula using the following factors and weights: (1) 50...

  14. Experience producing simulated events for the DZero experiment on the SAM-Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Garzoglio, G.; Terekhov, I.; Snow, J.; Jain, S.; Nishandar, A.; /Texas U., Arlington

    2004-12-01

    Most of the simulated events for the DZero experiment at Fermilab have been historically produced by the ''remote'' collaborating institutions. One of the principal challenges reported concerns the maintenance of the local software infrastructure, which is generally different from site to site. As the understanding of the distributed computing community over distributively owned and shared resources progresses, the adoption of grid technologies to address the production of Monte Carlo events for high energy physics experiments becomes increasingly interesting. SAM-Grid is a software system developed at Fermilab, which integrates standard grid technologies for job and information management with SAM, the data handling system of the DZero and CDF experiments. During the past few months, this grid system has been tailored for the Monte Carlo production of DZero. Since the initial phase of deployment, this experience has exposed an interesting series of requirements to the SAM-Grid services, the standard middleware, the resources and their management and to the analysis framework of the experiment. As of today, the inefficiency due to the grid infrastructure has been reduced to as little as 1%. In this paper, we present our statistics and the ''lessons learned'' in running large high energy physics applications on a grid infrastructure.

  15. Major Volatiles from MSL SAM Evolved Gas Analyses: Yellowknife Bay Through Lower Mount Sharp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Franz, H. B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Niles, P. B.; Stern, J. C.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Atreya, S. K.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; McKay, C. P.; Wilhelm, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) analysed several subsamples of <150 µm fines from five sites at Gale Crater. Three were in Yellowknife Bay: the Rocknest aeolian bedform ("RN") and drilled Sheepbed mudstone from sites John Klein ("JK") and Cumberland ("CB"). One was drilled from the Windjana ("WJ") site on a sandstone of the Kimberly formation investigated on route to Mount Sharp. Another was drilled from the Confidence Hills ("CH") site on a sandstone of the Murray Formation at the base of Mt. Sharp (Pahrump Hills). Outcrops are sedimentary rocks that are largely of fluvial or lacustrine origin, with minor aeolian deposits.. SAM's evolved gas analysis (EGA) mass spectrometry detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, and other trace gases, including organic fragments. The identity and evolution temperature (T) of evolved gases can support CheMin mineral detection and place constraints on trace volatile-bearing phases or phases difficult to characterize with XRD (e.g., X-ray amorphous phases). They can also give constraints on sample organic chemistry. Here, we discuss trends in major evolved volatiles from SAM EGA analyses to date.

  16. SAM: speech-aware applications in medicine to support structured data entry.

    PubMed

    Wormek, A K; Ingenerf, J; Orthner, H F

    1997-01-01

    In the last two years, improvement in speech recognition technology has directed the medical community's interest to porting and using such innovations in clinical systems. The acceptance of speech recognition systems in clinical domains increases with recognition speed, large medical vocabulary, high accuracy, continuous speech recognition, and speaker independence. Although some commercial speech engines approach these requirements, the greatest benefit can be achieved in adapting a speech recognizer to a specific medical application. The goals of our work are first, to develop a speech-aware core component which is able to establish connections to speech recognition engines of different vendors. This is realized in SAM. Second, with applications based on SAM we want to support the physician in his/her routine clinical care activities. Within the STAMP project (STAndardized Multimedia report generator in Pathology), we extend SAM by combining a structured data entry approach with speech recognition technology. Another speech-aware application in the field of Diabetes care is connected to a terminology server. The server delivers a controlled vocabulary which can be used for speech recognition.

  17. SAM 2 Measurements of the Polar Stratospheric Aerosol, volume 2. April 1979 to October 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Steele, H. M.; Hamill, P.

    1982-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II sensor is abroad the Earth orbiting Nimbus 7 spacecraft proving extinction measurements of the Antarctic and Arctic stratospheric aerosol with a vertical resolution of 1 km. Representative examples and weekly averages of aerosol data and corresponding temperature profiles for the time and place of each SAM II measurement (April 29, 1979, to October 27, 1979) is presented. Contours of aerosol extinction as a function of altitude and longitude or time were plotted and weekly aerosol optical depths were calculated. Seasonal variations and variations in space (altitude and longitude) for both polar regions are easily seen. Typical values of aerosol extinction at the SAM II wavelength of 1.0 micron for the time priod were 1 to 3 x 10 to the -4th power km -1 in the main stratospheric aerosol layer. Optical depths for the stratosphere were about 0.002. Polar stratospheric clouds at altitudes between the tropopause and 20 km were observed during the Antarctic winter at various times and locations. A ready-to-use format containing a representative sample of the second 6 months of data to be used in atmospheric and climatic studies is presented.

  18. Background and Artifacts Generated by the by the Sample Preparation Experiment on SAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmahdi, Imene; Buch, Arnaud; Szopa, Cyril; Freissinet, Caroline; Glavin, Daniel; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; Millan, Maeva; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Stern, Jennifer; Coscia, David; Bonnet, Jean-Yves; Teinturier, Samuel; Morisson, Marietta; Stambouli, Moncef; Dequaire, Tristan; Mahaffy, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) is one of the instruments of the Mars Science Laboratory mission. Three analytical devices composed the SAM experiment: the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS), the Gas Chromatography (GC) and the Mass Spectrometer (MS). To adapt the nature of a sample to the analytical devices used, a sample preparation and gas processing system implemented with (a) a pyrolysis system, (b) wet chemistry: MTBSTFA and TMAH (c) the hydrocarbon trap (silica beads, Tenax® TA and Carbosieve G) and the injection trap (Tenax® GR composed of Tenax® TA and 30% of graphite) are employed to concentrate volatiles released from the sample prior to GC-MS analysis. Our study investigates several propositions for chlorinated hydrocarbon formation detected in the SAM background by looking for: (a) all products coming from the interaction of Tenax® and perchlorates present on Mars, (b) also between some soil sample and perchlorates and (c) sources of chlorinated hydrocarbon precursors. Here we report on the detection of chlorohydrocarbon compounds and their potential origin.

  19. Serine and SAM Responsive Complex SESAME Regulates Histone Modification Crosstalk by Sensing Cellular Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Swanson, Selene K; Gogol, Madelaine; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Workman, Jerry L; Suganuma, Tamaki

    2015-11-05

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is a key enzyme for glycolysis and catalyzes the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate, which supplies cellular energy. PKM2 also phosphorylates histone H3 threonine 11 (H3T11); however, it is largely unknown how PKM2 links cellular metabolism to chromatin regulation. Here, we show that the yeast PKM2 homolog, Pyk1, is a part of a novel protein complex named SESAME (Serine-responsive SAM-containing Metabolic Enzyme complex), which contains serine metabolic enzymes, SAM (S-adenosylmethionine) synthetases, and an acetyl-CoA synthetase. SESAME interacts with the Set1 H3K4 methyltransferase complex, which requires SAM synthesized from SESAME, and recruits SESAME to target genes, resulting in phosphorylation of H3T11. SESAME regulates the crosstalk between H3K4 methylation and H3T11 phosphorylation by sensing glycolysis and glucose-derived serine metabolism. This leads to auto-regulation of PYK1 expression. Thus, our study provides insights into the mechanism of regulating gene expression, responding to cellular metabolism via chromatin modifications.

  20. SAM: speech-aware applications in medicine to support structured data entry.

    PubMed Central

    Wormek, A. K.; Ingenerf, J.; Orthner, H. F.

    1997-01-01

    In the last two years, improvement in speech recognition technology has directed the medical community's interest to porting and using such innovations in clinical systems. The acceptance of speech recognition systems in clinical domains increases with recognition speed, large medical vocabulary, high accuracy, continuous speech recognition, and speaker independence. Although some commercial speech engines approach these requirements, the greatest benefit can be achieved in adapting a speech recognizer to a specific medical application. The goals of our work are first, to develop a speech-aware core component which is able to establish connections to speech recognition engines of different vendors. This is realized in SAM. Second, with applications based on SAM we want to support the physician in his/her routine clinical care activities. Within the STAMP project (STAndardized Multimedia report generator in Pathology), we extend SAM by combining a structured data entry approach with speech recognition technology. Another speech-aware application in the field of Diabetes care is connected to a terminology server. The server delivers a controlled vocabulary which can be used for speech recognition. PMID:9357730